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Sample records for carbohydrate digesting enzymes

  1. Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrates are the major dietary sources of energy for humans. While most dietary carbohydrates are derived from multiple botanical sources, lactose and trehalose are the only animal-derived carbohydrates. Digestion of starch, the carbohydrate most abundantly consumed by humans, depends on the c...

  2. Effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake: a multi-mode study.

    PubMed

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the possible mechanism(s) behind the effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, muscle glucose uptake and intestinal glucose absorption using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. The effects of increasing concentrations of xylitol (2.5%-40% or 164.31 mM-2628.99 mM) on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase activity in vitro and intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake were investigated under ex vivo conditions. Additionally, the effects of an oral bolus dose of xylitol (1 g per kg BW) on gastric emptying and intestinal glucose absorption and digesta transit in the different segments of the intestinal tract were investigated in normal and type 2 diabetic rats at 1 hour after dose administration, when phenol red was used as a recovery marker. Xylitol exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of alpha amylase (IC₅₀ = 1364.04 mM) and alpha glucosidase (IC₅₀ = 1127.52 mM) activity in vitro and small intestinal glucose absorption under ex vivo condition. Xylitol also increased dose dependent muscle glucose uptake with and without insulin, although the uptake was not significantly affected by the addition of insulin. Oral single bolus dose of xylitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption but increased the intestinal digesta transit rate in both normal and diabetic rats compared to their respective controls. The data of this study suggest that xylitol reduces intestinal glucose absorption via inhibiting major carbohydrate digesting enzymes, slowing gastric emptying and fastening the intestinal transit rate, but increases muscle glucose uptake in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

  3. Gas or No Gas: Challenging Deductive Reasoning Skills Using a Carbohydrate Digestive Enzyme Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents an example involving the metabolism of carbohydrates by microorganisms that provides results that contradict the generally speculated outcome, which is not an unusual situation in many scientific investigations. (JRH)

  4. The role of lipid and carbohydrate digestive enzyme inhibitors in the management of obesity: a review of current and emerging therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Sonia A; Boyland, Emma J; Halford, Jason CG

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with significant morbidity and mortality in adults and ill health in children. A proven successful approach in weight management has been the disruption of nutrient digestion, with orlistat having been used to treat obesity for the last 10 years. Although orlistat-induced weight loss remains modest, it produces meaningful reductions in risk factors for obesity-related conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, this lipase inhibitor is free of the serious side effects that have dogged appetite-suppressing drugs. This success had driven investigation into new generation nutraceuticals, supplements and pharmaceutical agents that inhibit the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and fats within the gut. This review focuses on agents purported to inhibit intestinal enzymes responsible for macronutrient digestion. Except for some synthetic products, the majority of agents reviewed are either botanical extracts or bacterial products. Currently, carbohydrate digestion inhibitors are under development to improve glycemic control and these may also induce some weight loss. However, colonic fermentation induced side effects, such as excess gas production, remain an issue for these compounds. The α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, and the α-amylase inhibitor phaseolamine, have been used in humans with some promising results relating to weight loss. Nonetheless, few of these agents have made it into clinical studies and without any clinical proof of concept or proven efficacy it is unlikely any will enter the market soon. PMID:21437083

  5. Digestive Enzyme Supplementation in Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Pecere, Silvia; Giorgio, Valentina; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Cammarota, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Digestive enzymes are able to break down proteins and carbohydrates and lipids, and their supplementation may play a role in the management of digestive disorders, from lactose intolerance to cystic fibrosis. To date, several formulations of digestive enzymes are available on the market, being different each other in terms of enzyme type, source and origin, and dosage. This review, performed through a non-systematic search of the available literature, will provide an overview of the current knowledge of digestive enzyme supplementation in gastrointestinal disorders, discussion of the use of pancreatic enzymes, lactase (β-galactosidase) and conjugated bile acids, and also exploring the future perspective of digestive enzyme supplementation. Currently, the animal-derived enzymes represent an established standard of care, however the growing study of plant-based and microbe-derived enzymes offers great promise in the advancement of digestive enzyme therapy. New frontiers of enzyme replacement are being evaluated also in the treatment of diseases not specifically related to enzyme deficiency, whereas the combination of different enzymes might constitute an intriguing therapeutic option in the future.

  6. Carbohydrate digestion in Lutzomyia longipalpis' larvae (Diptera - Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Vale, Vladimir F; Moreira, Bruno H; Moraes, Caroline S; Pereira, Marcos H; Genta, Fernando A; Gontijo, Nelder F

    2012-10-01

    Lutzomyia longipalpis is the principal species of phlebotomine incriminated as vector of Leishmania infantum, the etiological agent of visceral leishmaniasis in the Americas. Despite its importance as vector, almost nothing related to the larval biology, especially about its digestive system has been published. The objective of the present study was to obtain an overview of carbohydrate digestion by the larvae. Taking in account that phlebotomine larvae live in the soil rich in decaying materials and microorganisms we searched principally for enzymes capable to hydrolyze carbohydrates present in this kind of substrate. The principal carbohydrases encountered in the midgut were partially characterized. One of them is a α-amylase present in the anterior midgut. It is probably involved with the digestion of glycogen, the reserve carbohydrate of fungi. Two other especially active enzymes were present in the posterior midgut, a membrane bound α-glucosidase and a membrane bound trehalase. The first, complete the digestion of glycogen and the other probably acts in the digestion of trehalose, a carbohydrate usually encountered in microorganisms undergoing hydric stress. In a screening done with the use of p-nitrophenyl-derived substrates other less active enzymes were also observed in the midgut. A general view of carbohydrate digestion in L. longipalpis was presented. Our results indicate that soil microorganisms appear to be the main source of nutrients for the larvae. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interference of age and supplementation of direct-fed microbial and essential oil in the activity of digestive enzymes and expression of genes related to transport and digestion of carbohydrates and proteins in the small intestine of broilers.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alarcon, M F; Trottier, N; Steibel, J P; Lunedo, R; Campos, D M B; Santana, A M; Pizauro, J M; Furlan, R L; Furlan, L R

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe alterations that age and dietary inclusion of direct-fed microbial (DFM) Bacillus subtilis (BS) and a specific essential oil (EO) blend (carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, cineol, and pepper extract) causes in the activity of digestive enzymes (maltase: MALT; aminopeptidase-N: APN; intestinal alkaline phosphate: IAP) and expression patterns of genes related to transport (oligopeptide transporter gene: SLC15A1; Na+-dependent glucose and galactose transporter gene: SLC5A1; Na+-independent glucose, galactose, and fructose transporter gene: SLC2A2; ATPase, Na+/K+ transporting gene: ATP1A1) and digestion (aminopeptidase-N gene: ANPEP; maltase-glucoamylase gene: MGAM; Sucrase-isomaltase gene: SI) of carbohydrates and proteins in the small intestine of broilers. Also, the objective was to analyze if growth performance of broilers is affected by supplementation (BS and EO blend). Day-old male broiler chicks (n = 1,320) were assigned to 5 treatments. Diets included a basal diet (BD) as a negative control (CON); experimental diets were BD + BS; BD + BS + EO; BD + EO; BD + antibiotic growth promoter (AGP) avilamycin was the positive control. Performance was evaluated between 1 to 42 d. Transcript abundance of transport-related genes and digestion-related genes were assayed by RT-qPCR and determined at d 7, 21, and 42. MALT-, APN-, and IAP-specific activities were determined at d 7, 21, and 42. Broilers fed BS had greater SLC15A1 mRNA abundance compared to CON, while EO and AGP were related to higher activities of IAP and APN. Analysis over time revealed higher abundance of MGAM, SLC2A2, SLC15A1, SLC5A1 and SI mRNA at d 42 when compared to d 7. Activity of IAP decreased after d 7 and activity of MALT increased with age. The current study suggests that age had effect over carbohydrate and protein transport and carbohydrate digestion. The supplementation of BS DFM hade evident effect over protein transport and that the use of EO in the diet

  8. Gastrointestinal effects of low-digestible carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Grabitske, Hollie A; Slavin, Joanne L

    2009-04-01

    Low-digestible carbohydrates (LDCs) are carbohydrates that are incompletely or not absorbed in the small intestine but are at least partly fermented by bacteria in the large intestine. Fiber, resistant starch, and sugar alcohols are types of LDCs. Given potential health benefits (including a reduced caloric content, reduced or no effect on blood glucose levels, non-cariogenic effect) the prevalence of LDCs in processed foods is increasing. Many of the benefits of LDCs are related to the inability of human digestive enzymes to break down completely the carbohydrates into absorbable saccharides and the subsequent fermentation of unabsorbed carbohydrates in the colon. As a result, LDCs may affect laxation and cause gastrointestinal effects, including abdominal discomfort, flatus, and diarrhea, especially at higher or excessive intakes. Such responses, though transient, affect the perception of the well-being of consumers and their acceptance of food products containing LDCs. Current recommendations for fiber intake do not consider total LDC consumption nor recommend an upper limit for LDC intake based on potential gastrointestinal effects. Therefore, a review of published studies reporting gastrointestinal effects of LDCs was conducted. We included only studies published in refereed journals in English. Additionally, we excluded studies of subjects with incomplete or abnormal functioning gastrointestinal tracts or where antibiotics, stimulant laxatives, or other drugs affecting motility were included. Only in studies with a control period, either placebo treatment or no LDC treatment, were included. Studies must have included an acceptable measure of gastrointestinal effect. Sixty-eight studies and six review articles were evaluated. This review describes definitions, classifications, and mechanisms of LDCs, evaluates published human feeding studies of fifteen LDCs for associations between gastrointestinal effects and levels of LDC intake, and presents recommendations

  9. Carbohydrates digestion and metabolism in the spiny lobster (Panulirus argus): biochemical indication for limited carbohydrate utilization.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Perera, Erick; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; García-Galano, Tsai; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan M

    2017-01-01

    As other spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus is supposed to use preferentially proteins and lipids in energy metabolism, while carbohydrates are well digested but poorly utilized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate level on digestion and metabolism in the spiny lobster P. argus . We used complementary methodologies such as post-feeding flux of nutrients and metabolites, as well as measurements of α-amylase expression and activity in the digestive tract. Lobsters readily digested and absorbed carbohydrates with a time-course that is dependent on their content in diet. Lobster showed higher levels of free glucose and stored glycogen in different tissues as the inclusion of wheat flour increased. Modifications in intermediary metabolism revealed a decrease in amino acids catabolism coupled with a higher use of free glucose as carbohydrates rise up to 20%. However, this effect seems to be limited by the metabolic capacity of lobsters to use more than 20% of carbohydrates in diets. Lobsters were not able to tightly regulate α-amylase expression according to dietary carbohydrate level but exhibited a marked difference in secretion of this enzyme into the gut. Results are discussed to highlight the limitations to increasing carbohydrate utilization by lobsters. Further growout trials are needed to link the presented metabolic profiles with phenotypic outcomes.

  10. Carbohydrates digestion and metabolism in the spiny lobster (Panulirus argus): biochemical indication for limited carbohydrate utilization

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; García-Galano, Tsai; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    As other spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus is supposed to use preferentially proteins and lipids in energy metabolism, while carbohydrates are well digested but poorly utilized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate level on digestion and metabolism in the spiny lobster P. argus. We used complementary methodologies such as post-feeding flux of nutrients and metabolites, as well as measurements of α-amylase expression and activity in the digestive tract. Lobsters readily digested and absorbed carbohydrates with a time-course that is dependent on their content in diet. Lobster showed higher levels of free glucose and stored glycogen in different tissues as the inclusion of wheat flour increased. Modifications in intermediary metabolism revealed a decrease in amino acids catabolism coupled with a higher use of free glucose as carbohydrates rise up to 20%. However, this effect seems to be limited by the metabolic capacity of lobsters to use more than 20% of carbohydrates in diets. Lobsters were not able to tightly regulate α-amylase expression according to dietary carbohydrate level but exhibited a marked difference in secretion of this enzyme into the gut. Results are discussed to highlight the limitations to increasing carbohydrate utilization by lobsters. Further growout trials are needed to link the presented metabolic profiles with phenotypic outcomes. PMID:29114440

  11. A Holistic View of Dietary Carbohydrate Utilization in Lobster: Digestion, Postprandial Nutrient Flux, and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Casuso, Antonio; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Gutierrez, Odilia; Scull, Idania; Carrillo, Olimpia; Martos-Sitcha, Juan A.; García-Galano, Tsai; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Crustaceans exhibit a remarkable variation in their feeding habits and food type, but most knowledge on carbohydrate digestion and utilization in this group has come from research on few species. The aim of this study was to make an integrative analysis of dietary carbohydrate utilization in the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. We used complementary methodologies such as different assessments of digestibility, activity measurements of digestive and metabolic enzymes, and post-feeding flux of nutrients and metabolites. Several carbohydrates were well digested by the lobster, but maize starch was less digestible than all other starches studied, and its inclusion in diet affected protein digestibility. Most intense hydrolysis of carbohydrates in the gastric chamber of lobster occurred between 2–6 h after ingestion and afterwards free glucose increased in hemolymph. The inclusion of wheat in diet produced a slow clearance of glucose from the gastric fluid and a gradual increase in hemolymph glucose. More intense hydrolysis of protein in the gastric chamber occurred 6–12 h after ingestion and then amino acids tended to increase in hemolymph. Triglyceride concentration in hemolymph rose earlier in wheat-fed lobsters than in lobsters fed other carbohydrates, but it decreased the most 24 h later. Analyses of metabolite levels and activities of different metabolic enzymes revealed that intermolt lobsters had a low capacity to store and use glycogen, although it was slightly higher in wheat-fed lobsters. Lobsters fed maize and rice diets increased amino acid catabolism, while wheat-fed lobsters exhibited higher utilization of fatty acids. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the type of carbohydrate ingested had a profound effect on overall metabolism. Although we found no evidence of a protein-sparing effect of dietary carbohydrate, differences in the kinetics of their digestion and absorption impacted lobster metabolism determining the fate of other nutrients. PMID

  12. A holistic view of dietary carbohydrate utilization in lobster: digestion, postprandial nutrient flux, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Perera, Erick; Casuso, Antonio; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Gutierrez, Odilia; Scull, Idania; Carrillo, Olimpia; Martos-Sitcha, Juan A; García-Galano, Tsai; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Crustaceans exhibit a remarkable variation in their feeding habits and food type, but most knowledge on carbohydrate digestion and utilization in this group has come from research on few species. The aim of this study was to make an integrative analysis of dietary carbohydrate utilization in the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. We used complementary methodologies such as different assessments of digestibility, activity measurements of digestive and metabolic enzymes, and post-feeding flux of nutrients and metabolites. Several carbohydrates were well digested by the lobster, but maize starch was less digestible than all other starches studied, and its inclusion in diet affected protein digestibility. Most intense hydrolysis of carbohydrates in the gastric chamber of lobster occurred between 2-6 h after ingestion and afterwards free glucose increased in hemolymph. The inclusion of wheat in diet produced a slow clearance of glucose from the gastric fluid and a gradual increase in hemolymph glucose. More intense hydrolysis of protein in the gastric chamber occurred 6-12 h after ingestion and then amino acids tended to increase in hemolymph. Triglyceride concentration in hemolymph rose earlier in wheat-fed lobsters than in lobsters fed other carbohydrates, but it decreased the most 24 h later. Analyses of metabolite levels and activities of different metabolic enzymes revealed that intermolt lobsters had a low capacity to store and use glycogen, although it was slightly higher in wheat-fed lobsters. Lobsters fed maize and rice diets increased amino acid catabolism, while wheat-fed lobsters exhibited higher utilization of fatty acids. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the type of carbohydrate ingested had a profound effect on overall metabolism. Although we found no evidence of a protein-sparing effect of dietary carbohydrate, differences in the kinetics of their digestion and absorption impacted lobster metabolism determining the fate of other nutrients.

  13. [Current concepts of digestion and absorption of carbohydrates].

    PubMed

    Luz, S dos S; de Campos, P L; Ribeiro, S M; Tirapegui, J

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review recent aspects of digestion and absorption of carbohydrates that are the main source of energy in human diets. Recent researches have found that starch is not largely hydrolysed and absorbed in the small bowel but one part of it is resistant to digestion. Several food factors may be responsible for digestion and absorption velocity and totality of carbohydrates. Therefore, carbohydrate classification must be based not only on molecular size to express the real carbohydrates utilization as an energy source by humans. In agreement with molecular size of carbohydrate, its classification can be: a) monosaccharides; b) disaccharides; c) oligosaccharides; d) polysaccharides. In agreement with carbohydrate digestibility or availability, its classification can be: a) digestible carbohydrates; b) undigestable carbohydrates (NSP). Carbohydrate digestibility can be altered by several factors like: Intrinsic factors: a) physical structure; b) molecular physical distribution; c) physical state of food; d) food antinutrients. Extrinsics factors: a) chewing; b) transit time of food; c) amount of starch present; d) diet antinutrients. Under influence of this factors, process of digestion happen by enzymatic activity a long the gastrointestinal tract. Salivary and pancreatic amylase; glycosidases of the duodenal enterocyte brush border (lactase, sacarase and maltase), whose activity happen by close interaction of digestive breakdown with transport. The summarized pathways of the absorptive process: 1. movement from the bulk phase of the lumenal or mucosal fluid to enterocyte surface; 2. movement across the brush border membrane through specific transporters: a) SGLT1; b) GLUT 5; c) passive diffusion. 3. movement across the basolateral membrane by the GLUT 2.

  14. Physical modification of palm kernel meal improved available carbohydrate, physicochemical properties and in vitro digestibility in economic freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Thongprajukaew, Karun; Yawang, Pinya; Dudae, Lateepah; Bilanglod, Husna; Dumrongrittamatt, Terdtoon; Tantikitti, Chutima; Kovitvadhi, Uthaiwan

    2013-12-01

    Unavailable carbohydrates are an important limiting factor for utilization of palm kernel meal (PKM) as aquafeed ingredients. The aim of this study was to improve available carbohydrate from PKM. Different physical modifications including water soaking, microwave irradiation, gamma irradiation and electron beam, were investigated in relation to chemical composition, physicochemical properties and in vitro carbohydrate digestibility using digestive enzymes from economic freshwater fish. Modified methods had significant (P < 0.05) effects on chemical composition by decreasing crude fiber and increasing available carbohydrates. Improvements in physicochemical properties of PKM, such as water solubility, microstructure, relative crystallinity and lignocellulosic spectra, were mainly achieved by soaking and microwave irradiation. Carbohydrate digestibility varied among the physical modifications tested (P < 0.05) and three fish species had different abilities to digest PKM. Soaking was the appropriate modification for increasing carbohydrate digestion specifically in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), whereas either soaking or microwave irradiation was effective for striped snakehead (Channa striata). For walking catfish (Clarias batrachus), carbohydrate digestibility was similar among raw, soaked and microwave-irradiated PKM. These findings suggest that soaking and microwave irradiation could be practical methods for altering appropriate physicochemical properties of PKM as well as increasing carbohydrate digestibility in select economic freshwater fish. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Digestion, absorption, and fermentation of carbohydrates in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Kien, C L

    1996-06-01

    In the newborn, sugars present in human milk and formulas are assimilated by both small intestinal digestion and, especially in the case of lactose, colonic bacterial fermentation. Colonic fermentation of carbohydrate serves three major functions: (1) conservation of a fraction of the metabolizable energy of dietary carbohydrate that is not absorbed in the small intestine; (2) prevention of osmotic diarrhea; and (3) production of short-chain fatty acids that stimulate sodium and water absorption, serve as fuel for colonocytes, and stimulate cell replication in colon and small intestine. Diarrhea produced in association with small bowel malabsorption of sugar may be caused by three, potentially overlapping mechanisms: (1) osmotic effects of unfermented sugar, which may cause secondary disruption of fermentation by purging the bacteria or diluting the bacteria mass; (2) damage to the colon mucosa from excessive fermentation leading to SCFA malabsorption and osmotic diarrhea on this basis; and (3) excessive fermentation leading to lowering of luminal pH and inhibition of bacterial enzymes. Therapy aimed at reducing diarrhea associated with sugar malabsorption might involve either slowing of motility to facilitate fermentation or stimulation of fermentative activity, but such interventions would depend on greater understanding of the mechanisms for colonic dysfunction in this condition.

  16. Digestible and indigestible carbohydrates: interactions with postprandial lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lairon, Denis; Play, Barbara; Jourdheuil-Rahmani, Dominique

    2007-04-01

    The balance between fats and carbohydrates in the human diet is still a matter of very active debate. Indeed, the processing of ordinary mixed meals involves complex processes within the lumen of the upper digestive tract for digestion, in the small intestine mucosa for absorption and resecretion, and in peripheral tissues and in the circulation for final handling. The purpose of this review is to focus on available knowledge on the interactions of digestible or indigestible carbohydrates with lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in the postprandial state. The observations made in humans after test meals are reported and interpreted in the light of recent findings on the cellular and molecular levels regarding possible interplays between carbohydrates and lipid moieties in some metabolic pathways. Digestible carbohydrates, especially readily digestible starches or fructose, have been shown to exacerbate and/or delay postprandial lipemia, whereas some fiber sources can lower it. While interactions between dietary fibers and the process of lipid digestion and absorption have been studied mainly in the last decades, recent studies have shown that dietary carbohydrate moieties (e.g., glucose) can stimulate the intestinal uptake of cholesterol and lipid resecretion. In addition to the well-known glucose/fructose transporters, a number of transport proteins have recently been involved in intestinal lipid processing, whose implications in such interactions are discussed. The potential importance of postprandial insulinemia in these processes is also evaluated in the light of recent findings. The interactions of carbohydrates and lipid moieties in the postprandial state may result from both acute and chronic effects, both at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  17. Physiochemical Characteristics and Molecular Structures for Digestible Carbohydrates of Silages.

    PubMed

    Refat, Basim; Prates, Luciana L; Khan, Nazir A; Lei, Yaogeng; Christensen, David A; McKinnon, John J; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-10-18

    The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the magnitude of differences among new barley silage varieties (BS) selected for varying rates of in vitro neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility (ivNDFD; Cowboy BS with higher ivNDFD, Copeland BS with intermediate ivNDFD, and Xena BS with lower ivNDFD) with regard to their carbohydrate (CHO) molecular makeup, CHO chemical fractions, and rumen degradability in dairy cows in comparison with a new corn silage hybrid (Pioneer 7213R) and (2) to quantify the strength and pattern of association between the molecular structures and digestibility of carbohydrates. The carbohydrate-related molecular structure spectral data was measured using advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy (FT/IR). In comparison to BS, corn silage showed a significantly (P < 0.05) higher level of starch and energy content and higher degradation of dry matter (DM). Cowboy BS had lower feeding value (higher indigestible fiber content and lower starch content) and lower DM degradation in the rumen compared to other BS varieties (P < 0.05). The spectral intensities of carbohydrates were significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with digestible carbohydrate content of the silages. In conclusion, the univariate approach with only one-factor consideration (ivNDFD) might not be a satisfactory method for evaluating and ranking BS quality. FT/IR molecular spectroscopy can be used to evaluate silage quality rapidly, particularly the digestible fiber content.

  18. Degradation properties of protein and carbohydrate during sludge anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Anqi

    2015-09-01

    Degradation of protein and carbohydrate is vital for sludge anaerobic digestion performance. However, few studies focused on degradation properties of protein and carbohydrate. This study investigated detailed degradation properties of sludge protein and carbohydrate in order to gain insight into organics removal during anaerobic digestion. Results showed that carbohydrate was more efficiently degraded than protein and was degraded prior to protein. The final removal efficiencies of carbohydrate and protein were 49.7% and 32.2%, respectively. The first 3 days were a lag phase for protein degradation since rapid carbohydrate degradation in this phase led to repression of protease formation. Kinetics results showed that, after initial lag phase, protein degradation followed the first-order kinetic with rate constants of 0.0197 and 0.0018 d(-1) during later rapid degradation phase and slow degradation phase, respectively. Carbohydrate degradation also followed the first-order kinetics with a rate constant of 0.007 d(-1) after initial quick degradation phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of enzymes on anaerobic digestion of primary sludge and septic tank performance.

    PubMed

    Diak, James; Örmeci, Banu; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2012-11-01

    Enzyme additives are believed to improve septic tank performance by increasing the hydrolysis and digestion rates and maintaining a healthy microbial population. Previous studies reported mixed results on the effectiveness of enzymes on mesophilic and thermophilic digestion, and it is not clear whether enzymes would be effective under septic tank conditions where there is no heating or mixing, quantities of enzymes added are small, and they can be washed out quickly. In this study, batch reactors and continuous-flow reactors designed and operated as septic tanks were used to evaluate whether enzymatic treatment would increase the hydrolysis and digestion rates in primary sludge. Total solids, volatile solids, total suspended solids, total and soluble chemical oxygen demand, concentrations of protein, carbohydrate, ammonia and volatile acids in sludge and effluent samples were measured to determine the differences in digestion rates in the presence and absence of enzymes. Overall, no significant improvement was observed in enzyme-treated reactors compared with the control reactors.

  20. The abundance and variety of carbohydrate-active enzymes in the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    El Kaoutari, Abdessamad; Armougom, Fabrice; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Raoult, Didier; Henrissat, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    Descriptions of the microbial communities that live on and in the human body have progressed at a spectacular rate over the past 5 years, fuelled primarily by highly parallel DNA-sequencing technologies and associated advances in bioinformatics, and by the expectation that understanding how to manipulate the structure and functions of our microbiota will allow us to affect health and prevent or treat diseases. Among the myriad of genes that have been identified in the human gut microbiome, those that encode carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) are of particular interest, as these enzymes are required to digest most of our complex repertoire of dietary polysaccharides. In this Analysis article, we examine the carbohydrate-digestive capacity of a simplified but representative mini-microbiome in order to highlight the abundance and variety of bacterial CAZymes that are represented in the human gut microbiota.

  1. Digestive enzymes of human and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Mareike Cora

    2016-09-01

    All living organisms need to consume nutrients to grow, survive, and reproduce, making the successful acquisition of food resources a powerful selective pressure. However, acquiring food is only part of the challenge. While all animals spend much of their daily activity budget hunting, searching for, or otherwise procuring food, a large part of what is involved in overall nutrition occurs once the meal has been swallowed. Most nutritional components are too complex for immediate use and must be broken down into simpler compounds, which can then be absorbed by the body. This process, digestion, is catalyzed by enzymes that are either endogenous or produced by the host's microbial population. 1 Research shows that the nutritional value of food is partially constrained by the digestive abilities of the microbial community present in the host's gut and that these microbes rapidly adapt to changes in diet and other environmental pressures. 2 An accumulating body of evidence suggests that endogenously produced digestive enzymes also have been, and still are, common targets of natural selection, further cementing their crucial role in an organism's digestive system. 3-5 . © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The impact of pollen consumption on honey bee (Apis mellifera) digestive physiology and carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ricigliano, Vincent A; Fitz, William; Copeland, Duan C; Mott, Brendon M; Maes, Patrick; Floyd, Amy S; Dockstader, Arnold; Anderson, Kirk E

    2017-10-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes play an important role in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) due to its dietary specialization on plant-based nutrition. Secretory glycoside hydrolases (GHs) produced in worker head glands aid in the processing of floral nectar into honey and are expressed in accordance with age-based division of labor. Pollen utilization by the honey bee has been investigated in considerable detail, but little is known about the metabolic fate of indigestible carbohydrates and glycosides in pollen biomass. Here, we demonstrate that pollen consumption stimulates the hydrolysis of sugars that are toxic to the bee (xylose, arabinose, mannose). GHs produced in the head accumulate in the midgut and persist in the hindgut that harbors a core microbial community composed of approximately 10 8 bacterial cells. Pollen consumption significantly impacted total and specific bacterial abundance in the digestive tract. Bacterial isolates representing major fermentative gut phylotypes exhibited primarily membrane-bound GH activities that may function in tandem with soluble host enzymes retained in the hindgut. Additionally, we found that plant-originating β-galactosidase activity in pollen may be sufficient, in some cases, for probable physiological activity in the gut. These findings emphasize the potential relative contributions of host, bacteria, and pollen enzyme activities to carbohydrate breakdown, which may be tied to gut microbiome dynamics and associated host nutrition. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Carbohydrate active enzymes revealed in Coptotermes formosanus transcriptome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A normalized cDNA library of Coptotermes formosanus was constructed using mixed RNA isolated from workers, soldiers, nymphs and alates of both sexes. Sequencing of this library generated 131,637 EST and 25,939 unigenes were assembled. Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) revealed in this library we...

  4. The role of enzyme supplementation in digestive disorders.

    PubMed

    Roxas, Mario

    2008-12-01

    This article reviews various forms of enzyme supplementation used clinically in digestive and absorption disorders. Enzyme supplementation plays an integral role in the management of various digestive disorders, particularly with regard to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. However, application of enzymes may also be beneficial for other conditions associated with poor digestion including lactose intolerance. Historically, porcine and bovine pancreatic enzymes have been the preferred form of supplementation for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Use of microbe-derived lipase has shown promise with studies indicating benefit similar to pancreatic enzymes, but at a lower dosage concentration and with a broader pH range. Safety and efficacy of enzymes derived from microbial species in the treatment of conditions such as malabsorption and lactose intolerance is promising. Plant-based enzymes, such as bromelain from pineapple, serve as effective digestive aids in the breakdown of proteins. Synergistic effects have been observed using a combination of animal-based enzymes and microbe-derived enzymes or bromelain.

  5. Gene expression and activity of digestive enzymes of Daphnia pulex in response to food quality differences.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Fink, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Food quality is an important factor influencing organisms' well-being. In freshwater ecosystems, food quality has been studied extensively for the keystone herbivore genus Daphnia, as they form the critical trophic link between primary producers and higher order consumers such as fish. For Daphnia, the edible fraction of phytoplankton in lakes (consisting mostly of unicellular algae and cyanobacteria) is extraordinarily diverse. To be able to digest different food particles, Daphnia possess a set of digestive enzymes that metabolize carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Recent studies have found a connection between gene expression and activity of single digestive enzyme types of Daphnia, i.e. lipases and proteases, and transcriptome studies have shown that a variety of genes coding for gut enzymes are differentially expressed in response to different food algae. However, never before has a set of digestive enzymes been studied simultaneously both on the gene expression and the enzyme activity level in Daphnia. Here, we investigated several digestive enzymes of Daphnia pulex in a comparison between a high-quality (green algal) and a low-quality (cyanobacterial) diet. Diet significantly affected the expression of all investigated digestive enzyme genes and enzyme activity was altered between treatments. Furthermore, we found that gene expression and enzyme activity were significantly correlated in cellulase, triacylglycerol lipase and β-glucosidase when switched from high to low-quality food. We conclude that one of the factors causing the often observed low biomass and energy transfer efficiency from cyanobacteria to Daphnia is probably the switch to a cost-effective overall increase of gene expression and activity of digestive enzymes of this herbivore. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Metagenomics Investigation of Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes along the Gastrointestinal Tract of Saudi Sheep.

    PubMed

    Al-Masaudi, Saad; El Kaoutari, Abdessamad; Drula, Elodie; Al-Mehdar, Hussein; Redwan, Elrashdy M; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    The digestive microbiota of humans and of a wide range of animals has recently become amenable to in-depth studies due to the emergence of DNA-based metagenomic techniques that do not require cultivation of gut microbes. These techniques are now commonly used to explore the feces of humans and animals under the assumption that such samples are faithful proxies for the intestinal microbiota. Sheep ( Ovis aries ) are ruminant animals particularly adapted to life in arid regions and in particular Najdi, Noaimi (Awassi), and Harrei (Harri) breeds that are raised in Saudi Arabia for milk and/or meat production. Here we report a metagenomics investigation of the distal digestive tract of one animal from each breed that (i) examines the microbiota at three intestinal subsites (small intestine, mid-colon, and rectum), (ii) performs an in-depth analysis of the carbohydrate-active enzymes genes encoded by the microbiota at the three subsites, and (iii) compares the microbiota and carbohydrate-active enzyme profile at the three subsites across the different breeds. For all animals we found that the small intestine is characterized by a lower taxonomic diversity than that of the large intestine and of the rectal samples. Mirroring this observation, we also find that the spectrum of encoded carbohydrate-active enzymes of the mid-colon and rectal sites is much richer than that of the small intestine. However, the number of encoded cellulases and xylanases in the various intestinal subsites was found to be surprisingly low, indicating that the bulk of the fiber digestion is performed upstream in the rumen, and that the carbon source for the intestinal flora is probably constituted of the rumen fungi and bacteria that pass in the intestines. In consequence we argue that ruminant feces, which are often analyzed for the search of microbial genes involved in plant cell wall degradation, are probably a poor proxy for the lignocellulolytic potential of the host.

  7. Effect of starvation and refeeding on digestive enzyme activities in sturgeon (Acipenser naccarii) and trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Furné, Miriam; García-Gallego, Manuel; Hidalgo, M Carmen; Morales, Amalia E; Domezain, Alberto; Domezain, Julio; Sanz, Ana

    2008-04-01

    The digestive enzyme activities were determined in Adriatic sturgeon and rainbow trout during starvation and refeeding period. Overall, the digestive enzyme activities are affected in the same sense in both species. The protease and lipase activities were decreased later than amylase activity. Even after 1 month of starvation, both species would be prepared to digest protein and lipids in an effective way. After 72 days of starvation, the digestive machinery of the sturgeon and of the trout shows an altered capacity to digest macronutrients. The capacity to digest proteins and lipids, after 60 days of refeeding, begins to become re-established in sturgeon and trout. In contrast, in this period, the capacity to digest carbohydrates remains depressed in both species.

  8. Susceptibility of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) peel proteins to digestive enzymes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweet potato proteins have been shown to possess antioxidant and antidiabetic properties in vivo. The ability of a protein to exhibit systemic effects is somewhat unusual as proteins are typically susceptible to digestive enzymes. This study was undertaken to better understand how digestive enzymes ...

  9. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data.

  10. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  11. Determining the Localization of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes Within Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    McLean, Richard; Inglis, G Douglas; Mosimann, Steven C; Uwiera, Richard R E; Abbott, D Wade

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the subcellular location of secreted proteins is valuable for illuminating their biological function. Although several bioinformatics programs currently exist to predict the destination of a trafficked protein using its signal peptide sequence, these programs have limited accuracy and often require experimental validation. Here, we present a systematic method to fractionate gram-negative cells and characterize the subcellular localization of secreted carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). This method involves four parallel approaches that reveal the relative abundance of protein within the cytoplasm, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular environment. Cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins are fractionated by lysis and osmotic shock, respectively. Outer membrane bound proteins are determined by comparing cells before and after exoproteolytic digestion. Extracellularly secreted proteins are collected from the media and concentrated. These four different fractionations can then be probed for the presence and quantity of target proteins using immunochemical methods such as Western blots and ELISAs, or enzyme activity assays.

  12. Update: The Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrate and Protein: Role of the Small Intestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leese, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the role of the small intestine in the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and proteins. Indicates as outdated the view that these materials must be broken down to monomeric units before absorption and that the gut secretes a mixture of digestive juices which brings about absorption. (JN)

  13. Carbohydrate Content and Enzyme Metabolism in Developing Canola Siliques.

    PubMed Central

    King, S. P.; Lunn, J. E.; Furbank, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Little biochemical information is available on carbohydrate metabolism in developing canola (Brassica napus L.) silique (pod) wall and seed tissues. This research examines the carbohydrate contents and sucrose (Suc) metabolic enzyme activities in different aged silique wall and seed tissues during oil filling. The silique wall partitioned photosynthate into Suc over starch and predominantly accumulated hexose. The silique wall hexose content and soluble acid invertase activity rapidly fell as embryos progressed from the early- to late-cotyledon developmental stages. A similar trend was not evident for alkaline invertase, Suc synthase (SuSy), and Suc-phosphate synthase. Silique wall SuSy activities were much higher than source leaves at all times and may serve to supply the substrate for secondary cell wall thickening. In young seeds starch was the predominant accumulated carbohydrate over the sampled developmental range. Seed hexose levels dropped as embryos developed from the early- to midcotyledon stage. Hexose and starch were localized to the testa or liquid endosperm, whereas Suc was evenly distributed among seed components. With the switch to oil accumulation, seed SuSy activity increased by 3.6-fold and soluble acid invertase activity decreased by 76%. These data provide valuable baseline knowledge for the genetic manipulation of canola seed carbon partitioning. PMID:12223695

  14. Carbohydrate Content and Enzyme Metabolism in Developing Canola Siliques.

    PubMed

    King, S. P.; Lunn, J. E.; Furbank, R. T.

    1997-05-01

    Little biochemical information is available on carbohydrate metabolism in developing canola (Brassica napus L.) silique (pod) wall and seed tissues. This research examines the carbohydrate contents and sucrose (Suc) metabolic enzyme activities in different aged silique wall and seed tissues during oil filling. The silique wall partitioned photosynthate into Suc over starch and predominantly accumulated hexose. The silique wall hexose content and soluble acid invertase activity rapidly fell as embryos progressed from the early- to late-cotyledon developmental stages. A similar trend was not evident for alkaline invertase, Suc synthase (SuSy), and Suc-phosphate synthase. Silique wall SuSy activities were much higher than source leaves at all times and may serve to supply the substrate for secondary cell wall thickening. In young seeds starch was the predominant accumulated carbohydrate over the sampled developmental range. Seed hexose levels dropped as embryos developed from the early- to midcotyledon stage. Hexose and starch were localized to the testa or liquid endosperm, whereas Suc was evenly distributed among seed components. With the switch to oil accumulation, seed SuSy activity increased by 3.6-fold and soluble acid invertase activity decreased by 76%. These data provide valuable baseline knowledge for the genetic manipulation of canola seed carbon partitioning.

  15. Characterizations of substrate and enzyme specificity of glucoamylase assays of mucosal starch digestion with determinations of group and single biopsy reference values

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrate digesting enzyme activities are measured in duodenal biopsies to detect deficiencies of lactase and sucrase activities, however glucoamylase (GA) assays for starch digestion are not included. Because food starch represents half of energy intake in the human diet, assays for starch diges...

  16. Developmental changes in digestive enzyme activity in American shad, Alosa sapidissima, during early ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Feng; Guan, Chang-Tao; Huang, Bin; Lei, Ji-Lin; Li, Juan; Guo, Zheng-Long; Wang, Yao-Hui; Hong, Lei

    2017-04-01

    In order to assess the digestive physiological capacity of the American shad Alosa sapidissima and to establish feeding protocols that match larval nutritional requirements, we investigated the ontogenesis of digestive enzymes (trypsin, amylase, lipase, pepsin, alkaline phosphatase, and leucine aminopeptidase) in larvae, from hatching to 45 days after hatching (DAH). We found that all of the target enzymes were present at hatching, except pepsin, which indicated an initial ability to digest nutrients and precocious digestive system development. Trypsin rapidly increased to a maximum at 14 DAH. Amylase sharply increased until 10 DAH and exhibited a second increase at 33 DAH, which coincided with the introduction of microdiet at 30 DAH, thereby suggesting that the increase was associated with the microdiet carbohydrate content. Lipase increased until 14 DAH, decreased until 27 DAH, and then increased until 45 DAH. Pepsin was first detected at 27 DAH and then sharply increased until 45 DAH, which suggested the formation of a functional stomach. Both alkaline phosphatase and leucine aminopeptidase markedly increased until 18 DAH, which indicated intestinal maturation. According to our results, we conclude that American shad larvae possess the functional digestive system before mouth opening, and the significant increases in lipase, amylase, pepsin, and intestinal enzyme activities between 27 and 33 DAH suggest that larvae can be successfully weaned onto microdiets around this age.

  17. The role and requirements of digestible dietary carbohydrates in infants and toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, A; Alles, M; de Graaf, C; Fleith, M; Hadjilucas, E; Isaacs, E; Maffeis, C; Zeinstra, G; Matthys, C; Gil, A

    2012-01-01

    Digestible carbohydrates are one of the main sources of dietary energy in infancy and childhood and are essential for growth and development. The aim of this narrative review is to outline the intakes of digestible carbohydrates and their role in health and disease, including the development of food preferences, as well the consequences of excess carbohydrate. Key experts in these fields provided up-to-date reviews of the literature. A search of available information on dietary intakes of children below the age of 4 years was conducted from 1985 up to 2010. Articles and reports including information about sugars and/or starch intakes were selected. A number of factors limit the ability to obtain an overall picture of carbohydrate intakes and food sources in this age group. These include small numbers of intake studies, differing approaches to analysing carbohydrate, a variety of terms used to describe sugars intakes and a dearth of information about starch intakes. Data suggest that sweet taste is preferred in infancy and later food choices. There are few established adverse consequences of high intakes of digestible carbohydrate for young children. The greatest evidence is for dental caries, although this is influenced by high intake frequency and poor oral hygiene. Evidence for detrimental effects on nutrient dilution, obesity, diabetes or cognition is limited. In infants, minimum carbohydrate (mainly lactose) intake should be 40% of total energy, gradually increasing to 55% energy by the age of 2 years. PMID:22473042

  18. Effect of partitioning the nonfiber carbohydrate fraction and neutral detergent fiber method on digestibility of carbohydrates by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Tebbe, A W; Faulkner, M J; Weiss, W P

    2017-08-01

    Many nutrition models rely on summative equations to estimate feed and diet energy concentrations. These models partition feed into nutrient fractions and multiply the fractions by their estimated true digestibility, and the digestible mass provided by each fraction is then summed and converted to an energy value. Nonfiber carbohydrate (NFC) is used in many models. Although it behaves as a nutritionally uniform fraction, it is a heterogeneous mixture of components. To reduce the heterogeneity, we partitioned NFC into starch and residual organic matter (ROM), which is calculated as 100 - CP - LCFA - ash - starch - NDF, where crude protein (CP), long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), ash, starch, and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) are a percentage of DM. However, the true digestibility of ROM is unknown, and because NDF is contaminated with both ash and CP, those components are subtracted twice. The effect of ash and CP contamination of NDF on in vivo digestibility of NDF and ROM was evaluated using data from 2 total-collection digestibility experiments using lactating dairy cows. Digestibility of NDF was greater when it was corrected for ash and CP than without correction. Conversely, ROM apparent digestibility decreased when NDF was corrected for contamination. Although correcting for contamination statistically increased NDF digestibility, the effect was small; the average increase was 3.4%. The decrease in ROM digestibility was 7.4%. True digestibility of ROM is needed to incorporate ROM into summative equations. Data from multiple digestibility experiments (38 diets) using dairy cows were collated, and ROM concentrations were regressed on concentration of digestible ROM (ROM was calculated without adjusting for ash and CP contamination). The estimated true digestibility coefficient of ROM was 0.96 (SE = 0.021), and metabolic fecal ROM was 3.43 g/100 g of dry matter intake (SE = 0.30). Using a smaller data set (7 diets), estimated true digestibility of ROM when calculated

  19. Application of high rate, high temperature anaerobic digestion to fungal thermozyme hydrolysates from carbohydrate wastes.

    PubMed

    Forbes, C; O'Reilly, C; McLaughlin, L; Gilleran, G; Tuohy, M; Colleran, E

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using a two-step, fully biological and sustainable strategy for the treatment of carbohydrate rich wastes. The primary step in this strategy involves the application of thermostable enzymes produced by the thermophilic, aerobic fungus, Talaromyces emersonii, to carbohydrate wastes producing a liquid hydrolysate discharged at elevated temperatures. To assess the potential of thermophilic treatment of this hydrolysate, a comparative study of thermophilic and mesophilic digestion of four sugar rich thermozyme hydrolysate waste streams was conducted by operating two high rate upflow anaerobic hybrid reactors (UAHR) at 37 degrees C (R1) and 55 degrees C (R2). The operational performance of both reactors was monitored from start-up by assessing COD removal efficiencies, volatile fatty acid (VFA) discharge and % methane of the biogas produced. Rapid start-up of both R1 and R2 was achieved on an influent composed of the typical sugar components of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). Both reactors were subsequently challenged in terms of volumetric loading rate (VLR) and it was found that a VLR of 9 gCOD l(-1)d(-1) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1 day severely affected the thermophilic reactor with instability characterised by a build up of volatile fatty acid (VFA) intermediates in the effluent. The influent to both reactors was changed to a simple glucose and sucrose-based influent supplied at a VLR of 4.5 gCOD l(-1)d(-1) and HRT of 2 days prior to the introduction of thermozyme hydrolysates. Four unique thermozyme hydrolysates were subsequently supplied to the reactors, each for a period of 10 HRTs. The applied hydrolysates were derived from apple pulp, bread, carob powder and cardboard, all of which were successfully and comparably converted by both reactors. The % total carbohydrate removal by both reactors was monitored during the application of the sugar rich thermozyme

  20. Assessment of in Vitro Digestibility of Dietary Carbohydrates Using Rat Small Intestinal Extract.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Lazarte, Alvaro; Olano, Agustín; Villamiel, Mar; Moreno, F Javier

    2017-09-13

    There are few studies on the assessment of digestibility of nondigestible carbohydrates, despite their increasingly important role in human health. In vitro digestibility of a range of dietary carbohydrates classified as digestible (maltose, sucrose, and lactose), well-recognized (lactulose, fructooligosaccharides (FOS), and two types of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) differing in the predominant glycosidic linkage), and potential (lactosucrose and GOS from lactulose, OsLu) prebiotics using a rat small intestinal extract (RSIE) under physiological conditions of temperature and pH is described. Recognized and potential prebiotics were highly resistant to RSIE digestion although partial hydrolysis at different extents was observed. FOS and lactulose were the most resistant to digestion, followed closely by OsLu and more distantly by both types of GOS and lactosucrose. In GOS, β(1 → 6) linkages were more resistant to digestion than β(1 → 4) bonds. The reported in vitro digestion model is a useful, simple, and cost-effective tool to evaluate the digestibility of dietary oligosaccharides.

  1. A 100-year review: Carbohydrates - characterization, digestion, and utilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our knowledge of the role of carbohydrates in dairy cattle nutrition has advanced substantially during the 100 years in which the Journal of Dairy Science has been published. In this review, we traced the history of scientific investigation and discovery from crude fiber, nitrogen-free extract, and ...

  2. Chronic ethanol feeding modulates the synthesis of digestive enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Ponnappa, B.C.; Hoek, J.B.; Rubin, E.

    1987-05-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on pancreatic protein synthesis were investigated. Protein synthesis was assessed by studying the rate of incorporation of /sup 3/H-leucine into TCA-precipitable proteins in isolated pancreatic acini from rats. Chronic ethanol ingestion increased the rate of pancreatic protein synthesis by 2-4 fold. The onset of the increase in protein synthesis was detectable two days after ethanol feeding, reached a maximum after 7 days and remained unchanged after 4 months on the ethanol-containing diet. The rate of synthesis of individual digestive enzymes was studied by SDS-PAGE on extracts obtained from purified zymogen granules. Ethanol feeding inducedmore » an increase in the rate of synthesis of most of the digestive enzymes; chymotrypsinogen, trypsinogen and an unidentified protein were increased to a greater extent than other digestive enzymes. By contrast, the synthesis of amylase was selectively decreased after ethanol feeding. These results suggest that chronic ethanol ingestion has specific effects on the rate of synthesis of individual digestive enzymes in the exocrine pancreas.« less

  3. Sequencing of oligosaccharides using enzyme array digestion with electrochemical and fluorescent detections

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, M.; Lee, C.S.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this study is to develop a rapid and sensitive method for oligosaccharide sequencing. The oligosaccharides are subjected to the enzyme array digestion with exoglycosidases of known and well-defined specificities. The enzyme array method involves the division of oligosaccharide sample into aliquots, and the incubation of each aliquot with a precisely defined mixture of exoglycosidases. In the enzyme array method, the presence of a specific linkage anywhere in the oligosaccharide is determined by the inability of an enzyme mixture lacking a given enzyme to cleave that linkage ( a stop point) and the ability of the other enzymesmore » to cleave the linkage up to that point. The direct quantification of released monosaccharides from the enzyme array can be achieved by using pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) or by fluorescent derivatization with a fluorophoric agent. The measured monosaccharide concentrations in combination with the enzyme array analysis provide detail characterization of oligosaccharides with their sugar composition, configuration, and linkage information, The released monosaccharides are further quantified by anion exchange chromatography and capillary electrophoresis for the comparison with the results obtained from PAD and fluorescence measurements. Our enzyme array-electrochemical (or fluorescent) detection method does not require any separation procedure and any prior labeling of oligosaccharide and have several practical advantages over the current carbohydrate sequencing techniques including simplicity, speed, and the ability to use small amounts of starting material.« less

  4. Preliminary characterization of digestive enzymes in freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauey, Blake W.; Amberg, Jon J.; Cooper, Scott T.; Grunwald, Sandra K.; Newton, Teresa J.; Haro, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Resource managers lack an effective chemical tool to control the invasive zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha. Zebra mussels clog water intakes for hydroelectric companies, harm unionid mussel species, and are believed to be a reservoir of avian botulism. Little is known about the digestive physiology of zebra mussels and unionid mussels. The enzymatic profile of the digestive glands of zebra mussels and native threeridge (Amblema plicata) and plain pocketbook mussels (Lampsilis cardium) are characterized using a commercial enzyme kit, api ZYM, and validated the kit with reagent-grade enzymes. A linear correlation was shown for only one of nineteen enzymes, tested between the api ZYM kit and a specific enzyme kit. Thus, the api ZYM kit should only be used to make general comparisons of enzyme presence and to observe trends in enzyme activities. Enzymatic trends were seen in the unionid mussel species, but not in zebra mussels sampled 32 days apart from the same location. Enzymatic classes, based on substrate, showed different trends, with proteolytic and phospholytic enzymes having the most change in relative enzyme activity.

  5. Physiology of digestion and the molecular characterization of the major digestive enzymes from Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Fábio K; Pimentel, André C; Dias, Alcides B; Cardoso, Christiane; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Ferreira, Clélia; Terra, Walter R

    2014-11-01

    Cockroaches are among the first insects to appear in the fossil record. This work is part of ongoing research on insects at critical points in the evolutionary tree to disclose evolutionary trends in the digestive characteristics of insects. A transcriptome (454 Roche platform) of the midgut of Periplanetaamericana was searched for sequences of digestive enzymes. The selected sequences were manually curated. The complete or nearly complete sequences showing all characteristic motifs and highly expressed (reads counting) had their predicted sequences checked by cloning and Sanger sequencing. There are two chitinases (lacking mucin and chitin-binding domains), one amylase, two α- and three β-glucosidases, one β-galactosidase, two aminopeptidases (none of the N-group), one chymotrypsin, 5 trypsins, and none β-glucanase. Electrophoretic and enzymological data agreed with transcriptome data in showing that there is a single β-galactosidase, two α-glucosidases, one preferring as substrate maltase and the other aryl α-glucoside, and two β-glucosidases. Chromatographic and enzymological data identified 4 trypsins, one chymotrypsin (also found in the transcriptome), and one non-identified proteinase. The major digestive trypsin is identifiable to a major P. americana allergen (Per a 10). The lack of β-glucanase expression in midguts was confirmed, thus lending support to claims that those enzymes are salivary. A salivary amylase was molecularly cloned and shown to be different from the one from the midgut. Enzyme distribution showed that most digestion occurs under the action of salivary and midgut enzymes in the foregut and anterior midgut, except the posterior terminal digestion of proteins. A counter-flux of fluid may be functional in the midgut of the cockroach to explain the low excretory rate of digestive enzymes. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical localization data showed that amylase and trypsin are released by both merocrine and apocrine secretion

  6. The function of digestive enzymes on Cu, Zn, and Pb release from soil in in vitro digestion tests.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Demisie, Walelign; Zhang, Ming-kui

    2013-07-01

    The bioaccessibility of soil heavy metals is the solubility of soil heavy metals in synthetic human digestive juice, which is usually determined using in vitro digestion test. To reveal the effects of digestive enzymes on soil heavy metals bioaccessibility, three representative in vitro digestion tests, Simple Bioaccessibility Extraction Test (SBET), Physiologically Based Extraction Test (PBET), and Simple Gastrointestinal Extraction Test (SGET), were chosen. The bioaccessibility of soil Cu, Zn, and Pb in each method were respectively evaluated with and without digestive enzymes, and the differences were compared. The results showed that the effects of digestive enzymes varied with different methods and elements. Because of digestive enzymes addition, the environmental change from acid gastric phase to neutral intestinal phase of PBET did not result in apparently decrease of the bioaccessibility of soil Cu. However, the solubility of soil Zn and Pb were pH-dependent. For SGET, when digestive enzymes were added, its results reflected more variations resulting from soil and element types. The impacts of digestive enzymes on heavy metal dissolution are mostly seen in the intestinal phase. Therefore, digestive enzyme addition is indispensable to the gastrointestinal digestion methods (PBET and SGET), while the pepsin addition is not important for the methods only comprised of gastric digestion (SBET).

  7. Digestive enzymes from workers and soldiers of termite Nasutitermes corniger.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thâmarah de Albuquerque; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Dornelles, Leonardo Prezzi; Amorim, Poliana Karla; Sá, Roberto Araújo; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2014-10-01

    The digestive apparatus of termites may have several biotechnological applications, as well as being a target for pest control. This report discusses the detection of cellulases (endoglucanase, exoglucanase, and β-glucosidase), hemicellulases (β-xylosidase, α-l-arabinofuranosidase, and β-d-xylanase), α-amylase, and proteases (trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, and keratinase-type) in gut extracts from Nasutitermes corniger workers and soldiers. Additionally, the effects of pH (3.0-11.0) and temperature (30-100°C) on enzyme activities were evaluated. All enzymes investigated were detected in the gut extracts of worker and soldier termites. Endoglucanase and β-xylanase were the main cellulase and hemicellulase, respectively. Zymography for proteases of worker extracts revealed polypeptides of 22, 30, and 43kDa that hydrolyzed casein, and assays using protease inhibitors showed that serine proteases were the main proteases in worker and soldier guts. The determined enzyme activities and their response to different pH and temperature values revealed that workers and soldiers contained a distinct digestive apparatus. The ability of these termites to efficiently digest the main components of lignocellulosic materials stimulates the purification of gut enzymes. Further investigation into their biotechnological potential as well as whether the enzymes detected are produced by the termites or by their symbionts is needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The complexities of hydrolytic enzymes from the termite digestive system.

    PubMed

    Saadeddin, Anas

    2014-06-01

    The main challenge in second generation bioethanol production is the efficient breakdown of cellulose to sugar monomers (hydrolysis). Due to the recalcitrant character of cellulose, feedstock pretreatment and adapted hydrolysis steps are needed to obtain fermentable sugar monomers. The conventional industrial production process of second-generation bioethanol from biomass comprises several steps: thermochemical pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and sugar fermentation. This process is undergoing continuous optimization in order to increase the bioethanol yield and reduce the economic cost. Therefore, the discovery of new enzymes with high lignocellulytic activity or new strategies is extremely important. In nature, wood-feeding termites have developed a sophisticated and efficient cellulose degrading system in terms of the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis and exploitation. This system, which represents a model for digestive symbiosis has attracted the attention of biofuel researchers. This review describes the termite digestive system, gut symbionts, termite enzyme resources, in vitro studies of isolated enzymes and lignin degradation in termites.

  9. Towards complete hydrolysis of soy flour carbohydrates by enzyme mixtures for protein enrichment: A modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Loman, Abdullah Al; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2016-05-01

    Soy protein is a well-known nutritional supplement in proteinaceous food and animal feed. However, soybeans contain complex carbohydrate. Selective carbohydrate removal by enzymes could increase the protein content and remove the indigestibility of soy products for inclusion in animal feed. Complete hydrolysis of soy flour carbohydrates is challenging due to the presence of proteins and different types of non-structural polysaccharides. This study is designed to guide complex enzyme mixture required for hydrolysis of all types of soy flour carbohydrates. Enzyme broths from Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus aculeatus and Trichoderma reesei fermentations were evaluated in this study for soy carbohydrate hydrolysis. The resultant hydrolysate was measured for solubilized carbohydrate by both total carbohydrate and reducing sugar analyses. Conversion data attained after 48h hydrolysis were first fitted with models to determine the maximum fractions of carbohydrate hydrolyzable by each enzyme group, i.e., cellulase, xylanase, pectinase and α-galactosidase. Kinetic models were then developed to describe the increasing conversions over time under different enzyme activities and process conditions. The models showed high fidelity in predicting soy carbohydrate hydrolysis over broad ranges of soy flour loading (5-25%) and enzyme activities: per g soy flour, cellulase, 0.04-30 FPU; xylanase, 3.5-618U; pectinase, 0.03-120U; and α-galactosidase, 0.01-60U. The models are valuable in guiding the development and production of optimal enzyme mixtures toward hydrolysis of all types of carbohydrates present in soy flour and in optimizing the design and operation of hydrolysis reactor and process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Slowly Digestible Carbohydrate for Balanced Energy: In Vitro and In Vivo Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Gourineni, Vishnupriya; Stewart, Maria L.; Skorge, Rob; Sekula, Bernard C.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest among consumers in foods for sustained energy management, and an increasing number of ingredients are emerging to address this demand. The SUSTRA™ 2434 slowly digestible carbohydrate is a blend of tapioca flour and corn starch, with the potential to provide balanced energy after a meal. The aim of the study was to characterize this starch’s digestion profile in vitro (modified Englyst assay) and in vivo (intact and cecectomized rooster study), and to determine its effects on available energy, by measuring post-prandial glycemia in healthy adults (n = 14), in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, with two food forms: cold-pressed bar and pudding. The in vitro starch digestion yielded a high slowly digestible fraction (51%) compared to maltodextrin (9%). In the rooster digestibility model, the starch was highly digestible (94%). Consumption of slowly digestible starch (SDS), in an instant pudding or bar, yielded a significantly lower glycemic index compared to a control. At individual time points, the SDS bar and pudding yielded blood glucose levels with significantly lower values at 30–60 min and significantly higher values at 120–240 min, demonstrating a balanced energy release. This is the first study to comprehensively characterize the physiological responses to slowly digestible starch (tapioca and corn blend) in in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:29125542

  11. Digestive enzyme activities of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) during early developmental stages under culture condition.

    PubMed

    Tong, X H; Xu, S H; Liu, Q H; Li, J; Xiao, Z Z; Ma, D Y

    2012-06-01

    Digestive enzyme activities were analysed in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) from hatching until 60 days after hatching (DAH). Trypsin sharply increased to the climax at 17 DAH and decreased until 31 DAH followed by a stable level thereafter. Amylase was determined at 4 DAH, reached the maximum value at 19 DAH and declined sharply to 39 DAH and remained at a low level thereafter, suggesting the carbohydrate component should remain at a low level in formulated diets. Pepsin was detected at 9 DAH and increased to 34 DAH and then remained at a stable level. The above results revealed pancreatic enzymes are no longer main enzymes for food digestion after the formation of functional stomach. Leucine-alanine peptidase (Leu-ala) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) and leucine aminopeptidase N (LAP) were found in newly hatched larvae. Both AP and LAP activities markedly increased to 23 DAH, decreased abruptly to 50 DAH and increased gradually to 60 DAH. Leu-ala reached the plateau from 23 to 39 DAH, followed by a decline to 46 DAH and an increase until 60 DAH. The brush border membrane (BBM)-bound enzyme activities increased from 30% at 31 DAH to 81% at 38 DAH of the total activities, indicating the maturation of intestinal tract.

  12. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from the zygomycete fungus Rhizopus oryzae: a highly specialized approach to carbohydrate degradation depicted at genome level

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhizopus oryzae is a zygomycete filamentous fungus, well-known as a saprobe ubiquitous in soil and as a pathogenic/spoilage fungus, causing Rhizopus rot and mucomycoses. Results Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZy) annotation of the R. oryzae identified, in contrast to other filamentous fungi, a low number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and a high number of glycosyl transferases (GTs) and carbohydrate esterases (CEs). A detailed analysis of CAZy families, supported by growth data, demonstrates highly specialized plant and fungal cell wall degrading abilities distinct from ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. The specific genomic and growth features for degradation of easily digestible plant cell wall mono- and polysaccharides (starch, galactomannan, unbranched pectin, hexose sugars), chitin, chitosan, β-1,3-glucan and fungal cell wall fractions suggest specific adaptations of R. oryzae to its environment. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genome of the zygomycete fungus R. oryzae and comparison to ascomycetes and basidiomycete species revealed how evolution has shaped its genetic content with respect to carbohydrate degradation, after divergence from the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. PMID:21241472

  13. Changes in molecular characteristics of cereal carbohydrates after processing and digestion.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Mirosław Marek; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2012-12-10

    Different extraction, purification and digestion methods were used to investigate the molecular properties of carbohydrates in arabinoxylan and β-glucan concentrates, dietary fiber (DF) rich breads and ileum content of bread fed pigs. The breads studied were: a low DF wheat bread (WF), whole meal rye bread (GR), rye bread with kernels (RK), wheat bread supplemented with wheat arabinoxylan concentrate (AX) and wheat bread supplemented with oat β-glucan concentrate (BG). The weight average molecular weight (M(w)) of extractable carbohydrates in β-glucan concentrate decreased eight-fold after inclusion in the BG bread when exposed to in vitro digestion, while the M(w) of purified extractable carbohydrates in AX bread was reduced two-fold, and remained almost unaffected until reaching the terminal ileum of pigs. Similarly, the M(w) of purified extractable carbohydrates in GR and RK bread was not significantly changed in the ileum. The AX bread resulted in the highest concentration of dissolved arabinoxylan in the ileum among all the breads that caused a substantial increased in ileal AX viscosity. Nevertheless, for none of the breads, the M(w) of extractable carbohydrates was related neither to the bread extract nor ileal viscosity.

  14. Changes in Molecular Characteristics of Cereal Carbohydrates after Processing and Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzak, Mirosław Marek; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2012-01-01

    Different extraction, purification and digestion methods were used to investigate the molecular properties of carbohydrates in arabinoxylan and β-glucan concentrates, dietary fiber (DF) rich breads and ileum content of bread fed pigs. The breads studied were: a low DF wheat bread (WF), whole meal rye bread (GR), rye bread with kernels (RK), wheat bread supplemented with wheat arabinoxylan concentrate (AX) and wheat bread supplemented with oat β-glucan concentrate (BG). The weight average molecular weight (Mw) of extractable carbohydrates in β-glucan concentrate decreased eight-fold after inclusion in the BG bread when exposed to in vitro digestion, while the Mw of purified extractable carbohydrates in AX bread was reduced two-fold, and remained almost unaffected until reaching the terminal ileum of pigs. Similarly, the Mw of purified extractable carbohydrates in GR and RK bread was not significantly changed in the ileum. The AX bread resulted in the highest concentration of dissolved arabinoxylan in the ileum among all the breads that caused a substantial increased in ileal AX viscosity. Nevertheless, for none of the breads, the Mw of extractable carbohydrates was related neither to the bread extract nor ileal viscosity. PMID:23222731

  15. An integrative in vitro approach to analyse digestion of wheat polysaccharides and the effect of enzyme supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lafond, Mickaël; Bouza, Bernard; Eyrichine, Sandrine; Bonnin, Estelle; Crost, Emmanuelle H; Geraert, Pierre-André; Giardina, Thierry; Ajandouz, El Hassan

    2011-07-01

    The digestion of polysaccharides from the wheat cultivars Caphorn and Isengrain was investigated, and the efficiency of an enzyme preparation was tested using the TNO gastrointestinal model (TIM-1). The apparent digestibility (AD) of carbohydrates was determined based on the measurement of organic matter (OM), total monosaccharides, reducing ends (RE) and end products (EP: glucose, maltose and xylobiose). The AD of the OM from Caphorn and Isengrain measured using caecectomised cockerels did not differ from that measured using TIM-1: 72.0 (SD 2.6) v. 70.6 (SD 0.6) % for Caphorn (P = 0.580) and 73.0 (SD 2.3) v. 71.1 (SD 1.9) % for Isengrain (P = 0.252). After the 6 h TIM-1 digestion, 41.4-58.9 % of the OM, RE and EP were recovered from the jejunal compartment and 18.3-27.1 % from the ileal compartment, while ileal deliveries and digestive residues constituted the remainder. A commercial enzyme cocktail tested at 0.2 μl/g of wheat improved TIM-1 digestibility of Caphorn and Isengrain polysaccharides: 3.9 % (P = 0.0203) and 3.4 % (P = 0.0058) based on the OM; 9.7 % (P < 0.0001) and 3.1 % (P = 0.031) based on the total glucose; 47.2 % (P < 0.0001) and 14.2 % (P = 0.0004) based on the RE, respectively. The enzyme cocktail improved the release of the EP for Caphorn (3.8 %, P = 0.008) but not for Isengrain ( − 0.8 %, P = 0.561). The higher efficiency of the enzyme supplementation on the digestion of Caphorn polysaccharides compared with Isengrain seems to be linked to the higher soluble carbohydrate contents and/or less ramified arabinoxylan of Caphorn.

  16. Enzyme use in kibble diets formulated with wheat bran for dogs: effects on processing and digestibility.

    PubMed

    Sá, F C; Vasconcellos, R S; Brunetto, M A; Filho, F O R; Gomes, M O S; Carciofi, A C

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there is an interest in technologies that favour the use of coproducts for animal nutrition. The effect of adding two enzyme mixtures in diets for dogs formulated with wheat bran (WB) was evaluated. Two foods with similar compositions were formulated: negative control (NC; without WB) and test diet (25% of WB). The test diet was divided into four treatments: without enzyme (positive control), enzyme mixture 1 (ENZ1; added before extrusion β-glucanase, xylanase, cellulase, glucoamylase, phytase); enzyme mixture 2 (ENZ2; added before extrusion the ENZ1 more α-amylase); enzyme mixture 2 added after the extrusion (ENZ2ex). ENZ1 and ENZ2 were used to evaluate the enzyme effect on extruder pre-conditioner (processing additive) and ENZ2ex to evaluate the effect of enzyme supplementation for the animal. Digestibility was measured through total collection of faeces and urine. The experiment followed a randomized block design with five treatments (diets) and six dogs per diet, totalling 30 dogs (7.0 ± 1.2 years old and 11.0 ± 2.2 kg of body weight). Data were submitted to analysis of variance and means compared by Tukey's test and orthogonal contrasts (p < 0.05). Reducing sugars showed an important reduction after extrusion, suggesting the formation of carbohydrate complexes. The apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, acid-hydrolysed fat and energy was higher in NC than in diets with WB (p < 0.001), without effects of enzyme additions. WB diets resulted in higher faecal production and concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and reduced pH and ammonia concentration (p < 0.01), with no effect of enzyme addition. The enzyme addition did not result in improved digestibility of a diet high in non-starch polysaccharides; however, only ATTD was measured and nutrient fermentation in the large intestine may have interfered with the results obtained. WB modified fermentation product formation in the colon of dogs

  17. Enzyme-based processing of soybean carbohydrate: Recent developments and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Al Loman, Abdullah; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2017-11-01

    Soybean is well known for its high-value oil and protein. Carbohydrate is, however, an underutilized major component, representing almost 26-30% (w/w) of the dried bean. The complex soybean carbohydrate is not easily hydrolyzable and can cause indigestibility when included in food and feed. Enzymes can be used to hydrolyze the carbohydrate for improving soybean processing and value of soybean products. Here the enzyme-based processing developed for the following purposes is reviewed: hydrolysis of different carbohydrate-rich by/products from soybean processing, improvement of soybean oil extraction, and increase of nutritional value of soybean-based food and animal feed. Once hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars, soybean carbohydrate can find more value-added applications and further improve the overall economics of soybean processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of a feruloyl esterase from Aspergillus terreus facilitates the division of fungal enzymes from Carbohydrate Esterase family 1 of the carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZy) database.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Koskela, Salla M; Kuuskeri, Jaana; de Vries, Ronald P; Hildén, Kristiina

    2018-04-26

    Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) are accessory enzymes for plant biomass degradation, which catalyse hydrolysis of carboxylic ester linkages between hydroxycinnamic acids and plant cell-wall carbohydrates. They are a diverse group of enzymes evolved from, e.g. acetyl xylan esterases (AXEs), lipases and tannases, thus complicating their classification and prediction of function by sequence similarity. Recently, an increasing number of fungal FAEs have been biochemically characterized, owing to their potential in various biotechnological applications and multitude of candidate FAEs in fungal genomes. However, only part of the fungal FAEs are included in Carbohydrate Esterase family 1 (CE1) of the carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZy) database. In this work, we performed a phylogenetic analysis that divided the fungal members of CE1 into five subfamilies of which three contained characterized enzymes with conserved activities. Conservation within one of the subfamilies was confirmed by characterization of an additional CE1 enzyme from Aspergillus terreus. Recombinant A. terreus FaeD (AtFaeD) showed broad specificity towards synthetic methyl and ethyl esters, and released ferulic acid from plant biomass substrates, demonstrating its true FAE activity and interesting features as potential biocatalyst. The subfamily division of the fungal CE1 members enables more efficient selection of candidate enzymes for biotechnological processes. © 2018 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Hepatic glucose metabolic responses to digestible dietary carbohydrates in two isogenic lines of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuerong; Marandel, Lucie; Dupont-Nivet, Mathilde; Quillet, Edwige; Geurden, Inge; Panserat, Stephane

    2018-06-05

    Rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) was recognized as a typical 'glucose-intolerant' fish and poor dietary carbohydrate user. Our first objective was to test the effect of dietary carbohydrates themselves (without modification of dietary protein intake) on hepatic glucose gene expression (taking into account the paralogs). The second aim was to research if two isogenic trout lines had different responses to carbohydrate intake, showing one with a better use dietary carbohydrates. Thus, we used two isogenic lines of rainbow trout (named A32h and AB1h) fed with either a high carbohydrate diet or a low carbohydrate diet for 12 weeks. We analysed the zootechnical parameters, the plasma metabolites, the hepatic glucose metabolism at the molecular level and the hormonal-nutrient sensing pathway. Globally, dietary carbohydrate intake was associated with hyperglycaemia and down regulation of the energy sensor Ampk, but also with atypical regulation of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Indeed, the first steps of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis catalysed by the glucokinase and the phospenolpyruvate carboxykinase are regulated at the molecular level by dietary carbohydrates as expected (i.e. induction of the glycolytic gck and repression of the gluconeogenic pck ); by contrast, and surprisingly, for two other key glycolytic enzymes (phosphofructokinase enzyme - pfk l and pyruvate kinase - p k ) some of the paralogs ( pfklb and pklr ) are inhibited by carbohydrates whereas some of the genes coding gluconeogenic enzymes (the glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme g6pcb1b and g6pcb2a gene and the fructose1-6 biphosphatase paralog fbp1a ) are induced. On the other hand, some differences for the zootechnical parameters and metabolic genes were also found between the two isogenic lines, confirming the existence of genetic polymorphisms for nutritional regulation of intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout. In conclusion, our study determines some new and unexpected molecular

  20. A new versatile microarray-based method for high throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G T

    2015-04-03

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. A New Versatile Microarray-based Method for High Throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-active Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L.; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B.; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. PMID:25657012

  2. The impact of pollen consumption on honey bee digestive physiology and carbohydrate metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes play an important role in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) due to its dietary specialization on plant-based nutrition. Secretory glycoside hydrolases (GHs) produced in worker head glands aid in the processing of floral nectar into honey and are expressed in accordance with ...

  3. Complementary Proteomic and Biochemical Analysis of Peptidases in Lobster Gastric Juice Uncovers the Functional Role of Individual Enzymes in Food Digestion.

    PubMed

    Bibo-Verdugo, Betsaida; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Craik, Charles S; García-Carreño, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Crustaceans are a diverse group, distributed in widely variable environmental conditions for which they show an equally extensive range of biochemical adaptations. Some digestive enzymes have been studied by purification/characterization approaches. However, global analysis is crucial to understand how digestive enzymes interplay. Here, we present the first proteomic analysis of the digestive fluid from a crustacean (Homarus americanus) and identify glycosidases and peptidases as the most abundant classes of hydrolytic enzymes. The digestion pathway of complex carbohydrates was predicted by comparing the lobster enzymes to similar enzymes from other crustaceans. A novel and unbiased substrate profiling approach was used to uncover the global proteolytic specificity of gastric juice and determine the contribution of cysteine and aspartic acid peptidases. These enzymes were separated by gel electrophoresis and their individual substrate specificities uncovered from the resulting gel bands. This new technique is called zymoMSP. Each cysteine peptidase cleaves a set of unique peptide bonds and the S2 pocket determines their substrate specificity. Finally, affinity chromatography was used to enrich for a digestive cathepsin D1 to compare its substrate specificity and cold-adapted enzymatic properties to mammalian enzymes. We conclude that the H. americanus digestive peptidases may have useful therapeutic applications, due to their cold-adaptation properties and ability to hydrolyze collagen.

  4. High-pressure tolerance of earthworm fibrinolytic and digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Shin-Ichi; Tokuyama, Haruka; Sato, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Toshinori; Shida, Yosuke; Ogasawara, Wataru

    2018-02-01

    Earthworms contain several digestive and therapeutic enzymes that are beneficial to our health and useful for biomass utilization. Specifically, earthworms contain potent fibrinolytic enzymes called lumbrokinases, which are highly stable even at room temperature and remain active in dried earthworm powder. However, the high-temperature sterilization method leads to the inactivation of enzymes. Therefore, we investigated the effect of high-pressure treatment (HPT) (from 0.1 MPa to 500 MPa at 25°C and 50°C) on the enzymatic activity of lumbrokinase (LK), α-amylase (AMY), endoglucanase (EG), β-glucosidase (BGL), and lipase (LP) of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, Waki strain, and its sterilization ability in producing dietary supplement. LK showed thermo- and high-pressure tolerance. In addition, HPT may have resulted in pressure-induced stabilization and activation of LK. Although AMY activity was maintained up to 400 MPa at 25°C, the apparent activity decreased slightly at 50°C with HPT. EG showed almost the same pattern as AMY. However, it is possible that the effects of temperature and pressure compensated each other under 100 MPa at 50°C. BGL was shown to be a pressure- and temperature-sensitive enzyme, and LP showed a thermo- and high-pressure tolerance. The slight decrease in apparent activity occurred under 200 MPa at both temperatures. Furthermore, the low-temperature and pressure treatment completely sterilized the samples. These results provide a basis for the development of a novel earthworm dietary supplement with fibrinolytic and digestive activity and of high-pressure-tolerant enzymes to be used for biomass pretreatment. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... include sugars added during food processing and refining. Complex carbohydrates include whole grain breads and cereals, starchy vegetables and legumes. Many of the complex carbohydrates are good sources of fiber. For a healthy ...

  6. Homology to peptide pattern for annotation of carbohydrate-active enzymes and prediction of function.

    PubMed

    Busk, P K; Pilgaard, B; Lezyk, M J; Meyer, A S; Lange, L

    2017-04-12

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes are found in all organisms and participate in key biological processes. These enzymes are classified in 274 families in the CAZy database but the sequence diversity within each family makes it a major task to identify new family members and to provide basis for prediction of enzyme function. A fast and reliable method for de novo annotation of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes is to identify conserved peptides in the curated enzyme families followed by matching of the conserved peptides to the sequence of interest as demonstrated for the glycosyl hydrolase and the lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase families. This approach not only assigns the enzymes to families but also provides functional prediction of the enzymes with high accuracy. We identified conserved peptides for all enzyme families in the CAZy database with Peptide Pattern Recognition. The conserved peptides were matched to protein sequence for de novo annotation and functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes with the Hotpep method. Annotation of protein sequences from 12 bacterial and 16 fungal genomes to families with Hotpep had an accuracy of 0.84 (measured as F1-score) compared to semiautomatic annotation by the CAZy database whereas the dbCAN HMM-based method had an accuracy of 0.77 with optimized parameters. Furthermore, Hotpep provided a functional prediction with 86% accuracy for the annotated genes. Hotpep is available as a stand-alone application for MS Windows. Hotpep is a state-of-the-art method for automatic annotation and functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

  7. Working with Enzymes - Where Is Lactose Digested? An Enzyme Assay for Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Sandi R.; Tolleson, Tonya D.; Williams, R. Jill; Underhill, Russell D.; Deal, S. Todd

    1998-06-01

    At Georgia Southern University, we offer a sophomore-level introductory biochemistry course that is aimed at nutrition and chemistry education majors. The laboratory portion of this course has long lacked an experimental introduction to enzymes. We have developed a simple enzyme assay utilizing lactase enzyme from crushed LactAid tablets and a 5% lactose solution ("synthetic milk"). In the experiment, the students assay the activity of the enzyme on the "synthetic milk" at pHs of approximately 1, 6, and 8 with the stated goal of determining where lactose functions in the digestive tract. The activity of the lactase may be followed chromatographically or spectrophotometrically. The experiment, which is actually a simple pH assay, is easily implemented in allied health chemistry laboratory courses and readily lends itself to adaptation for more complex kinetic assays in upper-level biochemistry laboratory courses. The experimental details, including a list of required supplies and hints for implementation, are provided.

  8. Function-based classification of carbohydrate-active enzymes by recognition of short, conserved peptide motifs.

    PubMed

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Lene

    2013-06-01

    Functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes is difficult due to low sequence identity. However, similar enzymes often share a few short motifs, e.g., around the active site, even when the overall sequences are very different. To exploit this notion for functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes, we developed a simple algorithm, peptide pattern recognition (PPR), that can divide proteins into groups of sequences that share a set of short conserved sequences. When this method was used on 118 glycoside hydrolase 5 proteins with 9% average pairwise identity and representing four characterized enzymatic functions, 97% of the proteins were sorted into groups correlating with their enzymatic activity. Furthermore, we analyzed 8,138 glycoside hydrolase 13 proteins including 204 experimentally characterized enzymes with 28 different functions. There was a 91% correlation between group and enzyme activity. These results indicate that the function of carbohydrate-active enzymes can be predicted with high precision by finding short, conserved motifs in their sequences. The glycoside hydrolase 61 family is important for fungal biomass conversion, but only a few proteins of this family have been functionally characterized. Interestingly, PPR divided 743 glycoside hydrolase 61 proteins into 16 subfamilies useful for targeted investigation of the function of these proteins and pinpointed three conserved motifs with putative importance for enzyme activity. Furthermore, the conserved sequences were useful for cloning of new, subfamily-specific glycoside hydrolase 61 proteins from 14 fungi. In conclusion, identification of conserved sequence motifs is a new approach to sequence analysis that can predict carbohydrate-active enzyme functions with high precision.

  9. PlantCAZyme: a database for plant carbohydrate-active enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrom, Alexander; Taujale, Rahil; McGinn, Nathan; Yin, Yanbin

    2014-01-01

    PlantCAZyme is a database built upon dbCAN (database for automated carbohydrate active enzyme annotation), aiming to provide pre-computed sequence and annotation data of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) to plant carbohydrate and bioenergy research communities. The current version contains data of 43 790 CAZymes of 159 protein families from 35 plants (including angiosperms, gymnosperms, lycophyte and bryophyte mosses) and chlorophyte algae with fully sequenced genomes. Useful features of the database include: (i) a BLAST server and a HMMER server that allow users to search against our pre-computed sequence data for annotation purpose, (ii) a download page to allow batch downloading data of a specific CAZyme family or species and (iii) protein browse pages to provide an easy access to the most comprehensive sequence and annotation data. Database URL: http://cys.bios.niu.edu/plantcazyme/ PMID:25125445

  10. Dietary non-digestible carbohydrates promote L-cell differentiation in the proximal colon of rats.

    PubMed

    Cani, Patrice D; Hoste, Sophie; Guiot, Yves; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2007-07-01

    One of the challenges in type 2 diabetes treatment is to ensure pancreas functionality with gut peptides such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). We have recently shown that the endogenous GLP-1 production is promoted by dietary non-digestible carbohydrates (oligofructose), the higher GLP-1 secretion could participate in the control of obesity and associated disorders. This experimental study was designed to highlight the mechanisms of endogenous increase of GLP-1 following non-digestible carbohydrate feeding. Male Wistar rats were fed a standard diet (70.4 g/100 g total carbohydrates; controls) or the same diet supplemented with oligofructose (10 g/100 g diet) for 4 weeks. GLP-1-producing L-cells of the colon were quantified by immunohistochemistry. GLP-1 was quantified by ELISA, and proglucagon, neurogenin 3 and NeuroD mRNA were measured in the colon by quantitative RT-PCR. The number of GLP-1-expressing cells was doubled in the proximal colon of oligofructose-treated rats, a phenomenon correlated with the increase in proglucagon mRNA and peptide content in the tissue. Moreover, oligofructose increased the number of enteroendocrine L-cells in the proximal colon by a mechanism involving up-regulation of two differentiation factors: neurogenin 3 and NeuroD. It is the first demonstration that nutrients fermented in the gut may promote L-cell differentiation in the proximal colon, a phenomenon contributing to a higher endogenous GLP-1 production. These results suggest a new mechanism by which dietary fibres may lower food intake and fat mass development.

  11. Factorial effects of salinity, dietary carbohydrate and moult cycle on digestive carbohydrases and hexokinases in Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931).

    PubMed

    Gaxiola, Gabriela; Cuzon, Gerard; García, Tomás; Taboada, Gabriel; Brito, Roberto; Chimal, María Eugenia; Paredes, Adriana; Soto, Luis; Rosas, Carlos; van Wormhoudt, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Litopenaeus vannamei were reared in close cycle over seven generations and tested for their capacity to digest starch and to metabolise glucose at different stages of the moulting cycle. After acclimation with 42.3% of carbohydrates (HCBH) or 2.3% carbohydrates (LCBH) diets and at high salinity (40 g kg(-1)) or low salinity (15 g kg(-1)), shrimp were sampled and hepatopancreas (HP) were stored. Total soluble protein in HP was affected by the interaction between salinity and moult stages (p<0.05). Specific activity of alpha-amylase ranged from 44 to 241 U mg protein(-1) and a significant interaction between salinity and moult stages was observed (p<0.05), resulting in highest values at stage C for low salinity (mean value 196.4 U mg protein(-1)), and at D0 in high salinity (mean value 175.7 U mg protein(-1)). Specific activity of alpha-glucosidase ranged between 0.09 and 0.63 U mg protein(-1), an interaction between dietary CBH and salinity was observed for the alpha-glucosidase (p<0.05) and highest mean value was found in low salinity-LCBH diet treatment (0.329 U mg protein(-1)). Hexokinase specific activity (range 9-113 mU mg protein(-1)) showed no significant differences when measured at 5 mM glucose (p>0.05). Total hexokinase specific activity (range 17-215 mU mg protein(-1)) showed a significant interaction between dietary CBH and salinity (p<0.05) with highest value (mean value 78.5 mU mg protein(-1)) found in HCBH-high salinity treatment, whereas in the other treatments the activity was not significantly different (mean value 35.93 mU mg protein(-1)). A synergistic effect of dietary CBH, salinity and moult stages over hexokinase IV-like specific activity was also observed (p<0.05). As result of this interaction, the highest value (135.5+/-81 mU mg protein(-1)) was observed in HCBH, high salinity at D0 moult stage. Digestive enzymes activity is enhanced in the presence of high starch diet (HCBH) and hexokinase can be induced at certain moulting stages under

  12. Preload of slowly digestible carbohydrate microspheres decreases gastric emptying rate of subsequent meal in humans.

    PubMed

    Cisse, Fatimata; Pletsch, Elizabeth A; Erickson, Daniel P; Chegeni, Mohammad; Hayes, Anna M R; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2017-09-01

    Gastric emptying rate influences how fast the nutrients of a meal are delivered to the body, and when slow, it moderates glycemic response and may impact satiety. Carbohydrates are one of the macronutrients that trigger the ileal brake, and we hypothesized that slowly digestible carbohydrate (SDC) administered in a premeal load would delay gastric emptying. A crossover design study was conducted with 10 healthy adults using fabricated SDC-microspheres (cooked) that were given 20 minutes before a non-nutritive viscous paste meal. There were 4 treatment arms, each separated by a 1-week washout period, consisting of (1) the paste alone, (2) a rapidly digesting maltodextrin (Polycose) preload followed by the paste 20 minutes later, (3) an SDC-microsphere preload followed by the paste, and (4) a comparably slower SDC-microsphere preload followed by the paste. A 13 C-labeled octanoic acid breath test method was used to measure gastric emptying, with the label incorporated into the non-nutritive paste. The microspheres were less than 1 mm in diameter (a size that does not require breakdown in the stomach before emptying) and, after cooking, were of the same density value. Compared with the paste alone, both of the SDC-microsphere preloads (slow and comparably slower digesting) decreased gastric emptying rate of the paste, with the latter having the most effect (half-emptying times of 1.7, 2.3, and 2.8 hours, respectively [each different at P<.05]). In conclusion, SDCs decreased gastric emptying rate, and this was suggested to be due to a triggering of the ileal brake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enzymes and Metabolites in Carbohydrate Metabolism of Desiccation Tolerant Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingwei; Song, Xiaomin; Bartels, Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Resurrection plants can tolerate extreme water loss. Substantial sugar accumulation is a phenomenon in resurrection plants during dehydration. Sugars have been identified as one important factor contributing to desiccation tolerance. Phylogenetic diversity of resurrection plants reflects the diversity of sugar metabolism in response to dehydration. Sugars, which accumulate during dehydration, have been shown to protect macromolecules and membranes and to scavenge reactive oxygen species. This review focuses on the performance of enzymes participating in sugar metabolism during dehydration stress. The relation between sugar metabolism and other biochemical activities is discussed and open questions as well as potential experimental approaches are proposed. PMID:28248249

  14. Carbohydrate-active enzymes in Trichoderma harzianum: a bioinformatic analysis bioprospecting for key enzymes for the biofuels industry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Filho, Jaire Alves; Horta, Maria Augusta Crivelente; Beloti, Lilian Luzia; Dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2017-10-12

    Trichoderma harzianum is used in biotechnology applications due to its ability to produce powerful enzymes for the conversion of lignocellulosic substrates into soluble sugars. Active enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism are defined as carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), and the most abundant family in the CAZy database is the glycoside hydrolases. The enzymes of this family play a fundamental role in the decomposition of plant biomass. In this study, the CAZymes of T. harzianum were identified and classified using bioinformatic approaches after which the expression profiles of all annotated CAZymes were assessed via RNA-Seq, and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. A total of 430 CAZymes (3.7% of the total proteins for this organism) were annotated in T. harzianum, including 259 glycoside hydrolases (GHs), 101 glycosyl transferases (GTs), 6 polysaccharide lyases (PLs), 22 carbohydrate esterases (CEs), 42 auxiliary activities (AAs) and 46 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Among the identified T. harzianum CAZymes, 47% were predicted to harbor a signal peptide sequence and were therefore classified as secreted proteins. The GH families were the CAZyme class with the greatest number of expressed genes, including GH18 (23 genes), GH3 (17 genes), GH16 (16 genes), GH2 (13 genes) and GH5 (12 genes). A phylogenetic analysis of the proteins in the AA9/GH61, CE5 and GH55 families showed high functional variation among the proteins. Identifying the main proteins used by T. harzianum for biomass degradation can ensure new advances in the biofuel production field. Herein, we annotated and characterized the expression levels of all of the CAZymes from T. harzianum, which may contribute to future studies focusing on the functional and structural characterization of the identified proteins.

  15. Specific starch digestion of maize alpha-limit dextrins by recombinant mucosal glucosidase enzymes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch digestion requires two luminal enzymes, salivary and pancreatic alpha-amylase (AMY), and four small intestinal mucosal enzyme activities from the N- and C-terminals of maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrose-isomaltase (SI) complexes. AMY is not a requirement for starch digestion to glucose b...

  16. Some enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in Mesocestoides corti and Heterakis spumosa.

    PubMed

    Dubinský, P; Ruscinová, B; Hetmanski, S L; Arme, C; Turceková, L; Rybos, M

    1991-09-01

    The activities of selected enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism were measured in tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides corti and in adult females and males of Heterakis spumosa. When the species were compared, only lactate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activities were considerably higher in M. corti. Activities of other enzymes were higher in H. spumosa, with malate dehydrogenase activity being considerably so. In H. spumosa, enzyme activity was higher, and succinate dehydrogenase markedly so in males, when compared with females. Tetrathyridia aged 170 and 210 days show relatively stable malate and lactate dehydrogenase activities, and mice of ICR and BALB/c strains are suitable for the maintenance of tetrathyridia.

  17. Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Cocinero, Emilio J; Çarçabal, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although carbohydrates represent one of the most important families of biomolecules, they remain under-studied in comparison to the other biomolecular families (peptides, nucleobases). Beyond their best-known function of energy source in living systems, they act as mediator of molecular recognition processes, carrying molecular information in the so-called "sugar code," just to name one of their countless functions. Owing to their high conformational flexibility, they encode extremely rich information conveyed via the non-covalent hydrogen bonds within the carbohydrate and with other biomolecular assemblies, such as peptide subunits of proteins. Over the last decade there has been tremendous progress in the study of the conformational preferences of neutral oligosaccharides, and of the interactions between carbohydrates and various molecular partners (water, aromatic models, and peptide models), using vibrational spectroscopy as a sensitive probe. In parallel, other spectroscopic techniques have recently become available to the study of carbohydrates in the gas phase (microwave spectroscopy, IRMPD on charged species).

  18. An enzyme complex increases in vitro dry matter digestibility of corn and wheat in pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu Ree; Park, Chan Sol; Kim, Beob Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of enzyme complex on in vitro dry matter (DM) digestibility for feed ingredients. The objective of experiment 1 was to screen feed ingredients that can be effective substrates for an enzyme complex, mainly consisted of β-pentosanase, β-glucanase and α-amylase, using in vitro digestibility methods. In experiment 1, the test ingredients were three grain sources (barley, corn and wheat) and six protein supplements (canola meal, copra expellers, cottonseed meal, distillers dried grains with solubles, palm kernel expellers and soybean meal). In vitro ileal and total tract digestibility (IVID and IVTTD, respectively) of DM for test ingredients were determined. In vitro digestibility methods consisted of two- or three-step procedure simulating in vivo digestion in the pig gastrointestinal tracts with or without enzyme complex. As the enzyme complex added, the IVID of DM for corn and wheat increased (p < 0.05) by 5.0 and 2.6 percentage unit, respectively. The IVTTD of DM for corn increased (p < 0.05) by 3.1 percentage unit with enzyme complex addition. As the effect of enzyme complex was the greatest in corn digestibility, corn grains were selected to determine the in vitro digestibility of the fractions (starch, germ, hull and gluten) that maximally respond to the enzyme complex in experiment 2. The IVID of DM for corn starch, germ and hull increased (p < 0.05) by 16.0, 2.8 and 1.2 percentage unit, respectively. The IVTTD of DM for corn starch and hull also increased (p < 0.05) by 8.6 and 0.9 percentage unit, respectively, with enzyme complex addition. In conclusion, the enzyme complex increases in vitro DM digestibility of corn and wheat, and the digestibility increments of corn are mainly attributed to the increased digestibility of corn starch.

  19. Impaired Carbohydrate Digestion and Transport and Mucosal Dysbiosis in the Intestines of Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brent L.; Hornig, Mady; Buie, Timothy; Bauman, Margaret L.; Cho Paik, Myunghee; Wick, Ivan; Bennett, Ashlee; Jabado, Omar; Hirschberg, David L.; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disturbances are commonly reported in children with autism, complicate clinical management, and may contribute to behavioral impairment. Reports of deficiencies in disaccharidase enzymatic activity and of beneficial responses to probiotic and dietary therapies led us to survey gene expression and the mucoepithelial microbiota in intestinal biopsies from children with autism and gastrointestinal disease and children with gastrointestinal disease alone. Ileal transcripts encoding disaccharidases and hexose transporters were deficient in children with autism, indicating impairment of the primary pathway for carbohydrate digestion and transport in enterocytes. Deficient expression of these enzymes and transporters was associated with expression of the intestinal transcription factor, CDX2. Metagenomic analysis of intestinal bacteria revealed compositional dysbiosis manifest as decreases in Bacteroidetes, increases in the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, and increases in Betaproteobacteria. Expression levels of disaccharidases and transporters were associated with the abundance of affected bacterial phylotypes. These results indicate a relationship between human intestinal gene expression and bacterial community structure and may provide insights into the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disturbances in children with autism. PMID:21949732

  20. Impaired carbohydrate digestion and transport and mucosal dysbiosis in the intestines of children with autism and gastrointestinal disturbances.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brent L; Hornig, Mady; Buie, Timothy; Bauman, Margaret L; Cho Paik, Myunghee; Wick, Ivan; Bennett, Ashlee; Jabado, Omar; Hirschberg, David L; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disturbances are commonly reported in children with autism, complicate clinical management, and may contribute to behavioral impairment. Reports of deficiencies in disaccharidase enzymatic activity and of beneficial responses to probiotic and dietary therapies led us to survey gene expression and the mucoepithelial microbiota in intestinal biopsies from children with autism and gastrointestinal disease and children with gastrointestinal disease alone. Ileal transcripts encoding disaccharidases and hexose transporters were deficient in children with autism, indicating impairment of the primary pathway for carbohydrate digestion and transport in enterocytes. Deficient expression of these enzymes and transporters was associated with expression of the intestinal transcription factor, CDX2. Metagenomic analysis of intestinal bacteria revealed compositional dysbiosis manifest as decreases in Bacteroidetes, increases in the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, and increases in Betaproteobacteria. Expression levels of disaccharidases and transporters were associated with the abundance of affected bacterial phylotypes. These results indicate a relationship between human intestinal gene expression and bacterial community structure and may provide insights into the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disturbances in children with autism.

  1. Production of digestive enzymes along the gut of the giant keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata (Mollusca: Vetigastropoda).

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary G; Martin, Alanna; Tsai, Whitney; Hafner, John C

    2011-11-01

    The esophagus and intestine form the longest regions of the digestive tract in the giant keyhole limpet and are lined by epithelial cells sharing a common morphology and releasing materials into the gut lumen by apocrine secretion. The purpose of this study was to determine if these morphologically similar regions release similar digestive enzymes and compare their contributions to digestive enzymes released from other regions of the gut. Principal component analysis of enzymes detected by the API ZYM system for 19 enzymes plus EnzChek assays for protease, α-amylase, lipase, cellulase, and lysozyme identify four distinct regions of the gut: 1) crystalline style and style sac, 2) digestive gland, 3) salivary glands, and 4) esophagus and intestine. Heterogeneity in enzymatic activity was observed in regions of the gut with similar cell morphology (middle and posterior esophagus and intestine) as well as regions with different cell morphology (salivary glands, digestive gland and crystalline style). Enzyme activity in each of these regions is compared to other gastropods, in particular the abalone. Although much of the length of the digestive tract is lined by a morphologically similar epithelium, different regions of the alimentary tract produce a different suite of enzymes which may contribute to the digestive process. These data will help enhance our limited understanding of the digestive physiology of Megathura crenulata and lead to improvement of its culture for clinical research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacteriophage-encoded virion-associated enzymes to overcome the carbohydrate barriers during the infection process.

    PubMed

    Latka, Agnieszka; Maciejewska, Barbara; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Briers, Yves; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-04-01

    Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that infect the host after successful receptor recognition and adsorption to the cell surface. The irreversible adherence followed by genome material ejection into host cell cytoplasm must be preceded by the passage of diverse carbohydrate barriers such as capsule polysaccharides (CPSs), O-polysaccharide chains of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules, extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) forming biofilm matrix, and peptidoglycan (PG) layers. For that purpose, bacteriophages are equipped with various virion-associated carbohydrate active enzymes, termed polysaccharide depolymerases and lysins, that recognize, bind, and degrade the polysaccharide compounds. We discuss the existing diversity in structural locations, variable architectures, enzymatic specificities, and evolutionary aspects of polysaccharide depolymerases and virion-associated lysins (VALs) and illustrate how these aspects can correlate with the host spectrum. In addition, we present methods that can be used for activity determination and the application potential of these enzymes as antibacterials, antivirulence agents, and diagnostic tools.

  3. A Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial of Digestive Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Saad, Khaled; Eltayeb, Azza A; Mohamad, Ismail L; Al-Atram, Abdulrahman A; Elserogy, Yasser; Bjørklund, Geir; El-Houfey, Amira A; Nicholson, Bubba

    2015-08-31

    There is growing evidence for a gut-brain connection associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This suggests a potential benefit from introduced digestive enzymes for children with ASD. We performed a double-blind, randomized clinical trial on 101 children with ASD (82 boys and 19 girls) aged from 3 to 9 years. ASD patients were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria. Structured interviews of at least one hour each both with the parents and the child were performed. Later on, another two hours-session was conducted applying the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). ASD patients were randomized to receive digestive enzymes or placebo. The ASD group receiving digestive enzyme therapy for 3 months had significant improvement in emotional response, general impression autistic score, general behavior and gastrointestinal symptoms. Our study demonstrated the usefulness of digestive enzyme in our population of ASD patients. Digestive enzymes are inexpensive, readily available, have an excellent safety profile, and have mildly beneficial effects in ASD patients. Depending on the parameter measured in our study, we propose digestive enzymes for managing symptoms of ASD. Digestive enzyme therapy may be a possible option in treatment protocols for ASD in the future.

  4. Effects of different sources of carbohydrates on intake, digestibility, chewing, and performance of Holstein dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of different sources of carbohydrates on intake, digestibility, chewing, and performance, nine lactating Holstein dairy cows (day in milk= 100±21 d; body weight=645.7 ± 26.5 kg) were allotted to a 3 × 3 Latin square design at three 23-d periods. The three treatments included 34.91% (B), 18.87% (BC), and 18.86% (BB) barley that in treatment B was partially replaced with only corn or corn plus beet pulp in treatments BC and BB, respectively. The concentration of starch and neutral detergent soluble carbohydrate varied (22.2, 20.2, and 14.5; 13.6, 15.9, and 20.1% of DM in treatments B, BC, and BB, respectively). Cows in treatment BB showed a higher DMI and improved digestibility of DM, NDF, and EE compared with treatments B or BC. Ruminal pH was higher in cows fed on BB (6.83) compared with those that received B or BC treatments (6.62 and 6.73, respectively). A lower proportion of propionate accompanied the higher pH in the BB group; however, a greater proportion of acetate and acetate: propionate ratio was observed compared with cows fed either on the B or BC diet. Moreover, cows fed on the BB diet showed the lowest ruminal passage rate and longest ruminal and total retention time. Eating time did not differ among treatments, rumination time was greater among cows fed on the BB diet compared with the others, whereas total chewing activity was greater than those fed on BC, but similar to those fed on B. The treatments showed no effect on milk yield. Partially replacing barley with corn or beet pulp resulted in an increase in milk fat and a lower protein concentration. Changing dietary NFC with that of a different degradability thus altered intake, chewing activity, ruminal environment, retention time or passage rate, and lactation performance. The results of this study showed that beet pulp with a higher NDF and a detergent-soluble carbohydrate or pectin established a more consistent ruminal mat than barley and corn, thus resulting in

  5. Effects of low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets on apparent digestibility of minerals and trace elements in rats.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, Lena; Bielohuby, Maximilian; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Menhofer, Dominik; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Kienzle, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Ketogenic low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LCHF) diets reduce growth and bone mineral density in children with epilepsy and in rats. Part of this effect might be due to a reduced availability of calcium in high-fat diets. The aim of this study was to determine mineral digestibility by total collection method in LCHF diets compared with a chow diet and a standard high-fat diet (HFD, high in fat and carbohydrates). Twelve-wk-old male Wistar rats were pair-fed isoenergetic amounts of either six different LCHF diets based on tallow and casein (crude fat 75%-50%, crude protein 10%-35%), with chow or with a HFD diet. Mineral-to-energy ratio was matched in all diets. Circulating parathyroid hormone was measured by immunoassay. The apparent digestibility of calcium was reduced in all HFDs (high-fat diets, LCHF diets and the HFD diet) by at least 30% compared with the chow diet (P < 0.001). Fecal calcium excretion correlated positively with fecal fat excretion, presumably because of formation of calcium soaps. Apparent digestibility of phosphorous was higher in all HFDs. This resulted in a decrease of the ratio of apparently digested calcium to apparently digested phosphorous in all HFDs below a ratio of 1:1. Plasma parathyroid hormone was not affected by any diet. The alteration of apparent calcium and phosphorus digestibility may affect the impact of HFDs on bone metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Digestibility of fucosylated glycosaminoglycan from sea cucumber and its effects on digestive enzymes under simulated salivary and gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Longyan; Qin, Yujing; Guan, Ruowei; Zheng, Wenqi; Liu, Jikai; Zhao, Jinhua

    2018-04-15

    The digestibility of fucosylated glycosaminoglycan (FG) and its effects on digestive enzymes were investigated using an in vitro digestion model. Results showed that the molecular weight and the reducing sugar content of FG were not significantly changed, and no free monosaccharides released from FG were detected after the salivary, gastric and intestinal digestion, indicating that both the backbone and the sulfated fucose branches of FG are resistant to be cleaved in the saliva and gastrointestinal tract environments. Furthermore, FG can dose-dependently inhibit digestive enzymes such as α-amylase, pepsin and pancreatic lipase in different degrees under the simulated digestion conditions due to the sulfate and carboxyl groups. These physiological effects of FG may help control the postprandial glucose concentration and have the potential in the prevention or treatment of reflux disease and obesity. The findings may provide information on the digestibility and beneficial physiological effects of FG as a potential natural product to promote human health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of dietary Pb on accumulation, histopathology, and digestive enzyme activities in the digestive system of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Du, Huahua; Fu, Linglin; Jin, Chengguan; Xu, Zirong; Liu, Huitao

    2009-02-01

    With the increasing occurrence of dietary lead (Pb) contamination in aquatic environment, threat of the dietary Pb toxicity to aquatic organisms attracted more attention. In this study, after being exposed to dietary Pb at concentrations of 0, 100, 400, and 800-microg/g dry weight for 60 days, the groups of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were sacrificed and sampled to analyze the effects of dietary Pb on accumulation, histopathology, and digestive enzyme activities in tissues of the digestive system. The results showed that the Pb accumulation in tissues increased with the dietary Pb concentrations. Moreover, Pb accumulated in sampled tissues in the following order: intestine > stomach > liver. By observation of liver histological sections in optical microscope, lesions could be detected in the Pb-contaminated groups. It was also demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of dietary Pb on digestive enzyme activities was dietary Pb concentration dependent. Different degrees of inhibition of enzyme activities were exhibited in sampled tissues. It was indicated that digestive enzyme activities in the digestive system might be considered as the potential biomarkers of dietary Pb contamination in tilapia.

  8. Monoterpenes as inhibitors of digestive enzymes and counter-adaptations in a specialist avian herbivore.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Pitman, Elizabeth; Robb, Brecken C; Connelly, John W; Dearing, M Denise; Forbey, Jennifer Sorensen

    2015-05-01

    Many plants produce plant secondary metabolites (PSM) that inhibit digestive enzymes of herbivores, thus limiting nutrient availability. In response, some specialist herbivores have evolved digestive enzymes that are resistant to inhibition. Monoterpenes, a class of PSMs, have not been investigated with respect to the interference of specific digestive enzymes, nor have such interactions been studied in avian herbivores. We investigated this interaction in the Greater Sage-Grouse (Phasianidae: Centrocercus urophasianus), which specializes on monoterpene-rich sagebrush species (Artemisia spp.). We first measured the monoterpene concentrations in gut contents of free-ranging sage-grouse. Next, we compared the ability of seven individual monoterpenes present in sagebrush to inhibit a protein-digesting enzyme, aminopeptidase-N. We also measured the inhibitory effects of PSM extracts from two sagebrush species. Inhibition of aminopeptidase-N in sage-grouse was compared to inhibition in chickens (Gallus gallus). We predicted that sage-grouse enzymes would retain higher activity when incubated with isolated monoterpenes or sagebrush extracts than chicken enzymes. We detected unchanged monoterpenes in the gut contents of free-ranging sage-grouse. We found that three isolated oxygenated monoterpenes (borneol, camphor, and 1,8-cineole) inhibited digestive enzymes of both bird species. Camphor and 1,8-cineole inhibited enzymes from chickens more than from sage-grouse. Extracts from both species of sagebrush had similar inhibition of chicken enzymes, but did not inhibit sage-grouse enzymes. These results suggest that specific monoterpenes may limit the protein digestibility of plant material by avian herbivores. Further, this work presents additional evidence that adaptations of digestive enzymes to plant defensive compounds may be a trait of specialist herbivores.

  9. Effect of evening exposure to dim or bright light on the digestion of carbohydrate in the supper meal.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Naoko; Sone, Yoshiaki; Tokura, Hiromi

    2003-09-01

    In a previous study we found that daytime exposure to bright as compared to dim light exerted a beneficial effect on the digestion of the evening meal. This finding prompted us to examine whether the digestion of the evening meal is also affected by evening light intensity. Subjects lived in light of 200 lux during the daytime (08:00-17:00 h) and took their evening meal at 17:00 h under 20 lux (evening dim-light condition: 17:00-02:00 h) or 2000 lux (evening bright-light condition: 17:00-02:00 h) until retiring at 02:00 h. Assessment of carbohydrate digestion of the evening meal was accomplished by a breath hydrogen test that is indicative of the malabsorption of dietary carbohydrate. Hydrogen excretion in the breath in the evening under the dim-light condition was significantly less than under the bright-light condition (p < 0.05). This finding is the opposite to that obtained in previous experiments in which subjects were exposed to the different intensities of light during the daytime, and indicates that the exposure to dim light in the evening exerts a better effect on carbohydrate digestion in the evening meal than does the exposure to bright light.

  10. Profiles of digestive enzymes of two competing planktivores, silver carp and gizzard shad, differ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amberg, Jon J.; Jensen, Nathan R.; Erickson, Richard A.; Sauey, Blake W.; Jackson, Craig

    2018-01-01

    Typically, studies in digestive physiology in fish focus on a few enzymes and provide insight into the specific processes of the enzyme in a targeted species. Comparative studies assessing a wide number of digestive enzymes on fishes that compete for food resources are lacking, especially in the context of an introduced species. It is generally thought that the invasive silver carp (SVC; Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) directly compete for food resources with the native gizzard shad (GZS; Dorosoma cepedianum) in waters where they coexist. We compared 19 digestive enzymes between SVC and GZS throughout a year and in two rivers in the Midwestern United States: Illinois River and Wabash River. All digestive enzymes analyzed were detected in both SVC and GZS in both rivers. However, the profiles of the digestive enzymes varied by species. Alkaline phosphatase, valine arylamidase, acid phosphatase, naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase were all much higher in SVC than in GZS. Differences between digestive enzyme profiles were also observed between rivers and months. This study demonstrates the utility of using an ecological approach to compare physiological features in fishes.

  11. THE SECRETION OF DIGESTIVE ENZYMES AND CAECAL SIZE ARE DETERMINED BY DIETARY PROTEIN IN THE CRICKET Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Woodring, Joseph; Weidlich, Sandy

    2016-11-01

    In Gryllus bimaculatus, the size of the caecum decreases in the latter half of each instar to a stable minimal size with a steady minimal rate of digestive enzyme secretion until feeding resumes after ecdysis. The higher the percent protein in the newly ingested food, the faster and larger the caecum grows, and as a consequent the higher the secretion rate of trypsin and amylase. When hard boiled eggs (40% protein) are eaten the caecum is 2× larger, the trypsin secretion is almost 3× greater, and amylase 2.5× greater then when fed the same amount of apples (1.5% protein). Only dietary protein increases amylase secretion, whereas dietary carbohydrates have no effect on amylase secretion. The minimal caecal size and secretion rate must be supported by utilization of hemolymph amino acids, but the growth of the caecum and increasing enzymes secretions after the molt depend upon an amino acid source in the lumen. This simple regulation of digestive enzyme secretion is ideal for animals that must stop feeding in order to molt. This basic control system does not preclude additional regulation mechanisms, such as prandal, which is also indicated for G. bimaculatus, or even paramonal regulation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Improved starch digestion of sucrase deficient shrews treated with oral glucoamylase enzyme supplements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although named because of its sucrose hydrolytic activity, this mucosal enzyme plays a leading role in starch digestion because of its maltase and glucoamylase activities. Sucrase deficient mutant shrews, Suncus murinus, were used as a model to investigate starch digestion in patients with Congenita...

  13. Bacillus Probiotic Enzymes: External Auxiliary Apparatus to Avoid Digestive Deficiencies, Water Pollution, Diseases, and Economic Problems in Marine Cultivated Animals.

    PubMed

    Olmos Soto, Jorge

    Exploitation of marine fishes is the main source of several life-supporting feed compounds such as proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates that maintain the production of most trading marine organisms by aquaculture. However, at this rate the marine inventory will go to the end soon, since fishery resources are finite. In this sense, the availability of the principal ingredients obtained from marine fishes is going to decrease considerably, increasing the diet prices and affecting the economy of this activity. Therefore, aquaculture industry needs to find nonexpensive land unconventional resources of protein, carbohydrates, and lipids and use bacterial probiotics to improve digestion-assimilation of these unfamiliar compounds. Bacillus subtilis is a cosmopolitan probiotic bacterium with a great enzymatic profile that could improve nutrient digestion-assimilation, induce healthy growth, and avoid water pollution, decreasing economic problems and increasing yields in the aquaculture industry. In this chapter, we present how Bacillus enzymes can help marine animals to assimilate nutrients from unconventional and economic plant resources. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effectiveness of dietary sunflower meal and exogenous enzyme on growth, digestive enzymes, carcass traits, and blood chemistry of broilers.

    PubMed

    Alagawany, Mahmoud; Attia, Adel I; Ibrahim, Zenat A; Mahmoud, Reda A; El-Sayed, Sabry A

    2017-05-01

    High costs of conventional protein feed sources including soybean meal (SBM) generated the need for finding other alternatives. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate the impact of graded replacements of SBM by sunflower seed meal (SFM) with or without enzyme supplementation on growth performance, digestive enzymes, carcass traits, and blood profile of broiler chickens. A total of 240 unsexed 1-week-old broiler chicks (Hubbard) were randomly divided into eight treatment groups of 30 chicks each in five replicates each of six chicks in a factorial design (4 × 2) arrangement, including four levels of SFM (0, 25, 50, and 75% replacing SBM) and two levels of enzyme (0- or 0.1-g/kg diet) supplementation. Performance traits including feed conversion ratio, body weight, and weight gain were significantly (P < 0.01) improved with increasing SFM up to 50% substitution for SBM or with enzyme supplementation in broiler diet during the experiment. However, feed intake of broiler chicks was decreased with enzyme supplementation (P < 0.05). The activities of digestive enzymes (protease and amylase) were significantly (P < 0.05) influenced and enhanced by SFM and enzyme inclusion in diets, respectively. The activities of protease and amylase were improved with SFM diet supplemented with 0.1 g/kg enzyme in comparison with those with the un-supplemented diet. The evaluated carcass traits were not statistically (P > 0.05) influenced by feeding SFM meal or enzyme addition. Biochemical blood parameters were significantly (P < 0.01) affected by SFM, enzyme, or their interaction in broiler diets, except for globulin that was not affected by dietary enzyme. It is concluded that increasing SFM level in the diet up to 50% replacing SBM with the supplementation of enzyme improved the growth performance and enhanced positively carcass traits as well as the activity of digestive enzymes in broiler chickens.

  15. Digestive enzyme activities in the guts of bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo) provide insight into their digestive strategy and evidence for microbial digestion in their hindguts.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Parth; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; German, Donovan P

    2015-11-01

    Few investigations have studied digestive enzyme activities in the alimentary tracts of sharks to gain insight into how these organisms digest their meals. In this study, we examined the activity levels of proteases, carbohydrases, and lipase in the pancreas, and along the anterior intestine, spiral intestine, and colon of the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo. We then interpreted our data in the context of a rate-yield continuum to discern this shark's digestive strategy. Our data show anticipated decreasing patterns in the activities of pancreatic enzymes moving posteriorly along the gut, but also show mid spiral intestine peaks in aminopeptidase and lipase activities, which support the spiral intestine as the main site of absorption in bonnetheads. Interestingly, we observed spikes in the activity levels of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase in the bonnethead colon, and these chitin- and cellulose-degrading enzymes, respectively, are likely of microbial origin in this distal gut region. Taken in the context of intake and relatively long transit times of food through the gut, the colonic spikes in N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase activities suggest that bonnetheads take a yield-maximizing strategy to the digestive process, with some reliance on microbial digestion in their hindguts. This is one of the first studies to examine digestive enzyme activities along the gut of any shark, and importantly, the data match with previous observations that sharks take an extended time to digest their meals (consistent with a yield-maximizing digestive strategy) and that the spiral intestine is the primary site of absorption in sharks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Co-digestion of municipal sewage sludge and solid waste: modelling of carbohydrate, lipid and protein content influence.

    PubMed

    Nielfa, A; Cano, R; Pérez, A; Fdez-Polanco, M

    2015-03-01

    Solid wastes from industrial, commercial and community activities are of growing concern as the total volume of waste produced continues to increase. The knowledge of the specific composition and characteristics of the waste is an important tool in the correct development of the anaerobic digestion process. The problems derived from the anaerobic digestion of sole substrates with high lipid, carbohydrate or protein content lead to the co-digestion of these substrates with another disposed waste, such as sewage sludge. The kinetic of the anaerobic digestion is especially difficult to explain adequately, although some mathematical models are able to represent the main aspects of a biological system, thus improving understanding of the parameters involved in the process. The aim of this work is to evaluate the experimental biochemical methane potential on the co-digestion of sewage sludge with different solid wastes (grease; spent grain and cow manure) through the implementation of four kinetic models. The co-digestion of grease waste and mixed sludge obtained the best improvements from the sole substrates, with additional positive synergistic effects. The Gompertz model fits the experimental biochemical methane potential to an accuracy of 99%, showing a correlation between the percentage of lipid in the substrates and co-digestions and the period of lag phase. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Ineffective Degradation of Immunogenic Gluten Epitopes by Currently Available Digestive Enzyme Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, George; Christis, Chantal; Kooy-Winkelaar, Yvonne; Edens, Luppo; Smith, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the high proline content of gluten molecules, gastrointestinal proteases are unable to fully degrade them leaving large proline-rich gluten fragments intact, including an immunogenic 33-mer from α-gliadin and a 26-mer from γ-gliadin. These latter peptides can trigger pro-inflammatory T cell responses resulting in tissue remodeling, malnutrition and a variety of other complications. A strict lifelong gluten-free diet is currently the only available treatment to cope with gluten intolerance. Post-proline cutting enzymes have been shown to effectively degrade the immunogenic gluten peptides and have been proposed as oral supplements. Several existing digestive enzyme supplements also claim to aid in gluten degradation. Here we investigate the effectiveness of such existing enzyme supplements in comparison with a well characterized post-proline cutting enzyme, Prolyl EndoPeptidase from Aspergillus niger (AN-PEP). Methods Five commercially available digestive enzyme supplements along with purified digestive enzymes were subjected to 1) enzyme assays and 2) mass spectrometric identification. Gluten epitope degradation was monitored by 1) R5 ELISA, 2) mass spectrometric analysis of the degradation products and 3) T cell proliferation assays. Findings The digestive enzyme supplements showed comparable proteolytic activities with near neutral pH optima and modest gluten detoxification properties as determined by ELISA. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of many different enzymes including amylases and a variety of different proteases with aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase activity. The enzyme supplements leave the nine immunogenic epitopes of the 26-mer and 33-mer gliadin fragments largely intact. In contrast, the pure enzyme AN-PEP effectively degraded all nine epitopes in the pH range of the stomach at much lower dose. T cell proliferation assays confirmed the mass spectrometric data. Conclusion Currently available digestive enzyme

  18. Polymorphism and partial characterization of digestive enzymes in the spiny lobster Panulirus argus.

    PubMed

    Perera, Erick; Moyano, F J; Díaz, M; Perdomo-Morales, R; Montero-Alejo, V; Alonso, E; Carrillo, O; Galich, G S

    2008-07-01

    We characterized major digestive enzymes in Panulirus argus using a combination of biochemical assays and substrate-(SDS or native)-PAGE. Protease and amylase activities were found in the gastric juice while esterase and lipase activities were higher in the digestive gland. Trypsin-like activity was higher than chymotrypsin-like activity in the gastric juice and digestive gland. Stability and optimal conditions for digestive enzyme activities were examined under different pHs, temperature and ionic strength. The use of protease inhibitors showed the prevalence of serine proteases and metalloproteases. Results for serine proteases were corroborated by zymograms where several isotrypsins-like (17-21 kDa) and isochymotrypsin-like enzymes (23-38 kDa) were identified. Amylases (38-47 kDa) were detected in zymograms and a complex array of non-specific esterases isoenzymes was found in the digestive gland. Isoenzyme polymorphism was found for trypsin, amylase, and esterase. This study is the first to evidence the biochemical bases of the plasticity in feeding habits of P. argus. Distribution and properties of enzymes provided some indication on how the digestion takes place and constitute baseline data for further studies on the digestion physiology of spiny lobsters.

  19. Effect of water quality and confounding factors on digestive enzyme activities in Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Charron, L; Geffard, O; Chaumot, A; Coulaud, R; Queau, H; Geffard, A; Dedourge-Geffard, O

    2013-12-01

    The feeding activity and subsequent assimilation of the products resulting from food digestion allow organisms to obtain energy for growth, maintenance and reproduction. Among these biological parameters, we studied digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase and trypsin) in Gammarus fossarum to assess the impact of contaminants on their access to energy resources. However, to enable objective assessment of a toxic effect of decreased water quality on an organisms' digestive capacity, it is necessary to establish reference values based on its natural variability as a function of changing biotic and abiotic factors. To limit the confounding influence of biotic factors, a caging approach with calibrated male organisms from the same population was used. This study applied an in situ deployment at 23 sites of the Rhone basin rivers, complemented by a laboratory experiment assessing the influence of two abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity). The results showed a small effect of conductivity on cellulase activity and a significant effect of temperature on digestive enzyme activity but only at the lowest temperature (7 °C). The experimental conditions allowed us to define an environmental reference value for digestive enzyme activities to select sites where the quality of the water impacted the digestive capacity of the organisms. In addition to the feeding rate, this study showed the relevance of digestive enzymes as biomarkers to be used as an early warning tool to reflect organisms' health and the chemical quality of aquatic ecosystems.

  20. [Exo- and endosecretive digestive glands of enzymes as modulators of secretion].

    PubMed

    Korot'ko, G F

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes, exosecreted by the digestive glands plays not only a role of the hydrolases, but also an informational and modulating role in the urgent adaptation of the enzyme secretion to the structure and properties of the luminal content of the gastrointestinal tract. Endosecreted enzymes in the blood not only inform about enzymatic condition of the hydrolase-producing glands and duct system, but also plays an informational and modulating role by the inhibition of the secretion of the same enzymes, and by the stimulation of the secretion of the heteronymic enzyme, defines a parity of their secretion and recretion, integrates enzyme secretion of the pancreas and gastric glands.

  1. Improved Starch Digestion of Sucrase-deficient Shrews Treated With Oral Glucoamylase Enzyme Supplements.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Buford L; Avery, Stephen E; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Kilani, Shadi B; Lin, Amy Hui-Mei; Burrin, Douglas G; Hodges, Benjamin E; Chacko, Shaji K; Opekun, Antone R; Hindawy, Marwa El; Hamaker, Bruce R; Oda, Sen-Ichi

    2017-08-01

    Although named because of its sucrose hydrolytic activity, this mucosal enzyme plays a leading role in starch digestion because of its maltase and glucoamylase activities. Sucrase-deficient mutant shrews, Suncus murinus, were used as a model to investigate starch digestion in patients with congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency.Starch digestion is much more complex than sucrose digestion. Six enzyme activities, 2 α-amylases (Amy), and 4 mucosal α-glucosidases (maltases), including maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) and sucrase-isomaltase (Si) subunit activities, are needed to digest starch to absorbable free glucose. Amy breaks down insoluble starch to soluble dextrins; mucosal Mgam and Si can either directly digest starch to glucose or convert the post-α-amylolytic dextrins to glucose. Starch digestion is reduced because of sucrase deficiency and oral glucoamylase enzyme supplement can correct the starch maldigestion. The aim of the present study was to measure glucogenesis in suc/suc shrews after feeding of starch and improvement of glucogenesis by oral glucoamylase supplements. Sucrase mutant (suc/suc) and heterozygous (+/suc) shrews were fed with C-enriched starch diets. Glucogenesis derived from starch was measured as blood C-glucose enrichment and oral recombinant C-terminal Mgam glucoamylase (M20) was supplemented to improve starch digestion. After feedings, suc/suc and +/suc shrews had different starch digestions as shown by blood glucose enrichment and the suc/suc had lower total glucose concentrations. Oral supplements of glucoamylase increased suc/suc total blood glucose and quantitative starch digestion to glucose. Sucrase deficiency, in this model of congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency, reduces blood glucose response to starch feeding. Supplementing the diet with oral recombinant glucoamylase significantly improved starch digestion in the sucrase-deficient shrew.

  2. Effect of enzyme supplements on macronutrient digestibility by healthy adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Cecilia; Manzanilla, Edgar G; Molina, Jenifer; Larsen, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    Some enzyme supplement products claim benefits for healthy dogs to compensate for alleged suboptimal production of endogenous enzymes and the loss of enzymes in commercial pet foods secondary to processing. The objective of the current study was to determine macronutrient and energy digestibility by healthy adult dogs fed a commercial maintenance diet with or without supplementation with plant- and animal-origin enzyme products at the dosage recommended by their respective manufacturers. A group of fourteen healthy neutered adult Beagle dogs (average age 8 years) was divided into two equal groups and fed the basal diet alone and then with either the plant- or animal-origin enzyme supplement in three consecutive 10-d periods; the treatment groups received the opposite enzyme supplement in the third period. Digestibility in each period was performed by the total faecal collection method. Serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) was measured at the end of each trial. Data were analysed by repeated measures and the α level of significance was set at 0·05. There were no differences in energy and nutrient digestibility between enzyme treatments. When comparing basal with enzyme supplementation, fat digestibility was higher for the basal diet compared with the animal-origin enzyme treatment, which could be a period effect and was not biologically significant (94·7 v . 93·5 %). Serum TLI was not affected by supplementation with either enzyme product. Exogenous enzyme supplementation did not significantly increase digestibility of a typical commercial dry diet in healthy adult dogs and routine use of such products is not recommended.

  3. Construction of a high-performance magnetic enzyme nanosystem for rapid tryptic digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-11-01

    A magnetic enzyme nanosystem have been designed and constructed by a polydopamine (PDA)-modification strategy. The magnetic enzyme nanosystem has well defined core-shell structure and a relatively high saturation magnetization (Ms) value of 48.3 emu g-1. The magnetic enzyme system can realize rapid, efficient and reusable tryptic digestion of proteins by taking advantage of its magnetic core and biofunctional shell. Various standard proteins (e.g. cytochrome C (Cyt-C), myoglobin (MYO) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) have been used to evaluate the effectiveness of the magnetic enzyme nanosystem. The results show that the magnetic enzyme nanosystem can digest the proteins in 30 minutes, and the results are comparable to conventional 12 hours in-solution digestion. Furthermore, the magnetic enzyme nanosystem is also effective in the digestion of low-concentration proteins, even at as low as 5 ng μL-1 substrate concentration. Importantly, the system can be reused several times, and has excellent stability for storage. Therefore, this work will be highly beneficial for the rapid digestion and identification of proteins in future proteomics.

  4. Molecular characterization of genes encoding trypsin-like enzymes from Aedes aegypti larvae and identification of digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Soares, Tatiane S; Watanabe, Renata M O; Lemos, Francisco J A; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2011-12-10

    Trypsin-like enzymes play an important role in the Aedes aegypti digestive process. The trypsin-like enzymes present in adults were characterized previously, but little is known about trypsins in larvae. In the present work, we identified one of the trypsin enzymes from Ae. aegypti larval midgut using a library of trypsin gene fragments, which was the sequence known as AAEL005607 from the Ae. aegypti genome. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that AAEL005607 was transcribed in all larval instars, but it was not present in adult midgut. In order to confirm transcription data, the trypsin-like enzymes from 4th instar larvae of Ae. aegypti midgut were purified and sequenced. Purified trypsin showed identity with the amino-terminal sequence of AAEL005607, AAEL005609 and AAEL005614. These three trypsins have high amino acids identity, and could all be used as a template for the design of inhibitors. In conclusion, for the first time, digestive enzymes of 4th larval instar of Ae. aegypti were purified and characterized. The knowledge of digestive enzymes present in Ae. aegypti larvae may be helpful in the development of a larvicide. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Screening exogenous fibrolytic enzyme preparations for improved in vitro digestibility of bermudagrass haylage.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Zarate, M A; Arriola, K G; Gonzalez, C F; Silva-Sanchez, C; Staples, C R; Adesogan, A T

    2015-04-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of 12 exogenous fibrolytic enzyme products (EFE) on ruminal in vitro neutral detergent fiber digestibility (NDFD) and preingestive hydrolysis of a 4-wk regrowth of bermudagrass haylage (BH), to examine the accuracy of predicting NDFD with EFE activity measures, and to examine the protein composition of the most and least effective EFE at increasing NDFD. In experiment 1, effects of 12 EFE on NDFD of BH were tested. Enzymes were applied in quadruplicate to culture tubes containing ground BH. The suspension was incubated for 24 h at 25 °C before addition of rumen fluid media and further incubation for 24 h at 39 °C. The experiment was repeated twice. In addition, regression relationships between EFE activity measures and NDFD were examined. Compared with the values for the control, 9 EFE-treated substrates had greater NDFD (37.8 to 40.4 vs. 35.6%), 6 had greater total VFA concentration (59.1 to 61.2 vs. 55.4 mM), and 4 had lower acetate-to-propionate ratios (3.03 to 3.16 vs. 3.24). In experiment 2, EFE effects on preingestive fiber hydrolysis were evaluated by incubating enzyme-treated and untreated bermudagrass suspensions in quadruplicate for 24 h at 25 °C and examining fiber hydrolysis measures. Compared with values for the control, 3 EFE reduced neutral detergent fiber concentration (62.8 to 63.7 vs. 67.3%), 10 increased release of water-soluble carbohydrates (26.8 to 58.5 vs. 22.8 mg/g), and 8 increased release of ferulic acid (210 to 391 vs. 198 μg/g). Regression analyses revealed that enzyme activities accurately [coefficient of determination (R(2)) = 0.98] predicted preingestive hydrolysis measures (water-soluble carbohydrates, ferulic acid), moderately (R(2) = 0.47) predicted neutral detergent fiber hydrolysis, but poorly (R(2) ≤ 0.1) predicted dry matter and NDFD. In experiment 3, proteomic tools were used to examine the protein composition of the most and least effective EFE at improving NDFD. Relative to

  6. Discovery of digestive enzymes in carnivorous plants with focus on proteases.

    PubMed

    Ravee, Rishiesvari; Mohd Salleh, Faris 'Imadi; Goh, Hoe-Han

    2018-01-01

    Carnivorous plants have been fascinating researchers with their unique characters and bioinspired applications. These include medicinal trait of some carnivorous plants with potentials for pharmaceutical industry. This review will cover recent progress based on current studies on digestive enzymes secreted by different genera of carnivorous plants: Drosera (sundews), Dionaea (Venus flytrap) , Nepenthes (tropical pitcher plants), Sarracenia (North American pitcher plants) , Cephalotus (Australian pitcher plants) , Genlisea (corkscrew plants) , and Utricularia (bladderworts). Since the discovery of secreted protease nepenthesin in Nepenthes pitcher, digestive enzymes from carnivorous plants have been the focus of many studies. Recent genomics approaches have accelerated digestive enzyme discovery. Furthermore, the advancement in recombinant technology and protein purification helped in the identification and characterisation of enzymes in carnivorous plants. These different aspects will be described and discussed in this review with focus on the role of secreted plant proteases and their potential industrial applications.

  7. Computational Glycobiology: Mechanistic Studies of Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes and Implication for Inhibitor Design.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Andrew P; Xiao, Kela; Wang, Xingyong; Skropeta, Danielle; Yu, Haibo

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) are families of essential and structurally related enzymes, which catalyze the creation, modification, and degradation of glycosidic bonds in carbohydrates to maintain essentially all kingdoms of life. CAZymes play a key role in many biological processes underpinning human health and diseases (e.g., cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's diseases, AIDS) and have thus emerged as important drug targets in the fight against pathogenesis. The realization of the full potential of CAZymes remains a significant challenge, relying on a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of catalysis. Considering numerous unsettled questions in the literature, while with a large amount of structural, kinetic, and mutagenesis data available for CAZymes, there is a pressing need and an abundant opportunity for collaborative computational and experimental investigations with the aim to unlock the secrets of CAZyme catalysis at an atomic level. In this review, we briefly survey key methodology development in computational studies of CAZyme catalysis. This is complemented by selected case studies highlighting mechanistic insights provided by computational glycobiology. Implication for inhibitor design by mimicking the transition state is also illustrated for both glycoside hydrolases and glycosyltransferases. The challenges for such studies will be noted and finally an outlook for future directions will be provided. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrastructure and immunolocalization of digestive enzymes in the midgut of Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Fialho, Maria do Carmo Q; Terra, Walter R; Moreira, Nathália R; Zanuncio, José C; Serrão, Jose Eduardo

    2013-07-01

    The predatory stinkbug Podisus nigrispinus has been utilized in biological control programs. Its midgut is anatomically divided into anterior, middle and posterior regions, which play different roles in the digestive process. We describe the midgut ultrastructure and the secretion of digestive enzymes in the midgut of P. nigrispinus. Midguts were analyzed with transmission electron microscopy and the digestive enzymes amylase, cathepsin L, aminopeptidase and α-glucosidase were immunolocalized. The ultrastructural features of the digestive cells in the anterior, middle and posterior midgut regions suggest that they play a role in digestive enzyme synthesis, ion and nutrient absorption, storage and excretion. The digestive enzymes have different distribution along the midgut regions of the predator P. nigrispinus. Amylase, aminopeptidase and α-glucosidase occur in three midgut regions, whereas cathepsin L occurs in the middle and posterior midgut regions. The anterior midgut region of P. nigrispinus seems to play a role in water absorption, the middle midgut may be involved in nutrient absorption and the posterior midgut region is responsible for water transport to the midgut lumen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Digestibility of carbohydrates from rice-, oat- and wheat-based ready-to-eat breakfast cereals in children.

    PubMed

    Brighenti, F; Casiraghi, M C; Ciappellano, S; Crovetti, R; Testolin, G

    1994-09-01

    To study the effect of the presence and quality of dietary fibre in ready-to-eat (RTE) breakfast cereals on completeness of carbohydrate digestion in children and on starch susceptibility to alpha-amylase in vitro. A controlled intervention study. Eight 3-8-year-old healthy children. Completeness of digestion was evaluated by assessing the amount of carbohydrates apparently fermented into the colon using the breath-H2 technique after consumption in random order, of five breakfast tests containing boiled rice (either alone or supplemented with 3 g of lactulose) as reference food, or RTE cereals based on rice (low-fibre), wheat (high insoluble fibre) and oats (high-soluble fibre). The potential glycaemic impact of the products was estimated in vitro by assessing starch susceptibility to alpha-amylolysis using an enzymatic-dialysis method. Compared to boiled rice and to rice-based RTE cereal, wheat- and oat-based RTE cereals both significantly (P < 0.05) increased the amount of apparently fermented carbohydrates (+1.1 +/- 1.7% of total breakfast carbohydrate fermented for rice, +5.6 +/- 0.9% for wheat and +9.4 +/- 3.7% for oats; mean +/- SEM), calculated using the excess H2 in breath after lactulose as standard. All products showed similar in vitro digestibility, resulting in estimated glycaemic indexes of 117.5 (24.0) for rice, and 105.7 (14.1) for oats-based, 128.4 (17.6) for wheat-based, and 129.8 (16.6) [mean 95% CI)] for rice-based RTE cereals. Results suggest that the presence of fibre in RTE breakfast cereals, in particular soluble fibre, increases colonic fermentation in children whereas it seems not to affect glucose availability.

  10. Carbohydrate composition and in vitro digestibility of dry matter and nonstarch polysaccharides in corn, sorghum, and wheat and coproducts from these grains.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, N W; Lærke, H N; Bach Knudsen, K E; Stein, H H

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this work were to determine carbohydrate composition and in vitro digestibility of DM and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) in corn, wheat, and sorghum and coproducts from these grains. In the initial part of this work, the carbohydrate composition of 12 feed ingredients was determined. The 12 ingredients included 3 grains (corn, sorghum, and wheat), 3 coproducts from the dry grind industry (corn distillers dried grains with solubles [DDGS] and 2 sources of sorghum DDGS), 4 coproducts from the wet milling industry (corn gluten meal, corn gluten feed, corn germ meal, and corn bran), and 2 coproducts from the flour milling industry (wheat middlings and wheat bran). Results indicated that grains contained more starch and less NSP compared with grain coproducts. The concentration of soluble NSP was low in all ingredients. Cellulose, arabinoxylans, and other hemicelluloses made up approximately 22, 49, and 29% (DM basis), respectively, of the NSP in corn and corn coproducts and approximately 25, 43, and 32% (DM basis), respectively, of the NSP in sorghum and sorghum DDGS. Cellulose, arabinoxylans, and other hemicelluloses made up approximately 16, 64, and 20% (DM basis), respectively, of the NSP in wheat and wheat coproducts. The concentration of lignin in grains was between 0.8 and 1.8% (DM basis), whereas coproducts contained between 2.2 and 11.5% lignin (DM basis). The in vitro ileal digestibility of NSP was close to zero or negative for all feed ingredients, indicating that pepsin and pancreas enzymes have no effect on in vitro degradation of NSP. A strong negative correlation ( = 0.97) between in vitro ileal digestibility of DM and the concentration of NSP in feed ingredients was observed. In vitro total tract digestibility of NSP ranged from 6.5% in corn bran to 57.3% in corn gluten meal. In conclusion, grains and grain coproducts contain mostly insoluble NSP and arabinoxylans make up the majority of the total NSP fraction. The in vitro

  11. Accelerating the Rate-Limiting Step in Novel Enzymatic Carbohydrate-to-Hydrogen Technology by Enzyme Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-30

    stable phosphoglucose isomerase through immobilization of cellulose-binding module-tagged thermophilic enzyme on low- cost high-capacity celiulosic...NOVEL ENZYMATIC CARBOHYDRATE-TO-HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY BY ENZYME ENGINEERING Grant/Contract Number: FA9550-08-1-0145 Program Manager: Dr. Walt...bbtransformation (SyPaB) is the implementation of complicated biochemical reactions by in vitro assembly of enzyme and coenzymes. Different from in vivo

  12. Relationship between digestive enzymes and food habit of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) larvae: Characterization of carbohydrases and digestion of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Moraes, C S; Lucena, S A; Moreira, B H S; Brazil, R P; Gontijo, N F; Genta, F A

    2012-08-01

    The sandfly Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Neiva, 1912) is the main vector of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. In spite of its medical importance and several studies concerning adult digestive physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology, very few studies have been carried out to elucidate the digestion in sandfly larvae. Even the breeding sites and food sources of these animals in the field are largely uncharacterized. In this paper, we describe and characterize several carbohydrases from the gut of L. longipalpis larvae, and show that they are probably not acquired from food. The enzyme profile of this insect is consistent with the digestion of fungal and bacterial cells, which were proved to be ingested by larvae under laboratory conditions. In this respect, sandfly larvae might have a detritivore habit in nature, being able to exploit microorganisms usually encountered in the detritus as a food source. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Energy efficiency of digestible protein, fat and carbohydrate utilisation for growth in rainbow trout and Nile tilapia.

    PubMed

    Schrama, Johan W; Haidar, Mahmoud N; Geurden, Inge; Heinsbroek, Leon T N; Kaushik, Sachi J

    2018-04-01

    Currently, energy evaluation of fish feeds is performed on a digestible energy basis. In contrast to net energy (NE) evaluation systems, digestible energy evaluation systems do not differentiate between the different types of digested nutrients regarding their potential for growth. The aim was to develop an NE evaluation for fish by estimating the energy efficiency of digestible nutrients (protein, fat and carbohydrates) and to assess whether these efficiencies differed between Nile tilapia and rainbow trout. Two data sets were constructed. The tilapia and rainbow data set contained, respectively, eight and nine experiments in which the digestibility of protein, fat and energy and the complete energy balances for twenty-three and forty-five diets was measured. The digestible protein (dCP), digestible fat (dFat) and digestible carbohydrate intakes (dCarb) were calculated. By multiple regression analysis, retained energy (RE) was related to dCP, dFat and dCarb. In tilapia, all digestible nutrients were linearly related to RE (P<0·001). In trout, RE was quadratically related to dCarb (P<0·01) and linearly to dCP and dFat (P<0·001). The NE formula was NE=11·5×dCP+35·8×dFAT+11·3×dCarb for tilapia and NE=13·5×dCP+33·0×dFAT+34·0×dCarb-3·64×(dCarb)2 for trout (NE in kJ/(kg0·8×d); dCP, dFat and dCarb in g/(kg0·8×d)). In tilapia, the energetic efficiency of dCP, dFat and dCarb was 49, 91 and 66 %, respectively, showing large similarity with pigs. Tilapia and trout had similar energy efficiencies of dCP (49 v. 57 %) and dFat (91 v. 84 %), but differed regarding dCarb.

  14. Functional diversity of carbohydrate-active enzymes enabling a bacterium to ferment plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Nogue, Pierre-Yves; Alberti, Adriana; Weissenbach, Jean; Salanoubat, Marcel; Tolonen, Andrew C

    2014-11-01

    Microbial metabolism of plant polysaccharides is an important part of environmental carbon cycling, human nutrition, and industrial processes based on cellulosic bioconversion. Here we demonstrate a broadly applicable method to analyze how microbes catabolize plant polysaccharides that integrates carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) assays, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and anaerobic growth screening. We apply this method to study how the bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans ferments plant biomass components including glucans, mannans, xylans, galactans, pectins, and arabinans. These polysaccharides are fermented with variable efficiencies, and diauxies prioritize metabolism of preferred substrates. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals how this bacterium responds to polysaccharides by up-regulating specific groups of CAZymes, transporters, and enzymes to metabolize the constituent sugars. Fifty-six up-regulated CAZymes were purified, and their activities show most polysaccharides are degraded by multiple enzymes, often from the same family, but with divergent rates, specificities, and cellular localizations. CAZymes were then tested in combination to identify synergies between enzymes acting on the same substrate with different catalytic mechanisms. We discuss how these results advance our understanding of how microbes degrade and metabolize plant biomass.

  15. Substitution of Wheat for Corn in Beef Cattle Diets: Digestibility, Digestive Enzyme Activities, Serum Metabolite Contents and Ruminal Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y F; Zhao, H B; Liu, X M; You, W; Cheng, H J; Wan, F C; Liu, G F; Tan, X W; Song, E L; Zhang, X L

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of diets containing different amounts of wheat, as a partial or whole substitute for corn, on digestibility, digestive enzyme activities, serum metabolite contents and ruminal fermentation in beef cattle. Four Limousin×LuXi crossbred cattle with a body weight (400±10 kg), fitted with permanent ruminal, proximal duodenal and terminal ileal cannulas, were used in a 4×4 Latin square design with four treatments: Control (100% corn), 33% wheat (33% substitution for corn), 67% wheat (67% substitution for corn), and 100% wheat (100% substitution for corn) on a dry matter basis. The results showed that replacing corn with increasing amounts of wheat increased the apparent digestibility values of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein (p<0.05). While the apparent digestibility of acid detergent fiber and neutral detergent fiber were lower with increasing amounts of wheat. Digestive enzyme activities of lipase, protease and amylase in the duodenum were higher with increasing wheat amounts (p<0.05), and showed similar results to those for the enzymes in the ileum except for amylase. Increased substitution of wheat for corn increased the serum alanine aminotransferase concentration (p<0.05). Ruminal pH was not different between those given only corn and those given 33% wheat. Increasing the substitution of wheat for corn increased the molar proportion of acetate and tended to increase the acetate-to-propionate ratio. Cattle fed 100% wheat tended to have the lowest ruminal NH3-N concentration compared with control (p<0.05), whereas no differences were observed among the cattle fed 33% and 67% wheat. These findings indicate that wheat can be effectively used to replace corn in moderate amounts to meet the energy and fiber requirements of beef cattle.

  16. Changes in digestive enzyme activities during larval development of leopard grouper (Mycteroperca rosacea).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lagos, R; Tovar-Ramírez, D; Gracia-López, V; Lazo, J P

    2014-06-01

    The leopard grouper is an endemic species of the Mexican Pacific with an important commercial fishery and good aquaculture potential. In order to assess the digestive capacity of this species during the larval period and aid in the formulation of adequate weaning diets, this study aimed to characterize the ontogeny of digestive enzymes during development of the digestive system. Digestive enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, acid protease, leucine-alanine peptidase, alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase N, lipase, amylase and maltase were quantified in larvae fed live prey and weaned onto a formulated microdiet at 31 days after hatching (DAH) and compared with fasting larvae. Enzyme activity for trypsin, lipase and amylase were detected before the opening of the mouth and the onset of exogenous feeding, indicating a precocious development of the digestive system that has been described in many fish species. The intracellular enzyme activity of leucine-alanine peptidase was high during the first days of development, with a tendency to decrease as larvae developed, reaching undetectable levels at the end of the experimental period. In contrast, activities of enzymes located in the intestinal brush border (i.e., aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase) were low at the start of exogenous feeding but progressively increased with larval development, indicating the gradual maturation of the digestive system. Based on our results, we conclude that leopard grouper larvae possess a functional digestive system at hatching and before the onset of exogenous feeding. The significant increase in the activity of trypsin, lipase, amylase and acid protease between 30 and 40 DAH suggests that larvae of this species can be successfully weaned onto microdiets during this period.

  17. Varying type of forage, concentration of metabolizable protein, and source of carbohydrate affects nutrient digestibility and production by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Weiss, W P; St-Pierre, N R; Willett, L B

    2009-11-01

    The effects of forage source, concentration of metabolizable protein (MP), type of carbohydrate, and their interactions on nutrient digestibility and production were evaluated using a central composite treatment design. All diets (dry basis) contained 50% forage that ranged from 25:75 to 75:25 alfalfa silage:corn silage. Rumen-degradable protein comprised 10.7% of the dry matter (DM) in all diets, but undegradable protein ranged from 4.1 to 7.1%, resulting in dietary MP concentrations of 8.8 to 12.0% of the DM. Dietary starch ranged from 22 to 30% of the DM with a concomitant decrease in neutral detergent fiber concentrations. A total of 15 diets were fed to 36 Holstein cows grouped in 6 blocks. Each block consisted of three 21-d periods, and each cow was assigned a unique sequence of 3 diets, resulting in 108 observations. Milk production and composition, feed intake, and digestibility of major nutrients (via total collection of feces and urine) were measured. Few significant interactions between main effects were observed. Starch concentration had only minor effects on digestibility and production. Replacing corn silage with alfalfa decreased digestibility of N but increased digestibility of neutral detergent fiber. Increasing the concentration of MP increased N digestibility. The concentration (Mcal/kg) of dietary digestible energy (DE) increased linearly as starch concentration increased (very small effect) and was affected by a forage by MP interaction. At low MP, high alfalfa reduced DE concentration, but at high MP, increasing alfalfa increased DE concentration. Increasing alfalfa increased DM and DE intakes, which increased yields of energy-corrected milk, protein, and fat. Increasing MP increased yields of energy-corrected milk and protein. The response in milk protein to changes in MP was much less than predicted using the National Research Council (2001) model.

  18. Low-protein diets affect ileal amino acid digestibility and gene expression of digestive enzymes in growing and finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    He, Liuqin; Wu, Li; Xu, Zhiqi; Li, Tiejun; Yao, Kang; Cui, Zhijie; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of dietary crude protein (CP) intake on ileal amino acid digestibilities and expression of genes for digestive enzymes in growing and finishing pigs. In Experiment 1, 18 growing pigs (average initial BW = 36.5 kg) were assigned randomly into one of three treatments (n = 6/treatment group) representing normal (18 % CP), low (15 % CP), and very low (12 % CP) protein intake. In Experiment 2, 18 finishing pigs (average initial BW = 62.3 kg) were allotted randomly into one of three treatments (n = 6/treatment group), representing normal (16 % CP), low (13 % CP) and very low (10 % CP) protein intake. In both experiments, diets with low and very low CP were supplemented with crystalline amino acids to achieve equal content of standardized ileal digestible Lys, Met, Thr, and Trp, and were provided to pigs ad libitum. Daily feed intake, BW, and feed/gain ratios were determined. At the end of each experiment, all pigs were slaughtered to collect pancreas, small-intestine samples, and terminal ileal chymes. Samples were used for determining expression of genes for digestive enzymes and ileal amino acid digestibilities. Growing pigs fed the 12 % CP and 15 % CP diets had lower final body weight (P < 0.01) and ADG (P < 0.0001) when compared with pigs fed the 18 % dietary CP diet. Growing pigs fed with the 12 % CP diet showed higher digestibilities for CP (P < 0.05), DM (P < 0.05), Lys (P < 0.0001), Met (P < 0.01), Cys (P < 0.01), Thr (P < 0.01), Trp (P < 0.05), Val (P < 0.05), Phe (P < 0.05), Ala (P < 0.05), Cys (P < 0.01), and Gly (P < 0.05) than those fed the 18 % CP diet. Finishing pigs fed the 16 % CP diet had a higher (P < 0.01) final body weight than those fed the 10 % CP diet. mRNA levels for digestive enzymes (trypsinogen, chymotrypsin B, and dipeptidases-II and III) differed among the three groups of pigs (P < 0.05), and no difference was noted in the genes expression between control group and lower CP group. These

  19. The flow and fate of digestive enzymes in the field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Woodring, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    The flow of enzymes, the ratio of bound to unbound enzymes, and their inactivation in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus was studied. The digestive enzymes are forced forward into the crop by caecal contraction and then they are mixed with freshly chewed food and saliva, forming a crop-chyme. This chyme is blended by crop peristalsis, and periodic opening of the preproventricular valve (PPV) allows posterior movement into the proventriculus and further into the midgut. The contraction of the crop is modulated by Grybi-AST and Grybi-SK peptides, which are partially secreted by the caecal endocrine cells. Most of the aminopeptidase and the four disaccharidases examined are membrane bound (62-80%); the remaining (20-38%) as well all trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, and amylase are secreted free into the caecal lumen. Cricket trypsin loses only 30% of its activity in 4 h and very little thereafter. The presence of digestive products in the lumen appears to retard further trypsin autolysis. Cricket trypsin digests 42% of the chymotrypsin, 37% of the lipase, and 45% of the amylase in the caecal fluids over 24 h in vitro no significant difference. Without Ca ion amylase was almost completely digested. About 50% of the membrane bound and free aminopeptidase was digested in the caecal lumen, and about 30-38% of the bound and free maltase. This loss of digestive enzyme activity is possible, because enzyme secretion rates are high, the unbound enzymes are effectively recycled, and the time of nutrient passage is short. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The effects of space flight on some rat liver enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight conditions on the activities of certain enzymes regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rat liver are investigated in an attempt to account for the losses in body weight observed during space flight despite preflight caloric consumption. Liver samples were analyzed for the activities of 32 cytosolic and microsomal enzymes as well as hepatic glycogen and individual fatty acid levels for ground control rats and rats flown on board the Cosmos 936 biosatellite under normal space flight conditions and in centrifuges which were sacrificed upon recovery or 25 days after recovery. Significant decreases in the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, alpha-glycerol phosphate acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, aconitase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and an increase in palmitoyl CoA desaturase are found in the flight stationary relative to the flight contrifuged rats upon recovery, with all enzymes showing alterations returning to normal values 25 days postflight. The flight stationary group is also observed to be characterized by more than twice the amount of liver glycogen of the flight centrifuged group as well as a significant increase in the ratio of palmitic to palmitoleic acid. Results thus indicate metabolic changes which may be involved in the mechanism of weight loss during weightlessness, and demonstrate the equivalence of centrifugation during space flight to terrestrial gravity.

  1. Protein, enzyme and carbohydrate quantification using smartphone through colorimetric digitization technique.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sibasish; Saikia, Gunjan Prasad; Sarma, Dhruva Jyoti; Gupta, Kuldeep; Das, Priyanka; Nath, Pabitra

    2017-05-01

    In this paper the utilization of smartphone as a detection platform for colorimetric quantification of biological macromolecules has been demonstrated. Using V-channel of HSV color space, the quantification of BSA protein, catalase enzyme and carbohydrate (using D-glucose) have been successfully investigated. A custom designed android application has been developed for estimating the total concentration of biological macromolecules. The results have been compared with that of a standard spectrophotometer which is generally used for colorimetric quantification in laboratory settings by measuring its absorbance at a specific wavelength. The results obtained with the designed sensor is found to be similar when compared with the spectrophotometer data. The designed sensor is low cost, robust and we envision that it could promote diverse fields of bio-analytical investigations. Schematic illustration of the smartphone sensing mechanism for colorimetric analysis of biomolecular samples. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. [Specific features of digestive function development in larvae of some salmonid fish].

    PubMed

    Ershova, T S; Volkova, I V; Zaĭtseva, V F

    2004-01-01

    We studied the activities of digestive enzymes responsible for the digestion of food carbohydrate and protein components in plant-eating fish at various stages of larval development. The activities of all digestive enzymes tend to rise during larval development. Species specific features of the alimentary canal functioning have been described.

  3. Comparison of in vitro systems of protein digestion using either mammal or fish proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Moyano, F J; Savoie, L

    2001-02-01

    Hydrolysis of three different proteins by either crude fish digestive extracts or purified mammal proteases was assayed using two different in vitro systems. The closed system was a modification of the pH-stat method including a previous acid digestion. The open system used a digestion cell containing a semi-permeable membrane which allowed continuous separation of the final products of hydrolysis with a molecular cut-off of 1000 Da. Assays in both systems resulted a similar arrangement of the tested proteins in relation to their ability to be hydrolyzed, with casein>fish meal> or =soybean meal. With the exception of casein, no significant differences were found between results produced by any of the enzyme sources using the closed system. In constrast, significantly higher hydrolysis of all proteins was produced by mammal enzymes under conditions operating in the open system. Differences in the rate of release of amino acids measured in this latter system were related both to the type of protein and the origin of the enzymes. When using purified mammal enzymes, release of lysine or phenylalanine from casein and soybean was high, but low from fishmeal. Isoleucine and valine present in fishmeal were preferentially hydrolyzed by commercial enzymes, but glycine and proline by fish enzymes.

  4. Inhibitory effect of Pistia tannin on digestive enzymes of Indian major carps: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sudipta; Ghosh, Koushik

    2010-12-01

    Aquatic weeds are one of the major unconventional feed ingredients tested for aquafeed formulation. Tannin content in the water lettuce, Pistia, has been quantified (26.67 mg g(-1); dry weight) and graded levels of which (12.5-200 μg) have been incorporated in the reaction mixtures to evaluate any change in the in vitro activity of the principal digestive enzymes from the three Indian major carps (IMC), namely rohu (Labeo rohita), catla (Catla catla) and mrigala (Cirrhinus mrigala). Result of the experiment revealed that the Pistia tannin (PT) significantly inhibit/lower the activities of the digestive enzymes from three IMCs in a dose-dependent manner, even at very low concentration. Significant variation in the reduction of the enzyme activities was noticed between the three fish species, as well as between the three enzymes studied. Among the three species studied, digestive enzymes from L. rohita were found to be the most sensitive to the PT, whereas enzymes from C. catla were found to be comparatively least affected. On the other hand, protease and lipase activities were comparatively more affected than the amylase activity. The results of the study suggest that more stress should be given on the elimination of tannin while incorporating feed ingredients of plant origin in fish diets.

  5. Functional Metagenomics: Construction and High-Throughput Screening of Fosmid Libraries for Discovery of Novel Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ufarté, Lisa; Bozonnet, Sophie; Laville, Elisabeth; Cecchini, Davide A; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure; Veronese, Gabrielle Potocki

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based metagenomics is one of the most efficient approaches to boost the discovery of novel biocatalysts from the huge reservoir of uncultivated bacteria. In this chapter, we describe a highly generic procedure of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput screening for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applicable to any bacterial ecosystem, it enables the swift identification of functional enzymes that are highly efficient, alone or acting in synergy, to break down polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  6. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored product pests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cereals have storage proteins with high amounts of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Therefore, storage pests need to have digestive enzymes that are efficient in hydrolyzing these types of proteins. Post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored product pe...

  7. Synergistic amylomaltase and branching enzyme catalysis to suppress cassava starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Sorndech, Waraporn; Meier, Sebastian; Jansson, Anita M; Sagnelli, Domenico; Hindsgaul, Ole; Tongta, Sunanta; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-11-05

    Starch provides our main dietary caloric intake and over-consumption of starch-containing foods results in escalating life-style disease including diabetes. By increasing the content of α-1,6 branch points in starch, digestibility by human amylolytic enzymes is expected to be retarded. Aiming at generating a soluble and slowly digestible starch by increasing the content and changing the relative positioning of the branch points in the starch molecules, we treated cassava starch with amylomaltase (AM) and branching enzyme (BE). We performed a detailed molecular analysis of the products including amylopectin chain length distribution, content of α-1,6 glucosidic linkages, absolute molecular weight distribution and digestibility. Step-by-step enzyme catalysis was the most efficient treatment, and it generated branch structures even more extreme than those of glycogen. All AM- and BE-treated samples showed increased resistance to degradation by porcine pancreatic α-amylase and glucoamylase as compared to cassava starch. The amylolytic products showed chain lengths and branching patterns similar to the products obtained from glycogen. Our data demonstrate that combinatorial enzyme catalysis provides a strategy to generate potential novel soluble α-glucan ingredients with low dietary digestibility assets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Kernel Composition, Starch Structure, and Enzyme Digestibility of Opaque-2 Maize and Quality Protein Maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objectives of this study were to understand how opaque-2 (o2) mutation and quality protein maize (QPM) affect maize kernel composition and starch structure, property, and enzyme digestibility. Kernels of o2 maize contained less protein (9.6−12.5%) than those of the wild-type (WT) counterparts (12...

  9. Expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in Eimeria acervulina-challenged layers and broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian coccidiosis is a disease caused by the intestinal protozoa Eimeria. Eimeria-infected chickens develop lesions in the intestinal mucosa, which result in reduced feed efficiency and body weight gain. This growth reduction may be due to changes in expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient tran...

  10. Digestive Enzyme Supplementation for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munasinghe, Sujeeva A.; Oliff, Carolyn; Finn, Judith; Wray, John A.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effects of a digestive enzyme supplement in improving expressive language, behaviour and other symptoms in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial using crossover design over 6 months for 43 children, aged 3-8 years. Outcome measurement tools included monthly Global Behaviour Rating…

  11. Hydrolytic enzymes expressivity in different parts of the Rapana digestive system.

    PubMed

    Toptikov, V A; Totsky, V N; Alieksieieva, T G; Kovtun, O A

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of comprehensive studies of the Rapana vital functions is determined by its considerab­le negative impact on the ecosystem of the Black Sea. The aim of the work was to find out the polymorphism and activity of the main hydrolases in the different parts of the digestive system of Rapana. Hydrolases (proteases, amylases, esterases, lipases and phosphatases) in glandular structures of the Rapana digestive system were studied by electrophoresis. It was found that different sets of hydrolytic enzymes are functioning in certain parts of the Rapana digestive tract. The gland of Leiblein and hepatopancreas played the most important role in the digestion of food components. The salivary glands had the significant influence on proteolysis.

  12. Development of digestive enzyme activity in larvae of spotted sand bass Paralabrax maculatofasciatus. 1. Biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-González, C A; Moyano-López, F J; Civera-Cerecedo, R; Carrasco-Chávez, V; Ortiz-Galindo, J L; Dumas, S

    2008-12-01

    Spotted sand bass Paralabrax maculatofasciatus is a potential aquaculture species in Northwest Mexico. In the last few years it has been possible to close its life cycle and to develop larviculture technology at on pilot scale using live food, however survival values are low (11%) and improvements in growth and survival requires the study of the morpho-physiological development during the initial ontogeny. In this research digestive activity of several enzymes were evaluated in larvae, from hatching to 30 days after hatching (dah), and in live prey (rotifers and Artemia), by use of biochemical and electrophoretic techniques. This paper, is the first of two parts, and covers only the biochemical analysis. All digestive enzyme activities were detected from mouth opening; however the, maximum activities varied among different digestive enzymes. For alkaline protease and trypsin the maximum activities were detected from 12 to 18 dah. Acid protease activity was observed from day 12 onwards. The other digestive enzymes appear between days 4 and 18 after hatching, with marked fluctuations. These activities indicate the beginning of the juvenile stage and the maturation of the digestive system, in agreement with changes that occur during morpho-physiological development and food changes from rotifers to Artemia. All enzymatic activities were detected in rotifers and Artemia, and their contribution to enhancement the digestion capacity of the larvae appears to be low, but cannot be minimised. We concluded that the enzymatic equipment of P. maculatofasciatus larvae is similar to that of other marine fish species, that it becomes complete between days 12 and 18 after hatching, and that it is totally efficient up to 25 dah.

  13. Bovine lactoferrin digested with human gastrointestinal enzymes inhibits replication of human echovirus 5 in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Furlund, Camilla B; Kristoffersen, Anja B; Devold, Tove G; Vegarud, Gerd E; Jonassen, Christine M

    2012-07-01

    Many infant formulas are enriched with lactoferrin (Lf) because of its claimed beneficial effects on health. Native bovine Lf (bLf) is known to inhibit in vitro replication of human enteroviruses, a group of pathogenic viruses that replicate in the gut as their primary infection site. On the basis of a model digestion and human gastrointestinal enzymes, we hypothesized that bLf could retain its antiviral properties against enterovirus in the gastrointestinal tract, either as an intact protein or through bioactive peptide fragments released by digestive enzymes. To test our hypothesis, bLf was digested with human gastric juice and duodenal juice in a 2-step in vitro digestion model. Two gastric pH levels and reduction conditions were used to simulate physiological conditions in adults and infants. The antiviral activity of native bLf and of the digested fractions was studied on echovirus 5 in vitro, using various assay conditions, addressing several mechanisms for replication inhibition. Both native and digested bLf fractions revealed a significant inhibitory effect, when added before or simultaneously with the virus onto the cells. Furthermore, a significant stronger sustained antiviral effect was observed when bLf was fully digested in the gastric phase with fast pH reduction to 2.5, compared with native bLf, suggesting the release of antiviral peptides from bLf during the human digestion process. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that bLf may have a role in the prevention of human gastrointestinal virus infection under physiological conditions and that food containing bLf may protect against infection in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Archaea: Current Insights into Unusual Enzymes and Pathways and Their Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Rauch, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The metabolism of Archaea, the third domain of life, resembles in its complexity those of Bacteria and lower Eukarya. However, this metabolic complexity in Archaea is accompanied by the absence of many “classical” pathways, particularly in central carbohydrate metabolism. Instead, Archaea are characterized by the presence of unique, modified variants of classical pathways such as the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. The pentose phosphate pathway is only partly present (if at all), and pentose degradation also significantly differs from that known for bacterial model organisms. These modifications are accompanied by the invention of “new,” unusual enzymes which cause fundamental consequences for the underlying regulatory principles, and classical allosteric regulation sites well established in Bacteria and Eukarya are lost. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of central carbohydrate metabolic pathways and their regulation in Archaea. In order to give an overview of their complexity, pathway modifications are discussed with respect to unusual archaeal biocatalysts, their structural and mechanistic characteristics, and their regulatory properties in comparison to their classic counterparts from Bacteria and Eukarya. Furthermore, an overview focusing on hexose metabolic, i.e., glycolytic as well as gluconeogenic, pathways identified in archaeal model organisms is given. Their energy gain is discussed, and new insights into different levels of regulation that have been observed so far, including the transcript and protein levels (e.g., gene regulation, known transcription regulators, and posttranslational modification via reversible protein phosphorylation), are presented. PMID:24600042

  15. Pancreatic Digestive Enzyme Blockade in the Intestine Increases Survival After Experimental Shock

    PubMed Central

    DeLano, Frank A.; Hoyt, David B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2015-01-01

    Shock, sepsis, and multiorgan failure are associated with inflammation, morbidity, and high mortality. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests that pancreatic enzymes in the intestinal lumen autodigest the intestine and generate systemic inflammation. Blocking these enzymes in the intestine reduces inflammation and multiorgan dysfunction. We investigated whether enzymatic blockade also reduces mortality after shock. Three rat shock models were used here: hemorrhagic shock, peritonitis shock induced by placement of cecal material into the peritoneum, and endotoxin shock. One hour after initiation of hemorrhagic, peritonitis, or endotoxin shock, animals were administered one of three different pancreatic enzyme inhibitors—6-amidino-2-naphtyl p-guanidinobenzoate di-methanesulfate, tranexamic acid, or aprotinin—into the lumen of the small intestine. In all forms of shock, blockade of digestive proteases with protease inhibitor attenuated entry of digestive enzymes into the wall of the intestine and subsequent autodigestion and morphological damage to the intestine, lung, and heart. Animals treated with protease inhibitors also survived in larger numbers than untreated controls over a period of 12 weeks. Surviving animals recovered completely and returned to normal weight within 14 days after shock. The results suggest that the active and concentrated digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine play a central role in shock and multi-organ failure, which can be treated with protease inhibitors that are currently available for use in the clinic. PMID:23345609

  16. Effects of dietary supplementation of multi-enzyme on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, small intestinal digestive enzyme activities, and large intestinal selected microbiota in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G G; Yang, Z B; Wang, Y; Yang, W R; Zhou, H J

    2014-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of dietary supplementation of an exogenous multi-enzyme (EME) preparation to 35- to 65-d-old piglets on apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD), growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and selected microbial populations in feces. In Exp.1, twenty eight 35-d-old piglets were randomly assigned to 7 dietary treatments (corn-soybean based diet supplemented with 0, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, or 350 mg EME/kg) in a 14-d digestibility study. Piglets fed the diets supplemented with EME had greater ATTD of DM, CP, and GE (P = 0.001, 0.005, and 0.009, respectively) than those fed the diet without EME supplementation, and those ATTD values increased linearly and quadratically (P < 0.001) as the levels of supplemented EME increased. In Exp. 2, two hundred 35-d-old weanling piglets were randomly allocated to 20 pens. The pens were then randomly assigned to 5 dietary treatments (corn-soybean based diet supplemented with 0, 100, 150, 250, or 350 mg EME/kg) with 4 pens per treatment in a 30-d feeding experiment. Piglets has ad libitum access to diets and water, and they were weighed at the beginning (35-d-old), middle (50-d-old), and end (65-d-old) of the experiment. Fecal samples were grabbed directly from the rectum and digesta samples from duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were taken at the end of the experiment for the analysis of selected bacteria populations and digestive-enzyme activities. The ADG and ADFI tended to be greater with the increasing levels of supplemented EME in both periods, whereas G:F was improved (P = 0.012 and 0.017) by EME in the period of 35 to 50 d of age and during the overall experimental period. Furthermore, inclusion of EME in diet increased the counts of Lactobacilli spp. and Bacillus subtilis spp., but reduced the populations of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli spp. in the feces. The EME supplementation also enhanced (P < 0.05) the activities of amylase, lipase, and protease in the

  17. Characterization and ontogenetic development of digestive enzymes in Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis larvae.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Koji; Matsunari, Hiroyuki; Kumon, Kazunori; Tanaka, Yosuke; Shiozawa, Satoshi; Furuita, Hirofumi; Oku, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    The major digestive enzymes in Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis larvae were characterized, and the physiological characteristics of the enzymes during early ontogeny were clarified using biochemical and molecular approaches. The maximum activity of trypsin (Try), chymotrypsin (Ct) and amylase (Amy) was observed at pH 6-11, 8-11 and 6-9, respectively. Maximum activity of Try, Ct and Amy occurred at 50 °C, that of lipase (Lip) was at 60 °C and that of pepsin (Pep) was at 40-50 °C. These pH and thermal profiles were similar to those for other fish species but differed from those previously reported for adult bluefin tuna. Enzyme activity for all enzymes assayed was found to decrease at high temperatures (Try, Ct, Amy and Pep: 50 °C; Lip: 40 °C), which is similar to findings for other fish species with one marked exception-increased Try activity was observed at 40 °C. Lip activity appeared to be dependent on bile salts under our assay conditions, resulting in a significant increase in activity in the presence of bile salts. Ontogenetic changes in pancreatic digestive enzymes showed similar gene expression patterns to those of other fish species, whereas marked temporal increases in enzyme activities were observed at 10-12 days post hatching (dph), coinciding with previously reported timing of the development of the pyloric caeca in bluefin tuna larvae. However, complete development of digestive function was indicated by the high pep gene expression from 19 dph, which contradicts the profile of Pep activity and previously reported development timing of the gastric gland. These findings contribute to the general knowledge of bluefin tuna larval digestive system development.

  18. Extracellular proteins, polysaccharides and enzymes impact on sludge aerobic digestion after ultrasonic pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Hui; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Zhu, Yi-Shu

    2008-04-01

    Ultrasonic pretreatment of excess sludge can improve its aerobic digestibility, leading to enhanced sludge reduction. In order to understand the mechanisms of this improvement, sludge flocs were divided into four layers, i.e. (1) slime, (2) loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS), (3) tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) and (4) pellet. Extracellular proteins, polysaccharides and five types of hydrolytic enzymes (protease, alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase, alkaline-phosphatase and acid-phosphatase) from sludge flocs were investigated to determine their influence on sludge aerobic digestion after ultrasonic pretreatment. Results suggested that most of the extracellular enzymes (except alpha-amylase) were present in pellet and TB-EPS layers, with minor quantities detected in LB-EPS and slime layers, and almost none detected in bulk solution. As for alpha-amylase in sludge flocs, most of it (52.6%) was also mainly bound with pellet; however, the rest of it was dispersed nearly uniformly throughout the sludge flocs. Ultrasonic pretreatment enhances enzymatic activities and promotes the shifts of extracellular proteins, polysaccharides and enzymes from inner layers of sludge flocs, i.e., pellet and TB-EPS, to outer layers, i.e., slime, to increase the contact and interaction among extracellular proteins, polysaccharides and enzymes that were originally embedded in the sludge flocs, resulting in improved efficiency in aerobic digestion. The optimum ultrasonic pretreatment conditions had a lasting time of 10min and density of 3 kWL(-1) at the frequency of 20 kHz. With the optimum ultrasonic pretreatment, the sludge reduction for TSS in aerobic digestion was 42.7% in which the part of 11.8% was removed by the ultrasonic pretreatment, compared with 20.9% for control, after an aerobic digestion time of 10.5d.

  19. Conservation of the egg envelope digestion mechanism of hatching enzyme in euteleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Mari; Yasumasu, Shigeki; Shimizu, Akio; Sano, Kaori; Iuchi, Ichiro; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2010-12-01

    We purified two hatching enzymes, namely high choriolytic enzyme (HCE; EC 3.4.24.67) and low choriolytic enzyme (LCE; EC 3.4.24.66), from the hatching liquid of Fundulus heteroclitus, which were named Fundulus HCE (FHCE) and Fundulus LCE (FLCE). FHCE swelled the inner layer of egg envelope, and FLCE completely digested the FHCE-swollen envelope. In addition, we cloned three Fundulus cDNAs orthologous to cDNAs for the medaka precursors of egg envelope subunit proteins (i.e. choriogenins H, H minor and L) from the female liver. Cleavage sites of FHCE and FLCE on egg envelope subunit proteins were determined by comparing the N-terminal amino acid sequences of digests with the sequences deduced from the cDNAs for egg envelope subunit proteins. FHCE and FLCE cleaved different sites of the subunit proteins. FHCE efficiently cleaved the Pro-X-Y repeat regions into tripeptides to dodecapeptides to swell the envelope, whereas FLCE cleaved the inside of the zona pellucida domain, the core structure of egg envelope subunit protein, to completely digest the FHCE-swollen envelope. A comparison showed that the positions of hatching enzyme cleavage sites on egg envelope subunit proteins were strictly conserved between Fundulus and medaka. Finally, we extended such a comparison to three other euteleosts (i.e. three-spined stickleback, spotted halibut and rainbow trout) and found that the egg envelope digestion mechanism was well conserved among them. During evolution, the egg envelope digestion by HCE and LCE orthologs was established in the lineage of euteleosts, and the mechanism is suggested to be conserved. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  20. Performance of Granular Starch with Controlled Pore Size during Hydrolysis with Digestive Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Benavent-Gil, Yaiza; Rosell, Cristina M

    2017-12-01

    Studies on porous starch have been directed to explore different industrial applications as bio-adsorbents of a variety of compounds. However, the analysis of starch digestibility is essential for food application. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of porous structure on in vitro starch digestibility. Porous starches were obtained using a range of concentrations of amyloglucosidase (AMG), α-amylase (AM), cyclodextrin-glycosyltransferase (CGTase) or branching enzyme (BE). Porous starches exhibited major content of digestible starch (DS) that increased with the intensity of the enzymatic treatment, and very low amount of resistant starch (RS). Porous starches behaved differently during in vitro hydrolysis depending on their enzymatic treatment. AMG was the unique treatment that increased the digestive amylolysis and estimated glycemic index, whereas AM, CGTase and BE reduced them. A significant relationship was found between the pore size and the severity of the amylolysis, suggesting that a specific pore size is required for the accessibility of the digestive amylase. Therefore, pore size in the starch surface was a limiting factor for digestion of starch granules.

  1. Effects of sources of protein and enzyme supplementation on protein digestibility and chyme characteristics in broilers.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Lee, T T T; Chiou, P W S

    2002-07-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of protein source and enzyme supplementation on protein digestibility and chyme characteristics in broilers. 2. One hundred and twenty growing (13 d old) and 60 finishing (34 d old) Arbor Acre strain commercial male broilers were selected and placed into individual metabolic cages. 3. The experiment was a 5 x 2 factorial arrangement with 5 different sources of protein: casein, fish meal, soybean meal (SBM), soy protein concentrate (SPC), maize gluten meal (MGM) and two levels of protease (bromelain), 0 and 65 CDU/kg diets. 4. The diets were iso-nitrogenous and semi-purified, with Cr2O3 as an indicator for determination of ileal digestibility and chyme characteristics. 5. Apparent ileal protein digestibility (AIPD) in both growing and finishing chickens was highest on the casein diet, followed by fish meal, SBM, SPC and MGM. 6. Enzyme inclusion did not improve protein digestibility, but significantly decreased the digesta pH value in the gizzard and increased pH in the ileum in the 3-week-old broilers. 7. The digesta pH values in the gizzard and duodenum were significantly lower in the SBM and fish meal groups compared with the other protein groups. The molecular weight distribution pattern of the soluble protein in the chyme of the gastrointestinal (GI) segments showed a similar trend, regardless of the enzyme inclusion or the stage of growth. 8. The molecular weight profile of soluble protein changed dynamically in the casein fed broilers from the gizzard to ileum and the low molecular weight proteins, < 7 kDa, reached maximum levels at the ileum. The molecular weight profile of the soluble protein in the SBM and SPC changed between the jejunum and the ileum and in the intermediate molecular soluble protein weight (7 to 10 kDa) was significantly decreased. This indicated that the hydrolysis process began from the middle to the posterior end of the small intestine. 9. Similar profiles were also shown with

  2. Transfer of carbohydrate-active enzymes from marine bacteria to Japanese gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Correc, Gaëlle; Barbeyron, Tristan; Helbert, William; Czjzek, Mirjam; Michel, Gurvan

    2010-04-08

    Gut microbes supply the human body with energy from dietary polysaccharides through carbohydrate active enzymes, or CAZymes, which are absent in the human genome. These enzymes target polysaccharides from terrestrial plants that dominated diet throughout human evolution. The array of CAZymes in gut microbes is highly diverse, exemplified by the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which contains 261 glycoside hydrolases and polysaccharide lyases, as well as 208 homologues of susC and susD-genes coding for two outer membrane proteins involved in starch utilization. A fundamental question that, to our knowledge, has yet to be addressed is how this diversity evolved by acquiring new genes from microbes living outside the gut. Here we characterize the first porphyranases from a member of the marine Bacteroidetes, Zobellia galactanivorans, active on the sulphated polysaccharide porphyran from marine red algae of the genus Porphyra. Furthermore, we show that genes coding for these porphyranases, agarases and associated proteins have been transferred to the gut bacterium Bacteroides plebeius isolated from Japanese individuals. Our comparative gut metagenome analyses show that porphyranases and agarases are frequent in the Japanese population and that they are absent in metagenome data from North American individuals. Seaweeds make an important contribution to the daily diet in Japan (14.2 g per person per day), and Porphyra spp. (nori) is the most important nutritional seaweed, traditionally used to prepare sushi. This indicates that seaweeds with associated marine bacteria may have been the route by which these novel CAZymes were acquired in human gut bacteria, and that contact with non-sterile food may be a general factor in CAZyme diversity in human gut microbes.

  3. The effects of the proportions of dietary macronutrients on the digestibility, post-prandial endocrine responses and large intestinal fermentation of carbohydrate in working dogs.

    PubMed

    Hill, S R; Rutherfurd-Markwick, K J; Ravindran, G; Ugarte, C E; Thomas, D G

    2009-12-01

    To compare the effects of feeding diets varying in the proportions of macronutrients on the digestibility, post-prandial endocrine responses and large intestinal fermentation of carbohydrate in working dogs. The apparent digestibility of two test diets, one comprising low-carbohydrate, high-protein dry biscuits (Diet 1), and one comprising high-carbohydrate, low-protein dry biscuits (Diet 2), fed to 12 adult Harrier Hounds (n=5 female), was determined using the indigestible-marker and total-collection methods. Serial breath samples were collected from each dog before and after feeding, and analysed for concentrations of hydrogen. Concentrations of glucose and insulin in plasma were established from serial blood samples obtained after feeding. The apparent dry matter, protein, fat and energy digestibility of Diet 1 were higher, but the carbohydrate digestibility was lower (p<0.05), than those of Diet 2. The apparent digestibility values determined using the total-collection method were lower (p<0.05) for carbohydrates, and tended to be lower for dry matter and energy (p<0.10) than those determined using the indigestible-marker method, but the values for protein and fat digestibility were similar using the two methods of determination. The maximum concentration (Cmax) of hydrogen detected in the breath of the dogs occurred earlier for Diet 1 than Diet 2 (p<0.01). However, the Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) for breath hydrogen were higher in the dogs fed Diet 2 than Diet 1 (p<0.01). The Cmax for glucose and insulin in plasma occurred earlier in dogs fed Diet 2 compared with those fed Diet 1 (p<0.05). However, the Cmax for glucose, and AUC for glucose and for insulin were not different between the two diets. The Cmax for insulin was greater for Diet 2 compared with Diet 1 (p<0.05). The low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet (Diet 1) appeared to offer certain advantages to working dogs, including higher apparent nutrient digestibility, slower release of glucose into

  4. The effect of free and protected oils on the digestion of dietary carbohydrates between the mouth and duodenum of sheep.

    PubMed

    McAllan, A B; Knight, R; Sutton, J D

    1983-05-01

    Sheep fitted with rumen and re-entrant duodenal cannulas were given diets of approximately 200 g hay and 400 g concentrate mixture alone, or supplemented daily with 40 g linseed or coconut oils free or protected with formaldehyde-casein in a 5 x 5 Latin-square arrangement. Chromic oxide paper was given as a marker at feeding time and passage to the duodenum of neutral-detergent fibre (NDF) and different sugars were estimated from the values for constituent:marker at the duodenum. Contributions of microbial carbohydrates to these flows were estimated from amounts of RNA present. The carbohydrate composition of mixed rumen bacteria from sheep rumen digesta were similar regardless of diet. Of the sugars entering the duodenum all the rhamnose and ribose and 0.51, 0.24 and 0.35 of the mannose, galactose and starch-glucose respectively, were contributed by the microbes. Virtually all the arabinose, xylose and cellulose-glucose were contributed by the diet. For sheep receiving the basal ration, coefficients of digestibility between mouth and duodenum, corrected where necessary for microbial contribution, were 0.95, 0.66, 0.67, 0.62, 0.45 and 0.51 for starch-glucose, mannose, arabinose, galactose, xylose and cellulose-glucose respectively. Corresponding values when free-oil-supplemented diets were given were 0.95, 0.55, 0.38, 0.55, 0.01 and -0.02 respectively. Values for diets supplemented with linseed oil or coconut oil did not differ significantly. Addition of protected oils to the basal feed also resulted in depressed digestibilities of dietary structural sugars but to a far lesser extent than those observed with the free oils. Apparent digestibility of NDF was altered in the same direction as those of the main structural sugars, averaging 0.50, 0.17 and 0.29 in animals receiving the basal, free-oil-supplemented or protected-oil-supplemented diets respectively. The reasons for the difference between NDF and discrete carbohydrate analytical totals are discussed.

  5. Iminosugar inhibitors of carbohydrate-active enzymes that underpin cereal grain germination and endosperm metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Andriotis, Vasilios M. E.; Rejzek, Martin; Rugen, Michael D.; Svensson, Birte; Smith, Alison M.; Field, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Starch is a major energy store in plants. It provides most of the calories in the human diet and, as a bulk commodity, it is used across broad industry sectors. Starch synthesis and degradation are not fully understood, owing to challenging biochemistry at the liquid/solid interface and relatively limited knowledge about the nature and control of starch degradation in plants. Increased societal and commercial demand for enhanced yield and quality in starch crops requires a better understanding of starch metabolism as a whole. Here we review recent advances in understanding the roles of carbohydrate-active enzymes in starch degradation in cereal grains through complementary chemical and molecular genetics. These approaches have allowed us to start dissecting aspects of starch degradation and the interplay with cell-wall polysaccharide hydrolysis during germination. With a view to improving and diversifying the properties and uses of cereal grains, it is possible that starch degradation may be amenable to manipulation through genetic or chemical intervention at the level of cell wall metabolism, rather than simply in the starch degradation pathway per se. PMID:26862201

  6. Effect of digestible carbohydrates on glucose control in insulin-dependent diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Perrotti, N; Santoro, D; Genovese, S; Giacco, A; Rivellese, A; Riccardi, G

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that high-carbohydrate-high-fiber diets may improve the metabolic control in diabetes. To evaluate the influence of dietary carbohydrates separate from dietary fiber on blood glucose control, six insulin-dependent diabetic patients (IDD) were assigned in random order to two weight-maintaining diets for consecutive periods of 10 days. The diets differed in carbohydrate (41% in diet A and 60% in diet B) and fat content (41% and 20%, respectively) but were identical in calories, proteins, simple sugars, and fiber. After each dietary period blood glucose was continuously monitored for 24 h (Biostator GCIIS, Life Science Instruments, Miles Laboratories, Elkhart, Indiana). The M value was 48 +/- 20 after diet A and 96 +/- 27 after diet B (t = 3.83, P less than 0.025); the mean daily blood glucose was 152 +/- 5 mg/dl after diet A and 206 +/- 11 mg/dl after diet B (t = 7.50, P less than 0.001). Similarly, the blood glucose level for the 3-h period after each of the three main meals was lower after diet A than after diet B (analysis of variance: F = 5.2, P less than 0.05). No significant difference in fasting serum cholesterol, triglycerides, or serum lipoprotein composition was observed between the two diets. In order to separate the influence of dietary carbohydrate and fat on postprandial blood glucose concentration, an additional test meal experiment was performed in eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients. In random order on consecutive days they were given two standard meals that were identical in carbohydrate and protein content and differed only in the amount of olive oil added to the meals (12 g versus 36 g).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Inside the trap: gland morphologies, digestive enzymes, and the evolution of plant carnivory in the Caryophyllales⋆

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Tanya; Specht, Chelsea D

    2013-01-01

    The digestion of prey by carnivorous plants is determined in part by suites of enzymes that are associated with morphologically and anatomically diverse trapping mechanisms. Chitinases represent a group of enzymes known to be integral to effective plant carnivory. In non-carnivorous plants, chitinases commonly act as pathogenesis-related proteins, which are either induced in response to insect herbivory and fungal elicitors, or constitutively expressed in tissues vulnerable to attack. In the Caryophyllales carnivorous plant lineage, multiple classes of chitinases are likely involved in both pathogenic response and digestion of prey items. We review what is currently known about trap morphologies, provide an examination of the diversity, roles, and evolution of chitinases, and examine how herbivore and pathogen defense mechanisms may have been coopted for plant carnivory in the Caryophyllales. PMID:23830995

  8. Influence of probiotics on the growth and digestive enzyme activity of white Pacific shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, R. Geovanny D.; Shen, M. A.

    2008-05-01

    The influence of Bacillus probiotics on the digestive enzyme activity and the growth of Litopenaeus vannamei were determined in this study. The shrimp was treated with five percentages (1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0 and 7.5) of probiotics ( Bacillus spp.) supplemented to the feed and cultured for 45d. The growth measured as the weight gain at the end of culturing was significantly ( P<0.05) higher in probiotic-treated shrimps than that of the control (without receiving probiotics). Activities of protease and amylase, two digestive enzymes of the midgut gland and the intestine were significantly ( P<0.05) higher in probiotic-treated shrimp than in the control.

  9. Lignocellulolytic enzymes and bacteria associated with the digestive tracts of Stenochironomus (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Koroiva, R; Souza, C W O; Toyama, D; Henrique-Silva, F; Fonseca-Gessner, A A

    2013-04-02

    We analyzed the digestive activity of the enzymes that digest cellulose and hemicellulose and the bacterial community that is capable of hydrolyzing wood compounds in the digestive tracts of Stenochironomus (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae, which are miners of decomposing submerged tree and bush branches. Based on quantification of reducing sugars, these larvae have a limited capacity for cellulose degradation but a good capacity for xylan hydrolysis. We isolated 31 types of colonies from two larval morphotypes, of which 19 tested positive for the capacity to hydrolyze at least one of the four substrates that were used as the main carbon source in the culture media. Their woody compound degradation capacity was assessed using colorimetric tests. The bacteria were identified by the analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. None of the bacteria were capable of degrading lignin. The genus Pseudomonas had the greatest species richness; Bacillus spp exhibited the greatest capacity for degrading the different substrates, and Sphingobium was found in both morphotypes. Microorganisms participate in the degradation of wood consumed by Stenochironomus larvae. This is the first report of lignocellulolytic bacteria and enzymes in the digestive tracts of mining chironomids.

  10. Mechanism for starch granule ghost formation deduced from structural and enzyme digestion properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Dhital, Sushil; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Gidley, Michael J

    2014-01-22

    After heating in excess water under little or no shear, starch granules do not dissolve completely but persist as highly swollen fragile forms, commonly termed granule "ghosts". The macromolecular architecture of these ghosts has not been defined, despite their importance in determining characteristic properties of starches. In this study, amylase digestion of isolated granule ghosts from maize and potato starches is used as a probe to study the mechanism of ghost formation, through microstructural, mesoscopic, and molecular scale analyses of structure before and after digestion. Digestion profiles showed that neither integral nor surface proteins/lipids were crucial for control of either ghost digestion or integrity. On the basis of the molecular composition and conformation of enzyme-resistant fractions, it was concluded that the condensed polymeric surface structure of ghost particles is mainly composed of nonordered but entangled amylopectin (and some amylose) molecules, with limited reinforcement through partially ordered enzyme-resistant structures based on amylose (for maize starch; V-type order) or amylopectin (for potato starch; B-type order). The high level of branching and large molecular size of amylopectin is proposed to be the origin for the unusual stability of a solid structure based primarily on temporary entanglements.

  11. Induced and constitutive responses of digestive enzymes to plant toxins in an herbivorous mammal.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Dearing, M Denise

    2011-12-15

    Many plants produce plant secondary compounds (PSCs) that bind and inhibit the digestive enzymes of herbivores, thus limiting digestibility for the herbivore. Herbivorous insects employ several physiological responses to overcome the anti-nutritive effects of PSCs. However, studies in vertebrates have not shown such responses, perhaps stemming from the fact that previously studied vertebrates were not herbivorous. The responses of the digestive system to dietary PSCs in populations of Bryant's woodrat (Neotoma bryanti) that vary in their ecological and evolutionary experience with the PSCs in creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) were compared. Individuals from naïve and experienced populations were fed diets with and without added creosote resin. Animals fed diets with creosote resin had higher activities of pancreatic amylase, as well as luminal amylase and chymotrypsin, regardless of prior experience with creosote. The experienced population showed constitutively higher activities of intestinal maltase and sucrase. Additionally, the naïve population produced an aminopeptidase-N enzyme that was less inhibited by creosote resin when feeding on the creosote resin diet, whereas the experienced population constitutively expressed this form of aminopeptidase-N. Thus, the digestive system of an herbivorous vertebrate responds significantly to dietary PSCs, which may be important for allowing herbivorous vertebrates to feed on PSC-rich diets.

  12. Enhancement of proteolytic enzyme activity excreted from Bacillus stearothermophilus for a thermophilic aerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kee; Bae, Jin-Hye; Oh, Byung-Keun; Lee, Won Hong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2002-04-01

    Proteolysis is one of the main enzymatic reactions involved in waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion. In this study, proteases excreted from Bacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 31197) were classified, and an enhancement of protease activity was achieved using economical chemical additives for WAS digestion. Proteases excreted from B. stearothermophilus were classified into two families: serine and metallo-proteases. Various metal ions were investigated as additives which could potentially enhance protease activity. It was observed that Ca2+ and Fe2+ could markedly activate these enzymes. These results were applied to thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) of industrial WAS using B. stearothermophilus. The addition of these divalent ions enhanced the degradation performance of the TAD process in terms of reducing the total suspended solids (TSSs), the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content, and the intracellular and extracellular protein concentrations. The best result, with respect to protein reduction in a digestion experiment, was obtained by the addition of 2 mM Ca2+. Therefore, a proposed TAD process activated by calcium addition can be successfully used for industrial and municipal WAS digestion to the upgrading of TAD process performance.

  13. Digestive enzyme expression and epithelial structure of small intestine in neonatal rats after 16 days spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, M.; Yamasaki, M.; Hazama, A.; Ijiri, K.; Shimizu, T.

    It is important to assure whether digestive system can develop normally in neonates during spaceflight. Because the small intestine changes its function and structure drastically around weaning known as redifferentiation. Lactase expression declines and sucrase increases in small intestine for digestion of solid food before weaning. In this paper, we compared this enzyme transition and structural development of small intestine in neonatal rats after spaceflight. To find digestive genes differentially expressed in fight rats, DNA membrane macroarray was also used. Eight-day old rats were loaded to Space Shuttle Columbia, and housed in the animal facility for 16 days in space (STS-90, Neurolab mission). Two control groups (AGC; asynchronous ground control and VIV; vivarium) against flight group (FLT) were prepared. There was no difference in structure (crypt depth) and cell differentiation of epithelium between FLT and AGC by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that the amount of sucrase mRNA compared to lactase was decreased in FLT by RT-PCR. It reflected the enzyme transition was inhibited. Increase of 5 genes (APO A-I, APO A-IV, ACE, aFABP and aminopeptidase M) and decrease of carboxypeptidase-D were detected in FLT using macroarray. We think nutrition differences (less nourishment and late weaning) during spaceflight may cause inhibition of enzyme transition at least partly. The weightlessness might contribute to the inhibition through behavioral change.

  14. Development of digestive enzymes in larvae of Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus.

    PubMed

    López-Ramírez, G; Cuenca-Soria, C A; Alvarez-González, C A; Tovar-Ramírez, D; Ortiz-Galindo, J L; Perales-García, N; Márquez-Couturier, G; Arias-Rodríguez, L; Indy, J R; Contreras-Sánchez, W M; Gisbert, E; Moyano, F J

    2011-03-01

    The development of digestive enzymes during the early ontogeny of the Mayan cichlid (Cichlasoma urophthalmus) was studied using biochemical and electrophoretic techniques. From yolk absorption (6 days after hatching: dah), larvae were fed Artemia nauplii until 15 dah, afterward they were fed with commercial microparticulated trout food (45% protein and 16% lipids) from 16 to 60 dah. Several samples were collected including yolk-sac larvae (considered as day 1 after hatching) and specimens up to 60 dah. Most digestive enzymes were present from yolk absorption (5-6 dah), except for the specific acid proteases activity (pepsin-like), which increase rapidly from 8 dah up to 20 dah. Three alkaline proteases isoforms (24.0, 24.8, 84.5 kDa) were detected at 8 dah using SDS-PAGE zymogram, corresponding to trypsin, chymotrypsin and probably leucine aminopeptidase enzymes, and only one isoform was detected (relative electromobility, Rf = 0.54) for acid proteases (pepsin-like) from 3 dah onwards using PAGE zymogram. We concluded that C. urophthamus is a precocious fish with a great capacity to digest all kinds of food items, including artificial diets provided from 13 dah.

  15. Salivary digestive enzymes of the wheat bug, Eurygaster integriceps (Insecta: Hemiptera: Scutelleridae).

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Bandani, Ali Reza; Dastranj, Mehdi

    2014-06-01

    The digestive enzymes from salivary gland complexes (SGC) of Eurygaster integriceps, and their response to starvation and feeding were studied. Moreover, digestive amylases were partially purified and characterized by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography. The SGC are composed of two sections, the principal glands and accessory glands. The principal glands are further divided into the anterior lobes and posterior lobes. The SGC main enzyme was α-amylase, which hydrolyzed starch better than glycogen. The other carbohydrases were also present in the SGC complexes. Enzymatic activities toward mannose (α/β-mannosidases) were little in comparison to activities against glucose (α/β-glucosidases) and galactose (α/β-galactosidases), the latter being the greatest. Acid phosphatase showed higher activity than alkaline phosphatase. There was no measurable activity for lipase and aminopeptidase. Proteolytic activity was detected against general and specific protease substrates. Activities of all enzymes were increased in response to feeding in comparison to starved insects, revealing their induction and secretion in response to feeding pulse. The SGC amylases eluted in four major peaks and post-electrophoretic detection of the α-amylases demonstrated the existence of at least five isoamylases in the SGC. The physiological implication of these findings in pre-oral digestion of E. integriceps is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Diversity of Microbial Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZYmes) Associated with Freshwater and Soil Samples from Caatinga Biome.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Ana Camila; Fróes, Adriana; Lopes, Fabyano Álvares Cardoso; Thompson, Fabiano L; Krüger, Ricardo Henrique; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Bruce, Thiago

    2017-07-01

    Semi-arid and arid areas occupy about 33% of terrestrial ecosystems. However, little information is available about microbial diversity in the semi-arid Caatinga, which represents a unique biome that extends to about 11% of the Brazilian territory and is home to extraordinary diversity and high endemism level of species. In this study, we characterized the diversity of microbial genes associated with biomass conversion (carbohydrate-active enzymes, or so-called CAZYmes) in soil and freshwater of the Caatinga. Our results showed distinct CAZYme profiles in the soil and freshwater samples. Glycoside hydrolases and glycosyltransferases were the most abundant CAZYme families, with glycoside hydrolases more dominant in soil (∼44%) and glycosyltransferases more abundant in freshwater (∼50%). The abundances of individual glycoside hydrolase, glycosyltransferase, and carbohydrate-binding module subfamilies varied widely between soil and water samples. A predominance of glycoside hydrolases was observed in soil, and a higher contribution of enzymes involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis was observed in freshwater. The main taxa associated with the CAZYme sequences were Planctomycetia (relative abundance in soil, 29%) and Alphaproteobacteria (relative abundance in freshwater, 27%). Approximately 5-7% of CAZYme sequences showed low similarity with sequences deposited in non-redundant databases, suggesting putative homologues. Our findings represent a first attempt to describe specific microbial CAZYme profiles for environmental samples. Characterizing these enzyme groups associated with the conversion of carbohydrates in nature will improve our understanding of the significant roles of enzymes in the carbon cycle. We identified a CAZYme signature that can be used to discriminate between soil and freshwater samples, and this signature may be related to the microbial species adapted to the habitat. The data show the potential ecological roles of the CAZYme repertoire and

  17. Helichrysum and grapefruit extracts inhibit carbohydrate digestion and absorption, improving postprandial glucose levels and hyperinsulinemia in rats.

    PubMed

    de la Garza, Ana Laura; Etxeberria, Usune; Lostao, María Pilar; San Román, Belén; Barrenetxe, Jaione; Martínez, J Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I

    2013-12-11

    Several plant extracts rich in flavonoids have been reported to improve hyperglycemia by inhibiting digestive enzyme activities and SGLT1-mediated glucose uptake. In this study, helichrysum ( Helichrysum italicum ) and grapefruit ( Citrus × paradisi ) extracts inhibited in vitro enzyme activities. The helichrysum extract showed higher inhibitory activity of α-glucosidase (IC50 = 0.19 mg/mL) than α-amylase (IC50 = 0.83 mg/mL), whereas the grapefruit extract presented similar α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities (IC50 = 0.42 mg/mL and IC50 = 0.41 mg/mL, respectively). Both extracts reduced maltose digestion in noneverted intestinal sacs (57% with helichrysum and 46% with grapefruit). Likewise, both extracts inhibited SGLT1-mediated methylglucoside uptake in Caco-2 cells in the presence of Na(+) (56% of inhibition with helichrysum and 54% with grapefruit). In vivo studies demonstrated that helichrysum decreased blood glucose levels after an oral maltose tolerance test (OMTT), and both extracts reduced postprandial glucose levels after the oral starch tolerance test (OSTT). Finally, both extracts improved hyperinsulinemia (31% with helichrysum and 50% with grapefruit) and HOMA index (47% with helichrysum and 54% with grapefruit) in a dietary model of insulin resistance in rats. In summary, helichrysum and grapefruit extracts improve postprandial glycemic control in rats, possibly by inhibiting α-glucosidase and α-amylase enzyme activities and decreasing SGLT1-mediated glucose uptake.

  18. Impact of levels of total digestible nutrients on microbiome, enzyme profile and degradation of feeds in buffalo rumen

    PubMed Central

    Kala, Anju; Kamra, D. N.; Kumar, Avinash; Agarwal, Neeta; Chaudhary, L. C.; Joshi, C. G.

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed at understanding a shift in rumen microbiome of buffaloes fed various levels of total digestible nutrients. To understand the process, the metagenomics of rumen microbes, in vivo and in vitro rumen fermentation studies were carried out. Three rumen fistulated adult male Murrah buffaloes were fed three isonitrogenous diets varying in total digestible nutrients (70, 85 and 100% of TDN requirement) in 3X3 switch over design. On dry matter basis, wheat straw/ roughage content were 81, 63 and 51% and that of maize grain was 8, 16 and 21% in three diets respectively. After 20 d of feeding, rumen liquor and rumen contents were sampled just before (0h) and 4h post feeding. Ruminococcus flavefaciens and R. albus (estimated with real time PCR) were higher in high roughage diets. The predominant phyla in all the three groups were Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes followed by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fibrobacteres. A core group of more than fifty rumen bacteria was present in all the animals with very little variations due to level of TDN. The most predominant bacterial genera reported in order of decreasing abundance were: Prevotella, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, Parabacteroides, Fibrobacter, Butyrivibrio etc. The higher diversity of the enyzmes families GH 23, GH 28, GH 39, GH 97, GH 106, and GH 127 (the enzymes active in fibre and starch degradation) were significantly higher on 100%TDN diet while CE 14 (required for the hydrolysis of bond between carbohydrate and lignin) was higher on low TDN (70%) diet, indicating ester bond cleavage was better in animals fed high roughage (wheat straw) diet. PMID:28207851

  19. Impact of levels of total digestible nutrients on microbiome, enzyme profile and degradation of feeds in buffalo rumen.

    PubMed

    Kala, Anju; Kamra, D N; Kumar, Avinash; Agarwal, Neeta; Chaudhary, L C; Joshi, C G

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed at understanding a shift in rumen microbiome of buffaloes fed various levels of total digestible nutrients. To understand the process, the metagenomics of rumen microbes, in vivo and in vitro rumen fermentation studies were carried out. Three rumen fistulated adult male Murrah buffaloes were fed three isonitrogenous diets varying in total digestible nutrients (70, 85 and 100% of TDN requirement) in 3X3 switch over design. On dry matter basis, wheat straw/ roughage content were 81, 63 and 51% and that of maize grain was 8, 16 and 21% in three diets respectively. After 20 d of feeding, rumen liquor and rumen contents were sampled just before (0h) and 4h post feeding. Ruminococcus flavefaciens and R. albus (estimated with real time PCR) were higher in high roughage diets. The predominant phyla in all the three groups were Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes followed by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fibrobacteres. A core group of more than fifty rumen bacteria was present in all the animals with very little variations due to level of TDN. The most predominant bacterial genera reported in order of decreasing abundance were: Prevotella, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, Parabacteroides, Fibrobacter, Butyrivibrio etc. The higher diversity of the enyzmes families GH 23, GH 28, GH 39, GH 97, GH 106, and GH 127 (the enzymes active in fibre and starch degradation) were significantly higher on 100%TDN diet while CE 14 (required for the hydrolysis of bond between carbohydrate and lignin) was higher on low TDN (70%) diet, indicating ester bond cleavage was better in animals fed high roughage (wheat straw) diet.

  20. Impact of feed carbohydrates and nitrogen source on the production of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Le, Chencheng; Stuckey, David C

    2017-10-01

    Six stirred fill-and-draw batch reactors with a range of carbohydrate feeds (glucose, fructose and sucrose), and nitrogen sources (NH 4 Cl, urea) at various concentrations were used to investigate the effect of feed composition on the production of soluble microbial products (SMPs) during anaerobic digestion (AD). To gain greater insights into the SMPs produced, the composition of various fractions was analyzed, while the low molecular weight (MW) SMPs generated with different feeds and nutrients were collected and chemically analyzed using GC-MS. Other organic solutes such as free amino acids were determined using HPLC, and this level of chemical analysis has never been carried out in past work because of analytical limitations. It was found that the presence of ammonium salts rather than urea at 200 mg/L stimulated the production of not only volatile fatty acids, but also SMPs of different MW fractions, and reduced the production of biogas significantly. The study also revealed that the type of SMP that dominates in a particular system depends on the chemical characteristics of the feed, and this insight has implications on the composition of the effluent from anaerobic digesters (and their potential chlorination by-products), and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nucleic acids digestion by enzymes in the stomach of snakehead (Channa argus) and banded grouper (Epinephelus awoara).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Pan, Xiaoming; Wu, Wei; Cao, Minjie; Dong, Ping; Liang, Xingguo

    2017-02-01

    Dietary nucleic acids (NAs) were important nutrients. However, the digestion of NAs in stomach has not been studied. In this study, the digestion of NAs by enzymes from fish stomach was investigated. The snakehead pepsins (SP) which were the main enzymes in stomach were extracted and purified. The purity of SP was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and HPLC. The snakehead pepsin 2 (SP2) which was the main component in the extracts was used for investigating the protein and NAs digestion activity. SP2 could digest NAs, including λ DNA and salmon sperm DNA. Interestingly, the digestion could be inhibited by treatment of alkaline solution at pH 8.0 and pepstatin A, and the digestion could happen either in the presence or absence of hemoglobin (Hb) and BSA as the protein substrates. Similarly, the stomach enzymes of banded grouper also showed the NAs digestion activity. NAs could be digested by the stomach enzymes of snakehead and banded grouper. It may be helpful for understanding both animal nutrition and NAs metabolic pathway.

  2. Probing the Complex Architecture of Multimodular Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes Using a Combination of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering and X-Ray Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Czjzek, Mirjam; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The various modules in multimodular carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) may function in catalysis, carbohydrate binding, protein-protein interactions or as linkers. Here, we describe how combining the biophysical techniques of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and macromolecular X-ray crystallography (XRC) provides a powerful tool for examination into questions related to overall structural organization of ultra multimodular CAZymes.

  3. The role of condensed tannins in the nutritional value of Lotus pedunculatus for sheep. 4. Sites of carbohydrate and protein digestion as influenced by dietary reactive tannin concentration.

    PubMed

    Barry, T N; Manley, T R; Duncan, S J

    1986-01-01

    1. Vegetative secondary growth Lotus pedunculatus was cut daily, and fed fresh at hourly intervals (600 g dry matter (DM)/d) to three groups each of three sheep fitted with permanent cannulas into the rumen and duodenum. Lotus fed to two of the groups was sprayed with low and high rates of polyethylene glycol (PEG; molecular weight 3350), which specifically binds the condensed tannins (CT). Nutrient intake and faecal excretion were measured directly, duodenal flows estimated from continuous intraruminal infusion of inert ruthenium phenanthroline (Ru-P) and CrEDTA markers, and rumen pool sizes measured at slaughter. 2. Dietary concentrations of total reactive CT (i.e. that not bound to PEG) were 95, 45 and 14 g/kg DM, whilst the corresponding values for free CT were 15, 5 and 2 g/kg DM. 3. Increasing dietary reactive CT concentration linearly increased duodenal flows of non-ammonia nitrogen, but linearly decreased the apparent digestibility of energy and organic matter, and rumen digestion of hemicellulose but not of cellulose. Rumen digestion as a proportion of total digestion was increased by the higher PEG rate for organic matter, energy, pectin and lignin. 4. High dietary CT concentration was associated with increased N retention. Rumen ammonia concentration and pool size showed only a slight decline on this diet, indicating that there must have been increased recycling of N into the rumen. 5. Increasing dietary reactive CT concentration had no effect on the rate at which carbohydrate constituents were degraded in the rumen per unit time (FDR), but increased the rate at which their undegraded residues (FOR) left the rumen per unit time. The latter appeared to be the principal mechanism by which rumen digestion as a proportion of total digestion was reduced at high dietary CT concentrations. From a comparison of FDR and FOR of carbohydrate components in lotus and Brassica oleracea diets, it was concluded that hemicellulose digestion was rate-limiting for rumen

  4. Wholeness and primary and secondary food structure effects on in vitro digestion patterns determine nutritionally distinct carbohydrate fractions in cereal foods.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Suman; Monro, John

    2012-12-01

    Starchy foods of differing structure, including bakery products, breakfast cereals, pastas, and pulses were digested in vitro. Bakery products and processed breakfast cereals with little resilient structure yielded large amounts of rapidly available carbohydrate (RAC), less slowly digested starch (SDS) and little inaccessible digestible starch (IDS) (70:22:8%). Partially processed grains, such as rolled oats contained an increased proportion of SDS (55:38:7%). Pastas, being dense starch structures digested more gradually to completion by superficial erosion, yielding approximately equal proportions of RAC and SDS but little IDS (43:52:4%). Pulses, which retained their cellular morphology, digested more linearly yielding a lower proportion of RAC, a larger proportion of SDS and more IDS (9:69:22%). Preservation of native "primary" structure, and use of processing to create "secondary" structure, are both means by which wholeness, in the sense of intactness, can be used to influence carbohydrate digestion to make foods of lower glycaemic impact. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. New Stable Isotope Method to Measure Protein Digestibility and Response to Pancreatic Enzyme Intake in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, M.P.K.J.; Com, G.; Anderson, P.J.; Deutz, N.E.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Adequate protein intake and digestion are necessary to prevent muscle wasting in cystic fibrosis (CF). Accurate and easy-to-use methodology to quantify protein maldigestion is lacking in CF. Objective To measure protein digestibility and the response to pancreatic enzyme intake in CF by using a new stable isotope methodology. Design In 19 CF and 8 healthy subjects, protein digestibility was quantified during continuous (sip) feeding for 6 hours by adding 15N-labeled spirulina protein and L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine (PHE) to the nutrition and measuring plasma ratio [15N]PHE to [2H5]PHE. Pancreatic enzymes were ingested after 2 h in CF and the response in protein digestibility was assessed. To exclude difference in mucosal function, postabsorptive whole-body citrulline (CIT) production rate was measured by L-[5-13C-5,5-2H2]-CIT pulse and blood samples were taken to analyze tracer-tracee ratios. Results Protein digestibility was severely reduced in the CF group (47% of healthy subjects; P<0.001). Intake of pancreatic enzymes induced a slow increase in protein digestibility in CF until 90% of values obtained by healthy subjects. Maximal digestibility was reached at 100 min and maintained for 80 min. Stratification into CF children (n=10) and adults showed comparable values for protein digestibility and similar kinetic responses to pancreatic enzyme intake. Whole-body citrulline production was elevated in CF indicating preserved mucosal function. Conclusion Protein digestibility is severely compromised in patients with CF as measured by this novel and easy-to-use stable isotope approach. Pancreatic enzymes are able to normalize protein digestibility in CF, albeit with a severe delay. PMID:24268783

  6. New stable isotope method to measure protein digestibility and response to pancreatic enzyme intake in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Engelen, M P K J; Com, G; Anderson, P J; Deutz, N E P

    2014-12-01

    Adequate protein intake and digestion are necessary to prevent muscle wasting in cystic fibrosis (CF). Accurate and easy-to-use methodology to quantify protein maldigestion is lacking in CF. To measure protein digestibility and the response to pancreatic enzyme intake in CF by using a new stable isotope methodology. In 19 CF and 8 healthy subjects, protein digestibility was quantified during continuous (sip) feeding for 6 h by adding (15)N-labeled spirulina protein and L-[ring-(2)H5]phenylalanine (PHE) to the nutrition and measuring plasma ratio [(15)N]PHE to [(2)H5]PHE. Pancreatic enzymes were ingested after 2 h in CF and the response in protein digestibility was assessed. To exclude difference in mucosal function, postabsorptive whole-body citrulline (CIT) production rate was measured by L-[5-(13)C-5,5-(2)H2]-CIT pulse and blood samples were taken to analyze tracer-tracee ratios. Protein digestibility was severely reduced in the CF group (47% of healthy subjects; P < 0.001). Intake of pancreatic enzymes induced a slow increase in protein digestibility in CF until 90% of values obtained by healthy subjects. Maximal digestibility was reached at 100 min and maintained for 80 min. Stratification into CF children (n = 10) and adults showed comparable values for protein digestibility and similar kinetic responses to pancreatic enzyme intake. Whole-body citrulline production was elevated in CF indicating preserved mucosal function. Protein digestibility is severely compromised in patients with CF as measured by this novel and easy-to-use stable isotope approach. Pancreatic enzymes are able to normalize protein digestibility in CF, albeit with a severe delay. Registration ClinicalTrials.gov = NCT01494909. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. Release of digestive enzymes from the crustacean hepatopancreas: effect of vertebrate gastrointestinal hormones.

    PubMed

    Resch-Sedlmeier, G; Sedlmeier, D

    1999-06-01

    Vertebrate gastrointestinal hormones were tested on their ability to liberate digestive enzymes from the crustacean midgut gland. CCK-8 (desulfated form), gastrin, bombesin, secretin, and substance P were detected to release enzymes. Maximal concentrations observed were 5 nM CCK for protease release, 1 nM gastrin for protease and 100 nM for amylase release, 100 nM bombesin for protease release, 10 nM secretin for amylase and protease release, and 100 nM substance P for protease release. Unlike in vertebrates, glucagon was unable to stimulate enzyme release in crustaceans, this also applies to the counterpart insulin. These results may support the assumption that Crustacea possess endogenous factors resembling the above mentioned vertebrate hormones, at least in such a way that the appropriate receptors have the capacity to accept these hormones.

  8. Digestive enzyme activity and trophic behavior in two predator aquatic insects (Plecoptera, Perlidae): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, M J; Trenzado, C E; Tierno de Figueroa, J M; Sanz, A

    2012-05-01

    Plecoptera (Perlidae) are among the major macroinvertebrate predators in stream ecosystems and one of the insect families with lower tolerance to environmental alterations, being usually employed as bioindicators of high water ecological quality. The differences in the trophic roles of the coexisting species have been exclusively studied from their gut contents, while no data are available on the comparative digestive capacity. In the present paper, we make a comparative study of the activity of several digestive enzymes, namely proteases (at different pH), amylase, lipase, trypsin and chymotrypsin, in two species of stoneflies, Perla bipunctata and Dinocras cephalotes, which cohabit in the same stream. The study of digestive enzyme activity together with the analysis of gut contents can contribute to a better understanding of the ecology of these aquatic insects and their role in freshwater food webs. Thus, our results show that the two studied predator species inhabiting in the same stream present specializations on their feeding behaviors, facilitating their coexistence, and also differences in their capacity of use the resources. One of the main findings of this study is that D. cephalotes is able to assimilate a wider trophic resource spectrum and this could be one of the reasons why this species has a wider global distribution in all its geographical range. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. EFFECTS OF FIVE DIVERSE LIGNOCELLULOSIC DIETS ON DIGESTIVE ENZYME BIOCHEMISTRY IN THE TERMITE Reticulitermes flavipes.

    PubMed

    Karl, Zachary J; Scharf, Michael E

    2015-10-01

    Termites have recently drawn much attention as models for biomass processing, mainly due to their lignocellulose digestion capabilities and mutualisms with cellulolytic gut symbionts. This research used the lower termite Reticulitermes flavipes to investigate gut enzyme activity changes in response to feeding on five diverse lignocellulosic diets (cellulose filter paper [FP], pine wood [PW], beech wood xylan [X], corn stover [CS], and soybean residue [SB]). Our objectives were to compare whole-gut digestive enzyme activity and host versus symbiont contributions to enzyme activity after feeding on these diets. Our hypothesis was that enzyme activities would vary among diets as an adaptive mechanism enabling termites and symbiota to optimally utilize variable resources. Results support our "diet-adaptation" hypothesis and further indicate that, in most cases, host contributions are greater than those of symbionts with respect to the enzymes and activities studied. The results obtained thus provide indications as to which types of transcriptomic resources, termite or symbiont, are most relevant for developing recombinant enzyme cocktails tailored to specific feedstocks. With regard to the agricultural feedstocks tested (CS and SB), our results suggest endoglucanase and exoglucanase (cellobiohydrolase) activities are most relevant for CS breakdown; whereas endoglucanase and xylosidase activities are relevant for SB breakdown. However, other unexplored activities than those tested may also be important for breakdown of these two feedstocks. These findings provide new protein-level insights into diet adaptation by termites, and also complement host-symbiont metatranscriptomic studies that have been completed for R. flavipes after FP, PW, CS, and SB feeding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Daily rhythms of digestive enzyme activity and gene expression in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Mata-Sotres, José Antonio; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Yúfera, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    In order to identify daily changes in digestive physiology in developing gilthead seabream larvae, the enzyme activity (trypsin, lipases and α-amylase) and gene expression (trypsinogen-try, chymotrypsinogen-ctrb, bile salt-activated lipase-cel1b, phospholipase A2-pla2 and α-amylase-amy2a) were measured during a 24h cycle in larvae reared under a 12h light/12h dark photoperiod. Larvae were sampled at 10, 18, 30 and 60days post-hatch. In each sampling day, larvae were sampled every 3h during a complete 24h cycle. The enzyme activity and gene expression exhibited a marked dependent behavior to the light/darkness cycle in all tested ages. The patterns of activity and expression of all tested enzymes were compared to the feeding pattern found in the same larvae, which showed a rhythmic feeding pattern with a strong light synchronization. In the four tested ages, the activities of trypsin, and to a lesser extent lipases and amylase, were related to feeding activity. Molecular expression of the pancreatic enzymes tended to increase during the night, probably as an anticipation of the forthcoming ingestion of food that will take place during the next light period. It follows that the enzymatic activities are being regulated at translational and/or post-translational level. The potential variability of enzyme secretion along the whole day is an important factor to take into account in future studies. A particularly striking consequence of the present results is the reliability of studies based in only one daily sample taken at the same hour of the day, as those focused to assess ontogeny of digestive enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of N-benzoyl-D-phenylalanine and metformin on carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in neonatal streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Natarajan; Pari, Leelavinothan

    2005-01-01

    The effect of N-benzoyl-D-phenylalanine (NBDP) and metformin was studied on the activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in neonatal streptozotocin (nSTZ) non-insulin-dependent diabetic rats. To induce non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), single dose injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 100 mg/kg body weight; i.p.) was given to 2-day old rats. After 10-12 weeks, rats weighing >150 g were selected for screening in NIDDM model, they were checked for fasting blood glucose concentrations to conform the status of NIDDM. NBDP (50,100 and 200 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally for 6 weeks into the confirmed diabetic rats. The activities of gluconeogenic enzymes were significantly increased, whereas the activities of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were significantly decreased in nSTZ diabetic rats. Both NBDP and metformin were able to restore the altered enzyme activities to almost control concentrations. Combination treatment was more effective than either drug alone. The administration of NBDP along with metformin to nSTZ diabetic rats normalizes blood glucose and causes marked improvement of altered carbohydrate metabolic enzymes during diabetes.

  12. Evolution of Digestive Enzymes and RNASE1 Provides Insights into Dietary Switch of Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengfei; Xu, Shixia; Du, Kexing; Huang, Fang; Chen, Zhuo; Zhou, Kaiya; Ren, Wenhua; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Although cetaceans (whales, porpoises, and dolphins) have multi-chambered stomachs, feeding habits of modern cetaceans have dramatically changed from herbivorous to carnivorous. However, the genetic basis underlying this dietary switch remains unexplored. Here, we present the first systematic investigation of 10 digestive enzymes genes (i.e., CYP7A1, CTRC, LIPC, LIPF, PNLIP, PGC, PRSS1, SI, SLC5A1, and TMPRSS15) of representative cetaceans, and the evolutionary trajectory of RNASE1 in cetartiodactylans. Positive selections were detected with proteinases (i.e., CTRC, PRSS1, and TMPRSS15) and lipases (i.e., CYP7A1, LIPF, and PNLIP) suggesting that cetaceans have evolved an enhanced digestion capacity for proteins and lipids, the major nutritional components of their prey (fishes and invertebrates). In addition, it was found that RNASE1 gene duplicated after the cetartiodactylan speciation and two independent gene duplication events took place in Camelidae and Ruminantia. Positive selection was detected with RNASE1 of Camelidae and Bovidae, suggesting enhanced digestive efficiency in the ruminants. Remarkably, even though the ancestors of cetaceans were terrestrial artiodactyls that are herbivorous, modern cetaceans lost the pancreatic RNASE1 copy with digestive function, which is in accordance with the dietary change from herbivorous to carnivorous. In sum, this is the first study that provides new insights into the evolutionary mechanism of dietary switch in cetaceans. PMID:27651393

  13. Bacteria of the human gut microbiome catabolize red seaweed glycans with carbohydrate-active enzyme updates from extrinsic microbes.

    PubMed

    Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Kelly, Amelia G; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Martens, Eric C; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2012-11-27

    Humans host an intestinal population of microbes--collectively referred to as the gut microbiome--which encode the carbohydrate active enzymes, or CAZymes, that are absent from the human genome. These CAZymes help to extract energy from recalcitrant polysaccharides. The question then arises as to if and how the microbiome adapts to new carbohydrate sources when modern humans change eating habits. Recent metagenome analysis of microbiomes from healthy American, Japanese, and Spanish populations identified putative CAZymes obtained by horizontal gene transfer from marine bacteria, which suggested that human gut bacteria evolved to degrade algal carbohydrates-for example, consumed in form of sushi. We approached this hypothesis by studying such a polysaccharide utilization locus (PUL) obtained by horizontal gene transfer by the gut bacterium Bacteroides plebeius. Transcriptomic and growth experiments revealed that the PUL responds to the polysaccharide porphyran from red algae, enabling growth on this carbohydrate but not related substrates like agarose and carrageenan. The X-ray crystallographic and biochemical analysis of two proteins encoded by this PUL, BACPLE_01689 and BACPLE_01693, showed that they are β-porphyranases belonging to glycoside hydrolase families 16 and 86, respectively. The product complex of the GH86 at 1.3 Å resolution highlights the molecular details of porphyran hydrolysis by this new porphyranase. Combined, these data establish experimental support for the argument that CAZymes and associated genes obtained from extrinsic microbes add new catabolic functions to the human gut microbiome.

  14. Digestive peptidase evolution in holometabolous insects led to a divergent group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Dias, Renata O; Via, Allegra; Brandão, Marcelo M; Tramontano, Anna; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2015-03-01

    Trypsins and chymotrypsins are well-studied serine peptidases that cleave peptide bonds at the carboxyl side of basic and hydrophobic L-amino acids, respectively. These enzymes are largely responsible for the digestion of proteins. Three primary processes regulate the activity of these peptidases: secretion, precursor (zymogen) activation and substrate-binding site recognition. Here, we present a detailed phylogenetic analysis of trypsins and chymotrypsins in three orders of holometabolous insects and reveal divergent characteristics of Lepidoptera enzymes in comparison with those of Coleoptera and Diptera. In particular, trypsin subsite S1 was more hydrophilic in Lepidoptera than in Coleoptera and Diptera, whereas subsites S2-S4 were more hydrophobic, suggesting different substrate preferences. Furthermore, Lepidoptera displayed a lineage-specific trypsin group belonging only to the Noctuidae family. Evidence for facilitated trypsin auto-activation events were also observed in all the insect orders studied, with the characteristic zymogen activation motif complementary to the trypsin active site. In contrast, insect chymotrypsins did not seem to have a peculiar evolutionary history with respect to their mammal counterparts. Overall, our findings suggest that the need for fast digestion allowed holometabolous insects to evolve divergent groups of peptidases with high auto-activation rates, and highlight that the evolution of trypsins led to a most diverse group of enzymes in Lepidoptera. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Andrographolide powder treatment as antifeedant decreased digestive enzyme activity from Plutella xylostella (L.) larvae midgut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihah, Malini, Desak Made; Roviani, Hana; Rani, Nessa Vidya; Hermawan, Wawan

    2018-02-01

    Andrographolide, an active compound of Andrographis paniculata, has shown antifeedant activity against Plutella xylostella larvae by disrupting the midgut histological structures. This study aims to determine the activity of andrographolide in crystallized powder form against several digestive enzymes from the midgut of 4th instar P. xylostella larvae. The concentrations used were 0 (control), 1000, 1600, 2500, 4000 and 6500 ppm with four replications each. No-choice antifeedant test with leaf disc method is used in a bioassay for 24 hours. The midgut was dissected from 2nd until 6th segment of 4th instar larvae and was homogenized in iced-buffer solution. Furthermore, larvae's midgut samples were centrifuged at 10,000 rpm, 4°C for 20 min and the supernatant is used as enzyme source. The results showed that andrographolide significantly reduces the amylase, invertase, protease and trypsin activity, as well as total protein concentration compared with control (p<0.05) in a dose-dependent manner. This study provides information about the mode of action of andrographolide in inhibiting feed activity by the reduced digestive enzyme activity of 4th instar P. xylostella larvae.

  16. Prolidase is a critical enzyme for complete gliadin digestion in Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenkova, Valeriia F; Goptar, Irina A; Zhuzhikov, Dmitry P; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Oppert, Brenda; Filippova, Irina Yu; Elpidina, Elena N

    2017-08-01

    Prolidase is a proline-specific metallopeptidase that cleaves imidodipeptides with C-terminal Pro residue. Prolidase was purified and characterized from the Tenebrio molitor larval midgut. The enzyme was localized in the soluble fraction of posterior midgut tissues, corresponding to a predicted cytoplasmic localization of prolidase according to the structure of the mRNA transcript. Expression of genes encoding prolidase and the major digestive proline-specific peptidase (PSP)-dipeptidyl peptidase 4-were similar. The pH optimum of T. molitor prolidase was 7.5, and the enzyme was inhibited by Z-Pro, indicating that it belongs to type I prolidases. In mammals, prolidase is particularly important in the catabolism of a proline-rich protein-collagen. We propose that T. molitor larval prolidase is a critical enzyme for the final stages of digestion of dietary proline-rich gliadins, providing hydrolysis of imidodipeptides in the cytoplasm of midgut epithelial cells. We propose that the products of hydrolysis are absorbed from the luminal contents by peptide transporters, which we have annotated in the T. molitor larval gut transcriptome. The origin of prolidase substrates in the insect midgut is discussed in the context of overall success of grain feeding insects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Carbohydrate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  18. Digestive enzymes of the Californian two-spot octopus, Octopus bimaculoides (Pickford and McConnaughey, 1949).

    PubMed

    Ibarra-García, Laura Elizabeth; Tovar-Ramírez, Dariel; Rosas, Carlos; Campa-Córdova, Ángel Isidro; Mazón-Suástegui, José Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Octopus bimaculoides is an important commercially fished species in the California Peninsula with aquaculture potential; however, to date limited information is available regarding its digestive physiology. The objective of this study was focused on biochemically characterizing the main enzymes involved in the digestion of O. bimaculoides. Optimum pH, temperature and thermostability were determined for amylases, lipases, trypsin and chymotrypsin; optimum pH and protease inhibitor effect were assessed for acidic and alkaline proteases, and the effect of divalent ions on trypsin and chymotrypsin activity was evaluated in enzymatic extracts from the digestive (DG) and salivary glands (SG) and crop gastric juices (GJ). High amylase activity was detected in GD and GJ whereas this activity is very low in other cephalopods. Salivary glands had the greatest activity in most of the enzyme groups, showing the importance of this organ in digestion. Optimum pH was different depending on the organ and enzyme analyzed. The optimum pH in DG was 3 showing the predominance of acidic proteases in the digestion process. All enzymes were resistant and stable at high temperatures in contrast with other marine species. Trypsin and chymotrypsin activity were highly incremented with the presence of Mg 2+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ in some tissues. The inhibitor assay showed the importance of serine proteases, metalloproteases and aspartic proteases in the digestive process of this species. This study is the first in assessing the main digestive enzymes of O. bimaculoides and in remarking the importance of other digestive enzyme groups besides proteases in octopuses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Purification and characterization of zebrafish hatching enzyme - an evolutionary aspect of the mechanism of egg envelope digestion.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kaori; Inohaya, Keiji; Kawaguchi, Mari; Yoshizaki, Norio; Iuchi, Ichiro; Yasumasu, Shigeki

    2008-12-01

    There are two hatching enzyme homologues in the zebrafish genome: zebrafish hatching enzyme ZHE1 and ZHE2. Northern blot and RT-PCR analysis revealed that ZHE1 was mainly expressed in pre-hatching embryos, whereas ZHE2 was rarely expressed. This was consistent with the results obtained in an experiment conducted at the protein level, which demonstrated that one kind of hatching enzyme, ZHE1, was able to be purified from the hatching liquid. Therefore, the hatching of zebrafish embryo is performed by a single enzyme, different from the finding that the medaka hatching enzyme is an enzyme system composed of two enzymes, medaka high choriolytic enzyme (MHCE) and medaka low choriolytic enzyme (MLCE), which cooperatively digest the egg envelope. The six ZHE1-cleaving sites were located in the N-terminal regions of egg envelope subunit proteins, ZP2 and ZP3, but not in the internal regions, such as the ZP domains. The digestion manner of ZHE1 appears to be highly analogous to that of MHCE, which partially digests the egg envelope and swells the envelope. The cross-species digestion using enzymes and substrates of zebrafish and medaka revealed that both ZHE1 and MHCE cleaved the same sites of the egg envelope proteins of two species, suggesting that the substrate specificity of ZHE1 is quite similar to that of MHCE. However, MLCE did not show such similarity. Because HCE and LCE are the result of gene duplication in the evolutionary pathway of Teleostei, the present study suggests that ZHE1 and MHCE maintain the character of an ancestral hatching enzyme, and that MLCE acquires a new function, such as promoting the complete digestion of the egg envelope swollen by MHCE.

  20. Oxidative Stress and Digestive Enzyme Activity of Flatfish Larvae in a Changing Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Marta S.; Faleiro, Filipa; Diniz, Mário; Machado, Jorge; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Peck, Myron A.; Pörtner, Hans O.; Rosa, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Until now, it is not known how the antioxidant and digestive enzymatic machinery of fish early life stages will change with the combined effects of future ocean acidification and warming. Here we show that high pCO2 (~1600 μatm) significantly decreased metabolic rates (up to 27.4 %) of flatfish larvae, Solea senegalensis, at both present (18 °C) and warmer temperatures (+4 °C). Moreover, both warming and hypercapnia increased the heat shock response and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), mainly in post-metamorphic larvae (30 dph). The lack of changes in the activity of CAT and GST of pre-metamorphic larvae (10 dph) seems to indicate that earlier stages lack a fully-developed antioxidant defense system. Nevertheless, the heat shock and antioxidant responses of post-metamorphic larvae were not enough to avoid the peroxidative damage, which was greatly increased under future environmental conditions. Digestive enzymatic activity of S. senegalensis larvae was also affected by future predictions. Hypercapnic conditions led to a decrease in the activity of digestive enzymes, both pancreatic (up to 26.1 % for trypsin and 74.5 % for amylase) and intestinal enzymes (up to 36.1 % for alkaline phosphatase) in post-metamorphic larvae. Moreover, the impact of ocean acidification and warming on some of these physiological and biochemical variables (namely, lower OCR and higher HSP and MDA levels) were translated into larvae performance, being significantly correlated with decreased larval growth and survival or increased incidence of skeletal deformities. The increased vulnerability of flatfish early life stages under future ocean conditions is expected to potentially determine recruitment and population dynamics in marine ecosystems. PMID:26221723

  1. Oxidative Stress and Digestive Enzyme Activity of Flatfish Larvae in a Changing Ocean.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Marta S; Faleiro, Filipa; Diniz, Mário; Machado, Jorge; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Peck, Myron A; Pörtner, Hans O; Rosa, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Until now, it is not known how the antioxidant and digestive enzymatic machinery of fish early life stages will change with the combined effects of future ocean acidification and warming. Here we show that high pCO2 (~1600 μatm) significantly decreased metabolic rates (up to 27.4 %) of flatfish larvae, Solea senegalensis, at both present (18 °C) and warmer temperatures (+4 °C). Moreover, both warming and hypercapnia increased the heat shock response and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), mainly in post-metamorphic larvae (30 dph). The lack of changes in the activity of CAT and GST of pre-metamorphic larvae (10 dph) seems to indicate that earlier stages lack a fully-developed antioxidant defense system. Nevertheless, the heat shock and antioxidant responses of post-metamorphic larvae were not enough to avoid the peroxidative damage, which was greatly increased under future environmental conditions. Digestive enzymatic activity of S. senegalensis larvae was also affected by future predictions. Hypercapnic conditions led to a decrease in the activity of digestive enzymes, both pancreatic (up to 26.1 % for trypsin and 74.5 % for amylase) and intestinal enzymes (up to 36.1 % for alkaline phosphatase) in post-metamorphic larvae. Moreover, the impact of ocean acidification and warming on some of these physiological and biochemical variables (namely, lower OCR and higher HSP and MDA levels) were translated into larvae performance, being significantly correlated with decreased larval growth and survival or increased incidence of skeletal deformities. The increased vulnerability of flatfish early life stages under future ocean conditions is expected to potentially determine recruitment and population dynamics in marine ecosystems.

  2. A Spatially Continuous Model of Carbohydrate Digestion and Transport Processes in the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Arun S.; Brooks, Stephen P. J.; Kalmokoff, Martin; Eberl, Hermann J.

    2015-01-01

    A spatially continuous mathematical model of transport processes, anaerobic digestion and microbial complexity as would be expected in the human colon is presented. The model is a system of first-order partial differential equations with context determined number of dependent variables, and stiff, non-linear source terms. Numerical simulation of the model is used to elucidate information about the colon-microbiota complex. It is found that the composition of materials on outflow of the model does not well-describe the composition of material in other model locations, and inferences using outflow data varies according to model reactor representation. Additionally, increased microbial complexity allows the total microbial community to withstand major system perturbations in diet and community structure. However, distribution of strains and functional groups within the microbial community can be modified depending on perturbation length and microbial kinetic parameters. Preliminary model extensions and potential investigative opportunities using the computational model are discussed. PMID:26680208

  3. Industrially Important Carbohydrate Degrading Enzymes from Yeasts: Pectinases, Chitinases, and β-1,3-Glucanases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N.; Kumar, D. Sunil; Dash, Swati S.; Sahu, Santosh Kumar

    Polysaccharide degrading enzymes are hydrolytic enzymes, which have a lot of industrial potential and also play a crucial role in carbon recycling. Pectinases, chitinases and glucanases are the three major polysaccharide degrading enzymes found abundantly in nature and these enzymes are mainly produced by fungal strains. Production of these enzymes by yeasts is advantageous over fungi, because the former are easily amenable to genetic manipulations and time required for growth and production is less than that of the latter. Several yeasts belonging to Saccharomyces, Pichia, Rhodotorula and Cryptococcus produce extracellular pectinases, glucanases and chitinases. This chapter emphasizes on the biological significance of these enzymes, their production and their industrial applications.

  4. Effects of consumption of sucromalt, a slowly digestible carbohydrate, on mental and physical energy questionnaire responses.

    PubMed

    Dammann, Kristen W; Bell, Margie; Kanter, Mitch; Berger, Alvin

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate whether consumption of the low-glycemic index (GI) carbohydrate sucromalt improves healthy adults' perceptions of mental and physical energy and fatigue compared to dextrose (glucose), a high GI control. In this double-blind, randomized, cross-over study, subjects (n = 44 healthy adults) consumed a standardized dinner, and following an overnight fast, ingested 75 g of either sucromalt or glucose in solution at 7:30 AM the next day. Subjects completed validated questionnaires that assessed mental and physical energy, and fatigue, hunger, and sleepiness at baseline and hourly until 12:30 PM for a total of five post-consumption time points. Within-subject differences adjusted for baseline for individual questions and composite scores (Mental Energy State, Mental Fatigue State, Physical Energy State, and Physical Fatigue State) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. Mental Energy State, Physical Energy State, and Physical Fatigue State results favored sucromalt compared to glucose, with significant differences emerging particularly after 4-5 hours (P < 0.050). A trend toward a delay in Mental Fatigue State was also observed with sucromalt compared to glucose (P < 0.100). Minimal differences in ratings of hunger and sleepiness were observed between the beverages. Sucromalt may help attenuate the perceived decline in mental and physical energy and rise in mental and physical fatigue that can occur 4-5 hours after ingestion of a high GI beverage. Trials examining effects of sucromalt on cognitive and physical performance are of future interest.

  5. IMPAIRED SMALL BOWEL BARRIER INTEGRITY IN THE PRESENCE OF LUMENAL PANCREATIC DIGESTIVE ENZYMES LEADS TO CIRCULATORY SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, Erik B.; Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2012-01-01

    In bowel ischemia, impaired mucosal integrity may allow intestinal pancreatic enzyme products to become systemic and precipitate irreversible shock and death. This can be attenuated by pancreatic enzyme inhibition in the small bowel lumen. It is unresolved, however, whether ischemically-mediated mucosal disruption is the key event allowing pancreatic enzyme products systemic access, and whether intestinal digestive enzyme activity in concert with increased mucosal permeability leads to shock in the absence of ischemia. To test this possibility, the small intestinal lumen of non-ischemic rats was perfused for two hours with either digestive enzymes, a mucin disruption strategy (i.e., mucolytics) designed to increase mucosal permeability, or both, and animals were observed for shock. Digestive enzymes perfused included trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, amylase and lipase. Control (n=6) and experimental animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes only (n=6) or single enzymes (n=3 for each of the five enzyme groups) maintained stable hemodynamics. After mucin disruption using a combination of enteral N-acetylcysteine, atropine, and increased flow rates, rats (n=6) developed mild hypotension (p<0.001 compared to groups perfused with pancreatic enzymes only after 90 minutes) and increased intestinal permeability to intralumenally perfused FITC-dextrans-20kD (p<0.05) compared to control and enzyme-only groups, but there were no deaths. All animals perfused with both digestive enzymes and subjected to mucin disruption (n=6) developed hypotension and increased intestinal permeability (p<0.001 after 90 minutes). Pancreatic enzymes were measured in the intestinal wall of both groups subjected to mucin disruption, but not in the enzyme-only or control groups. Depletion of plasma protease inhibitors was found only in animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes plus mucin disruption, implicating increased permeability and intralumenal pancreatic enzyme egress in this group. These

  6. Impaired small-bowel barrier integrity in the presence of lumenal pancreatic digestive enzymes leads to circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Erik B; Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2012-08-01

    In bowel ischemia, impaired mucosal integrity may allow intestinal pancreatic enzyme products to become systemic and precipitate irreversible shock and death. This can be attenuated by pancreatic enzyme inhibition in the small-bowel lumen. It is unresolved, however, whether ischemically mediated mucosal disruption is the key event allowing pancreatic enzyme products systemic access and whether intestinal digestive enzyme activity in concert with increased mucosal permeability leads to shock in the absence of ischemia. To test this possibility, the small intestinal lumen of nonischemic rats was perfused for 2 h with either digestive enzymes, a mucin disruption strategy (i.e., mucolytics) designed to increase mucosal permeability, or both, and animals were observed for shock. Digestive enzymes perfused included trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, amylase, and lipase. Control (n = 6) and experimental animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes only (n = 6) or single enzymes (n = 3 for each of the five enzyme groups) maintained stable hemodynamics. After mucin disruption using a combination of enteral N-acetylcysteine, atropine, and increased flow rates, rats (n = 6) developed mild hypotension (P < 0.001 compared with groups perfused with pancreatic enzymes only after 90 min) and increased intestinal permeability to intralumenally perfused fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 20 kd (P < 0.05) compared with control and enzyme-only groups, but there were no deaths. All animals perfused with both digestive enzymes and subjected to mucin disruption (n = 6) developed hypotension and increased intestinal permeability (P < 0.001 after 90 min). Pancreatic enzymes were measured in the intestinal wall of both groups subjected to mucin disruption, but not in the enzyme-only or control groups. Depletion of plasma protease inhibitors was found only in animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes plus mucin disruption, implicating increased permeability and intralumenal pancreatic enzyme egress

  7. The role of carbon starvation in the induction of enzymes that degrade plant-derived carbohydrates in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    van Munster, Jolanda M.; Daly, Paul; Delmas, Stéphane; Pullan, Steven T.; Blythe, Martin J.; Malla, Sunir; Kokolski, Matthew; Noltorp, Emelie C.M.; Wennberg, Kristin; Fetherston, Richard; Beniston, Richard; Yu, Xiaolan; Dupree, Paul; Archer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are an important source of enzymes for saccharification of plant polysaccharides and production of biofuels. Understanding of the regulation and induction of expression of genes encoding these enzymes is still incomplete. To explore the induction mechanism, we analysed the response of the industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger to wheat straw, with a focus on events occurring shortly after exposure to the substrate. RNA sequencing showed that the transcriptional response after 6 h of exposure to wheat straw was very different from the response at 24 h of exposure to the same substrate. For example, less than half of the genes encoding carbohydrate active enzymes that were induced after 24 h of exposure to wheat straw, were also induced after 6 h exposure. Importantly, over a third of the genes induced after 6 h of exposure to wheat straw were also induced during 6 h of carbon starvation, indicating that carbon starvation is probably an important factor in the early response to wheat straw. The up-regulation of the expression of a high number of genes encoding CAZymes that are active on plant-derived carbohydrates during early carbon starvation suggests that these enzymes could be involved in a scouting role during starvation, releasing inducing sugars from complex plant polysaccharides. We show, using proteomics, that carbon-starved cultures indeed release CAZymes with predicted activity on plant polysaccharides. Analysis of the enzymatic activity and the reaction products, indicates that these proteins are enzymes that can degrade various plant polysaccharides to generate both known, as well as potentially new, inducers of CAZymes. PMID:24792495

  8. The role of carbon starvation in the induction of enzymes that degrade plant-derived carbohydrates in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    van Munster, Jolanda M; Daly, Paul; Delmas, Stéphane; Pullan, Steven T; Blythe, Martin J; Malla, Sunir; Kokolski, Matthew; Noltorp, Emelie C M; Wennberg, Kristin; Fetherston, Richard; Beniston, Richard; Yu, Xiaolan; Dupree, Paul; Archer, David B

    2014-11-01

    Fungi are an important source of enzymes for saccharification of plant polysaccharides and production of biofuels. Understanding of the regulation and induction of expression of genes encoding these enzymes is still incomplete. To explore the induction mechanism, we analysed the response of the industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger to wheat straw, with a focus on events occurring shortly after exposure to the substrate. RNA sequencing showed that the transcriptional response after 6h of exposure to wheat straw was very different from the response at 24h of exposure to the same substrate. For example, less than half of the genes encoding carbohydrate active enzymes that were induced after 24h of exposure to wheat straw, were also induced after 6h exposure. Importantly, over a third of the genes induced after 6h of exposure to wheat straw were also induced during 6h of carbon starvation, indicating that carbon starvation is probably an important factor in the early response to wheat straw. The up-regulation of the expression of a high number of genes encoding CAZymes that are active on plant-derived carbohydrates during early carbon starvation suggests that these enzymes could be involved in a scouting role during starvation, releasing inducing sugars from complex plant polysaccharides. We show, using proteomics, that carbon-starved cultures indeed release CAZymes with predicted activity on plant polysaccharides. Analysis of the enzymatic activity and the reaction products, indicates that these proteins are enzymes that can degrade various plant polysaccharides to generate both known, as well as potentially new, inducers of CAZymes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of azelaic acid on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet induced type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Muthulakshmi, Shanmugam; Saravanan, Ramalingam

    2013-06-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA), a C9 linear α,ω-dicarboxylic acid, is found in whole grains namely wheat, rye, barley, oat seeds and sorghum. The study was performed to investigate whether AzA exerts beneficial effect on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet (HFD) induced type 2 diabetic C57BL/6J mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed high fat diet for 10 weeks and subjected to intragastric administration of various doses (20 mg, 40 mg and 80 mg/kg BW) of AzA daily for the subsequent 5 weeks. Rosiglitazone (RSG) was used as reference drug. Body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, plasma insulin, blood haemoglobin (Hb), blood glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), liver glycolytic enzyme (hexokinase), hepatic shunt enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes(glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase), liver glycogen, plasma and liver triglycerides were examined in mice fed with normal standard diet (NC), high fat diet (HFD), HFD with AzA (HFD + AzA) and HFD with rosiglitazone (HFD + RSG). Among the three doses, 80 mg/kg BW of AzA was able to positively regulate plasma glucose, insulin, blood HbA1c and haemoglobin levels by significantly increasing the activity of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and significantly decreasing the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase thereby increasing the glycogen content in the liver. From this study, we put forward that AzA could significantly restore the levels of plasma glucose, insulin, HbA1c, Hb, liver glycogen and carbohydrate metabolic key enzymes to near normal in diabetic mice and hence, AzA may be useful as a biomaterial in the development of therapeutic agents against high fat diet induced T2DM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of oregano essential oil with or without feed enzymes on growth performance, digestive enzyme, nutrient digestibility, lipid metabolism and immune response of broilers fed on wheat-soybean meal diets.

    PubMed

    Basmacioğlu Malayoğlu, H; Baysal, S; Misirlioğlu, Z; Polat, M; Yilmaz, H; Turan, N

    2010-02-01

    1. The study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary supplementation of enzyme and oregano essential oil at two levels, alone or together, on performance, digestive enzyme, nutrient digestibility, lipid metabolism and immune response of broilers fed on wheat-soybean meal based diets. 2. The following dietary treatments were used from d 0 to 21. Diet 1 (control, CONT): a commercial diet containing no enzyme or oregano essential oil, diet 2 (ENZY): supplemented with enzyme, diet 3 (EO250): supplemented with essential oil at 250 mg/kg feed, diet 4 (EO500): supplemented with essential oil at 500 mg/kg feed, diet 5 (ENZY + EO250): supplemented with enzyme and essential oil at 250 mg/kg, and diet 6 (ENZY + EO500): supplemented with enzyme and essential oil at 500 mg/kg. 3. Birds fed on diets containing ENZY, EO250 and ENZY + EO250 had significantly higher weight gain than those given CONT diet from d 0 to 7. No significant effects on feed intake, feed conversion ratio, mortality, organ weights except for jejunum weight and intestinal lengths was found with either enzyme or essential oil, alone or in combination, over the 21-d growth period. The supplementation of essential oil together with enzyme decreased jejunum weight compared with essential oil alone. 4. Supplementation with enzyme significantly decreased viscosity and increased dry matter of digesta, but did not alter pH of digesta. There was no effect of essential oil alone at either concentration on viscosity, dry matter or pH of digesta. A significant decrease in viscosity of digesta appeared when essential oil was used with together enzyme. 5. The supplementation of essential oil at both levels with or without enzyme significantly increased chymotrypsin activity in the digestive system, and improved crude protein digestibility. 6. The higher concentration of essential oil with and without enzyme significantly increased serum total cholesterol concentrations. No significant effect on immune response

  11. Effect of adding cofactors to exogenous fibrolytic enzymes on preingestive hydrolysis, in vitro digestibility, and fermentation of bermudagrass haylage.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Ma, Z X; Gonzalez, C F; Adesogan, A T

    2015-07-01

    Our objectives were to examine if adding metal ion cofactors (COF) to exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) would increase the beneficial effects of the EFE on the preingestive hydrolysis and in vitro digestibility and fermentation of bermudagrass haylage. In experiment 1, 5 COF (Mn(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) were screened to select the best candidates for synergistically enhancing release of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) from bermudagrass haylage by 5 EFE. The 5 EFE (1A, 2A, 11C, 13D, and 15D) were sourced from Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus oryzae and they were the most effective of 12 EFE at increasing the neutral detergent fiber digestibility of bermudagrass haylage in a previous trial. Adding 1mM of each of the COF to EFE 2A or 11C synergistically increased release of WSC from bermudagrass haylage, as did adding (1mM) Fe(2+) to 1A, Mn(2+), Co(2+), or Fe(2+) to 13D, or Co(2+)or Fe(2+) to 15D. The greatest release of WSC responses were obtained by adding Mn(2+) to 11C (38%) or by adding Fe(2+) to 2A or 13D (10 and 21.9%, respectively). In experiment 2, the effect of increasing the COF dose on in vitro digestibility and fermentation of bermudagrass haylage was examined using the best EFE-COF combinations from experiment 1. Effects of adding increasing doses of these COF on EFE-mediated changes in vitro digestibility depended on the COF-EFE combination. Adding 10mM Mn(2+) alone to bermudagrass haylage increased DMD and NDFD by 2.7 and 6.3% and adding 11C alone increased these measures by 6.6 and 15.5%, respectively. However, adding 10mM Mn(2+) with 11C resulted in 3.5 and 8.1% increases in DMD and NDFD, respectively, beyond the increases caused by adding 11C alone. Adding Fe(2+) to 2A had no effects on EFE-mediated digestibility responses, but 2A prevented adverse effects of adding Fe(2+) alone on DMD and NDFD. In contrast, adding Fe(2+) to 13D reduced the increases in DMD and NDFD caused by adding the EFE alone. This study shows that adding COF

  12. Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates food waste.

    PubMed

    Sunyoto, Nimas M S; Zhu, Mingming; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-11-01

    Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates was studied using bench-scale bioreactors. The cultures with biochar additions were placed in 100ml reactors and incubated at 35°C and pH 5 for hydrogen production. The residual cultures were then used for methane production, incubated at 35°C and pH 7. Daily yields of hydrogen and methane and weekly yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured. The hydrogen and methane production potentials, rate and lag phases of the two phases were analysed using the Gompertz model. The results showed that biochar addition increased the maximum production rates of hydrogen by 32.5% and methane 41.6%, improved hydrogen yield by 31.0% and methane 10.0%, and shortened the lag phases in the two phases by 36.0% and 41.0%, respectively. Biochar addition also enhanced VFA generation during hydrogen production and VFA degradation in methane production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-digestible carbohydrates in infant formula as substitution for human milk oligosaccharide functions: Effects on microbiota and gut maturation.

    PubMed

    Akkerman, Renate; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2018-01-15

    Human milk (HM) is the golden standard for nutrition of newborn infants. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are abundantly present in HM and exert multiple beneficial functions, such as support of colonization of the gut microbiota, reduction of pathogenic infections and support of immune development. HMO-composition is during lactation continuously adapted by the mother to accommodate the needs of the neonate. Unfortunately, for many valid reasons not all neonates can be fed with HM and are either totally or partly fed with cow-milk derived infant formulas, which do not contain HMOs. These cow-milk formulas are supplemented with non-digestible carbohydrates (NDCs) that have functional effects similar to that of some HMOs, since production of synthetic HMOs is challenging and still very expensive. However, NDCs cannot substitute all HMO functions. More efficacious NDCs may be developed and customized for specific groups of neonates such as pre-matures and allergy prone infants. Here current knowledge of HMO functions in the neonate in view of possible replacement of HMOs by NDCs in infant formulas is reviewed. Furthermore, methods to expedite identification of suitable NDCs and structure/function relationships are reviewed as in vivo studies in babies are impossible.

  14. The interplay of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase activities on the digestion of starch in in vitro enzymic systems.

    PubMed

    Warren, Frederick J; Zhang, Bin; Waltzer, Gina; Gidley, Michael J; Dhital, Sushil

    2015-03-06

    In vitro hydrolysis assays are a key tool in understanding differences in rate and extent of digestion of starchy foods. They offer a greater degree of simplicity and flexibility than dynamic in vitro models or in vivo experiments for quantifiable, mechanistic exploration of starch digestion. In the present work the influence of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase activities on the digestion of maize and potato starch granules was measured using both glucose and reducing sugar assays. Data were analysed through initial rates of digestion, and by 1st order kinetics, utilising logarithm of slope (LOS) plots. The rate and extent of starch digestion was dependent on the activities of both enzymes and the type of starch used. Potato required more enzyme than maize to achieve logarithmic reaction curves, and complete digestion. The results allow targeted design of starch digestion experiments through a thorough understanding of the contributions of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase to digestion rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ontogeny changes and weaning effects in gene expression patterns of digestive enzymes and regulatory digestive factors in spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus) larvae.

    PubMed

    Moguel-Hernández, I; Peña, R; Andree, K B; Tovar-Ramirez, D; Bonacic, K; Dumas, S; Gisbert, E

    2016-10-01

    The study of digestive physiology is an important issue in species that have been introduced in aquaculture like the spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus). The aims of this study were to describe the expression of digestive enzymes (trypsinogen, chymotrypsinogen, α-amylase, lipoprotein lipase, phospholipase A and pepsinogen) and their relation with orexigenic (neuropeptide Y, NPY) and anorexigenic (cholecystokinin, CCK) factors during the larval development and to evaluate the effect of weaning in their expression. The results showed that the transcripts of all the assayed digestive enzymes, with the exception of pepsinogen, and NPY and CCK were already present in L. guttatus from the hatching stage. The expression of all the enzymes was low during the yolk-sac stage (0-2 days after hatching, DAH), whereas after the onset of exogenous feeding at 2 DAH, their expression increased and fluctuated throughout larval development, which followed a similar pattern as in other marine fish species and reflected changes in different types of food items and the progressive maturation of the digestive system. On the other hand, weaning of L. guttatus larvae from live prey onto a microdiet between 25 and 35 DAH significantly affected the relative expression of most pancreatic digestive enzymes during the first weaning days, whereas chymotrypsinogen 2 and lipoprotein lipase remained stable during this period. At the end of co-feeding, larvae showed similar levels of gene expression regardless of the diet (live prey vs. microdiet), which indicated that larvae of L. guttatus were able to adapt their digestive capacities to the microdiet. In contrast, feeding L. guttatus larvae with live feed or microdiet did not affect the expression of CCK and NPY. The relevance of these findings with regard to current larval rearing procedures of L. guttatus is discussed.

  16. Quantitative analysis of total proteins and carbohydrates in the digestive gland-gonad complex (DGG) and hemolymph of the freshwater prosobranch snail Lanistes carinatus.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amaal Hassan M; Mahmoud, Salim; El-Hamidy, A

    2010-08-01

    Laboratory investigations were carried out to quantify the amount of total proteins, carbohydrates and reducing sugar in the hemolymph and Digestive Gland Gonad- complex (DGG) of infected and uinfected lanistes arinatus. Snails were naturally infected with two different types of trematode la:val stages (rediae of gymnocepahalus cercaria and sporocyst of xiphidiocercaria), collected from the River Nile at Sohag governorate, Egypt. Analysis was carried out using an extraction of the DGGs tissue with buffer solution, while snails' hemolymph was applied directly. The results revealed that snail infection by rediae of gymnocephalus cercariae led to non significant increasing in both total carbohydrates and protein in hemolymph. However, infection by sporocysts of xiphidiocercariae caused a significant increasing only in hemolymph total protein. On the other hand, the amount of both reducing sugar and total proteins in DGG did not increase significantly whenever the infection caused by both types of trematode larvae. However, total carbohydrates in DGG increased significantly.

  17. Expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in Eimeria-challenged broilers.

    PubMed

    Su, S; Miska, K B; Fetterer, R H; Jenkins, M C; Wong, E A

    2015-03-01

    Avian coccidiosis is a disease caused by the intestinal protozoa Eimeria. The site of invasion and lesions in the intestine is species-specific, for example E. acervulina affects the duodenum, E. maxima the jejunum, and E. tenella the ceca. Lesions in the intestinal mucosa cause reduced feed efficiency and body weight gain. The growth reduction may be due to changes in expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the intestine. The objective of this study was to compare the expression of digestive enzymes, nutrient transporters and an antimicrobial peptide in broilers challenged with either E. acervulina, E. maxima or E. tenella. The genes examined included digestive enzymes (APN and SI), peptide and amino acid transporters (PepT1, ASCT1, b(0,+)AT/rBAT, B(0)AT, CAT1, CAT2, EAAT3, LAT1, y(+)LAT1 and y(+)LAT2), sugar transporters (GLUT1, GLUT2, GLUT5 and SGLT1), zinc transporter (ZnT1) and an antimicrobial peptide (LEAP2). Duodenum, jejunum, ileum and ceca were collected 7 days post challenge. E. acervulina challenge resulted in downregulation of various nutrient transporters or LEAP2 in the duodenum and ceca, but not the jejunum or ileum. E. maxima challenge produced both downregulation and upregulation of nutrient transporters and LEAP2 in all three segments of the small intestine and ceca. E. tenella challenge resulted in the downregulation and upregulation of nutrient transporters and LEAP2 in the jejunum, ileum and ceca, but not the duodenum. At the respective target tissue, E. acervulina, E. maxima and E. tenella infection caused common downregulation of APN, b(0,+)AT, rBAT, EAAT3, SI, GLUT2, GLUT5, ZnT1 and LEAP2. The downregulation of nutrient transporters would result in a decrease in the efficiency of protein and polysaccharide digestion and uptake, which may partially explain the weight loss. The downregulation of nutrient transporters may also be a cellular response to reduced expression of the host defense protein LEAP2, which would

  18. Incorporation of in vitro digestive enzymes in an intestinal epithelial cell line model for protein hazard identification.

    PubMed

    Markell, Lauren K; Wezalis, Stephanie M; Roper, Jason M; Zimmermann, Cindi; Delaney, Bryan

    2017-10-01

    Relatively few proteins in nature produce adverse effects following oral exposure. Of those that do, effects are often observed in the gut, particularly on intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Previous studies reported that addition of protein toxins to IEC lines disrupted monolayer integrity but innocuous dietary proteins did not. Studies presented here investigated the effects of innocuous (bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin, RuBisCO, fibronectin) or hazardous (phytohaemagglutinin-E, concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin, melittin) proteins that either were untreated or exposed to digestive enzymes prior to addition to Caco-2 human IEC line monolayers. At high concentrations intact fibronectin caused an increase in monolayer permeability but other innocuous proteins did not whether exposed to digestive enzymes or not. In contrast, all untreated hazardous proteins and those that were resistant to digestion (ex. wheat germ agglutinin) disrupted monolayer integrity. However, proteins sensitive to degradation by digestive enzymes (ex. melittin) did not adversely affect monolayers when exposed to these enzymes prior to addition to IEC line monolayers. These results indicate that in vitro exposure of proteins to digestive enzymes can assist in differentiating between innocuous and hazardous proteins as another component to consider in the overall weight of evidence approach in protein hazard assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Food for thought: Selecting the right enzyme for the digestion of gluten.

    PubMed

    Colgrave, Michelle L; Byrne, Keren; Howitt, Crispin A

    2017-11-01

    Gluten describes a complex mixture of proteins found in wheat, rye, barley and oats that pose a health risk to people affected by conditions such as coeliac disease and non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. Complete digestion of gluten proteins is of critical importance during quantitative analysis. To this end, chymotrypsin was investigated for its ability to efficiently and reproducibly digest specific classes of gluten in barley. Using proteomics a chymotryptic peptide marker panel was elucidated and subjected to relative quantification using LC-MRM-MS. Thorough investigation of peptide markers revealed robust and reproducible quantification with CVs <15% was possible, however a greater proportion of non-specific cleavage variants were observed relative to trypsin. The selected peptide markers were assessed to ensure their efficient liberation from their parent proteins. While trypsin remains the preferred enzyme for quantification of the avenin-like A proteins, the B-, D- and γ-hordeins, chymotrypsin was the enzyme of choice for the C-hordeins. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lin; Wang, Mingfa; Zhang, Xiaotu; Wang, Zhixiang

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI) and average daily gain (ADG) were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05). Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR) was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05). Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP) was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05). Cholecystokinin (CCK) level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05), but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05), respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05). However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05). The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05). Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased

  1. Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingfa; Zhang, Xiaotu; Wang, Zhixiang

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI) and average daily gain (ADG) were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05). Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR) was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05). Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP) was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05). Cholecystokinin (CCK) level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05), but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05), respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05). However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05). The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05). Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased

  2. Effect of enzyme secreting bacterial pretreatment on enhancement of aerobic digestion potential of waste activated sludge interceded through EDTA.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; Adish Kumar, S; Yogalakshmi, K N; Kaliappan, S; Rajesh Banu, J

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the effect of Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) on Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) removal tailed with bacterial enzymatic pretreatment on aerobic digestion of activated sludge was studied. In order to enhance the accessibility of sludge to the enzyme secreting bacteria; the extracellular polymeric substances were removed using EDTA. EDTA efficiently removed the EPS with limited cell lysis and enhanced the sludge enzyme activity at its lower concentration of 0.2 g/g SS. The sludge was then subjected to bacterial pretreatment to enhance the aerobic digestion. In aerobic digestion the best results in terms of Suspended solids (SS) reduction (48.5%) and COD (Chemical oxygen demand) solubilization (47.3%) was obtained in experimental reactor than in control. These results imply that aerobic digestion can be enhanced efficiently through bacterial pretreatment of EPS removed sludge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Geraniol, a natural monoterpene, ameliorates hyperglycemia by attenuating the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Babukumar, Sukumar; Vinothkumar, Veerasamy; Sankaranarayanan, Chandrasekaran; Srinivasan, Subramani

    2017-12-01

    Geraniol, an acyclic monoterpene alcohol is found in medicinal plants, is used traditionally for several medical purposes including diabetes. The present study evaluates the antihyperglycemic potential of geraniol on key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in experimental rats, by a single intraperitoneal (i.p) injection of STZ [40 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)]. Different doses of geraniol (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg b.w.) and glyclazide (5 mg/kg b.w.) were administrated orally to diabetic rats for 45 days. Body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, insulin, blood haemoglobin (Hb), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ), hepatic glucose metabolic enzymes and glycogen were examined. The LD 50 value of geraniol is 3600 mg/kg b.w. at oral administration in rats. Administration of geraniol in a dose-dependent manner (100, 200, 400 mg/kg b.w.) and glyclazide (5 mg/kg b.w.) for 45 days significantly improved the levels of insulin, Hb and decreased plasma glucose, HbA 1C in diabetic-treated rats. Geraniol at its effective dose (200 mg/kg b.w.) ameliorated the altered activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes near normal effects compared with two other doses (100 and 400 mg/kg b.w.). Geraniol treatment to diabetic rats improved hepatic glycogen content suggesting its anti-hyperglycemic potential. Geraniol supplement was found to preserve the normal histological appearance of hepatic cells and pancreatic β-cells in diabetic rats. The present findings suggest that geraniol can potentially ameliorate key enzymes of glucose metabolism in experimental diabetes even though clinical studies used to evaluate this possibility are warranted.

  4. Ability of resveratrol to inhibit advanced glycation end product formation and carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme activity, and to conjugate methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yixiao; Xu, Zhimin; Sheng, Zhanwu

    2017-02-01

    Glycation can generate advanced glycation end products (AGE) and its intermediates methylglyoxal (MGO) and glyoxal in foods, which increase the risk of developing diabetes diseases. In this study, the effect of resveratrol against AGE formation, carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme activity and trapping MGO capability were evaluated. Resveratrol showed a significant inhibition capability against AGE formation in bovine serum albumin (BSA)-fructose, BSA-MGO and arginine-MGO models with inhibition percentages of 57.94, 85.95 and 99.35%, respectively. Furthermore, resveratrol acted as a competitive inhibitor for α-amylase with IC50 3.62μg/ml, while it behaved in an uncompetitive manner for α-glucosidase with an IC50 of 17.54μg/l. A prevention of BSA protein glycation was observed in the BSA-fructose model with addition of resveratrol. Three types of resveratrol-MGO adducts were identified in the model consisting of MGO and resveratrol. The results demonstrated that resveratrol has potential in reducing glycation in foods and retarding carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Variation of Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme Patterns in the Gut Microbiota of Italian Healthy Subjects and Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Soverini, Matteo; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Quercia, Sara; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco; Rampelli, Simone

    2017-01-01

    The human gut microbiota (GM) has been associated, to date, with various complex functions, essentials for the host health. Among these, it is certainly worth noting the degradation of the so-called microbiota-accessible carbohydrates (MACs), which the GM breaks down through specific enzymes, referred to as carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). This degradation constitutes the first step in the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), key microbial small molecules having multiple health-promoting effects for the host organism. The decline in MAC dietary intake in urban Western populations forced the shrinkage of CAZyme repertoire in the GM, as shown by the literature comparing the microbiome layout between Western urban citizens and traditional rural populations. Even if this reduction in GM functional complexity has been associated with the onset of the so-called "diseases of civilization," only few information regarding the CAZyme variation within Western populations has been provided to date, and its connections with diet and health are still unexplored. In this scenario, here we explore the GM-encoded CAZyme repertoire across two Italian adult cohorts, including healthy lean subjects consuming a Mediterranean diet and obese patients affected by type 2 diabetes, consuming a high-fat diet. In order to impute the CAZyme panel, a pipeline consisting of publicly available software - QIIME, FragGeneScan and HMMER - was specifically implemented. Our study highlighted the existence of robust clusters of bacterial species sharing a common MAC degradation profile in the Italian GM, allowing the stratification of the individual GM into different steady states according to the carbohydrate degradation profile, with possible connections with diet and health.

  6. In vitro digestibility of individual amino acids in rumen-undegraded protein: the modified three-step procedure and the immobilized digestive enzyme assay.

    PubMed

    Boucher, S E; Calsamiglia, S; Parsons, C M; Stern, M D; Moreno, M Ruiz; Vázquez-Añón, M; Schwab, C G

    2009-08-01

    Three soybean meal, 3 SoyPlus (West Central Cooperative, Ralston, IA), 5 distillers dried grains with solubles, and 5 fish meal samples were used to evaluate the modified 3-step in vitro procedure (TSP) and the in vitro immobilized digestive enzyme assay (IDEA; Novus International Inc., St. Louis, MO) for estimating digestibility of AA in rumen-undegraded protein (RUP-AA). In a previous experiment, each sample was ruminally incubated in situ for 16 h, and in vivo digestibility of AA in the intact samples and in the rumen-undegraded residues (RUR) was obtained for all samples using the precision-fed cecectomized rooster assay. For the modified TSP, 5 g of RUR was weighed into polyester bags, which were then heat-sealed and placed into Daisy(II) incubator bottles. Samples were incubated in a pepsin/HCl solution followed by incubation in a pancreatin solution. After this incubation, residues remaining in the bags were analyzed for AA, and digestibility of RUP-AA was calculated based on disappearance from the bags. In vitro RUP-AA digestibility estimates obtained with this procedure were highly correlated to in vivo estimates. Corresponding intact feeds were also analyzed via the pepsin/pancreatin steps of the modified TSP. In vitro estimates of AA digestibility of the feeds were highly correlated to in vivo RUP-AA digestibility, which suggests that the feeds may not need to be ruminally incubated before determining RUP-AA digestibility in vitro. The RUR were also analyzed via the IDEA kits. The IDEA values of the RUR were good predictors of RUP-AA digestibility in soybean meal, SoyPlus, and distillers dried grains with solubles, but the IDEA values were not as good predictors of RUP-AA digestibility in fish meal. However, the IDEA values of intact feed samples were also determined and were highly correlated to in vivo RUP-AA digestibility for all feed types, suggesting that the IDEA value of intact feeds may be a better predictor of RUP-AA digestibility than the IDEA

  7. Cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus counteracts dietary protease inhibitors by modulating propeptides of major digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J-E; Lovingshimer, M R; Salzman, R A; Presnail, J K; Lu, A L; Koiwa, H; Zhu-Salzman, K

    2007-06-01

    Cowpea bruchids, when challenged by consumption of the soybean cysteine protease inhibitor scN, reconfigure expression of their major CmCP digestive proteases and resume normal feeding and development. Previous evidence indicated that insects selectively induced CmCPs from subfamily B, that were more efficient in autoprocessing and possessed not only higher proteolytic, but also scN-degrading activities. In contrast, dietary scN only marginally up-regulated genes from the more predominant CmCP subfamily A that were inferior to subfamily B. To gain further molecular insight into this adaptive adjustment, we performed domain swapping between the two respective subfamily members B1 and A16, the latter unable to autoprocess or degrade scN even after intermolecular processing. Swapping the propeptides did not qualitatively alter autoprocessing in either protease isoform. Incorporation of either the N- (pAmBA) or C-terminal (pAmAB) mature B1 segment into A16, however, was sufficient to prime autoprocessing of A16 to its mature form. Further, the swap at the N-terminal mature A16 protein region (pAmBA) resulted in four amino acid changes. Replacement of these amino acid residues by the corresponding B1 residues, singly and pair-wise, revealed that autoprocessing activation in pAmBA resulted from cumulative and/or coordinated individual effects. Bacterially expressed isolated propeptides (pA16 and pB1) differed in their ability to inhibit mature B1 enzyme. Lower inhibitory activity in pB1 is likely attributable to its lack of protein stability. This instability in the cleaved propeptide is necessary, although insufficient by itself, for scN-degradation by the mature B1 enzyme. Taken together, cowpea bruchids modulate proteolysis of their digestive enzymes by controlling proCmCP cleavage and propeptide stability, which explains at least in part the plasticity cowpea bruchids demonstrate in response to protease inhibitors.

  8. Bioaccessibility and inhibitory effects on digestive enzymes of carnosic acid in sage and rosemary.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Pınar; El, Sedef Nehir

    2018-04-28

    In this study, the aim was to determine the bioaccessibilities of carnosic acid in sage and rosemary and in vitro inhibitory effects of these samples on lipid and starch digestive enzymes by evaluating the lipase, α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzyme inhibition activities. The content of carnosic acid in rosemary (18.72 ± 0.33 mg/g) was found to be higher than that content of that in sage (3.76 ± 0.13 mg/g) (p < 0.05). The carnosic acid bioaccessibilities were found as 45.10 ± 1.88% and 38.32 ± 0.21% in sage and rosemary, respectively. The tested sage and rosemary showed inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (Concentration of inhibitor required to produce a 50% inhibition of the initial rate of reaction - IC 50 88.49 ± 2.35, 76.80 ± 1.68 μg/mL, respectively), α-amylase (IC 50 107.65 ± 12.64, 95.65 ± 2.73 μg/mL, respectively) and lipase (IC 50 6.20 ± 0.63, 4.31 ± 0.62 μg/mL, respectively). Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that carnosic acid standard equivalent inhibition capacities (CAEIC 50 ) for these food samples were determined and these values were in agreement with the IC 50 values. These results show that sage and rosemary are potent inhibitors of lipase, α-amylase and α-glucosidase digestive enzymes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbohydrate-binding module 74 is a novel starch-binding domain associated with large and multidomain α-amylase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Valk, Vincent; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-06-01

    Microbacterium aurum B8.A is a bacterium that originates from a potato starch-processing plant and employs a GH13 α-amylase (MaAmyA) enzyme that forms pores in potato starch granules. MaAmyA is a large and multi-modular protein that contains a novel domain at its C terminus (Domain 2). Deletion of Domain 2 from MaAmyA did not affect its ability to degrade starch granules but resulted in a strong reduction in granular pore size. Here, we separately expressed and purified this Domain 2 in Escherichia coli and determined its likely function in starch pore formation. Domain 2 independently binds amylose, amylopectin, and granular starch but does not have any detectable catalytic (hydrolytic or oxidizing) activity on α-glucan substrates. Therefore, we propose that this novel starch-binding domain is a new carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), the first representative of family CBM74 that assists MaAmyA in efficient pore formation in starch granules. Protein sequence-based BLAST searches revealed that CBM74 occurs widespread, but in bacteria only, and is often associated with large and multi-domain α-amylases containing family CBM25 or CBM26 domains. CBM74 may specifically function in binding to granular starches to enhance the capability of α-amylase enzymes to degrade resistant starches (RSs). Interestingly, the majority of family CBM74 representatives are found in α-amylases originating from human gut-associated Bifidobacteria, where they may assist in resistant starch degradation. The CBM74 domain thus may have a strong impact on the efficiency of RS digestion in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. © 2016 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Effects of non-starch polysaccharides enzymes on pancreatic and small intestinal digestive enzyme activities in piglet fed diets containing high amounts of barley.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Fen; Feng, Jie; Xu, Zi-Rong; Yang, Cai-Mei

    2004-03-15

    To investigate effects of non-starch polysaccharides(NSP) enzymes on pancreatic and small intestinal digestive enzyme activities in piglet fed diets containing high amounts of barley. Sixty crossbred piglets averaging 13.5 kg were randomly assigned to two treatment groups with three replications (pens) based on sex and mass. Each group was fed on the diet based on barley with or without added NSP enzymes (0.15%) for a 40-d period. At the end of the experiment the pigs were weighed. Three piglets of each group were chosen and slaughtered. Pancreas, digesta from the distal end of the duodenum and jejunal mucosa were collected for determination. Activities of the digestive enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, amylase and lipase were determined in the small intestinal sections as well as in homogenates of pancreatic tissue. Maltase, sucrase, lactase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) activities were analyzed in jejunal mucosa. Supplementation with NSP enzymes improved growth performance of piglets. It showed that NSP enzymes had no effect on digestive enzyme activities in pancreas, but decreased the activities of proteolytic enzyme, trypsin, amylase and lipase in duodenal contents by 57.56%, 76.08%, 69.03% and 40.22%(P<0.05) compared with control, and increased gamma-GT activities in jejunal mucosa by 118.75%(P<0.05). Supplementation with NSP enzymes in barley based diets could improve piglets' growth performance, decrease activities of proteolytic enzyme, trypsin, amylase and lipase in duodenal contents and increase gamma-GT activities in jejunal mucosa.

  11. Effects of Geroprotectors on Age-Related Changes in Proteolytic Digestive Enzyme Activities at Different Lighting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Morozov, A V; Khizhkin, E A; Svechkina, E B; Vinogradova, I A; Ilyukha, V A; Anisimov, V N; Khavinson, V Kh

    2015-10-01

    We studied the effect of melatonin and epithalon on age-related changes in proteolytic digestive enzyme activity in the pancreas and gastric mucosa of rats kept under different lighting conditions. In rats kept under standard illumination, pepsin activity and the total proteolytic activity in the stomach and pancreas increased by the age of 12 months, but then decreased. Constant and natural lighting disturbed the age dynamics of proteolytic digestive enzyme activity. Administration of melatonin and epithalon to animals exposed to constant lighting restored age dynamics of pepsin activity and little affected total proteolytic activity.

  12. Assessment of digestive enzymes activity during the fry development of the endangered Caspian brown trout Salmo caspius.

    PubMed

    Zamani, A; Hajimoradloo, A; Madani, R; Farhangi, M

    2009-09-01

    The study of digestive enzymes activity at Salmo caspius fry showed that enzymes were available at the moment of mouth opening on the first day post hatching (dph) and the activity of enzymes showed no significant difference from the hatching day 28 dph. An increased activity was seen between 32 and 43 dph and this activity was significantly higher than the activity during the first 28 days. In the primary stages after yolk sac resorption (43-58 dph), enzymes activity showed an increased profile, however none of them showed a significant difference between 43 and 58 dph.

  13. SACCHARIS: an automated pipeline to streamline discovery of carbohydrate active enzyme activities within polyspecific families and de novo sequence datasets.

    PubMed

    Jones, Darryl R; Thomas, Dallas; Alger, Nicholas; Ghavidel, Ata; Inglis, G Douglas; Abbott, D Wade

    2018-01-01

    Deposition of new genetic sequences in online databases is expanding at an unprecedented rate. As a result, sequence identification continues to outpace functional characterization of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes). In this paradigm, the discovery of enzymes with novel functions is often hindered by high volumes of uncharacterized sequences particularly when the enzyme sequence belongs to a family that exhibits diverse functional specificities (i.e., polyspecificity). Therefore, to direct sequence-based discovery and characterization of new enzyme activities we have developed an automated in silico pipeline entitled: Sequence Analysis and Clustering of CarboHydrate Active enzymes for Rapid Informed prediction of Specificity (SACCHARIS). This pipeline streamlines the selection of uncharacterized sequences for discovery of new CAZyme or CBM specificity from families currently maintained on the CAZy website or within user-defined datasets. SACCHARIS was used to generate a phylogenetic tree of a GH43, a CAZyme family with defined subfamily designations. This analysis confirmed that large datasets can be organized into sequence clusters of manageable sizes that possess related functions. Seeding this tree with a GH43 sequence from Bacteroides dorei DSM 17855 (BdGH43b, revealed it partitioned as a single sequence within the tree. This pattern was consistent with it possessing a unique enzyme activity for GH43 as BdGH43b is the first described α-glucanase described for this family. The capacity of SACCHARIS to extract and cluster characterized carbohydrate binding module sequences was demonstrated using family 6 CBMs (i.e., CBM6s). This CBM family displays a polyspecific ligand binding profile and contains many structurally determined members. Using SACCHARIS to identify a cluster of divergent sequences, a CBM6 sequence from a unique clade was demonstrated to bind yeast mannan, which represents the first description of an α-mannan binding CBM. Additionally, we

  14. The role of condensed tannins in the nutritional value of Lotus pedunculatus for sheep. 2. Quantitative digestion of carbohydrates and proteins.

    PubMed

    Barry, T N; Manley, T R

    1984-05-01

    Primary growth vegetative Lotus pedunculatus containing 46 and 106 g/kg dry matter (DM) of total condensed tannin and 3 and 14 g/kg DM of free condensed tannin, was cut and fed fresh at hourly intervals (750 g DM/d) to sheep fitted with permanent cannulas into the rumen and duodenum. Low- and high-tannin lotus contained respectively 41.3 and 31.6 g total nitrogen/kg DM and 132 and 152 g lignin/kg DM. The two forms of lotus were similar in carbohydrate composition. Nutrient intake was recorded and faecal output measured by direct collection. Digesta flow to the duodenum was estimated by measuring dilution at the duodenum of inert ruthenium phenanthroline (Ru-P) and chromium-EDTA markers continuously infused into the rumen. Effects attributable to condensed tannins were assessed by comparing the digestion of the two diets, and by comparing the digestion of each with predicted values for non-tannin-containing fresh forages fed at similar intakes. Apparent digestibility of all nutrients measured was less for high- than for low-tannin lotus (P less than 0.01). The levels of cellulose digested ruminally and post- ruminally in both forms of lotus were similar to predicted values. However, less hemicellulose and readily fermentable carbohydrate (RFC; soluble carbohydrate + pectin) was digested in the rumen in sheep given both forms of lotus than would be predicted for non-tannin-containing fresh forage diets, but this was compensated for by greater post-ruminal absorption of both nutrients. Total N gains across the rumen (duodenal N flow--total N intake) were 1.8 and 10.5 g/d for low- and high-tannin lotus v. predicted losses of 3.7 and 2.1 g/d for non-tannin-containing fresh forages given at the same total N intakes. Post-ruminal digestion of non- amonia -N (NAN; proportion NAN flowing at duodenum) was 0.71 and 0.67 for low- and high-tannin lotus respectively v. 0.76 for comparable non-tannin-containing fresh forages. Energy absorbed as amino acids from the small

  15. Enzyme-Synthesized Highly Branched Maltodextrins Have Slow Glucose Generation at the Mucosal α-Glucosidase Level and Are Slowly Digestible In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Hoo; Yan, Like; Phillips, Robert J.; Reuhs, Bradley L.; Jones, Kyra; Rose, David R.; Nichols, Buford L.; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Hamaker, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    For digestion of starch in humans, α-amylase first hydrolyzes starch molecules to produce α-limit dextrins, followed by complete hydrolysis to glucose by the mucosal α-glucosidases in the small intestine. It is known that α-1,6 linkages in starch are hydrolyzed at a lower rate than are α-1,4 linkages. Here, to create designed slowly digestible carbohydrates, the structure of waxy corn starch (WCS) was modified using a known branching enzyme alone (BE) and an in combination with β-amylase (BA) to increase further the α-1,6 branching ratio. The digestibility of the enzymatically synthesized products was investigated using α-amylase and four recombinant mammalian mucosal α-glucosidases. Enzyme-modified products (BE-WCS and BEBA-WCS) had increased percentage of α-1,6 linkages (WCS: 5.3%, BE-WCS: 7.1%, and BEBA-WCS: 12.9%), decreased weight-average molecular weight (WCS: 1.73×108 Da, BE-WCS: 2.76×105 Da, and BEBA-WCS 1.62×105 Da), and changes in linear chain distributions (WCS: 21.6, BE-WCS: 16.9, BEBA-WCS: 12.2 DPw). Hydrolysis by human pancreatic α-amylase resulted in an increase in the amount of branched α-limit dextrin from 26.8% (WCS) to 56.8% (BEBA-WCS). The α-amylolyzed samples were hydrolyzed by the individual α-glucosidases (100 U) and glucogenesis decreased with all as the branching ratio increased. This is the first report showing that hydrolysis rate of the mammalian mucosal α-glucosidases is limited by the amount of branched α-limit dextrin. When enzyme-treated materials were gavaged to rats, the level of postprandial blood glucose at 60 min from BEBA-WCS was significantly higher than for WCS or BE-WCS. Thus, highly branched glucan structures modified by BE and BA had a comparably slow digesting property both in vitro and in vivo. Such highly branched α-glucans show promise as a food ingredient to control postprandial glucose levels and to attain extended glucose release. PMID:23565164

  16. Influence of low protein diets on gene expression of digestive enzymes and hormone secretion in the gastrointestinal tract of young weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhi-Mei; Ma, Xian-Yong; Yang, Xue-Fen; Fan, Qiu-Li; Xiong, Yun-Xia; Qiu, Yue-Qin; Wang, Li; Wen, Xiao-Lu; Jiang, Zong-Yong

    To investigate dietary protein level effects on digestive mechanisms, weaned piglets were fed for 45 d with diets containing 20%, 17%, or 14% crude protein (CP) supplemented to meet requirements for essential amino acids. This article describes the influence of dietary protein on gastrointestinal hormones and expression of an array of digestive enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in expression of enzymes involved in carbohydrate digestion, except for maltase in the duodenum. In the jejunum, amylase expression in pigs fed 20% CP was much higher than that in pigs fed other diets (P<0.05) and maltase expression in those fed 17% CP was higher than that in other treatments (P<0.05). Although there were no remarkable differences in expression of aminopeptidase in the small intestine or carboxypeptidase in the pancreas (P>0.05), there was a trend towards higher expression of various proteases in pigs fed 17% CP. The duodenal expression of enteropeptidase in diets with 14% and 17% CP was significantly higher than that with 20% CP (P<0.05), but treatment differences did not existed in jejunum (P>0.05). The expression of GPR93 as a nutrient-responsive G protein-coupled receptor in 14% and 17% CP diets was significantly higher than that in 20% CP diet in the small intestine (P<0.05). The expressions of genes for pancreatic enzymes, lipase and elastase, were significantly higher in pigs fed diets with low CP, while similar trends occurred for carboxypeptidase, chymotrypsin and amylase. Conversely, the gastric expressions of pepsinogen A and progastricsin were lower with the 17% CP diet. Differences between treatments were found in the gastric antral contents of cholecystokinin and somatostatin: both increased in pigs fed 17% CP, accompanied by decreased content of motilin, which was also seen in plasma concentrations. These patterns were not reflected in duodenal contents. In general, 17% dietary CP

  17. Enzyme-synthesized highly branched maltodextrins have slow glucose generation at the mucosal α-glucosidase level and are slowly digestible in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hoo; Yan, Like; Phillips, Robert J; Reuhs, Bradley L; Jones, Kyra; Rose, David R; Nichols, Buford L; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2013-01-01

    For digestion of starch in humans, α-amylase first hydrolyzes starch molecules to produce α-limit dextrins, followed by complete hydrolysis to glucose by the mucosal α-glucosidases in the small intestine. It is known that α-1,6 linkages in starch are hydrolyzed at a lower rate than are α-1,4 linkages. Here, to create designed slowly digestible carbohydrates, the structure of waxy corn starch (WCS) was modified using a known branching enzyme alone (BE) and an in combination with β-amylase (BA) to increase further the α-1,6 branching ratio. The digestibility of the enzymatically synthesized products was investigated using α-amylase and four recombinant mammalian mucosal α-glucosidases. Enzyme-modified products (BE-WCS and BEBA-WCS) had increased percentage of α-1,6 linkages (WCS: 5.3%, BE-WCS: 7.1%, and BEBA-WCS: 12.9%), decreased weight-average molecular weight (WCS: 1.73×10(8) Da, BE-WCS: 2.76×10(5) Da, and BEBA-WCS 1.62×10(5) Da), and changes in linear chain distributions (WCS: 21.6, BE-WCS: 16.9, BEBA-WCS: 12.2 DPw). Hydrolysis by human pancreatic α-amylase resulted in an increase in the amount of branched α-limit dextrin from 26.8% (WCS) to 56.8% (BEBA-WCS). The α-amylolyzed samples were hydrolyzed by the individual α-glucosidases (100 U) and glucogenesis decreased with all as the branching ratio increased. This is the first report showing that hydrolysis rate of the mammalian mucosal α-glucosidases is limited by the amount of branched α-limit dextrin. When enzyme-treated materials were gavaged to rats, the level of postprandial blood glucose at 60 min from BEBA-WCS was significantly higher than for WCS or BE-WCS. Thus, highly branched glucan structures modified by BE and BA had a comparably slow digesting property both in vitro and in vivo. Such highly branched α-glucans show promise as a food ingredient to control postprandial glucose levels and to attain extended glucose release.

  18. Activating Intrinsic Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes of the Smut Fungus Ustilago maydis for the Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Components

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Elena; Reindl, Michèle; Blank, Lars M.; Feldbrügge, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The microbial conversion of plant biomass to valuable products in a consolidated bioprocess could greatly increase the ecologic and economic impact of a biorefinery. Current strategies for hydrolyzing plant material mostly rely on the external application of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). Alternatively, production organisms can be engineered to secrete CAZymes to reduce the reliance on externally added enzymes. Plant-pathogenic fungi have a vast repertoire of hydrolytic enzymes to sustain their lifestyle, but expression of the corresponding genes is usually highly regulated and restricted to the pathogenic phase. Here, we present a new strategy in using the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis for the degradation of plant cell wall components by activating its intrinsic enzyme potential during axenic growth. This fungal model organism is fully equipped with hydrolytic enzymes, and moreover, it naturally produces value-added substances, such as organic acids and biosurfactants. To achieve the deregulated expression of hydrolytic enzymes during the industrially relevant yeast-like growth in axenic culture, the native promoters of the respective genes were replaced by constitutively active synthetic promoters. This led to an enhanced conversion of xylan, cellobiose, and carboxymethyl cellulose to fermentable sugars. Moreover, a combination of strains with activated endoglucanase and β-glucanase increased the release of glucose from carboxymethyl cellulose and regenerated amorphous cellulose, suggesting that mixed cultivations could be a means for degrading more complex substrates in the future. In summary, this proof of principle demonstrates the potential applicability of activating the expression of native CAZymes from phytopathogens in a biocatalytic process. IMPORTANCE This study describes basic experiments that aim at the degradation of plant cell wall components by the smut fungus Ustilago maydis. As a plant pathogen, this fungus contains a

  19. Enhancing polyphenol extraction from unripe apples by carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hu-zhe; Hwang, In-Wook; Chung, Shin-Kyo

    2009-12-01

    The effects of process variables such as enzyme types, enzyme ratio, reaction temperature, pH, time, and ethanol concentration on the extraction of unripe apple polyphenol were investigated. The results indicated that Viscozyme L had the strongest effect on polyphenols extraction and was selected to study the polyphenol composition. The ratio of enzyme (Viscozyme L) to substrate (2 fungal beta-glucanase units (FBG)) at 0.02, reaction at pH 3.7, 50 degrees C for 12 h, and ethanol concentration of 70% were chosen as the most favorable extraction condition. Total phenolic content (TPC), reducing sugar content (RSC), and extraction yield increased by about 3, 1.5, and 2 times, respectively, compared with control. The contents of p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid increased to 8, 4, and 32 times, respectively. The enzyme-aided polyphenol extraction process from unripe apples might be applied to food industry for enhancing bioactive compound production.

  20. Structural transformation of crystallized debranched cassava starch during dual hydrothermal treatment in relation to enzyme digestibility.

    PubMed

    Boonna, Sureeporn; Tongta, Sunanta

    2018-07-01

    Structural transformation of crystallized debranched cassava starch prepared by temperature cycling (TC) treatment and then subjected to annealing (ANN), heat-moisture treatment (HMT) and dual hydrothermal treatments of ANN and HMT was investigated. The relative crystallinity, lateral crystal size, melting temperature and resistant starch (RS) content increased for all hydrothermally treated samples, but the slowly digestible starch (SDS) content decreased. The RS content followed the order: HMT → ANN > HMT > ANN → HMT > ANN > TC, respectively. The HMT → ANN sample showed a larger lateral crystal size with more homogeneity, whereas the ANN → HMT sample had a smaller lateral crystal size with a higher melting temperature. After cooking at 50% moisture, the increased RS content of samples was observed, particularly for the ANN → HMT sample. These results suggest that structural changes of crystallized debranched starch during hydrothermal treatments depend on initial crystalline characteristics and treatment sequences, influencing thermal stability, enzyme digestibility, and cooking stability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Changes on digestive enzymes during initial ontogeny in the three-spot cichlid Cichlasoma trimaculatum.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Solís, F J; Uscanga-Martínez, A; Guerrero-Zárate, R; Márquez-Couturier, G; Martínez-García, R; Camarillo-Coop, S; Perales-García, N; Rodríguez-Valencia, W; Gómez-Gómez, M A; Álvarez-González, C A

    2015-02-01

    A study was performed in order to understand the development of digestive enzymes during initial ontogeny of Cichlasoma trimaculatum, for which the activity of acidic and alkaline proteases, lipases, amylases and phosphatases was determined by means of biochemical and electrophoretic analysis. Our results showed that the activity of alkaline proteases, trypsin and chymotrypsin is present from day 6 after hatching (dah) during exogenous feeding with Artemia nauplii. The activities of carboxypeptidase A and leucine aminopeptidase are present from the first days, increasing at 6 dah and reaching their maximum activity at 9 dah while acid protease activity started at 9 dah. Furthermore, the lipase activity is detected on 6 dah and keeps increasing and decreasing on 17 dah. Amylase activity is detected on 3 dah, presenting fluctuations until 45 dah, where it reaches its maximum activity. Acid and alkaline phosphatases are detected from 3 dah and reach a maximum activity between 13 and 19 dah. The SDS-PAGE electrophoresis revealed six types of bands in the alkaline proteases, with molecular weight between 113.4 and 20.4 kDa. First three bands appear on 6 dah, but it is until 11 dah when all isoforms appear. Based on these results, it is considered that this species completes its digestive enzymatic machinery from day 9 after hatching, therefore is recommended to perform the transition from live feed to inert feed at 15 dah.

  2. Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid profile of starry flounder Platichthys stellatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhidong; Wang, Jiying; Qiao, Hongjin; Li, Peiyu; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid (AA) profile of starry flounder, Platichthys stellatus, were investigated and limiting amino acids were estimated compared with the essential AA profile between larvae and live food to clarify starry flounder larval nutritional requirements. Larvae were collected at the egg stage and 0, 2, 4, 7, 12, 17, 24 days after hatching (DAH) for analysis. Larvae grew from 1.91 mm at hatching to 12.13 mm at 24 DAH. Trypsin and chymotrypsin activities changed slightly by 4 DAH and then increased significantly 4 DAH. Pepsin activity increased sharply beginning 17 DAH. Lipase activity increased significantly 4 DAH and increased progressively with larval growth. Amylase activity was also detected in newly hatched larvae and increased 7 DAH followed by a gradual decrease. High free amino acid (FAA) content was detected in starry flounder eggs (110.72 mg/g dry weight). Total FAA content dropped to 43.29 mg/g in 4-DAH larvae and then decreased gradually to 13.74 mg/g in 24-DAH larvae. Most FAAs (except lysine and methionine) decreased >50% in 4-DAH larvae compared with those in eggs and then decreased to the lowest values in 24-DAH larvae. Changes in the protein amino acid (PAA) profile were much milder than those observed for FAAs. Most PAAs increased gradually during larval development, except lysine and phenylalanine. The percentages of free threonine, valine, isoleucine, and leucine decreased until the end of the trial, whereas the protein forms of these four AAs followed the opposite trend. A comparison of the essential AA composition of live food (rotifers, Artemia nauplii, and Artemia metanauplii) and larvae suggested that methionine was potentially the first limiting AA. These results may help develop starry flounder larviculture methods by solving the AA imbalance in live food. Moreover, the increased digestive enzyme activities indicate the possibility of introducing artificial compound feed.

  3. Effects of dietary fructooligosaccharide on digestive enzyme activities, intestinal microflora and morphology of male broilers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z R; Hu, C H; Xia, M S; Zhan, X A; Wang, M Q

    2003-06-01

    Two hundred forty male Avian Farms broiler chicks, 1 d of age, were randomly allocated to four treatments, each of which had five pens of 12 chicks per pen. The chicks were used to investigate the effects of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) on digestive enzyme activities and intestinal microflora and morphology. The chicks received the same basal diet based on corn-soybean meal, and FOS was added to the basal diet at 0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 g/kg diet at the expense of corn. Addition of 4.0 g/kg FOS to the basal diet significantly increased average daily gain of broilers. The feed-to-gain ratios were significantly decreased for the birds fed diets with 2.0 and 4.0 g/kg FOS versus the control. Addition of 4.0 g/kg FOS enhanced the growth of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, but inhibited Escherichia coli in the small intestinal and cecal digesta. Supplementation of 2.0 or 4.0 g/kg FOS to chicks significantly improved the activities of amylase compared to the control (12.80 or 14.75 vs. 8.42 Somogyi units). A significant increase in the activities of total protease was observed in 4.0 g/kg FOS-treated birds versus controls (83.91 vs. 65.97 units). Morphology data for the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum showed no significant differences for villus height, crypt depth, or microvillus height at the duodenum. By contrast, addition of 4.0 g/kg FOS significantly increased ileal villus height, jejunal and ileal microvillus height, and villus-height-to-crypt-depth ratios at the jejunum and ileum and decreased crypt depth at the jejunum and ileum. However, addition of 8.0 g/kg FOS had no significant effect on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, intestinal microflora, or morphology.

  4. [The participation of ethanol in induction of carbohydrates metabolism disturbances].

    PubMed

    Orywal, Karolina; Jelski, Wojciech; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2009-07-01

    Alcohol and products of its metabolism lead to impairment of many organs functions, what cause systemic and local carbohydrates metabolism disturbances. Abusing of alcohol induces changes in pancreatic digestive enzymes secretion, what contributes to development of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. Alcohol can cause secondary diabetes, what is result of pancreatic beta-cells damage and is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Alcohol cause liver cells degeneration and induction of many metabolic disturbances especially carbohydrates.

  5. [Food intolerances caused by enzyme defects and carbohydrate malassimiliations : Lactose intolerance and Co].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Apart from allergic conditions, carbohydrate malassimiliations (sugar metabolism disorders) are classified within the group of food intolerances. These dose-dependent, yet non-immunological reactions require gastroenterological or internal diagnosis following nutritional therapy. Intolerances to carbohydrates such as lactose (milk sugar) and fructose (fruit sugar) in addition to sugar alcohols (sorbitol, mannitol, lactitol etc.) have been gaining increasing attention in recent decades as they are the cause of a wide range of gastrointestinal symptoms. There are currently various options for both diagnosis and therapy that differ notably in terms of effort, costs, and efficiency. Nutritional change and patient education are the bases of therapy. Non-observance of the trigger will result in increasing complaints and possibly even more infections, e.g., diverticula, rectal disorders, bacterial miscolonization, bile acid malabsorption). For an optimal therapy, the following sugar metabolism disorders have to be differentiated: hypolactasia versus lactose maldigestion, fructose malabsorption versus fructose overload, combined lactose and fructose intolerance, and isolated adverse reactions against sorbitol.For the medical conditions listed above, a three- or four-stage treatment regimen is recommended. Extensive dietary restrictions with regard to the relevant sugar, except for lactose, should not be maintained over a longer period of time.

  6. Digestive enzymes and gut morphometric parameters of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus): Influence of body size and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Adrien; Turies, Cyril; Kerambrun, Elodie; Palluel, Olivier; Bado-Nilles, Anne; Beaudouin, Rémy; Porcher, Jean-Marc; Geffard, Alain; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile

    2018-01-01

    Determining digestive enzyme activity is of potential interest to obtain and understand valuable information about fish digestive physiology, since digestion is an elementary process of fish metabolism. We described for the first time (i) three digestive enzymes: amylase, trypsin and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), and (ii) three gut morphometric parameters: relative gut length (RGL), relative gut mass (RGM) and Zihler’s index (ZI) in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and we studied the effect of temperature and body size on these parameters. When mimicking seasonal variation in temperature, body size had no effect on digestive enzyme activity. The highest levels of amylase and trypsin activity were observed at 18°C, while the highest IAP activity was recorded at 20°C. When sticklebacks were exposed to three constant temperatures (16, 18 and 21°C), a temporal effect correlated to fish growth was observed with inverse evolution patterns between amylase activity and the activities of trypsin and IAP. Temperature (in both experiments) had no effect on morphometric parameters. However, a temporal variation was recorded for both RGM (in the second experiment) and ZI (in both experiments), and the later was correlated to fish body mass. PMID:29614133

  7. Digestive enzymes and gut morphometric parameters of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus): Influence of body size and temperature.

    PubMed

    Hani, Younes Mohamed Ismail; Marchand, Adrien; Turies, Cyril; Kerambrun, Elodie; Palluel, Olivier; Bado-Nilles, Anne; Beaudouin, Rémy; Porcher, Jean-Marc; Geffard, Alain; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile

    2018-01-01

    Determining digestive enzyme activity is of potential interest to obtain and understand valuable information about fish digestive physiology, since digestion is an elementary process of fish metabolism. We described for the first time (i) three digestive enzymes: amylase, trypsin and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), and (ii) three gut morphometric parameters: relative gut length (RGL), relative gut mass (RGM) and Zihler's index (ZI) in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and we studied the effect of temperature and body size on these parameters. When mimicking seasonal variation in temperature, body size had no effect on digestive enzyme activity. The highest levels of amylase and trypsin activity were observed at 18°C, while the highest IAP activity was recorded at 20°C. When sticklebacks were exposed to three constant temperatures (16, 18 and 21°C), a temporal effect correlated to fish growth was observed with inverse evolution patterns between amylase activity and the activities of trypsin and IAP. Temperature (in both experiments) had no effect on morphometric parameters. However, a temporal variation was recorded for both RGM (in the second experiment) and ZI (in both experiments), and the later was correlated to fish body mass.

  8. Consequences of lower food intake on the digestive enzymes activities, the energy reserves and the reproductive outcome in Gammarus fossarum.

    PubMed

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Digestive enzyme activity is often used as a sensitive response to environmental pollution. However, only little is known about the negative effects of stress on digestive capacities and their consequences on energy reserves and reproduction, although these parameters are important for the maintenance of populations. To highlight if changes in biochemical responses (digestive enzymes and reserves) led to impairments at an individual level (fertility), Gammarus fossarum were submitted to a lower food intake throughout a complete female reproductive cycle (i.e. from ovogenesis to offspring production). For both males and females, amylase activity was inhibited by the diet stress, whereas trypsin activity was not influenced. These results underline similar sensitivity of males and females concerning their digestive capacity. Energy reserves decreased with food starvation in females, and remained stable in males. The number of embryos per female decreased with food starvation. Lower digestive activity in males and females therefore appears as an early response. These results underline the ecological relevance of digestive markers, as they make it possible to anticipate upcoming consequences on reproduction in females, a key biological variable for population dynamics.

  9. Digestive enzymes activity in subsequent generations of Cameraria ohridella larvae harvested from horse chestnut trees after treatment with imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Stygar, Dominika; Michalczyk, Katarzyna; Dolezych, Bogdan; Nakonieczny, Miroslaw; Migula, Pawel; Zaak, Maria; Sawczyn, Tomasz; Karcz-Socha, Iwona; Kukla, Michal; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna; Buldak, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we describe the effect of chloronicotinoid pesticide (imidacloprid) on the digestive enzymes activity of the Cameraria ohridella larvae after lasting 1 year sublethal exposure to imidacloprid pesticide. Caterpillars - L4 stage (fourth instar, hyperphagic tissue-feeding phase) - were collected from chemically protected white horse chestnut trees 1 year after imidacloprid treatment, and compared with caterpillars collected from non-treated trees in a previous study. Enzymes activity of α-amylase, disaccharidases, glycosidases and proteases was assayed. The presence of pesticide in ingested food changed the digestive enzymes profile of caterpillars. The analysis of correlations between different digestive enzymes showed many significant correlations (P<0.05) among glycolytic activities like β-glucosidase and α-galactosidase activities. Statistically significant correlations for proteolytic activity were found between trypsin and chymotrypsin activity and aminopeptidase activity that occurred only in the 1st generation. PCA distinguished five primary components with eigenvalues higher than 1, from which the first two explain almost 59% of analyzed results. Surprisingly, in the pesticide treated groups significantly higher activities of sucrase and lactase in relation to control were found. In general, glycosidase (α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase and β-galactosidase) activities showed a similar pattern of activity in different generations. These results contrast with those obtained with control larvae, where significant differences in activities of α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase and β-galactosidase may result from the different quantity and quality food intake by subsequent generations of larvae. No inter-generation differences in total proteolytic activity were observed in treated larvae. The absolute value of total proteolytic activity was higher than that in the control group. The pesticide present in the vascular system of the horse chestnut

  10. Techniques for quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of protein therapeutics: advances in enzyme digestion and immunocapture.

    PubMed

    Fung, Eliza N; Bryan, Peter; Kozhich, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    LC-MS/MS has been investigated to quantify protein therapeutics in biological matrices. The protein therapeutics is digested by an enzyme to generate surrogate peptide(s) before LC-MS/MS analysis. One challenge is isolating protein therapeutics in the presence of large number of endogenous proteins in biological matrices. Immunocapture, in which a capture agent is used to preferentially bind the protein therapeutics over other proteins, is gaining traction. The protein therapeutics is eluted for digestion and LC-MS/MS analysis. One area of tremendous potential for immunocapture-LC-MS/MS is to obtain quantitative data where ligand-binding assay alone is not sufficient, for example, quantitation of antidrug antibody complexes. Herein, we present an overview of recent advance in enzyme digestion and immunocapture applicable to protein quantitation.

  11. Expression of an antimicrobial peptide, digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the intestine of E. praecox-infected chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Coccidiosis is a major intestinal disease of poultry, caused by several species of the protozoan Eimeria. The objective of this study was to examine changes in expression of digestive enzymes, nutrient transporters and an antimicrobial peptide following an Eimeria praecox challenge of chickens at d...

  12. Release of EPA and DHA from salmon oil - a comparison of in vitro digestion with human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Aarak, K E; Kirkhus, B; Holm, H; Vogt, G; Jacobsen, M; Vegarud, G E

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, we hypothesised whether in vitro digestion of salmon oil would release different amounts of PUFA depending on the origin of the lipolytic enzymes used. For this purpose, in vitro digestion of salmon oil (SO) was performed using human duodenal juice (HDJ) or a commercial enzyme preparation consisting of porcine pancreatin and bile (PB). The lipolytic effect was determined by measuring the release of fatty acids (FA) using solid-phase extraction and GC-flame ionisation detection, withdrawing samples every 20 min during digestion. The amount of FA released indicated that a plateau was reached after 80 min with approximately similar amounts of FA detected using both HDJ and PB (379 (sd 18) and 352 (sd 23) mg/g SO, respectively). However, the release of 18 : 2, EPA (20 : 5) and DHA (22 : 6) was significantly different during in vitro digestion. At 80 min, HDJ and PB released 43 and 33% of 18 : 2, 14 and 9% of EPA and 11 and 9% of DHA, respectively. Both enzyme preparations released approximately the same amounts of the other FA analysed. The effect of the addition of bile salts (BS) was significantly different in the two enzyme systems, where porcine pancreatin highly responded to the increase in BS concentration, in contrast to HDJ.

  13. Temperature modulates hepatic carbohydrate metabolic enzyme activity and gene expression in juvenile GIFT tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed a carbohydrate-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Qiang, J; He, J; Yang, H; Wang, H; Kpundeh, M D; Xu, P; Zhu, Z X

    2014-02-01

    The effects of rearing temperature on hepatic glucokinase (GK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity and gene expression were studied in GIFT (genetically improved farmed tilapia) tilapia fed a high carbohydrate diet containing 28% crude protein, 5% crude lipid and 40% wheat starch. Triplicate groups of fish (11.28 g initial body weight) were fed the diet for 45 days at 22 °C, 28 °C or 34 °C. At the end of the trial, final body weight of juvenile at 28 °C (59.12 g) was higher than that of the fish reared at 22 °C (27.13 g) and 34 °C (43.17 g). Feed intake, feed efficiency and protein efficiency ratio were also better at 28 °C. Liver glycogen levels were higher at 28 °C, while plasma glucose levels were higher in the 22 °C group. Significant (P<0.05) effects of water temperature on enzymes activities and gene expression were observed. Hepatic GK activity and mRNA level were higher at 28 °C than at 34 °C. Higher G6Pase and G6PD activity and gene expression were observed at 22 °C. Overall, the data show that juveniles reared at 28 °C exhibited enhanced liver glycolytic capacity. In contrast, hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis were increased by low temperature (22 °C). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Effects of treating sorghum wet distillers grains with solubles with fibrolytic enzymes on nutrient digestibility and performance in finishing beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of treating sorghum WDG with solubles (SWDG) with an enzyme, or enzyme-buffer combination on diet digestibility and feedlot performance. Experimental treatments are; 1) untreated SWDG (control), 2) addition of an enzyme complex to SWDG (enzyme...

  15. Revealing oxidative damage to enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in yeast: An integration of 2D DIGE, quantitative proteomics, and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Boone, Cory H T; Grove, Ryan A; Adamcova, Dana; Braga, Camila P; Adamec, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    Clinical usage of lidocaine, a pro-oxidant has been linked with severe, mostly neurological complications. The mechanism(s) causing these complications is independent of the blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks voltage-gated sodium channels, thus provides an ideal system to investigate lidocaine-induced protein and pathway alterations. Whole-proteome alterations leading to these complications have not been identified. To address this, S. cerevisiae was grown to stationary phase and exposed to an LC50 dose of lidocaine. The differential proteomes of lidocaine treatment and control were resolved 6 h post exposure using 2D DIGE. Amine reactive dyes and carbonyl reactive dyes were used to assess protein abundance and protein oxidation, respectively. Quantitative analysis of these dyes (⩾ 1.5-fold alteration, p ⩽ 0.05) revealed a total of 33 proteoforms identified by MS differing in abundance and/or oxidation upon lidocaine exposure. Network analysis showed enrichment of apoptotic proteins and cell wall maintenance proteins, while the abundance of proteins central to carbohydrate metabolism, such as triosephosphate isomerase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and redox proteins superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin were significantly decreased. Enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, such as phosphoglycerate kinase and enolase, the TCA cycle enzyme aconitase, and multiple ATP synthase subunits were found to be oxidatively modified. Also, the activity of aconitase was found to be decreased. Overall, these data suggest that toxic doses of lidocaine induce significant disruption of glycolytic pathways, energy production, and redox balance, potentially leading to cell malfunction and death. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Rapid preparation of functional polysaccharides from Pyropia yezoensis by microwave-assistant rapid enzyme digest system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Ko, Ju-Young; Jang, Jun-Ho; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Lee, Jung-Suck; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-11-20

    This study describes a simple preparation of functional polysaccharides from Pyropia yezoensis using a microwave-assistant rapid enzyme digest system (MAREDS) with various carbohydrases, and evaluates their antioxidative effects. Polysaccharide hydrolysates were prepared using MAREDS under different hydrolytic conditions of the carbohydrases and microwave powers. Polysaccharides less than 10kDa (Low molecular weight polysaccharides, LMWP, ≤10kDa) were efficiently obtained using an ultrafiltration (molecular weight cut-off of 10kDa). MAREDS increases AMG activation via an increased degree of hydrolysis; the best AMG hydrolysate was prepared using a 10:1 ratio of substrate to enzyme for 2h in MAREDS with 400W. LMWP consisted of galactose (27.3%), glucose (64.5%), and mannose (8.3%) from the AMG hydrolysate had stronger antioxidant effects than the high molecular weight polysaccharides (>10kDa). We rapidly prepared functional LMWPs by using MAREDS with carbohydrases, and suggest that LMWP might be potentially a valuable algal polysaccharide antioxidant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancing polyphenol extraction from unripe apples by carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hu-zhe; Hwang, In-Wook; Chung, Shin-Kyo

    2009-01-01

    The effects of process variables such as enzyme types, enzyme ratio, reaction temperature, pH, time, and ethanol concentration on the extraction of unripe apple polyphenol were investigated. The results indicated that Viscozyme L had the strongest effect on polyphenols extraction and was selected to study the polyphenol composition. The ratio of enzyme (Viscozyme L) to substrate (2 fungal beta-glucanase units (FBG)) at 0.02, reaction at pH 3.7, 50 °C for 12 h, and ethanol concentration of 70% were chosen as the most favorable extraction condition. Total phenolic content (TPC), reducing sugar content (RSC), and extraction yield increased by about 3, 1.5, and 2 times, respectively, compared with control. The contents of p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid increased to 8, 4, and 32 times, respectively. The enzyme-aided polyphenol extraction process from unripe apples might be applied to food industry for enhancing bioactive compound production. PMID:19946955

  18. Astrocyte-neuron crosstalk regulates the expression and subcellular localization of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mamczur, Piotr; Borsuk, Borys; Paszko, Jadwiga; Sas, Zuzanna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Gizak, Agnieszka; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-02-01

    Astrocytes releasing glucose- and/or glycogen-derived lactate and glutamine play a crucial role in shaping neuronal function and plasticity. Little is known, however, how metabolic functions of astrocytes, e.g., their ability to degrade glucosyl units, are affected by the presence of neurons. To address this issue we carried out experiments which demonstrated that co-culturing of rat hippocampal astrocytes with neurons significantly elevates the level of mRNA and protein for crucial enzymes of glycolysis (phosphofructokinase, aldolase, and pyruvate kinase), glycogen metabolism (glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase), and glutamine synthetase in astrocytes. Simultaneously, the decrease of the capability of neurons to metabolize glucose and glutamine is observed. We provide evidence that neurons alter the expression of astrocytic enzymes by secretion of as yet unknown molecule(s) into the extracellular fluid. Moreover, our data demonstrate that almost all studied enzymes may localize in astrocytic nuclei and this localization is affected by the co-culturing with neurons which also reduces proliferative activity of astrocytes. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that the astrocyte-neuron crosstalk substantially affects the expression of basal metabolic enzymes in the both types of cells and influences their subcellular localization in astrocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Changes in digestive enzyme activities during larval development of Chinese loach Paramisgurnus dabryanus (Dabry de Thiersant, 1872).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Long; Wu, Qiao-Wan; Hu, Wei-Hua; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Zhong-Bo; He, Hui; Shao, Wei-Han; Fan, Qi-Xue

    2015-12-01

    The digestive physiology of Chinese loach (Paramisgurnus dabryanus) was studied by assessing the specific and total activities of different pancreatic (trypsin, chymotrypsin, amylase and lipase), gastric (pepsin) and intestinal (alkaline phosphatase and leucine-aminopeptidase) enzymes from hatching to 40 days after hatching (DAH). Larvae were reared at 24.4 ± 0.4 °C and fed with rotifers from mouth opening (4 DAH) to 15 DAH, from 10 to 35 DAH with Cladocera and from 30 to 40 DAH with compound diet. Enzyme activities for trypsin, chymotrypsin, amylase and lipase were detected before the onset of exogenous feeding, indicating that these enzymes were genetically pre-programmed. Most of the pancreatic enzyme specific activities increased until 20 DAH and decreased thereafter. The pepsin activity of Chinese loach was firstly detected at 30 DAH, indicating the appearance of functional gastric gland. Alkaline phosphatase specific activity was detected from hatching onward, showed marked increase and reached the second peak at 20 DAH, while a gradual increase in specific leucine-aminopeptidase activity was observed until the end of the experiment. Accordingly, the larvae of Chinese loach possess a functional digestive system before the onset of exogenous feeding and the digestive capacity gradually increases as development progresses. The abrupt increase in intestinal enzyme activities between 10 and 20 DAH demonstrates onset of juvenile-like digestive mode in Chinese loach larvae. The increase in pepsin activity after 30 DAH indicates the shift from alkaline to acidic digestion in Chinese loach larvae, which may be considered as the onset of weaning.

  20. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement. PMID:26791570

  1. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-21

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement.

  2. Evaluation of the National Research Council (2001) dairy model and derivation of new prediction equations. 1. Digestibility of fiber, fat, protein, and nonfiber carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    White, R R; Roman-Garcia, Y; Firkins, J L; VandeHaar, M J; Armentano, L E; Weiss, W P; McGill, T; Garnett, R; Hanigan, M D

    2017-05-01

    Evaluation of ration balancing systems such as the National Research Council (NRC) Nutrient Requirements series is important for improving predictions of animal nutrient requirements and advancing feeding strategies. This work used a literature data set (n = 550) to evaluate predictions of total-tract digested neutral detergent fiber (NDF), fatty acid (FA), crude protein (CP), and nonfiber carbohydrate (NFC) estimated by the NRC (2001) dairy model. Mean biases suggested that the NRC (2001) lactating cow model overestimated true FA and CP digestibility by 26 and 7%, respectively, and under-predicted NDF digestibility by 16%. All NRC (2001) estimates had notable mean and slope biases and large root mean squared prediction error (RMSPE), and concordance (CCC) ranged from poor to good. Predicting NDF digestibility with independent equations for legumes, corn silage, other forages, and nonforage feeds improved CCC (0.85 vs. 0.76) compared with the re-derived NRC (2001) equation form (NRC equation with parameter estimates re-derived against this data set). Separate FA digestion coefficients were derived for different fat supplements (animal fats, oils, and other fat types) and for the basal diet. This equation returned improved (from 0.76 to 0.94) CCC compared with the re-derived NRC (2001) equation form. Unique CP digestibility equations were derived for forages, animal protein feeds, plant protein feeds, and other feeds, which improved CCC compared with the re-derived NRC (2001) equation form (0.74 to 0.85). New NFC digestibility coefficients were derived for grain-specific starch digestibilities, with residual organic matter assumed to be 98% digestible. A Monte Carlo cross-validation was performed to evaluate repeatability of model fit. In this procedure, data were randomly subsetted 500 times into derivation (60%) and evaluation (40%) data sets, and equations were derived using the derivation data and then evaluated against the independent evaluation data. Models

  3. Application of solid waste from anaerobic digestion of poultry litter in Agrocybe aegerita cultivation: mushroom production, lignocellulolytic enzymes activity and substrate utilization.

    PubMed

    Isikhuemhen, Omoanghe S; Mikiashvili, Nona A; Kelkar, Vinaya

    2009-06-01

    The degradation and utilization of solid waste (SW) from anaerobic digestion of poultry litter by Agrocybe aegerita was evaluated through mushroom production, loss of organic matter (LOM), lignocellulolytic enzymes activity, lignocellulose degradation and mushroom nutrients content. Among the substrate combinations (SCs) tested, substrates composed of 10-20% SW, 70-80% wheat straw and 10% millet was found to produce the highest mushroom yield (770.5 and 642.9 g per 1.5 kg of substrate). LOM in all SCs tested varied between 8.8 and 48.2%. A. aegerita appears to degrade macromolecule components (0.6-21.8% lignin, 33.1-55.2% cellulose and 14-53.9% hemicellulose) during cultivation on the different SCs. Among the seven extracellular enzymes monitored, laccase, peroxidase and CMCase activities were higher before fruiting; while xylanase showed higher activities after fruiting. A source of carbohydrates (e.g., millet) in the substrate is needed in order to obtain yield and biological efficiency comparable to other commercially cultivated exotic mushrooms.

  4. Enhanced biomethane production rate and yield from lignocellulosic ensiled forage ley by in situ anaerobic digestion treatment with endogenous cellulolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Speda, Jutta; Johansson, Mikaela A; Odnell, Anna; Karlsson, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Enzymatic treatment of lignocellulosic material for increased biogas production has so far focused on pretreatment methods. However, often combinations of enzymes and different physicochemical treatments are necessary to achieve a desired effect. This need for additional energy and chemicals compromises the rationale of using enzymes for low energy treatment to promote biogas production. Therefore, simpler and less energy intensive in situ anaerobic digester treatment with enzymes is desirable. However, investigations in which exogenous enzymes are added to treat the material in situ have shown mixed success, possibly because the enzymes used originated from organisms not evolutionarily adapted to the environment of anaerobic digesters. In this study, to examine the effect of enzymes endogenous to methanogenic microbial communities, cellulolytic enzymes were instead overproduced and collected from a dedicated methanogenic microbial community. By this approach, a solution with very high endogenous microbial cellulolytic activity was produced and tested for the effect on biogas production from lignocellulose by in situ anaerobic digester treatment. Addition of enzymes, endogenous to the environment of a mixed methanogenic microbial community, to the anaerobic digestion of ensiled forage ley resulted in significantly increased rate and yield of biomethane production. The enzyme solution had an instant effect on more readily available cellulosic material. More importantly, the induced enzyme solution also affected the biogas production rate from less accessible cellulosic material in a second slower phase of lignocellulose digestion. Notably, this effect was maintained throughout the experiment to completely digested lignocellulosic substrate. The induced enzyme solution collected from a microbial methanogenic community contained enzymes that were apparently active and stable in the environment of anaerobic digestion. The enzymatic activity had a profound effect on the

  5. The effect of enzymes upon metabolism, storage, and release of carbohydrates in normal and abnormal endometria.

    PubMed

    Hughes, E C

    1976-07-01

    This paper presents preliminary data concerning the relationship of various components of glandular epithelium and effect of enzymes on metabolism, storage, and release of certain substances in normal and abnormal endometria. Activity of these endometrial enzymes has been compared between two groups: 252 patients with normal menstrual histories and 156 patients, all over the age of 40, with abnormal uterine bleeding. Material was obtained by endometrial biopsy or curettage. In the pathologic classification of the group of 156, 30 patients had secretory endometria, 88 patients had endometria classified as proliferative, 24 were classified as endometrial hyperplasia, and 14 were classified as adenocarcinoma. All tissue was studied by histologic, histochemical, and biochemical methods. Glycogen synthetase activity caused synthesis of glucose to glycogen, increasing in amount until midcycle, when glycogen phosphorylase activity caused the breakdown to glucose during the regressive stage of endometrial activity. This normal cyclic activity did not occur in the abnormal endometria, where activity of both enzymes continued at low constant tempo. Only the I form of glycogen synthetase increased as the tissue became more hyperplastic. With the constant glycogen content and the increased activity of both the TPN isocitric dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the hyperplastic and cancerous endometria, tissue energy was created, resulting in abnormal cell proliferation. These altered biochemical and cellular activities may be the basis for malignant cell growth.

  6. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme: A Research-Inspired Methods Optimization Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willbur, Jaime F.; Vail, Justin D.; Mitchell, Lindsey N.; Jakeman, David L.; Timmons, Shannon C.

    2016-01-01

    The development and implementation of research-inspired, discovery-based experiences into science laboratory curricula is a proven strategy for increasing student engagement and ownership of experiments. In the novel laboratory module described herein, students learn to express, purify, and characterize a carbohydrate-active enzyme using modern…

  7. In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Mosier, Annika

    2018-01-22

    Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, CA.

  8. Digestive enzyme activities in mudskipper Boleophthalmus pectinirostris and Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Renxie; Hong, Wanshu; Zhang, Qiyong

    2010-07-01

    The mudskipper Boleophthalmus pectinirostris and Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis occupy the intertidal zone. However, both species have their own unique diet. The former is an herbivore and the latter is a carnivore. In order to reveal the relationship between digestive enzyme activities and diets in the two species, the activities of protease (P), non-specific bile salt-activated lipase (BAL) and α-amylase (A) were determined in the stomach and intestine of adult mudskipper B. pectinirostris and Chinese black sleeper B. sinensis. The results showed that the activities of protease, BAL and α-amylase in the intestine of B. pectinirostris were significantly ( P<0.05) higher than those in the stomach. In B. sinensis, gastric protease activity was not different from the intestinal protease ( P>0.05), while BAL and α-amylase activities of the intestine were significantly ( P<0.05) higher than those of the stomach. The activity of gastric protease in B. sinensis was significantly ( P<0.05) higher than that in B. pectinirostris, while the activities of intestinal protease were not different between the two fish species ( P>0.05). BAL activities of the stomach and intestine in B. sinensis were significantly ( P<0.05) higher than those in B. pectinirostris, while α-amylase activities of the stomach and intestine in B. pectinirostris were significantly ( P<0.05) higher than those in B. sinensis. The ratios of P/BAL, A/P and A/BAL of the digestive tract in B. pectinirostris were 1.5, 107.3 and 158.6, respectively; and those in B. sinensis were 0.2, 1.6 and 0.2, respectively. It can be concluded that food digestion in the adult B. pectinirostris is mainly carried out in the intestine, whereas in the adult B. sinensis it is initiated in the stomach and finishes in the intestine. The activities of BAL and α-amylase in B. pectinirostris and B. sinensis are well correlated with their diets. However, a clear-cut correlation between protease activity and diets is

  9. Phenolic Compounds from Olea europaea L. Possess Antioxidant Activity and Inhibit Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Dekdouk, Nadia; Malafronte, Nicola; Russo, Daniela; Faraone, Immacolata; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Ameddah, Souad; Severino, Lorella; Milella, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic composition and biological activities of fruit extracts from Italian and Algerian Olea europaea L. cultivars were studied. Total phenolic and tannin contents were quantified in the extracts. Moreover 14 different phenolic compounds were identified, and their profiles showed remarkable quantitative differences among analysed extracts. Moreover antioxidant and enzymatic inhibition activities were studied. Three complementary assays were used to measure their antioxidant activities and consequently Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index (RACI) was used to compare and easily describe obtained results. Results showed that Chemlal, between Algerian cultivars, and Coratina, among Italian ones, had the highest RACI values. On the other hand all extracts and the most abundant phenolics were tested for their efficiency to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Leccino, among all analysed cultivars, and luteolin, among identified phenolic compounds, were found to be the best inhibitors of α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Results demonstrated that Olea europaea fruit extracts can represent an important natural source with high antioxidant potential and significant α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects.

  10. Phenolic Compounds from Olea europaea L. Possess Antioxidant Activity and Inhibit Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dekdouk, Nadia; Malafronte, Nicola; Russo, Daniela; Faraone, Immacolata; Ameddah, Souad; Severino, Lorella

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic composition and biological activities of fruit extracts from Italian and Algerian Olea europaea L. cultivars were studied. Total phenolic and tannin contents were quantified in the extracts. Moreover 14 different phenolic compounds were identified, and their profiles showed remarkable quantitative differences among analysed extracts. Moreover antioxidant and enzymatic inhibition activities were studied. Three complementary assays were used to measure their antioxidant activities and consequently Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index (RACI) was used to compare and easily describe obtained results. Results showed that Chemlal, between Algerian cultivars, and Coratina, among Italian ones, had the highest RACI values. On the other hand all extracts and the most abundant phenolics were tested for their efficiency to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Leccino, among all analysed cultivars, and luteolin, among identified phenolic compounds, were found to be the best inhibitors of α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Results demonstrated that Olea europaea fruit extracts can represent an important natural source with high antioxidant potential and significant α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects. PMID:26557862

  11. Net energy value of two low-digestible carbohydrates, Lycasin HBC and the hydrogenated polysaccharide fraction of Lycasin HBC in healthy human subjects and their impact on nutrient digestive utilization.

    PubMed

    Sinau, S; Montaunier, C; Wils, D; Verne, J; Brandolini, M; Bouteloup-Demange, C; Vermorel, M

    2002-02-01

    The metabolizable energy content of low-digestible carbohydrates does not correspond with their true energy value. The aim of the present study was to determine the tolerance and effects of two polyols on digestion and energy expenditure in healthy men, as well as their digestible, metabolizable and net energy values. Nine healthy men were fed for 32 d periods a maintenance diet supplemented either with dextrose, Lycasin HBC (Roquette Frères, Lestrem, France), or the hydrogenated polysaccharide fraction of Lycasin HBC, at a level of 100 g DM/d in six equal doses per d according to a 3 x 3 Latin square design with three repetitions. After a 20 d progressive adaptation period, food intake was determined for 12d using the duplicate meal method and faeces and urine were collected for 10 d for further analyses. Subjects spent 36 h in one of two open-circuit whole-body calorimeters with measurements during the last 24h. Ingestion of the polyols did not cause severe digestive disorders, except excessive gas emission, and flatulence and gurgling in some subjects. The polyols induced significant increases in wet (+45 and +66% respectively, P<0.01) and dry (+53 and +75 % respectively, P<0.002) stool weight, resulting in a 2% decrease in dietary energy digestibility (P<0.001). They resulted also in significant increases in sleeping (+4.1%, P<0.03) and daily energy expenditure (+2.7 and +2.9% respectively, P<0.02) compared with dextrose ingestion. The apparent energy digestibility of the two polyols was 0.82 and 0.79 respectively, their metabolizable energy value averaged 14.1 kJ/g DM, and their net energy value averaged 10.8 kJ/g DM, that is, 35 % less than those of sucrose and starch.

  12. Concentrations and apparent digestibility of lignin and carbohydrate fractions in cell walls of whole-crop cereal silages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whole-crop cereal silage (WCCS) of oats generally has lower fiber digestibility than WCCS of barley. When investigated more closely, the difference seems mainly to be in the digestibility of the hemicellulosic fraction (HC), where HC is calculated as neutral detergent fibre (NDF) – acid detergent fi...

  13. Effects of Dietary Supplementation with the Combination of Zeolite and Attapulgite on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Secretion of Digestive Enzymes and Intestinal Health in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P.; Tan, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Zhou, Y. M.; Gao, F.; Zhou, G. H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of basal diets supplemented with a clay product consisting of zeolite and attapulgite (ZA) at 1:1 ratio on growth performance, digestibility of feed nutrients, activities of digestive enzymes in small intestine and intestinal health in broiler chickens. In experiment 1, 112 one-day-old male chickens were randomly divided into 2 groups with 8 replicates of 7 chickens each. In experiment 2, 84 one-day-old male chickens were randomly allocated into 2 groups consisting 6 replicates of 7 chickens each. The experimental diets both consisted of a maize-soybean basal control diet supplemented with 0% or 2% ZA. The diets were fed from 1 to 42 days of age. The results showed that ZA supplementation could increase body weight gain (BWG) and feed intake (FI), but had no significant effect on feed conversion ratio. The apparent digestibility values of crude protein and gross energy were significantly increased (p<0.05) by ZA from 14 to 16 d and 35 to 37 d. Dietary ZA treatment significantly increased (p<0.05) the activities of amylase, lipase and trypsin in jejunal digesta and the activities of maltase and sucrase in jejunal mucosa on days 21 and 42. The ZA supplementation also significantly increased (p<0.05) the catalase activity, reduced (p<0.05) the malondialdehyde concentration in the jejunal mucosa. In addition, a decrease of serum diamine oxidase activity and an increase (p<0.05) in concentration of secretory immunoglobulin A in jejunal mucosa were observed in birds treated with ZA on 21 and 42 days. It is concluded that ZA supplementation (2%) could partially improve the growth performance by increasing BWG and FI. This improvement was achieved through increasing the secretion of digestive enzymes, enhancing the digestibilites of nutrients, promoting intestinal health of broiler chickens. PMID:25178375

  14. Pectinases From Sphenophorus levis Vaurie, 1978 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): Putative Accessory Digestive Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Danilo Elton; de Paula, Fernando Fonseca Pereira; Rodrigues, André; Henrique-Silva, Flávio

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall in plants offers protection against invading organisms and is mainly composed of the polysaccharides pectin, cellulose, and hemicellulose, which can be degraded by plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). Such enzymes are often synthesized by free living microorganisms or endosymbionts that live in the gut of some animals, including certain phytophagous insects. Thus, the ability of an insect to degrade the cell wall was once thought to be related to endosymbiont enzyme activity. However, recent studies have revealed that some phytophagous insects are able to synthesize their own PCWDEs by endogenous genes, although questions regarding the origin of these genes remain unclear. This study describes two pectinases from the sugarcane weevil, Sphenophorus levis Vaurie, 1978 (Sl-pectinases), which is considered one of the most serious agricultural pests in Brazil. Two cDNA sequences identified in a cDNA library of the insect larvae coding for a pectin methylesterase (PME) and an endo-polygalacturonase (endo-PG)—denominated Sl-PME and Sl-endoPG, respectively—were isolated and characterized. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction expression profile for both Sl-pectinases showed mRNA production mainly in the insect feeding stages and exclusively in midgut tissue of the larvae. This analysis, together Western blotting data, suggests that Sl-pectinases have a digestive role. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Sl-PME and Sl-endoPG sequences are closely related to bacteria and fungi, respectively. Moreover, the partial genomic sequences of the pectinases were amplified from insect fat body DNA, which was certified to be free of endosymbiotic DNA. The analysis of genomic sequences revealed the existence of two small introns with 53 and 166 bp in Sl-endoPG, which is similar to the common pattern in fungal introns. In contrast, no intron was identified in the Sl-PME genomic sequence, as generally observed in bacteria

  15. Nanoparticle-based sandwich electrochemical immunoassay for carbohydrate antigen 125 with signal enhancement using enzyme-coated nanometer-sized enzyme-doped silica beads.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dianping; Su, Biling; Tang, Juan; Ren, Jingjing; Chen, Guonan

    2010-02-15

    A novel nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassay of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) as a model was designed to couple with a microfluidic strategy using anti-CA125-functionalized magnetic beads as immunosensing probes. To construct the immunoassay, thionine-horseradish peroxidase conjugation (TH-HRP) was initially doped into nanosilica particles using the reverse micelle method, and then HRP-labeled anti-CA125 antibodies (HRP-anti-CA125) were bound onto the surface of the synthesized nanoparticles, which were used as recognition elements. Different from conventional nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassays, the recognition elements of the immunoassay simultaneously contained electron mediator and enzyme labels and simplified the electrochemical measurement process. The sandwich-type immunoassay format was used for the online formation of the immunocomplex in an incubation cell and captured in the detection cell with an external magnet. The electrochemical signals derived from the carried HRP toward the reduction of H(2)O(2) using the doped thionine as electron mediator. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunoassay exhibited a wide working range from 0.1 to 450 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.1 U/mL CA125. The precision, reproducibility, and stability of the immunoassay were acceptable. The assay was evaluated for clinical serum samples, receiving in excellent accordance with results obtained from the standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Concluding, the nanoparticle-based assay format provides a promising approach in clinical application and thus represents a versatile detection method.

  16. Different digestion enzymes used for human pancreatic islet isolation: A mixed treatment comparison (MTC) meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rheinheimer, Jakeline; Ziegelmann, Patrícia Klarmann; Carlessi, Rodrigo; Reck, Luciana Ross; Bauer, Andrea Carla; Leitão, Cristiane Bauermann; Crispim, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Collagenases are critical reagents determining yield and quality of isolated human pancreatic islets and may affect islet transplantation outcome. Some islet transplantation centers have compared 2 or more collagenase blends; however, the results regarding differences in quantity and quality of islets are conflicting. Thus, for the first time, a mixed treatment comparison (MTC) meta-analysis was carried out to compile data about the effect of different collagenases used for human pancreas digestion on islet yield, purity, viability and stimulation index (SI). Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane libraries were searched. Of 755 articles retrieved, a total of 15 articles fulfilled the eligibility criteria and were included in the MTC meta-analysis. Our results revealed that Vitacyte and Liberase MTF were associated with a small increase in islet yield (islet equivalent number/g pancreas) when compared with Sevac enzyme [standardized mean difference (95% credible interval – CrI) = −2.19 (−4.25 to −0.21) and −2.28 (−4.49 to −0.23), respectively]. However, all other enzyme comparisons did not show any significant difference regarding islet yield. Purity and viability percentages were not significantly different among any of the analyzed digestion enzymes. Interestingly, Vitacyte and Serva NB1 were associated with increased SI when compared with Liberase MTF enzyme [unstandardized weighted mean difference (95% CrI) = −1.69 (−2.87 to −0.51) and −1.07 (−1.79 to −0.39), respectively]. In conclusion, our MTC meta-analysis suggests that the digestion enzymes currently being used for islet isolation works with similar efficiency regarding islet yield, purity and viability; however, Vitacyte and Serva NB1 enzymes seem to be associated with an improved SI as compared with Liberase MTF. PMID:25437379

  17. The early ontogeny of digestive and metabolic enzyme activities in two commercial strains of arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.).

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Le François, Nathalie R; Blier, Pierre U

    2003-10-01

    The extent to which growth performance is linked to digestive or energetic capacities in the early life stages of a salmonid species was investigated. We compared two strains of Arctic charr known to have different growth potentials during their early development (Fraser and Yukon gold). Trypsin, lipase, and amylase activities of whole alevins were measured at regular intervals from hatching through 65 days of development. To assess catabolic ability, we also measured five enzymes representing the following metabolic pathways: amino acid oxidation (amino aspartate transferase), fatty acid oxidation (beta-hydroxy acyl CoA-dehydrogenase), tricarboxylic acid cycle (citrate synthase), glycolysis (pyruvate kinase), and anaerobic glycolysis (lactate dehydrogenase). The measurement of these enzyme activities in individual fish allowed a clear evaluation of digestive capacity in relation to energetic demand. We also compared triploid and diploid individuals within the Yukon gold strain. For the whole experimental period, diploid Yukon gold fish exhibited the highest growth rate (1.08+/-0.18% length/day) followed by triploid Yukon gold fish (1.00+/-0.28% length/day) and finally Fraser strain fish (0.84+/-0.28% length/day). When differences in enzyme activities were observed, the Fraser strain showed higher enzyme activities at a given length than the Yukon gold strain (diploid and triploid). Higher growth performance appears to be linked to lower metabolic capacity. Our results suggest that fish may have to reach an important increase in the ratio of digestive to catabolic enzyme activities or a leveling off of metabolic enzyme activities before the onset of large increases in mass. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Effect of Flavonoid-Rich Extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra on Gut-Friendly Microorganisms, Commercial Probiotic Preparations, and Digestive Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Asha, Mannanthendil Kumaran; Debraj, Debnath; Dethe, Shekhar; Bhaskar, Anirban; Muruganantham, Nithyanantham; Deepak, Mundkinajeddu

    2017-05-04

    Flavonoid-rich extract prepared from Glycyrrhiza glabra has been found to be beneficial in patients with functional dyspepsia and was reported to possess some gut health-promoting properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-Helicobacter pylori activities. In the present study, the flavonoid-rich extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra was evaluated for its compatibility with probiotic strains (Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Streptococcus thermophilus), commercial probiotic drinks, and digestive enzymes (pancreatic α-amylase, α-glucosidase, phytase, xylanase, and pancreatic lipase). Results of this study indicated that the flavonoid-rich extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra is compatible with the tested probiotic strains, probiotic drinks and digestive enzymes.

  19. Application of carbohydrate arrays coupled with mass spectrometry to detect activity of plant-polysaccharide degradative enzymes from the fungus Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    van Munster, Jolanda M.; Thomas, Baptiste; Riese, Michel; Davis, Adrienne L.; Gray, Christopher J.; Archer, David B.; Flitsch, Sabine L.

    2017-01-01

    Renewables-based biotechnology depends on enzymes to degrade plant lignocellulose to simple sugars that are converted to fuels or high-value products. Identification and characterization of such lignocellulose degradative enzymes could be fast-tracked by availability of an enzyme activity measurement method that is fast, label-free, uses minimal resources and allows direct identification of generated products. We developed such a method by applying carbohydrate arrays coupled with MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry to identify reaction products of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. We describe the production and characterization of plant polysaccharide-derived oligosaccharides and their attachment to hydrophobic self-assembling monolayers on a gold target. We verify effectiveness of this array for detecting exo- and endo-acting glycoside hydrolase activity using commercial enzymes, and demonstrate how this platform is suitable for detection of enzyme activity in relevant biological samples, the culture filtrate of A. niger grown on wheat straw. In conclusion, this versatile method is broadly applicable in screening and characterisation of activity of CAZymes, such as fungal enzymes for plant lignocellulose degradation with relevance to biotechnological applications as biofuel production, the food and animal feed industry. PMID:28220903

  20. Application of carbohydrate arrays coupled with mass spectrometry to detect activity of plant-polysaccharide degradative enzymes from the fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    van Munster, Jolanda M; Thomas, Baptiste; Riese, Michel; Davis, Adrienne L; Gray, Christopher J; Archer, David B; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2017-02-21

    Renewables-based biotechnology depends on enzymes to degrade plant lignocellulose to simple sugars that are converted to fuels or high-value products. Identification and characterization of such lignocellulose degradative enzymes could be fast-tracked by availability of an enzyme activity measurement method that is fast, label-free, uses minimal resources and allows direct identification of generated products. We developed such a method by applying carbohydrate arrays coupled with MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry to identify reaction products of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. We describe the production and characterization of plant polysaccharide-derived oligosaccharides and their attachment to hydrophobic self-assembling monolayers on a gold target. We verify effectiveness of this array for detecting exo- and endo-acting glycoside hydrolase activity using commercial enzymes, and demonstrate how this platform is suitable for detection of enzyme activity in relevant biological samples, the culture filtrate of A. niger grown on wheat straw. In conclusion, this versatile method is broadly applicable in screening and characterisation of activity of CAZymes, such as fungal enzymes for plant lignocellulose degradation with relevance to biotechnological applications as biofuel production, the food and animal feed industry.

  1. Enhanced activity of carbohydrate- and lipid-metabolizing enzymes in insecticide-resistant populations of the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais.

    PubMed

    Araújo, R A; Guedes, R N C; Oliveira, M G A; Ferreira, G H

    2008-08-01

    Insecticide resistance is frequently associated with fitness disadvantages in the absence of insecticides. However, intense past selection with insecticides may allow the evolution of fitness modifier alleles that mitigate the cost of insecticide resistance and their consequent fitness disadvantages. Populations of Sitophilus zeamais with different levels of susceptibility to insecticides show differences in the accumulation and mobilization of energy reserves. These differences may allow S. zeamais to better withstand toxic compounds without reducing the beetles' reproductive fitness. Enzymatic assays with carbohydrate- and lipid-metabolizing enzymes were, therefore, carried out to test this hypothesis. Activity levels of trehalase, glycogen phosphorylase, lipase, glycosidase and amylase were determined in two insecticide-resistant populations showing (resistant cost) or not showing (resistant no-cost) associated fitness cost, and in an insecticide-susceptible population. Respirometry bioassays were also carried out with these weevil populations. The resistant no-cost population showed significantly higher body mass and respiration rate than the other two populations, which were similar. No significant differences in glycogen phosphorylase and glycosidase were observed among the populations. Among the enzymes studied, trehalase and lipase showed higher activity in the resistant cost population. The results obtained in the assays with amylase also indicate significant differences in activity among the populations, but with higher activity in the resistant no-cost population. The inverse activity trends of lipases and amylases in both resistant populations, one showing fitness disadvantage without insecticide exposure and the other not showing it, may underlay the mitigation of insecticide resistance physiological costs observed in the resistant no-cost population. The higher amylase activity observed in the resistant no-cost population may favor energy storage

  2. Lignocellulolytic enzyme activity, substrate utilization, and mushroom yield by Pleurotus ostreatus cultivated on substrate containing anaerobic digester solids.

    PubMed

    Isikhuemhen, Omoanghe S; Mikiashvilli, Nona A

    2009-11-01

    Solid waste from anaerobic digestion of litter from the commercial production of broiler chickens has limited use as fertilizer. Its disposal is a major problem for digester operators who are seeking alternative use for anaerobic digester solids, also referred to as solid waste (SW). The use of SW as substrates for the cultivation of Pleurotus ostreatus strain MBFBL400 was investigated. Lignocellulolytic enzymes activity, substrate utilization, and mushroom yield were evaluated in ten different substrate combinations (SCs) containing varying amounts of solid waste, wheat straw, and millet. Nutritional content of mushrooms produced on the different substrates was also determined. Substrates containing 70-80% wheat straw, 10-20% SW, and 10-20% millet were found to produce the highest mushroom yield (874.8-958.3 g/kg). Loss of organic matter in all SCs tested varied from 45.8% to 56.2%, which had positive correlation with the biological efficiency. Laccase, peroxidase, and carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) activities were higher before fruiting, whereas xylanase showed higher activities after mushroom fruiting. SW increased the nutritional content in mushrooms harvested, and the combination of wheat straw and SW with millet significantly improved mushroom yield. Our findings demonstrated the possibility of utilizing anaerobic digester solids in mushroom cultivation. The application of SW as such could improve the financial gains in the overall economy of anaerobic digester plants.

  3. The effect of chaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius) leaf meal and of exogenous enzymes on amino acid digestibility in broilers.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Franco, L; McNab, J M; Pearson, A; Belmar-Casso, R

    2003-07-01

    1. The apparent ileal nitrogen (N) and amino acid digestibilities in chaya leaf meal (CLM) (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius) with added enzymes, and the same variables in diets containing different amounts of CLM were studied in chickens. 2. In the first experiment pectinase, beta-glucanase, and pectinase + beta-glucanase were added to CLM. In the second experiment, there were three diets based on maize and soybean: 0, 150 and 250 g/kg CLM. 3. Pectinase significantly increased both lysine and overall amino acid digestibilities in CLM. 4. In experiment 2, the amino acid digestibility in birds fed on CLM250 was lower than that from birds fed on either control or CLM150. Only the digestibilities of alanine, arginine and proline were lower in birds fed on CLM150 than in those fed on the control diet. Nitrogen digestibility was lower in birds fed on the CLM250 diet than on either control or CLM150 diets. These findings were attributed to the increasing concentration of fibre with increasing dietary CLM.

  4. The Effects of Space Flight on Some Liver Enzymes Concerned with Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C. Y.; Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C.

    1978-01-01

    The activities of about 30 enzymes concerned with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and the levels of glycogen and of individual fatty acids were measured in livers of rats ex- posed to prolonged space flight (18.5 days) aboard COSMOS 986 Biosatellite. When flight stationary, (FS) and flight centrifuged (FC) rats were compared at recovery (R(sub 0)), decrceases in the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, alpha glycerphosphate, acyl transferase, diglyceride acyl transferase, acconitase and Epsilon-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were noted in the weightless group (FS). The significance of these findings was strengthened since all activities, showing alterations at R(sub 0), returned to normal 25 days post-flight. Differences were also seen in levels of two liver constituents. When glycogen and total fatty acids of the two groups of flight animals were determined, differences that could be attributed to reduced gravity were observed, the FS group at R(sub 0) contained, on the average, more than twice the amount of glycogen than did controls ad a remarkable shift in the ratio of palmitate to palmitoleate were noted. These metabolic alterations appear to be unique to the weightless condition. Our data justify the conclusion that centrifugation during space flight is equivalent to terrestrial gravity.

  5. Sequential ultrasound and low-temperature thermal pretreatment: Process optimization and influence on sewage sludge solubilization, enzyme activity and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Patricio; González, Zenón; Vidal, Gladys

    2017-06-01

    The influence of sequential ultrasound and low-temperature (55°C) thermal pretreatment on sewage sludge solubilization, enzyme activity and anaerobic digestion was assessed. The pretreatment led to significant increases of 427-1030% and 230-674% in the soluble concentrations of carbohydrates and proteins, respectively, and 1.6-4.3 times higher enzymatic activities in the soluble phase of the sludge. Optimal conditions for chemical oxygen demand solubilization were determined at 59.3kg/L total solids (TS) concentration, 30,500kJ/kg TS specific energy and 13h thermal treatment time using response surface methodology. The methane yield after pretreatment increased up to 50% compared with the raw sewage sludge, whereas the maximum methane production rate was 1.3-1.8 times higher. An energy assessment showed that the increased methane yield compensated for energy consumption only under conditions where 500kJ/kg TS specific energy was used for ultrasound, with up to 24% higher electricity recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Amniotic fluid digestive enzyme analysis is useful for identifying CFTR gene mutations of unclear significance.

    PubMed

    Oca, Florine; Dreux, Sophie; Gérard, Bénédicte; Simon-Bouy, Brigitte; de Becdelièvre, Alix; Ferec, Claude; Girodon, Emmanuelle; Muller, Françoise

    2009-12-01

    The large number of CFTR [cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ATP-binding cassette sub-family C, member 7)] mutations and the existence of variants of unclear significance complicate the prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of this study was to determine whether the pattern of amniotic fluid digestive enzymes (AF-DEs) could be correlated with the severity of CFTR mutations. The AF-DE pattern (gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, aminopeptidase M, and the intestinal isoform of alkaline phosphatase) was retrospectively analyzed in 43 AF samples. All fetuses presented 2 CFTR mutations, which were classified according to the severity of the disease: CF/CF (n = 38); CF/CFTR-related disorders (n = 1); and CF/unknown variant (n = 4). The relationships between clinical CF status, CFTR mutations, and AF-DE pattern were studied. Of 38 severely affected CF fetuses, an "obstructive" AF-DE pattern was observed in 15 of 15 samples collected before 22 weeks, irrespective of the CFTR mutation (diagnostic sensitivity, 100%; diagnostic specificity, 99.8%). In the 23 fetuses evaluated after 22 weeks, the AF-DE pattern was abnormal in 7 cases and noncontributive in 16 (diagnostic sensitivity, 30.4%; diagnostic specificity, 99.8%). Of the 5 questionable cases (F508del/N1224K, F508del/L73F, 3849+10kbC>T/G1127E, F508del/S1235R, F508del/G622D), all were CF symptom free at 2-4 years of follow-up. The AF-DE pattern (<22 weeks) was typical in 3 cases but abnormal in the last 2 cases. AF-DE analysis is of value for prenatal CF diagnosis in classic forms of CF and could be helpful in nonclassic CF.

  7. Upregulation of genes encoding digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the digestive system of broiler chickens by dietary supplementation of fiber and inclusion of coarse particle size corn.

    PubMed

    Kheravii, Sarbast K; Swick, Robert A; Choct, Mingan; Wu, Shu-Biao

    2018-03-20

    Measures to improve bird performance have been sought due to the imminent phase out of in-feed antibiotics in poultry and continued demand for higher poultry feeding efficiency. Increasing grain particle size and dietary fibre may improve gizzard function, digestive efficiency and nutrient absorption. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect increased particle size of corn and inclusion of sugarcane bagasse (SB) on mRNA expression of genes encoding digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in broilers. A total of 336 day-old Ross 308 males were assigned in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with corn particle size - coarse 3576 μm or fine 1113 μm geometric mean diameter, and SB - 0 or 2% inclusion. Feed conversion ratio (FCR), weight gain and feed intake were measured from d 0-10 and d 10-24. The relative gizzard weight and mRNA expression of genes encoding digestive enzymes and intestinal nutrient transporters were measured on d 24. During d 10-24, a particle size × SB interaction was observed for FCR (P < 0.01), where birds fed coarsely ground corn (CC) with 2% SB had lower FCR than those fed CC without SB. A particle size × SB interaction was observed for both expression of pepsinogen A and C (P < 0.01) which were negatively correlated with FCR on d 24. Addition of 2% SB upregulated pepsinogen A and C only in CC fed birds. Further, 2% SB also upregulated pancreatic amylase (AMY2A) and intestinal cationic amino acid transporter-1 (CAT1). Inclusion of dietary CC upregulated duodenal amino peptidase N (APN), jejunal alanine, serine, cysteine and threonine transporter-1 (ASCT1), and ileal peptide transporter-2 (PepT2). These results suggest that both SB and coarse particle size modulate expression of genes encoding important digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters and thus are directly related to bird performance. These findings provide insights into the combination effects of dietary fiber and particle size in the future

  8. Gut feedback mechanisms and food intake: a physiological approach to slow carbohydrate bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genyi; Hasek, Like Y; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2015-04-01

    Glycemic carbohydrates in foods are an important macronutrient providing the biological fuel of glucose for a variety of physiological processes. A classification of glycemic carbohydrates into rapidly digestible carbohydrate (RDC) and slowly digestible carbohydrate (SDC) has been used to specify their nutritional quality related to glucose homeostasis that is essential to normal functioning of the brain and critical to life. Although there have been many studies and reviews on slowly digestible starch (SDS) and SDC, the mechanisms of their slow digestion and absorption were mostly investigated from the material side without considering the physiological processes of their in vivo digestion, absorption, and most importantly interactions with other food components and the gastrointestinal tract. In this article, the physiological processes modulating the bioavailability of carbohydrates, specifically the rate and extent of their digestion and absorption as well as the related locations, in a whole food context, will be discussed by focusing on the activities of the gastrointestinal tract including glycolytic enzymes and glucose release, sugar sensing, gut hormones, and neurohormonal negative feedback mechanisms. It is hoped that a deep understanding of these physiological processes will facilitate the development of innovative dietary approaches to achieve desired carbohydrate or glucose bioavailability for improved health.

  9. The Choice of Enzyme for Human Pancreas Digestion is a Critical Factor for Increasing the Success of Islet Isolation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meirigeng; Valiente, Luis; McFadden, Brian; Omori, Keiko; Bilbao, Shiela; Juan, Jemily; Rawson, Jeffrey; Scott, Stephen; Ferreri, Kevin; Mullen, Yoko; El-Shahawy, Mohamed; Dafoe, Donald; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail H

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated three commercially available enzymes for pancreatic digestion by comparing key parameters during the islet isolation process, as well as islet quality post-isolation. Retrospectively compared and analyzed islet isolations from pancreata using three different enzyme groups: Liberase HI (n=63), Collagenase NB1/Neutral Protease (NP) (n=43), and Liberase Mammalian Tissue Free Collagenase/Thermolysin (MTF C/T) (n=115). A standardized islet isolation and purification method was used. Islet quality assessment was carried out using islet count, viability, in vitro glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), glucose-stimulated oxygen consumption rate (ΔOCR), and in vivo transplantation model in mice. Donor characteristics were not significantly different among the three enzyme groups used in terms of age, sex, hospital stay duration, cause of death, body mass index (BMI), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), cold ischemia time (CIT), and pancreas weight. Digestion efficacy (percentage of digested tissue by weight) was significantly higher in the Liberase MTF C/T group (73.5 ± 1.5 %) when compared to the Liberase HI group (63.6 ± 2.3 %) (p<0.001) and the Collagenase NB1/NP group (61.7 ± 2.9%) (p<0.001). The stimulation index for GSIS was significantly higher in the Liberase MTF C/T group (5.3 ± 0.5) as compared to the Liberase HI (2.9 ± 0.2) (p<0.0001) and the Collagenase NB1/NP (3.6 ± 2.9) (p=0.012) groups. Furthermore, the Liberase MTF C/T enzymes showed the highest success rate of transplantation in diabetic NOD Scid mice (65%), which was significantly higher than the Liberase HI (42%, p=0.001) and the Collagenase NB1/NP enzymes (41%, p<0.001). Liberase MTF C/T is superior to Liberase HI and Collagenase NB1/NP in terms of digestion efficacy and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro . Moreover, Liberase MTF C/T had a significantly higher success rate of transplantation in diabetic NOD Scid mice compared to Liberase HI and Collagenase NB1/NP enzymes.

  10. Source of carbohydrate and metabolizable lysine and methionine in the diet of recently weaned dairy calves on digestion and growth.

    PubMed

    Hill, T M; Quigley, J D; Bateman, H G; Aldrich, J M; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2016-04-01

    Two 56-d trials with weaned Holstein dairy calves (initially 72 ± 1.8 kg of body weight, 58 to 60 d of age) fed 95% concentrate and 5% chopped grass hay diets were conducted. Each trial used 96 calves (4 calves/pen). During 15 of the last 21 d of the first trial and 10 of 14 d of the second and third week of the second trial, fecal samples were taken to estimate digestibility using acid-insoluble ash as an internal marker. Digestibility estimates along with 56-d average daily gain (ADG), hip width change, body condition score, and fecal score were analyzed with pen as the experimental unit. In trial 1, a textured diet (19% crude protein) with high starch [52% starch, 13% neutral detergent fiber (NDF)] based on whole corn and oats or a pelleted low-starch (20% starch, 35% NDF), high-digestible fiber diet were used. Within starch level, diets were formulated from supplemental soybean meal or soybean meal with blood meal and Alimet (Novus International Inc., St. Charles, MO) to provide 2 metabolizable protein levels (1 and 1.07% metabolizable lysine plus methionine). The 4 treatments were analyzed as a completely randomized design with a 2 by 2 factorial arrangement (6 pens/diet). In trial 2, all pelleted diets (19% crude protein) were fed. Diets were based on soybean hulls, wheat middlings, or corn, which contained increasing concentrations of starch (13, 27, and 42% starch and 42, 23, and 16% NDF, respectively; 8 pens/diet). Contrast statements were constructed to separate differences in the means (soybean hulls plus wheat middlings vs. corn; soybean hulls vs. wheat middlings). In trial 1, intake of organic matter (OM) did not differ. Digestibility of OM was greater in calves fed high- versus low starch-diets. Digestibility of NDF and starch were less in calves fed the high- versus low-starch diets. Calf ADG and hip width change were greater for high- versus low-starch diets. Source of protein did not influence digestibility or ADG. In trial 2, intake of OM was not

  11. Soybean hull and enzyme inclusion effects on diet digestibility and growth performance in beef steers consuming corn-based diets.

    PubMed

    Russell, J R; Sexten, W J; Kerley, M S

    2016-06-01

    A beef feedlot study was conducted to determine the effects of increasing soybean hull (SH) inclusion and enzyme addition on diet digestibility and animal performance. The hypothesis was SH inclusion and enzyme addition would increase fiber digestibility with no negative effect on animal performance. Eight treatments (TRT) were arranged in a 4 × 2 factorial using four diets and two enzyme (ENZ) inclusion rates. The diets were composed primarily of whole shell corn (WSC) with 0%, 7%, 14%, or 28% SH replacing corn. The ENZ was a commercial proprietary mix of , and (Cattlemace, R&D Life Sciences, Menomonie, WI) included in the diets at 0% (S0, S7, S14, S28) or 0.045% DM basis (S0e, S7e, S14e, S28e). Eighty steers (287 ± 31 kg, SD) were stratified by weight and blocked into pens with 1 heavy and 1 light pen per TRT (2 pen/TRT, 5 steers/pen). Steers were fed for 70 d with titanium dioxide included in the diets for the final 15 d. Fecal samples were collected on d 70 to determine diet digestibility. Diets were balanced for AA and RDP requirement based on available ME. Individual DMI was measured using a GrowSafe system. Diet, ENZ, and diet × ENZ effects were analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Initial BW was applied as a covariate for final BW (FBW), and DMI was included as a covariate for all digestibility measures. The diet × ENZ interaction had no effect on FBW, ADG, DMI, or any digestibility measure ( ≥ 0.11). Steers fed ENZ tended to have greater FBW ( = 0.09) and had numerically greater ADG than steers not fed ENZ. Diet influenced DMI ( < 0.01), as steers fed S7 diets had the greatest DMI ( ≤ 0.3), steers fed S0 diets had the least DMI ( ≤ 0.002), and DMI of steers fed S14 and S28 diets did not differ ( = 0.5). There was a diet × ENZ interaction for G:F ( = 0.02) in which S0, S0e, S14e, and S28e did not differ ( ≥ 0.3) and were greatest ( ≤ 0.05). There was no effect of diet or ENZ on DM, OM, or CP digestibility ( ≥ 0.2). Diet had an effect

  12. Enzyme resistant carbohydrate based micro-scale materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp for food and pharmaceutical applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bio-based micro scale materials are increasingly used in functional food and pharmaceutical applications. The present study produced carbohydrate-based micro scale tubular materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp (SBP), a by-product of sugar beet processing. The isolated carbohydrates wer...

  13. Effects of traditional Chinese medicine formula on ruminal fermentation, enzyme activities and nutrient digestibility of beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Song, Zhen-Hui; Cao, Li-Ting; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Wen-Zhang; Zhou, Pei; Zuo, Fu-Yuan

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of traditional Chinese medicine formula (TCMF) combined with several herbs on ruminal fermentation, enzyme activities and nutrient digestibility. Twenty finishing bulls were assigned to control or different TCMFs (Yufeisan-1, -2, -3; 2.5% dry matter (DM) in concentrate). Results showed that DM intake was higher (P < 0.05) in the Yufeisan-3 group than others. Compared to control, apparent digestibility of crude protein and neutral detergent fiber were increased (P < 0.05) by Yufeisan-3. No changes were observed in ruminal pH, concentrations of ammonia-N, microbial crude protein and total volatile fatty acid, whereas ratio of acetate to propionate was lower (P < 0.05) and propionate proportion tended to be higher (P < 0.1) in three TCMFs than control. Ruminal xylanase (P = 0.061) and carboxymethylcellulase (P < 0.05) activities were higher in Yufeisan-3 than control. No changes were observed in abundance of total bacteria, fungi and protozoa, whereas Fibrobacter succinogenes (P = 0.062) and Ruminococcus flavefaciens (P < 0.05) were increased and total methanogens was reduced (P = 0.069) by Yufeisan-3 compared to control. Yufeisan-3 improved nutrient digestibility and ruminal enzyme activity, and modified fermentation and microbial community, maybe due to the presence of Herba agastaches, Cortex phellodendri and Gypsum fibrosum. © 2018 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Response of digestive enzymes and esterases of ecotoxicological concern in earthworms exposed to chlorpyrifos-treated soils.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Ríos, Juan Manuel; Attademo, Andrés M

    2018-03-01

    Assessment of organophosphorus (OP) pesticide exposure in non-target organisms rarely involves non-neural molecular targets. Here we performed a 30-d microcosm experiment with Lumbricus terrestris to determine whether the activity of digestive enzymes (phosphatase, β-glucosidase, carboxylesterase and lipase) was sensitive to chlorpyrifos (5 mg kg -1 wet soil). Likewise, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities were measured in the wall muscle and gastrointestinal tissues as indicators of OP exposure. Chlorpyrifos inhibited the acid phosphatase (34% of controls), carboxylesterase (25.6%) and lipase activities (31%) in the gastrointestinal content. However, in the gastrointestinal tissue, only the carboxylesterase and lipase activities were significantly depressed (42-67% carboxylesterase inhibition in the foregut and crop/gizzard, and 15% lipase inhibition in the foregut). Chlorpyrifos inhibited the activity of both cholinesterases in the gastrointestinal tissues, whereas the AChE activity was affected in the wall muscle. These results suggested chlorpyrifos was widely distributed throughout the earthworm body after 30 d of incubation. Interestingly, we found muscle carboxylesterase activity strongly inhibited (92% of control) compared with that detected in the gastrointestinal tissues of the same OP-exposed individuals. This finding was explained by the occurrence of pesticide-resistant esterases in the gastrointestinal tissues, which were evidenced by zymography. Our results suggest that digestive processes of L. terrestris may be altered by chlorpyrifos, as a consequence of the inhibitory action of the insecticide on some digestive enzymes.

  15. Protective Effect of Free and Bound Polyphenol Extracts from Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) on the Hepatic Antioxidant and Some Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kazeem, Mutiu Idowu; Akanji, Musbau Adewunmi; Yakubu, Musa Toyin; Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo Tom

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the hepatoprotective effects of polyphenols from Zingiber officinale on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by assessing liver antioxidant enzymes, carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes and liver function indices. Initial oral glucose tolerance test was conducted using 125 mg/kg, 250 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight of both free and bound polyphenols from Z. officinale. 28 day daily oral administration of 500 mg/kg body weight of free and bound polyphenols from Z. officinale to streptozotocin-induced (50 mg/kg) diabetic rats significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the fasting blood glucose compared to control groups. There was significant increase (P < 0.05) in the antioxidant enzymes activities in the animals treated with both polyphenols. Similarly, the polyphenols normalised the activities of some carbohydrate metabolic enzymes (hexokinase and phosphofructokinase) in the liver of the rats treated with it and significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the activities of liver function enzymes. The results from the present study have shown that both free and bound polyphenols from Z. officinale especially the free polyphenol could ameliorate liver disorders caused by diabetes mellitus in rats. This further validates the use of this species as medicinal herb and spice by the larger population of Nigerians. PMID:24367390

  16. Protective Effect of Free and Bound Polyphenol Extracts from Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) on the Hepatic Antioxidant and Some Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Kazeem, Mutiu Idowu; Akanji, Musbau Adewunmi; Yakubu, Musa Toyin; Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo Tom

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the hepatoprotective effects of polyphenols from Zingiber officinale on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by assessing liver antioxidant enzymes, carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes and liver function indices. Initial oral glucose tolerance test was conducted using 125 mg/kg, 250 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight of both free and bound polyphenols from Z. officinale. 28 day daily oral administration of 500 mg/kg body weight of free and bound polyphenols from Z. officinale to streptozotocin-induced (50 mg/kg) diabetic rats significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the fasting blood glucose compared to control groups. There was significant increase (P < 0.05) in the antioxidant enzymes activities in the animals treated with both polyphenols. Similarly, the polyphenols normalised the activities of some carbohydrate metabolic enzymes (hexokinase and phosphofructokinase) in the liver of the rats treated with it and significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the activities of liver function enzymes. The results from the present study have shown that both free and bound polyphenols from Z. officinale especially the free polyphenol could ameliorate liver disorders caused by diabetes mellitus in rats. This further validates the use of this species as medicinal herb and spice by the larger population of Nigerians.

  17. Beta-glucuronidase and hexosaminidase are marker enzymes for different compartments of the endo-lysosomal system in mussel digestive cells.

    PubMed

    Izagirre, U; Angulo, E; Wade, S C; ap Gwynn, I; Marigómez, I

    2009-02-01

    In environmental toxicology, the most commonly used techniques used to visualise lysosomes in order to determine their responses to pollutants (LSC test: lysosomal structural changes test; LMS test: lysosomal membrane stability test) are based on the histochemical application of lysosomal marker enzymes. In mussel digestive cells, the marker enzymes used are beta-glucuronidase (beta-Gus) and hexosaminidase (Hex). The present work has been aimed at determining the distribution of these lysosomal marker enzymes in the various compartments of the endo-lysosomal system (ELS) of mussel digestive cells and at exploring whether intercellular transfer of lysosomal enzymes occurs between digestive and basophilic cells. Immunogold cytochemistry has allowed us to conclude that beta-Gus is present in every compartment of the digestive cell ELS, whereas Hex is not so widely distributed. Moreover, Hex is intimately linked to the lysosomal membrane, whereas beta-Gus appears to be not necessarily membrane-bound. Therefore, two populations of heterolysosomes with different enzyme load and membrane stability have been distinguished in the digestive cell. In addition, heterolysosomes of different electron density have been commonly observed merging together by contact; we suggest that some might act as storage granules for lysosomal enzymes. On the other hand, beta-Gus seems to be released to the digestive alveolar lumen in secretory lysosomes produced by basophilic cells and endocytosed by digestive cells. Regarding the implications of the present study on the interpretation of lysosomal biomarkers, we conclude that beta-Gus, but not Hex, histochemistry provides an appropriate marker for the LSC test and that, although both lysosomal marker enzymes can be employed in the LMS test, different values would be obtained depending on the marker enzyme employed.

  18. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin–cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan, E-mail: npashokkumar1@gmail.com

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)–cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine,more » blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. - Highlights: • Diabetic rats are more susceptible to cadmium nephrotoxicity. • Cadmium plays as a

  19. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin-cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)-cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro digestion of purified β-casein variants A(1), A(2), B, and I: effects on antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Petrat-Melin, B; Andersen, P; Rasmussen, J T; Poulsen, N A; Larsen, L B; Young, J F

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of bovine milk proteins affect the protein profile of the milk and, hence, certain technological properties, such as casein (CN) number and cheese yield. However, reports show that such polymorphisms may also affect the health-related properties of milk. Therefore, to gain insight into their digestion pattern and bioactive potential, β-CN was purified from bovine milk originating from cows homozygous for the variants A(1), A(2), B, and I by a combination of cold storage, ultracentrifugation, and acid precipitation. The purity of the isolated β-CN was determined by HPLC, variants were verified by mass spectrometry, and molar extinction coefficients at λ=280nm were determined. β-Casein from each of the variants was subjected to in vitro digestion using pepsin and pancreatic enzymes. Antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacities of the hydrolysates were assessed at 3 stages of digestion and related to that of the undigested samples. Neither molar extinction coefficients nor overall digestibility varied significantly between these 4 variants; however, clear differences in digestion pattern were indicated by gel electrophoresis. In particular, after 60min of pepsin followed by 5min of pancreatic enzyme digestion, one ≈4kDa peptide with the N-terminal sequence (106)H-K-E-M-P-F-P-K- was absent from β-CN variant B. This is likely a result of the (122)Ser to (122)Arg substitution in variant B introducing a novel trypsin cleavage site, leading to the changed digestion pattern. All investigated β-CN variants exhibited a significant increase in antioxidant capacity upon digestion, as measured by the Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. After 60min of pepsin + 120min of pancreatic enzyme digestion, the accumulated increase in antioxidant capacity was ≈1.7-fold for the 4 β-CN variants. The ACE inhibitory capacity was also significantly increased by digestion, with the B variant reaching the highest inhibitory

  1. Evaluation of the Effect of Low Dietary Fermentable Carbohydrate Content on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Blood Characteristics, and Meat Quality in Finishing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S. M.; Hwang, J. H.; Kim, I. H.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 96 pigs (49.23±3.20 kg) were used in an 11 wk growth trial to evaluate the effect of fermentable carbohydrate (FC) content on growth performance, apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of nutrient, blood profile, and meat quality. The dietary treatments were: i) negative control (NC), basal diet, ii) positive control (PC), NC+antibiotics (positive control diet with 5 ppm flavomycin), iii) PCL, PC-13% lower FC, and iv) NCL, NC-13% lower FC. The growth performance (average daily gain, average daily feed intake, and gain/feed) didn’t differ among treatments through the whole experiment. These pigs fed the PCL diet had the greater (p<0.05) apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of dry matter than those from PC and NC treatment at the end of the experiment. No differences were observed in white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC), and lymphocyte concentration among different treatments. After the feeding period, meat samples were collected from the pigs at slaughter. The pigs in NCL and PCL treatments had greater (p<0.05) backfat thickness and lower lean percentage. The color value of loin was higher (p<0.05) in NCL treatment compared to PCL treatment. Also, the NCL treatment had higher (p<0.05) marbling value than PC treatment. The drip loss was depressed by PCL and NCL treatment comapared to NC treatments. The water holding capacity (WHC) was higher (p<0.05) in NC and PCL treatment. In conclusion, the low FC can improve digestibility and meat quality of finishing pigs. PMID:25049693

  2. Effect of dietary genistein on growth performance, digestive enzyme activity, and body composition of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Wei; Ru, Shaoguo

    2015-01-01

    An 8-week feeding experiment was performed to evaluate the effect of dietary genistein on growth performance, body composition, and digestive enzymes activity of juvenile Nile tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus). Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated containing four graded supplements of genistein: 0, 30, 300, and 3 000 μg/g. Each diet was randomly assigned in triplicate to tanks stocked with 15 juvenile tilapia (10.47±1.24 g). The results show that 30 and 300 μg/g dietary genistein had no significant effect on growth performance of Nile tilapia, but the higher level of genistein (3 000 μg/g) significantly depressed the final body weight and specific growth rate. There was no significant difference in survival rate, feed intake, feed efficiency ratio or whole body composition among all dietary treatments. An assay of digestive enzymes showed that the diet containing 3 000 μg/ggenistein decreased stomach and hepatopancreas protease activity, and amylase activity in the liver and intestine, while a dietary level of 300 μg/g genistein depressed stomach protease and intestine amylase activities. However, no significant difference in stomach amylase activity was found among dietary treatments. Overall, the results of the present study indicate that a high level of dietary genistein (3 000 μg/g, or above) would significantly reduce the growth of Nile tilapia, partly because of its inhibitory effect on the activity of major digestive enzymes. Accordingly, the detrimental effects of genistein, as found in soybean products, should not be ignored when applied as an alternative ingredient source in aquaculture.

  3. RNA-Seq reveals the dynamic and diverse features of digestive enzymes during early development of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiankai; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Yang; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-09-01

    The Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), with high commercial value, has a typical metamorphosis pattern by going through embryo, nauplius, zoea, mysis and postlarvae during early development. Its diets change continually in this period, and a high mortality of larvae also occurs in this period. Since there is a close relationship between diets and digestive enzymes, a comprehensive investigation about the types and expression patterns of all digestive enzyme genes during early development of L. vannamei is of considerable significance for shrimp diets and larvae culture. Using RNA-Seq data, the types and expression characteristics of the digestive enzyme genes were analyzed during five different development stages (embryo, nauplius, zoea, mysis and postlarvae) in L. vannamei. Among the obtained 66,815 unigenes, 296 were annotated as 16 different digestive enzymes including five types of carbohydrase, seven types of peptidase and four types of lipase. Such a diverse suite of enzymes illustrated the capacity of L. vannamei to exploit varied diets to fit their nutritional requirements. The analysis of their dynamic expression patterns during development also indicated the importance of transcriptional regulation to adapt to the diet transition. Our study revealed the diverse and dynamic features of digestive enzymes during early development of L. vannamei. These results would provide support to better understand the physiological changes during diet transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucose-Specific Enzyme IIA of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Chitin Signaling Pathways in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shouji; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2017-09-15

    In Vibrio cholerae , the genes required for chitin utilization and natural competence are governed by the chitin-responsive two-component system (TCS) sensor kinase ChiS. In the classical TCS paradigm, a sensor kinase specifically phosphorylates a cognate response regulator to activate gene expression. However, our previous genetic study suggested that ChiS stimulates the non-TCS transcriptional regulator TfoS by using mechanisms distinct from classical phosphorylation reactions (S. Yamamoto, J. Mitobe, T. Ishikawa, S. N. Wai, M. Ohnishi, H. Watanabe, and H. Izumiya, Mol Microbiol 91:326-347, 2014, https://doi.org/10.1111/mmi.12462). TfoS specifically activates the transcription of tfoR , encoding a small regulatory RNA essential for competence gene expression. Whether ChiS and TfoS interact directly remains unknown. To determine if other factors mediate the communication between ChiS and TfoS, we isolated transposon mutants that turned off tfoR :: lacZ expression but possessed intact chiS and tfoS genes. We demonstrated an unexpected association of chitin-induced signaling pathways with the glucose-specific enzyme IIA (EIIA glc ) of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) for carbohydrate uptake and catabolite control of gene expression. Genetic and physiological analyses revealed that dephosphorylated EIIA glc inactivated natural competence and tfoR transcription. Chitin-induced expression of the chb operon, which is required for chitin transport and catabolism, was also repressed by dephosphorylated EIIA glc Furthermore, the regulation of tfoR and chb expression by EIIA glc was dependent on ChiS and intracellular levels of ChiS were not affected by disruption of the gene encoding EIIA glc These results define a previously unknown connection between the PTS and chitin signaling pathways in V. cholerae and suggest a strategy whereby this bacterium can physiologically adapt to the existing nutrient status. IMPORTANCE The EIIA glc

  5. Extraction of intracellular protein from Chlorella pyrenoidosa using a combination of ethanol soaking, enzyme digest, ultrasonication and homogenization techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruilin; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Xuewu

    2018-01-01

    Due to the rigid cell wall of Chlorella species, it is still challenging to effectively extract significant amounts of protein. Mass methods were used for the extraction of intracellular protein from microalgae with biological, mechanical and chemical approaches. In this study, based on comparison of different extraction methods, a new protocol was established to maximize extract amounts of protein, which was involved in ethanol soaking, enzyme digest, ultrasonication and homogenization techniques. Under the optimized conditions, 72.4% of protein was extracted from the microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa, which should contribute to the research and development of Chlorella protein in functional food and medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Combined techniques for characterising pasta structure reveals how the gluten network slows enzymic digestion rate.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Sissons, Mike; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Robert G; Warren, Frederick J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to characterise the influence of gluten structure on the kinetics of starch hydrolysis in pasta. Spaghetti and powdered pasta were prepared from three different cultivars of durum semolina, and starch was also purified from each cultivar. Digestion kinetic parameters were obtained through logarithm-of-slope analysis, allowing identification of sequential digestion steps. Purified starch and semolina were digested following a single first-order rate constant, while pasta and powdered pasta followed two sequential first-order rate constants. Rate coefficients were altered by pepsin hydrolysis. Confocal microscopy revealed that, following cooking, starch granules were completely swollen for starch, semolina and pasta powder samples. In pasta, they were completely swollen in the external regions, partially swollen in the intermediate region and almost intact in the pasta strand centre. Gluten entrapment accounts for sequential kinetic steps in starch digestion of pasta; the compact microstructure of pasta also reduces digestion rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  8. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-10

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  9. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  10. Ameliorating effect of berbamine on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high-fat diet and streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Chandrasekaran; Nishanthi, Ramajayam; Pugalendi, Pachaiappan

    2018-07-01

    Aberrations in the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism is well documented in diabetes mellitus. Previous studies have shown that active ingredients in the extracts of Berberis aristata exhibits diverse pharmacological activities in animal models. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether berbamine (BBM), an alkaloid from the roots of Berberis aristata can ameliorate the altered activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in high fat diet (HFD)/streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Supplementation of HFD for 4 weeks followed by intraperitonial administration of single low dose of STZ (40 mg/kg b.w.) to Sprague Dawley rats resulted in significant hyperglycemia with a decline in plasma insulin levels. The rats also exhibited decreased hemoglobin with an increase in glycated hemoglobin levels. The activities of hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were decreased whereas increases in the activities of glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase were observed in the hepatic tissues of diabetic control rats. Glycogen content in the hepatic and skeletal muscle tissues were found to be decreased in diabetic rats. Oral administration of BBM for 56 days, dose dependently (50, 100, 200 mg/kg b.w.) improved insulin secretion in diabetic treated rats. Immunohistochemical studies on pancreas revealed a strong immunoreactivity to insulin in BBM treated rats. At the effective dose of 100 mg/kg b.w., BBM restored the altered activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and also improved glycogen content in insulin dependent tissues. From the biochemical and histochemical data obtained in this study we conclude that BBM ameliorated the activities of metabolic enzymes and maintained glucose homeostasis in HFD/STZ induced diabetic rats and it can be used as a potential phytomedicine for the management of diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Mapping N-linked glycosylation of carbohydrate-active enzymes in the secretome of Aspergillus nidulans grown on lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Marcelo Ventura; Zubieta, Mariane Paludetti; Franco Cairo, João Paulo Lourenço; Calzado, Felipe; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Squina, Fabio Marcio; Prade, Rolf Alexander; de Lima Damásio, André Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Aspergillus includes microorganisms that naturally degrade lignocellulosic biomass, secreting large amounts of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) that characterize their saprophyte lifestyle. Aspergillus has the capacity to perform post-translational modifications (PTM), which provides an additional advantage for the use of these organisms as a host for the production of heterologous proteins. In this study, the N-linked glycosylation of CAZymes identified in the secretome of Aspergillus nidulans grown on lignocellulose was mapped. Aspergillus nidulans was grown in glucose, xylan and pretreated sugarcane bagasse (SCB) for 96 h, after which glycoproteomics and glycomics were carried out on the extracellular proteins (secretome). A total of 265 proteins were identified, with 153, 210 and 182 proteins in the glucose, xylan and SCB substrates, respectively. CAZymes corresponded to more than 50 % of the total secretome in xylan and SCB. A total of 182 N-glycosylation sites were identified, of which 121 were detected in 67 CAZymes. A prevalence of the N-glyc sequon N-X-T (72.2 %) was observed in N-glyc sites compared with N-X-S (27.8 %). The amino acids flanking the validated N-glyc sites were mainly composed of hydrophobic and polar uncharged amino acids. Selected proteins were evaluated for conservation of the N-glyc sites in Aspergilli homologous proteins, but a pattern of conservation was not observed. A global analysis of N-glycans released from the proteins secreted by A. nidulans was also performed. While the proportion of N-glycans with Hex5 to Hex9 was similar in the xylan condition, a prevalence of Hex5 was observed in the SCB and glucose conditions. The most common and frequent N-glycosylated motifs, an overview of the N-glycosylation of the CAZymes and the number of mannoses found in N-glycans were analyzed. There are many bottlenecks in protein production by filamentous fungi, such as folding, transport by vesicles and secretion, but N

  12. Functional evaluation of carbohydrate-centred glycoclusters by enzyme-linked lectin assay: ligands for concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Maja; Benito, Juan M; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Lindhorst, Thisbe K; García Fernández, José M

    2004-06-07

    The affinities of the mannose-specific lectin concanavalin A (Con A) towards D-glucose-centred mannosyl clusters differing in the anomeric configuration of the monosaccharide core, nature of the bridging functional groups and valency, have been measured by a competitive enzyme-linked lectin assay. Pentavalent thioether-linked ligands (5 and 7) were prepared by radical addition of 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1-thio-alpha-D-mannopyranose to the corresponding penta-O-allyl-alpha- or -beta-D-glucopyranose, followed by deacetylation. The distinct reactivity of the anomeric position in the D-glucose scaffold was exploited in the preparation of a tetravalent cluster (10) that keeps a reactive aglyconic group for further manipulation, including incorporation of a reporter group or attachment to a solid support. Hydroboration of the double bonds in the penta-O-allyl-alpha-D-glucopyranose derivative and replacement of the hydroxy groups with amine moieties gave a suitable precursor for the preparation of pentavalent and 15-valent mannosides through the thiourea-bridging reaction (17 and 20, respectively). The diastereomeric 1-thiomannose-coated clusters 5 and 7 were demonstrated to be potent ligands for Con A, with IC(50) values for the inhibition of the Con A-yeast mannan association indicative of 6.4- and 5.5-fold increases in binding affinity (valency-corrected values), respectively, relative to the value for methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside. The tetravalent cluster 10 exhibited a valency-corrected relative lectin-binding potency virtually identical to that of the homologous pentavalent mannoside 7. In sharp contrast, replacement of the 1-thiomannose wedges of 5 with alpha-D-mannopyranosylthioureido units (17) virtually abolished any multivalent or statistic effects, with a dramatic decrease of binding affinity. The 15-valent ligand 20, possessing classical O-glycosidic linkages, exhibited a twofold increase in lectin affinity relative to the penta-O-(thioglycoside) 5; it is

  13. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an Enzyme Essential for NAD+ Biosynthesis, Leads to Altered Carbohydrate Metabolism in Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bo; Dong, Sucai; Shepard, Robert L.; Kays, Lisa; Roth, Kenneth D.; Geeganage, Sandaruwan; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Zhao, Genshi

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) has been extensively studied due to its essential role in NAD+ biosynthesis in cancer cells and the prospect of developing novel therapeutics. To understand how NAMPT regulates cellular metabolism, we have shown that the treatment with FK866, a specific NAMPT inhibitor, leads to attenuation of glycolysis by blocking the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase step (Tan, B., Young, D. A., Lu, Z. H., Wang, T., Meier, T. I., Shepard, R. L., Roth, K., Zhai, Y., Huss, K., Kuo, M. S., Gillig, J., Parthasarathy, S., Burkholder, T. P., Smith, M. C., Geeganage, S., and Zhao, G. (2013) Pharmacological inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), an enzyme essential for NAD+ biosynthesis, in human cancer cells: metabolic basis and potential clinical implications. J. Biol. Chem. 288, 3500–3511). Due to technical limitations, we failed to separate isotopomers of phosphorylated sugars. In this study, we developed an enabling LC-MS methodology. Using this, we confirmed the previous findings and also showed that NAMPT inhibition led to accumulation of fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate but not glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, and sedoheptulose 7-phosphate as previously thought. To investigate the metabolic basis of the metabolite formation, we carried out biochemical and cellular studies and established the following. First, glucose-labeling studies indicated that fructose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde, and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate was derived from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and erythrose via an aldolase reaction. Second, biochemical studies showed that aldolase indeed catalyzed these reactions. Third, glyceraldehyde- and erythrose-labeling studies showed increased incorporation of corresponding labels into fructose 1-phosphate and sedoheptulose 1-phosphate in FK866-treated cells. Fourth, NAMPT inhibition led to increased glyceraldehyde and

  14. Cloning and molecular ontogeny of digestive enzymes in fed and food-deprived developing gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) larvae.

    PubMed

    Mata-Sotres, José Antonio; Martos-Sitcha, Juan Antonio; Astola, Antonio; Yúfera, Manuel; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    We have determined the expression pattern of key pancreatic enzymes precursors (trypsinogen, try; chymotrypsinogen, ctrb; phospholipase A2, pla2; bile salt-activated lipase, cel; and α-amylase, amy2a) during the larval stage of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) up to 60days after hatching (dph). Previously, complete sequences of try, cel, and amy2a were cloned and phylogenetically analyzed. One new isoform was found for cel transcript (cel1b). Expression of all enzyme precursors was detected before the mouth opening. Expression of try and ctrb increased during the first days of development and then maintained high values with some fluctuations during the whole larval stage. The prolipases pla2 and cel1b increased from first-feeding with irregular fluctuation until the end of the experiment. Contrarily, cel1a maintained low expression values during most of the larval stage increasing at the end of the period. Nevertheless, cel1a expression was negligible as compared with cel1b. The expression of amy2a sharply increased during the first week followed by a gradual decrease. In addition, a food-deprivation experiment was performed to find the differences in relation to presence/absence of gut content after the opening of the mouth. The food-deprived larvae died at 10dph. The expression levels of all digestive enzymes increased up to 7dph, declining sharply afterwards. This expression pattern up to 7dph was the same observed in fed larvae, confirming the genetic programming during the early development. Main digestive enzymes in gilthead seabream larvae exhibited the same expression profiles than other marine fish with carnivorous preferences in their juvenile stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Common Prairie feeds with different soluble and insoluble fractions used for CPM diet formulation in dairy cattle: impact of carbohydrate-protein matrix structure on protein and other primary nutrient digestion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship of carbohydrates molecular spectral characteristics to rumen degradability of primary nutrients in Prairie feeds in dairy cattle. In total, 12 different types of feeds were selected, each type of feed was from three different source with total 37 samples. Six types of them were energy-sourced feeds and the others were protein-sourced feeds. The carbohydrates molecular spectral intensity of various functional groups were collected using Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FT/IR) spectroscopy. In the in situ study, the results showed that the rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of primary nutrients (DM, OM, NCP, and CP) were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. The spectral bands features were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. Spectral intensities of A_Cell, H_1415 and H_1370 were weakly positively correlated with in situ rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of DM, OM and NCP. Spectral intensities of H_1150, H_1015, A_1, and A_3 were weakly negatively associated with in situ rumen degradation of CP. Spectral intensities of A_1240 and H_1240, mainly associated with cellulosic compounds, were correlated with rumen CP degradation. The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the spectral intensities of A_3 and H_1415 played the most important role and could be used as a potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feeds in dairy cattle. In conclusion, this study showed that the carbohydrates as a whole have an effect on protein rumen degradation, rather than cellulose alone, indicating carbohydrate-protein matrix structure impact protein utilization in dairy cattle. The non-invasive molecular spectral technique (ATR-FT/IR) could be used as a rapid potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feedstuffs by using molecular spectral bands intensities in carbohydrate fingerprint region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B

  16. Common Prairie feeds with different soluble and insoluble fractions used for CPM diet formulation in dairy cattle: Impact of carbohydrate-protein matrix structure on protein and other primary nutrient digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship of carbohydrates molecular spectral characteristics to rumen degradability of primary nutrients in Prairie feeds in dairy cattle. In total, 12 different types of feeds were selected, each type of feed was from three different source with total 37 samples. Six types of them were energy-sourced feeds and the others were protein-sourced feeds. The carbohydrates molecular spectral intensity of various functional groups were collected using Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FT/IR) spectroscopy. In the in situ study, the results showed that the rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of primary nutrients (DM, OM, NCP, and CP) were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the feeds. The spectral bands features were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the feeds. Spectral intensities of A_Cell, H_1415 and H_1370 were weakly positively correlated with in situ rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of DM, OM and NCP. Spectral intensities of H_1150, H_1015, A_1, and A_3 were weakly negatively associated with in situ rumen degradation of CP. Spectral intensities of A_1240 and H_1240, mainly associated with cellulosic compounds, were correlated with rumen CP degradation. The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the spectral intensities of A_3 and H_1415 played the most important role and could be used as a potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feeds in dairy cattle. In conclusion, this study showed that the carbohydrates as a whole have an effect on protein rumen degradation, rather than cellulose alone, indicating carbohydrate-protein matrix structure impact protein utilization in dairy cattle. The non-invasive molecular spectral technique (ATR-FT/IR) could be used as a rapid potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feedstuffs by using molecular spectral bands intensities in carbohydrate fingerprint region.

  17. Nanostructuring Biomaterials with Specific Activities towards Digestive Enzymes for Controlled Gastrointestinal Absorption of Lipophilic Bioactive Molecules.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Paul; Whitby, Catherine P; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-11-01

    This review describes the development of novel lipid-based biomaterials that modulate fat digestion for the enhanced uptake of encapsulated lipophilic bioactive compounds (e.g. drugs and vitamins). Specific focus is directed towards analysing how key material characteristics affect the biological function of digestive lipases and manipulate lipolytic digestion. The mechanism of lipase action is a complex, interfacial process, whereby hydrolysis can be controlled by the ability for lipase to access and adsorb to the lipid-in-water interface. However, significant conjecture exists within the literature regarding parameters that influence the activities of digestive lipases. Important findings from recent investigations that strategically examined the interplay between the interfacial composition of the lipid microenvironment and lipolysis kinetics in simulated biophysical environments are presented. The correlation between lipolysis and the rate of solubilisation and absorption of lipophilic compounds in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is detailed. Greater insights into the mechanism of lipase action have provided a new approach for designing colloidal carriers that orally deliver poorly soluble compounds, directly impacting the pharmaceutical and food industries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Inquiry-Based Experiments for Large-Scale Introduction to PCR and Restriction Enzyme Digests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, Kelly E.; Watt, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digest are important techniques that should be included in all Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory curriculums. These techniques are frequently taught at an advanced level, requiring many hours of student and faculty time. Here we present two inquiry-based experiments that are…

  19. Effects of Hanseniaspora opuntiae C21 on the growth and digestive enzyme activity of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuexin; Liu, Zhiming; Yang, Zhiping; Bao, Pengyun; Zhang, Congyao; Ding, Jianfeng

    2014-07-01

    The effects of a diet containing Hanseniaspora opuntiae C21 on growth and digestive enzyme activity were estimated in juvenile Apostichopus japonicus. Groups of sea cucumbers were fed diets containing H. opuntiae C21 at 0 (control), 104, 105, and 106 CFU (colony-forming units)/g feed. Results showed that after 45 d the specific growth rate (SGR) of sea cucumbers fed a C21-supplemented diet at 10 4 CFU/g feed was significantly higher than that of the control ( P < 0.05). Intestinal trypsin and lipase activities were significantly enhanced by C21 administration at 104 and 105 CFU/g feed compared with the control ( P < 0.05). After feeding for 23-42 d, C21 was demonstrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to be present in the intestine of sea cucumbers. In addition, after feeding the C21-supplemented diets for 15 d, the sea cucumbers were switched to an unsupplemented diet and C21 was confirmed to be capable of colonizing the intestine for at least 31 d after cessation of feeding. In conclusion, C21 was shown to successfully colonize the intestine of juvenile A. japonicus via dietary supplementation, and improve growth and digestive enzyme activity.

  20. Effects of Pseudoalteromonas sp. BC228 on digestive enzyme activity and immune response of juvenile sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuexin; Sun, Feixue; Zhang, Congyao; Bao, Pengyun; Cao, Shuqing; Zhang, Meiyan

    2014-12-01

    A marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas sp. BC228 was supplemented to feed in a feeding experiment aiming to determine its ability of enhancing the digestive enzyme activity and immune response of juvenile Apostichopus japonicus. Sea cucumber individuals were fed with the diets containing 0 (control), 105, 107 and 109 CFU g-1 diet of BC228 for 45 days. Results showed that intestinal trypsin and lipase activities were significantly enhanced by 107 and 109 CFU g-1 diet of BC228 in comparison with control ( P < 0.01). The phagocytic activity in the coelomocytes of sea cucumber fed the diet supplemented with 107 CFU g-1 diet of BC228 was significantly higher than that of those fed control diet ( P < 0.05). In addition, 105 and 107 CFU g-1 diet of BC228 significantly enhanced lysozyme and phenoloxidase activities in the coelomic fluid of sea cucumber, respectively, in comparison with other diets ( P < 0.01). Sea cucumbers, 10 each diet, were challenged with Vibrio splendidus NB13 after 45 days of feeding. It was found that the cumulative incidence and mortality of sea cucumber fed with BC228 containing diets were lower than those of animals fed control diet. Our findings evidenced that BC228 supplemented in diets improved the digestive enzyme activity of juvenile sea cucumber, stimulated its immune response and enhanced its resistance to the infection of V. splendidus.

  1. Performance, intestinal microflora, and amino acid digestibility altered by exogenous enzymes in broilers fed wheat- or sorghum-based diets.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Wu, S B; Choct, M; Swick, R A

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of dietary enzymes and nutrient restriction on performance and bone mineralization in birds fed wheat- or sorghum-based diets. A total of 720 d-old male broiler chicks were randomly allocated to 8 treatments, with 6 replicates per treatment and 15 birds per replicate. Birds were reared in floor pens from 0 to 35 d. The study used a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement with 2 grains (sorghum or wheat) and 4 diets: positive control (no enzyme and ME, digestible Lys, Ca, and P sufficient, negative control (NC; no enzyme and reduced ME [-100 kcal/kg], digestible AA [-2%], Ca [-0.12 percentage points], and available P [-0.18 percentage points in the starter phase and -0.22 percentage points in the grower phase]), NC + nonstarch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes + phytase (500 phytase units [FTU]; NCCP), and NC + phytase (1,000 FTU; NCP). From 0 to 35 d, birds fed wheat-based diets had greater G:F (4.5%), BW gain (9.2%), breast meat yield (6.8%), and tibia ash (2.0%) compared with birds fed sorghum-based diets. Across grain types, the NCCP treatment improved BW gain ( < 0.001), feed intake ( < 0.001), G:F ( < 0.05), and livability ( < 0.001) compared with the NC treatment. Birds fed NCP had greater BW gain ( < 0.001), feed intake ( < 0.001), G:F ( < 0.001), and livability ( < 0.001) compared with birds fed NC. Birds fed the NCP diet had greater BW gain ( < 0.001), toe ash ( < 0.01), and tibia ash ( < 0.001) compared with birds fed the NCCP diet. There was a grain × diet interaction for feed intake ( < 0.01), BW gain ( < 0.001), tibia ash ( < 0.01), and tibia breaking strength ( < 0.05). The influence of enzymes was more pronounced in sorghum-based diets than in wheat-based diets. Birds fed wheat-based diets had greater ileal digestibility of His, Met, Val, Phe, Ile, Leu, Trp, Glu, Pro, Ala, Tyr, and Cys compared with those fed sorghum-based diets ( < 0.05). Across grain types, NCP had greater apparent ileal

  2. Small-bowel absorption of D-tagatose and related effects on carbohydrate digestibility: an ileostomy study.

    PubMed

    Normén, L; Laerke, H N; Jensen, B B; Langkilde, A M; Andersson, H

    2001-01-01

    The ketohexose D-tagatose is a new sweetener with a low energy content. This low energy content may be due to either low absorption of the D-tagatose or decreased absorption of other nutrients. The aims of this study were to measure the excretion of D-tagatose from the human small bowel, to calculate the apparent absorption of D-tagatose, and to study the effects of D-tagatose on the small-bowel excretion of other carbohydrates. A controlled diet was served for 2 periods of 2 d during 3 consecutive weeks to 6 ileostomy subjects. In one of the periods, 15 g D-tagatose was added to the diet daily. Duplicate portions of the diet and ileostomy effluents were freeze-dried and analyzed to calculate the apparent net absorption of D-tagatose and carbohydrates. Median D-tagatose excretion was 19% (range: 12-31%), which corresponded to a calculated apparent absorption of 81% (69-88%). Of the total amount of D-tagatose excreted [2.8 g (1.7-4.4 g)], 60% (8-88%) was excreted within 3 h. Between 3 and 5 h, 32% (11-82%) was excreted. Excretion of wet matter increased by 41% (24-52%) with D-tagatose ingestion. Sucrose and D-glucose excretion increased to a small extent, whereas no significant changes were found in the excretion of dry matter, energy, starch, or D-fructose. The apparent absorption of 15 g D-tagatose/d was 81%. D-Tagatose had only a minor influence on the apparent absorption of other nutrients.

  3. Effect of structural carbohydrates and lignin content on the anaerobic digestion of paper and paper board materials by anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Asato, Caitlin M; Jerke, Amber C; Stone, James J; Gilcrease, Patrick C

    2017-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of lignocellulosic materials is commonly limited by the hydrolysis step. Unlike unprocessed lignocellulosic materials, paper and paper board (PPB) are processed for their fabrication. Such modifications may affect their methane yields and methane production rates. Previous studies have investigated the correlation between lignin and biomethane yields of unprocessed lignocellulosic materials; nevertheless, there is limited knowledge regarding the relationship between the AD kinetic parameters and composition of PPB. This study evaluated correlations of methane yields and Monod and Gompertz kinetic parameters with structural carbohydrates, lignin, and ash concentration of five types of PPBs. All components were used as single and combined independent variables in linear regressions to predict methane yield, maximum specific methanogenic activity (SMA max ), saturation constant (K s ), and lag phase (λ). Additionally, microbial community profiles were obtained for each PPB assay. Results showed methane yields ranging from 69.2 ± 8.61 to 97.2 ± 2.29% of PPB substrates provided. The highest correlation coefficients were obtained for SMA max as function of hemicellulose/(lignin + ash) (R 2  = 0.86) and for λ as a function of lignin + cellulose (R 2  = 0.85). All other parameters exhibited weaker correlations (R 2  ≤ 0.77). Relative abundance analyses revealed no major changes in the community profile for each of the substrates evaluated. The overall findings of this study are: (i) combinations of structural carbohydrates, lignin, and ash used as ratios of degradable to either non-degradable or slowly degradable fractions predict AD kinetic parameters of PPB materials better than single independent variables; and (ii) other components added during their fabrication may also influence both methane yield and kinetic parameters. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 951-960. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley

  4. NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme |

    Science.gov Websites

    abundant cellulase in the leading commercial mixtures, Cel7A, when acting on Avicel, which is an industry domains working in concert most likely makes it such a good cellulose degrader." Most commercial operations use enzyme cocktails, a combination of 15 to 20 different enzymes, to turn plant material into the

  5. Protective effects of Ficus carica leaves on glucose and lipids levels, carbohydrate metabolism enzymes and β-cells in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Stephen Irudayaraj, Santiagu; Christudas, Sunil; Antony, Stalin; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Naif Abdullah, Al-Dhabi; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2017-12-01

    The decoctions of Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae) leaves are used in the folklore treatment of diabetes. To evaluate the effect of F. carica on glucose and lipids levels, carbohydrate metabolism enzymes and β-cells protective effects in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes was induced in 15 days high-fat diet (HFD)-fed Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (40 mg/kg). The ethyl acetate extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) of F. carica leaves was administered for 28 days. Oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests (ITT) were evaluated on 15th and 25th days, respectively. The ethyl acetate extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) of n F. carica leaves showed significant effect (p < 0.005) in the levels of blood glucose, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), body weight and hepatic glycogen. In OGTT, F. carica (250 and 500 mg/kg) significantly (p < 0.005) detained the increase in blood glucose levels at 60 and 120 min and in ITT, F. carica enhanced the glucose utilization significantly (p < 0.005) over 30 and 60 min compared to diabetic control. Further, the altered activities of key carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes such as glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and hexokinase in the liver tissue of diabetic rats were significantly (p < 0.005) reverted to near normal levels upon treatment with F. carica. Immumohistochemical studies of islets substantiated the cytoprotective effect on pancreatic β-cells. F. carica leaves exerted significant effect on carbohydrate metabolism enzymes with promising hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities in type 2 diabetic rats.

  6. Nutrient value of spray field forages fed to pigs and the use of feed enzymes to enhance nutrient digestibility.

    PubMed

    Passos, A A; Andrade, C; Phillips, C E; Coffey, M T; Kim, S W

    2015-04-01

    This study determined the DE, ME, apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of N, and N retention of spray field forages (Bermuda grass, forage sorghum, and sweet sorghum) fed to pigs and the effects of the supplemental feed enzymes on energy and N utilization. A basal diet was formulated with 96% corn and 4% amino acids, minerals, and vitamins. Test diets contained 85% basal diet + 15% Bermuda grass, forage sorghum, or sweet sorghum. Allzyme SSF (Alltech, Nicholasville, KY) was used as a feed enzyme, which was composed of cellulase, glucanase, xylanase, phytase, and protease. The basal diet and test diets were evaluated by using 4 sets of 2 × 2 Latin square designs consisting of 2 pigs and 2 periods with a total of 32 barrows (38.7 ± 7.9 kg). Each period (10-d adjustment and 4-d collection) had 2 Latin squares. The 2 treatments were levels of enzyme supplementation (0 or 200 mg/kg). Pigs received experimental diets twice daily (0700 and 1700 h) at a fixed amount based on BW of pigs (0.09 × BW0.75 kg). On d 10, chromic oxide (0.5%) was added to the diets at 1700 h as an external marker. Fecal and urine samples were collected during 4 consecutive days. The basal diet contained 3,850 kcal DE/kg, 3,769 kcal ME/kg, 86.06% ATTD of N, and 71.10% N retention and was not affected by enzyme supplementation. Bermuda grass contained 893 kcal DE/kg, 845 kcal ME/kg, -16.50% ATTD of N, and -37.49% N retention and tended to be improved by enzyme supplementation to 1,211 kcal DE/kg (P = 0.098), 1,185 kcal ME/kg (P = 0.081), and -10.54% N retention (P = 0.076). The ATTD of N of Bermuda grass increased (P < 0.05) to 0.08% by enzyme supplementation. The forage sorghum contained 1,520 kcal DE/kg, 1,511 kcal ME/kg, -0.72% ATTD of N, and -16.99% N retention. The sweet sorghum contained 1,086 kcal DE/kg, 1,061 kcal ME/kg, -75.47% ATTD of N, and -49.22% N retention. Enzyme supplementation did not improve energy digestibility of forage sorghum and sweet sorghum. Nitrogen in these

  7. Saccharification of bamboo carbohydrates for the production of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    De Menezes, T.J.B.; Azzini, A.; Dos Santos, C.L.M.

    1983-04-01

    Bamboo carbohydrates were hydrolyzed with commercial amylases and a mixture of fungal culture broths containing cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes. The effects of cooking temperature and the size of fiber particles were also investigated. It was found that the higher the cooking temperature, the higher the rate of sugar formation and the lower the viscosity of the slurry. Additions of cellulose and hemicellulose digesting enzymes increased the sugar yield and decreased the viscosity of both the cooked and noncooked slurries. A smaller size of particle appeared to favor the average saccharification rate. Although glucose, xylose, and cellobiose were present in themore » hydrolysates, only 50% of the total carbohydrate was digested, and 78.9% of this was converted to reducing sugars. The alcohol efficiency for the fermentation of cooked and noncooked mashes by Saccharomyces was about 85%.« less

  8. Effect of exogenous enzymes in maize-based diets varying in nutrient density for young broilers: growth performance and digestibility of energy, minerals and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Cowieson, A J; Ravindran, V

    2008-01-01

    1. A total of 192 male broilers (Cobb 500) were used in a growth and digestibility assay, involving a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments, to assess the effects of an enzyme cocktail of xylanase, amylase and protease in maize-based diets. 2. The following two diets were formulated: a positive control diet containing adequate nutrient concentrations for broiler starters as per breeder recommendations and a negative control diet to contain approximately 0.63 MJ/kg apparent metabolisable energy (AME) and 3% amino acids less than the positive control. 3. A further two dietary treatments were developed by supplementing each control diet with an enzyme product containing xylanase, amylase and protease. 4. Birds fed on the negative control diet had poorer weight gain and feed efficiency than those given the positive control diet. There was no effect of diet or enzyme on feed intake. The digestibility of nitrogen, calcium, phosphorus and most amino acids were unaffected by dietary nutrient density. 5. Supplementation of both the positive and negative control diets with the enzyme improved weight gain and feed efficiency compared with the unsupplemented diets. In the case of the negative control, supplemental enzyme improved performance to that of the unsupplemented positive control diet. There was no interaction between diet and enzyme for either weight gain or FCR, suggesting similar beneficial responses regardless of the nutrient density of the diet. 6. In both diets, enzyme supplementation improved AME by an average of 3% (0.35 MJ/kg DM) and nitrogen retention by an average of 11.7% (26 g/kg DM intake vs 29 g/kg DM intake). There was no interaction between diet and enzyme for AME or nitrogen retention. 7. Ileal digestibilities of calcium and phosphorus were not influenced by supplemental enzyme, whereas the digestibility of nitrogen and most amino acids was improved by enzyme addition compared with the unsupplemented control diets. There was no interaction between

  9. Enhanced efficiency of biological excess sludge hydrolysis under anaerobic digestion by additional enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Luo, Kun; Li, Xiao-ming; Wang, Dong-bo; Zheng, Wei; Zeng, Guang-ming; Liu, Jing-jin

    2010-05-01

    In this investigation, the effects of commercial enzyme preparation containing alpha amylase and neutral protease on hydrolysis of excess sludge and the kinetic analysis of hydrolysis process were evaluated. The results indicated that amylase treatment displayed higher hydrolysis efficiency than that of protease. VSS reduction greatly increased to 39.70% for protease and 54.24% for amylase at the enzyme dosage of 6% (w/w), respectively. The hydrolysis rate of sludge improved with temperature increasing from 40 to 50 degrees Celsius, which could be well described by the amended Arrhenius equation. Mixed-enzyme had great impact on sludge solubilisation than single enzyme. The mixture of two enzymes (protease:amylase=1:3) resulted in optimum hydrolysis efficiency, the efficiency of solids hydrolysis increased from 10% (control test) to 68.43% at the temperature of 50 degrees Celsius. Correspondingly, the concentration of reducing sugar and NH(4)(+)-N improved about 377% and 201%, respectively. According to the kinetic analysis of enzymatic hydrolysis process, VSS solubilisation process within prior 4 h followed first-order kinetics. Compared with control test, the hydrolysis rate improved significantly at 50 degrees Celsius when either single enzyme or mixed-enzyme was added. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Digestive enzyme activity in the intestine of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) under pond and cage farming systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana Ferreira; Soares, Karollina Lopes Siqueira; Assis, Caio Rodrigo Dias; Guerra, Carlos Augusto Martins; Lemos, Daniel; Carvalho, Luiz Bezerra; Bezerra, Ranilson Souza

    2016-10-01

    The effect of different farming systems (cage, pond) upon digestive enzyme activities of Nile tilapia was evaluated. Juvenile Nile tilapia (87.61 ± 1.52 g) were simultaneously cultured in pond and cage systems during 90 days. Cages used nutritional biphasic plan (35 and 32 % crude protein-CP feeds) and ponds used nutritional triphasic plan (35, 32 and 28 % CP feeds). Biometric measurements were monthly performed for adjustments in feeding regimes and removal of intestine tissues to evaluate the performance of enzyme activities. Total proteolytic, amylase and lipase activities were not statistically different between the treatments throughout the periods analyzed (31, 63 and 94 days of culture). However, trypsin and chymotrypsin activities were higher with 31 and 63 days of culture in fish from pond system, suggesting that natural food may have influenced these activities. A positive correlation was observed between the recommended concentration of essential amino acids for Nile tilapia and specific aminopeptidases activity in fish cage system. Substrate-SDS-PAGE revealed 12 active proteolytic bands in both systems. However, integrated density (ID) values were higher in the bands of ponds. Specimens of either cage or pond exhibited five bands of amylolytic activity. Fish from cage and pond systems showed the highest values of ID within 31 days of cultivation. In this study, the complexity of digestive functions could be verified for animals maintained under commercial conditions. Some of the assessed enzymes may show adaptations of their activities and/or expression that allow the fish to achieve a more efficient nutrient assimilation.

  11. STRANDEDNESS OF VICIA FABA CHROMOSOMES AS REVEALED BY ENZYME DIGESTION STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Trosko, James E.; Wolff, Sheldon

    1965-01-01

    Chromosomes and nuclei isolated from neutral formalin-fixed Vicia faba lateral roots were treated with trypsin, pepsin, RNase, or DNase. Only trypsin affected the morphology of the chromosomes and nuclei. The appearance of the chromosomes after trypsin digestion indicated that each chromatid contained four strands that could be seen with an ordinary light microscope. The experiments are interpreted as indicating that mitotic chromosomes of Vicia faba are multistranded and that the linear continuity of the chromosome is dependent on protein. PMID:5323605

  12. Effect of the dose of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme preparations on preingestive fiber hydrolysis, ruminal fermentation, and in vitro digestibility of bermudagrass haylage.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Zarate, M A; Adesogan, A T

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of the dose rates of 5 Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus oryzae exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE; 1A, 2A, 11C, 13D, and 15D) on in vitro digestibility, fermentation characteristics, and preingestive hydrolysis of bermudagrass haylage and to identify the optimal dose of each EFE for subsequent in vitro and in vivo studies. In experiment 1, EFE were diluted in citrate-phosphate buffer (pH 6) and applied in quadruplicate in each of 2 runs at 0× (control), 0.5×, 1×, 2×, and 3×; where 1× was the respective manufacturer-recommended dose (2.25, 2.25, 10, 15, and 15g of EFE/kg of dry matter). The suspension was incubated for 24h at 25°C and for a further 24h at 39°C after the addition of ruminal fluid. In experiment 2, a similar approach to that in experiment 1 was used to evaluate simulated preingestive effects, except that sodium azide (0.02% wt/vol) was added to the EFE solution. The suspension was incubated for 24h at 25°C and then 15mL of water was added before filtration to extract water-soluble compounds. For both experiments, data for each enzyme were analyzed separately as a completely randomized block design with a model that included effects of EFE dose, run, and their interaction. In experiment 1, increasing the EFE dose rate nonlinearly increased the DM digestibility of 1A, 2A, 11C, and 13D and the neutral detergent fiber digestibility (NDFD) of 1A, 2A, 11C, and 13D. Optimal doses of 1A, 2A, 11C, 13D, and 15D, as indicated by the greatest increases in NDFD at the lowest dose tested, were 2×, 2×, 1×, 0.5×, and 0.5×, respectively. Increasing the dose rate of 2A, 11C, and 13D nonlinearly increased concentrations of total volatile fatty acids and propionate (mM), decreased their acetate-to-propionate ratios and linearly decreased those of samples treated with 1A and 15D. In experiment 2, increasing the dose rate of each EFE nonlinearly decreased concentrations of netural detergent fiber; also, increasing

  13. Responses of antioxidant enzymes, photosynthetic pigments and carbohydrates in micropropagated Pitcairnia encholirioides L.B. Sm. (Bromeliaceae) under ex vitro water deficit and after rehydration.

    PubMed

    Resende, C F; Pacheco, V S; Dornellas, F F; Oliveira, A M S; Freitas, J C E; Peixoto, P H P

    2018-03-22

    In this study, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, photosynthetic pigments, proline and carbohydrate contents in Pitcairnia encholirioides under ex vitro conditions of water deficit were evaluated. Results show that plants under progressive water stress, previously in vitro cultured in media supplemented with 30 g L-1 sucrose and GA3, accumulated more proline and increased peroxidase (POD) activity and the contents of photosynthetic pigments and carbohydrates. For plants previously in vitro cultured with 15 g L-1 sucrose and NAA, no differences were found for proline content and there were reductions in activities of peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and poliphenoloxidase (PPO), and in contents of carbohydrates, with progress of ex vitro water deficit. After rehydration, plants showed physiological recovery, with enzymatic activities and contents of metabolites similar to those found in the controls not submitted to dehydration, regardless of the previous in vitro culture conditions. These results show that micropropagated P. encholirioides has high tolerance to dehydration once in ex vitro conditions, which can ensure the survival of plants from tissue culture when transferred to its natural environment, emphasizing the importance of such biotechnology for the propagation of endangered species.

  14. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  15. Effects of different digestible carbohydrates on bile acid metabolism and SCFA production by human gut micro-flora grown in an in vitro semi-continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Zampa, Andrea; Silvi, Stefania; Fabiani, Roberto; Morozzi, Guido; Orpianesi, Carla; Cresci, Alberto

    2004-02-01

    The main source of carbon in the human large intestine comes from carbohydrates like starches and oligosaccharides which remain unchanged by gastric digestion. These polysaccharides are metabolised in the colon by saccharolytic bacteria whose composition is dependent upon the substrate availability. Among the metabolites produced, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are important for colon function and to prevent diseases. In particular, butyrate affects several cellular functions (proliferation, membrane synthesis, sodium absorption), and it has been shown to be protective against colorectal cancer. In addition, faecal bacteria are responsible for the conversion of primary bile acids (BA) to secondary BA, which are considered tumor promoters. In this study we investigated the in vitro effect of different substrates (CrystaLean starch, xylo-oligosaccharides, corn starch) supplied to human faecal micro-flora, on the SCFA production, on the bowel micro-flora composition and on the primary BA conversion rate. In addition, with corn starch as substrate, we considered the effect of enriching normal human faecal micro-flora with lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, on the above reported parameters.

  16. Miglitol prevents diet-induced obesity by stimulating brown adipose tissue and energy expenditure independent of preventing the digestion of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Kitazumi, Tomoya; Hiraga, Haruna; Nakagawa, Yuko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Kikuchi, Osamu; Kim, Hye-jin; Fujita, Yuki; Maruyama, Jun; Susanti, Vina Yanti; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Saito, Masayuki; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2013-01-01

    Miglitol is an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor that improves post-prandial hyperglycemia, and it is the only drug in its class that enters the bloodstream. Anecdotally, miglitol lowers patient body weight more effectively than other alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, but the precise mechanism has not been addressed. Therefore, we analyzed the anti-obesity effects of miglitol in mice and in the HB2 brown adipocyte cell line. Miglitol prevented diet-induced obesity by stimulating energy expenditure without affecting food intake in mice. Long-term miglitol treatment dose-dependently prevented diet-induced obesity and induced mitochondrial gene expression in brown adipose tissue. The anti-obesity effect was independent of preventing carbohydrate digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. Miglitol effectively stimulated energy expenditure in mice fed a high-fat high-monocarbohydrate diet, and intraperitoneal injection of miglitol was sufficient to stimulate energy expenditure in mice. Acarbose, which is a non-absorbable alpha glucosidase inhibitor, also prevented diet-induced obesity, but through a different mechanism: it did not stimulate energy expenditure, but caused indigestion, leading to less energy absorption. Miglitol promoted adrenergic signaling in brown adipocytes in vitro. These data indicate that circulating miglitol stimulates brown adipose tissue and increases energy expenditure, thereby preventing diet-induced obesity. Further optimizing miglitol's effect on brown adipose tissue could lead to a novel anti-obesity drug.

  17. The activity of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes in the development of brood and newly emerged workers and drones of the Carniolan honeybee, Apis mellifera carnica.

    PubMed

    Żółtowska, Krystyna; Lipiński, Zbigniew; Łopieńska-Biernat, Elżbieta; Farjan, Marek; Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The activity of glycogen Phosphorylase and carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes α-amylase, glucoamylase, trehalase, and sucrase was studied in the development of the Carniolan honey bee, Apis mellifera carnica Pollman (Hymenoptera: Apidae), from newly hatched larva to freshly emerged imago of worker and drone. Phosphorolytic degradation of glycogen was significantly stronger than hydrolytic degradation in all developmental stages. Developmental profiles of hydrolase activity were similar in both sexes of brood; high activity was found in unsealed larvae, the lowest in prepupae followed by an increase in enzymatic activity. Especially intensive increases in activity occurred in the last stage of pupae and newly emerged imago. Besides α-amylase, the activities of other enzymes were higher in drone than in worker broods. Among drones, activity of glucoamylase was particularly high, ranging from around three times higher in the youngest larvae to 13 times higher in the oldest pupae. This confirms earlier suggestions about higher rates of metabolism in drone broods than in worker broods.

  18. Dietary Immunogen® modulated digestive enzyme activity and immune gene expression in Litopenaeus vannamei post larvae.

    PubMed

    Miandare, Hamed Kolangi; Mirghaed, Ali Taheri; Hosseini, Marjan; Mazloumi, Nastaran; Zargar, Ashkan; Nazari, Sajad

    2017-11-01

    Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931) is an important economical shrimp species worldwide, especially in the Middle East region, and farming activities of this species have been largely affected by diseases, mostly viral and bacterial diseases. Scientists have started to use prebiotics for bolstering the immune status of the animal. This study aimed to investigate the influence of Immunogen ® on growth, digestive enzyme activity and immune related gene expression of Litopenaeus vannamei post-larvae. All post-larvae were acclimated to the laboratory condition for 14 days. Upon acclimation, shrimps were fed on different levels of Immunogen ® (0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 g kg -1 ) for 60 days. No significant differences were detected in weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR) and food conversion ratio (FCR) in shrimp post-larvae in which fed with different levels of Immunogen ® and control diet. The results showed that digestive enzymes activity including protease and lipase increased with different amounts of Immunogen ® in the shrimp diet. Protease activity increased with 1.5 g kg -1 Immunogen ® after 60 days and lipase activity increased with 1 and 1.5 g kg -1 Immunogen ® after 30 and 60 days of the trial respectively (P < 0.05), while amylase activity did not change in response to different levels of Immunogen ® (P > 0.05). The expression of immune related genes including, prophenoloxidase, crustin and g-type lysozyme increased with diet 1.5 g kg -1 Immunogen ® (P < 0.05) while expression of penaeidin gene increased only with experimental diet 1 g kg -1 of Immunogen ® . These results indicated that increase in digestive enzymes activity and expression of immune related genes could modulate the Immunogen ® in the innate immune system in L. vannamei in this study. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Microbial degradation of complex carbohydrates in the gut.

    PubMed

    Flint, Harry J; Scott, Karen P; Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Forano, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria that colonize the mammalian intestine collectively possess a far larger repertoire of degradative enzymes and metabolic capabilities than their hosts. Microbial fermentation of complex non-digestible dietary carbohydrates and host-derived glycans in the human intestine has important consequences for health. Certain dominant species, notably among the Bacteroidetes, are known to possess very large numbers of genes that encode carbohydrate active enzymes and can switch readily between different energy sources in the gut depending on availability. Nevertheless, more nutritionally specialized bacteria appear to play critical roles in the community by initiating the degradation of complex substrates such as plant cell walls, starch particles and mucin. Examples are emerging from the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobium phyla, but more information is needed on these little studied groups. The impact of dietary carbohydrates, including prebiotics, on human health requires understanding of the complex relationship between diet composition, the gut microbiota and metabolic outputs.

  20. Digestibility, productive performance, and egg quality of laying hens as affected by dried cassava pulp replacement with corn and enzyme supplementation.

    PubMed

    Khempaka, Sutisa; Maliwan, Prapot; Okrathok, Supattra; Molee, Wittawat

    2018-02-24

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the potential use of dried cassava pulp (DCP) supplemented with enzymes as an alternative feed ingredient in laying hen diets. In experiment 1, 45 laying hens (Isa Brown) aged 45 weeks were placed in individual cages to measure nutrient digestibility for 10 days. Nine dietary treatments were control and DCP as a replacement for corn at 20, 25, 30, and 35% supplemented with mixed enzymes (cellulase, glucanase, and xylanase) at 0.10 and 0.15%. Results showed that the use of DCP at 20-35% added with mixed enzymes had no negative effects on dry matter digestibility, while organic matter digestibility and nitrogen retention decreased with increased DCP up to 30-35% in diets. Both enzyme levels (0.10 and 0.15%) showed similar results on nutrient digestibility and retention. In experiment 2, a total of 336 laying hens aged 32 weeks were randomly allocated to seven dietary treatments (control and DCP-substituted diets at 20, 25, and 30%) supplemented with mixed enzymes (0.10 and 0.15%). Diets incorporated with 20-30% of DCP and supplemented with mixed enzymes at both levels had no significant effects on egg production, egg weight, feed intake, egg mass, feed conversion ratio, protein efficiency ratio, or egg quality, except for egg yolk color being decreased with an increase of DCP in diets (P < 0.05). In conclusion, it is suggested that DCP supplemented with enzymes can be used as an energy source in laying hen diets up to 30% without showing negative effects on nutrient digestibility, productive performance, or egg quality.

  1. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity of the Norwegian autochthonous cheeses Gamalost and Norvegia after in vitro human gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, T M; Vegarud, G E; Abrahamsen, R K; Skeie, S

    2013-02-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of Gamalost cheese, its pH 4.6-soluble fraction, and Norvegia cheese was monitored before and after digestion with human gastric and duodenal juices. Both Gamalost and Norvegia cheeses showed an increased ACE-inhibitory activity during gastrointestinal digestion. However, only Norvegia showed pronounced increased activity after duodenal digestion. More peptides were detected in digested Gamalost compared with digested Norvegia. Most of the peptides in Gamalost were derived from β-casein (CN), some originated from α(s1)-CN, and only a very few originated from α(s2)-CN and κ-CN. In general, the number of peptides increased during gastrointestinal digestion, whereas some peptides were further degraded and disappeared; however, surprisingly, a few peptides remained stable. The aromatic amino acids, such as Tyr, Phe, and Trp; the positively charged amino acids (Arg and Lys); and Leu increased after simulated gastrointestinal digestion of Gamalost and Norvegia. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, both Gamalost and Norvegia showed high ACE-inhibitory activity, which may contribute in lowering of mild hypertension. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Actions of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate metabolism and ATP levels in vivo and in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Marcos Rodrigues; Bracht, Lívia; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Corrêa, Rúbia Carvalho Gomes; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2018-01-01

    p-Synephrine is one of the main active components of the fruit of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange). Extracts of the bitter orange and other preparations containing p-synephrine have been used worldwide to promote weight loss and for sports performance. The purpose of the study was to measure the action of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate and energy metabolism and the levels of adenine mononucleotides. Enzymes and adenine mononucleotides were measured in the isolated perfused rat liver and in vivo after oral administration of the drug (50 and 300 mg/kg) by using standard techniques. p-Synephrine increased the activity of glycogen phosphorylase in vivo and in the perfused liver. It decreased, however, the activities of pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase also in vivo and in the perfused liver. p-Synephrine increased the hepatic pools of adenosine diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate. Stimulation of glycogen phosphorylase is consistent with the reported increased glycogenolysis in the perfused liver and increased glycemia in rats. The decrease in the pyruvate dehydrogenase activity indicates that p-synephrine is potentially capable of inhibiting the transformation of carbohydrates into lipids. The capability of increasing the adenosine triphosphate-adenosine diphosphate pool indicates a beneficial effect of p-synephrine on the cellular energetics. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Modulatory effects of naringin on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high-fat diet/low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Chandramohan, Ramasamy

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated the modulatory effects of naringin on altered hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high-fat diet/low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Oral treatment of naringin at a doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg body weight to diabetic rats for 30 days resulted in a significant reduction in the levels of plasma glucose, blood glycosylated hemoglobin and increase in the levels of plasma insulin and blood hemoglobin. The altered activities of the hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism such as hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen synthase, glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen content of diabetic rats were significantly reverted to near normal levels by the treatment of naringin in a dose-dependent manner. Naringin at a dose of 80 mg/kg body weight showed the highest significant effect than the other two doses (20 and 40 mg/kg). Further, immunohistochemical observation of pancreas revealed that naringin-treated diabetic rats showed the increased number of insulin immunoreactive β-cells, which confirmed the biochemical findings. These findings revealed that naringin has potential antihyperglycemic activity in high-fat diet/low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

  4. Proteomics of Fusarium oxysporum race 1 and race 4 reveals enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and ion transport that might play important roles in banana Fusarium wilt.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Yi, Xiaoping; Peng, Ming; Zeng, Huicai; Wang, Dan; Li, Bo; Tong, Zheng; Chang, Lili; Jin, Xiang; Wang, Xuchu

    2014-01-01

    Banana Fusarium wilt is a soil-spread fungal disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum. In China, the main virulence fungi in banana are F. oxysporum race 1 (F1, weak virulence) and race 4 (F4, strong virulence). To date, no proteomic analyses have compared the two races, but the difference in virulence between F1 and F4 might result from their differentially expressed proteins. Here we report the first comparative proteomics of F1 and F4 cultured under various conditions, and finally identify 99 protein species, which represent 59 unique proteins. These proteins are mainly involved in carbohydrate metabolism, post-translational modification, energy production, and inorganic ion transport. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that among the 46 proteins identified from F4 were several enzymes that might be important for virulence. Reverse transcription PCR analysis of the genes for 15 of the 56 proteins revealed that their transcriptional patterns were similar to their protein expression patterns. Taken together, these data suggest that proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism and ion transport may be important in the pathogenesis of banana Fusarium wilt. Some enzymes such as catalase-peroxidase, galactosidase and chitinase might contribute to the strong virulence of F4. Overexpression or knockout of the genes for the F4-specific proteins will help us to further understand the molecular mechanism of Fusarium-induced banana wilt.

  5. Molecular motors that digest their track to rectify Brownian motion: processive movement of exonuclease enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2009-09-16

    A general model is presented for the processive movement of molecular motors such as λ-exonuclease, RecJ and exonuclease I that use digestion of a DNA track to rectify Brownian motion along this track. Using this model, the translocation dynamics of these molecular motors is studied. The sequence-dependent pausing of λ-exonuclease, which results from a site-specific high affinity DNA interaction, is also studied. The theoretical results are consistent with available experimental data. Moreover, the model is used to predict the lifetime distribution and force dependence of these paused states.

  6. Production of Phytase Enzyme by a Bioengineered Probiotic for Degrading of Phytate Phosphorus in the Digestive Tract of Poultry.

    PubMed

    Pakbaten, Bahareh; Majidzadeh Heravi, Reza; Kermanshahi, Hassan; Sekhavati, Mohammad-Hadi; Javadmanesh, Ali; Mohammadi Ziarat, Masoud

    2018-04-21

    Probiotics are beneficial microorganisms and have long been used in food production as well as health promotion products. Bioengineered probiotics are used to express and transfer native or recombinant molecules to the mucosal surface of the digestive tract to improve feed efficiency and promote health. Lactococcus lactis is a potential probiotic candidate to produce useful biological proteins. The aim of this investigation was to develop a recombinant Lactococcus lactis with the potential of producing phytase. To enhance the efficiency of expression and secretion of recombinant phytase, usp45 signal peptide was added to the expression vector containing phytase gene (appA2) derived from Escherichia coli. Sequencing of recombinant plasmid containing appA2 showed the correct construction of plasmid. Total length of the phytase insert was 1.25 kbp. A Blast search of the cloned fragment showed 99% similarity to the reported E. coli phytase sequence in the GenBank (accession number: AM946981.2). A plasmid containing usp45 and appA2 electrotransferred into Lactococcus lactis. Zymogram with polyacrylamide gel revealed that the protein extract from the supernatant and the cell pellet of recombinant bacteria had phytase activity. Enzyme activity of 4 U/ml was obtained in cell extracts, and supernatant maximal phytase activity was 19 U/ml. The recombinant L. lactis was supplemented in broiler chicken feed and showed the increase of apparent digestibility on phytate phosphorus in the digestive tract and it was same as performance of E. coli commercial phytase.

  7. Non-antigenic and low allergic gelatin produced by specific digestion with an enzyme-coupled matrix.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Y; Yamato, R; Onuma, M; Kikuta, T; Watanabe, M; Nakayama, T

    1998-04-01

    Porcine gelatin (heat-denatured collagen) was digested with a bioreactor using an enzyme-coupled matrix (ECM) with purified collagenase. The digested gelatin, FreAlagin type R (M.W. range 200-10000 Da), was further purified by an HPLC system depending upon molecular size. The molecular weight range of the purified fractions, FreAlagin type P and type AD, were 200-500 and 2000-10000 Da, respectively, and glycine was the N-terminal amino acid of both types (> or =93%). ECM has the capability of digesting gelatin at a specific point in the sequence before glycine, and it was determined that FreAlagin type P consists of a tri-peptide fraction with the amino acid sequence Gly-X-Y. No types of FreAlagin exhibited any reactivity with gelatin-specific IgG antibody raised in guinea pigs, and they also possessed an extremely low reactivity with gelatin-specific IgE antibody from the sera of patients who had experienced an anaphylactic reaction against gelatin after vaccination or after eating gelatin-containing foods. From these results, it was determined that FreAlagin types R and AD were non-antigenic, low-allergic gelatins. FreAlagin type R, and especially type AD, had strong adsorption-blocking activity comparable to the level of bovine serum albumin, whereas type P and glycine had virtually no adsorption-blocking activity. Therefore, the new types of gelatin, FreAlagin types R and AD, are suitable for pharmaceutical use to avoid gelatin allergy.

  8. Azadirachtin induced larval avoidance and antifeeding by disruption of food intake and digestive enzymes in Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Bezzar-Bendjazia, Radia; Kilani-Morakchi, Samira; Maroua, Ferdenache; Aribi, Nadia

    2017-11-01

    Botanical insecticides are a promising alternative to reduce the harmful effects of synthetic chemicals. Among the botanical biopesticides, azadirachtin obtained from the Indian neem tree Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (Meliaceae) is probably the biorational insecticide with greatest agriculture use nowadays due to its broad insecticide activity. The current study, evaluated the lethal and sublethal effects of azadirachtin on larval avoidance, food intake and digestive enzymes of Drosophila melanogaster larvae as biological model. Azadirachtin was applied topically at two doses LD 25 (0.28μg) and LD 50 (0.67μg) on early third instars larvae. Results evaluated 24h after treatment showed that larvae exhibited significant repellence to azadirachtin and prefer keeping in untreated arenas rather than moving to treated one. In addition, azadirachtin avoidance was more marked in larvae previously treated with this compound as compared with naïf larvae (controls). Moreover, azadirachtin treatment decreased significantly the amount of larval food intake. Finally, azadirachtin reduced significantly the activity of larval α-amylase, chitinase and protease and increased the activity of lipase. This finding showed that azadirachtin induced behavioral and physiological disruption affecting the ability of the insect to digest food. This rapid installation of avoidance and long term antifeedancy might reinforce the action of azadirachtin and provide a new behavioral strategy for integrated pest management programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Histochemical study of the distribution of a few enzymes in the digestive system of Indian parrot.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Agrawal, V P; Goel, K A

    1977-01-01

    Acid-and alkaline phosphatase, 5-nucleotidase and lipase have been localized histochemically in the gizzard, intestine liver and pancreas of Indian parrot, Psittacula krameri. In the gizzard and intestine, the mucosal epithelial cells are the main sites for the enzyme production. The tubular glands of the gizzard show intense reaction for all the enzymes tested. The hepatic sinusoid cells of the liver and the acinii of pancreas give positive reaction. Like pancreas, the intestine has also been found responsible for the production and secretion of lipase. Functional significance of phosphatases in the tissues tested has been discussed.

  10. Inquiry-based experiments for large-scale introduction to PCR and restriction enzyme digests.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Kelly E; Watt, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digest are important techniques that should be included in all Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory curriculums. These techniques are frequently taught at an advanced level, requiring many hours of student and faculty time. Here we present two inquiry-based experiments that are designed for introductory laboratory courses and combine both techniques. In both approaches, students must determine the identity of an unknown DNA sequence, either a gene sequence or a primer sequence, based on a combination of PCR product size and restriction digest pattern. The experimental design is flexible, and can be adapted based on available instructor preparation time and resources, and both approaches can accommodate large numbers of students. We implemented these experiments in our courses with a combined total of 584 students and have an 85% success rate. Overall, students demonstrated an increase in their understanding of the experimental topics, ability to interpret the resulting data, and proficiency in general laboratory skills. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Effects of dietary stachyose on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and intestinal morphology of juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haibin; Zhang, Yanjiao; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Li, Yanxian; Liu, Jintao

    2015-10-01

    A 12-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary stachyose on the growth performance, digestive enzymes activities and intestinal structures of juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L). Five isonitrogenous (49.58% crude protein) and isolipidic (10.50% crude lipid) diets were formulated to contain 0 (Control), 0.625% (S-0.625), 1.25% (S-1.25), 2.5% (S-2.5) and 5% (S-5) stachyose, respectively. With the increase of stachyose level, the growth performance and feed utilization of turbot, such as the specific growth rate, final mean body weight, weight gain rate and feed efficiency, increased significantly ( P< 0.05) and then stabilized. The feed intake of fish fed S-5 was significantly higher ( P< 0.05) than that of fish in other groups. The activities of trypsin, intestinal caseinolytic, stomach and intestinal amylase were significantly influenced by stachyose ( P<0.05). The highest values of trypsin and intestinal caseinolytic activities were observed in group S-1.25, while the highest activity of stomach amylase and the lowest activity of intestine amylase were observed in group S-5. No lesion or damage was found on the distal intestine structures of fish from all treatments, while the height of simple folds in the distal intestine was significantly increased ( P< 0.05) when 1.25% or 2.5% stachyose was added in the diets. These results indicated that moderate level of stachyose (1.25%) improves the growth performance, feed utilization, digestive enzyme activities and the distal intestine structures of juvenile turbot.

  12. Prolidase is a critical enzyme for complete gliadin digestion in Tenebrio molitor larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prolidase is a proline specific metallopeptidase that cleaves imidodipeptides with C-terminal Pro residue. Prolidase was purified and characterized from the Tenebrio molitor larval midgut. The enzyme was localized in the soluble fraction of posterior midgut tissues, corresponding to a predicted cyto...

  13. Interactions between the concentration of non-starch polysaccharides in wheat and the addition of an enzyme mixture in a broiler digestibility and performance trial.

    PubMed

    Smeets, N; Nuyens, F; Van Campenhout, L; Delezie, E; Niewold, T A

    2018-06-01

    Two broiler trials were designed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) in wheat and 1) its nutritional value for broilers and 2) the efficacy of exogenous enzymes. In a balance trial, diets were formulated with 3 wheat cultivars (Rustic and Viscount-medium NSP, Centenaire-high NSP) and were tested with or without the addition of an exogenous enzyme mixture. The diets were fed to 144 male Ross 308 broiler chickens housed in digestibility cages. Total tract nutrient digestibilities and AMEn were measured from 18 to 22 d of age. In a performance trial, diets were formulated with wheat (medium NSP diet) or with wheat mixed with rye and barley (high NSP diet) and were tested with or without the addition of an exogenous enzyme mixture. The diets were fed to 960 male Ross 308 broilers housed in pens and broiler performance during starter, grower and finisher periods was measured.In the balance trial, wheat cultivar did not affect nutrient digestibility or AMEn. Enzyme addition caused a significant increase in nutrient digestibilities and AMEn for the diet formulated with the high NSP wheat Centenaire only. In the performance trial, feeding the high NSP diet resulted in a higher feed conversion ratio and lower final body weight compared to the medium NSP diet. The largest improvements by enzyme addition were observed in the high NSP diet.In conclusion, the study was not able to show a consistent relationship between the NSP concentration of wheat and its nutritional value, but did demonstrate that the effect of an enzyme mixture on nutrient digestibility or broiler performance depends upon the NSP concentration in the diet.

  14. Interactions between the concentration of non-starch polysaccharides in wheat and the addition of an enzyme mixture in a broiler digestibility and performance trial

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, N; Nuyens, F; Van Campenhout, L; Delezie, E; Niewold, T A

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Two broiler trials were designed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) in wheat and 1) its nutritional value for broilers and 2) the efficacy of exogenous enzymes. In a balance trial, diets were formulated with 3 wheat cultivars (Rustic and Viscount—medium NSP, Centenaire—high NSP) and were tested with or without the addition of an exogenous enzyme mixture. The diets were fed to 144 male Ross 308 broiler chickens housed in digestibility cages. Total tract nutrient digestibilities and AMEn were measured from 18 to 22 d of age. In a performance trial, diets were formulated with wheat (medium NSP diet) or with wheat mixed with rye and barley (high NSP diet) and were tested with or without the addition of an exogenous enzyme mixture. The diets were fed to 960 male Ross 308 broilers housed in pens and broiler performance during starter, grower and finisher periods was measured. In the balance trial, wheat cultivar did not affect nutrient digestibility or AMEn. Enzyme addition caused a significant increase in nutrient digestibilities and AMEn for the diet formulated with the high NSP wheat Centenaire only. In the performance trial, feeding the high NSP diet resulted in a higher feed conversion ratio and lower final body weight compared to the medium NSP diet. The largest improvements by enzyme addition were observed in the high NSP diet. In conclusion, the study was not able to show a consistent relationship between the NSP concentration of wheat and its nutritional value, but did demonstrate that the effect of an enzyme mixture on nutrient digestibility or broiler performance depends upon the NSP concentration in the diet. PMID:29471412

  15. Metagenomic insights into the carbohydrate-active enzymes carried by the microorganisms adhering to solid digesta in the rumen of cows.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Hatem, Ayat; Catalyurek, Umit V; Morrison, Mark; Yu, Zhongtang

    2013-01-01

    The ruminal microbial community is a unique source of enzymes that underpin the conversion of cellulosic biomass. In this study, the microbial consortia adherent on solid digesta in the rumen of Jersey cattle were subjected to an activity-based metagenomic study to explore the genetic diversity of carbohydrolytic enzymes in Jersey cows, with a particular focus on cellulases and xylanases. Pyrosequencing and bioinformatic analyses of 120 carbohydrate-active fosmids identified genes encoding 575 putative Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes) and proteins putatively related to transcriptional regulation, transporters, and signal transduction coupled with polysaccharide degradation and metabolism. Most of these genes shared little similarity to sequences archived in databases. Genes that were predicted to encode glycoside hydrolases (GH) involved in xylan and cellulose hydrolysis (e.g., GH3, 5, 9, 10, 39 and 43) were well represented. A new subfamily (S-8) of GH5 was identified from contigs assigned to Firmicutes. These subfamilies of GH5 proteins also showed significant phylum-dependent distribution. A number of polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) were found, and two of them contained genes encoding Sus-like proteins and cellulases that have not been reported in previous metagenomic studies of samples from the rumens of cows or other herbivores. Comparison with the large metagenomic datasets previously reported of other ruminant species (or cattle breeds) and wallabies showed that the rumen microbiome of Jersey cows might contain differing CAZymes. Future studies are needed to further explore how host genetics and diets affect the diversity and distribution of CAZymes and utilization of plant cell wall materials.

  16. Effects of nonstructural carbohydrates and protein sources on intake, apparent total tract digestibility, and ruminal metabolism in vivo and in vitro with high-concentrate beef cattle diets.

    PubMed

    Rotger, A; Ferret, A; Calsamiglia, S; Manteca, X

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the effects of synchronizing nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) and protein degradation on intake and rumen microbial fermentation, four ruminally fistulated Holstein heifers (BW = 132.3 +/- 1.61 kg) fed high-concentrate diets were assigned to a 4 x 4 Latin square design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments studied in vivo and in vitro with a dual-flow continuous culture system. Two NSC sources (barley and corn) and 2 protein sources [soybean meal (SBM) and sunflower meal (SFM)] differing in their rate and extent of ruminal degradation were combined resulting in a synchronized rapid fermentation diet (barley-SFM), a synchronized slow fermentation diet (corn-SBM), and 2 unsynchronized diets with a rapidly and a slowly fermenting component (barley-SBM, and corn-SFM). In vitro, the fermentation profile was studied at a constant pH of 6.2, and at a variable pH with 12 h at pH 6.4 and 12 h at pH 5.8. Synchronization tended to result in greater true OM digestion (P = 0.072), VFA concentration (P = 0.067), and microbial N flow (P = 0.092) in vitro, but had no effects on in vivo fermentation pattern or on apparent total tract digestibility. The NSC source affected the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis in vitro, tending to be greater (P = 0.07) for barley-based diets, and in vivo, the NSC source tended to affect intake. Dry matter and OM intake tended to be greater (P > or = 0.06) for corn- than barley-based diets. Ammonia N concentration was lower in vitro (P = 0.006) and tended to be lower in vivo (P = 0.07) for corn- than barley-based diets. In vitro, pH could be reduced from 6.4 to 5.8 for 12 h/d without any effect on ruminal fermentation or microbial protein synthesis. In summary, ruminal synchronization seemed to have positive effects on in vitro fermentation, but in vivo recycling of endogenous N or intake differences could compensate for these effects.

  17. Quantitative study of digestive enzyme secretion and gastrointestinal lipolysis in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Carrière, Frédéric; Grandval, Philippe; Renou, Christophe; Palomba, Aurélie; Priéri, Florence; Giallo, Jacqueline; Henniges, Friederike; Sander-Struckmeier, Suntje; Laugier, René

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of human gastric lipase (HGL) to the overall lipolysis process in chronic pancreatitis (CP), as well as the relative pancreatic enzyme levels, rarely are addressed. This study was designed to quantify pancreatic and extrapancreatic enzyme output, activity, and stability in CP patients vs. healthy volunteers. Healthy volunteers (n = 6), mild CP patients (n = 5), and severe (n = 7) CP patients were intubated with gastric and duodenal tubes before the administration of a test meal. HGL, human pancreatic lipase (HPL), chymotrypsin, and amylase concentrations were assessed in gastric and duodenal samples by measuring the respective enzymatic activities. Intragastric and overall lipolysis levels at the angle of Treitz were estimated based on quantitative analysis of lipolysis products. Similar analyses were performed on duodenal contents incubated ex vivo for studying enzyme stability and evolution of lipolysis. Although HPL, chymotrypsin, and amylase outputs all were extremely low, HGL outputs in patients with severe CP (46.8 +/- 31.0 mg) were 3-4-fold higher than in healthy controls (13.3 +/- 13.8 mg). Intragastric lipolysis did not increase, however, in patients with severe CP, probably because of the rapid decrease in the pH level of the gastric contents caused by a higher gastric acid secretion. HGL remains active and highly stable in the acidic duodenal contents of CP patients, and, overall, can achieve a significant lipolysis of the dietary triglycerides (30% of the control values) in the absence of HPL. Although all pancreatic enzyme secretions are simultaneously reduced in severe CP, gastric lipase can compensate partly for the loss of pancreatic lipase but not normalize overall lipolytic activity.

  18. Aqueous extract of Psidium guajava leaves: phenolic compounds and inhibitory potential on digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Simão, Anderson A; Marques, Tamara R; Marcussi, Silvana; Corrêa, Angelita D

    2017-01-01

    Leaves of Psidium guajava L. (guava) have been widely used in the popular way for prevention and treatment of various diseases. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory potential of leaves aqueous extract from three cultivars of P. guajava (Pedro Sato, Paluma and Século XXI) on α-amylase, α-glycosidase, lipase, and trypsin enzymes, in the presence or not of simulated gastric fluid and to determine the content of phenolic compounds by high performance liquid chromatography. All cultivars presented the same composition in phenolic compounds, but in different proportions. The compounds identified are gallic acid, epigallocatechin gallate, syringic acid, o-coumaric acid, resveratrol, quercetin, and catechin (which was the major compound in all the cultivars evaluated). In the absence of simulated gastric fluid, it was observed different inhibitions exercised by the leaves aqueous extracts from three cultivars of P. guajava on each enzyme. In presence of simulated gastric fluid, all cultivars showed increase in the inhibition of lipase and α-glycosidase, and decrease in inhibition of α-amylase and trypsin enzymes. These results indicate that P. guajava leaves aqueous extracts from all cultivars evaluated possess potential of use as an adjuvant in the treatment of obesity and other dyslipidemias.

  19. Why can't young fish eat plants? Neither digestive enzymes nor gut development preclude herbivory in the young of a stomachless marine herbivorous fish.

    PubMed

    Day, Ryan D; German, Donovan P; Tibbetts, Ian R

    2011-01-01

    Most young fishes lack the ability to function as herbivores, which has been attributed to two aspects of the digestive system: elevated nitrogen demand and a critical gut capacity. We compared the digestive morphology and biochemistry of two size classes of the marine herbivore Hyporhamphus regularis ardelio, pre-ontogenetic trophic shift (pre-OTS, <100mm) and post-ontogenetic trophic shift (post-OTS, >100mm), to determine what limits the onset of herbivory and how their digestive processes fit with current models of digestion. Two gut-somatic indices comparing gut length to body length (relative gut length) and body mass (Zihler's Index) demonstrated a significant decrease (RGL 0.59→0.49, P<0.01; ZI 3.24→2.44, P<0.01) in gut length relative to body size. There was little difference in enzyme activity between the two classes, with juveniles showing similar levels of carbohydrase and lipase and less protease compared with adults, indicating that juveniles did not preferentially target nitrogen and were as capable of digesting an herbivorous diet. These findings suggest that herbivory in this fish is not limited by the function of the post-oesophageal digestive tract, but rather the ability of the pharyngeal mill to mechanically process plants. Our findings offer partial support for the current model of stomachless digestion, indicating that further refinement may be necessary. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Symbiotic Chlorella variabilis incubated under constant dark conditions for 24 hours loses the ability to avoid digestion by host lysosomal enzymes in digestive vacuoles of host ciliate Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Endosymbiosis between symbiotic Chlorella and alga-free Paramecium bursaria cells can be induced by mixing them. To establish the endosymbiosis, algae must acquire temporary resistance to the host lysosomal enzymes in the digestive vacuoles (DVs). When symbiotic algae isolated from the alga-bearing paramecia are kept under a constant dark conditions for 24 h before mixing with the alga-free paramecia, almost all algae are digested in the host DVs. To examine the cause of algal acquisition to the host lysosomal enzymes, the isolated algae were kept under a constant light conditions with or without a photosynthesis inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea for 24 h, and were mixed with alga-free paramecia. Unexpectedly, most of the algae were not digested in the DVs irrespective of the presence of the inhibitor. Addition of 1 mM maltose, a main photosynthetic product of the symbiotic algae or of a supernatant of the isolated algae kept for 24 h under a constant light conditions, did not rescue the algal digestion in the DVs. These observations reveal that unknown factors induced by light are a prerequisite for algal resistance to the host lysosomal enzymes. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Proteomic analysis of scallop hepatopancreatic extract provides insights into marine polysaccharide digestion.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Qianqian; Jiao, Wenqian; Zhang, Keke; Bao, Zhenmin; Wang, Shi; Liu, Weizhi

    2016-12-16

    Marine polysaccharides are used in a variety of applications, and the enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides are of increasing interest. The main food source of herbivorous marine mollusks is seaweed, and several polysaccharide-degrading enzymes have been extracted from mollusk digestive glands (hepatopancreases). Here, we used a comprehensive proteomic approach to examine the hepatopancreatic proteins of the Zhikong scallop (Chlamys farreri). We identified 435 proteins, the majority of which were lysosomal enzymes and carbohydrate and protein metabolism enzymes. However, several new enzymes related to polysaccharide metabolism were also identified. Phylogenetic and structural analyses of these enzymes suggest that these polysaccharide-degrading enzymes may have a variety of potential substrate specificities. Taken together, our study characterizes several novel polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in the scallop hepatopancreas and provides an enhanced view of these enzymes and a greater understanding of marine polysaccharide digestion.

  2. Comparison of monolithic and microparticulate columns for reversed-phase liquid chromatography of tryptic digests of industrial enzymes in cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Beneito-Cambra, M; Herrero-Martínez, J M; Ramis-Ramos, G; Lindner, W; Lämmerhofer, M

    2011-10-14

    Enzymes of several classes used in the formulations of cleaning products were characterized by trypsin digestion followed by HPLC with UV detection. A polymeric monolithic column (ProSwift) was used to optimize the separation of both the intact enzymes and their tryptic digests. This column was adequate for the quality control of raw industrial enzyme concentrates. Then, monolithic and microparticulate columns were compared for peptide analysis. Under optimized conditions, the analysis of tryptic digests of enzymes of different classes commonly used in the formulation of cleaning products was carried out. Number of peaks, peak capacity and global resolution were obtained in order to evaluate the chromatographic performance of each column. Particulate shell-core C18 columns (Kinetex, 2.6 μm) showed the best performance, followed by a silica monolithic column (Chromolith RP-18e) and the conventional C18 packings (Gemini, 5 μm or 3 μm). A polymeric monolithic column (ProSwift) gave the worst performances. The proposed method was satisfactorily applied to the characterization of the enzymes present in spiked detergent bases and commercial cleaners. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Debranching and Crystallization of Waxy Maize Starch in Relation to Enzyme Digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, L.; Shi, Y; Rong, L

    Molecular and crystal structures as well as morphology during debranching and crystallization of waxy maize starch at a high solid content (25%, w/w) were investigated, and the results were related to the digestibility of debranched products. The starch was cooked at 115-120 C for 10 min, cooled to 50 C and debranched by isoamylase. After 1 h of debranching, wormlike objects with 5-10 nm width and ca. 30 nm length were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Further release of linear chains and crystallization led to assembly of semi-crystalline structures in the form of nano-particles and subsequent growth of nano-particles intomore » large aggregates. After 24 h at 50 C, a debranched starch product with an A-type X-ray diffraction pattern, a high melting temperature (90-140 C), and high resistant starch content (71.4%) was obtained. Small-angle X-ray scattering results indicated that all debranched products were surface fractal in a dry state (4% moisture) but had a mass fractal structure when hydrated (e.g. 45% moisture).« less

  4. Interaction between wheat alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitor and mammalian digestive enzymes: Kinetic, equilibrium and structural characterization of binding.

    PubMed

    Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Ali, Ishtiaq; Bonfili, Laura; Cecarini, Valentina; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2016-12-15

    Alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitors (ATIs) are non-gluten protein components of wheat and other cereals that can hypersensitise the human gastrointestinal tract, eventually causing enteropathies in predisposed individuals. These inhibitory proteins can act both directly by targeting specific pro-inflammatory receptors, and indirectly by impairing the activity of digestive enzymes, the latter event causing the accumulation of undigested peptides with potential immunogenic properties. Herein, according to a concerted approach based on in vitro and in silico methods we characterized kinetics, equilibrium parameters and modes of binding of the complexes formed between wheat ATI and two representative mammalian digestive enzymes, namely trypsin and alpha-amylase. Interestingly, we demonstrated ATI to target both enzymes with independent binding sites and with moderately high affinity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of orally administered betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile production in rats.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, M S; Platel, K; Saraswathi, G; Srinivasan, K

    1995-10-01

    The influence of two varieties of betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) namely, the pungent Mysore and non-pungent Ambadi, was examined on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile secretion in experimental rats. The betel leaves were administered orally at two doses which were either comparable to human consumption level or 5 times this. The results indicated that while these betel leaves do not influence bile secretion and composition, they have a significant stimulatory influence on pancreatic lipase activity. Besides, the Ambadi variety of betel leaf has a positive stimulatory influence on intestinal digestive enzymes, especially lipase, amylase and disaccharidases. A slight lowering in the activity of these intestinal enzymes was seen when Mysore variety of betel leaf was administered, and this variety also had a negative effect on pancreatic amylase. Further, both the betel leaf varieties have shown decreasing influence on pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities.

  6. Melatonin Promotes Cheliped Regeneration, Digestive Enzyme Function, and Immunity Following Autotomy in the Chinese Mitten Crab, Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong; Yang, Xiao-zhen; Xu, Min-jie; Huang, Gen-yong; Zhang, Qian; Cheng, Yong-xu; He, Long; Ren, Hong-yu

    2018-01-01

    In the pond culture of juvenile Eriocheir sinensis, a high limb-impairment rate seriously affects the culture success. Therefore, it is particularly important to artificially promote limb regeneration. This study evaluated the effects of melatonin on cheliped regeneration, digestive ability, and immunity, as well as its relationship with the eyestalk. It was found that the injection of melatonin significantly increased the limb regeneration rate compared with the saline group (P < 0.05). The qRT-PCR results of growth-related genes showed that the level of EcR-mRNA (ecdysteroid receptor) and Chi-mRNA (chitinase) expression was significantly increased following the melatonin injection, while the expression of MIH-mRNA (molt-inhibiting hormone) was significantly decreased (P < 0.05). Melatonin significantly increased lipase activity (P < 0.05). We observed that the survival rates of limb-impaired and unilateral eyestalk-ablated crabs were substantially improved following melatonin treatment, whereas the survival of the unilateral eyestalk-ablated crabs was significantly decreased compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the results of serum immune and antioxidant capacity revealed that melatonin significantly increased the total hemocyte counts (THC), hemocyanin content, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), acid phosphatase (ACP), and glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px), whereas the immune-related parameters were significantly decreased in eyestalk-ablated crabs (P < 0.05). Therefore, these findings indicate that melatonin exerts a protective effect on organism injury, which could promote limb regeneration by up-regulating the expression of growth-related genes, improve digestive enzyme activity, and strengthen the immune response, particularly antioxidant capacity. PMID:29623051

  7. Comparative transcriptomics of Pleurotus eryngii reveals blue-light regulation of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) expression at primordium differentiated into fruiting body stage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunliang; Gong, Wenbing; Zhu, Zuohua; Yan, Li; Hu, Zhenxiu; Peng, Yuande

    2018-05-01

    Blue light is an important environmental factor which could induce mushroom primordium differentiation and fruiting body development. However, the mechanisms of Pleurotus eryngii primordium differentiation and development induced by blue light are still unclear. The CAZymes (carbohydrate-active enzymes) play important roles in degradation of renewable lignocelluloses to provide carbohydrates for fungal growth, development and reproduction. In the present research, the expression profiles of genes were measured by comparison between the Pleurotus eryngii at primordium differentiated into fruiting body stage after blue light stimulation and dark using high-throughput sequencing approach. After assembly and compared to the Pleurotus eryngii reference genome, 11,343 unigenes were identified. 539 differentially expressed genes including white collar 2 type of transcription factor gene, A mating type protein gene, MAP kinase gene, oxidative phosphorylation associated genes, CAZymes genes and other metabolism related genes were identified during primordium differentiated into fruiting body stage after blue light stimulation. KEGG results showed that carbon metabolism, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and biosynthesis of amino acids pathways were affected during blue light inducing primordia formation. Most importantly, 319 differentially expressed CAZymes participated in carbon metabolism were identified. The expression patterns of six representative CAZymes and laccase genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR. Enzyme activity results indicated that the activities of CAZymes and laccase were affected in primordium differentiated into fruiting body under blue light stimulation. In conclusion, the comprehensive transcriptome and CAZymes of Pleurotus eryngii at primordium differentiated into fruiting body stage after blue light stimulation were obtained. The biological insights gained from this integrative system represent a valuable resource for future genomic studies on this

  8. Application of an enzyme-labeled antigen method for visualizing plasma cells producing antibodies against Strep A, a carbohydrate antigen of Streptococcus pyogenes, in recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Takanori; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Inada, Ken-ichi; Okada, Tatsuyoshi; Naito, Kensei; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the main causative pathogen of recurrent tonsillitis. Histologically, lesions of recurrent tonsillitis contain numerous plasma cells. Strep A is an antigenic carbohydrate molecule on the cell wall of S. pyogenes. As expected, plasma cells in subjects with recurrent tonsillitis secrete antibodies against Strep A. The enzyme-labeled antigen method is a novel histochemical technique that visualizes specific antibody-producing cells in tissue sections by employing a biotin-labeled antigen as a probe. The purpose of the present study was to visualize plasma cells producing antibodies reactive with Strep A in recurrent tonsillitis. Firstly, the lymph nodes of rats immunized with boiled S. pyogenes were paraformaldehyde-fixed and specific plasma cells localized in frozen sections with biotinylated Strep A. Secondly, an enzyme-labeled antigen method was used on human tonsil surgically removed from 12 patients with recurrent tonsillitis. S. pyogenes genomes were PCR-detected in all 12 specimens. The emm genotypes belonged to emm12 in nine specimens and emm1 in three. Plasma cells producing anti-Strep A antibodies were demonstrated in prefixed frozen sections of rat lymph nodes, 8/12 human specimens from patients with recurrent tonsillitis but not in two control tonsils. In human tonsils, Strep A-reactive plasma cells were observed within the reticular squamous mucosa and just below the mucosa, and the specific antibodies belonged to either IgA or IgG classes. Our technique is effective in visualizing immunocytes producing specific antibodies against the bacterial carbohydrate antigen, and is thus a novel histochemical tool for analyzing immune reactions in infectious disorders. © 2014 The Authors. Microbiology and Immunology Published by The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Inhibitory potentials of phenolic-rich extracts from Bridelia ferruginea on two key carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes and Fe2+-induced pancreatic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Olakunle Bamikole; Oloyede, Omotade Ibidun; Agunbiade, Shadrack Oludare

    2018-05-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the various antioxidant potentials and inhibitory effects of phenolic-rich leaf extracts of Bridelia ferruginea (BF) on the in vitro activities of some key enzymes involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates. In this study, BF leaf free and bound phenolic-rich extracts were used. We quantified total phenolic and flavonoid contents, and evaluated several antioxidant activities using assays for ferric reducing antioxidant power, total antioxidant activity (phosphomolybdenum reducing ability), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and thiobarbituric acid reactive species. Also, extracts were tested for their ability to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. The total phenolic and total flavonoid contents in the free phenolic extract of BF were significantly greater than in the bound phenolic extract. Also, all the antioxidant activities considered were significantly greater in the free phenolic extract than in the bound phenolic extract. In the same vein, the free phenolic-rich extract had a significantly higher percentage inhibition against α-glucosidase activity (IC 50  = 28.5 µg/mL) than the bound phenolic extract (IC 50  = 340.0 µg/mL). On the contrary, the free phenolic extract (IC 50  = 210.0 µg/mL) had significantly lower inhibition against α-amylase than the bound phenolic-rich extract (IC 50  = 190.0 µg/mL). The phenolic-rich extracts of BF leaves showed antioxidant potentials and inhibited two key carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes in vitro. Copyright © 2018 Shanghai Changhai Hospital. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental support for the effects of a probiotic/digestive enzyme supplement on serum cholesterol concentrations and the intestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Ichim, Thomas E; Patel, Amit N; Shafer, Kim A

    2016-06-22

    Elevated levels of blood cholesterol are associated with cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current therapies for addressing elevated blood cholesterol can be inadequate, ineffective or associated with side effects; therefore, the search for additional therapies is ongoing. This study evaluated Daily Body Restore (DBR), a proprietary blend of 9 probiotic organisms of the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, and 10 digestive enzymes, for its effects on cholesterol metabolism using an in vitro system and a mouse model. We used a murine model of hypercholesterolemia induced by a high fat diet to evaluate the effects of DBR on blood cholesterol concentrations. Hypercholesterolemic mice were supplemented with DBR in their drinking water for 8 weeks and compared to control mice given low fat diets or unsupplemented high fat diets. To evaluate the effects of DBR on the activity of gut microbiota in vitro, the Shime(®) system consisting of sequential colon reactors was supplemented with DBR for analysis of short chain fatty acid production. Analysis of hypercholesterolemic mice after 4 and 8 weeks of DBR supplementation revealed significant decreases in blood concentrations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and increases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) while triglyceride concentrations were unaltered. Specifically, after 4 weeks of DBR supplementation, there was a 47 % decrease in LDL and a 32 % increase in HDL in peripheral blood compared to unsupplemented, high fat diet-fed mice. After 8 weeks of DBR treatment, LDL concentrations were dramatically reduced by 78 % and HDL was increased by 52 % relative to control mice. Addition of DBR to the Shime(®) system led to significantly increased production of propionate in colon reactors, indicative of microbial production of short chain fatty acids known to inhibit cholesterol synthesis. DBR, a probiotic and digestive enzyme supplement, lowered harmful LDL and increased

  11. Digestive enzyme as benchmark for insecticide resistance development in Culex pipiens larvae to chemical and bacteriologic insecticides.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Nashwa H; Bahgat, Iman M; El Kady, Gamal A

    2013-04-01

    This work monitored changes in some digestive enzymes (trypsin and aminopeptidase) associated with the building up of resistance in Cx. pipiens larvae to two chemical insecticides (methomyl and/or malathion) and one biological insecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis-H14 or B.t H 14). The LC50 value of methomyl for both field- and the 12th generation (F12) of the selected strain was 1.789 ppm and 8.925 ppm respectively. The LC50 value of malathion for both field and the F12 of the selected strain was 0.082 ppm and 0.156 ppm respectively, and those of B.t H14 of field strain and the F12 was 2.550ppm & 2.395ppm respectively. The specific activity of trypsin enzyme in control susceptible colony was 20.806 +/- 0.452micromol/min/mg protein; but at F4 and F8 for malathion and methomyl treated larvae were 10.810 +/- 0.860 & 15.616+/-0.408 micromol/min/mg protein, respectively. Trypsin activity of F12 in treated larvae with B.t.H14 was 2.097 +/- 0.587 microiol/min/mg protein. Aminopeptidase specific activity for susceptible control larvae was 173.05 +/- 1.3111 micromol/min/mg protein. This activity decreased to 145.15 +/- 4.12, 152.497 +/- 6.775 & 102.04 +/- 3.58a micromol/min/mg protein after larval (F 12) treatment with methomyl, malathion and B.t H 14 respectively.

  12. Long-range Electrostatic Complementarity Governs Substrate Recognition by Human Chymotrypsin C, a Key Regulator of Digestive Enzyme Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Jyotica; Szabó, András; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Soares, Alexei S.; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Radisky, Evette S.

    2013-01-01

    Human chymotrypsin C (CTRC) is a pancreatic serine protease that regulates activation and degradation of trypsinogens and procarboxypeptidases by targeting specific cleavage sites within their zymogen precursors. In cleaving these regulatory sites, which are characterized by multiple flanking acidic residues, CTRC shows substrate specificity that is distinct from that of other isoforms of chymotrypsin and elastase. Here, we report the first crystal structure of active CTRC, determined at 1.9-Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for binding specificity. The structure shows human CTRC bound to the small protein protease inhibitor eglin c, which binds in a substrate-like manner filling the S6-S5′ subsites of the substrate binding cleft. Significant binding affinity derives from burial of preferred hydrophobic residues at the P1, P4, and P2′ positions of CTRC, although acidic P2′ residues can also be accommodated by formation of an interfacial salt bridge. Acidic residues may also be specifically accommodated in the P6 position. The most unique structural feature of CTRC is a ring of intense positive electrostatic surface potential surrounding the primarily hydrophobic substrate binding site. Our results indicate that long-range electrostatic attraction toward substrates of concentrated negative charge governs substrate discrimination, which explains CTRC selectivity in regulating active digestive enzyme levels. PMID:23430245

  13. Distribution and characteristics of endogenous digestive enzymes in the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Yi; Du, Jie; Qian, Li-Chun; Jing, Ming-Yan; Weng, Xiao-Yan

    2007-08-01

    Distribution and properties of the main digestive enzymes including protease and amylase, from stomach, pancreas and the anterior, middle and posterior intestine of the adult red-eared slider turtle Trachemys scripta elegans were studied at various pHs and temperatures. The optimum temperature and pH for protease in stomach, pancreas and the anterior, middle and posterior intestine were 40 degrees C, 2.5; 50 degrees C, 8.0; 50 degrees C, 7.0; 50 degrees C, 8.0; and 50 degrees C, 8.5; respectively. The optimum temperature and pH for amylase in stomach, pancreas and anterior, middle and posterior intestine were 40 degrees C, 8.0; 30 degrees C, 7.5; 40 degrees C, 7.0; 50 degrees C, 8.0; and 50 degrees C, 8.0; respectively. Under the optimum conditions, the order of protease activity from high to low was of pancreas, stomach and the anterior, posterior and middle intestine; the activity of amylase in descending order was of anterior intestine, pancreas, posterior intestine, middle intestine and stomach.

  14. Preimaginal exposure to azadirachtin affects food selection and digestive enzymes in adults of Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Kilani-Morakchi, Samira; Bezzar-Bendjazia, Radia; Ferdenache, Maroua; Aribi, Nadia

    2017-08-01

    Among the plant derived product, azadirachtin, a neem-based insecticide, is exceptional in having a broad range of bioactivity including toxicity, growth, development and reproduction effects, repellency and antifeedancy. If considerable progress on the physiological and biological activities and agricultural application of azadirachtin has been achieved, its exact mechanism of action remains uncertain. In this study, we aimed at assessing the lethal and sublethal behavioral and physiological effects of azadirachtin on Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 (Diptera: Drosophilidae) as biological model. Azadirachtin was applied topically at two doses LD 25 (0.28μg) and LD 50 (0.67μg) on early third instar larvae. Results showed that flies preferentially ingested control medium rather than azadirachtin-treated medium. Pre-imaginal exposure (L3) to azadirachtin increased aversion to this substance suggesting a memorability of the learned avoidance. In addition, all tested flies revealed a clear preference for solvent odour rather than azadirachtin odour. Moreover, azadirachtin treatment decreased significantly the amount of food intake in the adults of both sexes. Finally, azadirachtin was found to affect digestive enzyme activities in the midgut of flies. Indeed, an inhibition of α-amylase, chitinase, and protease activities and an increase of lipasic activity were noted. These results may reflect interference of azadirachtin with regulation of feeding and metabolism, and provide some evidence of a long term antifeedancy and delayed effects through developmental stage which may reinforce the insecticidal activity of this bioinsecticide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-range electrostatic complementarity governs substrate recognition by human chymotrypsin C, a key regulator of digestive enzyme activation.

    PubMed

    Batra, Jyotica; Szabó, András; Caulfield, Thomas R; Soares, Alexei S; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Radisky, Evette S

    2013-04-05

    Human chymotrypsin C (CTRC) is a pancreatic serine protease that regulates activation and degradation of trypsinogens and procarboxypeptidases by targeting specific cleavage sites within their zymogen precursors. In cleaving these regulatory sites, which are characterized by multiple flanking acidic residues, CTRC shows substrate specificity that is distinct from that of other isoforms of chymotrypsin and elastase. Here, we report the first crystal structure of active CTRC, determined at 1.9-Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for binding specificity. The structure shows human CTRC bound to the small protein protease inhibitor eglin c, which binds in a substrate-like manner filling the S6-S5' subsites of the substrate binding cleft. Significant binding affinity derives from burial of preferred hydrophobic residues at the P1, P4, and P2' positions of CTRC, although acidic P2' residues can also be accommodated by formation of an interfacial salt bridge. Acidic residues may also be specifically accommodated in the P6 position. The most unique structural feature of CTRC is a ring of intense positive electrostatic surface potential surrounding the primarily hydrophobic substrate binding site. Our results indicate that long-range electrostatic attraction toward substrates of concentrated negative charge governs substrate discrimination, which explains CTRC selectivity in regulating active digestive enzyme levels.

  16. Effects of periplocoside X on midgut cells and digestive enzymes activity of the soldiers of red imported fire ant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zeng, Xin-Nian

    2013-07-01

    The pathological effects of ingested periplocoside X, an insecticidal component isolated from the root of Periploca sepium Bunge, on the midgut epithelial cells of the soldiers of red imported fire ant were studied and the symptom was described. The results showed that periplocoside X could induce a severe, time-dependent cytotoxicity in the midgut epithelial cells. An optical microscopy showed that epithelial cells swelled firstly and then lysed. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that numerous swollen lysosomes were appeared, microvilli were disrupted and sloughed off, and the numbers of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria decreased sharply in earlier stage. Numerous vacuoles were observed in the later stage. Finally, periplocoside X resulted in cell death by cytolysis. Assay of main three digestive enzymes activity indicated that amylase activity was significantly inhibited, but no significant changes were seen for lipase activity and total protease activity. So it is suggested that periplocoside X induced mainly to organic damage of midgut epithelium cells of insect. In all, insect midgut is one of targets for periplocoside X. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Outer membrane vesicles from Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 contain an array of carbohydrate-active enzymes with versatile polysaccharide-degrading capacity.

    PubMed

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Várnai, Anikó; Mackie, Roderick I; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Pope, Phillip B

    2017-07-01

    Fibrobacter succinogenes is an anaerobic bacterium naturally colonising the rumen and cecum of herbivores where it utilizes an enigmatic mechanism to deconstruct cellulose into cellobiose and glucose, which serve as carbon sources for growth. Here, we illustrate that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by F. succinogenes are enriched with carbohydrate-active enzymes and that intact OMVs were able to depolymerize a broad range of linear and branched hemicelluloses and pectin, despite the inability of F. succinogenes to utilize non-cellulosic (pentose) sugars for growth. We hypothesize that the degradative versatility of F. succinogenes OMVs is used to prime hydrolysis by destabilising the tight networks of polysaccharides intertwining cellulose in the plant cell wall, thus increasing accessibility of the target substrate for the host cell. This is supported by observations that OMV-pretreatment of the natural complex substrate switchgrass increased the catalytic efficiency of a commercial cellulose-degrading enzyme cocktail by 2.4-fold. We also show that the OMVs contain a putative multiprotein complex, including the fibro-slime protein previously found to be important in binding to crystalline cellulose. We hypothesize that this complex has a function in plant cell wall degradation, either by catalysing polysaccharide degradation itself, or by targeting the vesicles to plant biomass. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effect of trichloroethylene (TCE) toxicity on the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, brush border membrane and oxidative stress in kidney and other rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sheeba; Priyamvada, Shubha; Khan, Sara A; Khan, Wasim; Farooq, Neelam; Khan, Farah; Yusufi, A N K

    2009-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), an industrial solvent, is a major environmental contaminant. Histopathological examinations revealed that TCE caused liver and kidney toxicity and carcinogenicity. However, biochemical mechanism and tissue response to toxic insult are not completely elucidated. We hypothesized that TCE induces oxidative stress to various rat tissues and alters their metabolic functions. Male Wistar rats were given TCE (1000 mg/kg/day) in corn oil orally for 25 d. Blood and tissues were collected and analyzed for various biochemical and enzymatic parameters. TCE administration increased blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, cholesterol and alkaline phosphatase but decreased serum glucose, inorganic phosphate and phospholipids indicating kidney and liver toxicity. Activity of hexokinase, lactate dehydrogenase increased in the intestine and liver whereas decreased in renal tissues. Malate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase decreased in all tissues whereas increased in medulla. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased but NADP-malic enzyme decreased in all tissues except in medulla. The activity of BBM enzymes decreased but renal Na/Pi transport increased. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities variably declined whereas lipid peroxidation significantly enhanced in all tissues. The present results indicate that TCE caused severe damage to kidney, intestine, liver and brain; altered carbohydrate metabolism and suppressed antioxidant defense system.

  19. The Activity of Carbohydrate-Degrading Enzymes in the Development of Brood and Newly Emerged workers and Drones of the Carniolan Honeybee, Apis mellifera carnica

    PubMed Central

    Żółtowska, Krystyna; Lipiński, Zbigniew; Łopieńska-Biernat, Elżbieta; Farjan, Marek; Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The activity of glycogen Phosphorylase and carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes α-amylase, glucoamylase, trehalase, and sucrase was studied in the development of the Carniolan honey bee, Apis mellifera carnica Pollman (Hymenoptera: Apidae), from newly hatched larva to freshly emerged imago of worker and drone. Phosphorolytic degradation of glycogen was significantly stronger than hydrolytic degradation in all developmental stages. Developmental profiles of hydrolase activity were similar in both sexes of brood; high activity was found in unsealed larvae, the lowest in prepupae followed by an increase in enzymatic activity. Especially intensive increases in activity occurred in the last stage of pupae and newly emerged imago. Besides α-amylase, the activities of other enzymes were higher in drone than in worker broods. Among drones, activity of glucoamylase was particularly high, ranging from around three times higher in the youngest larvae to 13 times higher in the oldest pupae. This confirms earlier suggestions about higher rates of metabolism in drone broods than in worker broods. PMID:22943407

  20. Effect of Pterocarpus santalinus bark, on blood glucose, serum lipids, plasma insulin and hepatic carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kondeti, Vinay Kumar; Badri, Kameswara Rao; Maddirala, Dilip Rajasekhar; Thur, Sampath Kumar Mekala; Fatima, Shaik Sameena; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Rao, Chippada Appa

    2010-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of bark of Pterocarpus santalinus, an ethnomedicinal plant, on blood glucose, plasma insulin, serum lipids and the activities of hepatic glucose metabolizing enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated (acute/short-term and long-term) with ethyl acetate:methanol fractions of ethanolic extract of the bark of P. santalinus. Fasting blood glucose, HbA(1C), plasma insulin and protein were estimated before and after the treatment, along with hepatic glycogen, and activities of hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Further anti-hyperlipidemic activity was studied by measuring the levels of serum lipids and lipoproteins. Phytochemical analysis of active fraction showed the presence of flavonoids, glycosides and phenols. Biological testing of the active fraction demonstrated a significant antidiabetic activity by reducing the elevated blood glucose levels and glycosylated hemoglobin, improving hyperlipidemia and restoring the insulin levels in treated experimental induced diabetic rats. Further elucidation of mechanism of action showed improvement in the hepatic carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes after the treatment. Our present investigation suggests that active fraction of ethanolic extract of bark of P. santalinus decreases streptozotocin induced hyperglycemia by increasing glycolysis and decreasing gluconeogenesis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Potential of the waste from beer fermentation broth for bio-ethanol production without any additional enzyme, microbial cells and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung Hwan; Shah, Nasrullah; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Park, Joong Kon

    2011-08-10

    The potential of the waste from beer fermentation broth (WBFB) for the production of bio-ethanol using a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process without any extra additions of saccharification enzymes, microbial cells or carbohydrate was tested. The major microbial cells in WBFB were isolated and identified. The variations in compositions of WBFB with stock time were investigated. There was residual activity of starch hydrolyzing enzymes in WBFB. The effects of reaction modes e.g. static and shaking on bio-ethanol production were studied. After 7 days of cultivation using the supernatant of WBFB at 30 °C the ethanol concentration reached 103.8 g/L in shaking culture and 91.5 g/L in static culture. Agitation experiments conducted at a temperature-profile process in which temperature was increased from 25 to 67 °C shortened the simultaneous process time. The original WBFB was more useful than the supernatant of WBFB in getting the higher concentration of ethanol and reducing the fermentation time. From this whole study it was found that WBFB is a cheap and suitable source for bio-ethanol production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CAZymes Analysis Toolkit (CAT): web service for searching and analyzing carbohydrate-active enzymes in a newly sequenced organism using CAZy database.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung H; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Syed, Mustafa H; Leuze, Michael R; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2010-12-01

    The Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme (CAZy) database provides a rich set of manually annotated enzymes that degrade, modify, or create glycosidic bonds. Despite rich and invaluable information stored in the database, software tools utilizing this information for annotation of newly sequenced genomes by CAZy families are limited. We have employed two annotation approaches to fill the gap between manually curated high-quality protein sequences collected in the CAZy database and the growing number of other protein sequences produced by genome or metagenome sequencing projects. The first approach is based on a similarity search against the entire nonredundant sequences of the CAZy database. The second approach performs annotation using links or correspondences between the CAZy families and protein family domains. The links were discovered using the association rule learning algorithm applied to sequences from the CAZy database. The approaches complement each other and in combination achieved high specificity and sensitivity when cross-evaluated with the manually curated genomes of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 and Saccharophagus degradans 2-40. The capability of the proposed framework to predict the function of unknown protein domains and of hypothetical proteins in the genome of Neurospora crassa is demonstrated. The framework is implemented as a Web service, the CAZymes Analysis Toolkit, and is available at http://cricket.ornl.gov/cgi-bin/cat.cgi.

  3. Experiment K304: Studies of specific hepatic enzymes and liver constituents involved in the conversion of carbohydrates to lipids in rats exposed to prolonged space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Klein, H. P.; Lin, C. Y.; Volkmann, C.; Tigranyan, R. A.; Vetrova, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the activities of 26 enzymes concerned with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in hepatic tissue taken from male Wistar rats are investigated. These activities were measured in the various hepatic cell compartments, i.e., cytosol, mitochondria and microsomes. In addition, the levels of glycogen, total lipids, phospholipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, and the fatty acid composition of the rat livers were also examined and quantified. A similar group of ground-based rats treated in an identical manner served as controls. Both flight and synchronous control rats were sacrificed at three time intervals: R+0, 7-11 hours after recovery; R+6, after 6 days; R+6(S), after 6 days (having undergone 2-5 hour periods of fixed stress in a "backupward" position on days 0, 3, 4, 5 and 6) and R+29, after 29 days post-flight. Although most of the enzyme activities and the amounts of liver constituents studied were unaffected by the period of weightlessness, some significant differences were observed.

  4. Nutritional supplements modulate fluorescent protein-bound advanced glycation endproducts and digestive enzymes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Koch, Emily R; Deo, Permal

    2016-09-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia enhances the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to diabetic complications. Thus, controlling blood glucose levels, inhibiting the formation of AGEs and reducing ROS are key therapeutic targets in early stage type 2 diabetes. The inhibitory effects of seven commercial liquid nutritional supplements against carbohydrate hydrolysing enzymes, α-amylase and α-glucosidase, was determined by dinitrosalicylic (DNS) reagent and p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside solution, respectively. Antiglycation activity was determined using the formation of fluorescent protein-bound AGEs. Total phenolic and flavonoid content and antioxidant properties (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl antioxidant activity (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)) were determined for correlation among these components and inhibitory activities. Samoan noni juice showed the greatest inhibitory effects against α-amylase, whereas chlorophyll extracts showed the greatest inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase. Inhibition of α-glucosidase correlated with TFC (r(2) = 0.766; p < 0.01) and FRAP (r(2) = 0.750; p < 0.01) whereas no correlation was observed for α-amylase inhibition. All supplements inhibited fluorescent protein-bound AGEs, with the greatest effect exerted by Olive Leaf Extract, Blood Sugar Support (IC50 = 0.5 mg/ml). The IC50 values negatively correlated with TPC (r(2) = -0.707; p < 0.001) and DPPH scavenging activities (r(2) = 0.515; p < 0.05). The findings of this study highlight the potential of liquid nutritional supplements in managing and treating type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Influence of feeding alternative fiber sources on the gastrointestinal fermentation, digestive enzyme activities and mucosa morphology of growing Greylag geese.

    PubMed

    He, L W; Meng, Q X; Li, D Y; Zhang, Y W; Ren, L P

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this trial was to study the influence of dietary fiber sources on the gastrointestinal fermentation, digestive enzyme activity, and mucosa morphology of growing Greylag geese. In total, 240 Greylag geese (28-day-old) were allocated to 4 treatments (15 pens/treatment) differing in dietary fiber source: corn straw silage (CSS group), steam-exploded corn straw (SECS group), steam-exploded wheat straw (SEWS group), or steam-exploded rice straw (SERS group). At 112 days of age, 15 birds per group were euthanized to collect samples. No difference (P > 0.05) was found on all the gastrointestinal pH values and ammonia-nitrogen concentrations between the groups. The CSS and SERS groups had a lower (P < 0.05) proportion of acetic acid in the gizzard than the SECS and SEWS groups. The CSS group had a higher VFA concentration in the jejunum (P < 0.05) and acetic acid proportion (P < 0.01) in the ceca, and a lower (P < 0.01) butyric acid proportion than the other groups except for the SECS group. The SECS group had a higher (P < 0.01) acetic acid proportion and lower (P < 0.05) proportions of propionic acid and valeric acid in the ceca than the SEWS and SERS groups. Different fiber sources resulted in different VFA profiles, especially in the gizzard and ceca. Almost all gastrointestinal protease activities of the CSS group were higher (P < 0.05) than the other groups, along with lower (P < 0.01) amylase activities in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and ceca. Lipase activity in proventriculus was highest (P < 0.01) in the SEWS group and its cecal activity was lower (P < 0.01) in the SECS and SEWS groups than the CSS and SERS groups with a higher (P < 0.01) lipase activity in the CSS group than the SERS group. The SECS and SERS groups had a higher cellulase activity in the ceca than the CSS and SEWS groups, with a higher (P < 0.01) rectal cellulase activity in the SERS group than the other groups. There was no

  6. Influence of Palm Kernel Meal Inclusion and Exogenous Enzyme Supplementation on Growth Performance, Energy Utilization, and Nutrient Digestibility in Young Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, M. R.; Hosking, B. J.; Ning, D.; Ravindran, V.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of palm kernel meal (PKM) inclusion and exogenous enzyme supplementation on growth performance, nitrogen-corrected apparent metabolizable energy (AMEn), coefficient of apparent ileal digestibility (CAID) and total tract retention of nutrients in young broilers fed corn-based diets. Four inclusion levels of PKM (no PKM [PKM0], 8% [PKM8], 16% [PKM16], and 24% [PKM24]) and two enzyme additions were evaluated in a 4×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. A total of 384, one-d-old male broilers (Ross 308) were individually weighed and allocated to 48 cages (eight broilers/cage), and cages were randomly assigned to eight dietary treatments. Results indicated that the inclusion of 8% and 16% PKM increased (p<0.05) the weight gain compared to the PKM0 diet. Birds fed the PKM8 diets had the highest (p<0.05) feed intake. Weight gain and feed intake were severely reduced (p<0.05) by feeding the PKM24 diet. Enzyme supplementation increased weight gain (p<0.05), independent of PKM inclusion level. In PKM0 and PKM8 diets, enzyme addition significantly (p<0.05) lowered feed conversion ratio (FCR); whereas enzyme addition had no effect on FCR of birds fed PKM16 and PKM24 diets. In PKM0 and PKM16 diets, enzyme addition significantly (p<0.05) increased CAID of nitrogen and energy but had no effect in the PKM8 and PKM24 diets. Inclusion of PKM into the basal diet, irrespective of inclusion level, enhanced (p<0.05) starch and fat digestibility. Inclusion of PKM at 16% and 24% resulted in similar CAID of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) but higher (p<0.05) than that of the PKM0 and PKM8 diets. Enzyme addition, regardless of the level of PKM inclusion, significantly (p<0.05) increased CAID of NDF. There was a significant (p<0.05) decrease in AMEn with PKM inclusion of 24%. The present data suggest that inclusion of PKM in broiler diets could be optimized if PKM-containing diets are formulated based on digestible amino

  7. Characterization of digestive enzymes from de-oiled mackerel (Scomber japonicus) muscle obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide and n-hexane extraction as a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Asaduzzaman, A K M; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2015-06-01

    The oil in mackerel muscle was extracted using an environmental friendly solvent, supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) at a semi-batch flow extraction process and an n-hexane. The SC-CO2 was carried out at temperature 45 °C and pressures ranging from 15 to 25 MPa. The flow rate of CO2 (27 g/min) was constant at the entire extraction period of 2 h. The highest oil extracted residues after SC-CO2 extraction was used for activity measurement of digestive enzymes. Four digestive enzymes were found in water soluble extracts after n-hexane and SC-CO2 treated samples. Amylase, lipase and trypsin activities were higher in water soluble extracts after SC-CO2 treated samples except protease. Among the four digestive enzymes, the activity of amylase was highest and the value was 44.57 uM/min/mg of protein. The water soluble extracts of SC-CO2 and n-hexane treated mackerel samples showed same alkaline optimum pH and pH stability for each of the digestive enzymes. Optimum temperature of amylase, lipase, protease and trypsin was 40, 50, 60 and 30 °C, respectively of both extracts. More than 80 % temperature stability of amylase, lipase, protease and trypsin were retained at mentioned optimum temperature in water soluble extracts of both treated samples. Based on protein patterns, prominent protein band showed in water soluble extracts after SC-CO2 treated samples indicates no denaturation of protein than untreated and n-hexane.

  8. Lack of any association between insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphisms in the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and digestive system cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Fei; Xie, Hao-Jun; Cheng, Tian-Ming

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association between the gene polymorphisms of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and digestive system cancer risk. A search was performed in Pubmed, Medline, ISI Web of Science and Chinese Biomedical (CBM) databases, covering all studies until Sep 1st, 2013. Statistical analysis was performed by using Revman5.2 and STATA 12.0. A total of 15 case-control studies comprising 2,390 digestive system cancer patients and 9,706 controls were identified. No significant association was found between the I/D polymorphism and digestive cancer risk (OR =0.93, 95%CI = (0.75, 1.16), P =0.53 for DD+DI vs. II). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity and cancer type, no significant associations were found for the comparison of DD+DI vs. II. Results from other comparative genetic models also indicated a lack of associations between this polymorphism and digestive system cancer risks. This meta-analysis suggested that the ACE D/I polymorphism might not contribute to the risk of digestive system cancer.

  9. Extraction and identification of α-amylase inhibitor peptides from Nephelium lappacheum and Nephelium mutabile seed protein using gastro-digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Evaristus, Natashya Anak; Wan Abdullah, Wan Nadiah; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2018-04-01

    The potential of N. lappacheum and N. mutabile seed as a source of α-amylase inhibitor peptides was explored based on the local traditional practice of using the seed. Different gastro-digestive enzymes (i.e. pepsin or chymotrypsin) or a sequential digestion were used to extract the peptides. The effects of digestion time and enzyme to substrate (E:S) ratio on the α-amylase inhibitory activity were investigated. Results showed that chymotrypsin was effective in producing the inhibitor peptides from rambutan seed protein at E:S ratio 1:20 for 1 h, whereas pepsin was more effective for pulasan seed protein under the same condition. A total of 20 and 31 novel inhibitor peptides were identified, respectively. These peptides could bind with the subsites of α-amylase (i.e. Trp58, Trp59, Tyr62, Asp96, Arg195, Asp197, Glu233, His299, Asp300, and His305) and formed a sliding barrier that preventing the formation of enzyme/substrate intermediate leading to lower α-amylase activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effect of light intensity on the growth and digestive enzyme activity of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicas under two kinds of culture methods].

    PubMed

    Wei, Zi-Zhong; Zhao, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The effects of light intensity (0, 1000, 2000 and 3000 1x) on the growth and digestive enzyme activity of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus under two kinds of culture methods (compound Chinese medicine preparation and microbial preparation) were studied. Results showed that the relative mass gain rate (WGR) and the specific growth rate (SGR) of juvenile sea cucumber were significantly affected by light intensity (P < 0.05) , and the orders of WGR and SGR (form high to low) of juvenile sea cucumber under different light intensities were 2000 1x > 1000 1x > 3000 1x > 0 1x. Under the same light intensity, the growth of juvenile sea cucumber under the two kinds of culture methods were significantly different (P < 0.05), with the WGR and SGR of the Chinese medicine treatment being greater than those of the microbial treatment. The light intensity also significantly affected the digestive enzyme activity of juvenile sea cucumber. The order of amylase and lipase activity was 2000 1x > 1000 1x > 3000 1x > 0 1x, while that of protease activity was 1000 1x > 2000 1x > 0 1x > 3000 1x. Under the same light intensity, the digestive enzyme activities of the Chinese medicine treatment were generally higher than those of the microbial treatment.

  11. Comparative Digestive Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Karasov, William H.; Douglas, Angela E.

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates and invertebrates, morphological and functional features of gastrointestinal (GI) tracts generally reflect food chemistry, such as content of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, and material(s) refractory to rapid digestion (e.g., cellulose). The expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters approximately matches the dietary load of their respective substrates, with relatively modest excess capacity. Mechanisms explaining differences in hydrolase activity between populations and species include gene copy number variations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional adjustments mediate phenotypic changes in the expression of hydrolases and transporters in response to dietary signals. Many species respond to higher food intake by flexibly increasing digestive compartment size. Fermentative processes by symbiotic microorganisms are important for cellulose degradation but are relatively slow, so animals that rely on those processes typically possess special enlarged compartment(s) to maintain a microbiota and other GI structures that slow digesta flow. The taxon richness of the gut microbiota, usually identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, is typically an order of magnitude greater in vertebrates than invertebrates, and the interspecific variation in microbial composition is strongly influenced by diet. Many of the nutrient transporters are orthologous across different animal phyla, though functional details may vary (e.g., glucose and amino acid transport with K+ rather than Na+ as a counter ion). Paracellular absorption is important in many birds. Natural toxins are ubiquitous in foods and may influence key features such as digesta transit, enzymatic breakdown, microbial fermentation, and absorption PMID:23720328

  12. Recombinant Trichoderma harzianum endoglucanase I (Cel7B) is a highly acidic and promiscuous carbohydrate-active enzyme.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Vanessa O A; Serpa, Viviane Isabel; Godoy, Andre S; Camilo, Cesar M; Bernardes, Amanda; Rezende, Camila A; Junior, Nei Pereira; Franco Cairo, João Paulo L; Squina, Fabio M; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Trichoderma filamentous fungi have been investigated due to their ability to secrete cellulases which find various biotechnological applications such as biomass hydrolysis and cellulosic ethanol production. Previous studies demonstrated that Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 has a high degree of cellulolytic activity and potential for biomass hydrolysis. However, enzymatic, biochemical, and structural studies of cellulases from T. harzianum are scarce. This work reports biochemical characterization of the recombinant endoglucanase I from T. harzianum, ThCel7B, and its catalytic core domain. The constructs display optimum activity at 55 °C and a surprisingly acidic pH optimum of 3.0. The full-length enzyme is able to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, with high specific activity: 75 U/mg for β-glucan, 46 U/mg toward xyloglucan, 39 U/mg for lichenan, 26 U/mg for carboxymethyl cellulose, 18 U/mg for 4-nitrophenyl β-D-cellobioside, 16 U/mg for rye arabinoxylan, and 12 U/mg toward xylan. The enzyme also hydrolyzed filter paper, phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, Sigmacell 20, Avicel PH-101, and cellulose, albeit with lower efficiency. The ThCel7B catalytic domain displays similar substrate diversity. Fluorescence-based thermal shift assays showed that thermal stability is highest at pH 5.0. We determined kinetic parameters and analyzed a pattern of oligosaccharide substrates hydrolysis, revealing cellobiose as a final product of C6 degradation. Finally, we visualized effects of ThCel7B on oat spelt using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrating the morphological changes of the substrate during the hydrolysis. The acidic behavior of ThCel7B and its considerable thermostability hold a promise of its industrial applications and other biotechnological uses under extremely acidic conditions.

  13. Digestive enzyme activities are higher in the shortfin mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus, than in ectothermic sharks as a result of visceral endothermy.

    PubMed

    Newton, Kyle C; Wraith, James; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2015-08-01

    Lamnid sharks are regionally endothermic fishes that maintain visceral temperatures elevated above the ambient water temperature. Visceral endothermy is thought to increase rates of digestion and food processing and allow thermal niche expansion. We tested the hypothesis that, at in vivo temperatures, the endothermic shortfin mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus, has higher specific activities of three digestive enzymes-gastric pepsin and pancreatic trypsin and lipase-than the thresher shark, Alopias vulpinus, and the blue shark, Prionace glauca, neither of which can maintain elevated visceral temperatures. Homogenized stomach or pancreas tissue obtained from sharks collected by pelagic longline was incubated at both 15 and 25 °C, at saturating substrate concentrations, to quantify tissue enzymatic activity. The mako had significantly higher enzyme activities at 25 °C than did the thresher and blue sharks at 15 °C. This difference was not a simple temperature effect, because at 25 °C the mako had higher trypsin activity than the blue shark and higher activities for all enzymes than the thresher shark. We also hypothesized that the thermal coefficient, or Q 10 value, would be higher for the mako shark than for the thresher and blue sharks because of its more stable visceral temperature. However, the mako and thresher sharks had similar Q 10 values for all enzymes, perhaps because of their closer phylogenetic relationship. The higher in vivo digestive enzyme activities in the mako shark should result in higher rates of food processing and may represent a selective advantage of regional visceral endothermy.

  14. Effects of chronic exposure to cadmium and temperature, alone or combined, on the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus): Interest of digestive enzymes as biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Hani, Younes Mohamed Ismail; Turies, Cyril; Palluel, Olivier; Delahaut, Laurence; Gaillet, Véronique; Bado-Nilles, Anne; Porcher, Jean-Marc; Geffard, Alain; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile

    2018-06-01

    The development of predictive, sensitive and reliable biomarkers is of crucial importance for aquatic biomonitoring to assess the effects of chemical substances on aquatic organisms, especially when it comes to combined effects with other stressors (e.g. temperature). The first purpose of the present study was to evaluate the single and combined effects of 90 days of exposure to an environmental cadmium concentration (0.5 μg L -1 ) and two water temperatures (16 and 21 °C) on different parameters. These parameters are involved in (i) the antioxidant system (superoxide dismutase activity -SOD- and total glutathione levels -GSH-), (ii) the energy metabolism, i.e. energy reserves (glycogen, lipids, proteins) and digestive enzymes (trypsin, amylase, intestinal alkaline phosphatase -IAP-), and (iii) biometric parameters (weight, length, Fulton's condition factor, and the gonadosomatic index -GSI-) of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). The second purpose was to determine the interest of the three digestive enzymes as biomarkers in comparison with the other parameters. The higher temperature (21 °C) impacted the anti-oxidant and energy reserve parameters. In liver, GSH levels increased on day 60, while SOD decreased on days 15 and 90, with a significant decrease of protein and lipid energy reserves on day 90. In muscle, the higher temperature decreased SOD activity only on day 90. G. aculeatus biometric parameters were also impacted by the higher temperature, which limited stickleback growth after 90 days of exposure. In female sticklebacks, the GSI peaked on day 60 and decreased sharply on day 90, while the highest values were reached at day 90 in the control groups, suggesting impaired reproduction in sticklebacks raised at 21 °C. These results suggest that 21 °C is an upper-limit temperature for long-term physiological processes in sticklebacks. In contrast, very low-concentration cadmium exposure had no effect on classical biomarkers

  15. Beneficial effect of recombinant rC1rC2 collagenases on human islet function: Efficacy of low-dose enzymes on pancreas digestion and yield.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Subhashree, Venugopal; Breite, Andrew G; Tucker, William W; Narayanan, Siddharth; Dhanasekaran, Maheswaran; Mokshagundam, SriPrakash; Green, Michael L; Hughes, Michael G; Williams, Stuart K; Dwulet, Francis E; McCarthy, Robert C; Balamurugan, Appakalai N

    2018-02-01

    A high number of human islets can be isolated by using modern purified tissue dissociation enzymes; however, this requires the use of >20 Wunsch units (WU)/g of pancreas for digestion. Attempts to reduce this dose have resulted in pancreas underdigestion and poor islet recovery but improved islet function. In this study, we achieved a high number of functional islets using a low dose of recombinant collagenase enzyme mixture (RCEM-1200 WU rC2 and 10 million collagen-degrading activity [CDA] U of rC1 containing about 209 mg of collagenase to digest a 100-g pancreas). The collagenase dose used in these isolations is about 42% of the natural collagenase enzyme mixture (NCEM) dose commonly used to digest a 100-g pancreas. Low-dose RCEM was efficient in digesting entire pancreases to obtain higher yield (5535 ± 830 and 2582 ± 925 islet equivalent/g, P < .05) and less undigested tissue (16.7 ± 5% and 37.8 ± 3%, P < .05) compared with low-dose NCEM (12WU/g). Additionally, low-dose RCEM islets retained better morphology (confirmed with scanning electron microscopy) and higher in vitro basal insulin release (2391 ± 1342 and 1778 ± 978 μU/mL; P < .05) compared with standard-dose NCEM. Nude mouse bioassay demonstrated better islet function for low-dose RCEM (area under the curve [AUC] 24 968) compared with low-dose (AUC-38 225) or standard-dose NCEM (AUC-38 685), P < .05. This is the first report indicating that islet function can be improved by using low-dose rC1rC2 (RCEM). © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Impact of UV-B radiation on the digestive enzymes and immune system of larvae of Indian major carp Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jaigopal; Rao, Y Vasudeva; Kumar, S; Chakrabarti, Rina

    2010-03-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a potent threat to the aquatic animals. Exposure to such stressor affects metabolic and immunological processes. The present investigation aims to study the effect of UV-B radiation on digestive enzymes and immunity of larvae of Catla catla. Larvae were exposed to ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-320 nm) radiation (145 microW/cm(2)) for three different exposure times of 5, 10 and 15 min on every other day. After 55 days, important digestive enzymes were assayed. For immunological study, lysozyme, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) levels were measured. Then the fish were kept for one month without radiation and lysozyme level was measured. Protein concentration varied directly with the duration of exposure and was highest among fish that had received the 15 min UV-B irradiation. Significantly higher amylase, protease, trypsin and chymotrypsin activities were found in 5 min exposed fish compared to others. Lysozyme level was significantly higher in control group compared to the UV-B treated fish. The lysozyme level decreased with the increasing duration of UV-B radiation. When fish were kept without UV-B radiation for one month, lysozyme level was brought to the normal level in all treatments, except 15 min exposed fish. The GOT and GPT levels were significantly higher in the 15 min exposed group than others. The effects of UV-B radiation on the digestive physiology and immune system of catla have been clearly observed in the present study. The decreased enzyme activities in UV-B radiated fish results into improper digestion and poor growth.

  17. Omics Analyses of Trichoderma reesei CBS999.97 and QM6a Indicate the Relevance of Female Fertility to Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme and Transporter Levels

    DOE PAGES

    Tisch, Doris; Pomraning, Kyle R.; Collett, James R.; ...

    2017-09-15

    Here, the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is found predominantly in the tropics but also in more temperate regions, such as Europe, and is widely known as a producer of large amounts of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. We sequenced the genome of the sexually competent isolate CBS999.97, which is phenotypically different from the female sterile strain QM6a but can cross sexually with QM6a. Transcriptome data for growth on cellulose showed that entire carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) families are consistently differentially regulated between these strains. We evaluated backcrossed strains of both mating types, which acquired female fertility from CBS999.97 but maintained a mostlymore » QM6a genetic background, and we could thereby distinguish between the effects of strain background and female fertility or mating type. We found clear regulatory differences associated with female fertility and female sterility, including regulation of CAZyme and transporter genes. Analysis of carbon source utilization, transcriptomes, and secondary metabolites in these strains revealed that only a few changes in gene regulation are consistently correlated with different mating types. Different strain backgrounds (QM6a versus CBS999.97) resulted in the most significant alterations in the transcriptomes and in carbon source utilization, with decreased growth of CBS999.97 on several amino acids (for example proline or alanine), which further correlated with the downregulation of genes involved in the respective pathways. In combination, our findings support a role of fertility-associated processes in physiology and gene regulation and are of high relevance for the use of sexual crossing in combining the characteristics of two compatible strains or quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis.« less

  18. Ashanti pepper (Piper guineense Schumach et Thonn) attenuates carbohydrate hydrolyzing, blood pressure regulating and cholinergic enzymes in experimental type 2 diabetes rat model.

    PubMed

    Adefegha, Stephen Adeniyi; Oboh, Ganiyu; Adefegha, Omowunmi Monisola

    2017-01-01

    Ashanti pepper (Piper guineense Schumach et Thonn) seed is well known in folkloric medicine in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) with little or no scientific documentation for its action. This study investigated the effect of Ashanti pepper seed on some enzymes relevant to carbohydrate hydrolysis, blood regulation and the cholinergic system, as well as the blood glucose level, lipid profile, antioxidant parameters, and hepatic and renal function markers in T2DM rats. T2DM was induced by feeding rats with high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 days followed by a single intraperitoneal dose of 35 mg/kg body weight of streptozotocin (STZ). Three days after STZ induction, diabetic rats were placed on a dietary regimen containing 2%-4% Ashanti pepper. Reduced blood glucose level with decreased α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) activities were observed in Ashanti pepper seed and acarbose-treated rat groups when compared to that of the diabetic control rat group. Furthermore, the results revealed that inclusion of 2%-4% Ashanti pepper seed in diabetic rat fed group diets may ameliorate the lipid profile, antioxidant status, and hepatic and renal function in T2DM rats as much as in the acarbose-treated groups. In addition, a chromatographic profile of the seed revealed the presence of quercitrin (116.51 mg/g), capsaicin (113.94 mg/g), dihydrocapsaicin (88.29 mg/g) and isoquercitrin (74.89 mg/g). The results from this study clearly suggest that Ashanti pepper could serve as a promising source of phenolic compounds with great alternative therapeutic potentials in the management of T2DM.

  19. Omics Analyses of Trichoderma reesei CBS999.97 and QM6a Indicate the Relevance of Female Fertility to Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme and Transporter Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Tisch, Doris; Pomraning, Kyle R.; Collett, James R.

    Here, the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is found predominantly in the tropics but also in more temperate regions, such as Europe, and is widely known as a producer of large amounts of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. We sequenced the genome of the sexually competent isolate CBS999.97, which is phenotypically different from the female sterile strain QM6a but can cross sexually with QM6a. Transcriptome data for growth on cellulose showed that entire carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) families are consistently differentially regulated between these strains. We evaluated backcrossed strains of both mating types, which acquired female fertility from CBS999.97 but maintained a mostlymore » QM6a genetic background, and we could thereby distinguish between the effects of strain background and female fertility or mating type. We found clear regulatory differences associated with female fertility and female sterility, including regulation of CAZyme and transporter genes. Analysis of carbon source utilization, transcriptomes, and secondary metabolites in these strains revealed that only a few changes in gene regulation are consistently correlated with different mating types. Different strain backgrounds (QM6a versus CBS999.97) resulted in the most significant alterations in the transcriptomes and in carbon source utilization, with decreased growth of CBS999.97 on several amino acids (for example proline or alanine), which further correlated with the downregulation of genes involved in the respective pathways. In combination, our findings support a role of fertility-associated processes in physiology and gene regulation and are of high relevance for the use of sexual crossing in combining the characteristics of two compatible strains or quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis.« less

  20. Comparative genomics of maize ear rot pathogens reveals expansion of carbohydrate-active enzymes and secondary metabolism backbone genes in Stenocarpella maydis.

    PubMed

    Zaccaron, Alex Z; Woloshuk, Charles P; Bluhm, Burton H

    2017-11-01

    Stenocarpella maydis is a plant pathogenic fungus that causes Diplodia ear rot, one of the most destructive diseases of maize. To date, little information is available regarding the molecular basis of pathogenesis in this organism, in part due to limited genomic resources. In this study, a 54.8 Mb draft genome assembly of S. maydis was obtained with Illumina and PacBio sequencing technologies, and analyzed. Comparative genomic analyses with the predominant maize ear rot pathogens Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium verticillioides, and Fusarium graminearum revealed an expanded set of carbohydrate-active enzymes for cellulose and hemicellulose degradation in S. maydis. Analyses of predicted genes involved in starch degradation revealed six putative α-amylases, four extracellular and two intracellular, and two putative γ-amylases, one of which appears to have been acquired from bacteria via horizontal transfer. Additionally, 87 backbone genes involved in secondary metabolism were identified, which represents one of the largest known assemblages among Pezizomycotina species. Numerous secondary metabolite gene clusters were identified, including two clusters likely involved in the biosynthesis of diplodiatoxin and chaetoglobosins. The draft genome of S. maydis presented here will serve as a useful resource for molecular genetics, functional genomics, and analyses of population diversity in this organism. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Combining mutations at genes encoding key enzymes involved in starch synthesis affects the amylose content, carbohydrate allocation and hardness in the wheat grain.

    PubMed

    Botticella, Ermelinda; Sestili, Francesco; Sparla, Francesca; Moscatello, Stefano; Marri, Lucia; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A; Falini, Giuseppe; Battistelli, Alberto; Trost, Paolo; Lafiandra, Domenico

    2018-03-02

    Modifications to the composition of starch, the major component of wheat flour, can have a profound effect on the nutritional and technological characteristics of the flour's end products. The starch synthesized in the grain of conventional wheats (Triticum aestivum) is a 3:1 mixture of the two polysaccharides amylopectin and amylose. Altering the activity of certain key starch synthesis enzymes (GBSSI, SSIIa and SBEIIa) has succeeded in generating starches containing a different polysaccharide ratio. Here, mutagenesis, followed by a conventional marker-assisted breeding exercise, has been used to generate three mutant lines that produce starch with an amylose contents of 0%, 46% and 79%. The direct and pleiotropic effects of the multiple mutation lines were identified at both the biochemical and molecular levels. Both the structure and composition of the starch were materially altered, changes which affected the functionality of the starch. An analysis of sugar and nonstarch polysaccharide content in the endosperm suggested an impact of the mutations on the carbon allocation process, suggesting the existence of cross-talk between the starch and carbohydrate synthesis pathways. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Short communication: Effect of casein haplotype on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant capacities of milk casein from Italian Holstein cows before and following in vitro digestion with gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Perna, Annamaria; Simonetti, Amalia; Gambacorta, Emilio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of casein haplotype (αS1, β, and κ) on antioxidative and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacities of milk casein from Italian Holstein cows before and following in vitro digestion with gastrointestinal enzymes. The antioxidant capacity was measured using 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid and ferric-reducing antioxidant power assays, whereas ACE inhibition was determined by ACE-inhibitory assay. The ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant capacities of milk casein increased during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. Casein haplotype significantly influenced the antioxidative and ACE-inhibitory capacities of digested casein. In particular, BB-A(2)A(1)-AA casein and BB-A(1)A(1)-AA casein showed the highest ACE-inhibitory capacity, BB-A(2)A(2)-AA casein showed the highest antioxidant capacity, whereas BB-A(2)A(2)-BB casein showed the lowest biological capacity. To date, few studies have been done on the effect of casein haplotype on biological capacity of milk casein, thus the present study sets the basis for a new knowledge that could lead to the production of milk with better nutraceutical properties. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of full-fat rice bran on palatability and digestibility of diets supplemented with enzymes in adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, G F E; Marcolla, C S; Machado, G S; Kessler, A M; Trevizan, L

    2014-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of full-fat rice bran (FFRB) inclusion in dry diets with and without enzyme blend (EB) supplementation for adult dogs. The diets contained 0, 20, or 40% of FFRB, replacing the equivalent amount of wheat flour (WF). Experiment 1 evaluated the consumption and preference of diets using a simple choice method with 3 comparisons (0 vs. 20, 0 vs. 40, and 20 vs. 40% FFRB). Experiment 2 investigated the effect of EB supplementation on the apparent digestibility coefficients (ADC) of nutrients and GE, fecal characteristics, urinary pH, Ca and P balance, and ME of the diets. In Exp. 1, the results indicated that FFRB included in diets up to 40% did not affect the preference or consumption of food by dogs (P < 0.05). In Exp. 2, increasing levels of FFRB in the diet linearly reduced the ADC of nutrients, GE, and ME (P < 0.05). The addition of EB had no effect on any of the variables examined. Regression analysis enabled estimation of the ADC in FFRB; and ADC of DM, CP, ether extract, GE; and the apparent coefficient of ME were 60.5, 74.8, 88.4, 70.8, and 66.4%, respectively. The inclusion of 20 or 40% FFRB in the diets did not affect urinary pH but caused an imbalance in the Ca and P metabolism when included at 40% (P < 0.05), which could be one of the limitations for greater inclusion of FFRB. The ME of FFRB was estimated to be 3,443 kcal/kg DM. The FFRB appears to be palatable for adult dogs, and although ADC was reduced by 40% FFRB in the diet, this ingredient has the potential for inclusion at 20% of diets for dogs, depending on the other ingredients used to achieve adequate Ca and P balance. The inclusion greater than 20% tends to increase P in the diet and reverse the relationship between Ca and P.

  4. Ghrelin modulates gene and protein expression of digestive enzymes in the intestine and hepatopancreas of goldfish (Carassius auratus) via the GHS-R1a: Possible roles of PLC/PKC and AC/PKA intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Delgado, María Jesús; Valenciano, Ana Isabel; Unniappan, Suraj

    2017-02-15

    Ghrelin, a multifunctional gut-brain hormone, is involved in the regulation of gastric functions in mammals. This study aimed to determine whether ghrelin modulates digestive enzymes in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Immunofluorescence microscopy found colocalization of ghrelin, GHS-R1a and the digestive enzymes sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase A, trypsin and lipoprotein lipase in intestinal and hepatopancreatic cells. In vitro ghrelin treatment in intestinal and hepatopancreas explant culture led to a concentration- and time-dependent modulation (mainly stimulatory) of most of the digestive enzymes tested. The ghrelin-induced upregulations of digestive enzyme expression were all abolished by preincubation with the GHS-R1a ghrelin receptor antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6, and most of them by the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 or the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. This indicates that ghrelin effects on digestive enzymes are mediated by GHS-R1a, partly by triggering the PLC/PKC and AC/PKA intracellular signaling pathways. These data suggest a role for ghrelin on digestive processes in fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of carbohydrate and protein metabolism in the digestive organs of the rabbit under the combined influence of vibration, acceleration and irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuy, R. I.

    1975-01-01

    During spaceflight, the organism is subjected to the influence of various extremal factors such as acceleration, vibration, irradiation, etc. The study of the influence of these factors on metabolism, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism, in young rabbits is of great significance in simulation experiments. Dynamic factors and irradiation, depending on dose and duration, lead to reduced RNA and protein metabolism.

  6. Quantitative assessment of the association between the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and digestive system cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Yang, S; Guo, F H; Mao, X; Zhou, H; Dong, Y Q; Wang, Z M; Luo, F

    2015-11-13

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism has been reported to be associated with digestive system cancer; however, the results from previous studies have been conflicting. The present study aimed to investigate the association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and the risk of digestive system cancer using a meta-analysis of previously published studies. Databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies published prior to December 2014. We estimated the pooled OR with its 95%CI to assess the association. The meta-analysis consisted of thirteen case-control studies that included 2557 patients and 4356 healthy controls. Meta-analysis results based on all the studies showed no significant association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and the risk of digestive system cancer (DD vs II: OR = 0.85, 95%CI = 0.59-1.24; DI vs II: OR = 0.94, 95%CI = 0.78-1.15; dominant model: OR = 0.96, 95%CI = 0.81- 1.15; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.76-1.48). Subgroup analyses by race and cancer type did not detect an association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and digestive system cancer risk. However, when the analyses were restricted to smaller studies (N < 500 patients), the summary OR of DI vs II was 0.80 (95%CI = 0.66-0.97). Our analyses detected a possibility of publication bias with a misestimate of the true association by smaller studies. Overall, meta-analysis results suggest the ACE I/D polymorphism might not be associated with susceptibility to digestive system cancer. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm these conclusions.

  7. Effect of dietary Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis on the growth performance, antioxidant enzyme activity, nutrient digestibility, cecal microflora, excreta noxious gas emission, and breast meat quality of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Lee, S I; Kim, I H

    2018-04-17

    This study examined the effects of dietary Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis supplementation on growth performance, antioxidant enzyme activity, nutrient digestibility, cecal microflora, excreta noxious gas emission, organ weight and breast meat quality in broiler chickens. In total, 800 Ross 308 male broiler chickens (1-d-old) were randomly divided into 5 dietary treatments with 10 replicate cages (16 birds/replicate) per treatment for 5 wk. The dietary treatments were a control basal diet without Spirulina or with 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, or 1.0% Spirulina. Body weight gain, feed conversion, and/or European production efficiency index improved linearly with supplementation of Spirulina during d 8 to 21, 22 to 35, and overall d 1 to 35 (P < 0.05). Dietary Spirulina supplementation caused a significant increase in the serum enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (linear, P < 0.05). Apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter and nitrogen showed a linear increase in Spirulina supplementation (P < 0.05). Cecal Lactobacillus count linearly increased and excreta ammonia gas emission linearly decreased, as dietary Spirulina supplementation increased (P < 0.05). There were no significant effects on relative organ weight and breast meat quality of broilers fed with Spirulina diets; however, 7 d drip loss linearly decreased in treatment groups fed with Spirulina (P < 0.05). These results indicate that adding Spirulina to the diet of broilers can improve antioxidant enzyme activity, dry matter and nitrogen digestibility, cecal Lactobacillus population, excreta ammonia gas emission, and 7 d drip loss of breast meat. In addition, dietary inclusion of 1.0% Spirulina powder might provide a good alternative to improve broiler chicken production.

  8. Effect of potential probiotic Rhodotorula benthica D30 on the growth performance, digestive enzyme activity and immunity in juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-hui; Zhao, Liu-qun; Liu, Jin-feng; Wang, Han; Xiao, Shan

    2015-04-01

    The effects of dietary addition of yeast Rhodotorula benthica (R. benthica) D30 which isolated from local sea mud at levels of 0 (control), 10(5), 10(6) and 10(7) CFU/g feed on the growth performance, digestive enzyme activity, immunity and disease resistance of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus were investigated. It was shown that dietary addition of R. benthica D30 significantly increased the growth rates of sea cucumbers (p < 0.05). The amylase activity, cellulase activity and alginase activity were increased for the animals from three probiotics treated groups. And with the supplemented concentration increased, the values of those digestive enzyme activities increased as well. Dietary addition of R. benthica D30 at the level of 10(7) CFU significantly increased the lysozyme, phagocytic and total nitric oxide synthase activity of A. japonicus (p < 0.05). While, the highest values of the phenoloxidase and alkaline phosphatase activity were found in sea cucumbers fed with R. benthica D30 at the level of 10(6) CFU. Whereas adding R. benthica D30 to diet had no significant effects on the total coelomocyte counts and acid phosphatase activity of A. japonicus (p > 0.05). It was observed that adding R. benthica D30 could significantly decrease the cumulative mortality of sea cucumbers. The present study demonstrated that dietary addition of R. benthica D30 could increase growth performance and some digestive enzyme activities, improve immunity and disease resistance of A. japonicus. And the medium (10(6) CFU) and high (10(7) CFU) additional levels showed better effects. It suggests that yeast R. benthica D30 could be a good probiotic for aquaculture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of time, storage temperature and freeze/thaw cycles on the activity of digestive enzymes from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Mikhail; Gisbert, Enric

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we tested the effects of long-term storage (2 years) at -20 °C and short-term storage (several hours) in ice and freeze/thaw cycles on the activities of pancreatic, gastric and intestinal (brush border and cytosolic) digestive enzymes in a teleost fish species. The results revealed a significant lose in activity of pancreatic (trypsin, chymotrypsin, total alkaline proteases and α-amylase) and intestinal cytosolic (leucine-alanine peptidase) enzymes between 140 and 270 days of storage at -20 °C, whereas in contrast, the activity of all the assayed brush border enzymes remained constant during the first 2 years of storage at -20 °C. During short-term storage conditions, the most stable enzymes assayed were those of the enterocytes of the brush border, which did not show any change in activity after being held for 5 h in ice. Five freezing and thawing cycles did not affect the activity of the intestinal brush border enzymes and the cytosolic ones, whereas the activity of trypsin, α-amylase and bile-salt-activated lipase was significantly affected by the number of freezing and thawing cycles. No changes in pepsin activity were found in samples exposed to 1 and 2 freezing and thawing cycles.

  10. Comparison of multi-enzyme and thermophilic bacteria on the hydrolysis of mariculture organic waste (MOW).

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Sun, Mei; Zong, Yan; Zhao, Yangguo; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian

    2016-01-01

    Mariculture organic waste (MOW) is rich in organic matter, which is a potential energy resource for anaerobic digestion. In order to enhance the anaerobic fermentation, the MOW was hydrolyzed by multi-enzyme and thermophilic bacteria. It was advantageous for soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) release at MOW concentrations of 6 and 10 g/L with multi-enzyme and thermophilic bacteria pretreatments. For multi-enzyme, the hydrolysis was not obvious at substrate concentrations of 1 and 3 g/L, and the protein and carbohydrate increased with hydrolysis time at substrate concentrations of 6 and 10 g/L. For thermophilic bacteria, the carbohydrate was first released at 2-4 h and then consumed, and the protein increased with hydrolysis time. The optimal enzyme hydrolysis for MOW was determined by measuring the changes of SCOD, protein, carbohydrate, ammonia and total phosphorus, and comparing with acid and alkaline pretreatments.

  11. Nutritional performance and activity of some digestive enzymes of the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera , in response to seven tested bean cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Namin, Foroogh Rahimi; Naseri, Bahram; Razmjou, Jabraeil; Cohen, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nutritional performance and activity of some digestive enzymes (protease and α -amylase) of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in response to feeding on bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabales: Fabaceae)) cultivars (Shokufa, Akhtar, Sayyad, Naz, Pak, Daneshkadeh, and Talash) were evaluated under laboratory conditions (25 ± 1°C, 65 ± 5% RH, and a 16:8 L:D photoperiod). The highest and lowest respective values of approximate digestibility were observed when fourth, fifth, and sixth larval instar H. armigera were fed red kidney bean Akhtar and white kidney bean Daneshkadeh. The efficiency of conversion of ingested and digested food was highest when H. armigera was fed red kidney beans Akhtar and Naz and lowest when they were fed white kidney bean Pak. The highest protease activity of fifth instars was observed when they were fed red kidney bean Naz, and the highest amylase activity of fifth instars was observed when they were fed red kidney bean Sayyad. Sixth instar larvae that fed on red kidney bean Sayyad showed the highest protease activity. Larvae reared on common bean Talash and white kidney bean Pak showed the highest amylase activity. Among bean cultivars tested, red kidney bean Sayyad was the most unsuitable host for feeding H. armigera . PMID:25368049

  12. Growth, nutrient digestibility, ileal digesta viscosity, and energy metabolizability of growing turkeys fed diets containing malted sorghum sprouts supplemented with enzyme or yeast.

    PubMed

    Oke, F O; Oso, A O; Oduguwa, O O; Jegede, A V; Südekum, K-H; Fafiolu, A O; Pirgozliev, V

    2017-06-01

    Growth, apparent nutrient digestibility, ileal digesta viscosity, and energy metabolizability of growing turkeys fed diets containing malted sorghum sprouts (MSP) supplemented with enzyme or yeast were investigated using 120, 28-day-old male turkeys. Six treatments were laid out in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with three dietary inclusion levels of MSP (0, 50, and 100 g/kg) and supplemented with 200 mg/kg yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) or 200 mg/kg of a commercial enzyme. The experiment lasted for the starter (day 28-56) and grower phases (day 57-84) of the birds. Each treatment group consisted of 20 turkeys replicated four times with five birds each. Data were analysed using analysis of variance while polynomial contrast was used to determine the trends (linear and quadratic) of MSP inclusion levels. Irrespective of dietary supplementation with enzyme or yeast, final body weight (BW), total BW gain, and feed intake for turkey poults from day 29-56 was reduced (p < 0.05) with increasing inclusion level of MSP. Dietary supplementation with yeast resulted in increased (p < 0.05) feed intake while enzyme supplementation improved (p < 0.05) feed conversion ratio of the poults. Turkeys fed enzyme-supplemented MSP diets had higher (p < 0.05) BW gain than their counterparts fed yeast-supplemented MSP diets. Apparent ash digestibility reduced linearly (p < 0.05) with increasing inclusion levels of MSP. Apparent metabolizable energy (AME) did not vary significantly (p > 0.05) with MSP inclusion levels. Enzyme supplementation reduced (p < 0.05) ileal viscosity but had no effect (p > 0.05) on AME. Inclusion of MSP resulted in poor growth performance. This confirms earlier studies that utilization of MSP by poultry is rather poor. Supplementation with enzyme or yeast did not lead to any appreciable improvement in performance of turkeys in this study. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Cats and Carbohydrates: The Carnivore Fantasy?

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugghe, Adronie; Hesta, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    The domestic cat’s wild ancestors are obligate carnivores that consume prey containing only minimal amounts of carbohydrates. Evolutionary events adapted the cat’s metabolism and physiology to this diet strictly composed of animal tissues and led to unique digestive and metabolic peculiarities of carbohydrate metabolism. The domestic cat still closely resembles its wild ancestor. Although the carnivore connection of domestic cats is well recognised, little is known about the precise nutrient profile to which the digestive physiology and metabolism of the cat have adapted throughout evolution. Moreover, studies show that domestic cats balance macronutrient intake by selecting low-carbohydrate foods. The fact that cats evolved consuming low-carbohydrate prey has led to speculations that high-carbohydrate diets could be detrimental for a cat’s health. More specifically, it has been suggested that excess carbohydrates could lead to feline obesity and diabetes mellitus. Additionally, the chances for remission of diabetes mellitus are higher in cats that consume a low-carbohydrate diet. This literature review will summarise current carbohydrate knowledge pertaining to digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, food selection and macronutrient balancing in healthy, obese and diabetic cats, as well as the role of carbohydrates in prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes mellitus. PMID:29140289

  14. Mucosal C-terminal maltase-glucoamylase hydrolyzes large size starch digestion products that may contribute to rapid postprandial glucose generation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The four mucosal alpha-glucosidases, which differ in their digestive roles, generate glucose from glycemic carbohydrates and accordingly can be viewed as a control point for rate of glucose delivery to the body. In this study, individual recombinant enzymes were used to understand how alpha-glucan o...

  15. Antioxidant and antidiabetic properties of tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids after in vitro digestion*

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Tao; Wang, Ye; Li, Yu-ting; Gowd, Vemana; Niu, Xin-he; Yang, Hai-ying; Chen, Li-shui; Chen, Wei; Sun, Chong-de

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and diabetes have a tendency to alter protein, lipid, and DNA moieties. One of the strategic methods used to reduce diabetes-associated oxidative stress is to inhibit the carbohydrate-digesting enzymes, thereby decreasing gastrointestinal glucose production. Plant-derived natural antioxidant molecules are considered a therapeutic tool in the treatment of oxidative stress and diabetes. The objective of this study was to identify tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids and evaluate the effect of in vitro digestion on their antioxidant and antidiabetic properties. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated the presence of rutin as a major component and quercitrin as a minor component of both digested and non-digested flavonoids. Both extracts showed a significant antioxidant capacity, but digested flavonoids showed reduced activity compared to non-digested. There were some decreases of the antioxidant activities (2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazy (DPPH) radical, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)) of digested tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids compared with non-digested. Flavonoids from both groups significantly inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and α-glucosidase activity. Both digested and non-digested flavonoids markedly increased glucose consumption and glycogen content in HepG2 cells. Tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids showed appreciable antioxidant and antidiabetic properties, even after digestion. Tartary buckwheat rice appears to be a promising functional food with potent antioxidant and antidiabetic properties. PMID:27921399

  16. Omics Analyses of Trichoderma reesei CBS999.97 and QM6a Indicate the Relevance of Female Fertility to Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme and Transporter Levels.

    PubMed

    Tisch, Doris; Pomraning, Kyle R; Collett, James R; Freitag, Michael; Baker, Scott E; Chen, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Chuang, Yu Chien; Schuster, Andre; Dattenböck, Christoph; Stappler, Eva; Sulyok, Michael; Böhmdorfer, Stefan; Oberlerchner, Josua; Wang, Ting-Fang; Schmoll, Monika

    2017-11-15

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is found predominantly in the tropics but also in more temperate regions, such as Europe, and is widely known as a producer of large amounts of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. We sequenced the genome of the sexually competent isolate CBS999.97, which is phenotypically different from the female sterile strain QM6a but can cross sexually with QM6a. Transcriptome data for growth on cellulose showed that entire carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) families are consistently differentially regulated between these strains. We evaluated backcrossed strains of both mating types, which acquired female fertility from CBS999.97 but maintained a mostly QM6a genetic background, and we could thereby distinguish between the effects of strain background and female fertility or mating type. We found clear regulatory differences associated with female fertility and female sterility, including regulation of CAZyme and transporter genes. Analysis of carbon source utilization, transcriptomes, and secondary metabolites in these strains revealed that only a few changes in gene regulation are consistently correlated with different mating types. Different strain backgrounds (QM6a versus CBS999.97) resulted in the most significant alterations in the transcriptomes and in carbon source utilization, with decreased growth of CBS999.97 on several amino acids (for example proline or alanine), which further correlated with the downregulation of genes involved in the respective pathways. In combination, our findings support a role of fertility-associated processes in physiology and gene regulation and are of high relevance for the use of sexual crossing in combining the characteristics of two compatible strains or quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. IMPORTANCE Trichoderma reesei is a filamentous fungus with a high potential for secretion of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. We sequenced the genome of the fully fertile field isolate CBS999.97 and

  17. Responses of non-starch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes on digestibility and performance of growing pigs fed a diet based on corn, soya bean meal and Chinese double-low rapeseed meal.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z F; Peng, J; Liu, Z L; Liu, Y G

    2007-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of two distinct enzyme preparations on nutrients' digestibility and growth performance of growing pigs fed diets based on corn, soya bean meal and Chinese double-low rapeseed meal (DLRM). The two enzyme preparations were Enzyme R, a preparation extracted from fermentation of a non-GMO fungus Penicillum funiculosum, developed for multi-grain and multi-animal species; and Enzyme P, a xylanase preparation from Trichoderma longibrachiatum, for pigs fed corn-based diets only. Both enzymes were tested at 0, 0.25 and 0.50 g/kg feed using 70 crossbred male pigs (Large Yorkshire x Landrace) in five dietary treatments and seven replicates in each treatment, for growth period from 27 to 68 kg live weight in 49 days. Results showed that the supplementation of both enzymes (1) increased total-tract digestibility of dietary energy from 77.5% (control) to 81.4% (Enzyme R, p < 0.05) and 81.9% (Enzyme P, p < 0.05); of neutral detergent fibre from 41.0% (control) to 57.8% (Enzyme R, p < 0.05) and 60.0% (Enzyme P, p < 0.05); (2) improved average daily gain from 786 g (control) to 829 g (Enzyme R, p < 0.05) and 846 g (Enzyme P, p < 0.05); and numerical increases in feed intake from 1.96 kg/pig/day (control) to 2.01 (Enzyme R) and 2.00 (p > 0.05) and feed conversion ratio from 2.50 (control) to 2.42 (Enzyme R) and 2.36 (Enzyme P, p < 0.05); (3) there was a dose response but no significant differences were observed in enzyme efficacy between the two enzyme preparations. The present study demonstrated beneficial effects of applying xylanase-based enzymes to improve feeding values of pig diets based on corn, soya bean meal and DLRM.

  18. Effects of small peptides, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics on growth performance, digestive enzymes, and oxidative stress in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, juveniles reared in artificial seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Cheng, Yongzhou; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhaopu; Long, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Aquaculture production efficiency may increase by using feed additives. This study investigated the effects of different dietary additives [w/w: 2% small peptides, 0.01% probiotics ( Bacillus licheniformis) and 0.2% prebiotics (inulin)] on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and oxidative stress in juvenile Epinephelus coioides reared in artificial seawater of two salt concentrations (13.5 vs. 28.5). Weight gain rate was significantly higher in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides, B. licheniformis, inulin, or synbiotics than that in fish fed the basal diet; the greatest weight gain rate was found in fish fed the small peptide treatment [56.0% higher than basal diet]. Higher feed efficiency was detected in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides than that of fish in the other dietary treatments. Total protease activity in the stomach and intestines was highest in fish fed the small peptide-treated diet, whereas lipase activity was highest in those fed synbiotics (combination of Bacillus licheniformis and inulin) than that in fish fed the other treatments. Antioxidant enzyme (total superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities and hepatic malondialdehyde content were higher in fish receiving the dietary supplements and maintained in artificial seawater containing 13.5 salinity compared with those in the control (28.5). Hepatic catalase activity in grouper fed the diets with small peptides or synbiotics decreased significantly compared with that in control fish. Overall, the three types of additives improved growth rate of juvenile grouper and digestive enzymes activities to varying degrees but did not effectively improve antioxidant capacity under low-salinity stress conditions.

  19. Multiple components in restriction enzyme digests of mammalian (insectivore), avian and reptilian genomic DNA hybridize with murine immunoglobulin VH probes.

    PubMed

    Litman, G W; Berger, L; Jahn, C L

    1982-06-11

    High molecular weight genomic DNAs isolated from an insectivore, Tupaia, and a representative reptilian, Caiman, and avian, Gallus, were digested with restriction endonucleases transferred to nitrocellulose and hybridized with nick-translated probes of murine VH genes. The derivations of the probes designated S107V (1) and mu 107V (2,3) have been described previously. Under conditions of reduced stringency, multiple hybridizing components were observed with Tupaia and Caiman; only mu mu 107V exhibited significant hybridization with the separated fragments of Gallus DNA. The nick-translated S107V probe was digested with Fnu4H1 and subinserts corresponding to the 5' and 3' regions both detected multiple hybridizing components in Tupaia and Caiman DNA. A 5' probe lacking the leader sequence identified the same components as the intact 5' probe, suggesting that VH coding regions distant as the reptilians may possess multiple genetic components which exhibit significant homology with murine immunoglobulin in VH regions.

  20. Effect of cooking and in vitro digestion on the stability of co-enzyme Q10 in processed meat products.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Brian D; O'Sullivan, Maurice G; Hamill, Ruth; Kerry, Joseph P

    2014-05-01

    The use of CoQ10 fortification in the production of a functional food has been demonstrated in the past but primarily for dairy products. This study aimed to determine the bio-accessibility of CoQ10 in processed meat products, beef patties and pork breakfast sausages, fortified with CoQ10. Both the patties and sausages were fortified with a micellarized form of CoQ10 to enhance solubility to a concentration of 1mg/g of sample (NovaSolQ®). An assay was developed combining in vitro digestion and HPLC analysis to quantify the CoQ10 present in fortified products (100mg/g). The cooking retention level of CoQ10 in the products was found to be 74±1.42% for patties and 79.69±0.75% for sausages. The digestibility for both products ranged between 93% and 95%, sausages did have a higher digestibility level than patties but this was not found to be significant (P<0.01). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The impact of fermentation and in vitro digestion on formation angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from pea proteins.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Anna; Karaś, Monika; Baraniak, Barbara; Pietrzak, Marlena

    2013-12-15

    Pea seeds were fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum 299v in monoculture under different time and temperature conditions and the fermented products were digested in vitro under gastrointestinal conditions. After fermentation and digestion ACE inhibitory activity was determined. In all samples after fermentation no ACE inhibitory activity was noted. Potentially antihypertensive peptides were released during in vitro digestion. The highest DH (68.62%) were noted for control sample, although the lowest IC50 value (0.19 mg/ml) was determined for product after 7 days fermentation at 22 °C. The hydrolysate characterised by the highest ACE inhibitory activity was separated on Sephadex G10 and two peptides fractions were obtained. The highest ACE inhibitory activity (IC50=64.04 μg/ml) for the first fraction was noted. This fraction was separated by HPLC and identified by LC-MS/MS and the sequence of peptide derived from pea proteins was determined as KEDDEEEEQGEEE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of aerobic exercise training on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and postprandial metabolic response in juvenile qingbo (Spinibarbus sinensis).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Ming; Yu, Li-Juan; Wang, Chuan; Zeng, Ling-Qing; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2013-09-01

    Continual swimming exercise usually promotes growth in fish at a moderate water velocity. We hypothesized that the improvement in growth in exercise-trained fish may be accompanied by increases in digestive enzyme activity, respiratory capacity and, hence, postprandial metabolism. Juvenile qingbo fish (Spinibarbus sinensis) were subjected to aerobic training for 8weeks at a water velocity of control (3cms(-1)), 1, 2 and 4 body length (bl)s(-1) at a constant temperature of 25°C. The feed intake (FI), food conversion rate (FCR), specific growth rate (SGR), whole-body composition, trypsin and lipase activities, maximal oxygen consumption (M˙O2max) and postprandial M˙O2 response were measured at the end of the training period. Aerobic exercise training induced a significant increase in FI compared with the control group, while the FCR of the 4bls(-1) group was significantly lower than for the other three groups (P<0.05). The 1 and 2bls(-1) groups showed a significantly higher SGR over the control group (P<0.05). The whole-body fat and protein contents were significantly altered after aerobic exercise training (P<0.05). Furthermore, aerobic exercise training elevated the activity of both trypsin and lipase in the hepatopancreas and intestinal tract of juvenile S. sinensis. The M˙O2max of the 4bls(-1) training group was significantly higher than for the control group. The resting M˙O2 (M˙O2rest) and peak postprandial M˙O2 (M˙O2peak) in the three training groups were significantly higher than in the control group (P<0.05). Time to M˙O2peak was significantly shorter in the 1, 2 and 4bls(-1) training groups compared with the control group, while exercise training showed no effect on SDA (specific dynamic action) duration, factorial metabolic scope, energy expended on SDA and the SDA coefficient when compared to the control group. These data suggest that (1) the optimum water velocity for the growth of juvenile S. sinensis occurred at approximately 2.4bls(-1); (2

  3. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  4. Effect of wheat dried distillers grains with solubles and fibrolytic enzymes on ruminal fermentation, digestibility, growth performance, and feeding behavior of beef cattle.

    PubMed

    He, Z X; Walker, N D; McAllister, T A; Yang, W Z

    2015-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) and fibrolytic enzymes (FE) on ruminal fermentation, in situ ruminal and in vivo total tract digestibility, growth performance, and feeding behavior of growing beef cattle. In Exp. 1, 6 ruminally cannulated Angus heifers (average BW of 794 ± 44.2 kg) were used in a 6 × 6 Latin square design with 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Treatments were a control diet consisting of 50% barley silage, 10% grass hay, and 40% barley grain-based concentrate (CON) and the CON with 15% DDGS substituted for barley grain (WDG) combined with either 0, 1, or 2 mL FE/kg diet DM, respectively. Inclusion of DDGS increased total tract digestibility of CP ( < 0.01), NDF ( = 0.04), and ADF ( = 0.03). Increasing FE linearly ( = 0.03) increased CP digestibility without affecting the digestibility of other nutrients. There were no effects of DDGS inclusion or FE on ruminal pH or VFA concentration except that propionate was greater ( = 0.04) with the WDG. In situ ruminal DM and NDF disappearance of barley silage was greater ( < 0.04) in heifers fed the WDG than in heifers fed the CON after 24 h of incubation. Increasing FE linearly ( = 0.03) increased in situ NDF disappearance of barley silage after 24 h of incubation. In Exp. 2, 120 weaned steers (initial BW of 289 ± 11.0 kg) were fed diets similar to those in Exp. 1. The steers fed the WDG had greater ( < 0.01) final BW, ADG, DMI, and G:F compared with steers fed the CON. Increasing FE did not alter ADG or G:F but tended ( < 0.07) to linearly decrease DMI. There were interactions ( < 0.02) between DDGS and FE on eating rate and the time spent at the feed bunk. Supplementing FE decreased ( < 0.01) time at the bunk and increased ( < 0.01) eating rate for steers fed the WDG but not for steers fed the CON. Eating rate ( < 0.01) and meal frequency ( = 0.02) were greater but eating duration was shorter ( < 0.01) for steers fed

  5. Influence of partial replacement of ground wheat with whole wheat and exogenous enzyme supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and energy utilization in young broilers.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, M R; Ravindran, V; Amerah, A M

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of pre-pelleting inclusion of whole wheat (WW) and exogenous enzyme supplementation on growth performance, coefficient of apparent ileal nutrient digestibility (CAID) and apparent metabolizable energy (AME) in broilers fed wheat-based pelleted diets. A 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments was used with two methods of wheat inclusion [622 g/kg ground wheat (GW) and 250 g/kg WW replaced GW (wt/wt) pre-pelleting (PWW)] and three enzymes (xylanase, phytase and xylanase plus phytase). A total of 288, one-day-old male broilers (Ross 308) were individually weighed and allocated to 36 cages (8 broilers/cage), and the cages were randomly assigned to the six dietary treatments. Birds fed PWW diets gained more (p < 0.05) weight than those fed GW diets. There was no effect (p > 0.05) of WW inclusion on feed intake (FI). Phytase alone increased (p < 0.05) FI compared to xylanase or the combination. Whole wheat inclusion increased (p < 0.05) the gain-to-feed ratio (G:F). Feeding xylanase plus phytase and phytase-added diets resulted in the greatest and lowest G:F, respectively, with xylanase supplemented diets being intermediate. Birds fed PWW diets had greater (p < 0.05) relative gizzard weights than those fed GW diets. There was no effect (p > 0.05) of WW inclusion on the CAID of nitrogen (N), starch and fat. Combination of xylanase and phytase resulted in greater (p < 0.05) digestibility of N, starch and fat than that of individual additions. Feeding PWW diets resulted in greater (p < 0.05) AME values than GW diets. Combination of xylanase and phytase increased (p < 0.05) the AME compared to the diets with individual additions of xylanase or phytase. The current results suggest that the influence of pre-pelleting WW inclusion and exogenous enzymes on nutrient digestibility and broiler performance is not additive. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Effects of dietary amylose/amylopectin ratio on growth performance, feed utilization, digestive enzymes, and postprandial metabolic responses in juvenile obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-he; Ye, Chao-xia; Ye, Ji-dan; Shen, Bi-duan; Wang, Chun-yan; Wang, An-li

    2014-10-01

    The effect of dietary amylose/amylopectin (AM/AP) ratio on growth, feed utilization, digestive enzyme activities, plasma parameters, and postprandial blood glucose responses was evaluated in juvenile obscure puffer, Takifugu obscurus. Five isonitrogenous (430 g kg(-1) crude protein) and isolipidic (90 g kg(-1) crude lipid) diets containing an equal starch level (250 g kg(-1) starch) with different AM/AP ratio diets of 0/25, 3/22, 6/19, 9/16 and 12/13 were formulated. Each experimental diet was fed to triplicate groups (25 fish per tank), twice daily during a period of 60 days. After the growth trial, a postprandial blood response test was carried out. Fish fed diet 6/19 showed best growth, feed efficiency and protein efficiency ratio. Hepatosomatic index, plasma total cholesterol concentration, liver glycogen and lipid content, and gluconokinase, pyruvate kinase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activities were lower in fish fed highest AM/AP diet (12/13) than in fish fed the low-amylose diets. Activities of liver and intestinal trypsin in fish fed diet 3/22 and diet 6/19 were higher than in fish fed diet 9/16 and diet 12/13. Activities of liver and intestinal amylase and intestinal lipase, and starch digestibility were negatively correlated with dietary AM/AP ratio. Fish fed diet 3/22 and diet 6/19 showed higher plasma total amino acid concentration than fish fed the other diets, while plasma urea nitrogen concentration and activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase showed the opposite trend. Equal values were found for viscerosomatic index and condition factor, whole body and muscle composition, plasma high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, and activities of lipase and hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase in liver. Postprandial plasma glucose and triglyceride peak value of fish fed diet 12/13 were lower than in fish fed the low-amylose diets, and the peak time of plasma glucose was later than in fish fed the

  7. Effect of DHA supplementation on digestible starch utilization by rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Salazar, M; Bureau, W; Panserat, S; Corraze, G; Bureau, D P

    2006-01-01

    Rainbow trout has a limited ability to utilize digestible carbohydrates efficiently. Trout feeds generally contain high levels of DHA, a fatty acid known to inhibit a number of glycolytic and lipogenic enzymes in animals. A study was conducted to determine whether carbohydrate utilization by rainbow trout might be affected by dietary DHA level. Two low-carbohydrate (<4 % digestible carbohydrate) basal diets were formulated to contain 1 (adequate) or 4 (excess) g/100 g DHA diet respectively. The two basal diets were diluted with increasing levels of digestible starch (0 %, 10 %, 20 % and 30 %, respectively) to produce eight diets. These diets were fed to fish for 12 weeks at 15 degrees C according to a pair-fed protocol that consisted of feeding the same amount of basal diet but different amounts of starch. Live weight, N and lipid gains, hepatic glycogen and plasma glucose values significantly increased, whereas feed efficiency (gain:feed) significantly decreased, with increasing starch intake (P<0.05). The retention efficiency of N (N gain/digestible N intake) improved with starch supplementation but was not affected by DHA level (P>0.05). Starch increased the activity of glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and fatty acid synthase (P<0.05) but did not affect hexokinase and malic enzyme activity. DHA had no effect on growth but increased plasma glucose and reduced carcass lipid and liver glycogen contents (P<0.05). Glycolytic and lipogenic enzymes were not affected by DHA level, except for pyruvate kinase, which was reduced by increasing DHA level. These results suggest only a marginal effect of dietary DHA on the ability of fish to utilize carbohydrate.

  8. Effects of beta-glucanase and xylanase supplementation on gastrointestinal digestive enzyme activities of weaned piglets fed a barley-based diet.

    PubMed

    Fan, C L; Han, X Y; Xu, Z R; Wang, L J; Shi, L R

    2009-04-01

    The effects of supplementing a barley-based diet for weaned piglets withexogenous beta-glucanase and xylanase on gastrointestinal digestiveenzyme activities were investigated. Thirty-six cross-bred weaned pigletswere randomly assigned to two groups with three pens based on sexand mass. Each group was fed on the diet based on barley with or withoutadded beta-glucanase and xylanase (0.15%) for a 4-week period. Theresults showed that enzyme supplementation improved growth performanceof piglets significantly (p < 0.05), but had no effect (p = 0.091)on average daily feed intake. The results also showed that supplementationof beta-glucanase and xylanase had no effect on pepsin activity in gastriccontents but slightly decreased (p = 0.092) the pepsin activity ingastric mucosa. Meanwhile, no effect of enzyme supplementation ontrypsin activity in duodenal contents was observed. However, the activitiesof amylase and lipase in duodenal contents were significantly(p < 0.05) decreased, whereas the activities of maltase, sucrase andgamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) in jejunal and ileal mucosa wereenhanced significantly (p < 0.05). The improvement of disaccharidaseand gamma-GT activity may be attributed to the positive impacts of exogenousenzymes on digestion and absorption of the nutrients. In conclusion,the current results indicated that supplementation with enzymes in barley-based diets could improve the growth performance of piglets,decrease the activities of amylase and lipase in duodenal contents andincrease the activities of disaccharidase and gamma-GT in jejunal and ilealmucosa.

  9. [Specific problems posed by carbohydrate utilization in the rainbow trout].

    PubMed

    Bergot, F

    1979-01-01

    Carbohydrate incorporation in trout diets arises problems both at digestive and metabolic levels. Digestive utilization of carbohydrate closely depends on their molecular weight. In addition, in the case of complex carbohydrates (starches), different factors such as the level of incorporation, the amount consumed and the physical state of starch influence the digestibility. The measurement of digestibility in itself is confronted with methodological difficulties. The way the feces are collected can affect the digestion coefficient. Dietary carbohydrates actually serve as a source of energy. Nevertheless, above a certain level in the diet, intolerance phenomena may appear. The question that arises now is to establish the optimal part that carbohydrates can take in the metabolizable energy of a given diet.

  10. In vitro study of prebiotic properties of levan-type exopolysaccharides from Lactobacilli and non-digestible carbohydrates using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bello, F D; Walter, J; Hertel, C; Hammes, W P

    2001-07-01

    Batch cultures inoculated with human faeces were used to study the prebiotic properties of levan-type exopolysaccharides (EPS) from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis as well as levan, inulin, and fructooligosaccharide (FOS). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA fragments generated by PCR with universal primers was used to analyse the cultures. Characteristic changes were revealed in the composition of the gut bacteria during fermentation of the carbohydrates. An enrichment of Bifidobacterium spp. was found for the EPS and inulin but not for levan and FOS. The bifidogenic effect of the EPS was confirmed by culturing on selective medium. In addition, the use of EPS and FOS resulted in enhanced growth of Eubacterium biforme and Clostridium perfringens, respectively.

  11. Starch digestibility, energy utilization, and growth performance of broilers fed corn-soybean basal diets supplemented with enzymes.

    PubMed

    Stefanello, C; Vieira, S L; Santiago, G O; Kindlein, L; Sorbara, J O B; Cowieson, A J

    2015-10-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary α-amylase and β-xylanase supplementation of corn-soy diets, formulated with or without supplemental phytase, on growth performance, energy utilization, and starch digestibility in broiler chickens. A total of 336 slow-feathering, Cobb × Cobb 500 male broilers were randomly distributed to 6 treatments having 8 replicates of 7 birds each. Birds were fed a common starter diet to d 14 post-hatch (3,050 kcal/kg AMEn, 21.7% CP, 1.05% Ca, and 0.53% nPP). The experimental diets were provided afterwards until d 25. A 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of 2 control diets (basal = corn-soy diet without added phytase or PHY = corn-soy diet formulated with 1,000 phytase units/kg) and 3 carbohydrase supplementations (0, 80 kilo-Novo α-amylase units/kg, or 80 kilo-Novo α-amylase units/kg + 100 fungal β-xylanase units/kg) was used from d 14 to 25. Excreta were collected from 21 to 24 d and all birds were euthanized at 25 d for jejunum and ileum content collection. Samples of feed, excreta, and jejunal and ileal digesta were analyzed for determination of total tract retention and ileal apparent digestibility. No interactions between diet and carbohydrase were observed. Broilers fed diets formulated with phytase or supplemented with amylase + xylanase had higher BW gain (BWG) and lower FCR (P < 0.05) when compared with birds fed diets without carbohydrases. Relative to the basal diet, AMEn was increased (P < 0.01) by 70 kcal/kg and 99 kcal/kg when birds were fed the diet supplemented with amylase and amylase + xylanase, respectively. Starch digestibility in the jejunum and ileum was increased (P < 0.05) by 3.5% and 2.4%, respectively, when birds were fed the diet supplemented with amylase + xylanase. Results from this experiment show that corn-soy diets having phytase and supplemented with amylase and xylanase led to increased growth performance, AMEn, and starch digestibility in broilers. Furthermore, the efficacy of

  12. The effect of age and carbohydrate and protein sources on digestibility, fecal microbiota, fermentation products, fecal IgA, and immunological blood parameters in dogs.

    PubMed

    Maria, A P J; Ayane, L; Putarov, T C; Loureiro, B A; Neto, B P; Casagrande, M F; Gomes, M O S; Glória, M B A; Carciofi, A C

    2017-06-01

    The present study compared the effects of diets formulated with fibers of different fermentability and protein sources of animal or vegetable origins on old and adult dogs. The experiment was organized in a 3 (diets) × 2 (ages) factorial arrangement, totaling 6 treatments. Thirty-six Beagle dogs were used (18 old dogs [10.2 ± 1.0 yr] and 18 young adult dogs [2.6 ± 0.9 yr]), with 6 dogs per treatment. Three diets with similar compositions were used: a nonfermentable insoluble fiber source (sugarcane fiber) and chicken byproduct meal (nonfermentable fiber [NFF] diet), a fermentable fiber source (beet pulp) and chicken byproduct meal (fermentable fiber [FF] diet), and soybean meal as a protein and fiber source (soybean meal [SM] diet). Data were evaluated using the MIXED procedure and considering the effects and interactions of block, animal, diets, and age. Means were compared using Tukey's test ( < 0.05). Age × diet interactions were evaluated when < 0.1. Old dogs had a reduced coefficient of total tract apparent digestibility of DM, which was explained by the age and diet interaction of CP and fat digestibility that was lower for old than for adult dogs fed the FF diet ( < 0.05). The SM diet obtained higher DM, OM, CP, and fiber digestibility compared with the NFF diet ( < 0.05). The feces of dogs fed the NFF diet had increased DM content ( < 0.05). The short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) did not change by age group and were higher for dogs fed the FF and SM diets compared with dogs fed the NFF diet ( < 0.05). An age and diet interaction was observed for lactate and was increased in the feces of old dogs compared with adult dogs fed the FF diet ( < 0.05). Fecal putrescine, cadaverine, and spermine were increased for old dogs compared with adult dogs ( < 0.05), and the spermidine fecal concentration was increased for dogs fed the SM diet regardless of age ( < 0.05). Old dogs had reduced peripheral T and B lymphocytes ( < 0.05). An age and diet interaction was

  13. Supplementation of diets containing pea meal with exogenous enzymes: effects on weight gain, feed conversion, nutrient digestibility and gross morphology of the gastrointestinal tract of growing broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Cowieson, A J; Acamovic, T; Bedford, M R

    2003-07-01

    1. The potential for the nutritional improvement of pea-based diets by supplementation with a cocktail of exogenous carbohydrases was investigated using growing broiler chicks. 2. Pea meals (grown in the UK) were included in wheat-based diets at 300 g/kg as a partial replacement for an approximately isonitrogenous mixture of wheat and soybean meal. A wheat/soybean meal diet served as a control and each diet was supplemented with a cocktail of alpha-amylase, pectinase and cellulase. The diets were fed to 1-d-old broiler chicks for a period of 21 d. Weight gain and feed conversion were monitored weekly and excreta were collected during the final week in order to determine nutrient digestibility coefficients and metabolisable energy. On d 21, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract was excised and gross morphology measured. 3. Inclusion of pea meal reduced weight gain, feed conversion, nutrient digestibility and also increased the relative sizes of the distal sections of the GI tract. 4. Enzyme addition partially ameliorated the detrimental effects of pea meal inclusion although similar improvements were also noted for birds fed on the control diet. 5. It is concluded that the nutritive value of pea-meal-based diets can be improved by the addition of carbohydrases, and that some pea cultivars show considerable potential as vegetable protein sources for broiler chicks.

  14. Antioxidative and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory potential of a Pacific Hake ( Merluccius productus ) fish protein hydrolysate subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion and Caco-2 cell permeation.

    PubMed

    Samaranayaka, Anusha G P; Kitts, David D; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y

    2010-02-10

    Pacific hake fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) with promising chemical assay based antioxidative capacity was studied for in vitro angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory potential, intestinal cell permeability characteristics, and intracellular antioxidative potential using the Caco-2 cell model system. FPH showed substrate-type inhibition of ACE with IC(50) of 161 microg of peptides/mL. HPLC analysis revealed that different peptides were responsible for antioxidative and ACE-inhibitory activity. FPH inhibited 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride-induced oxidation in Caco-2 cells at noncytotoxic concentrations. In vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion increased (P < 0.05) antioxidative capacity; ACE-inhibitory activity of FPH remained unchanged, although individual peptide fractions showed decreased or no activity after digestion. Some FPH peptides passed through Caco-2 cells: the permeates showed 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging activity but no ACE-inhibitory activity. These results suggest the potential for application of Pacific hake FPH to reduce oxidative processes in vivo. Further studies are needed to assess prospective antihypertensive effects.

  15. Multiple components in restriction enzyme digests of mammalian (insectivore), avian and reptilian genomic DNA hybridize with murine immunoglobulin VH probes.

    PubMed Central

    Litman, G W; Berger, L; Jahn, C L

    1982-01-01

    High molecular weight genomic DNAs isolated from an insectivore, Tupaia, and a representative reptilian, Caiman, and avian, Gallus, were digested with restriction endonucleases transferred to nitrocellulose and hybridized with nick-translated probes of murine VH genes. The derivations of the probes designated S107V (1) and mu 107V (2,3) have been described previously. Under conditions of reduced stringency, multiple hybridizing components were observed with Tupaia and Caiman; only mu mu 107V exhibited significant hybridization with the separated fragments of Gallus DNA. The nick-translated S107V probe was digested with Fnu4H1 and subinserts corresponding to the 5' and 3' regions both detected multiple hybridizing components in Tupaia and Caiman DNA. A 5' probe lacking the leader sequence identified the same components as the intact 5' probe, suggesting that VH coding regions distant as the reptilians may possess multiple genetic components which exhibit significant homology with murine immunoglobulin in VH regions. Images PMID:6285298

  16. Identification of RNA molecules by specific enzyme digestion and mass spectrometry: software for and implementation of RNA mass mapping

    PubMed Central

    Matthiesen, Rune; Kirpekar, Finn

    2009-01-01

    The idea of identifying or characterizing an RNA molecule based on a mass spectrum of specifically generated RNA fragments has been used in various forms for well over a decade. We have developed software—named RRM for ‘RNA mass mapping’—which can search whole prokaryotic genomes or RNA FASTA sequence databases to identify the origin of a given RNA based on a mass spectrum of RNA fragments. As input, the program uses the masses of specific RNase cleavage of the RNA under investigation. RNase T1 digestion is used here as a demonstration of the usability of the method for RNA identification. The concept for identification is that the masses of the digestion products constitute a specific fingerprint, which characterize the given RNA. The search algorithm is based on the same principles as those used in peptide mass fingerprinting, but has here been extended to work for both RNA sequence databases and for genome searches. A simple and powerful probability model for ranking RNA matches is proposed. We demonstrate viability of the entire setup by identifying the DNA template of a series of RNAs of biological and of in vitro transcriptional origin in complete microbial genomes and by identifying authentic 16S ribosomal RNAs in a ‘small ribosomal subunit RNA’ database. Thus, we present a new tool for a rapid identification of unknown RNAs using only a few picomoles of starting material. PMID:19264806

  17. The variation in chemical composition of barley feed with or without enzyme supplementation influences nutrient digestibility and subsequently affects performance in piglets.

    PubMed

    Clarke, L C; Sweeney, T; Curley, E; Duffy, S K; Rajauria, G; O'Doherty, J V

    2018-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of dietary supplementation of a β-glucanase and β-xylanase enzyme mix to barley based diets, at two different chemical compositions achieved through different agronomical conditions on growth performance, coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility (CATTD) of nutrients, selected faecal microbial populations and faecal scores in piglets. Sixty-four piglets (11.7 kg (SD 0.96)) housed in pens of two were assigned to one of four dietary treatments (n = 8). The dietary treatments were as follows: (T1) low quality barley diet, (T2) low quality barley diet containing a β-glucanase and β-xylanase enzyme supplement, (T3) high quality barley diet and (T4) high quality barley diet containing a β-glucanase and β-xylanase enzyme supplement. Piglets offered the low quality barley-based diet had a higher (p < .05) average daily gain (ADG) (0.73 vs. 0.69 kg, SEM 0.001), gain:feed (G:F) ratio (0.61 vs. 0.58 kg, SEM 0.011) and a higher CATTD (p < .001) of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), nitrogen (N), ash, gross energy (GE) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) compared with piglets offered the high quality barley diet. Piglets offered the high quality barley-based diet had reduced faecal scores compared to piglets offered the low quality barley-based diet (2.44 vs. 2.57, SEM 0.036) (p < .05). There was a higher population of Lactobacillus spp. (11.6 vs. 10.5 log gene copy number/g faeces, SEM 0.177) (p < .001) and total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration (185 vs. 165 mmol/g faeces, SEM 5.658) (p < .001) in the faeces of piglets offered the high quality barley-based diet compared to piglets offered the low quality barley-based diet. The inclusion of a β-glucanase and β-xylanase enzyme complex had no effect on any variable measured. In conclusion, the higher quality barley-based diet showed beneficial effects on the faecal Lactobacillus spp. population and faecal scores of the piglets; however, the higher level of

  18. Effect of γ-aminobutyric acid on digestive enzymes, absorption function, and immune function of intestinal mucosa in heat-stressed chicken.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Xie, J; Wang, B; Tang, J

    2014-10-01

    To explore the effect of dietary γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on digestive enzyme activity, absorption function and immune function of intestinal mucosa in heat-stressed Wenchang chicken were studied. One-day-old male Wenchang chickens were randomly divided into a control group (CK), heat stress group (HS), and GABA+HS group. The chickens from the GABA+HS group were administered with 0.2 mL of GABA solution daily. Chickens from HS and GABA+HS groups were subjected to heat stress treatment at 40 ± 0.5°C for 2 h during 1300 to 1500 h every day. Blood was drawn and 0.5 cm-long duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were collected from the chickens on d 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 15. Results showed that the activity of Ca²⁺-Mg²⁺-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase, maltase, sucrase, and alkaline phosphatase, the contents of secretory IgA, glutathione, and d-xylose, and the number of lymphocytes in HS group were significantly lower than those in the CK group. Among them, some were rescued after the treatment of GABA as the time extension. For maltase, d-xylose, alkaline phosphatase, and Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase, it required 5 to 7 d for achieving the significant effect. For sucrase, 12 d for the alleviation effect was required. In the case of other parameters, no alleviation was observed during the whole period of the study. We have concluded that HS can inhibit the activity of digestive enzymes and reduce absorption and immune functions of intestinal mucosa. γ-Aminobutyric acid can effectively alleviate these inhibitory effects. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Comparison of time-restricted and ad libitum self-feeding on the growth, feeding behavior and daily digestive enzyme profiles of Atlantic salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ce; Liu, Ying; Yi, Mengmeng; Zheng, Jimeng; Tian, Huiqin; Du, Yishuai; Li, Xian; Sun, Guoxiang

    2017-07-01

    Although it has been hypothesized that a predictable feeding regime in animals allows physiological variables to be adjusted to maximize nutrient utilization and, hence, better growth performance, the assumption has rarely been tested. This study compares the effects of time-restricted versus free access self-feeding on the growth, feeding behavior and daily digestive enzyme rhythms of Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar). In an experiment that lasted 6 weeks, fish (109.9 g) were divided into two groups: group 1 had free access to a self-feeder (FA); group 2 received three meals per day (2 h per meal) at dawn, midday and dusk via a time-restricted self-feeder (TR). At the end of the experiment, the fish were sampled every 3 h over a 24-h period. The results showed that the TR fish quickly synchronized their feeding behavior to the feeding window and their blood glucose showed a significant postprandial increase, while FA fish displayed no statistically significant rhythms ( P>0.05). Pepsin activity of TR fish also showed a significant daily rhythm ( P<0.05) with the acrophase at the second feed and a decrease over the next 12 h. Average daily trypsin, lipase and amylase levels of FA fish were significantly lower than those of TR fish ( P<0.01); however, the growth performance of both groups was similar ( P>0.05). In conclusion, the study failed to confirm a link between the entrainment of daily digestive enzyme profiles and growth performance, with the TR group showing comparatively poor blood glucose regulation.

  20. In vitro inhibitory activities of selected Australian medicinal plant extracts against protein glycation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and digestive enzymes linked to type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Deo, Permal; Hewawasam, Erandi; Karakoulakis, Aris; Claudie, David J; Nelson, Robert; Simpson, Bradley S; Smith, Nicholas M; Semple, Susan J

    2016-11-04

    There is a need to develop potential new therapies for the management of diabetes and hypertension. Australian medicinal plants collected from the Kuuku I'yu (Northern Kaanju) homelands, Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, Australia were investigated to determine their therapeutic potential. Extracts were tested for inhibition of protein glycation and key enzymes relevant to the management of hyperglycaemia and hypertension. The inhibitory activities were further correlated with the antioxidant activities. Extracts of five selected plant species were investigated: Petalostigma pubescens, Petalostigma banksii, Memecylon pauciflorum, Millettia pinnata and Grewia mesomischa. Enzyme inhibitory activity of the plant extracts was assessed against α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Antiglycation activity was determined using glucose-induced protein glycation models and formation of protein-bound fluorescent advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Antioxidant activity was determined by measuring the scavenging effect of plant extracts against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and using the ferric reducing anti-oxidant potential assay (FRAP). Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also determined. Extracts of the leaves of Petalostigma banksii and P. pubescens showed the strongest inhibition of α-amylase with IC 50 values of 166.50 ± 5.50 μg/mL and 160.20 ± 27.92 μg/mL, respectively. The P. pubescens leaf extract was also the strongest inhibitor of α-glucosidase with an IC 50 of 167.83 ± 23.82 μg/mL. Testing for the antiglycation potential of the extracts, measured as inhibition of formation of protein-bound fluorescent AGEs, showed that P. banksii root and fruit extracts had IC 50 values of 34.49 ± 4.31 μg/mL and 47.72 ± 1.65 μg/mL, respectively, which were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than other extracts. The inhibitory effect on α-amylase, α-glucosidase and the antiglycation potential of

  1. Water soaking and exogenous enzyme treatment of plant-based diets: effect on growth performance, whole-body composition, and digestive enzyme activities of rohu, Labeo rohita (Hamilton), fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Biji; Sahu, N P; Pal, A K; Jain, K K; Misra, Sougat; Dalvi, R S; Baruah, Kartik

    2012-04-01

    A 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment was conducted to delineate the main effect of water soaking of plant ingredients, phytase, cellulase, and their interactions on the growth and digestive enzyme activities of Labeo rohita fingerlings. Two basal diets were prepared using water-soaked (S) or unsoaked (US) plant-based ingredients. Feed of US ingredients was supplemented with phytase (U kg(-1)) and cellulase (%) at the level of 0, 0 (C(us)); 500, 0 (T(1)); 0, 0.2 (T(2)); 500, 0.2 (T(3)), and feed of S ingredients at 0, 0 (C(s)); 500, 0 (T(4)); 0, 0.2 (T(5)), and 500, 0.2 (T(6)), respectively. Three hundred and sixty fingerlings were randomly distributed into eight treatments, each with three replicates. Soaking of the ingredients for 24 h significantly reduced the tannin content. However, feeding of S diets did not improve the fish growth. Highest performance was recorded in the T(3) group. A significant interaction between dietary phytase and cellulase was observed for apparent net protein utilization. Tissue crude protein, ether extract, and ash content of the fingerlings were observed highest in the T(3) group. Activities of amylase, protease, and lipase were recorded highest in the T(3) group. Results suggested that soaking of plant-based ingredients reduces tannin content; however, growth and digestive enzyme activities of group fed soaked diet were not improved, possibly due to leaching of soluble nutrients. Probably, a shorter duration soaking may be effective in reducing tannin content and avoiding nutrients leaching.

  2. Effects of dietary supplementation with green tea waste on growth, digestive enzyme and lipid metabolism of juvenile hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus × O. aureus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qingmei; Han, Chunyan; Zhong, Yanmei; Wen, Rushu; Zhong, Ming

    2017-04-01

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation with green tea waste (GTW) on growth, digestive enzyme and lipid metabolism of juvenile hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus × O. aureus. The fish (initial mean body weight, 12.63 ± 0.75 g) were fed five experimental diets that included 0 (control), 0.8, 1.6, 3.2 or 6.4 % of GTW in triplicate aquaria, twice daily. Growth performance, plasma metabolites content and liver and intestine digestive enzyme activities were determined. Fish accepted well all experimental diets during the trial, and no mortality was observed. The weight gain increased (P < 0.05) with the increase in GTW inclusion level up to 1.6 %, after which it decreased, but no significant differences between the control and high level (3.2 or 6.4 % of GTW) groups were observed. Moreover, fish fed on diets containing 0.8 and 1.6 % GTW had lower feed conversion ratio (FCR, 1.75 and 1.73, respectively) and had better protein deposition (higher protein efficiency ratio, PER, 1.73 and 1.71, respectively), compared to other treatments. No differences among groups were observed in whole body and dorsal muscle composition with the exception of lipid content which was lower in fish fed 6.4 % GTW diets, compared to other treatments. Lipase activities in liver or intestine were higher in fish fed GTW-supplemented diets with the exception of intestine lipase activities, which was unaffected, compared to the control. Similarly, liver lipoprotein lipase activities were also increased in fish fed diets supplemented a medium dose of GTW (1.6 or 3.2 %), compared to other treatments. However, intestine amylase activities were decreased in fish fed diets containing a high dose of GTW (3.2 and 6.4 %); while the liver amylase activities were unaffected by the GTW supplementation. Blood chemistry parameters were affected by GTW inclusion, except the values of triglycerides, which was unaffected. The values of total

  3. Carbohydrate Counting

    MedlinePlus

    ... help you manage your blood glucose. It sounds complex, but with time you and your diabetes care team can figure out the right balance for you. How Much Carbohydrate? A great place to start may be to ...

  4. Influence of carbohydrates on the interaction of procyanidin B3 with trypsin.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rui; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Victor

    2011-11-09

    The biological properties of procyanidins, in particular their inhibition of digestive enzymes, have received much attention in the past few years. Dietary carbohydrates are an environmental factor that is known to affect the interaction of procyanidins with proteins. This work aimed at understanding the effect of ionic food carbohydrates (polygalacturonic acid, arabic gum, pectin, and xanthan gum) on the interaction between procyanidins and trypsin. Physical-chemical techniques such as saturation transfer difference-NMR (STD-NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching, and nephelometry were used to evaluate the interaction process. Using STD-NMR, it was possible to identify the binding of procyanidin B3 to trypsin. The tested carbohydrates prevented the association of procyanidin B3 and trypsin by a competition mechanism in which the ionic character of carbohydrates and their ability to encapsulate procyanidins seem crucial leading to a reduction in STD signal and light scattering and to a recovery of the proteins intrinsic fluorescence. On the basis of these results, it was possible to grade the carbohydrates in their aggregation inhibition ability: XG > PA > AG ≫ PC. These effects may be relevant since the coingestion of procyanidins and ionic carbohydrates are frequent and furthermore since these might negatively affect the antinutritional properties ascribed to procyanidins in the past.

  5. Effect of the Ratio of Non-fibrous Carbohydrates to Neutral Detergent Fiber and Protein Structure on Intake, Digestibility, Rumen Fermentation, and Nitrogen Metabolism in Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Ma, T.; Tu, Y.; Zhang, N. F.; Deng, K. D.; Diao, Q. Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of the ratio of non-fibrous carbohydrates to neutral detergent fibre (NFC/NDF) and undegraded dietary protein (UDP) on rumen fermentation and nitrogen metabolism in lambs. Four Dorper×thin-tailed Han crossbred lambs, averaging 62.3±1.9 kg of body weight and 10 mo of age, were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments of combinations of two levels of NFC/NDF (1.0 and 1.7) and two levels of UDP (35% and 50% of crude protein [CP]). Duodenal nutrient flows were measured with dual markers of Yb and Co, and microbial N (MN) synthesis was estimated using 15N. High UDP decreased organic matter (OM) intake (p = 0.002) and CP intake (p = 0.005). Ruminal pH (p<0.001), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N; p = 0.008), and total volatile fatty acids (p<0.001) were affected by dietary NFC/NDF. The ruminal concentration of NH3-N was also affected by UDP (p<0.001). The duodenal flow of total MN (p = 0.007) was greater for lambs fed the high NFC/NDF diet. The amount of metabolisable N increased with increasing dietary NFC:NDF (p = 0.02) or UDP (p = 0.04). In conclusion, the diets with high NFC/NDF (1.7) and UDP (50% of CP) improved metabolisable N supply to lambs. PMID:26323398

  6. Effect of the Ratio of Non-fibrous Carbohydrates to Neutral Detergent Fiber and Protein Structure on Intake, Digestibility, Rumen Fermentation, and Nitrogen Metabolism in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Tu, Y; Zhang, N F; Deng, K D; Diao, Q Y

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of the ratio of non-fibrous carbohydrates to neutral detergent fibre (NFC/NDF) and undegraded dietary protein (UDP) on rumen fermentation and nitrogen metabolism in lambs. Four Dorper×thin-tailed Han crossbred lambs, averaging 62.3±1.9 kg of body weight and 10 mo of age, were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments of combinations of two levels of NFC/NDF (1.0 and 1.7) and two levels of UDP (35% and 50% of crude protein [CP]). Duodenal nutrient flows were measured with dual markers of Yb and Co, and microbial N (MN) synthesis was estimated using (15)N. High UDP decreased organic matter (OM) intake (p = 0.002) and CP intake (p = 0.005). Ruminal pH (p<0.001), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N; p = 0.008), and total volatile fatty acids (p<0.001) were affected by dietary NFC/NDF. The ruminal concentration of NH3-N was also affected by UDP (p<0.001). The duodenal flow of total MN (p = 0.007) was greater for lambs fed the high NFC/NDF diet. The amount of metabolisable N increased with increasing dietary NFC:NDF (p = 0.02) or UDP (p = 0.04). In conclusion, the diets with high NFC/NDF (1.7) and UDP (50% of CP) improved metabolisable N supply to lambs.

  7. Changes in physicochemical properties and in vitro starch digestion of native and extruded maize flours subjected to branching enzyme and maltogenic α-amylase treatment.

    PubMed

    Román, Laura; Martínez, Mario M; Rosell, Cristina M; Gómez, Manuel

    2017-08-01

    Extrusion is an increasingly used type of processing which combined with enzymatic action could open extended possibilities for obtaining clean label modified flours. In this study, native and extruded maize flours were modified using branching enzyme (B) and a combination of branching enzyme and maltogenic α-amylase (BMA) in order to modulate their hydrolysis properties. The microstructure, pasting properties, in vitro starch hydrolysis and resistant starch content of the flours were investigated. Whereas BMA treatment led to greater number of holes on the granule surface in native samples, B and BMA extruded samples showed rougher surfaces with cavities. A reduction in the retrogradation trend was observed for B and BMA native flours, in opposition to the flat pasting profile of their extruded counterparts. The glucose release increased gradually for native flours as the time of reaction did, whereas for extruded flours a fast increase of glucose release was observed during the first minutes of reaction, and kept till the end, indicating a greater accessibility to their porous structure. These results suggested that, in enzymatically treated extruded samples, changes produced at larger hierarchical levels in their starch structure could have masked a slowdown in the starch digestion properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of realimentation after nutrient restriction during mid- to late gestation on pancreatic digestive enzymes, serum insulin and glucose levels, and insulin-containing cell cluster morphology.

    PubMed

    Keomanivong, F E; Camacho, L E; Lemley, C O; Kuemper, E A; Yunusova, R D; Borowicz, P P; Kirsch, J D; Vonnahme, K A; Caton, J S; Swanson, K C

    2017-06-01

    This study examined effects of stage of gestation and nutrient restriction with subsequent realimentation on maternal and foetal bovine pancreatic function. Dietary treatments were assigned on day 30 of pregnancy and included: control (CON; 100% requirements; n = 18) and restricted (R; 60% requirements; n = 30). On day 85, cows were slaughtered (CON, n = 6; R, n = 6), remained on control (CC; n = 12) and restricted (RR; n = 12), or realimented to control (RC; n = 11). On day 140, cows were slaughtered (CC, n = 6; RR, n = 6; RC, n = 5), remained on control (CCC, n = 6; RCC, n = 5) or realimented to control (RRC, n = 6). On day 254, the remaining cows were slaughtered and serum samples were collected from the maternal jugular vein and umbilical cord to determine insulin and glucose concentrations. Pancreases from cows and foetuses were removed, weighed, and subsampled for enzyme and histological analysis. As gestation progressed, maternal pancreatic α-amylase activity decreased and serum insulin concentrations increased (p ≤ 0.03). Foetal pancreatic trypsin activity increased (p < 0.001) with advancing gestation. Foetal pancreases subjected to realimentation (CCC vs. RCC and RRC) had increased protein and α-amylase activity at day 254 (p ≤ 0.02), while trypsin (U/g protein; p = 0.02) demonstrated the opposite effect. No treatment effects were observed for maternal or foetal pancreatic insulin-containing cell clusters. Foetal serum insulin and glucose levels were reduced with advancing gestation (p ≤ 0.03). The largest maternal insulin-containing cell cluster was not influenced by advancing gestation, while foetal clusters grew throughout (p = 0.01). These effects indicate that maternal digestive enzymes are influenced by nutrient restriction and there is a potential for programming of increased foetal digestive enzyme production resulting from previous maternal nutrient restriction. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal

  9. CH/π Interactions in Carbohydrate Recognition.

    PubMed

    Spiwok, Vojtěch

    2017-06-23

    Many carbohydrate-binding proteins contain aromatic amino acid residues in their binding sites. These residues interact with carbohydrates in a stacking geometry via CH/π interactions. These interactions can be found in carbohydrate-binding proteins, including lectins, enzymes and carbohydrate transporters. Besides this, many non-protein aromatic molecules (natural as well as artificial) can bind saccharides using these interactions. Recent computational and experimental studies have shown that carbohydrate-aromatic CH/π interactions are dispersion interactions, tuned by electrostatics and partially stabilized by a hydrophobic effect in solvated systems.

  10. Bioinsecticidal activity of Talisia esculenta reserve protein on growth and serine digestive enzymes during larval development of Anticarsia gemmatalis.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Freire, Maria das Graças M; Kubo, Carlos Eduardo G; Parra, José Roberto P

    2011-01-01

    Plants synthesize a variety of molecules to defend themselves against an attack by insects. Talisin is a reserve protein from Talisia esculenta seeds, the first to be characterized from the family Sapindaceae. In this study, the insecticidal activity of Talisin was tested by incorporating the reserve protein into an artificial diet fed to the velvetbean caterpillar Anticarsia gemmatalis, the major pest of soybean crops in Brazil. At 1.5% (w/w) of the dietary protein, Talisin affected larval growth, pupal weight, development and mortality, adult fertility and longevity, and produce