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Sample records for carbon 11

  1. The 11 Micron Emissions of Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Cheeseman, P.; Gerbault, F.

    1995-01-01

    A new classification scheme of the IRAS LRS carbon stars is presented. It comprises the separation of 718 probable carbon stars into 12 distinct self-similar spectral groupings. Continuum temperatures are assigned and range from 470 to 5000 K. Three distinct dust species are identifiable: SiC, alpha:C-H, and MgS. In addition to the narrow 11 + micron emission feature that is commonly attributed to SiC, a broad 11 + micron emission feature, that is correlated with the 8.5 and 7.7 micron features, is found and attributed to alpha:C-H. SiC and alpha:C-H band strengths are found to correlate with the temperature progression among the Classes. We find a spectral sequence of Classes that reflects the carbon star evolutionary sequence of spectral types, or alternatively developmental sequences of grain condensation in carbon-rich circumstellar shells. If decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing evolution, then decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing C/O resulting in increasing amounts of carbon rich dust, namely alpha:C-H. If decreasing the temperature corresponds to a grain condensation sequence, then heterogeneous, or induced nucleation scenarios are supported. SiC grains precede alpha:C-H and form the nuclei for the condensation of the latter material. At still lower temperatures, MgS appears to be quite prevalent. No 11.3 micron PAH features are identified in any of the 718 carbon stars. However, one of the coldest objects, IRAS 15048-5702, and a few others, displays an 11.9 micron emission feature characteristic of laboratory samples of coronene. That feature corresponds to the C-H out of plane deformation mode of aromatic hydrocarbon. This band indicates the presence of unsaturated, sp(sup 3), hydrocarbon bonds that may subsequently evolve into saturated bonds, sp(sup 2), if, and when, the star enters the planetary nebulae phase of stellar evolution. The effusion of hydrogen from the hydrocarbon grain results in the evolution in wavelength of this

  2. 46 CFR 97.37-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 97.37-11 Section 97.37-11... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  3. 46 CFR 78.47-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 78.47-11 Section 78.47-11... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space into...

  4. 46 CFR 78.47-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 78.47-11 Section 78.47-11... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space into...

  5. 46 CFR 97.37-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 97.37-11 Section 97.37-11... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  6. 46 CFR 78.47-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 78.47-11 Section 78.47-11... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space into...

  7. 46 CFR 97.37-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 97.37-11 Section 97.37-11... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  8. Carbon-11: Where Familiar Chemistry Still Holds New Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feliu, Anthony L.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the properties, chemistry, generation of precursors, and use in organic synthesis of this isotope of carbon. The use of carbon-11 in research is emphasized. Pitfalls and possibilities are described. (CW)

  9. Solid-phase reversible trap for [11C]carbon dioxide using carbon molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Mock, B H; Vavrek, M T; Mulholland, G K

    1995-07-01

    A simple, maintenance-free trapping technique which concentrates and purifies no-carrier-added 11CO2 from gas targets is described. The trap requires no liquid nitrogen cooling and has no moving parts besides solenoid valves. It employs carbon molecular sieves to adsorb 11CO2 selectively from gas targets at room temperature. Nitrogen, O2, CO, NO and moisture in the target gas which could interfere with subsequent radiochemical steps are not retained. Trapping efficiency of 1 g of sieve for 11CO2 from a 240 cm3 target gas dump and helium flush cycle is > 99%, and the adsorbed 11CO2 is recovered quantitatively as a small concentrated bolus from the carbon sieve trap by thermal desorption. This durable trap has performed reliably for more than 1 y with a single charge of carbon sieve. It has simplified the production, and improved the yields of several 11C-radiochemicals at this laboratory.

  10. Ethanolic Carbon-11 Chemistry: the Introduction of Green Radiochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xia; Fawaz, Maria V.; Jang, Keunsam; Scott, Peter J. H.

    2014-01-01

    The principles of green chemistry have been applied to a radiochemistry setting. Eleven carbon-11 labeled radiopharmaceuticals have been prepared using ethanol as the only organic solvent throughout the entire manufacturing process. The removal of all other organic solvents from the process simplifies production and quality control (QC) testing, moving our PET Center towards the first example of a green radiochemistry laboratory. All radiopharmaceutical doses prepared are suitable for clinical use. PMID:24631743

  11. Ethanolic carbon-11 chemistry: the introduction of green radiochemistry.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xia; Fawaz, Maria V; Jang, Keunsam; Scott, Peter J H

    2014-07-01

    The principles of green chemistry have been applied to a radiochemistry setting. Eleven carbon-11 labeled radiopharmaceuticals have been prepared using ethanol as the only organic solvent throughout the entire manufacturing process. The removal of all other organic solvents from the process simplifies production and quality control (QC) testing, moving our PET Center towards the first example of a green radiochemistry laboratory. All radiopharmaceutical doses prepared are suitable for clinical use.

  12. The 11 micron Silicon Carbide Feature in Carbon Star Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speck, A. K.; Barlow, M. J.; Skinner, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is known to form in circumstellar shells around carbon stars. SiC can come in two basic types - hexagonal alpha-SiC or cubic beta-SiC. Laboratory studies have shown that both types of SiC exhibit an emission feature in the 11-11.5 micron region, the size and shape of the feature varying with type, size and shape of the SiC grains. Such a feature can be seen in the spectra of carbon stars. Silicon carbide grains have also been found in meteorites. The aim of the current work is to identity the type(s) of SiC found in circumstellar shells and how they might relate to meteoritic SiC samples. We have used the CGS3 spectrometer at the 3.8 m UKIRT to obtain 7.5-13.5 micron spectra of 31 definite or proposed carbon stars. After flux-calibration, each spectrum was fitted using a chi(exp 2)-minimisation routine equipped with the published laboratory optical constants of six different samples of small SiC particles, together with the ability to fit the underlying continuum using a range of grain emissivity laws. It was found that the majority of observed SiC emission features could only be fitted by alpha-SiC grains. The lack of beta-SiC is surprising, as this is the form most commonly found in meteorites. Included in the sample were four sources, all of which have been proposed to be carbon stars, that appear to show the SiC feature in absorption.

  13. Characterization of 1:1 Random Copolymers Obtained from 6-, 7-, 11-, and 12-Carbon Amino Acids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-22

    Random Copolymers Obtained From 6-, 7-, 11-, and 12-Carbon Amino Acids by C. G. Johnson and L. J. Mathias 0 T .... Prepared for Publication r. t in the...NOOOG4-f-j- From 6-, 7-, 11-, and 12-Carbon Amino Acids 1225 ~~~ :: V Co~de 413m(iUK C. G Johnson, and Lo J. Mathias ś RFORMING ORGANIZA7,iCN ;fAMjjS...distribution is unlimited. Copolymers were prepared from the title amino acids by rr ilt condensation under dry nitrogen. The resulting copolymers were

  14. Synthesis of [11C]Bexarotene by Cu-Mediated [11C]Carbon Dioxide Fixation and Preliminary PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bexarotene (Targretin) is a retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist that has applications for treatment of T cell lymphoma and proposed mechanisms of action in Alzheimer’s disease that have been the subject of recent controversy. Carbon-11 labeled bexarotene ([11C-carbonyl]4-[1-(3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyltetralin-2-yl)ethenyl]benzoic acid) was synthesized using a Cu-mediated cross-coupling reaction employing an arylboronate precursor 1 and [11C]carbon dioxide under atmospheric pressure in 15 ± 2% uncorrected radiochemical yield (n = 3), based on [11C]CO2. Judicious choice of solvents, catalysts, and additives, as well as precursor concentration and purity of [11C]CO2, enabled the preparation of this 11C-labeled carboxylic acid. Formulated [11C]bexarotene was isolated (>37 mCi) with >99% radiochemical purity in 32 min. Preliminary positron emission tomography–magnetic resonance imaging revealed rapid brain uptake in nonhuman primate in the first 75 s following intravenous administration of the radiotracer (specific activity >0.3 Ci/μmol at time of injection), followed by slow clearance (Δ = −43%) over 60 min. Modest uptake (SUVmax = 0.8) was observed in whole brain and regions with high RXR expression. PMID:24944741

  15. Noninvasive measurement of lung carbon-11-serotonin extraction in man

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, G.; Firnau, G.; Meyer, G.J.; Gratz, K.F. )

    1991-04-01

    The fraction of serotonin extracted on a single passage through the lungs is being used as an early indicator of lung endothelial damage but the existing techniques require multiple arterial blood samples. We have developed a noninvasive technique to measure lung serotonin uptake in man. We utilized the double indicator diffusion principle, a positron camera, {sup 11}C-serotonin as the substrate, and {sup 11}CO-erythrocytes as the vascular marker. From regions of interest around each lung, we recorded time-activity curves in 0.5-sec frames for 30 sec after a bolus injection of first the vascular marker {sup 11}CO-erythrocytes and 10 min later {sup 11}C-serotonin. A second uptake measurement was made after imipramine 25-35 mg was infused intravenously. In three normal volunteers, the single-pass uptake of {sup 11}C-serotonin was 63.9% +/- 3.6%. This decreased in all subjects to a mean of 53.6% +/- 1.4% after imipramine. The rate of lung washout of {sup 11}C was also significantly prolonged after imipramine. This noninvasive technique can be used to measure lung serotonin uptake to detect early changes in a variety of conditions that alter the integrity of the pulmonary endothelium.

  16. Uptake of carbon-11-methionine and fluorodeoxyglucose in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Leskinen-Kallio, S.; Ruotsalainen, U.; Nagren, K.T.; Teraes, M.J.; Joensuu, H. )

    1991-06-01

    Uptake of L-(methyl-11C)methionine (11C-methionine) and (18F)-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was studied with PET in 14 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The low molecular weight fraction of venous plasma separated by fast gel filtration was used as the input function for 11C-methionine studies, and tracer accumulation was analyzed according to Patlak and Gjedde. The average uptake rate of 11C-methionine was 0.0775 {plus minus} 0.0245 min-1 (s.d.) and of FDG 0.0355 {plus minus} 0.0293 min-1, 11C-methionine uptake rate being significantly higher than that of FDG (p less than 0.01). Carbon-11-methionine accumulated strongly in all but one of the lymphomas. FDG accumulated clearly in lymphomas of high-grade malignancy, whereas two intermediate- and three low-grade malignant lymphomas had a poor uptake rate. The tumor/plasma ratio of both 11C-methionine and FDG increased faster in high and intermediate-grade lymphomas than in low-grade lymphomas, but there was considerable overlap between the histologic grades. Carbon-11-methionine seems to be preferable in detecting tumors, while FDG was superior to 11C-methionine in distinguishing the high-grade malignant lymphomas from the other grades.

  17. Synthesis and electrochemical capacitive properties of nitrogen-doped porous carbon micropolyhedra by direct carbonization of zeolitic imidazolate framework-11

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Fei; Li, Li; Zhang, Xiaohua Chen, Jinhua

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-doped porous carbon micropolyhedra (N-PCMPs) were prepared from ZIF-11. • The activated N-PCMPs with fused KOH (N-PCMPs-A) have high specific surface area. • N-PCMPs-A exhibits high specific capacitance. • N-PCMPs-A reveals good cycling performance even at a high current density. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped porous carbon micropolyhedra (N-PCMPs) were successfully prepared by direct carbonization of ZIF-11 polyhedra and further activated with fused KOH to obtain N-PCMPs-A. The morphology and microstructure of samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and micropore and chemisorption analyzer. Electrochemical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge method in 1.0 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution on a standard three-electrode system. Results show that, compared with N-PCMPs, N-PCMPs-A has higher specific surface area (2188 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and exhibits improved electrochemical capacitive properties (307 F g{sup −1} at 1.0 A g{sup −1}). The mass specific capacitance of N-PCMPs-A is also higher than that of most MOF-derived carbons, some carbide-derived carbons and carbon aerogel-derived carbons. In addition, the capacitance of the N-PCMPs-A retains 90% after 4000 cycles even at a high current density of 10 A g{sup −1}. These imply that N-PCMPs-A is the promising materials for the construction of a high-performance supercapacitor.

  18. Routine synthesis of carbon-11-carboxyl-labeled L-dopa

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, M.J.; Grierson, J.R.; Ruth, T.J.; Pedersen, K.; Pate, B.D.

    1987-10-01

    Carbon-11-carboxyl-labeled L-dopa has been synthesized by the modified Bucherer-Strecker method. The reaction mixture was first purified by chiral HPLC followed by deprotection using hydriodic acid. The entire procedure was performed in a remotely operated system which gave the product in 28% radiochemical yield (decay corrected) in an overall synthesis time of 55-60 min.

  19. Carbon 11-MPTP: a potential tracer for Parkinson's disease research in laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Livni, E.; Spellman, J.P.; Correia, J.A.; Alpert, N.M.; Brownell, G.L.; Strauss, H.W.; Elmaleh, D.R.

    1986-10-01

    (11C)-1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine ((11C)MPTP), a compound producing parkinson-like symptoms in several species, has been synthesized and purified in sufficient activity to obtain tomographic images in the monkey. Biodistribution data has also been obtained in rats. Carbon-11-labeled MPTP could be used as a probe to study the pharmacokinetics of the compound under various research conditions in animals. Because of its neurotoxicity, the compound is not intended for use in humans.

  20. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of /sup 11/C, /sup 18/F and /sup 13/N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume.

  1. Myocardial kinetics of carbon-11-epinephrine in the isolated working rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, N.T.B.; DeGrado, T.R.; Chakraborty, P.

    1997-05-01

    The kinetics of EPI were studied in the isolated rat heart model to evaluate {sup 11}C-epinephrine (EPI) as a radiotracer for the assessment of sympathetic neuronal function in the heart. Isolated rat hearts were perfused in a working mode. Carbon-11-EPI was added to the perfusate during wash-in period of 20 min, followed by a washout period of 40 min. Radioactivity in the heart was externally monitored and time-activity curves were recorded as a function of time. Effluent samples were collected throughout each study to determine the fraction of {sup 11}C radioactivity as intact tracer. Time-activity curves of control hearts showed that {sup 11}C-EPI is taken up and retained by the myocardium. Desipramine inhibition (DMI) of uptake-1 resulted in a significant decrease in myocardial uptake and retention of {sup 11}C-EPI by 91% compared to controls. Addition of DMI to the perfusion medium during washout did not affect kinetics of {sup 11}C-EPI compared to control hearts. Reserpine pretreated rat hearts also showed significant decrease in tracer retention of 95% compared to controls. The metabolic data showed that, in control conditions, about 61% of {sup 11}C-EPI taken up by the rat heart is rapidly metabolized and released. Carbon-11-EPI traces sympathetic nerve terminals in the isolated rat heart. Uptake blockade by DMI and reserpine suggest that uptake and storage of {sup 11}C-EPI appear to be similar to that of norepinephrine. However, the prominent metabolic pathway warrants further consideration. These results suggest that {sup 11}C-EPI may be a suitable radiolabeled tracer for the evaluation of sympathetic vesicular function of the heart by PET. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Carbon-11 radiolabeling of iron-oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality PET/MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Xu, Youwen; Kim, Sung Won; Schueller, Michael J.; Alexoff, David; Smith, S. David; Wang, Wei; Schlyer, David

    2013-07-01

    Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled SPIO NPs was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled

  3. Synthesis and radiopharmaceutical preparation of (ethylenediamine) (1-carbon-11-malonate) platinum(II) for PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    De Spiegeleer, B.; Goethals, P.; Slegers, G.; Gillis, E.; Van den Bossche, W.; De Moerloose, P.

    1988-06-01

    Interest in the distribution, biotransformation, and mechanism of action of anticancer platinum complexes has led to the microscale, semi-automated and remote-controlled synthesis of (ethylenediamine) (1-(/sup 11/C)malonate) platinum(II) (( /sup 11/C)Ptenmal, EDMAL, JM40) from cyclotron-produced (/sup 11/C)cyanide. Carbon-11 cyanoacetate is produced by reacting (/sup 11/C)cyanide with bromoacetate. After hydrolysis, the resulting (/sup 11/C)malonic acid is purified and complexed to (diaquo) (ethylenediamine) platinum(II). Each step of the synthesis was optimized by studying the influence of different variables like reaction time and temperature, pH, necessary purification of intermediates, concentration and ratios of the reactants. Purification of the endproduct is achieved using preparative high performance liquid chromatography. The total incorporation of the (/sup 11/C)cyanide in the final product was 17-40%. After approximately 1 hr, approximately 40 mCi of (/sup 11/C)Ptenmal are produced in 10 ml sterile and isotonic dextrose solution ready for i.v. injection. The specific activity is approximately 200 mCi/mumol at EOB.

  4. Assessment of dopamine receptor densities in the human brain with carbon-11-labeled N-methylspiperone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstroem, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1984-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon-11-labeled 3-N-methylspiperone, a ligand that preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and, for the first time, in a human. The method has now been used in 58 humans for noninvasive assessment of the state of brain dopamine receptors under normal and pathological conditions.

  5. Effects of active chronic cocaine use on cardiac sympathetic neuronal function assessed by carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine

    SciTech Connect

    Melon, P.G.; Boyd, C.J.; McVey, S. |

    1997-03-01

    Cardiac toxicity of cocaine has been linked to its inhibitory effect on norepinephrine reuptake by sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine is a positron-emitting tracer that has been validated as a highly specific marker for norepinephrine transporter activity of the sympathetic nerve terminals and thus makes possible in vivo assessment of the effect of cocaine on norepinephrine reuptake and storage in the cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals. The aim of the study was to use the catecholamine analog {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine with PET to determine whether active chronic use of cocaine in women modifies the function of sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Six normal female volunteers and nine female active chronic cocaine users were studied. Cardiac regional {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine uptake and blood flow, as assessed with {sup 13}N-ammonia, were determined using semi-quantitative polar map analysis of myocardial tracer distribution. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine cardiac retention was quantified using dynamic data acquisition and kinetic analysis of blood and tissue activity. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Use of the metabolic tracer carbon-11-acetate for evaluation of regional myocardial perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.Y.; Brunken, R.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R. )

    1991-04-01

    The high first-pass myocardial extraction fraction of carbon-11-acetate suggests that its initial uptake depends on blood flow. Accordingly, regional uptake of {sup 11}C-acetate at 4 min was compared to regional perfusion determined with nitrogen-13-ammonia in 119 segments in 15 patients with stable coronary artery disease by two methods. A close correlation was observed between initial relative myocardial concentrations (segmental activity normalized to maximal activity) of both tracers (11C-acetate = 0.88; 13N-ammonia + 0.079; s.e.e. = 0.064, r = 0.94, p less than 0.001). Furthermore, segmental net extractions (E.F), as calculated from the input function and segmental activities, of the two tracers correlated closely by E.FC-11 = 0.55E.FN-13 + 0.080 (s.e.e. = 0.045, r = 0.87, p less than 0.001). These relationships indicate that initial regional myocardial uptake of {sup 11}C-acetate reflects perfusion and that {sup 11}C-acetate permits near simultaneous evaluation of regional oxidative metabolism and of regional myocardial perfusion.

  7. Exploration of the labeling of [11C]Tubastatin A at the hydroxamic acid site with [11C]carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuiyu; Zhang, Yi; Kalin, Jay; Cai, Lisheng; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Pike, Victor W.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to label tubastatin A (1) with carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) in the hydroxamic acid site to provide a potential radiotracer for imaging histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET). Initial attempts at a one-pot Pd-mediated insertion of [11C]carbon monoxide between the aryl iodide (2) and hydroxylamine gave low radiochemical yields (< 5%) of [11C]1. Labeling was achieved in useful radiochemical yields (16.1 ± 5.6%, n = 4) through a two-step process based on Pd-mediated insertion of [11C]carbon monoxide between the aryl iodide (2) and p-nitrophenol to give the [11C]p-nitrophenyl ester ([11C]5), followed by ultrasound-assisted hydroxyaminolysis of the activated ester with excess hydroxylamine in DMSO/THF mixture in the presence of a strong phosphazene base P1-t-Bu. However, the success in labeling the hydroxamic acid group of [11C]tubastatin A was not transferable to the labeling of three other model hydroxamic acids. PMID:26647018

  8. Survey of lunar carbon compounds. I - The presence of indigenous gases and hydrolysable carbon compounds in Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, P. I.; Cadogan, P. H.; Eglinton, G.; Maxwell, J. R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1971-01-01

    Indigenous gases and hydrolyzable carbon compounds in Apollo 11 and 12 samples through gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric examination, noting meteoritic impact and solar wind implantation as probable origins

  9. Modelled interglacial carbon cycle dynamics during the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor; Munhoven, Guy

    2016-11-01

    Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials - the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 - are investigated using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, which we extended with process-based modules to consider two slow carbon cycle processes - peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation (coral reef formation). For all three interglacials, model simulations considering peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation substantially improve the agreement between model results and ice core CO2 reconstructions in comparison to a carbon cycle set-up neglecting these processes. This enables us to model the trends in atmospheric CO2, with modelled trends similar to the ice core data, forcing the model only with orbital and sea level changes. During the Holocene, anthropogenic CO2 emissions are required to match the observed rise in atmospheric CO2 after 3 ka BP but are not relevant before this time. Our model experiments show a considerable improvement in the modelled CO2 trends by the inclusion of the slow carbon cycle processes, allowing us to explain the CO2 evolution during the Holocene and two recent interglacials consistently using an identical model set-up.

  10. Relations between Light Level, Sucrose Concentration, and Translocation of Carbon 11 in Zea mays Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Troughton, John H.; Currie, B. G.; Chang, F. H.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanism of carbon transport in Zea mays leaves was investigated using carbon 11 which is a short lived (half-life 20.4 min) positronemitting isotope. The gamma radiation produced on annihilation allows in vivo or nondestructive measurement of the isotope and the short half-life allows many measurements of translocation to be made on the same leaf within the same day. Carbon 11 produced by the 10B (d,n)11C nuclear reaction was converted to 11CO2, fed to a leaf as a short pulse, and assimilated during photosynthesis. The progress of the radioactive pulse along the leaf in the phloem was monitored in several positions simultaneously with counters. The counters were NaI crystals with photomultipliers and the output was amplified, passed to single channel analyzers, and the counts accumulated for 20 seconds every 30 seconds. Corrections were made for the half-life and background radiation by computer, and the results were displayed on a high speed plotter. Information derived from the corrected data included the speed of translocation, the shape of the radioactive carbon pulse, and the influence of light and distance along the leaf on these parameters. The plants were kept under controlled environment conditions during all measurements. A speed was derived from the time displacement of the midpoint of the front of the pulse, measured at two positions along the leaf. This was an apparent mean speed of translocation because it averaged a variation in speed with distance, variation in speed between or within sieve tubes, and it averaged the mean speed of all of the particles in the pulse. A wide range of speeds of translocation from 0.25 to 11 cm min−1 was observed but most of the variability was due to the variation in light available to the leaf. For example, the speed of translocation was proportional to the light level on either the whole plant or individual leaf. Shading of the leaf established that the light effect was not localized in either the feeding area

  11. SU-E-J-144: Low Activity Studies of Carbon 11 Activation Via GATE Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L; Butuceanu, C; Qu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of a Monte Carlo simulation code with low levels of activity (∼1,000Bq). Such activity levels are expected from phantoms and patients activated via a proton therapy beam. Methods: Three different ranges for a therapeutic proton radiation beam were examined in a Monte Carlo simulation code: 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm. For each range, the decay of an equivalent length{sup 11}C source and additional sources of length plus or minus one cm was studied in a benchmark PET simulation for activities of 1000, 2000 and 3000Bq. The ranges were chosen to coincide with a previous activation study, and the activities were chosen to coincide with the approximate level of isotope creation expected in a phantom or patient irradiated by a therapeutic proton beam. The GATE 7.0 simulation was completed on a cluster node, running Scientific Linux Carbon 6 (Red Hat©). The resulting Monte Carlo data were investigated with the ROOT (CERN) analysis tool. The half-life of{sup 11}C was extracted via a histogram fit to the number of simulated PET events vs. time. Results: The average slope of the deviation of the extracted carbon half life from the expected/nominal value vs. activity showed a generally positive value. This was unexpected, as the deviation should, in principal, decrease with increased activity and lower statistical uncertainty. Conclusion: For activity levels on the order of 1,000Bq, the behavior of a benchmark PET test was somewhat unexpected. It is important to be aware of the limitations of low activity PET images, and low activity Monte Carlo simulations. This work was funded in part by the Philips corporation.

  12. Carbon Counter-Electrode-Based Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells with Certified Efficiency Exceeding 11.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhonglin; Pan, Zhenxiao; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Zhao, Ke; Long, Donghui; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Yixin; Zhong, Xinhua; Yu, Jong-Sung; Bisquert, Juan

    2016-08-18

    The mean power conversion efficiency (PCE) of quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) is mainly limited by the low photovoltage and fill factor (FF), which are derived from the high redox potential of polysulfide electrolyte and the poor catalytic activity of the counter electrode (CE), respectively. Herein, we report that this problem is overcome by adopting Ti mesh supported mesoporous carbon (MC/Ti) CE. The confined area in Ti mesh substrate not only offers robust carbon film with submillimeter thickness to ensure high catalytic capacity, but also provides an efficient three-dimension electrical tunnel with better conductivity than state-of-art Cu2S/FTO CE. More importantly, the MC/Ti CE can down shift the redox potential of polysulfide electrolyte to promote high photovoltage. In all, MC/Ti CEs boost PCE of CdSe0.65Te0.35 QDSCs to a certified record of 11.16% (Jsc = 20.68 mA/cm(2), Voc = 0.798 V, FF = 0.677), an improvement of 24% related to previous record. This work thus paves a way for further improvement of performance of QDSCs.

  13. Radio-metabolite analysis of carbon-11 biochemical partitioning to non-structural carbohydrates for integrated metabolism and transport studies.

    PubMed

    Babst, Benjamin A; Karve, Abhijit A; Judt, Tatjana

    2013-06-01

    Metabolism and phloem transport of carbohydrates are interactive processes, yet each is often studied in isolation from the other. Carbon-11 ((11)C) has been successfully used to study transport and allocation processes dynamically over time. There is a need for techniques to determine metabolic partitioning of newly fixed carbon that are compatible with existing non-invasive (11)C-based methodologies for the study of phloem transport. In this report, we present methods using (11)C-labeled CO2 to trace carbon partitioning to the major non-structural carbohydrates in leaves-sucrose, glucose, fructose and starch. High-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) was adapted to provide multisample throughput, raising the possibility of measuring different tissues of the same individual plant, or for screening multiple plants. An additional advantage of HPTLC was that phosphor plate imaging of radioactivity had a much higher sensitivity and broader range of sensitivity than radio-HPLC detection, allowing measurement of (11)C partitioning to starch, which was previously not possible. Because of the high specific activity of (11)C and high sensitivity of detection, our method may have additional applications in the study of rapid metabolic responses to environmental changes that occur on a time scale of minutes. The use of this method in tandem with other (11)C assays for transport dynamics and whole-plant partitioning makes a powerful combination of tools to study carbohydrate metabolism and whole-plant transport as integrated processes.

  14. Synthesis of Ultra-incompressible sp 3 -Hybridized Carbon Nitride with 1:1 Stoichiometry

    DOE PAGES

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Lobanov, Sergey; Dong, Huafeng; ...

    2016-10-11

    Search of materials with C-N composition hold a great promise in creating materials which would rival diamond hardness due to the very strong and relatively low-ionic C-N bond. Early experimental and theoretical works on C-N compounds were based on structural similarity with binary A3B4 structural types; however, the synthesis of C3N4 remains elusive. Here we explored an unbiased synthesis from the elemental materials at high pressures and temperatures. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy we demonstrate the synthesis of highly incompressible Pnnm CN compound with sp3 hybridized carbon above 55 GPa and 7000 K. This result ismore » supported by first principles evolutionary search, which finds that Pnnm CN is the most stable compound above 10.9 GPa. On pressure release below 6 GPa the synthesized CN compound amorphizes reattaining its 1:1 stoichiometry as confirmed by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. Here, this work underscores the importance of understanding of novel high-pressure chemistry rules and it opens a new route for synthesis of superhard materials.« less

  15. Adrenal-derived 11-Oxygenated 19-Carbon Steroids are the Dominant Androgens in Classic 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Nanba, Aya T.; Chomic, Robert; Upadhyay, Sunil K.; Giordano, Thomas J.; Shields, James J.; Merke, Deborah P.; Rainey, William E.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To comprehensively characterize androgens and androgen precursors in classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD) and to gain insight to the mechanisms of their formation. Design Serum samples were obtained from 38 patients (19 men) with classic 21OHD, age 3-59, and 38 sex- and age-matched controls; 3 patients with 11β-hydroxylase deficiency; 4 patients with adrenal insufficiency; and 16 patients (8 men) undergoing adrenal vein sampling. Paraffin-embedded normal (n=5) and 21OHD adrenal tissue (n=3) was used for immunohistochemical studies. Methods We measured 11 steroids in all sera using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Immunofluroescence localized 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD3B2) and cytochrome b5 (CYB5A) within the normal and 21OHD adrenals. Results Four 11-oxygenated 19-carbon (11oxC19) steroids were significantly higher in male and female 21OHD patients than in controls: 11β-hydroxyandrostenedione, 11-ketoandrostenedione 11β-hydroxytestosterone, and 11-ketotestosterone (3-4-fold, p< 0.0001). For 21OHD patients, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone were positively correlated in females, but inversely correlated in males. All 11oxC19 steroids were higher in adrenal vein than in inferior vena cava samples from men and women and rose with cosyntropin stimulation. Only trace amounts of 11oxC19 steroids were found in sera from patients with 11β-hydroxylase deficiency and adrenal insufficiency, confirming their adrenal origin. HSD3B2 and CYB5A immunoreactivities were sharply segregated in the normal adrenal glands, whereas areas of overlapping expression were identified in the 21OHD adrenals. Conclusions All four 11oxC19 steroids are elevated in both men and women with classic 21OHD. Our data suggest that 11oxC19 steroids are specific biomarkers of adrenal-derived androgen excess. PMID:26865584

  16. Concentration and isotopic composition of carbon and sulfur in apollo 11 lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, I R; Smith, J W

    1970-01-30

    The concentration of carbon and sulfur in six samples ranged between 20 to 200 and 650 to 2300 parts per million, respectively. Carbon was present in gaseous, volatilizable, and nonvolatile forms, and terrestrial contaminants were recognized. Sulfur appeared to exist only as acid-volatile sulfide. The bulk fines contain a high concentration of carbon and a low concentration of sulfur. They are always enriched in the heavier isotope carbon-13 or sulfur-34. The fine-grained basaltic rocks show the reverse relation; lowest carbon, highest sulfide concentrations, and no apparent enrichment in heavy isotopes. The breccias are of intermediate composition.

  17. The putative glutamate receptor 1.1 (AtGLR1.1) functions as a regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jiman; Turano, Frank J.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to coordinate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism enables plants to regulate development and metabolic responses to different environmental conditions. The regulator(s) or sensor(s) that monitor crosstalk between biosynthetic pathways and ultimately control the flow of C or N through them have remained elusive. We used an antisense strategy to demonstrate that the putative glutamate receptor 1.1 (AtGLR1.1) functions as a regulator of C and N metabolism in Arabidopsis. Seeds from AtGLR1.1-deficient Arabidopsis (antiAtGLR1.1) lines did not germinate in the presence of an animal ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGLR) antagonist, but germination was restored upon coincubation with an iGLR agonist or the putative ligand glutamate. In antiAtGLR1.1 lines, endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations increased with iGLR antagonist treatments and decreased with coincubation with an iGLR agonist, suggesting that germination was controlled by ABA. antiAtGLR1.1 seedlings also exhibited sensitivity to increased levels of Ca2+ compared with wild type, and they exhibited a conditional phenotype that was sensitive to the C:N ratio. In the presence of C, specifically sucrose, but not glucose, mannitol, or sorbitol, antiAtGLR1.1 seeds did not germinate, but germination was restored upon coincubation with \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{NO}}_{3}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}, but not \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{NH}}_{4}^{+}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}. Immunoblot, isoenzyme, and RT-PCR analyses indicate that AtGLR1.1 regulates the

  18. Facile radiosynthesis of new carbon-11-labeled propanamide derivatives as selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) radioligands for prostate cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingzhang; Wang, Min; Miller, Kathy D; Zheng, Qi-Huang

    2011-12-11

    The androgen receptor (AR) is an attractive target for the treatment and molecular imaging of prostate cancer. New carbon-11-labeled propanamide derivatives were first designed and synthesized as selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) radioligands for prostate cancer imaging using the biomedical imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET). The target tracers, (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide ([(11)C]8a), (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide ([(11)C]8 e), (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide ([(11)C]8c) and (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide ([(11)C]8 g), were prepared by O-[(11)C]methylation of their corresponding precursors, (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide (9a), (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide (9b), (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide (9 c) and (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide (9 d), with [(11)C]CH(3)OTf under basic conditions and isolated by a simplified C-18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) method in 55 ± 5% (n = 5) radiochemical yields based on [(11)C]CO(2) and decay corrected to end of bombardment (EOB). The overall synthesis time from EOB was 23 min, the radiochemical purity was >99%, and the specific activity at end of synthesis (EOS) was 277.5 ± 92.5 GBq/μmol (n = 5).

  19. 11 things a geologist thinks an engineer should know about carbonate beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, R.B.; ,

    2000-01-01

    A review is given on the geological aspects of carbonate beaches that a geologist thinks may be useful for an engineer. Though, Geologists not involved in engineering problems may find it difficult to know what an engineer should understand about carbonate beaches. Nevertheless, there are at least eleven topics that are potentially very useful for engineers to keep in mind. This paper emits the discussions of certain kinds of carbonate shorelines that are beyond the scope of engineering issues, and focuses on sand-sized coastal carbonate deposits.

  20. In Vivo Tissue Pharmacokinetics of Carbon-11-Labeled Clozapine in Healthy Volunteers: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, HS; Kim, E; Moon, BS; Lim, NH; Lee, BC; Kim, SE

    2015-01-01

    We investigated clozapine (CLZ) tissue pharmacokinetics in vivo by using carbon-11-labeled CLZ (11C-CLZ) and positron emission tomography (PET). Eight healthy volunteers underwent 11C-CLZ studies wherein computed tomography image acquisition was followed by PET scans (whole-body, four; brain, four). After bolus intravenous 11C-CLZ injection, PET images were acquired at various timepoints for 2–3 hours. Tissue 11C-CLZ signals were plotted over time, and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined. High 11C-CLZ radioactivity was detected in the liver and brain, implying CLZ hepatic metabolism and efficient blood–brain barrier penetration. The urinary and hepatobiliary tracts were involved in 11C-CLZ excretion. Moderate to high radioactivity was observed in the dopaminergic and serotonergic receptor-rich brain regions, indicating CLZ binding to multiple receptor types. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the determination of 11C-CLZ tissue pharmacokinetics in humans. PET using radiolabeled drugs can provide valuable information that could complement plasma pharmacokinetic data. PMID:26225256

  1. Non-detection of HC11N towards TMC-1: constraining the chemistry of large carbon-chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Ryan A.; Shingledecker, Christopher N.; Langston, Glen; McGuire, Brett A.; Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; Burkhardt, Andrew M.; Corby, Joanna; Booth, Shawn T.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Turner, Barry; Remijan, Anthony J.

    2016-12-01

    Bell et al. reported the first detection of the cyanopolyyne HC11N towards the cold dark cloud TMC-1; no subsequent detections have been reported towards any source. Additional observations of cyanopolyynes and other carbon-chain molecules towards TMC-1 have shown a log-linear trend between molecule size and column density, and in an effort to further explore the underlying chemical processes driving this trend, we have analysed Green Bank Telescope observations of HC9N and HC11N towards TMC-1. Although we find an HC9N column density consistent with previous values, HC11N is not detected and we derive an upper limit column density significantly below that reported in Bell et al. Using a state-of-the-art chemical model, we have investigated possible explanations of non-linearity in the column density trend. Despite updating the chemical model to better account for ion-dipole interactions, we are not able to explain the non-detection of HC11N, and we interpret this as evidence of previously unknown carbon-chain chemistry. We propose that cyclization reactions may be responsible for the depleted HC11N abundance, and that products of these cyclization reactions should be investigated as candidate interstellar molecules.

  2. 11 things a geologist thinks an engineer should know about carbonate beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Magoon, Orville T.; Robbins, Lisa L.; Ewing, Lesley

    2002-01-01

    This is a review of the geological aspects of carbonate beaches that a geologist thinks may be useful for an engineer. Classical geologic problems of carbonate beaches, for example how ancient examples are recognized in rock sequences, are of little interest to engineers. Geologists not involved in engineering problems may find it difficult to know what an engineer should understand about carbonate beaches. Nevertheless, there are at least eleven topics that are potentially very useful for engineers to keep in mind. These eleven are chosen with as much thought going into what has been omitted as has been given to the eleven included topics. Some qualifications are in order: First, this paper does not discuss certain kinds of carbonate shorelines that are beyond the scope of engineering issues. For example, this review does not discuss very high-energy carbonate boulder beaches. These beaches are comprised of pieces of carbonate material ganging in size from ten centimeters to meters. Typically, these are high-energy storm deposits formed from pieces of either eroded carbonate rock or other large carbonate pieces such as pieces of large corals. This paper focuses on sand-sized (0.0625–2.0 mm) coastal carbonate deposits. Second, offshore beaches will not be discussed. There are many carbonate beaches that form on banks or shoals exposed at low tide, but our discussion is confined to what most people think of when they go to some tropical island and/or resort and walk out to lay on the beach. Third, this paper does not consider mixed carbonate/quartz sand beaches. While mixed beaches are common, only the end member of purely carbonate sand beaches is considered. Fourth, there will be no order of preference of the eleven topics. And lastly, these eleven topics are not consensus items. These are simply one geologist s thoughts about the aspects of carbonate beaches that would be useful for engineering colleagues to keep in mind. Where possible, general reference is

  3. Mechanical properties and hardness of new carbon-rich superhard C11N4 from first-principles investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yingchun

    2012-06-01

    The structural, mechanical properties and hardness of the new carbon-rich material C11N4 are studied by first-principles total energy calculations based on the density-functional theory. We use the empirical equations of state (EOS) to investigate the lattice properties and bulk modulus. It is found that the calculated lattice constants and bulk modulus are in good agreement with previous calculations. And the full set elastic constants are calculated using the stress-strain method. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximation is used to evaluate the mechanical moduli. The elastic constants show that the two phases of C11N4 are mechanically stable. The tetragonal-C11N4 (α-C11N4) exhibits larger mechanical moduli than the orthorhombic-C11N4 (β-C11N4). The mechanical anisotropy is calculated of several different anisotropic indexes and factors, such as universal anisotropic index (AU), the percent anisotropy (AG and AB) and shear anisotropic factors (A1, A2 and A3). Furthermore, the hardness of α-C11N4 and β-C11N4 are evaluated according to the intrinsic hardness calculation theory. α-C11N4 is predicted to be a superhard material with the Vickers hardness of 67.17 GPa, which is slightly higher than that of the cubic boron nitride. And the β-C11N4 is also a superhard material with the calculated Vickers hardness of 45.63 GPa. C11N4 can be considered as candidate superhard compounds.

  4. Biodistribution of a positron-emitting suicide inactivator of monoamine oxidase, carbon-11 pargyline, in mice and a rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiwata, K.; Ido, T.; Yanai, K.; Kawashima, K.; Miura, Y.; Monma, M.; Watanuki, S.; Takahashi, T.; Iwata, R.

    1985-06-01

    Carbon-11 (/sup 11/C) pargyline, which is a suicide inactivator of Type B monoamine oxidase (MAO), was synthesized by the reaction of N-demethylpargyline with /sup 11/CH/sub 3/l. Biodistribution was investigated in mice, and positron tomographic images of the heart and lung in a rabbit were obtained. The distribution of /sup 11/C after administration of (/sup 11/C)pargyline was measured in several organs and blood at various time intervals. After 30 min its concentrations in the organs were constant. Subcellular distribution studies in the brain, lung, liver, and kidney showed that 59-70% of the /sup 11/C became acid-insoluble and 9-33% was present in the crude mitochondrial fraction at 60 min after injection. The uptakes of the /sup 11/C in each organ except for the kidney and spleen seemed to correlate with the in vitro enzymatic activity of Type B MAO. At high loading dose a nonspecific uptake was observed.

  5. Webinar Presentations: STAR Black Carbon Webinar Series (11/21 and 12/9)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These presentations were given at the STAR Black Carbon Webinar Series held on Nov. 21, 2016 (Topic: Interactions with Water) and on Dec. 9, 2016 (Topic: Representation at Different Geographic Scales).

  6. Stable isotopic compositions of elemental carbon in PM1.1 in north suburb of Nanjing Region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhaobing; Jiang, Wenjuan; Chen, Shanli; Sun, Deling; Shi, Lei; Zeng, Gang; Rui, Maoling

    2016-02-01

    Stable isotopic compositions (δ13C) of elemental carbon (EC) in PM1.1 in north suburb of Nanjing region were determined in order to quantitatively evaluate the carbon sources of atmospheric fine particles during different seasons. Besides, δ13C values from potential sources such as coal combustion, vehicle exhaust, biomass burning, and dust were synchronously measured. The results showed that the average δ13C values of EC in PM1.1 in winter and summer were - 23.89 ± 1.6‰ and - 24.76 ± 0.9‰, respectively. Comparing with δ13C values from potential sources, we concluded that the main sources of EC in PM1.1 were from the emission of coal combustion and vehicle exhaust. The higher δ13C values in winter than those in summer were chiefly attributed to the more coal consumption. Combining with the concentrations of SO42 - and K+ in PM1.1, the high δ13C values of EC on 24 December and 27 December 2013 were ascribed to extra input of corn straw burning in addition to coal combustion and vehicle exhaust.

  7. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,α)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  8. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    DOE PAGES

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; ...

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,α)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass.more » It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.« less

  9. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide.

    PubMed

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J; Fowler, Joanna S; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([(11)C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [(11)C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of (12)C-cyanide ((12)CN¯). The [(11)C]CN¯ is produced from [(11)C]CO2, which is generated by the (14)N(p,α)(11)C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [(11)C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to (12)CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33µA for 1 and 10min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [(11)C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [(11)C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  10. Carbon-11 and radioiodinated derivatives of lysergic acid diethylamide: Ligands for the study of serotonin S2 receptors in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lever, J.R.; Hartig, P.R.; Wong, D.F.; Scheffel, U.; Dannals, R.F.; Wilson, A.A.; Ravert, H.T.; Hoffman, B.J.; Frost, J.J.; Burns, H.D.

    1985-05-01

    2-(/sup 125/1)-LSD binds selectively and with high affinity to serotonin S2 receptors in vitro. In the present study, the authors prepared 2-(/sup 123/1)-LSD as well as a carbon-11 labeled analog. They also characterized the in vivo binding of these tracers to receptor sites in mouse brain to assess their potential for tomographic imaging of S2 receptors in man. The temporal distribution of 2-(/sup 125/1)-LSD paralleled the density of S2 receptors. Regional selectivity was maximal after 15 minutes when tissue to cerebellum ratios were: frontal cortex (2.6), olfactory tubercles (2.4), striatum (2.3), and cortex (2.0). Preinjection of ketanserin, a potent S2 antagonist, inhibited binding. 2-(/sup 123/1)-LSD, prepared in 20% yield from LSD and electrophilic I-123, gave similar results in vivo and may be useful for SPECT studies. The authors then synthesized N1-((/sup 11/C)-Me)-2-Br-LSD (/sup 11/C-MBL) from (/sup 11/C)-methyl iodide and 2-Br-LSD for PET imaging trials. /sup 11/C-MBL was isolated by HPLC in high chemical and radiochemical purity within 30 minutes from E.O.B. The average radiochemical yield was 20% and the specific activity was determined by U.V. spectroscopy to be up to 1300Ci/mMol (E.O.S.). 11C-MBL showed greater regional selectivity in vivo in mouse brain than 2-(/sup 125/1)-LSD. After 30 minutes, peak tissue to cerebellum ratios were: frontal cortex (5.4), olfactory tubercles (4.2), striatum (3.0), and cortex (2.8). Preinjection of ketanserin markedly inhibited /sup 11/C-MBL binding. /sup 11/C-MBL is a promising candidate for PET studies of S2 receptors.

  11. Carbon-11-cocaine binding compared at subpharmacological and pharmacological doses: A PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J. |

    1995-07-01

    The authors have characterized cocaine binding in the brain to a high-affinity site on the dopamine transporter using PET and tracer doses of [{sup 11}C]cocaine in the baboon in vivo. The binding pattern, however, of cocaine at tracer (subpharmacological) doses may differ from that observed when the drug is taken in behaviorally active doses, particularly since in vitro studies have shown that cocaine also binds to low affinity binding sites. PET was used to compare and characterize [{sup 11}C]cocaine binding in the baboon brain at low subpharmacological (18 {mu}g average dose) and at pharmacological (8000 {mu}g) doses. Serial studies on the same day in the same baboon were used to assess the reproducibility of repeated measures and to assess the effects of drugs which inhibit the dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Time-activity curves from brain and the arterial plasma input function were used to calculate the steady-state distribution volume (DV). At subpharmacological doses, [{sup 11}C]cocaine had a more homogeneous distribution. Bmax/Kd for sub-pharmacological [{sup 11}C]cocaine corresponded to 0.5-0.6 and for pharmacological [{sup 11}C]cocaine it corresponded to 0.1-0.2. Two-point Scatchard analysis gave Bmax = 2300 pmole/g and Kd = 3600 nM. Bmax/Kd for sub-pharmacological doses of [{sup 11}C]cocaine was decreased by cocaine and drugs that inhibit the dopamine transporter, to 0.1-0.2, but not by drugs that inhibit the serotonin or the norepinephrine transporter. None of these drugs changed Bmax/Kd for a pharmacological dose of [{sup 11}C]cocaine. At subpharmacological doses, [{sup 11}C]cocaine binds predominantly to a high-affinity site on the dopamine transporter. 36 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Inhalation Toxicology. 11. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Carbon Monoxide Toxicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    TEMPERATURE ON CARBON MONOXIDE TOXICITY INTRODUCTION The use of the laboratory rat as an animal model for determining the toxicity of combustion gases is...response of rats during exercise. J Appl Physiol. 1968; 24:747-50. 7. Hubbard RW, Matthew WT, Linduska JD, et al. The laboratory rat as a model for

  13. In vivo measurement of carbon-11 thymidine uptake in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Martiat, P.; Ferrant, A.; Labar, D.; Cogneau, M.; Bol, A.; Michel, C.; Michaux, J.L.; Sokal, G.

    1988-10-01

    Carbon-11 thymidine (TdR) uptake using positron emission tomography (PET) has been measured in ten patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The rate of TdR uptake (mean +/- s.d.) was of 0.009 +/- 0.006 mumol.100 cc-1.min-1 in low-grade NHL. This rate was 0.063 +/- 0.049 mumol.100 cc-1.min-1 in intermediate-grade NHL and 0.159 mumol.100 cc-1.min-1 in a patient with high-grade NHL. Lymphoma radioactivity reached a plateau at 0.42 +/- 0.22%. 100 cc-1 of the injected dose from 10 min after injection. The highest /sup 11/C uptakes were observed in the kidneys and in the liver (3.30 +/- 1.30 and 2.10 +/- 0.05%. 100 cc-1 of the injected dose, respectively). The lymphoma-to-muscle ratio was of 11.8 +/- 1.7, whereas the lymphoma-to-intestine ratio was of 1.5 +/- 0.7. Accordingly, the measurement of (/sup 11/C)TdR uptake in the abdomen may need other imaging methods for adequate interpretation. The results suggest that (/sup 11/C)TdR uptake using PET might be a method for noninvasively measuring cell proliferation in vivo.

  14. Noninvasive estimation of regional myocardial oxygen consumption by positron emission tomography with carbon-11 acetate in patients with myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, M.N.; Geltman, E.M.; Brown, M.A.; Henes, C.G.; Weinheimer, C.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R. )

    1989-11-01

    We previously demonstrated in experimental studies that myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) can be estimated noninvasively with positron emission tomography (PET) from analysis of the myocardial turnover rate constant (k) after administration of carbon-11 (11C) acetate. To determine regional k in healthy human subjects and to estimate alterations in MVO2 accompanying myocardial ischemia, we administered (11C)acetate to five healthy human volunteers and to six patients with myocardial infarction. Extraction of (11C)acetate by the myocardium was avid and clearance from the blood-pool rapid yielding myocardial images of excellent quality. Regional k was homogeneous in myocardium of healthy volunteers (coefficient variation = 11%). In patients, k in regions remote from the area of infarction was not different from values in myocardium of healthy human volunteers (0.061 +/- 0.025 compared with 0.057 +/- 0.008 min-1). In contrast, MVO2 in the center of the infarct region was only 6% of that in remote regions (p less than 0.01). In four patients studied within 48 hr of infarction and again more than seven days after the acute event, regional k and MVO2 did not change. The approach developed should facilitate evaluation of the efficacy of interventions designed to enhance recovery of jeopardized myocardium and permit estimation of regional MVO2 and metabolic reserve underlying cardiac disease of diverse etiologies.

  15. Assessment of myocardial oxidative metabolic reserve with positron emission tomography and carbon-11 acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Henes, C.G.; Bergmann, S.R.; Walsh, M.N.; Sobel, B.E.; Geltman, E.M. )

    1989-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that positron emission tomography (PET) with ({sup 11}C)acetate allows noninvasive regional quantification of myocardial oxidative metabolism. To assess the metabolic response of normal myocardium to increased work (oxidative metabolic reserve), clearance of myocardial {sup 11}C activity after administration of ({sup 11}C)acetate i.v. was measured with PET in seven normal subjects at rest and during dobutamine infusion. At rest, clearance of {sup 11}C was monoexponential and homogeneous. The rate constant of the first phase of {sup 11}C clearance, k1, averaged 0.054 {plus minus} 0.014 min-1 at a rate-pressure produce (RPP) of 7329 {plus minus} 1445 mmHg X bpm. During dobutamine infusion, RPP increased by an average of 141% to 17,493 {plus minus} 3582 mm Hg Z bpm. Clearance of 11C became biexponential and remained homogeneous. k1 averaged 0.198 {plus minus} 0.043 min-1 with a mean coefficient of variation of 16%.. k1 and RPP correlated closely (r = 0.91; p less than 0.001), and the slope of the k1/RPP relation remained consistent in all subjects (1.48 {plus minus} 0.42). These findings suggest that PET with ({sup 11}C)acetate and dobutamine stress may provide a promising approach for evaluation of regional myocardial oxidative metabolic reserve in patients with cardiac diseases of diverse etiologies and for assessment of the efficacy of interventions designed to enhance the recovery of metabolically comprised myocardium.

  16. Carbon-11-methionine and PET in evaluation of treatment response of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Huovinen, R.; Leskinen-Kallio, S.; Någren, K.; Lehikoinen, P.; Ruotsalainen, U.; Teräs, M.

    1993-01-01

    Uptake of L-methyl-11C-methionine (11C-methionine) in breast cancer metastases was studied with positron emission tomography (PET). Eight patients with soft tissue metastases were studied twice: before the onset of chemotherapy (4), hormonal therapy (3) or radiotherapy (1) and 3-14 weeks later. The radioactivity concentration of the low molecular weight fraction of venous plasma samples separated by fast gel filtration was used as input function. The input corrected uptake rate of 11C-methionine (Ki) in breast cancer metastases before the treatment ranged between 0.035 and 0.186 1 min-1 and the standardised uptake value (SUV) between 2.0 and 11.4. The uptake of 11C-methionine into the metastases decreased when clinical objective stability or regression of the metastases was later obtained and increased in cases where progressive disease was seen during treatment. We conclude that metabolic changes in the amino acid metabolism detected by PET precede the clinical response, and may be of clinical value in predicting the treatment response. Images Figure 1 PMID:8471437

  17. Imaging of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor in tumor: carbon ion irradiation reduced the uptake of a positron emission tomography ligand [11C]DAC in tumor.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Koike, Sachiko; Hatori, Akiko; Yanamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawamura, Kazunori; Yui, Joji; Kumata, Katsushi; Ando, Koichi; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of carbon ion irradiation on the uptake of N-benzyl-N-11C-methyl-2-(7-methyl-8-oxo-2-phenyl-7,8-dihydro-9H-purin-9-yl)acetamide ([(11)C]DAC), a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), in tumor cells and tumor-bearing mice. Spontaneous murine fibrosarcoma (NFSa) cells were implanted into the right hind legs of syngeneic C3H male mice. Conditioning irradiation with 290 MeV/u carbon ions was delivered to the 7- to 8-mm tumors In vitro uptake of [(11)C]DAC was measured in single NFSa cells isolated from NFSa-bearing mice after irradiation. In vivo biodistribution of [(11)C]DAC in NFSa-bearing mice was determined by small animal PET scanning and dissection. In vitro autoradiography was performed using tumor sections prepared from mice after PET scanning. In vitro and in vivo uptake of [(11)C]DAC in single NFSa cells and NFSa-bearing mice was significantly reduced by carbon ion irradiation. The decrease in [(11)C]DAC uptake in the tumor sections was mainly due to the change in PBR expression. In conclusion, [(11)C]DAC PET responded to the change in PBR expression in tumors caused by carbon ion irradiation in this study. Thus, [(11)C]DAC is a promising predictor for evaluating the effect of carbon ion radiotherapy.

  18. Evaluation of DNA synthesis with carbon-11-labeled 4′-thiothymidine

    PubMed Central

    Toyohara, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In the cancer research field, the preferred method for evaluating the proliferative activity of cancer cells in vivo is to measure DNA synthesis rates. The cellular proliferation rate is one of the most important cancer characteristics, and represents the gold standard of pathological diagnosis. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to evaluate in vivo DNA synthetic activity through visualization of enhanced nucleoside metabolism. However, methods for the quantitative measurement of DNA synthesis rates have not been fully clarified. Several groups have been engaged in research on 4′-[methyl-11C]-thiothymidine (11C-4DST) in an effort to develop a PET tracer that allows quantitative measurement of in vivo DNA synthesis rates. This mini-review summarizes the results of recent studies of the in vivo measurement of cancer DNA synthesis rates using 11C-4DST. PMID:27721942

  19. Carbon-11 labeling of CP-126,998*: A radiotracer for in vivo studies of acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Musachio, J.L.; Flesher, J.E.; Scheffel, U.

    1996-05-01

    The study of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) via PET is of interest as reduced activity of this enzyme has been observed in Alzheimer`s disease. Our efforts to develop a radiotracer for mapping of AChE have focused on the N-benzylpiperidine benzisoxazole, CP-126,998, a highly potent (IC{sub 50}=0.48 nm) and selective inhibitor of AChE. High specific activity [C-11] CP-126,998 was synthesized (14 - 24% radiochemical yield, non-decay corrected) by treatment of the desmethyl precursor, CP-118,954, with [C-11] methyl iodide and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide in DMF. In vivo studies with [C-11] CP-126,998 in mice show that this radiotracer displays highest uptake in striatum (6.2 %ID/g), a brain region known to be rich in AChE. The (striatum-cerebellum)/cerebellar radioactivity ratio reached a maximum of 4.3 at 30 min postinjection, and this ratio decreased to 2.4 at 120 min. .Radiotracer binding was saturable in vivo by pretreatment with CP-118,954. Pretreatment of mice with diisopropylfluorophosphate (4 mg/kg i.p.), a known AChE inhibitor, significantly inhibited binding in striatum in a dose-dependent manner. Initial results suggest that [C-11] CP-126,998 may prove useful as a marker for the study of AChE in humans via PET.

  20. Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 chemistry devoted to molecular probes for imaging the brain with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Dollé, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the living human brain in real-time and in a noninvasive way was for centuries only a dream, made, however, possible today with the remarkable development during the four last decades of powerful molecular imaging techniques, and especially positron emission tomography (PET). Molecular PET imaging relies, from a chemical point of view, on the use and preparation of a positron-emitting radiolabelled probe or radiotracer, notably compounds incorporating one of two short-lived radionuclides fluorine-18 (T1/2 : 109.8 min) and carbon-11 (T1/2 : 20.38 min). The growing availability and interest for the radiohalogen fluorine-18 in radiopharmaceutical chemistry undoubtedly results from its convenient half-life and the successful use in clinical oncology of 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([(18) F]FDG). The special interest of carbon-11 is not only that carbon is present in virtually all biomolecules and drugs allowing therefore for isotopic labelling of their chemical structures but also that a given molecule could be radiolabelled at different functions or sites, permitting to explore (or to take advantage of) in vivo metabolic pathways. PET chemistry includes production of these short-lived radioactive isotopes via nuclear transmutation reactions using a cyclotron, and is directed towards the development of rapid synthetic methods, at the trace level, for the introduction of these nuclides into a molecule, as well as the use of fast purification, analysis and formulation techniques. PET chemistry is the driving force in molecular PET imaging, and this special issue of the Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals, which is strongly chemistry and radiochemistry-oriented, aims at illustrating, be it in part only, the state-of-the-art arsenal of reactions currently available and its potential for the research and development of specific molecular probes labelled with the positron emitters carbon-11 and fluorine-18, with optimal imaging

  1. Measurement of Gamma Decay Strengths in Scandium -41 and CARBON-11.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKamy, Jerry Neal

    1982-03-01

    Two different investigations were undertaken that involve the study of gamma decay from nuclei produced in nuclear reactions. In one experiment, the structure of an unusual intermediate structure state in ('41)Sc was investigated; the second experiment sought to determine the gamma decay strength of ('11)C at an excitation energy of astrophysical significance. A cluster of intermediate structure states is known to exist in ('41)Sc centered around an excitation energy of 7.2 MeV. These states are thought to be formed from the relatively pure coupling of a 2p(, 1/2) proton to the. (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI). excited state of the ('40)Ca core. If this interpretation is correct, there should be a reasonable probability for the 2p(, 1/2) proton dropping into the d(,3/2) hole with the emission of a 7.2 MeV E1 gamma ray leaving the ('41)Sc nucleus in its ground state. The study of the ('40)Ca(p,(gamma))('41)Sc reaction was undertaken to measure the anticipated enhancement of the gamma decay widths of these states. Seven states, including a state of ambiguous spin which is not a member of the intermediate structure, were examined for capture gamma ray decay to the ground state of ('41)Sc. The lowest of these states occurred at E(,p) = 6.035 MeV and the highest state occurred at 6.405 MeV. No gamma decay enhancement was observed. Indeed, only upper limits of (TURN)10(' -3) w.u. for the E1 transitions from the 5/2('+) states and (TURN)10('-2) w.u. for the expected M1 transitions from the intruder state were set. The lack of enhancement may arise either from a cancellation of the transition amplitude due to configuration mixing with collective states of the core or a radial wave function mismatch. The second experiment sought to measure the gamma decay width of the 8.105 MeV state in ('11)C. This state, if it has a sufficiently large gamma decay width, could influence the stellar nucleosynthesis of ('11)B and ('12)C. This state can be populated by

  2. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Al-11 wt% Si Alloy via Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosa, Ahmed A.; Mohamed, Mohamed I.; Ismael, Mustafa K.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different portions (0.5, l, 2, 4) wt% were added to a gas atomized Al-ll wt% Si powder. The Al-ll wt% /MWCNTS nanocomposite powder was examined by FESEM, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD). Air plasma spraying (APS) was used to spray Al-ll wt% Si/MwCNTs nanocomposite powder on aluminum alloy AA6082-T6 substrates. Al-ll wt% Si/MWCNTs nanocomposite coating layer was examined using FESEM/EDS, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and HRTEM. SEM/EDS showed that Al4C3 is formed at the interface e between the coating layer and the substrate in Al-ll wt% Si/4 wt% MWCNTs plasma spray coating. The adhesion test showed good adhesion in the ranges 5-l5 MPa between the coating layer and the substrate. Microhardness test of the air plasma sprayed (APS) Al-ll wt% Si/MWNTs nanocomposite layer is increased with the MWCNTs wt%.

  3. Taking out one billion tones of carbon: the magic of China's 11thFive-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark D.; Fridley, David

    2007-05-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious targetfor energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country sgross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20 percent from 2005 to2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and bindingtarget has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift inChina's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energydevelopment. The 20 percent energy intensity target also translates intoan annual reduction of over one billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making theChinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in theworld today. While it is still too early to tell whether China willachieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend inenergy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options towardmeeting the 20 percent target using a detailed endues energymodel.

  4. Mathematical modeling of enzyme production using Trichoderma harzianum P49P11 and sugarcane bagasse as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Gelain, Lucas; da Cruz Pradella, José Geraldo; da Costa, Aline Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model to describe the kinetics of enzyme production by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum P49P11 was developed using a low cost substrate as main carbon source (pretreated sugarcane bagasse). The model describes the cell growth, variation of substrate concentration and production of three kinds of enzymes (cellulases, beta-glucosidase and xylanase) in different sugarcane bagasse concentrations (5; 10; 20; 30; 40 gL(-1)). The 10 gL(-1) concentration was used to validate the model and the other to parameter estimation. The model for enzyme production has terms implicitly representing induction and repression. Substrate variation was represented by a simple degradation rate. The models seem to represent well the kinetics with a good fit for the majority of the assays. Validation results indicate that the models are adequate to represent the kinetics for a biotechnological process.

  5. No-carrier-added carbon-11-labeled sn-1,2- and sn-1,3-diacylglycerols by (11C)propyl ketene method

    SciTech Connect

    Imahori, Y.; Fujii, R.; Ueda, S.; Ido, T.; Nishino, H.; Moriyama, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Nakahashi, H. )

    1991-08-01

    This article describes the preparation of sn-1,2-(11C)diacylglycerols and sn-1,3-(11C)diacylglycerols by a no-carrier-added reaction based on a labeling method using (1-11C)propyl ketene, which is one of the most potent acylating agents. (1-11C)Propyl ketene was produced by pyrolytic decomposition of (1-11C)butyric acid and was trapped in pyridine containing L-alpha-palmitoyl-lysophosphatidylcholine, producing L-alpha-palmitoyl-2-(1-11C)butyryl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine. The authors adopted an enzymatic reaction to remove the phosphorylcholine, in which L-alpha-palmitoyl-2-(1-11C)butyryl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine was incubated with phospholipase C, hydrolyzing to produce 1-palmitoyl-sn-2-(1-11C)butyrylglycerol. Total synthesis time was about 50 minutes and the specific activity was estimated at 93 GBq/mumol (2.5 Ci/mumol) at end of synthesis. Radiochemical yield was 3.8% based on the trapped 11CO2. sn-1,3-(11C)Diacylglycerol was also synthesized by (1-11C)propyl ketene reaction with 1-palmitoyl-sn-glycerol in a single procedure. The regional brain tissue radioactivities obtained in sn-1,2-(11C)diacylglycerol were higher than those of sn-1,3-(11C)diacylglycerol, and the regional values varied widely. In autoradiography of brain slices from conscious rats, sn-1,2-(11C)diacylglycerol incorporation sites were discretely localized, especially in the amygdala, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus, suggesting that intensive neuronal processing occurred in these areas on the basis of phosphatidylinositol turnover.

  6. An investigation of electromagnetic response of composite polymer materials containing carbon nanostructures within the range of frequencies 10 MHz - 1.1 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslyaev, V. I.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Zhuravlev, V. A.; Mazov, I. N.; Korovin, E. Yu.; Moseenkov, S. I.; Dorozhkin, K. V.

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic characteristics of composite polymer materials based on multilayer carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) and nano-onion carbon structures in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) matrix are investigated. The purpose is to identify a functional relationship between the size, kind, type of processing, concentration of nanotubes and electromagnetic characteristics of composite materials within the frequency range 10 MHz - 1.1 THz. Use is made of the coaxial waveguide, resonator, and quasi-optical methods. The spectra of reflection and transmission coefficients are reported. The composite materials based on carbon nanostructures are shown to actively interact with electromagnetic radiation in a wide range of frequencies.

  7. Synthesis of Ultra-incompressible sp 3 -Hybridized Carbon Nitride with 1:1 Stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Lobanov, Sergey; Dong, Huafeng; Oganov, Artem R.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Konôpková, Zuzana; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-10-11

    Search of materials with C-N composition hold a great promise in creating materials which would rival diamond hardness due to the very strong and relatively low-ionic C-N bond. Early experimental and theoretical works on C-N compounds were based on structural similarity with binary A3B4 structural types; however, the synthesis of C3N4 remains elusive. Here we explored an unbiased synthesis from the elemental materials at high pressures and temperatures. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy we demonstrate the synthesis of highly incompressible Pnnm CN compound with sp3 hybridized carbon above 55 GPa and 7000 K. This result is supported by first principles evolutionary search, which finds that Pnnm CN is the most stable compound above 10.9 GPa. On pressure release below 6 GPa the synthesized CN compound amorphizes reattaining its 1:1 stoichiometry as confirmed by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. Here, this work underscores the importance of understanding of novel high-pressure chemistry rules and it opens a new route for synthesis of superhard materials.

  8. Temporal changes in allocation and partitioning of new carbon as (11)C elicited by simulated herbivory suggest that roots shape aboveground responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, Abigail P; Agtuca, Beverly; Appel, Heidi M; Ferrieri, Richard A; Schultz, Jack C

    2013-02-01

    Using the short-lived isotope (11)C (t(1/2) = 20.4 min) as (11)CO(2), we captured temporal changes in whole-plant carbon movement and partitioning of recently fixed carbon into primary and secondary metabolites in a time course (2, 6, and 24 h) following simulated herbivory with the well-known defense elicitor methyl jasmonate (MeJA) to young leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Both (11)CO(2) fixation and (11)C-photosynthate export from the labeled source leaf increased rapidly (2 h) following MeJA treatment relative to controls, with preferential allocation of radiolabeled resources belowground. At the same time, (11)C-photosynthate remaining in the aboveground sink tissues showed preferential allocation to MeJA-treated, young leaves, where it was incorporated into (11)C-cinnamic acid. By 24 h, resource allocation toward roots returned to control levels, while allocation to the young leaves increased. This corresponded to an increase in invertase activity and the accumulation of phenolic compounds, particularly anthocyanins, in young leaves. Induction of phenolics was suppressed in sucrose transporter mutant plants (suc2-1), indicating that this phenomenon may be controlled, in part, by phloem loading at source leaves. However, when plant roots were chilled to 5°C to disrupt carbon flow between above- and belowground tissues, source leaves failed to allocate resources belowground or toward damaged leaves following wounding and MeJA treatment to young leaves, suggesting that roots may play an integral role in controlling how plants respond defensively aboveground.

  9. USGS Arctic Ocean carbon cruise 2011: field activity H-01-11-AR to collect carbon data in the Arctic Ocean, August - September 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Yates, Kimberly K.; Knorr, Paul O.; Wynn, Jonathan; Lisle, John; Buczkowski, Brian J.; Moore, Barbara; Mayer, Larry; Armstrong, Andrew; Byrne, Robert H.; Liu, Xuewu

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is absorbed at the surface of the ocean by reacting with seawater to form a weak, naturally occurring acid called carbonic acid. As atmospheric carbon dioxide increases, the concentration of carbonic acid in seawater also increases, causing a decrease in ocean pH and carbonate mineral saturation states, a process known as ocean acidification. The oceans have absorbed approximately 525 billion tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or about one-quarter to one-third of the anthropogenic carbon emissions released since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution (Sabine and others, 2004). Global surveys of ocean chemistry have revealed that seawater pH has decreased by about 0.1 units (from a pH of 8.2 to 8.1) since the 1700s due to absorption of carbon dioxide (Caldeira and Wickett, 2003; Orr and others, 2005; Raven and others, 2005). Modeling studies, based on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) CO2 emission scenarios, predict that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels could reach more than 500 parts per million (ppm) by the middle of this century and 800 ppm by the year 2100, causing an additional decrease in surface water pH of 0.3 pH units. Ocean acidification is a global threat and is already having profound and deleterious effects on the geology, biology, chemistry, and socioeconomic resources of coastal and marine habitats (Raven and others, 2005; Ruttiman, 2006). The polar and sub-polar seas have been identified as the bellwethers for global ocean acidification.

  10. Determination of δ11B by HR-ICP-MS from mass limited samples: Application to natural carbonates and water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sambuddha; Owen, Robert; Kerr, Joanna; Greaves, Mervyn; Elderfield, Henry

    2014-09-01

    We present an improved method for accurate and precise determination of the boron isotopic composition (11B/10B) of carbonate and water samples using a mineral acid matrix and HR-ICP-MS. Our method for δ11B determination utilizes a micro-distillation based boron purification technique for both carbonate and seawater matrices. The micro-distillation method is characterized by low blank (⩽0.01 ng-B) and 99.8 ± 5.7% boron recovery. We also report a new ICP-MS method, performed in a hydrofluoric acid matrix, using a jet interface fitted Thermo® Element XR that consumes <3.0 ng-B per quintuplicate analyses (±0.5‰, 2σ, n = 5). A comparatively high matrix tolerance limit of ⩽50 ppb Na/K/Mg/Ca characterizes our ICP-MS method. With an extremely low procedural blank (⩽0.05 ± 0.01 ng-B) the present isotope method is optimized for rapid (∼25 samples per session) analysis of small masses of carbonates (foraminifera, corals) with low boron abundance and small volume water samples (seawater, porewater, river water). Our δ11B estimates of seawater (39.8 ± 0.5‰, 2σ, n = 30); SRM AE-120 (-20.2 ± 0.5‰, 2s, n = 33); SRM AE-121 (19.8 ± 0.4‰, 2s, n = 16); SRM AE-122 (39.6 ± 0.5‰, 2s, n = 16) are within analytical uncertainty of published values. We apply this new method to assess the impacts of laboratory handling induced sample contamination and seawater physio-chemical parameters (temperature, pH, and salinity) on marine carbonate bound δ11B by analyzing core-top planktonic foraminifera samples.

  11. Geochemical Characterization of Bitumen Carbonate from Grosmont Formation, Alberta: Well 10-12-93-24W4 and 11-33-94-22W4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, J.; Kil, Y. W.; Kim, J. H.; Choi, J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate bitumen, one of the unconventional oils, has been attracting attention as an energy resource, which can substitute petroleum resources. Various researchers have been investigating carbonate rocks to exploit bitumen reservoirs. Grosmont Formation, located in northern Alberta, is one of the largest carbonate reservoirs in the world. We conducted inorganic geochemical analysis about two-carbonate rock cores of Grosmont Formation (well 10-12-93-24W4, 11-33-94-22W4), obtained from Core Research Center (CRC) in Canada to investigate the characteristics and origin of dolomite in the Grosmont Formation. Grosmont Formation consists of four carbonate units, UG3, UG2, UG1 and LG, with three shale beds, SB3, SB2 and SB1. Major and trace elements, and isotope compositions of dolomites from UG and LG units indicate that UG dolomites were formed within a near surface environment under evaporitic condition, whereas LG dolomites were formed in a diagenetic environment. UG and LG dolomites might be formed at temperature ranging from 43.9 °C to 56.7 °C with Devonian seawater.

  12. Syntheses and Radiosyntheses of Two Carbon-11 Labeled Potent and Selective Radioligands for Imaging Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Padakanti, Prashanth K.; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Junfeng; Parsons, Stanley M.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Tu, Zhude

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) is a specific biomarker for imaging presynaptic cholinergic neurons. The syntheses and C-11 labeling of two potent enantiopure VAChT inhibitors are reported here. Procedures Two VAChT inhibitors, (±)-2 and (±)-6, were successfully synthesized. A chiral HPLC column was used to resolve the enantiomers from each corresponding racemic mixture for in vitro characterization. The radiosyntheses of (−)-[11C]2 and (−)-[11C]6 from the corresponding desmethyl phenol precursor was accomplished using [11C]methyl iodide or [11C]methyl triflate, respectively. Results The synthesis of (−)-[11C]2 was accomplished with 40–50 % radiochemical yield (decay-corrected), SA>480 GBq/μmol (EOB), and radiochemical purity >99 %. Synthesis of (−)-[11C]6 was accomplished with 5–10 % yield, SA>140 GBq/μmol (EOB), and radiochemical purity >97 %. The radiosynthesis and dose formulation of each tracer was completed in 55–60 min. Conclusions Two potent enantiopure VAChT ligands were synthesized and 11C-labeled with good radiochemical yield and specific activity. PMID:24875230

  13. Understanding Climate Policy Data Needs. NASA Carbon Monitoring System Briefing: Characterizing Flux Uncertainty, Washington D.C., 11 January 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Macauley, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Climate policy in the United States is currently guided by public-private partnerships and actions at the local and state levels. This mitigation strategy is made up of programs that focus on energy efficiency, renewable energy, agricultural practices and implementation of technologies to reduce greenhouse gases. How will policy makers know if these strategies are working, particularly at the scales at which they are being implemented? The NASA Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) will provide information on carbon dioxide fluxes derived from observations of earth's land, ocean and atmosphere used in state of the art models describing their interactions. This new modeling system could be used to assess the impact of specific policy interventions on CO2 reductions, enabling an iterative, results-oriented policy process. In January of 2012, the CMS team held a meeting with carbon policy and decision makers in Washington DC to describe the developing modeling system to policy makers. The NASA CMS will develop pilot studies to provide information across a range of spatial scales, consider carbon storage in biomass, and improve measures of the atmospheric distribution of carbon dioxide. The pilot involves multiple institutions (four NASA centers as well as several universities) and over 20 scientists in its work. This pilot study will generate CO2 flux maps for two years using observational constraints in NASA's state-of -the-art models. Bottom-up surface flux estimates will be computed using data-constrained land and ocean models; comparison of the different techniques will provide some knowledge of uncertainty in these estimates. Ensembles of atmospheric carbon distributions will be computed using an atmospheric general circulation model (GEOS-5), with perturbations to the surface fluxes and to transport. Top-down flux estimates will be computed from observed atmospheric CO2 distributions (ACOS/GOSAT retrievals) alongside the forward-model fields, in conjunction with an

  14. cis-Bis{1,1-dibenzyl-3-[(furan-2-yl)carbon­yl]thio­ureato-κ2 O,S}nickel(II)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Hiram; da Silva, Cecilia C. P.; Plutín, Ana M.; de Simone, Carlos A.; Ellena, Javier

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound, [Ni(C20H17N2O2S)2], the NiII atom is coordinated by the S and O atoms of two 1,1-dibenzyl-3-[(furan-2-yl)carbon­yl]thio­ureate ligands in a distorted square-planar geometry. The two O and two S atoms are mutually cis to each other. The Ni—S and Ni—O bond lengths lie within the range of those found in related structures. The dihedral angle between the planes of the two chelating rings is 20.33 (6)°. PMID:21754011

  15. Effects of carbon and hafnium concentrations in wrought powder-metallurgy superalloys based on NASA 2B-11 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A candidate alloy for advanced-temperature turbine engine disks, and four modifications of that alloy with various C and Hf concentrations were produced as cross-rolled disks from prealloyed powder that was hot isostatically compacted. The mechanical properties, microstructures, and phase relations of the alloys are discussed in terms of their C and Hf concentrations. A low-C and high-Hf modification of IIB-11 had the best balance of mechanical properties for service below about 750 C. Because of their finer grain sizes, none of the powder-metallurgy alloys produced had the high-temperature rupture strength of conventionally cast and wrought IIB-11.

  16. PET study of carbon-11-PK 11195 binding to peripheral type benzodiazepine sites in glioblastoma: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Pappata, S.; Cornu, P.; Samson, Y.; Prenant, C.; Benavides, J.; Scatton, B.; Crouzel, C.; Hauw, J.J.; Syrota, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The utility of the peripheral type benzodiazepine site ligand 11C-PK 11195, for imaging human glioma in conjunction with Positron Emission Tomography, relies on a high specific binding of the tracer to tumoral peripheral type benzodiazepines sites. In a patient with glioblastoma, the authors found that 11C-PK 11195 binding was two-fold higher in the tumor than in normal gray matter and that 30% of tumoral binding could be displaced by a large excess of unlabeled drug. These findings suggest that tumoral retention of the ligand is due, in part, to specific binding.

  17. L-[METHYL-{sup 11}C] Methionine Positron Emission Tomography for Target Delineation in Malignant Gliomas: Impact on Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahasittiwat, Pawinee; Mizoe, Jun-etsu Hasegawa, Azusa; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Yanagi, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryou D.D.S.; Pattaranutaporn, Pittayapoom; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the importance of {sup 11}C-methionine (MET)-positron emission tomography (PET) for clinical target volume (CTV) delineation. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 16 patients with malignant glioma (4 patients, anaplastic astrocytoma; 12 patients, glioblastoma multiforme) treated with surgery and carbon ion radiotherapy from April 2002 to Nov 2005. The MET-PET target volume was compared with gross tumor volume and CTV, defined by using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Correlations with treatment results were evaluated between positive and negative extended volumes (EVs) of the MET-PET target for CTV. Results: Mean volumes of the MET-PET targets, CTV1 (defined by means of high-intensity volume on T2-weighted MRI), and CTV2 (defined by means of contrast-enhancement volume on T1-weighted MRI) were 6.35, 264.7, and 117.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean EVs of MET-PET targets for CTV1 and CTV2 were 0.6 and 2.2 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The MET-PET target volumes were included in CTV1 and CTV2 in 13 (81.3%) and 11 patients (68.8%), respectively. Patients with a negative EV for CTV1 had significantly greater survival rate (p = 0.0069), regional control (p = 0.0047), and distant control time (p = 0.0267) than those with a positive EV. Distant control time also was better in patients with a negative EV for CTV2 than those with a positive EV (p = 0.0401). Conclusions: For patients with malignant gliomas, MET-PET has a possibility to be a predictor of outcome in carbon ion radiotherapy. Direct use of MET-PET fused to planning computed tomography will be useful and yield favorable results for the therapy.

  18. Encapsulated gadolinium and dysprosium ions within ultra-short carbon nanotubes for MR microscopy at 11.75 and 21.1 T.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jens T; Cisneros, Brandon T; Matson, Michael; Sokoll, Michelle; Sachi-Kocher, Afi; Bejarano, Fabian Calixto; Wilson, Lon J; Grant, Samuel C

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have gained interest for their biocompatibility and multifunctional properties. Ultra-short SWNTs (US-tubes) have demonstrated high proton relaxivity when encapsulating gadolinium ions (Gd(3+)) at clinical field strengths. At higher field strengths, however, Gd(3+) ions demonstrate decreased proton relaxation properties while chemically similar dysprosium ions (Dy(3+)) improve relaxation properties. This report investigates the first use of Gd(3+) and Dy(3+) ions within US-tubes (GNTs and DNTs, respectively) at ultra-high magnetic field (21.1 T). Both agents are compared in solution and as an intracellular contrast agent labeling a murine microglia cell line (Bv2) immobilized in a tissue-mimicking agarose phantom using two high magnetic fields: 21.1 and 11.75 T. In solution at 21.1 T, results show excellent transverse relaxation; DNTs outperformed GNTs as a T(2) agent with measured r(2)/r(1) ratios of 247 and 47, respectively. Additionally, intracellular DNTs were shown to be a better T(2) agent than GNTs with higher contrast percentages and contrast-to-noise ratios. As such, this study demonstrates the potential of DNTs at high magnetic fields for cellular labeling and future in vivo, MRI-based cell tracking.

  19. Evaluation of 11 terrestrial carbon-nitrogen cycle models against observations from two temperate Free-Air CO2 Enrichment studies.

    PubMed

    Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E; De Kauwe, Martin G; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Hickler, Thomas; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Ying-Ping; El-Masri, Bassil; Thornton, Peter; Jain, Atul; Wang, Shusen; Warlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William; Iversen, Colleen M; Gallet-Budynek, Anne; McCarthy, Heather; Finzi, Adrien; Hanson, Paul J; Prentice, I Colin; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-05-01

    We analysed the responses of 11 ecosystem models to elevated atmospheric [CO2 ] (eCO2 ) at two temperate forest ecosystems (Duke and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments) to test alternative representations of carbon (C)-nitrogen (N) cycle processes. We decomposed the model responses into component processes affecting the response to eCO2 and confronted these with observations from the FACE experiments. Most of the models reproduced the observed initial enhancement of net primary production (NPP) at both sites, but none was able to simulate both the sustained 10-yr enhancement at Duke and the declining response at ORNL: models generally showed signs of progressive N limitation as a result of lower than observed plant N uptake. Nonetheless, many models showed qualitative agreement with observed component processes. The results suggest that improved representation of above-ground-below-ground interactions and better constraints on plant stoichiometry are important for a predictive understanding of eCO2 effects. Improved accuracy of soil organic matter inventories is pivotal to reduce uncertainty in the observed C-N budgets. The two FACE experiments are insufficient to fully constrain terrestrial responses to eCO2 , given the complexity of factors leading to the observed diverging trends, and the consequential inability of the models to explain these trends. Nevertheless, the ecosystem models were able to capture important features of the experiments, lending some support to their projections.

  20. Combined δ11B, δ13C, and δ18O analyses of coccolithophore calcite constrains the response of coccolith vesicle carbonate chemistry to CO2-induced ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Wei; Tripati, Robert; Aciego, Sarah; Gilmore, Rosaleen; Ries, Justin

    2016-04-01

    Coccolithophorid algae play a central role in the biological carbon pump, oceanic carbon sequestration, and in marine food webs. It is therefore important to understand the potential impacts of CO2-induced ocean acidification on these organisms. Differences in the regulation of carbonate chemistry, pH, and carbon sources of the intracellular compartments where coccolith formation occurs may underlie the diverse calcification and growth responses to acidified seawater observed in prior experiments. Here we measured stable isotopes of boron (δ11B), carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) within coccolith calcite, and δ13C of algal tissue to constrain carbonate system parameters in two strains of Pleurochrysis carterae (P. carterae). The two strains were cultured under variable pCO2, with water temperature, salinity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and alkalinity monitored. Notably, PIC, POC, and PIC/POC ratio did not vary across treatments, indicating that P. carterae is able to calcify and photosynthesize at relatively constant rates irrespective of pCO2 treatment. The δ11B data indicate that mean pH at the site of coccolith formation did not vary significantly in response to elevated CO2. These results suggest that P. carterae regulates calcifying vesicle pH, even amidst changes in external seawater pH. Furthermore, δ13C and δ18O data suggest that P. carterae may utilize carbon from a single internal DIC pool for both calcification and photosynthesis, and that a greater proportion of dissolved CO2 relative to HCO3- enters the internal DIC pool under acidified conditions. These results suggest that P. carterae is able to calcifyand photosynthesize at relatively constant rates across pCO2 treatments by maintaining pH homeostasis at their site of calcification and utilizing a greater proportion of aqueous CO2.

  1. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 (11 January - 24 February, 2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyr, Alex

    2006-08-30

    This report presents methods, and analytical and quality control procedures for salinity, oxygen, nutrient, inorganic carbon, organic carbon, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), and bomb 14C system parameters performed during the A16S_2005 cruise, which took place from January 11 to February 24, 2005, aboard research vessel (R/V) Ronald H. Brown under the auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The R/V Ronald H. Brown departed Punta Arenas, Chile, on January 11, 2005, and ended its cruise in Fortaleza, Brazil, on February 24, 2005. The research conducted was one of a series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by NOAA and the National Science Foundation as part of the CLIVAR/CO2/repeat hydrography/tracer program. Samples were taken from 36 depths at 121 stations. The data presented in this report include the analyses of water samples for total inorganic carbon (TCO2), fugacity of CO2 (fCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CFC, 14C, hydrographic, and other chemical measurements. The R/V Ronald H. Brown A16S_2005 data set is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  2. The effect of interstitial carbon on the mechanical properties and dislocation substructure evolution in Fe40.4Ni11.3Mn34.8Al7.5Cr6 high entropy alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhangwei; Baker, Ian; Cai, Zhonghou; ...

    2016-09-01

    A systematic study of the effects of up to 1.1 at. % carbon on the mechanical properties and evolution of the dislocation substructure in a series of a high entropy alloys (HEA) based on Fe40.4Ni11.3Mn34.8Al7.5Cr6 is presented. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atom probe tomography (APT) were used to show that all the alloys are single-phase f.c.c. random solid solutions. The lattice constant, determined from synchrotron XRD measurements, increases linearly with increasing carbon concentration, which leads to a linear relationship between the yield strength and the carbon concentration. The dislocation substructures, as determined by a TEM,more » show a transition from wavy slip to planar slip and, at higher strains, and from cell-forming structure (dislocations cells, cell blocks and dense dislocation walls) to non-cell forming structure (Taylor lattice, microbands and domain boundaries) with the addition of carbon, features related to the increase in lattice friction stress. The stacking fault energy (measured via weak-beam imaging of the separation of dislocation partials) decreases with increasing carbon content, which also contributes to the transition from wavy slip to planar slip. The formation of non-cell forming structure induced by carbon leads to a high degree of strain hardening and a substantial increase in the ultimate tensile strength. In conclusion, the consequent postponement of necking due to the high strain hardening, along with the plasticity accommodation arising from the formation of microbands and domain boundaries, result in an increase of ductility due to the carbon addition.« less

  3. Cross section asymmetry of two-body carbon disintegration 12C (γ , p)11B with polarized photons at energy 40-50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdeinyi, D.; Brudvik, J.; Fissum, K.; Ganenko, V.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Livingston, K.; Lundin, M.; Nilsson, B.; Schroder, B.

    2017-01-01

    The cross section asymmetry of 12C (γ ,p01)11B and 12C (γ ,p2-6)11B reactions has been studied at the energy range 40-55 MeV, using linearly polarized tagged photons of the MAX-lab facility. The asymmetry of the 12C (γ ,p01)11B processes, which assume the one-body mechanism of the reaction, is Σ ≈ 0.82 ± 0.05 for photon energies 45-50 MeV. The asymmetry for the 12C (γ ,p2-6)11B reactions, which produce a maximum at excitation energy ∼ 6 MeV, is Σ ≈ 0.53 ± 0.13 for a photon energy 49 MeV. It is close to the asymmetry of reaction of the free deuteron photodisintegration, and can be resulted from the two-body mechanism of the photon absorption.

  4. Design, synthesis, radiolabeling and in vivo evaluation of carbon-11 labeled N-[2-[4-(3-cyanopyridin-2-yl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-3-methoxybenzamide, a potential Positron Emission Tomography tracer for the dopamine D4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lacivita, Enza; De Giorgio, Paola; Lee, Irene T.; Rodeheaver, Sean I.; Weiss, Bryan A.; Fracasso, Claudia; Caccia, Silvio; Berardi, Francesco; Perrone, Roberto; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Maeda, Jun; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Schetz, John A.; Leopoldo, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe the design, synthesis, physicochemical, and pharmacological evaluation of D4 dopamine receptor ligands related to N-[2-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-3-methoxybenzamide (2). Structural features were incorporated to increase affinity for the target receptor, to improve selectivity over D2 and sigma1 receptors, to enable labeling with carbon-11 or fluorine-18, and to adjust lipophilicity within the range considered optimal for brain penetration and low nonspecific binding. Compounds 7 and 13 showed the overall best characteristics: nanomolar affinity for the D4 receptor, > 100-fold selectivity over D2 and D3 dopamine receptor 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C serotonin receptors and sigma1 receptors, and logP = 2.37–2.55. Following intraperitoneal administration, both compounds rapidly entered the central nervous system. The methoxy of N-[2-[4-(3-cyanopyridin-2-yl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-3-methoxybenzamide (7) was radiolabelled with carbon-11 and subjected to PET analysis in non-human primate. [11C]7 time-dependently accumulated to saturation in the posterior eye in the region of the retina, a tissue containing a high density of D4 receptors. PMID:20873719

  5. Fabrication of very-low-density, high-stiffness carbon fiber/aluminum hybridized composite with ultra-low density and high stiffness (M-11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Tomoo

    1993-01-01

    Fabrication of a composite material with ultra-low density and high stiffness in microgravity is the objective of the investigation. The composite structure to be obtained is a random three-dimensional array of high modulus, short carbon fibers bonded at contact points by an aluminum alloy coated on the fibers. The material is highly porous and thus has a very low density. The motivation toward the investigation, simulation experiments, choice of the component materials, and on-flight experiment during ballistic trajectory of a NASDA rocket, are described.

  6. Spectroelectrochemical Study of Carbon Monoxide and Ethanol Oxidation on Pt/C, PtSn(3:1)/C and PtSn(1:1)/C Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rizo, Rubén; Lázaro, María Jesús; Pastor, Elena; García, Gonzalo

    2016-09-12

    PtSn-based catalysts are one of the most active materials toward that contribute ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). In order to gain a better understanding of the Sn influence on the carbon monoxide (principal catalyst poison) and ethanol oxidation reactions in acidic media, a systematic spectroelectrochemical study was carried out. With this end, carbon-supported PtSnx (x = 0, 1/3 and 1) materials were synthesized and employed as anodic catalysts for both reactions. In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) indicate that Sn diminishes the amount of bridge bonded CO (COB) and greatly improves the CO tolerance of Pt-based catalysts. Regarding the effect of Sn loading on the EOR, it enhances the catalytic activity and decreases the onset potential. FTIRS and DEMS analysis indicate that the C-C bond scission occurs at low overpotentials and at the same potential values regardless of the Sn loading, although the amount of C-C bond breaking decreases with the rise of Sn in the catalytic material. Therefore, the elevated catalytic activity toward the EOR at PtSn-based electrodes is mainly associated with the improved CO tolerance and the incomplete oxidation of ethanol to form acetic acid and acetaldehyde species, causing the formation of a higher amount of both C2 products with the rise of Sn loading.

  7. Inorganic and Organic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (4 June-11 August, 2003)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyr, Alex

    2005-08-30

    This report presents methods and analytical and quality control procedures for nutrient, oxygen, and inorganic carbon system parameters performed during the A16N_2003a cruise, which took place from June 4 to August 11, 2003 aboard NOAA Ship R/V Ronald H. Brown under auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The first hydrographic leg (June 19–July 10) was from Reykjavik, Iceland, to Funchal, Madeira, Portugal along the 20°W meridian, and the second leg (July 15–August 11) continued operations from Funchal, Portugal to Natal, Brazil, on a track southward and ending at 6°S, 25°W. The research was the first in a decadal series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by NOAA and the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the CLIVAR/CO2/hydrography/tracer program. Samples were taken from up to 34 depths at 150 stations. The data presented in this report includes the analyses of water samples for total inorganic carbon (TCO2), fugacity of CO2 (fCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, nitrate (NO3), nitrite (NO2), phosphate (PO4), silicate (SiO4), and dissolved oxygen (O2). The R/V Ronald H. Brown A16N_2003a data set is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Cu- and Co-Doped Bi4V2O11 for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrolytes by Carbonate Coprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Goo; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2011-01-01

    Bi2MexV1-xO5.5-3x/2 (Me = Cu; 0≤x≤0.2) powders were prepared by the ammonium carbonate coprecipitation method. The starting salts were bismuth nitrate, copper nitrate, cobalt nitrate, and vanadium sulphate. The thermal decomposition of Bi2MexV1-xO5.5-3x/2 precursors was completed at about 500 °C. The crystallite structure, surface morphology, and ionic conductivity of the prepared powders and pellets were examined using X-ray diffractometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and an impedance analyzer, respectively. The average particle sizes of the Bi2Cu0.1V0.9O5.35 and Bi2Co0.1V0.9O5.35 powders were 10-50 nm. The tetragonal structure (γ-phase) appeared at sintering temperatures higher than 700 °C and the peak intensity increased at higher sintering temperatures. The ionic conductivities of the Bi2Cu0.1V0.9O5.35 and Bi2Co0.1V0.9O5.35 pellets sintered at 800 °C showed the highest values of 6.8×10-2 S cm-1 at 700 °C and 9.1×10-2 S cm-1 at 700 °C, respectively. The optimum concentration of the Cu and Co dopants in Bi2MexV1-xO5.5-3x/2 was determined to be 0.1. The results of this study demonstrated that the ammonium carbonate coprecipitation process could be used as an economical method for the preparation of Bi2MexV1-xO5.5-3x/2 electrolytes for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  9. Pentagon 9/11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    the building worried managers, workers who remained in their offices, and first responders, fearful that carbon monoxide, cyanide , asbes- tos, lead...rangers. Person- nel from the Treasury Department’s Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco , and Firearms arrived at the Pentagon about 11:00 a.m. and immediately...Chu, David, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191 Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco , and Firearms Clark, Vernon, 133, 134 (ATF), 165 Clarke, Victoria, 145 Burlingame

  10. Performance characteristics and relationship of PSA value/kinetics on carbon-11 acetate PET/CT imaging in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fabio D; Yen, Chi-Kwan; Scholz, Mark C; Lam, Richard Y; Turner, Jeffrey; Bans, Larry L; Lipson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    An elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level alone cannot distinguish between local-regional recurrences and distant metastases after treatment with curative intent. With available salvage treatments, it has become important to localize the site of recurrence. 11C-Acetate PET/CT was performed in patients with rising PSA, with statistical analysis of detection rates, sites/location of detection, PSA kinetics and comparison with other tracers (FDG and Choline). Correlation to biopsy, subsequent imaging and PSA response to focal treatment was also performed. 88% (637) of 721 11C-Acetate PET/CT scans performed were positive. There was a statistically significant difference in PSA values between the positive and negative scans (P < 0.001 for mean difference) with the percentage of positive scans and PSA having a positive correlation. A PSA of 1.09 ng/mL was found to be an optimal cutoff. PSAdT was significantly correlated with a positive scan only when the PSA was < 1.0 ng/mL. For this subgroup, a PSAdT of < 3.8 months appeared significant (P < 0.05) as an optimal cutoff point. 11C-Acetate PET/CT demonstrates a high detection rate for the site of recurrence/metastasis in biochemical relapsed prostate cancer (88% overall detection rate, PPV 90.8%). This analysis suggests an optimal PSA threshold of > 1.09 ng/mL or a PSAdT of < 3.8 months when the PSA is below 1.0 ng/mL as independent predictors of positive findings. PMID:28123863

  11. Validity of estimates of myocardial oxidative metabolism with carbon-11 acetate and positron emission tomography despite altered patterns of substrate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Myears, D.W.; Bergmann, S.R.

    1989-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that the myocardial turnover rate constant (k) measured noninvasively with positron emission tomography (PET) after intravenous administration of (/sup 11/C)acetate provides a reliable index of myocardial oxidative metabolism (MVO/sub 2/) theoretically independent of the pattern of myocardial substrate use. However, because estimates of metabolism with other metabolic tracers are sensitive to substrate use, we measured k in 12 dogs during baseline conditions and again after infusion of either glucose (n = 8) or Intralipid (n = 4), interventions that raised arterial glucose or fatty acids by more than fivefold with concomitant changes in myocardial substrate use. Following glucose administration k increased, but no difference was detected after compensation for changes in hemodynamics and myocardial work induced by the infusion (0.18 +/- 0.03 min-1) (t1/2 = 3.9 min) at baseline compared with 0.22 +/- 0.06 min-1 (t1/2 = 3.2 min, p = N.S.). k was not affected by Intralipid infusion (k = 0.15 +/- 0.06 min-1 at baseline and 0.14 +/- 0.04 min-1 during infusion), and correlated closely with MVO/sub 2/ measured directly (n = 19 comparisons, r = 0.89). The results indicate that estimates of MVO/sub 2/ using (/sup 11/C)acetate and PET are valid despite changes in the pattern of myocardial substrate utilization.

  12. Evaluation of surface energy and carbon fluxes within a large wind farm during the CWEX-10/11 Crop Wind-energy EXperiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajewski, D. A.; Takle, E. S.; Prueger, J. H.; Oncley, S.; Horst, T. W.; Pfeiffer, R.; Hatfield, J.; Spoth, K. K.; Doorenbos, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Crop Wind-energy EXperiment conducted in summer 2010 (very moist conditions) and summer 2011 (abnormally dry) included measurements of wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, turbulence kinetic energy, H2O, and CO2 at stations north and south of a line of turbines at the southwest edge of a large-scale 200-turbine wind farm (prevailing wind from the south). In contrast to previous studies that have reported turbine influences on surface wind speed and temperature, this report focuses on scalar fluxes of heat, H2O, and CO2. From previous measurements in agricultural fields we recognize the importance of non-turbine factors in analysis of the flux differences: variability of soil characteristics, moisture content, crop cultivar, management practices, planting dates, etc., which can create differences in what looks like a uniform field of maize (corn). We conceptualize the influences of turbines at canopy height at a given location in the field to arise from (1) wakes of reduced wind speed and turbulence conditions different from ambient that intersect the surface, (2) wakes that are passing overhead and interrupt the ambient turbulence that scales with height, or (3) changes in static pressure upwind and downwind of lines of turbines that create small-scale pressure gradients, localized flows, and changes to the vertical exchange of scalar variables. The turbine SCADA wind speed and wind direction provided by the wind farm operator facilitated our comparison of surface fluxes upwind and downwind as wakes moved laterally throughout the day and night. We report multiple levels of evidence that wind turbines increase vertical exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor over the canopy. Latent heat and carbon fluxes are responsive to slight changes in the turbine wake position, and the flux differences are maximized when the periphery of the wake edge is above the station. The flux stations north of the turbine line report a larger net ecosystem exchange

  13. The effect of carbon doping on the upper critical field (Hc2) and resistivity of MgB2 by using sucrose (C12H22O11) as the carbon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Zhou, S. H.; Lu, C.; Konstantinov, K.; Dou, S. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, sucrose was doped into MgB2 samples to act as a carbon source. The sintering temperature varied from 850 to 1050 °C. The effects of sucrose doping and sintering temperature on the lattice parameters, microstrain, critical temperature (Tc), resistivity, and upper critical field (Hc2) have been investigated in detail. It has been found that sucrose doping results in a small depression in Tc and high resistivity, while the Hc2 performance is improved. The best performance was shown in the sucrose-doped sample sintered at 850 °C. The reason for the enhancement of Hc2 is likely to be disorder caused by C substitution for B and/or diffusion of C atoms in the MgB2 lattice as interstitial atoms.

  14. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 11/5 in the South Atlantic and Northern Weddell Sea areas (WOCE sections A-12 and A-21)

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, T.; Breger, D.; Sutherland, S.C.; Kozyr, A. |; Gaslightwala, A.F. |

    1994-07-01

    This document presents the procedures and methods used to obtain carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), hydrographic, and chemical data during R/V Meteor Expedition 11/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean, including the Drake Passage; the Northern Weddell Sea; and the Eastern South Atlantic Ocean. This cruise was conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). The cruise started from Ushuaia, Argentina, on January 23, 1990, and ended at Capetown, South Africa on March 8, 1990. Samples were collected at 78 stations that covered the Drake Passage; the Northern Weddell Sea; a section along the 58 W parallel; and two segmented S-N sections between the Northern Weddell Sea and Capetown, South Africa. Measurements taken at WOCE sections A-12 and A-21 included pressure, temperature, salinity measured by the Conductivity, Temperature and Depth sensor (CTD); bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrate; silicate; total carbon concentration (TCO{sub 2}); and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) measured at 20 C. In addition, potential density at 0 decibar (dbar) and potential temperature were calculated from the measured variables. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in seawater samples was measured using a coulometer with an estimated precision of approximately {+-} {mu}mol/kg.

  15. Properties of carbon-based structures synthesized in nuclear reactions induced by bremsstrahlung γ quanta with threshold energy of 10 MeV at helium pressure of 1.1 kbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.

    2016-07-01

    Helium gas with an initial pressure of about 1.1 kbar inside a high-pressure chamber (HeHPC) has been irradiated by bremsstrahlung γ quanta with a threshold energy of 10 MeV for 1.0 × 105 s produced by an electron-beam current of 22-24 μA. After opening the HeHPC, the residual pressure of helium is equal to 430 bar. Synthesized black foils with a variety of other objects are found inside the HeHPC. They are located on the inner surfaces of the reaction chamber made of high-purity copper (99.99%), the entrance the window of γ quanta made of beryllium bronze and a copper container of nuclear and chemical reaction products. Elemental analysis with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microprobe analysis has revealed that the foils contain predominantly carbon and small quantities of other elements from carbon to iron. The results are in good agreement with the cycle of investigations of the authors devoted to the γ-quanta irradiation of dense hydrogen and helium gases in the presence (absence) of metals in a reaction chamber.

  16. The effect of carbon on the microstructures, mechanical properties, and deformation mechanisms of thermo-mechanically treated Fe40.4Ni11.3Mn34.8Al7.5Cr6 high entropy alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhangwei; Baker, Ian; Guo, Wei; ...

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the effects of cold rolling followed by annealing on the mechanical properties and dislocation substructure evolution of undoped and 1.1 at. % carbon-doped Fe40.4Ni11.3Mn34.8Al7.5Cr6 high entropy alloys (HEAs). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) were employed to characterize the microstructures. The as-cast HEAs were coarse-grained and single phase f.c.c., whereas the thermo-mechanical treatment caused recrystallization (to fine grain sizes) and precipitation (a B2 phase for the undoped HEA; and a B2 phase, and M23C6 and M7C3 carbides for the C-doped HEA). Carbon, which was found to have segregated tomore » the grain boundaries using APT, retarded recrystallization. The reduction in grain size resulted in a sharp increase in strength, while the precipitation, which produced only a small increase in strength, probably accounted for the small decrease in ductility for both undoped and C-doped HEAs. For both undoped and C-doped HEAs, the smaller grain-sized material initially exhibited higher strain hardening than the coarse-grained material but showed a much lower strain hardening at large tensile strains. Wavy slip in the undoped HEAs and planar slip in C-doped HEAs were found at the early stages of deformation irrespective of grain size. At higher strains, dislocation cell structures formed in the 19 μm grain-sized undoped HEA, while microbands formed in the 23 μm grain-sized C-doped HEA. Conversely, localized dislocation clusters were found in both HEAs at the finest grain sizes (5 μm). The inhibition of grain subdivision by the grain boundaries and precipitates lead to the transformation from regular dislocation configurations consisting of dislocation-cells and microbands to irregular dislocation configurations consisting of localized dislocation clusters, which further account for the decrease in ductility. Our investigation of the formation mechanism

  17. 43 CFR 11.11 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Purpose. 11.11 Section 11.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.11 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to provide standardized and cost-effective procedures for...

  18. 43 CFR 11.11 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purpose. 11.11 Section 11.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.11... natural resource damages. The results of an assessment performed by a Federal or State natural...

  19. 43 CFR 11.11 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 11.11 Section 11.11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.11... natural resource damages. The results of an assessment performed by a Federal or State natural...

  20. EPR evidence for magnetic exchange through a four-carbon aliphatic bridge in a binuclear copper(II) complex. Single crystal x-ray structure of 7,7'-(1,4-butanediyl)-bis(2,12-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetraazabicyclo(11. 3. 1)heptadeca-1(17),2,11,13,15-pentaene)nickel(II)) perchlorate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.A.; Brown, D.R.; Timken, M.D.; Van Derveer, D.G.; Belford, R.L.; Barefield, E.K.

    1988-12-01

    The single crystal x-ray structure of the title, binuclear nickel(II) complex has been determined and the compound used as a host for EPR investigations of the analogous copper(II) complex. The impetus for this work was an earlier suggestion that magnetic exchange interactions detected by EPR spectroscopy on frozen solutions of the biscopper(II) complex were a result of a direct copper-copper interaction in a closed conformation of the binuclear species. Results reported here suggest that the complex exists in the open conformation where the distance between metal centres is maximized and that the magnetic exchange occurs by a super-exchange mechanism through the aliphatic chain. The /vert bar/J/vert bar/ value for the exchange interaction is greater than 0.018 cm/sup /minus/1/. Crystal data for (Ni/sub 2/C/sub 34/H/sub 50/N/sub 8/)(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 4/ /center dot/ H/sub 2/O (298 K): monoclinic, space group P2/sub 1//n, a = 13.560(3), b = 11.678(2), c = 15.377(3) /angstrom/, /beta/ = = 108.48(2)/degree/, /rho//sub calcd/ = 1.588 g cm/sup /minus/3/ for Z = 2 and M/sub r/ = 1104.1, R = 0.068, R/sub w/ = 0.76. The intramolecular Ni-Ni distance is 9.13 /angstrom/. The analogous copper complex is isomorphorus with the nickel complex.

  1. The effect of interstitial carbon on the mechanical properties and dislocation substructure evolution in Fe40.4Ni11.3Mn34.8Al7.5Cr6 high entropy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhangwei; Baker, Ian; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Si; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A systematic study of the effects of up to 1.1 at. % carbon on the mechanical properties and evolution of the dislocation substructure in a series of a high entropy alloys (HEA) based on Fe40.4Ni11.3Mn34.8Al7.5Cr6 is presented. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atom probe tomography (APT) were used to show that all the alloys are single-phase f.c.c. random solid solutions. The lattice constant, determined from synchrotron XRD measurements, increases linearly with increasing carbon concentration, which leads to a linear relationship between the yield strength and the carbon concentration. The dislocation substructures, as determined by a TEM, show a transition from wavy slip to planar slip and, at higher strains, and from cell-forming structure (dislocations cells, cell blocks and dense dislocation walls) to non-cell forming structure (Taylor lattice, microbands and domain boundaries) with the addition of carbon, features related to the increase in lattice friction stress. The stacking fault energy (measured via weak-beam imaging of the separation of dislocation partials) decreases with increasing carbon content, which also contributes to the transition from wavy slip to planar slip. The formation of non-cell forming structure induced by carbon leads to a high degree of strain hardening and a substantial increase in the ultimate tensile strength. In conclusion, the consequent postponement of necking due to the high strain hardening, along with the plasticity accommodation arising from the formation of microbands and domain boundaries, result in an increase of ductility due to the carbon addition.

  2. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program (FY11 Quarter 2: January through March 2011).

    SciTech Connect

    Shane, R.; Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 2 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of the four carbons that have been added to the negative active material of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries for the purposes of this study. The four carbons selected for this study were a graphitic carbon, a carbon black, an activated carbon, and acetylene black. The morphology, crystallinity, and impurity contents of each of the four carbons were analyzed; results were consistent with previous data. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO{sub 2}) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown.

  3. 11 CFR 9032.11 - State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State. 9032.11 Section 9032.11 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND DEFINITIONS § 9032.11 State. State means each State of the United States, Puerto Rico,...

  4. 10 CFR 11.11 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General requirements. 11.11 Section 11.11 Energy NUCLEAR... the licensee possesses or uses only irradiated special nuclear material subject to the exemption of... amendment to its security plan: (1) All jobs in which an individual could steal or divert special...

  5. 10 CFR 11.11 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirements. 11.11 Section 11.11 Energy NUCLEAR... the licensee possesses or uses only irradiated special nuclear material subject to the exemption of... amendment to its security plan: (1) All jobs in which an individual could steal or divert special...

  6. Bathymetric influence on dissolved methane in hydrothermal plumes revealed by concentration and stable carbon isotope measurements at newly discovered venting sites on the Central Indian Ridge (11-13°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Ok-Rye; Son, Seung Kyu; Baker, Edward T.; Son, Juwon; Kim, Mi Jin; Barcelona, Michael J.; Kim, Moonkoo

    2014-09-01

    Methane is a useful tracer for studying hydrothermal discharge, especially where the source fluids are of low temperature and lack metal precipitates. However, the dual origins of deep-sea methane, both chemical and biological, complicate the interpretation of methane observations. Here, we use both the concentration and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of dissolved methane to trace hydrothermal plumes and identify the source and behavior of methane at two sites of newly discovered hydrothermal activity on the Central Indian Ridge (11-13°S). At both sites, methane and optical anomalies between 2500 and 3500 m at all stations indicate active hydrothermal discharge. We compared methane concentrations and δ13C at three stations, two (CTIR110136 and CTIR110208) with the most prominent anomalies at each site, and a third (CTIR110140) with near-background methane values. At stations CTIR110136 and CTIR110208, the concentration and δ13C of methane in distinct plumes ranged from 3.3 to 42.3 nmol kg-1 and -30.0 to -15.4‰, respectively, compared to deep-water values of 0.5 to 1.2 nmol kg-1 and -35.1 to -28.9‰ at the station with a near-background distal plume (CTIR110140). δ13C was highest in the center of the plumes at CTIR110136 (-15.4‰) and CTIR110208 (-17.8‰). From the plume values we estimate that the δ13C of methane in the hydrothermal fluids at these stations was approximately -19‰ and thus the methane was most likely derived from magmatic outgassing or the chemical synthesis of inorganic matter. We used the relationship between δ13C and methane concentration to examine the behavior of methane at the plume stations. In the CTIR110208 plume, simple physical mixing was likely the major process controlling the methane profile. In the CTIR110136 plume we interpret a more complicated relationship as resulting from microbial oxidation as well as physical mixing. We argue that this difference in methane behavior between the two areas stems from a

  7. 11CO2 fixation: a renaissance in PET radiochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Benjamin H; Liang, Steven H; Holland, Jason P; Collier, Thomas Lee; Hooker, Jacob M; Wilson, Alan A; Vasdev, Neil

    2013-06-25

    Carbon-11 labelled carbon dioxide is the cyclotron-generated feedstock reagent for most positron emission tomography (PET) tracers using this radionuclide. Most carbon-11 labels, however, are installed using derivative reagents generated from [(11)C]CO2. In recent years, [(11)C]CO2 has seen a revival in applications for the direct incorporation of carbon-11 into functional groups such as ureas, carbamates, oxazolidinones, carboxylic acids, esters, and amides. This review summarizes classical [(11)C]CO2 fixation strategies using organometallic reagents and then focuses on newly developed methods that employ strong organic bases to reversibly capture [(11)C]CO2 into solution, thereby enabling highly functionalized labelled compounds to be prepared. Labelled compounds and radiopharmaceuticals that have been translated to the clinic are highlighted.

  8. Carbon Pneumoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A. A.; Ramsden, F.

    1961-01-01

    The occurrence of carbon pneumoconiosis in rubber-factory workers is unusual: the case reported here was discovered in a routine post-mortem examination. The report includes the clinical, radiological, morbid anatomical, and histological findings on a man who had worked in the carbon black store of a rubber works for a continuous period of 21 years, followed by 11 years in the calender department of the same factory. At the age of 65 years the man was retired on the grounds of age and indifferent health: he collapsed and died soon afterwards. The medical history of severe cough with expectoration suggested that he may have had pulmonary tuberculosis in earlier life and some supporting evidence of this infection was found in that his wife contracted this disease after marriage and subsequently died from tuberculosis. The appearances of massive fibrosis in the upper lobes of the lungs suggested that the combined action of carbon black and tuberculosis had produced an “infective” type of pneumoconiosis: in the lower lobes there was far less fibrosis and the appearances were those of simple pneumoconiosis. In addition to the fibrosis the lungs showed nodules of black dust with severe perifocal emphysema. Electron microscopy of the lung dust showed two distinct components and they were similar to samples of channel and thermal blacks which were the main types of carbon used in the factory. This case is an example of pneumoconiosis due to virtually non-siliceous carbon and illustrates that prolonged exposure to heavy dust concentration produces such lesions as described in this paper. Images PMID:13770721

  9. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE energy storage systems program (FY11 Quarter 3: April through June 2011).

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney; Enos, David George

    2011-09-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 3 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of a control as well as three carbon-containing negative plates in the raw, as cast form as well as after formation. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within each plate was evaluated. In addition, baseline electrochemical measurements were performed on each battery to establish their initial performance. These measurements included capacity, internal resistance, and float current. The results obtained for the electrochemical testing were in agreement with previous evaluations performed at East Penn manufacturing. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure, and explosive decomposition of 1,2:5,6: 11,12:15,16-tetrabenzo-3,7,9,13,17,19-hexadehydro[20] annulene: formation of onion- and tube-like closed-shell carbon particles

    SciTech Connect

    Boese, R.; Matzger, A.J.; Vollhardt, K.P.C. |

    1997-02-26

    We have reported that tribenzotetradehydro[14]annulene 1 undergoes topochemical polymerization that results in a novel polyannulenoenyne. In this connection, the `expanded` title compound 2a suggested itself as a promising candidate on route to unprecedented annulene-crosslinked polyenynes. We report the very different physical and chemical behavior of 2a, most importantly its explosive transformation to methane, hydrogen, and extensively ordered pure carbon. Present results give a clear validation of the notion that dehydroannulenes might be potential precursors to carbon allotropes. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (FY11 Quarter 4: July through September 2011).

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney; Enos, David George

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 4 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails the initiation of high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling of the carbon enhanced batteries. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within the plates after 1k and 10k cycles were documented, illustrating the changes which take place in the early life of the carbon containing batteries, and as the battery approaches failure due to hard sulfation for the control battery. Longer term cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) continues, and will progress into FY12. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO2) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown in a graph. In addition to the aforementioned hybrid device, carbon has also been added directly to

  12. The series of carbon-chain complexes {Ru(dppe)Cp*}₂{μ-(C≡C)x} (x = 4–8, 11): Synthesis, structures, properties and some reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, Michael I.; Cole, Marcus L.; Ellis, Benjamin G.; Gaudio, Maryka; Nicholson, Brian K.; Parker, Christian R.; Skelton, Brian W.; White, Allan H.

    2015-01-28

    The construction of a series of compounds {Ru(dppe)Cp*}2(μ-C2x) (Ru*-C2x-Ru*, x = 4–8, 11)) is described. A direct reaction between RuCl(dppe)Cp* and Me3Si(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)4SiMe3 afforded Ru*-C8-Ru* in 89% yield. The Pd(0)/Cu(I)-catalysed coupling of Ru{Ctriple bond; length of mdashCCtriple bond; length of mdashCAu(PPh3)}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C4-Au (2 equiv.) with diiodoethyne gave Ru*-C10-Ru* (64%), or of 1 equiv. with I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)3I gave Ru*-C14-Ru* (36%); similarly, Ru{(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)4Au(PPh3)}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C8-Au and I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)3I gave Ru*-C22-Ru* (12%). Desilylation (TBAF) of Ru{(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)xSiMe3}(dppe)Cp*Ru*-C2x-Si (x = 3, 4) followed by oxidative coupling [Cu(OAc)2/py] gave Ru*-C12-Ru* (82%) and Ru*-C16-Ru* (58%), respectively. Similar oxidative coupling of Ru(Ctriple bond; length of mdashCCtriple bond; length of mdashCH)(dppe)Cp* was a second route to Ru*-C8-Ru* (82%). Appropriate precursors are already known, or obtained by coupling of Ru*-C2x-Si (x = 2, 4) with AuCl(PPh3)/NaOMe [Ru*-C4-Au, 95%; Ru*-C8-Au, 74%] or from Pd(0)/Cu(I) catalysed coupling of Ru*-C2x-Au (x = 2, 3) with I(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)2SiMe3 (Ru*-C8-Si, 64%; Ru*-C10-Si, 2%). Reactions between Ru*-C2x-Ru* (x = 3, 4) and Fe2(CO)9 gave {Fe3(CO)9}{μ3-CCtriple bond; length of mdashC[Ru(dppe)Cp*]}2Fe(C3-Ru*)2 and {Fe3(CO)9}{μ3-CCtriple bond; length of mdashC[Ru(dppe)Cp*]}{μ3-C(Ctriple bond; length of mdashC)2[Ru(dppe)Cp*]} Fe(C3-Ru*)(C5-Ru*), respectively. The redox properties of the series of complexes with 2x = 2–16 were measured and showed a diminution of the

  13. Supplies tight for CFC-11 and -12

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.; Kirschner, E.

    1992-09-30

    With US 1992 production of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-11 and -12 cut back to less than 50% of 1986 levels, supplies are tight and prices are rising. While CFC customers can find the product, the first half of the year was particularly bumpy, marked by shortages of key feedstock carbon tetrachloride. US carbon tet production dropped from 400 million lbs in 1991 to 250 million lbs because of a series of plant closings in 1991. The lack of carbon tet, says a spokesman for one CFC producer, was [open quotes]a real disruption.[close quotes] And, says Jerry Dziedzic, general manager, fluorochemicals at Elf Atochem (Philadelphia), in a such a tight market [open quotes]even a little hiccup can throw the system out of whack.[close quotes] Dow senior project manager Jeff Sullivan says CFC producers were expecting a drop in 1992 sales when the company's Sarnia, ON carbon tet plant closing was announced. By the time CFC producers recognized that demand would remain at 1991 levels, the shutdown was under way. [open quotes]We were caught short because they were caught short.[close quotes] While the carbon tet shortage has lessened recently, supplies of CFC-11 and 12 are expected to remain tight through the rest of the year. But that could ease toward year-end as hydrofluorocarbon-141b increasingly replaces CFC-11.

  14. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  15. Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy of the nu4 (sigma u) fundamental and associated nu11(pi u) hot band of C7 - Evidence for alternating rigidity in linear carbon clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, J. R.; Saykally, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    The first characterization of the bending potential of the C7 cluster is reported via the observation of the v = 1(1) and v = 2 deg levels of the nu11 (pi u) bend as hot bands associated with the nu4 (sigma u) antisymmetric stretch fundamental. The lower state hot band rotational constants are measured to be 1004.4(1.3) and 1123.6(9.0) MHz, constituting a 9.3 and 22 percent increase over the ground state rotational constant, 918.89 (41) MHz. These large increases are strong quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants determined for the ground and nu 4 = 1 states are found to be anomalously large and negative, evidencing strong perturbations between stretching and bending modes.

  16. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  17. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema

    Jeffrey Long

    2016-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  18. 11. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, DETAIL OF EXCITER No. 2 GENERAL ELECTRIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, DETAIL OF EXCITER No. 2 GENERAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR SHOWING COPPER COMMUTATOR AND CARBON BRUSHES. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  19. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  20. Carbon-carbon piston development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    A new piston concept, made of carbon-carbon refractory-composite material, has been developed that overcomes a number of the shortcomings of aluminum pistons. Carbon-carbon material, developed in the early 1960's, is lighter in weight than aluminum, has higher strength and stiffness than aluminum and maintains these properties at temperatures over 2500 F. In addition, carbon-carbon material has a low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent resistance to thermal shock. An effort, called the Advanced Carbon-Carbon Piston Program was started in 1986 to develop and test carbon-carbon pistons for use in spark ignition engines. The carbon-carbon pistons were designed to be replacements for existing aluminum pistons, using standard piston pin assemblies and using standard rings. Carbon-carbon pistons can potentially enable engines to be more reliable, more efficient and have greater power output. By utilizing the unique characteristics of carbon-carbon material a piston can: (1) have greater resistance to structural damage caused by overheating, lean air-fuel mixture conditions and detonation; (2) be designed to be lighter than an aluminum piston thus, reducing the reciprocating mass of an engine, and (3) be operated in a higher combustion temperature environment without failure.

  1. Stereocomplexity and stereoselective synthesis of triamine molecules bearing four chiral carbon centers: Stereodifferentiated preparation of all 10 stereoisomers of 2,6-bis[1-(1-phenylethylamino)ethyl]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Jun'ichi; Aburatani, Sachiko; Takami, Taro

    2007-01-05

    Compounds (S,S)-2,6-bis(1-hydroxyethyl)pyridine, (R,R)-2,6-bis(1-acetoxyethyl)pyridine, and (1R,1'S)-2-(1-acetoxyethyl)-6-(1'-hydroxyethyl)pyridine were obtained by lipase-catalyzed kinetic acetylation of 2,6-bis(1-hydroxyethyl)pyridine as enantiomerically pure forms. The stereospecific replacement of hydroxy groups with (R)-phenylethylamine or (S)-phenylethylamine via its methanesulfonate or toluenesulfonate simultaneously or stepwise afforded all the stereoisomers of 1. Stereospecific preparation of all the 10 possible stereoisomers of 2,6-bis[1-(1-phenylethylamino)ethyl]pyridines 1a-f was achieved. Triamine 1b reacted with ZnCl2 to form Zn-triamine complex 16, the structure of which was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis.

  2. The 11 Micron Emissions of Cabon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Cheeseman, P.; Gerbault, F.

    1995-01-01

    A new classification scheme of the IRAS LRS carbon stars is presented. It comprises the separation of 718 probable carbon stars into 12 distinct self-similar spectral groupings. Continuum temperatures are assigned and range from 470 to 5000 K. Three distinct dust species are identifiable: SiC, alpha:C-H, and MgS. In addition to the narrow 11 + micron emission feature that is commonly attributed to SiC, a broad 11 + micron emission feature, that is correlated with the 8.5 and 7.7 micron features, is found and attributed to alpha:C-H. SiC and alpha:C-H band strengths are found to correlate with the temperature progression among the Classes. We find a spectral sequence of Classes that reflects the carbon star evolutionary sequence of spectral types, or alternatively developmental sequences of grain condensation in carbon-rich circumstellar shells. If decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing evolution, then decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing CIO resulting in increasing amounts of carbon rich dust, namely alpha:C-H. If decreasing the temperature corresponds to a grain condensation sequence, then heterogeneous, or induced nucleation scenarios are supported. SiC grains precede alpha:C-H and form the nuclei for the condensation of the latter material. At still lower temperatures, MgS appears to be quite prevalent. No 11.3 micron PAH features are identified in any of the 718 carbon stars. However, one of the coldest objects, IRAS 15048-5702, and a few others, displays an 11.9 micron emission feature characteristic of laboratory samples of coronene. That feature corresponds to the C-H out of plane deformation mode of aromatic hydrocarbon. This band indicates the presence of unsaturated, sp(sup 3), hydrocarbon bonds that may subsequently evolve into saturated bonds, sp(sup 2), if, and when, the star enters the planetary nebulae phase of stellar evolution. The effusion of hydrogen from the hydrocarbon grain results in the evolution in wavelength of this

  3. Carbon and carbon-14 in lunar soil 14163

    SciTech Connect

    Fireman, E.L.; Stoenner, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon is removed from the surface of lunar soil 14163 size fractions by combustions at 500 and 1000/sup 0/C in an oxygen stream and the carbon contents and the carbon-14 activities are measured. The carbon contents are inversely correlated with grain size. A measured carbon content of 198 ppM for bulk 14163, obtained by combining the size fraction results, is modified to 109 +- 12 ppM by a carbon contamination correction. This value is in accord with a previous determination, 110 ppM, for bulk 14163. The small (< 53 ..mu..) grains of 14163 had more combusted carbon-14 activity, 31.2 +- 2.5 dpm /kg, than the large (> 53 ..mu..) grains, 11.2 +- 2.0 dpm/kg. The combusted carbon and carbon-14 are attributed mainly to solar-wind implantation. Melt extractions of carbon-14 from the combusted soil samples gave essentially identical activities, 21.0 +- 1.5 and 19.2 +- 2.0 dpm/kg for the small and large grains, and are attributed to cosmic-ray spallation-produced carbon-14.

  4. Carbon and its isotopes in mid-oceanic basaltic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Moore, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Sample surface carbon, mantle carbon dioxide in vesicles, and mantle carbon dissolved in glasses, are the three carbon components evident in the 11 mid-oceanic basalts presently analyzed. The total carbon content may be controlled by the depth of the shallowest ridge magma chamber, and carbon isotopic fractionation accompanies magma degassing. Using He-3 and carbon data for submarine hydrothermal fluids, the present day midoceanic ridge carbon flux is approximately estimated to be 1.0 x 10 to the 13th g C/yr, requiring 8 Gyr to accumulate the earth's present crustal carbon inventory.

  5. 11C=O Bonds Made Easily for Positron Emission Tomography Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Rotstein, Benjamin H.; Liang, Steven H.; Placzek, Michael S.; Hooker, Jacob M.; Gee, Antony D.; Dollé, Frédéric; Wilson, Alan A.; Vasdev, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The positron-emitting radionuclide carbon-11 (11C, t1/2 = 20.3 minutes) possesses the unique potential for radiolabeling of any biological, naturally occurring, or synthetic organic molecule for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Carbon-11 is most often incorporated into small molecules by methylation of alcohol, thiol, amine or carboxylic acid precursors using [11C]methyl iodide or [11C]methyl triflate (generated from [11C]CO2). Consequently, small molecules that lack an easily substituted 11C-methyl group are often considered to have non-obvious strategies for radiolabeling and require a more customized approach. [11C]Carbon dioxide, [11C]carbon monoxide, [11C]cyanide, and [11C]phosgene represent alternative carbon-11 reactants to enable 11C-carbonylation. Methodologies developed for preparation of 11C-carbonyl groups have had a tremendous impact on the development of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals and provided key tools for clinical research. 11C-Carbonyl radiopharmaceuticals based on labeled carboxylic acids, amides, carbamates, and ureas now account for a substantial number of important imaging agents that have seen translation to higher species and clinical research of previously inaccessible targets, which is a testament to the creativity, utility, and practicality of the underlying radiochemistry. PMID:27276357

  6. Apollo 11 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    On 16 July 1969, American astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin, and Michael Collins lifted off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in the mammoth-sized Saturn V rocket on their way to the moon during the Apollo 11 mission. Cmdr. Armstrong and pilot Aldrin landed the spacecraft, Eagle, on the moon's Sea of Tranquillity. Apollo 11 booster stages were tested at Stennis Space Center.

  7. High pressure study of low compressibility tetracalcium aluminum carbonate hydrates 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}11H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Juhyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2012-01-15

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data was collected from a sample of monocarboaluminate 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}11H{sub 2}O from ambient pressure to 4.3 GPa. The refined crystal structure at ambient pressure is triclinic with parameters a = 5.77(2) A, b = 8.47(5) A, c = 9.93(4) A, {alpha} = 64.6(2) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 82.8(3) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 81.4(4) Degree-Sign , and space group of P1 or P1{sup Macron }. It showed some degree of perfectly reversible pressure-induced dehydration with a non-hygroscopic pressure-transmitting medium. However the dehydration effect does not critically affect a bulk modulus due to its strong framework. The isothermal bulk modulus of monocarboaluminate was found to be 53(5) GPa and 54(4) GPa with 3rd order and 2nd order Birch-Murnaghan Equation of state, respectively. That value is higher than for any other reported AFm or AFt phase. The pressure-volume behavior of the monocarboaluminate was compared with that of previous studied hemicarboaluminate.

  8. Blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices utilizing cesium–carbonate-doped 2,4,6-tris(2',4'-difluoro-[1,1'- biphenyl]-4-yl)-1,3,5-triazine

    SciTech Connect

    Swensen, James S.; Rainbolt, James E.; Wang, Liang; Koech, Phillip K.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Gaspar, Daniel J.

    2011-01-20

    We report an alternative, high yielding synthesis for the known compound 2,4,6-tris(2',4'-difluoro-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)-1,3,5-triazine, (tris-(dFB)Tz). The lowest occupied molecular orbital energy for tris-(dFB)Tz is calculated to be -3.5 eV via electrochemical characterization. The deep ELUMO of tris-(dFB)Tz affords a material with excellent electron acceptor characteristics for use in n-doped electron transport layers. Tris-(dFB)Tz shows a four order of magnitude increase in the number of carriers upon doping with 8 wt.% Cs2CO3. Enhanced electron injection was also observed upon doping with Cs2CO3, eliminating the need for a LiF injection layer. Blue phosphorescent OLEDs were fabricated using n-doped tris-(dFB)Tz electron transport layers. OLEDs with thick (700Å) Cs2CO3 doped tris-(dFB)Tz electron transport layers had lower operating voltage than OLEDS with an undoped electron transport layer of bis(diphenylphosphoryl)dibenzothiophene (PO15), which has previously been used in low voltage, high efficiency OLEDs. The tris-(dFB)Tz results indicate that aromatic substituted triazines may be promising materials for use as electron acceptors in n-doped organic electronic systems.

  9. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  10. Carbon storage in US wetlands.

    PubMed

    Nahlik, A M; Fennessy, M S

    2016-12-13

    Wetland soils contain some of the highest stores of soil carbon in the biosphere. However, there is little understanding of the quantity and distribution of carbon stored in our remaining wetlands or of the potential effects of human disturbance on these stocks. Here we use field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment to provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales. We find that wetlands in the conterminous United States store a total of 11.52 PgC, much of which is within soils deeper than 30 cm. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fold more carbon than tidal saltwater sites-indicating their importance in regional carbon storage. Our data suggest a possible relationship between carbon stocks and anthropogenic disturbance. These data highlight the need to protect wetlands to mitigate the risk of avoidable contributions to climate change.

  11. Carbon storage in US wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Nahlik, A. M.; Fennessy, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Wetland soils contain some of the highest stores of soil carbon in the biosphere. However, there is little understanding of the quantity and distribution of carbon stored in our remaining wetlands or of the potential effects of human disturbance on these stocks. Here we use field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment to provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales. We find that wetlands in the conterminous United States store a total of 11.52 PgC, much of which is within soils deeper than 30 cm. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fold more carbon than tidal saltwater sites—indicating their importance in regional carbon storage. Our data suggest a possible relationship between carbon stocks and anthropogenic disturbance. These data highlight the need to protect wetlands to mitigate the risk of avoidable contributions to climate change. PMID:27958272

  12. Carbon storage in US wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahlik, A. M.; Fennessy, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Wetland soils contain some of the highest stores of soil carbon in the biosphere. However, there is little understanding of the quantity and distribution of carbon stored in our remaining wetlands or of the potential effects of human disturbance on these stocks. Here we use field data from the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment to provide unbiased estimates of soil carbon stocks for wetlands at regional and national scales. We find that wetlands in the conterminous United States store a total of 11.52 PgC, much of which is within soils deeper than 30 cm. Freshwater inland wetlands, in part due to their substantial areal extent, hold nearly ten-fold more carbon than tidal saltwater sites--indicating their importance in regional carbon storage. Our data suggest a possible relationship between carbon stocks and anthropogenic disturbance. These data highlight the need to protect wetlands to mitigate the risk of avoidable contributions to climate change.

  13. Apollo 11 lunar photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. T.; Michlovitz, C. K.; Hug, K.

    1970-01-01

    A data user's note is presented which announces the availability of the complete set of Apollo 11 pictorial data and aids investigators in the selection of Apollo 11 photographs for study. In addition, this note provides guidance in the interpretation of the photographs. As background information, brief descriptions of the Apollo 11 mission objectives, photographic equipment, and photographic coverage and quality are included. The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) can provide all forms of photographs described in the section on format of available data.

  14. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  15. Morpheus Tether Test #11

    NASA Video Gallery

    Morpheus conducts another tethered test, April 11, 2012. Morpheus is a full spacecraft and rocket-powered lander, which demonstrates new green technology, as well as an autonomous landing and hazar...

  16. Carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1992-01-01

    The current applications of C-C composites extend to aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles, missile nosetips, and leading edges of the Space Shuttle. More advanced, secondary and even primary structure applications in cyclic, high-temperature oxidizing environments depend on effective oxidation protection for repeated missions. Accounts are presently given of state-of-the-art methods in substrate fabrication, carbon deposition, and SiC and Si3N4 protective coatings. Attention is given to current levels of high temperature oxidation protection for various mission and vehicle types, as well as to performance projections for C-C composites used by a representative National Aerospace Plane airframe structure. Future technology requirements in C-C composites are projected.

  17. 27 CFR 11.11 - Meaning of terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Meaning of terms. 11.11 Section 11.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS CONSIGNMENT SALES Definitions § 11.11 Meaning of terms. As used in this...

  18. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat. No. 4.909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially. the carbon fabric or tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel. to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar. or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U" channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also be accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum-alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  19. Palaeoclimatology: the record for marine isotopic stage 11.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Dominique; Barnola, Jean-Marc; Souchez, Roland; Lorrain, Reginald; Petit, Jean-Robert; Duval, Paul; Lipenkov, Vladimir Y

    2005-07-07

    The marine isotopic stage 11 (MIS 11) is an extraordinarily long interglacial period in the Earth's history that occurred some 400,000 years ago and lasted for about 30,000 years. During this period there were weak, astronomically induced changes in the distribution of solar energy reaching the Earth. The conditions of this orbital climate forcing are similar to those of today's interglacial period, and they rendered the climate susceptible to other forcing--for example, to changes in the level of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here we use ice-core data from the Antarctic Vostok core to reconstruct a complete atmospheric carbon dioxide record for MIS 11. The record indicates that values for carbon dioxide throughout the interglacial period were close to the Earth's pre-industrial levels and that both solar energy and carbon dioxide may have helped to make MIS 11 exceptionally long. Anomalies in the oceanic carbonate system recorded in marine sediments at the time, for example while coral reefs were forming, apparently left no signature on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.

  20. Carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  1. 50 CFR 11.11 - Notice of violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of violation. 11.11 Section 11.11 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING... be a waiver of the notice ef assessment required by § 11.14, and of the opportunity for a...

  2. Log of Apollo 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The major events of the first manned moon landing mission, Apollo 11, are presented in chronological order from launch time until arrival of the astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. The log is descriptive, non-technical, and includes numerous color photographs of the astronauts on the moon. (PR)

  3. Apollo 11 Moon Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The crowning achievement for the Saturn V rocket came when it launched Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, and Michael Collins, to the Moon in July 1969. In this photograph, astronaut Aldrin takes his first step onto the surface of the Moon.

  4. 1,1-Difluoroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1 - Difluoroethane ; CASRN 75 - 37 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  5. 1,1-Dichloroethane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,1 - Dichloroethane ; CASRN 75 - 34 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  6. Microstructural Characterization and Mechanical Properties of PA11 Nanocomposite Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latko, Paulina; Kolbuk, Dorota; Kozera, Rafal; Boczkowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Polyamide 11/multi-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite fibers with weight fraction 2, 4, and 6 wt.% and diameter 80 μm were prepared with a twin screw mini-extruder. The morphology and degree of dispersion of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the fibers was investigated by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In turn, the molecular structure was indicated by using wide-angle x-ray scattering and correlated with thermal analysis. It was found that carbon nanotubes lead to the formation of α phase in the fibers and they show medial level of alignment within the length of the fiber. Mechanical analysis of the fibers shows that apart from the crystallinity content, the tensile strength is strongly dependent on the macroscopic defects of the surface of the fibers. Nanocomposite fibers based on polyamide 11 with carbon nanotubes can be used as a precursor for non-woven or woven fabrics manufacturing process.

  7. Carbon photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Konov, V I

    2015-11-30

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed. (optical elements of laser devices)

  8. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures is disclosed. The improvement consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat.No. 4,909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially, the carbon fabric of tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar, or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U"-channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  9. CARBON FLUXES ON NORTH AMERICAN RANGELANDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonal patterns of growth and thus carbon uptake are relevant to both scientists who study ecosystem properties and managers who strive to maintain rangeland productivity. We studied seasonal patterns of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) on 11 US rangelands over a 6-year period. All sites w...

  10. A novel modified carbon paste electrode based on NiO/CNTs nanocomposite and (9, 10-dihydro-9, 10-ethanoanthracene-11, 12-dicarboximido)-4-ethylbenzene-1, 2-diol as a mediator for simultaneous determination of cysteamine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and folic acid.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Maleh, Hassan; Biparva, Pourya; Hatami, Mehdi

    2013-10-15

    A carbon paste electrode (CPE) modified with (9, 10-dihydro-9, 10-ethanoanthracene-11, 12-dicarboximido)-4-ethylbenzene-1, 2-diol (DEDE) and NiO/CNTs nanocomposite was used for the sensitive voltammetric determination of cysteamine (CA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and folic acid (FA) for the first time. The synthesized materials were characterized with different methods such as XRD, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and square wave voltammetry (SWV). The modified electrode exhibited a potent and persistent electron mediating behavior followed by well-separated oxidation peaks of CA, NADH and FA. The peak currents were linearly dependent on CA, NADH and FA concentrations using square wave voltammetry (SWV) method in the ranges of 0.01-250, 1.0-500, and 3.0-550 µmol L⁻¹, with detection limits of 0.007, 0.6, and 0.9 µmol L⁻¹, respectively. The modified electrode was used for the determination of CA, NADH and FA in biological and pharmaceutical samples.

  11. Apollo 11 Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Apollo 11 spacecraft is lifted from the ocean after its water landing (not shown) onto the deck of the USS Hornet. The crewmembers, Commander Neil A. Armstrong, Lunar Module Pilot Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., and Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, are seen going from the spacecraft to the quarantine chambers. They talk to family members over the phone after their arrival at the Ellington Air Force Base. Footage shows the celebration of Armstrong's birthday and the release of the crew from quarantine.

  12. Apollo 11 Mission Commemorated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-07-01

    On 24 July 1969, 4 days after Apollo 11 Mission Commander Neil Armstrong and Lunar Module Eagle Pilot Eugene “Buzz” Aldrin had become the first people to walk on the Moon, they and Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins peered through a window of the Mobile Quarantine Facility on board the U.S.S. Hornet following splashdown of the command module in the central Pacific as U.S. President Richard Nixon told them, “This is the greatest week in the history of the world since the creation.” Forty years later, the Apollo 11 crew and other Apollo-era astronauts gathered at several events in Washington, D. C., to commemorate and reflect on the Apollo program, that mission, and the future of manned spaceflight. “I don’t know what the greatest week in history is,” Aldrin told Eos. “But it was certainly a pioneering opening the door. With the door open when we touched down on the Moon, that was what enabled humans to put many more footprints on the surface of the Moon.”

  13. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are costs associated with the termination of the...

  14. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are costs associated with the termination of the...

  15. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are... administrative costs associated with winding down the campaign, including office space rental, staff...

  16. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are... administrative costs associated with winding down the campaign, including office space rental, staff...

  17. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are... administrative costs associated with winding down the campaign, including office space rental, staff...

  18. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are... administrative costs associated with winding down the campaign, including office space rental, staff...

  19. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are costs associated with the termination of the...

  20. 11 CFR 9034.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9034.11 Section 9034.11... MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are... administrative costs associated with winding down the campaign, including office space rental, staff...

  1. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are costs associated with the termination of the...

  2. 11 CFR 9004.11 - Winding down costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Winding down costs. 9004.11 Section 9004.11... FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES TO PAYMENTS; USE OF PAYMENTS § 9004.11 Winding down costs. (a) Winding down costs. Winding down costs are costs associated with the termination of the...

  3. 11 CFR 1.1 - Purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Purpose and scope. 1.1 Section 1.1 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.1 Purpose and scope. (a) The purpose of this part is to set forth rules informing the public as to what information is maintained by the Federal...

  4. 11 CFR 1.1 - Purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose and scope. 1.1 Section 1.1 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.1 Purpose and scope. (a) The purpose of this part is to set forth rules informing the public as to what information is maintained by the Federal...

  5. 11 CFR 9002.11 - Qualified campaign expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified campaign expense. 9002.11 Section 9002.11 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: GENERAL ELECTION FINANCING DEFINITIONS § 9002.11 Qualified campaign expense. (a) Qualified campaign expense...

  6. 40 CFR 600.115-11 - Criteria for determining the fuel economy label calculation method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... economy label calculation method. 600.115-11 Section 600.115-11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 600.115-11 Criteria...

  7. Developments in carbon materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The following carbon-based materials are reviewed and their applications discussed: fullerenes; graphite (synthetic and manufactured); activated carbon fibers; and carbon-carbon composites. Carbon R&D activities at ORNL are emphasized.

  8. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables.

  9. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. Template Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, J. C.; Sanip, S. M.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-03-01

    The template synthesis of carbon nanostructures formed in porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) template with a pore size of 200 nm by a liquid phase impregnation of the template with a polymer, polyfurfuryl alcohol, followed by carbonization is studied. The temperatures of exposure to furfuryl alcohol vapour were varied between 50 and 70° C. The resultant carbon nanotubules formed were hollow with open ends having diameter ranging from 220-300 nm which is in agreement with the pore size of the template used. The BET surface area was found to increase from 11.64 m2/g before pyrolysis to 90.19 m2/g after pyrolysis as a result of the formation of carbon nanotubules.

  14. Synthesis of C-11-{beta}-aminoisobutyric acid (C-11-{beta}-AlB): A major in vivo catabolite of [methyl-C-11]thymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Alauddin, M.M.; Conti, P.S.; Fissekis, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    Carbon-11 labeled thymidine (TdR) is being used for brain tumor imaging in patients with PET. Following clearance of 5-methyl C-11 TdR from plasma in humans, there is a progressive increase of C-11 activity in normal brain and tumor presumably secondary to accumulation of C-11 beta-AIB, a major by-product of thymidine catabolism in vivo. Canine studies have demonstrated that the major radiolabeled species in acid soluble extracts of brain and tumor tissues during C-14 TdR studies is beta-AIB. The previously reported synthesis of beta-AIB is not suitable for incorporation of carbon-11. A convenient method of synthesis of C-11 beta-AIB was developed where commercially available beta-alanine ethyl ester was converted to the cold precursor reagent, benzaldimine-beta-alanine ethyl ester, in 87% yield. Treatment of the imine derivative with LDA (1.1 eq) in THF at -78{degrees} C, followed by addition of iodomethane (1.1 eq) produced the alpha-methylated benzaldimine-beta-alanine ethyl ester in 73% chemical yield. Deprotection of the amino group by acidic hydrolysis followed by basic hydrolysis of the ester group produced the desired product in 50% chemical yield. Chemical structures of unlabeled intermediates and product were confirmed by H-1 NMR and CI mass spectrometry. Labeling was accomplished using C-11-methyl iodide prepared from C-11-CO{sub 2} according to literature methods. After removal of protecting groups and neutralization, the enatiomeric mixture was purified by HPLC using a semipreparative reverse phase C-18 column and PBS as eluent. The desired compound was eluted at 8.26 minutes. In preliminary runs, the synthesis time was 39 minutes including HPLC purification, with radiochemical yields of 5-6% (EOB). Radiochemical purity was >99%

  15. Biological activation of carbon filters.

    PubMed

    Seredyńska-Sobecka, Bozena; Tomaszewska, Maria; Janus, Magdalena; Morawski, Antoni W

    2006-01-01

    To prepare biological activated carbon (BAC), raw surface water was circulated through granular activated carbon (GAC) beds. Biological activity of carbon filters was initiated after about 6 months of filter operation and was confirmed by two methods: measurement of the amount of biomass attached to the carbon and by the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) test. The effect of carbon pre-washing on WG-12 carbon properties was also studied. For this purpose, the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77K and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra analyses were performed. Moreover, iodine number, decolorizing power and adsorption properties of carbon in relation to phenol were studied. Analysis of the results revealed that after WG-12 carbon pre-washing its BET surface increased a little, the pH value of the carbon water extract decreased from 11.0 to 9.4, decolorizing power remained at the same level, and the iodine number and phenol adsorption rate increased. In preliminary studies of the ozonation-biofiltration process, a model phenol solution with concentration of approximately 10mg/l was applied. During the ozonation process a dose of 1.64 mg O(3)/mg TOC (total organic carbon) was employed and the contact time was 5 min. Four empty bed contact times (EBCTs) in the range of 2.4-24.0 min were used in the biofiltration experiment. The effectiveness of purification was measured by the following parameters: chemical oxygen demand (COD(Mn)), TOC, phenol concentration and UV(254)-absorbance. The parameters were found to decrease with EBCT.

  16. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  17. Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) Expression in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Shin; Tanaka, Yasuko; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-11 (AQP11) is an intracellular aquaporin expressed in various tissues, including brain tissues in mammals. While AQP11-deficient mice have developed fatal polycystic kidneys at one month old, the role of AQP11 in the brain was not well appreciated. In this study, we examined the AQP11 expression in the mouse brain and the brain phenotype of AQP11-deficient mice. AQP11 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein were expressed in the brain, but much less than in the thymus and kidney. Immunostaining showed that AQP11 was localized at the epithelium of the choroid plexus and at the endothelium of the brain capillary, suggesting that AQP11 may be involved in water transport at the choroid plexus and blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the brain. The expression of AQP4, another brain AQP expressed at the BBB, was decreased by half in AQP11-deficient mice, thereby suggesting the presence of the interaction between AQP11 and AQP4. The brain of AQP11-deficient mice, however, did not show any morphological abnormalities and the function of the BBB was intact. Our findings provide a novel insight into a water transport mechanism mediated by AQPs in the brain, which may lead to a new therapy for brain edema. PMID:27258268

  18. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conferences; conference memorandum . 6101.11 Section 6101.11 Federal Acquisition Regulations System CIVILIAN BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  19. Commissioned Review. Carbon: freshwater plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.; Sandquist, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    δ13C values for freshwater aquatic plant matter varies from −11 to −50‰ and is not a clear indicator of photosynthetic pathway as in terrestrial plants. Several factors affect δ13C of aquatic plant matter. These include: (1) The δ13C signature of the source carbon has been observed to range from +1‰ for HCO3− derived from limestone to −30‰ for CO2 derived from respiration. (2) Some plants assimilate HCO3−, which is –7 to –11‰ less negative than CO2. (3) C3, C4, and CAM photosynthetic pathways are present in aquatic plants. (4) Diffusional resistances are orders of magnitude greater in the aquatic environment than in the aerial environment. The greater viscosity of water acts to reduce mixing of the carbon pool in the boundary layer with that of the bulk solution. In effect, many aquatic plants draw from a finite carbon pool, and as in terrestrial plants growing in a closed system, biochemical discrimination is reduced. In standing water, this factor results in most aquatic plants having a δ13C value similar to the source carbon. Using Farquhar's equation and other physiological data, it is possible to use δ13C values to evaluate various parameters affecting photosynthesis, such as limitations imposed by CO2 diffusion and carbon source.

  20. Carbon content of sediments of small reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Carbon content was measured in sediments deposited in 58 small reservoirs across the US. Reservoirs varied from 0.2 to 4,000 km{sup 2} in surface area. The carbon content of sediment ranged from 0.3 to 5.6 percent, with a mean of 1.9 {plus minus} 1.1 percent. No significant differences between the soil and sediment carbon content were found using a paired t-test or ANOVA. The carbon content of sediments in reservoirs was similar to the carbon content of surface soils in the watershed, except in watersheds with shrub or steppe (desert) vegetation. Based on the sediment accumulation rates measured in each reservoir, the calculated organic carbon accumulation rates among reservoirs ranged from 26 to 3,700 gC m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1}, with a mean of 675 {plus minus} 739 gC m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1}. The carbon content and accumulation rates were highest in sediments from grassland watersheds. High variability was found in carbon content, carbon accumulation, and sediment accumulation rates due to individual watershed and reservoir characteristics rather than to any broad physiographic patterns. The carbon accumulation rates in these reservoir sediments indicate that reservoir sediments could be a significant sink of organic carbon.

  1. Rigid amorphous fraction of Nylon 11 determined from TMDSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Bin; Cebe, Peggy

    2012-02-01

    High precision, high accuracy heat capacity measurements were used to study both neat Nylon 11 and Nylon 11 nanocomposites which had been prepared by different processing procedures. The heat capacity step at the glass transition temperature was characterized from the reversing flow using temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry, and this allows us to determine the mobile amorphous fraction. Heat fusion was obtained from endotherm area of the total heat flow curve, and was correlated with the degree of crystallinity determined from X-ray diffraction. Based on three phase model of the semicrystalline polymer structure, the rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) in Nylon 11 could be calculated. Studied Nylon 11 samples include solution cast, liquid quenched, and isothermally crystallized films, solution cast films containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and electrospun fibers. We observed that a rigid amorphous fraction exists in all Nylon 11 samples, and the amount of RAF is strongly dependent upon the crystalline fraction and the nanofiller content.

  2. Carbon tetrachloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 005F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF CARBON TETRACHLORIDE ( CAS No . 56 - 23 - 5 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) March 2010 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document has bee

  3. Carbon disulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbon disulfide ; CASRN 75 - 15 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  4. Carbon-carbon - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D.

    1988-01-01

    In nonoxidizing high-temperature environments, carbon-carbon composites retain room temperature properties to more than 2225 C; in oxidizing environments, the variety of coatings thus far developed limits maximum operating temperatures to about 1600 C. The high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion of these composites renders them ideal for applications encountering thermal shocks. In addition, the variety of fibers, weave patterns, and layup procedures that can be used for the composites allows mechanical properties to be carefully tailored over a wide range to fit the application in question.

  5. Carbon recycling in ophiolite-hosted carbonates, Oman-UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, A.; Jenkin, G. R.; Smith, D. J.; Styles, M. T.; Naden, J.; Boyce, A. J.; Bryant, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale surface and subsurface freshwater carbonate deposits of probable Quaternary age have formed on the Oman-UAE ophiolite. Here, serpentinisation reactions in ultramafic rocks have produced calcite and magnesite. These carbonates are frequently cited as examples of natural atmospheric CO2 sequestration, but the possibility of carbon recycling has not been addressed. The aim of this study is to assess the degree of atmospheric CO2 being incorporated into carbonates versus that which has been recycled from alternative sources such as soil CO2, or limestones that underlie the ophiolite. This has been determined through δ13C/δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and 14C analysis of all major carbonate lithofacies identified. Our analyses of modern carbonate crusts forming on the surface of stagnant hyperalkaline (pH >11) waters show highly depleted δ13C and δ18O values (-25.5‰ ×0.5 PDB and -16.8‰ ×0.5 PDB respectively). This depletion has been attributed to a kinetic isotope effect occurring during atmospheric CO2 exchange with Ca(OH)2 hyperalkaline waters [1]. By comparison, inactive travertine deposits show a large range in δ13C (-10.5 to -21.8‰ PDB) which lies on a trajectory from the composition of modern crusts towards bicarbonate fluids in equilibrium with soil CO2. We interpret this trend as being produced by the mixing of different carbon sources, either at the time of formation or during later alteration. Modern carbonates and inactive travertines also have 87Sr/86Sr ratios and Sr concentrations similar to Cretaceous and Tertiary limestones which surround the ophiolite, whilst subsurface veins also display 87Sr/86Sr ratios similar to these Cretaceous limestones. Carbon recycling can also be determined with 14C. Modern atmospheric CO2 has a global average of 105-106% modern 14C (pMC), therefore freshwater carbonates forming solely from atmospheric CO2 would be expected to contain >100 pMC. However, modern carbonates display varied results from 94.5-101.4 p

  6. Equation of State of Carbonated Hydroxylapatite at Ambient Temperature up to 10 GPa: Significance of Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    X Liu; S Shieh; M Fleet; L Zhang; Q He

    2011-12-31

    The incorporation of the carbonate ion into the crystal structure of hydroxylapatite results in the creation of vacancies, oxygen-loss, and disorder, with consequent changes in physical and chemical properties. High-pressure experimental investigation up to 10 GPa of two synthetic carbonated hydroxylapatite samples with up to 11 wt% CO3, using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction, provides the first rigorous assessment of the mechanical behavior of the carbonated hydroxylapatite. The pressure-volume data suggest that the isothermal bulk modulus of these carbonated hydroxylapatites has been significantly decreased by the presence of the carbonate (up to about 15%), which in turn will affect all the carbonated apatite-related reactions in the geosystem. Since hydroxylapatite is one of the major components of the bones and teeth, the incorporation of the carbonate in the hydroxylapatite weakens teeth and bones not only chemically, but also physically.

  7. Biosynthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol by lipase in dimethyl carbonate as the solvent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hwa; Park, Chang-Ho; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2010-11-01

    Glycerol carbonate was synthesized from renewable glycerol and dimethyl carbonate using lipase in solvent-free reaction system in which excess dimethyl carbonate played as the reaction medium. A variety of lipases have been tested for their abilities to catalyze transesterification reaction, and Candida antartica lipase B and Novozyme 435 exhibited higher catalytic activities. The silica-coated glycerol with a 1:1 ratio was supplied to prevent two-phase formation between hydrophobic dimethyl carbonate and hydrophilic glycerol. Glycerol carbonate was successfully synthesized with more than 90% conversion from dimethyl carbonate and glycerol with a molar ratio of 10 using Novozyme 435-catalyzed transesterification at 70 °C. The Novozyme 435 [5% (w/w) and 20% (w/w)] and silica gel were more than four times recycled with good stability in a repeated batch operation for the solvent-free synthesis of glycerol carbonate.

  8. (/sup 11/C)clorgyline and (/sup 11/C)-L-deprenyl and their use in measuring functional monoamine oxidase activity in the brain using positron emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1986-04-17

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase in the living body by using /sup 11/C-labeled enzyme inhibitors which bind irreversibly to an enzyme as a result of catalysis. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  9. Study of the Unstable Nucleus {sup 10}Li in Stripping Reactions of the Radioactive Projectiles {sup 11}Be and {sup 11}Li

    SciTech Connect

    Zinser, M.; Humbert, F.; Nilsson, T.; Schwab, W.; Blaich, T.; Borge, M.J.G.; Chulkov, L.V.; Eickhoff, H.; Elze, T.W.; Emling, H.; Franzke, B.; Freiesleben, H.; Geissel, H.; Grimm, K.; Guillemaud-Mueller, D.; Hansen, P.G.; Holzmann, R.; Irnich, H.; Jonson, B.; Keller, J.G.; Klepper, O.; Klingler, H.; Kratz, J.V.; Kulessa, R.; Lambrecht, D.; Leifels, Y.; Magel, A.; Mohar, M.; Mueller, A.C.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nickel, F.; Nyman, G.; Richter, A.; Riisager, K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schrieder, G.; Sherrill, B.M.; Simon, H.; Stelzer, K.; Stroth, J.; Tengblad, O.; Trautmann, W.; Wajda, E.; Zude, E. |||||||||||[Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United State

    1995-08-28

    Reactions of the halo systems {sup 11}Be and {sup 11}Li (at 460 and 280 MeV/nucleon) with a carbon target demonstrate that ({ital n}+{sup 9}Li) has an (unbound) {ital l}=0 ground state very close to the threshold. The neutron halo of {sup 11}Li has appreciable (1{ital s}{sub 1/2}){sup 2} and (0{ital p}{sub 1/2}){sup 2} components.

  10. Analysis of plasma metabolites during human PET-studies with three receptor ligands, [11C]YM-09151-2, [11C]doxepin and [11C]pyrilamine.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, K; Yanai, K; Iwata, R; Takahashi, T; Hatazawa, J; Itoh, M; Watabe, K; Watanabe, T; Ido, T

    1996-02-01

    Carbon-11 labeled metabolites in human plasma were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography during positron emission tomography (PET) studies using the dopamine D2 ligand [11C]YM-09151-2 as well as the histamine H1 ligands [11C]doxepin and [11C]pyrilamine. For all the three tracers, blood clearance of the radioactivity was extremely rapid after an i.v. injection. The plasma protein-binding of [11C]YM-09151-2 and [11C]doxepin had protective effects upon the metabolic alteration of the ligands, whereas [11C]pyrilamine was free from the protein-binding and immediately degraded. The degradation of [11C]doxepin was more rapid in epileptic patients on medication than in normal subjects. These results indicate that analysis of metabolites in the plasma is necessary to determine the accurate arterial input function for quantitative PET measurement.

  11. Barium carbonate catalysis of carbon gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Ersolmaz, C.; Falconer, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of barium carbonate with carbon black was studied to understand catalyzed CO/sub 2/ gasification of carbon. Temperature-programmed reaction with isotopic labeling of the carbonate and the carbon showed that carbon dramatically accelerated with rate of BaCO/sub 3/ decomposition to form BaO and CO/sub 2/, which rapidly gasified carbon to form CO. Pure BaCO/sub 3/ was observed to exchange carbon dioxide with the gas-phase, and the exchange rate was significantly increased by carbon at higher temperatures, due to formation of a carbon-carbonate complex. The interaction of BaCO/sub 3/ and C to form a complex occurred well below gasification temperatures, and BaCO/sub 3/ did not decompose until after gasification began and the gas phase CO/sub 2/ concentration was low.

  12. Development of additive [11C]CO2 target system in the KOTRON-13 cyclotron and its application for [11C]radiopharmaceutical production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byung Seok; Lee, Hong Jin; Lee, Won Kyung; Hur, Min Goo; Yang, Seung Dae; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun

    2015-08-01

    The KOTRON-13 cyclotron, which was developed in South Korea for the production of medical radioisotopes, has the structural limitation of only one beam-output port, restricting the production of the carbon-11 isotope. In the present study, we investigate the design of a switchable target system and develop an effective carbon-11 target in the KOTRON-13 cyclotron, for combination with the fluorine-18 target. The target system was designed by introducing a sliding-type element between the fluorine-18 and carbon-11 targets, a tailor-made C-11 target and its cooling system. For the efficient production of [11C]CO2, the desirable target shape and internal volume were determined by a Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) simulation program, and the target grid was modified to resist the cavity pressure during beam irradiation. We evaluated the [11C]CO2 production while varying the material and thickness of the target foil, oxygen content of the nitrogen gas, and target loading pressure. Using sliding-type equipment including an additional gate valve and a high vacuum in a beam line, the bi-directional conversion between the fluorine-18 and carbon-11 targets was efficient regarding the accurate beam irradiation on both targets. The optimal [11C]CO2 production for 30 min irradiation at 60 μA (86.6 ± 1.7 GBq in the target at EOB) was observed at a thickness of 19 μm with HAVAR® material as a target foil and a target loading pressure of 24 bar with nitrogen plus 300 ppb of oxygen gas. Additionally, the coolant cavity system in the target grid and target chamber is useful to remove the heat transferred to the target body by the internal convection of water and thereby ensure the stability of the [11C]CO2 production under a high beam current. In the application of C-11 labeled radiopharmaceuticals such as [11C]PIB, [11C]DASB, [11C]PBR28, [11C]Methionine and [11C]Clozapine, the radiochemical yields were shown to be 25-38% (decay corrected) with over 166 GBq/μmol of

  13. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  14. IC Engine Applications of Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton; Rivers, H. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Many of the properties of carbon-carbon make it an ideal material for reciprocating materials of intermittent combustion (IC) engines. Recent diesel engine tests, shown herein, indicate that the thermal and mechanical properties of carbon-carbon are adequate for piston applications, However, reducing the manufacturing costs and providing long term oxidation protection are still issues that need to be addressed.

  15. Filament Winding Of Carbon/Carbon Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoy, Paul J.; Schmitigal, Wesley P.; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved method of winding carbon filaments for carbon/carbon composite structures less costly and labor-intensive, also produces more consistent results. Involves use of roller squeegee to ensure filaments continuously wet with resin during winding. Also involves control of spacing and resin contents of plies to obtain strong bonds between carbon filaments and carbon matrices. Lends itself to full automation and involves use of filaments and matrix-precursor resins in their simplest forms, thereby reducing costs.

  16. Enzymatic synthesis of C-11 formaldehyde: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Slegers, G.; Lambrecht, R.H.D.; Vandewalle, T.; Meulewaeter, L.; Vandecasteele, C.

    1984-03-01

    An enzymatic synthesis of C-11 formaldehyde from C-11 methanol is presented, with immobilized alcohol oxidase and catalase: a rapid, simple procedure, with a high and reproducible yield. Carbon-11 methanol is oxidized to C-11 formaldehyde by passage over a column on which the enzymes alcohol oxidase and catalase are immobilized. The catalase increases reaction velocity by recycling the oxygen, and prevents destruction of the alcohol oxidase by eliminating the excess of hydrogen peroxide. The yield of the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation was 80-95%. A specific activity of 400-450 mCi/..mu..mole was obtained at EOB + 20 min. Various immobilization techniques and the optimal reaction conditions of the immobilized enzymes are investigated.

  17. Carbonic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Kerkhof, Alfons; Thiéry, Régis

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the phase relations in carbonic fluid inclusions with pure, binary and ternary mixtures of the system CO 2-CH 4-N 2, compositions, which are frequently found in geological materials. Phase transitions involving liquid, gas and solid phases in the temperature range between -192°C and 31°C are discussed and presented in phase diagrams ( PT, TX and VX projections). These diagrams can be applied for the interpretation of microthermometry data in order to determine fluid composition and molar volume (or density).

  18. C-11 cyanide production system

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Dohyun; Alexoff, David; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob; Ferrieri, Richard A

    2015-01-13

    A method for providing .sup.11C-labeled cyanides from .sup.11C labeled oxides in a target gas stream retrieved from an irradiated high pressure gaseous target containing O.sub.2 is provided, wherein .sup.11C labeled oxides are reduced with H.sub.2 in the presence of a nickel catalyst under a pressure and a temperature sufficient to form a product stream comprising at least about 95% .sup.11CH.sup.4 , the .sup.11CH.sub.4 is then combined with an excess of NH.sub.3 in a carrier/reaction stream flowing at an accelerated velocity and the combined .sup.11CH4 carrier/reaction stream is then contacted with a platinum (Pt) catalyst particulate supported on a substantially-chemically-nonreactive heat-stable support at a temperature of at least about 900 .degree. C., whereby a product stream comprising at least about 60%H.sup.11CN is provided in less than 10 minutes from retrieval of the .sup.11C labeled oxide.

  19. Hydrothermal carbonization of municipal waste streams.

    PubMed

    Berge, Nicole D; Ro, Kyoung S; Mao, Jingdong; Flora, Joseph R V; Chappell, Mark A; Bae, Sunyoung

    2011-07-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that can be used to convert municipal waste streams into sterilized, value-added hydrochar. HTC has been mostly applied and studied on a limited number of feedstocks, ranging from pure substances to slightly more complex biomass such as wood, with an emphasis on nanostructure generation. There has been little work exploring the carbonization of complex waste streams or of utilizing HTC as a sustainable waste management technique. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the environmental implications associated with the carbonization of representative municipal waste streams (including gas and liquid products), to evaluate the physical, chemical, and thermal properties of the produced hydrochar, and to determine carbonization energetics associated with each waste stream. Results from batch carbonization experiments indicate 49-75% of the initially present carbon is retained within the char, while 20-37% and 2-11% of the carbon is transferred to the liquid- and gas-phases, respectively. The composition of the produced hydrochar suggests both dehydration and decarboxylation occur during carbonization, resulting in structures with high aromaticities. Process energetics suggest feedstock carbonization is exothermic.

  20. Carbon cycling and storage in mangrove forests.

    PubMed

    Alongi, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves are ecologically and economically important forests of the tropics. They are highly productive ecosystems with rates of primary production equal to those of tropical humid evergreen forests and coral reefs. Although mangroves occupy only 0.5% of the global coastal area, they contribute 10-15% (24 Tg C y(-1)) to coastal sediment carbon storage and export 10-11% of the particulate terrestrial carbon to the ocean. Their disproportionate contribution to carbon sequestration is now perceived as a means for conservation and restoration and a way to help ameliorate greenhouse gas emissions. Of immediate concern are potential carbon losses to deforestation (90-970 Tg C y(-1)) that are greater than these ecosystems' rates of carbon storage. Large reservoirs of dissolved inorganic carbon in deep soils, pumped via subsurface pathways to adjacent waterways, are a large loss of carbon, at a potential rate up to 40% of annual primary production. Patterns of carbon allocation and rates of carbon flux in mangrove forests are nearly identical to those of other tropical forests.

  1. BOREAS TF-11 Biomass Data over the SSA-Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, David W.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team collected several data sets in its efforts to fully describe the flux and site characteristics at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains plant cover, standing crop of plant biomass, and estimated net primary productivity at each chamber site at the end of the 1994 field season. The measurements were conducted as part of a 2 x 2 factorial experiment in which we added carbon (300 g/sq m as wheat straw) and nitrogen (6 g/sq m as urea) to four replicate locations in the vicinity of the TF-11 tower. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  2. BOREAS TF-11 Decomposition Data over the SSA-Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, David W.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team collected several data sets in its efforts to fully describe the flux and site characteristics at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains decomposition rates of a standard substrate (wheat straw) across treatments. The measurements were conducted in 1994 as part of a 2 x 2 factorial experiment in which we added carbon (300 g/sq m as wheat straw) and nitrogen (6 g/sq m as urea) to four replicate locations in the vicinity of the TF-11 tower. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  3. Carbon Nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Turchanin, Andrey; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanomembranes (CNMs) are synthetic 2D carbon sheets with tailored physical or chemical properties. These depend on the structure, molecular composition, and surroundings on either side. Due to their molecular thickness, they can be regarded as "interfaces without bulk" separating regions of different gaseous, liquid, or solid components and controlling the materials exchange between them. Here, a universal scheme for the fabrication of 1 nm-thick, mechanically stable, functional CNMs is presented. CNMs can be further modified, for example perforated by ion bombardment or chemically functionalized by the binding of other molecules onto the surfaces. The underlying physical and chemical mechanisms are described, and examples are presented for the engineering of complex surface architectures, e.g., nanopatterns of proteins, fluorescent dyes, or polymer brushes. A simple transfer procedure allows CNMs to be placed on various support structures, which makes them available for diverse applications: supports for electron and X-ray microscopy, nanolithography, nanosieves, Janus nanomembranes, polymer carpets, complex layered structures, functionalization of graphene, novel nanoelectronic and nanomechanical devices. To close, the potential of CNMs in filtration and sensorics is discussed. Based on tests for the separation of gas molecules, it is argued that ballistic membranes may play a prominent role in future efforts of materials separation.

  4. 40 CFR 458.11 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process... shall apply to this subpart. (b) The term “product” shall mean carbon black manufactured by the...

  5. 40 CFR 458.11 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND STANDARDS CARBON BLACK MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Black Furnace Process... shall apply to this subpart. (b) The term “product” shall mean carbon black manufactured by the...

  6. Trading forest carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading. Carbon inventories, specifically in the area of land use and forestry are reviewed for the Pacific Northwest. Carbon turnover in forests is discussed as it relates to carbon sequestration. Scient...

  7. Interfaces in carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Peebles, L.H.; Meyer, R.A.; Jortner, J.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites, consisting of a carbon matrix reinforced with carbon fibers, have complex microstructures. Several types of interfaces, microcracks, and various degress of local anisotropy were observed. This paper provides examples of microstructures seen in carbon-carbon composites, with emphasis on the interfaces. Information relating to the degree of bonding at interfaces, and its effects on composite behavior, is reviewed. The causes and effects of the various observed microstructures are beginning to be understood, but there remain many questions deserving further study.

  8. A record of Neogene seawater δ11B reconstructed from paired δ11B analyses on benthic and planktic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenop, Rosanna; Hain, Mathis P.; Sosdian, Sindia M.; Oliver, Kevin I. C.; Goodwin, Philip; Chalk, Thomas B.; Lear, Caroline H.; Wilson, Paul A.; Foster, Gavin L.

    2017-02-01

    The boron isotope composition (δ11B) of foraminiferal calcite reflects the pH and the boron isotope composition of the seawater the foraminifer grew in. For pH reconstructions, the δ11B of seawater must therefore be known, but information on this parameter is limited. Here we reconstruct Neogene seawater δ11B based on the δ11B difference between paired measurements of planktic and benthic foraminifera and an estimate of the coeval water column pH gradient from their δ13C values. Carbon cycle model simulations underscore that the ΔpH-Δδ13C relationship is relatively insensitive to ocean and carbon cycle changes, validating our approach. Our reconstructions suggest that δ11Bsw was ˜ 37.5 ‰ during the early and middle Miocene (roughly 23-12 Ma) and rapidly increased during the late Miocene (between 12 and 5 Ma) towards the modern value of 39.61 ‰. Strikingly, this pattern is similar to the evolution of the seawater isotope composition of Mg, Li and Ca, suggesting a common forcing mechanism. Based on the observed direction of change, we hypothesize that an increase in secondary mineral formation during continental weathering affected the isotope composition of riverine input to the ocean since 14 Ma.

  9. Target design considerations for high specific activity [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Alexoff, D.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; McDonald, K.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    In the routine preparation of {sup 11}C-labeled compounds through N-[{sup 11}C]-methylation using [{sup 11}C]H{sub 3}I, total masses are always higher than synthesis mass contribution, suggesting that the target system contributes carrier carbon to the final product mass. This conclusion prompted this evaluation of target materials and target design for [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} production. Ultimately, one is faced with the sprospect of compromising between [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} specific activity and the amount that can be extracted from the target after a reasonable irradiation time.

  10. Synthesis, isolation and purification of [11C]-choline

    PubMed Central

    Jadwiński, Michał; Chmura, Agnieszka; Gorczewski, Kamil; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    [11C]-choline is an effective PET tracer used for imaging of neoplastic lesions and metastases of the prostate cancer. However, its production can be a challenge for manufacturers, as it has not yet been described in Polish or European pharmacopoeia. In this study the technical aspects of [11C]-choline production are described and detailed process parameters are provided. The quality control procedures for releasing [11C]-choline as solutio iniectabilis are also presented. The purity and quality of the radiopharmaceutical obtained according to the proposed method were find to be high enough to safely administrate the radiopharmaceutical to patients. Application of an automated synthesizer makes it possible to carry out the entire process of [11C]-choline production, isolation and purification within 20 minutes. It is crucial to maintain all aspects of the process as short as possible, since the decay half-time of carbon-11 is 20.4 minutes. The resulting radiopharmaceutical is sterile and pyrogen-free and of a high chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity proved by chromatographic techniques. The yield of the process is up to 20%. [11C]-choline PET scanning can be used as accurate and effective diagnostic tool in all centers equipped with [11C]-target containing cyclotron. PMID:27660552

  11. Synthesis, isolation and purification of [(11)C]-choline.

    PubMed

    Szydło, Marcin; Jadwiński, Michał; Chmura, Agnieszka; Gorczewski, Kamil; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    [(11)C]-choline is an effective PET tracer used for imaging of neoplastic lesions and metastases of the prostate cancer. However, its production can be a challenge for manufacturers, as it has not yet been described in Polish or European pharmacopoeia. In this study the technical aspects of [(11)C]-choline production are described and detailed process parameters are provided. The quality control procedures for releasing [(11)C]-choline as solutio iniectabilis are also presented. The purity and quality of the radiopharmaceutical obtained according to the proposed method were find to be high enough to safely administrate the radiopharmaceutical to patients. Application of an automated synthesizer makes it possible to carry out the entire process of [(11)C]-choline production, isolation and purification within 20 minutes. It is crucial to maintain all aspects of the process as short as possible, since the decay half-time of carbon-11 is 20.4 minutes. The resulting radiopharmaceutical is sterile and pyrogen-free and of a high chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity proved by chromatographic techniques. The yield of the process is up to 20%. [(11)C]-choline PET scanning can be used as accurate and effective diagnostic tool in all centers equipped with [(11)C]-target containing cyclotron.

  12. Carbon Farming as a Carbon Negative Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Laird, D.; Hayes, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon farms have a pivotal role in national and international efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change. A carbon farm in its broadest sense is one that reduces greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. Their capacity to remove carbon from the air and store it safely and permanently, while providing additional human and ecosystem benefits, means they could contribute significantly to national efforts to stabilize or reduce GHGs. We examine carbon farms in the context of corn and soybean production agriculture. We illustrate, using Iowa data but with relevance across United States corn and soybean production, the potential for carbon farms to reduce human GHG emissions and sequester carbon permanently at a rate that has meaningful impact on global greenhouse gas concentration. Carbon has been viewed as a next generation cash crop in Iowa for over a decade. The carbon farm perspective, however, goes beyond carbon as cash crop to make carbon the center of an entire farm enterprise. The transformation is possible through slight adjustment crop practices mixed with advances in technology to sequester carbon through biochar. We examine carbon balance of Iowa agriculture given only the combination of slight reduction in fertilizer and sequestration by biochar. We find the following. Iowa carbon farms could turn Iowa agriculture into a carbon sink. The estimated range of GHG reduction by statewide implementation of carbon farms is 19.46 to 90.27 MMt CO2-equivalent (CO2-e), while the current agricultural CO2-e emission estimate is 35.38 MMt CO2-e. Iowa carbon farm GHG reduction would exceed Iowa GHG reduction by wind energy (8.7 MMt CO2-e) and could exceed combined reductions from wind energy and corn grain ethanol (10.7 MMt CO2-e; 19.4 MMt CO2-e combined). In fact, Iowa carbon farms alone could exceed GHG reduction from national corn grain ethanol production (39.6 MMt CO2-e). A carbon price accessible to agricultural

  13. Carbon dioxide concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, C. F.; Huebscher, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Passed exhaled air through electrochemical cell containing alkali metal carbonate aqueous solution, and utilizes platinized electrodes causing reaction of oxygen at cathode with water in electrolyte, producing hydroxyl ions which react with carbon dioxide to form carbonate ions.

  14. Inclusion of soil carbon lateral movement alters terrestrial carbon budget in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haicheng; Liu, Shuguang; Yuan, Wenping; Dong, Wenjie; Ye, Aizhong; Xie, Xianhong; Chen, Yang; Liu, Dan; Cai, Wenwen; Mao, Yuna

    2014-01-01

    The lateral movement of soil carbon has a profound effect on the carbon budget of terrestrial ecosystems; however, it has never been quantified in China, which is one of the strongest soil erosion areas in the world. In this study, we estimated that the overall soil erosion in China varies from 11.27 to 18.17 Pg yr−1 from 1982 to 2011, accounting for 7–21% of total soil erosion globally. Soil erosion induces a substantial lateral redistribution of soil organic carbon ranging from 0.64 to 1.04 Pg C yr−1. The erosion-induced carbon flux ranges from a 0.19 Pg C yr−1 carbon source to a 0.24 Pg C yr−1 carbon sink in the terrestrial ecosystem, which is potentially comparable in magnitude to previously estimated total carbon budget of China (0.19 to 0.26 Pg yr−1). Our results showed that the lateral movement of soil carbon strongly alters the carbon budget in China, and highlighted the urgent need to integrate the processes of soil erosion into the regional or global carbon cycle estimates. PMID:25430970

  15. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  16. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L; De Voss, James J; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs.

  17. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Engle, Glen B.

    1993-01-01

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  18. Pioneer 11's New Saturn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    New findings about the planet, Saturn and its environs, as collected by Pioneer 11 are detailed. Topics discussed include: the composition of the planet's interior, the search for new satellites, and the planet's magnetic field. (BT)

  19. Engineering of High-Toughness Carbon Nanotubes Hierarchically Laminated Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-27

    REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Jul-10 - Jul-11 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Program Title: ENGINEERING OF HIGH-TOUGHNESS CARBON NANOTUBES ...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Program Title: ENGINEERING OF HIGH-TOUGHNESS CARBON NANOTUBES ...Ashby plots can be attained (Fig. 2B). 5. New doping method of carbon nanotubes was developed. Funding Profile: (Give the fiscal year funding

  20. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  1. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    Smit, Berend

    2016-07-12

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  2. Carbon-carbon grid for ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus of manufacturing a grid member for use in an ion discharge apparatus provides a woven carbon fiber in a matrix of carbon. The carbon fibers are orientated to provide a negatibe coefficient of thermal expansion for at least a portion of the grid member's operative range of use.

  3. Carbon-carbon grid for ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus of manufacturing a grid member for use in an ion discharge apparatus provides a woven carbon fiber in a matrix of carbon. The carbon fibers are orientated to provide a negatibe coefficient of thermal expansion for at least a portion of the grid member's operative range of use.

  4. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  5. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  6. 40 CFR Table 11 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) for Carbon Monoxide (CO) 11 Table 11 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Carbon Monoxide (CO) As stated in § 63.1565(b)(2) and (3), you shall meet each requirement in the... monitoring system. Measure CO emissions Data from your continuous emission monitoring system. Collect...

  7. 40 CFR Table 11 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) for Carbon Monoxide (CO) 11 Table 11 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Carbon Monoxide (CO) As stated in § 63.1565(b)(2) and (3), you shall meet each requirement in the... monitoring system. Measure CO emissions Data from your continuous emission monitoring system. Collect...

  8. 40 CFR Table 11 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) for Carbon Monoxide (CO) 11 Table 11 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Carbon Monoxide (CO) As stated in § 63.1565(b)(2) and (3), you shall meet each requirement in the... monitoring system. Measure CO emissions Data from your continuous emission monitoring system. Collect...

  9. 11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/15, Rev. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Carbon-Carbon Heat Pipe Testing and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rovang, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses development and proof-of-concept testing of a new lightweight carbon-carbon (C-C) space radiator heat pipe developed under the NASA Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Program. The heat pipe was filled with potassium working fluid and tested for 11 hours including startup from ambient temperature with the working fluid initially in the frozen state to near 700 K condenser temperature. Steady-state heat pipe input power during testing was facility limited to about 300 watts, representing about 50 percent of the design input power. Post test inspection showed the heat pipe to be in excellent condition after eight thermal cycles from ambient to steady-state operating temperature. Potential applications, ranging from small spacecraft heat rejection to aircraft and terrestrial uses, are discussed.

  11. Deep Soil Carbon: The Insight into Global Carbon Estimation and Deforestation Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangmanee, Podjanee; Dell, Bernard; Harper, Richard; Henry, David

    2015-04-01

    World carbon stocks have been dramatically changed by deforestation. The current estimation of carbon loss is based on allometric techniques assisted with satellite imagery and the assumption that, 20% of the total biomass carbon stock is below ground. However, the monitoring of soil carbon is limited to 0.3 m despite many soils being much deeper than this. For example, direct measurement of soil carbon demonstrated the occurrence of two to five times more carbon stored in deep soils of south Western Australia (SWA) compared to what would normally be reported, although the land had been deforested for 80 years. This raises important questions about the dynamics of this deeper carbon and whether it will contribute to global climate change. This paper reports the form and variation of carbon in soil at three adjacent areas at three different depths (0-1, 11-12 and 18-19 m). Techniques were developed to quantitatively and qualitatively determine small concentrations of carbon in deep soils. There were marked differences in carbon compounds with depth. Near the surface these were macromolecular organic compounds derived from lignin, polysaccharides, proteins, terpenes, whereas at depth they were low molecular weight compounds, 13-docosenamide, 13-docosenoate, xanthone, benzophenone. The deeper compounds are likely derived from the roots of the previous forest whereas the surface soils are affected by current land use. The in situ decomposition of deep roots was revealed by the pyridine compound. The variation of compounds and location of carbon in clay could imply the state of decomposition. The result demonstrated that carbon is contained in deep soils and should be considered in global carbon accounting, particularly given ongoing deforestation on deep soils.

  12. Carbon Nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Polina; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2017-03-01

    This chapter describes the formation and properties of one nanometer thick carbon nanomembranes (CNMs), made by electron induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The cross-linked SAMs are robust enough to be released from the surface and placed on solid support or over holes as free-standing membranes. Annealing at 1000K transforms CNMs into graphene accompanied by a change of mechanical stiffness and electrical resistance. The developed fabrication approach is scalable and provides molecular level control over thickness and homogeneity of the produced CNMs. The mechanisms of electron-induced cross-linking process are discussed in details. A variety of polyaromatic thiols: oligophenyls as well as small and extended condensed polycyclic hydrocarbons have been successfully employed, demonstrating that the structural and functional properties of the resulting nanomembranes are strongly determined by the structure of molecular monolayers. The mechanical properties of CNMs (Young's modulus, tensile strength and prestress) are characterized by bulge testing. The interpretation of the bulge test data relates the Young's modulus to the properties of single molecules and to the structure of the pristine SAMs. The gas transport through the CNM is measured onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) - thin film composite membrane. The established relationship of permeance and molecular size determines the molecular sieving mechanism of permeation through this ultrathin sheet.

  13. The effect of energy substrates on PHB accumulation of Acidiphilium cryptum DX1-1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ai-ling; Xia, Jin-lan; Song, Zhi-wen; Jiang, Peng; Xia, Yan; Wan, Min-xi; Zhang, Rui-yong; Yang, Yi; Liu, Ke-ke

    2013-09-01

    The effect of glucose and elemental sulfur on the growth and PHB accumulation of Acidiphilium cryptum DX1-1 was investigated. Meanwhile, the differential expressions of 19 genes related with PHB accumulation, sulfur metabolism and carbon fixed in heterotrophy, phytotrophy and mixotrophy were studied by RT-qPCR. The results showed that strain DX1-1 could accumulate PHB with sulfur as the energy substance and atmospheric CO2 as carbon resource. Glucose could improve the growth of strain DX1-1 cultured in medium with sulfur as the energy substance, and almost all the key enzyme-encoding genes related with PHB, sulfur metabolism and carbon fixed were basically up-regulated. PHB polymerase (Arcy_3030), ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase (Acry_0825), ribulose-phosphate-epimerase (Acry_0022), and cysteine synthase A (Acry_2560) played important role in PHB accumulation, the modified expression of which could influence the PHB yield. With CO2 as carbon resource, the main initial substance of PHB accumulation for strain DX1-1 was acetyl-CoA, instead of acetate with the glucose as the carbon resource. Because of accumulating PHB by fixed atmospheric CO2 while independent of light, A. cryptum DX1-1 may have specifically potential in production of PHB.

  14. Photoconductivity of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M.S. )

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity. 54 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Boron and diagenesis: Questioning the fidelity of Snowball δ11B excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. L.; Stewart, J.; Gutjahr, M.; Pearce, F.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Large negative carbon (δ13C) and boron (δ11B) isotope excursions (both >6‰) within the widely distributed Neoproterozoic "Snowball Earth" cap carbonates are interpreted as evidence for considerable perturbation of the carbon cycle and the associated reduction, then recovery of global ocean pH. Yet, before conclusive interpretations may be drawn, isotopic data must first be shown to be primary in origin and non-diagenetic. Recent studies of Quaternary carbonate platform sediments from a number of locations worldwide reveal δ13C excursions of similar magnitude and distribution to the "Snowball Earth" excursions. However, these recent analogues were formed following eustatic sea level fall and exposure of recent carbonates to meteoric diagenesis (Swart and Kennedy, 2012). Here we present δ11B and B/Ca data from Pleistocene-aged carbonate platform sediments recovered by the Clino Core from the Bahamas to examine the effects of diagenesis on the boron system. We find that within the interval of meteoric diagenesis the δ11B of bulk carbonate is substantially reduced by approximately 6‰ in conjunction with a drop in B/Ca of 90%. These isotopic and elemental down-core patterns are strikingly similar to those reported for δ11B and B/Ca in the cap carbonates of the Neoproterozoic snowball Earth events (Kasemann et al., 2005; Kasemann et al., 2010). Our results may therefore question the primary nature of "Snowball Earth" isotope excursions. We recommend more rigorous assessment of the diagenetic history of these ancient carbonates to ensure palaeoclimatological interpretations are robust.

  16. Carbon in, Carbon out: Reevaluating Carbon Fluxes in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction zones exert a fundamental control on the deep carbon cycle. We reevaluated carbon inputs and outputs in convergent margins considering new estimates of C concentration in subducting mantle peridotites, carbonate solubility in aqueous fluids along subduction geotherms, melting and diapirism of carbon-bearing metasediments, and diffuse degassing from arcs. Our updated estimate of carbon inputs to the global subduction system, which includes estimates for C in altered peridotite, is 40-66 megatons carbon/year (MtC/y). We find that estimates of C lost from slabs (14-66 MtC/y) must take into account the high CaCO3 solubility in aqueous fluids, which contributes significant C that must be added to that derived from mineral decarbonation reactions. When taken together with hydrous silicate and carbonatite melts and metasediment diapirs, nearly all C can be scavenged from subducting lithosphere. The return of C to the atmosphere via arc-volcano degassing is only 18-43 MtC/y, but consideration deep volatile saturation of arc magmas, magma ponding in the middle and deep arc crust, and CO2 venting in forearcs can account for the remaining C lost from the slab. Thus, whereas previous studies concluded that about half the subducting carbon is returned to the convecting mantle, we find that relatively little carbon may be recycled. If so, substantial quantities of carbon are stored in the mantle lithosphere and crust and the carbon content of the mantle lithosphere + crust + ocean + atmosphere must be increasing, at least over the last 5-10 My. This is consistent with inferences from noble gas data. Recycled carbon in diamonds is a small fraction of the global carbon inventory.

  17. SAR11 Bacteria: The Most Abundant Plankton in the Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    SAR11 is a group of small, carbon-oxidizing bacteria that reach a global estimated population size of 2.4×1028 cells—approximately 25% of all plankton. They are found throughout the oceans but reach their largest numbers in stratified, oligotrophic gyres, which are an expanding habitat in the warming oceans. SAR11 likely had a Precambrian origin and, over geological time, evolved into the niche of harvesting labile, low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM). SAR11 cells are minimal in size and complexity, a phenomenon known as streamlining that is thought to benefit them by lowering the material costs of replication and maximizing transport functions that are essential to competition at ultralow nutrient concentrations. One of the surprises in SAR11 metabolism is their ability to both oxidize and produce a variety of volatile organic compounds that can diffuse into the atmosphere. SAR11 cells divide slowly and lack many forms of regulation commonly used by bacterial cells to adjust to changing environmental conditions. As a result of genome reduction, they require an unusual range of nutrients, which leads to complex biochemical interactions with other plankton. The study of SAR11 is providing insight into the biogeochemistry of labile DOM and is affecting microbiology beyond marine science by providing a model for understanding the evolution and function of streamlined cells.

  18. SAR11 Bacteria: The Most Abundant Plankton in the Oceans.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2017-01-03

    SAR11 is a group of small, carbon-oxidizing bacteria that reach a global estimated population size of 2.4×10(28) cells-approximately 25% of all plankton. They are found throughout the oceans but reach their largest numbers in stratified, oligotrophic gyres, which are an expanding habitat in the warming oceans. SAR11 likely had a Precambrian origin and, over geological time, evolved into the niche of harvesting labile, low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM). SAR11 cells are minimal in size and complexity, a phenomenon known as streamlining that is thought to benefit them by lowering the material costs of replication and maximizing transport functions that are essential to competition at ultralow nutrient concentrations. One of the surprises in SAR11 metabolism is their ability to both oxidize and produce a variety of volatile organic compounds that can diffuse into the atmosphere. SAR11 cells divide slowly and lack many forms of regulation commonly used by bacterial cells to adjust to changing environmental conditions. As a result of genome reduction, they require an unusual range of nutrients, which leads to complex biochemical interactions with other plankton. The study of SAR11 is providing insight into the biogeochemistry of labile DOM and is affecting microbiology beyond marine science by providing a model for understanding the evolution and function of streamlined cells.

  19. 1,1-Dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R02 / 002 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF 1,1 - DICHLOROETHYLENE ( CAS No . 75 - 35 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2002 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance

  20. Stress Calculations for Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, Timur; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Atomic stresses were calculated for carbon nanotubes under strain conditions. Graphitic tubules with radii ranging from approximately 2 to 11 Angstroms and two different tubule structures with varying atomic orientations were included in the calculations. Elongations and contractions were applied in the axial direction and atomic stress values were calculated for infinitely long tubules. The calculations were carried out using Brenner's function which was developed for carbon species. Results indicate that the stress is tensile in the radial direction while it is compressive in the tangential direction. Variations in stress values in the direction of the cylindrical aids were investigated as a function of applied strain. Furthermore, using the stress-strain curve (calculated based on atomic considerations), the values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for nanotubules were also estimated.

  1. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  2. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  3. Petroleum-derived carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bacha, J.D.; Newman, J.W.; White, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on petroleum coke. Topics considered at the symposium included mesophase formation, thermal analysis, rheology, microstructure, carbon fibers, electron microscopy, residual oil processing, synthetic aromatic pitch, delayed coking, calcination, desulfurization, graphite, metallurgical coke, carbon black, natural gas pyrolysis, liquid impregnation, and carbon-carbon composites.

  4. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  5. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  6. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, and carbon..., Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.990 Absorbers, condensers, and...

  7. Automotive high color carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ducote, R.E.; Dees, R.G.; Musick, V.L.

    1988-06-14

    A method of making a low porosity carbon black is described comprising: (1) feeding into a carbon black reactor a carbonaceous feed; (2) contacting the feed in the reactor with combustion gases containing oxygen thereby cracking the feed to produce carbon black; and (3) contacting the produced carbon black in the reactor with vaporizable hydrocarbon oil injected into the reaction at a point where the carbon black forming reaction is substantially complete to at least partially quench the carbon black producing reaction, the vaporizable hydrocarbon oil being cracked and serving to plate the carbon black to reduce the porosity thereof.

  8. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  9. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  10. Pyrogenic carbon in Australian soils.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fangjie; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi S; Dong, Zhaomin; Yan, Yubo; Lamb, Dane; Bucheli, Thomas D; Choppala, Girish; Duan, Luchun; Semple, Kirk T

    2017-02-16

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC), the combustion residues of fossil fuel and biomass, is a versatile soil fraction active in biogeochemical processes. In this study, the chemo-thermal oxidation method (CTO-375) was applied to investigate the content and distribution of PyC in 30 Australian agricultural, pastoral, bushland and parkland soil with various soil types. Soils were sampled incrementally to 50cm in 6 locations and at another 7 locations at 0-10cm. Results showed that PyC in Australian soils typically ranged from 0.27-5.62mg/g, with three Dermosol soils ranging within 2.58-5.62mg/g. Soil PyC contributed 2.0-11% (N=29) to the total organic carbon (TOC), with one Ferrosol as high as 26%. PyC was concentrated either in the top (0-10cm) or bottom (30-50cm) soil layers, with the highest PyC:TOC ratio in the bottom (30-50cm) soil horizon in all soils. Principal component analysis - multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) suggested the silt-associated organic C factor accounted for 38.5% of the variation in PyC. Our findings suggest that PyC is an important fraction of the TOC (2.0-11%, N=18) and chemically recalcitrant organic C (ROC) obtained by chemical C fractionation method accounts for a significant proportion of soil TOC (47.3-84.9%, N=18). This is the first study comparing these two methods, and it indicates both CTO-375 and C speciation methods can determine a fraction of recalcitrant organic C. However, estimated chemically recalcitrant organic carbon pool (ROC) was approximately an order of magnitude greater than that of thermally stable organic carbon (PyC).

  11. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  12. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N; Leu, A; Muñoz, E; Olsen, J; Kwong, E; Des Marais, D

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4% depleted in 13C relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3% enriched in 13C. The acetate 13C enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6% depleted in 13C, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7%, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7%, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. PMID:2867741

  13. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  14. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-10-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. 38 references.

  15. Catalysis by basic carbons: Preparation of dihydropyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozo-Rondón, E.; Calvino-Casilda, V.; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; Casal, B.; Durán-Valle, C. J.; Rojas-Cervantes, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    The condensation of benzaldehyde and different substituted benzaldehydes, such as 2-nitrobenzaldehyde, 3-nitrobenzaldehyde, and 2,4-dichlorobenzaldehyde, with ethyl cyanoacetate was carried out using two alkaline carbons (Na-Norit and Cs-Norit) as catalysts in the absence of solvent. The reaction products are precursors in the production of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives, which have expanding practical applications as pharmaceuticals in the line of calcium channel blockers. High values of activity and selectivity were obtained. The most active carbon (Cs-Norit), which contains basic sites with p Kb = 11.2, is more active than pyridine, and less than piperidine. The selectivity to the desired condensation product when using these activated carbons is, at least, as high as in the case of the homogeneous catalyst. This "green" and "clean" method (alkaline doped carbon catalyst in the absence of solvent) can be extended to the preparation of other intermediates with medical applications.

  16. Pioneer 11 Encounter. [with Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Pioneer 11's encounter with Jupiter is discussed in detail. The scientific experiments carried out on the probe are described along with the instruments used. Tables are included which provide data on the times of experiments, encounters, and the distances from Jupiter. Educational study projects are also given.

  17. Activity Book. Celebrate Apollo 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchert, Linda; And Others

    1994-01-01

    An activity book helps students learn about the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon as they get a sense of the mission's impact on their lives. The activities enhance understanding of science, math, social studies, and language arts. A teacher's page offers information on books, magazines, computer materials, and special resources. (SM)

  18. Apollo 11 Lunar Science Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Wendell

    1970-01-01

    Report of a conference called to discuss the findings of 142 scientists from their investigations of samples of lunar rock and soil brought back by the Apollo 11 mission. Significant findings reported include the age and composition of the lunar samples, and the absence of water and organic matter. Much discussed was the origin and structure of…

  19. Apollo 11: 20th Anniversary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Apollo 11 Mission which culminated in the first manned lunar landing on July 20, 1969 is recounted. Historical footage of preparation, takeoff, stage separation, the Eagle Lunar Lander, and the moon walk accompany astronauts Michael Collins, Buzz Aldrin, and Neil Armstrong giving their recollections of the mission.

  20. Parenting after September 11, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Val J.

    Many mothers and fathers are parenting differently since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. This booklet describes how parents are discovering new ways to strengthen and build upon their relationships with their children and provides advice to parents on how to help their children grow closer to them, to become caring and sharing people,…

  1. Earth Science 11. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This publication, developed by the Ministry of Education, Province of British Columbia, Canada, is a teaching guide for the Earth Science 11 course. The course is intended to provide secondary school students with the background and desire to investigate their earth, its materials and its processes. The guide consists of four sections. Section A…

  2. Teaching after 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Gardner is a Social Studies teacher at a large urban high school in Edmonton (Canada) with a widely diverse ethnic population. He observes that after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 his students became much more engaged in discussion of international issues and more willing to share their personal experiences of life outside of…

  3. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-03

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  4. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-07

    atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2005–2014), EFF was 9.0 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 4.4 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1. For the year 2014 alone, EFF grew to 9.8 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, 0.6 % above 2013, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, albeit at a slower rate compared to the average growth of 2.2 % yr-1 that took place during 2005–2014. Also, for 2014, ELUC was 1.1 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 3.9 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 4.1 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. GATM was lower in 2014 compared to the past decade (2005–2014), reflecting a larger SLAND for that year. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 397.15 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2014. For 2015, preliminary data indicate that the growth in EFF will be near or slightly below zero, with a projection of -0.6 [range of -1.6 to +0.5] %, based on national emissions projections for China and the USA, and projections of gross domestic product corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy for the rest of the world. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2015, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 555 ± 55 GtC (2035 ± 205 GtCO2) for 1870–2015, about 75 % from EFF and 25 % from ELUC. Finally

  5. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Feely, R. A.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-01

    carbon budget. For the last decade available (2005-2014), EFF was 9.0 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 4.4 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1. For the year 2014 alone, EFF grew to 9.8 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, 0.6 % above 2013, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, albeit at a slower rate compared to the average growth of 2.2 % yr-1 that took place during 2005-2014. Also, for 2014, ELUC was 1.1 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 3.9 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 4.1 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. GATM was lower in 2014 compared to the past decade (2005-2014), reflecting a larger SLAND for that year. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 397.15 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2014. For 2015, preliminary data indicate that the growth in EFF will be near or slightly below zero, with a projection of -0.6 [range of -1.6 to +0.5] %, based on national emissions projections for China and the USA, and projections of gross domestic product corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy for the rest of the world. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2015, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 555 ± 55 GtC (2035 ± 205 GtCO2) for 1870-2015, about 75 % from EFF and 25 % from ELUC. This living data update documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this data set (Le Quéré et al., 2015, 2014, 2013). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2015).

  6. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    DOE PAGES

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; ...

    2015-12-07

    component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2005–2014), EFF was 9.0 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 4.4 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1. For the year 2014 alone, EFF grew to 9.8 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, 0.6 % above 2013, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, albeit at a slower rate compared to the average growth of 2.2 % yr-1 that took place during 2005–2014. Also, for 2014, ELUC was 1.1 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM was 3.9 ± 0.2 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND was 4.1 ± 0.9 GtC yr-1. GATM was lower in 2014 compared to the past decade (2005–2014), reflecting a larger SLAND for that year. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 397.15 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2014. For 2015, preliminary data indicate that the growth in EFF will be near or slightly below zero, with a projection of -0.6 [range of -1.6 to +0.5] %, based on national emissions projections for China and the USA, and projections of gross domestic product corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy for the rest of the world. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2015, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 555 ± 55 GtC (2035 ± 205 GtCO2) for 1870–2015, about 75 % from EFF and 25 % from ELUC. Finally, this living data update documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this data set (Le Quéré et al., 2015, 2014, 2013). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2015).« less

  7. High Thermal Conductivity Carbon/Carbon Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop a lowcost, high thermal conductivity carbon/carbon composite with a mesophase pitch -based matrix. A low...carbonization technique and heat treatment of the mesophase pitch was utilized to enhance composite properties by increasing the composite density...Three different fibers, T300 PAN-based, P55 pitch -based, and an experimental high thermal conductivity mesophase pitch -based, were incorporated as the

  8. New Carbonate Standard Reference Materials for Boron Isotope Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Christopher, S. J.; Day, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of boron (δ11B) in marine carbonates is well established as a proxy for past ocean pH. Yet, before palaeoceanographic interpretation can be made, rigorous assessment of analytical uncertainty of δ11B data is required; particularly in light of recent interlaboratory comparison studies that reported significant measurement disagreement between laboratories [1]. Well characterised boron standard reference materials (SRMs) in a carbonate matrix are needed to assess the accuracy and precision of carbonate δ11B measurements throughout the entire procedural chemistry; from sample cleaning, to ionic separation of boron from the carbonate matrix, and final δ11B measurement by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To date only two carbonate reference materials exist that have been value-assigned by the boron isotope measurement community [2]; JCp-1 (porites coral) and JCt-1 (Giant Clam) [3]. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will supplement these existing standards with new solution based inorganic carbonate boron SRMs that replicate typical foraminiferal and coral B/Ca ratios and δ11B values. These new SRMs will not only ensure quality control of full procedural chemistry between laboratories, but have the added benefits of being both in abundant supply and free from any restrictions associated with shipment of biogenic samples derived from protected species. Here we present in-house δ11B measurements of these new boron carbonate SRM solutions. These preliminary data will feed into an interlaboratory comparison study to establish certified values for these new NIST SRMs. 1. Foster, G.L., et al., Chemical Geology, 2013. 358(0): p. 1-14. 2. Gutjahr, M., et al., Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses. Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU General Assembly 2014, 2014. 16(EGU2014-5028-1). 3. Inoue, M., et al., Geostandards and

  9. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, John F.; Benninger, Larry; Alperin, Marc; de Dios Morales, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hampered the inclusion of sequestration by mangroves in carbon cycle models and in carbon offset markets. The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative carbon capture and storage potential in natural and restored mangrove forests. We measured depth profiles of soil organic carbon content in 72 cores collected from six sites (three natural, two restored, and one afforested) surrounding Muisne, Ecuador. Samples up to 1 m deep were analyzed for organic matter content using loss-on-ignition and values were converted to organic carbon content using an accepted ratio of 1.72 (g/g). Results suggest that average soil carbon storage is 0.055 ± 0.002 g cm−3 (11.3 ± 0.8% carbon content by dry mass, mean ± 1 SE) up to 1 m deep in natural sites, and 0.058 ± 0.002 g cm−3 (8.0 ± 0.3%) in restored sites. These estimates are concordant with published global averages. Evidence of equivalent carbon stocks in restored and afforested mangrove patches emphasizes the carbon sink potential for reestablished mangrove systems. We found no relationship between sediment carbon storage and aboveground biomass, forest structure, or within-patch location. Our results demonstrate the long-term carbon storage potential of natural mangroves, high effectiveness of mangrove restoration and afforestation, a lack of predictability in carbon storage strictly based on aboveground parameters, and the need to establish standardized protocol for quantifying mangrove sediment carbon stocks. PMID:24883249

  10. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests.

    PubMed

    DelVecchia, Amanda G; Bruno, John F; Benninger, Larry; Alperin, Marc; Banerjee, Ovik; de Dios Morales, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hampered the inclusion of sequestration by mangroves in carbon cycle models and in carbon offset markets. The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative carbon capture and storage potential in natural and restored mangrove forests. We measured depth profiles of soil organic carbon content in 72 cores collected from six sites (three natural, two restored, and one afforested) surrounding Muisne, Ecuador. Samples up to 1 m deep were analyzed for organic matter content using loss-on-ignition and values were converted to organic carbon content using an accepted ratio of 1.72 (g/g). Results suggest that average soil carbon storage is 0.055 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (11.3 ± 0.8% carbon content by dry mass, mean ± 1 SE) up to 1 m deep in natural sites, and 0.058 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (8.0 ± 0.3%) in restored sites. These estimates are concordant with published global averages. Evidence of equivalent carbon stocks in restored and afforested mangrove patches emphasizes the carbon sink potential for reestablished mangrove systems. We found no relationship between sediment carbon storage and aboveground biomass, forest structure, or within-patch location. Our results demonstrate the long-term carbon storage potential of natural mangroves, high effectiveness of mangrove restoration and afforestation, a lack of predictability in carbon storage strictly based on aboveground parameters, and the need to establish standardized protocol for quantifying mangrove sediment carbon stocks.

  11. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F [Oakland, CA

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  12. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A transaction... priority, parity, and precedence in execution to orders for the account of persons who are not members...

  13. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A transaction... priority, parity, and precedence in execution to orders for the account of persons who are not members...

  14. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A transaction... priority, parity, and precedence in execution to orders for the account of persons who are not members...

  15. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A transaction... priority, parity, and precedence in execution to orders for the account of persons who are not members...

  16. 17 CFR 240.11a1-1(T) - Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., parity, and precedence. 240.11a1-1(T) Section 240.11a1-1(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... (rule 11a-1) § 240.11a1-1(T) Transactions yielding priority, parity, and precedence. (a) A transaction... priority, parity, and precedence in execution to orders for the account of persons who are not members...

  17. Apollo 11 preflight press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The three prime crewmen of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission participate in a pre-flight press conference in the bldg 1 auditorium on July 5, 1969. Left to right, are Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot; and Michael Collins, command module pilot. The box-like enclosure surrounding the three astronauts was part of elaborate precautions in effect to reduce the possibility of exposing the crewmen to infectious disease in the preflight period.

  18. Justice after September 11th

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Stanley N.

    2004-01-01

    Like many of us, Stanley Katz will always remember exactly where he was and what he was doing on the morning of 9-11 as we all watched American life as we had known it implode before our eyes. Here, Katz reflects upon his experiences of the day and how difficult it was to know what students were thinking or feeling about the events. He writes that…

  19. MC-11 Oxia Palus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-11 quadrangle, Oxia Palus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands of the southeastern two-thirds are cut by several large outflow channels. These channels terminate at the dark large depression, Chryse basin, which contain relatively smooth plains in the northwestern part. Latitude range 0 to 30 degrees, longitude range 0 to 45 degrees.

  20. Metallic carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Marvin Lou; Crespi, Vincent Henry; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    1999-01-01

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  1. 43 CFR 11.16 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 11.16 Section 11.16 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.16...

  2. 43 CFR 11.19 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 11.19 Section 11.19 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.19...

  3. 43 CFR 11.16 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 11.16 Section 11.16 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.16...

  4. 43 CFR 11.19 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 11.19 Section 11.19 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.19...

  5. Carbon sequestration rate and aboveground biomass carbon potential of three young species in lower Gangetic plain.

    PubMed

    Jana, Bipal K; Biswas, Soumyajit; Majumder, Mrinmoy; Roy, Pankaj K; Mazumdar, Asis

    2011-07-01

    Carbon is sequestered by the plant photosynthesis and stored as biomass in different parts of the tree. Carbon sequestration rate has been measured for young species (6 years age) of Shorea robusta at Chadra forest in Paschim Medinipur district, Albizzia lebbek in Indian Botanic Garden in Howrah district and Artocarpus integrifolia at Banobitan within Kolkata in the lower Gangetic plain of West Bengal in India by Automated Vaisala Made Instrument GMP343 and aboveground biomass carbon has been analyzed by CHN analyzer. The specific objective of this paper is to measure carbon sequestration rate and aboveground biomass carbon potential of three young species of Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia. The carbon sequestration rate (mean) from the ambient air during winter season as obtained by Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia were 11.13 g/h, 14.86 g/h and 4.22g/h, respectively. The annual carbon sequestration rate from ambient air were estimated at 8.97 t C ha(-1) by Shorea robusta, 11.97 t C ha(-1) by Albizzia lebbek and 3.33 t C ha(-1) by Artocarpus integrifolia. The percentage of carbon content (except root) in the aboveground biomass of Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia were 47.45, 47.12 and 43.33, respectively. The total aboveground biomass carbon stock per hectare as estimated for Shorea robusta, Albizzia lebbek and Artocarpus integrifolia were 5.22 t C ha(-1) , 6.26 t C ha(-1) and 7.28 t C ha(-1), respectively in these forest stands.

  6. Understanding Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Leakage from Carbon Capture and Sequestration

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA held a technical Geochemical Impact Workshop in Washington, DC on July 10 and 11, 2007 to discuss geological considerations and Area of Review (AoR) issues related to geologic sequestration (GS) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). Seventy=one (71) representatives of the electric uti...

  7. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, G.B.

    1991-10-29

    A process is described for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500 to 3000 C to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000 to 1300 C at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

  8. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn; Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process--carbonation--has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr-1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr-1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

  9. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Engle, Glen B.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

  10. Recent advances in carbon-carbon materials systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rummler, D.R.

    1982-11-01

    Carbon-carbon materials and new oxidation resistant coating developments are discussed. Potential areas of application are highlighted. A short bibliography of selected references is included that describe carbon-carbon materials and related technology in detail.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10420 - Fluoropolymers (generic) (P-11-567, P-11-568, and P-11-569).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fluoropolymers (generic) (P-11-567, P-11-568, and P-11-569). 721.10420 Section 721.10420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10420 Fluoropolymers (generic) (P-11-567,...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10420 - Fluoropolymers (generic) (P-11-567, P-11-568, and P-11-569).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fluoropolymers (generic) (P-11-567, P-11-568, and P-11-569). 721.10420 Section 721.10420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10420 Fluoropolymers (generic) (P-11-567,...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10420 - Fluoropolymers (generic) (P-11-567, P-11-568, and P-11-569).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fluoropolymers (generic) (P-11-567, P-11-568, and P-11-569). 721.10420 Section 721.10420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10420 Fluoropolymers (generic) (P-11-567,...

  14. Carbon Monoxide (CO)

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Carbon Monoxide's Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this page: Overview Sources of Carbon Monoxide ...

  15. Carbon Based Nanotechnology: Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews publicly available information related to carbon based nanotechnology. Topics covered include nanomechanics, carbon based electronics, nanodevice/materials applications, nanotube motors, nano-lithography and H2O storage in nanotubes.

  16. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  17. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  18. Interstellar carbon in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swart, P. K.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Murchison and Allende chondrites contain up to 5 parts per million carbon that is enriched in carbon-13 by up to +1100 per mil (the ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 is approximately 42, compared to 88 to 93 for terrestrial carbon). This 'heavy' carbon is associated with neon-22 and with anomalous krypton and xenon showing the signature of the s-process (neutron capture on a slow time scale). It apparently represents interstellar grains ejected from late-type stars. A second anomalous xenon component ('CCFXe') is associated with a distinctive, light carbon (depleted in carbon-13 by 38 per mil), which, however, falls within the terrestrial range and hence may be of either local or exotic origin.

  19. Synthetic carbon precursor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    Synthetic carbon precursor systems offer advantages over natural petroleum and coal-tar pitch precursors in that they can reproducibly provide a material with a known and uniform composition. They also permit controlled modifications of the derived carbon's properties through variations in the precursor's properties and processing conditions. Extensive research efforts at Oak Ridge have been directed toward the production and characterization of synthetic carbon precursors and the correlations that exist between carbon precursor properties and the properties of the ultimate carbon. This report describes how synthetic carbon precursors can be used to tailor and develop reproducible carbon structures for advanced materials applications. The potential and capability for performing carbon material development at Oak Ridge is also described.

  20. Trading forest carbon - OSU

    EPA Science Inventory

    Issues associate with trading carbon sequestered in forests are discussed. Scientific uncertainties associated with carbon measurement are discussed with respect to proposed accounting procedures. Major issues include: (1) Establishing baselines. (2) Determining additivity from f...

  1. Not just carbon widgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-08-01

    Forests are important for the global carbon cycle, and for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. However, the role forests play in carbon sequestration should not eclipse everything else we value them for.

  2. When carbon footprints hop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Anna

    2012-07-01

    Despite having achieved legally binding commitments on emissions reductions, many countries have increased their appetite for carbon-intensive products, making up the difference through international trade. Anna Petherick reports on the sticky task of regulating these invisible carbon flows.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes for Polymer Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anctil, Annick; Dileo, Roberta; Schauerman, Chris; Landi, Brian; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being investigated for optical absorption, exciton dissociation, and carrier transport in polymer photovoltaic devices. In the present work, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by an Alexandrite pulsed laser vaporization reactor at standard conditions and purified based upon our previously reported TOP procedure. The SWNTs were dispersed in polymer composites for pure MEH-PPV, pure P3HT, and [C60]-PCBM-P3HT (1:1 by weight) as a function of nanotube weight loading (0.1 -- 5% w/w). The AM0 current-voltage measurements for structures sandwiched between PEDOT/PSS coated ITO substrates and an evaporated aluminum contact demonstrate the dramatic effect of SWNT content on the short circuit current density, with conversions efficiencies consistently greater than 1%. The temperature coefficient for nanotube-containing polymer photovoltaics has been compared to conventional PCBM-P3HT devices, and the general relationship of increasing efficiency with increasing temperature is observed. However, the necessity to control nanotube percolation to prevent device shunting has led to recent developments which focus on controlling nanotube length through oxidative cutting, the deposition of intrinsic polymer layers, and the use of aligned carbon nanotube arrays for preferential charge transport.

  4. [11C]PR04.MZ, a promising DAT ligand for low concentration imaging: synthesis, efficient 11C-0-methylation and initial small animal PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Riss, P.J.; Hooker, J.; Alexoff, D.; Kim, Sung-Won; Fowler, J.S.; Roesch, F.

    2009-05-01

    PR04.MZ was designed as a highly selective dopamine transporter inhibitor, derived from natural cocaine. Its binding profile indicates that [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ may be suited as a PET radioligand for the non-invasive exploration of striatal and extrastriatal DAT populations. As a key feature, its structural design facilitates both, labelling with fluorine-18 at its terminally fluorinated butynyl moiety and carbon-11 at its methyl ester function. The present report concerns the efficient [{sup 11}C]MeI mediated synthesis of [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ from an O-desmethyl precursor trifluoroacetic acid salt with Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in DMF in up to 95 {+-} 5% labelling yield. A preliminary {mu}PET-experiment demonstrates the reversible, highly specific binding of [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ in the brain of a male Sprague-Dawley rat.

  5. Incidental finding of meningioma on C11-PIB PET.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Young; Kim, Jaeseung; Lee, Jae-Hong

    2012-02-01

    As a healthy volunteer for amyloid imaging study, a 83-year-old woman with no history of neurologic or psychiatric illness underwent carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) PET, which showed focal increased PIB binding in the right anterior temporal region. This focal PIB uptake turned out to be a mass lesion on MRI, which was consistent with a benign meningioma. This is the first case report on the incidentally found intracranial meningioma by PIB PET scan, highlighting the excellent sensitivity of PIB radiotracer in detecting brain amyloid deposition.

  6. Repair materials and processes for the MD-11 Composite Tailcone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Bonnar, Gerard R.

    This paper describes field and depot level repair methods for the MD-11 Composite Tailcone. The repair materials, processing methods, and mechanical properties of the test specimens and subcomponents are discussed. According to recent tests, the dry carbon cloth and the liquid resin matrix that can be cured under 93 C have better processing and mechanical properties than the 121 C curing prepregs and film adhesives. The moisture in the parent CFRP is the main cause of creating voids in the adhesive layer during the 121 C/vacuum pressure cure cycle. The lower processing temperature (wet layup) showed better results than higher processing temperature (prepreg/adhesive layup) for composite repair.

  7. Metal filled porous carbon

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Adam F.; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping; Salguero, Tina T.

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  8. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-04

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  9. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to −41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle. PMID:27488228

  10. Apollo 11 soil mechanics investigation.

    PubMed

    Costes, N C; Carrier, W D; Mitchell, J K; Scott, R F

    1970-01-30

    The fine-grained surface material at the Apollo 11 landing site is a brownish, medium-gray, slightly cohesive granular soil, with bulky grains in the silt-to-fine-sand range, having a specific gravity of 3.1 and exhibiting adhesive characteristics. Within the upper few centimeters, the lunar soil has an average density of about 1.6 grams per cubic centimeter and is similar in appearance and behavior to the soils studied at the Surveyor equatorial landing sites. Althouglh considerably different in composition and in range of particle shapes, it is similar in its mechanical behavior to terrestrial soils of the same grain size distribution.

  11. FY11 Force Structure Announcement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    R-3) Rep B. McCollum (D-4) Rep K. Ellison (D-5) Rep M. Bachmann (R-6) Rep C. Peterson (D-7) Rep J. Oberstar (D-8) 1 - MINN-ST PAUL RegAF Military...of 1 1 Congressional Members: Sen J. Reed (D-Senior) Sen S. Whitehouse (D-Junior) Rep P. Kennedy (D-1) Rep J. Langevin (D-2) 1 - QUONSET RegAF...McCaul (R-10) Rep M. Conaway (R-11) Rep K. Granger (R-12) Rep M. Thornberry (R-13) Rep R. Paul (R-14) Rep R. Hinojosa (D-15) Rep S. Reyes (D-16) Rep C

  12. Bion 11 mission: primate experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilyin, E. A.; Korolkov, V. I.; Skidmore, M. G.; Viso, M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Grindeland, R. E.; Lapin, B. A.; Gordeev, Y. V.; Krotov, V. P.; Fanton, J. W.; Bielitzki, J. T.; Golov, V. K.; Magedov, V. S.; Hines, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    A summary is provided of the major operations required to conduct the wide range of primate experiments on the Bion 11 mission, which flew for 14 days beginning December 24, 1996. Information is given on preflight preparations, including flight candidate selection and training; attachment and implantation of bioinstrumentation; flight and ground experiment designs; onboard life support and test systems; ground and flight health monitoring; flight monkey selection and transport to the launch site; inflight procedures and data collection; postflight examinations and experiments; and assessment of results.

  13. Apollo 11: The Twentieth Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Live footage shows the Apollo 11 crew, Commander Neil A. Armstrong, Lunar Module Pilot Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., and Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, preparing for their mission. The crewmembers are seen getting their medical examinations, suiting up, and walking out to the Astro-van. Scenes include a brief view of the Launch Control Center (LCC), ignition, liftoff, and shell and engine skirt separation. The most important images are those of the moon landing and astronauts walk on the moon. Also shown are the parachute landing of the shuttle and the celebration of the world.

  14. Carbon Goes To…

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savasci, Funda

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this activity are to help middle school students understand the carbon cycle and realize how human activities affect the carbon cycle. This activity consists of two parts. The first part of the activity focuses on the carbon cycle, especially before the Industrial Revolution, while the second part of the activity focuses on how…

  15. Protolytic carbon film technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  16. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  17. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-06

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  18. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  19. Conversion of carbon-containing materials to carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G. D.; Hill, J. C.; Mcminn, T. D.; Rooks, C. W.

    1981-06-09

    Carbon-containing materials are gasified to produce high purity carbon monoxide in a three zone unified system (Oxidizer, reducer and gasifier) using a metal oxide as the oxygen and heat source for the gasification with carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide contacts the metal oxide prior to the gasification to release the oxygen and convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide as the gasification medium.

  20. Melting Behaviour of Carbonated MORB: the transition zone carbon filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, A. R.; Walter, M. J.; Kohn, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    ledge may act as a carbon filter for downgoing slabs, and might be responsible for some low velocity anomalies seen above the 410 km seismic discontinuity. [1] Maruyama & Okamoto (2007) Gond Res 11, 148-165. [2] Martin and Hammouda (2011) Eur J Min 23, 5-16. [3] Syracuse et al. (2010) Phys Earth Plan Int 183, 73-90.

  1. Development of a NiO target for the production of 11C at ISAC/TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricault, Pierre G.; Ames, Friedhelm; Dombsky, Marik; Kunz, Peter; Lassen, Jens; Mjøs, Anders; Wong, John

    2016-01-01

    High intensity 11C beams are necessary for the investigation of the formation of 12C via the nuclear reaction 11C(p, γ)12N → 12C + e+ + ν. The production of intense carbon beams on-line is quite challenging due to the thermodynamic properties and chemical reactivity of carbon at high temperatures. A previous attempt, using a medical isotope cyclotron production method in batch mode, was not conclusive. The intensity obtained was at least one order of magnitude too low for a direct proton capture experiment using the DRAGON facility at ISAC/TRIUMF. Producing a 11C beams using the ISOL method requires a target capable of efficiently releasing the carbon isotopes. NiO has been selected as a target material because most of the nickel carbides are not stable at high temperature. The development of carbon beams using a composite NiO/Ni target on-line is described.

  2. Characterization of calcium deposition induced by Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 in BG11 culture medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huaxiao; Han, Zuozhen; Zhao, Hui; Zhou, Shixue; Chi, Naijie; Han, Mei; Kou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Linlin; Tian, Chenchen; Qin, Song

    2014-05-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals in their preferred orientation were obtained in BG11 culture media inoculated with Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (inoculated BG11). In this study, the features of calcium carbonate deposition were investigated. Inoculated BG11 in different calcium ion concentrations was used for the experimental group, while the BG11 culture medium was used for the control group. The surface morphologies of the calcium carbonate deposits in the experimental and control groups were determined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The deposits were analyzed by electronic probe micro-analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrum, X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that the surfaces of the crystals in the experimental group were hexahedral in a scaly pattern. The particle sizes were micrometer-sized and larger than those in the control group. The deposits of the control group contained calcium (Ca), carbon (C), oxygen (O), phosphorus (P), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and other elements. The deposits in the experimental group contained Ca, C, and O only. The deposits of both groups contained calcite. The thermal decomposition temperature of the deposits in the control group was lower than those in the experimental group. It showed that the CaCO3 deposits of the experimental group had higher thermal stability than those of the control group. This may be due to the secondary metabolites produced by the algae cells, which affect the carbonate crystal structure and result in a close-packed structure. The algae cells that remained after thermal weight loss were heavier in higher calcium concentrations in BG11 culture media. There may be more calcium-containing crystals inside and outside of these cells. These results shall be beneficial for understanding the formation mechanism of carbonate minerals.

  3. Quarantined Apollo 11 Crew Debriefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) which served as their home until they reached the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Lunar Receiving Laboratory in Houston, Texas. The three are seen here at the MSC, still inside the MQF, undergoing their first debriefing on Sunday, August 3, 1969. Behind the glass are (L-R): Edwin Aldrin, Michael Collins, and Neil Armstrong.

  4. 7 CFR 1739.11 - Eligible project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible project. 1739.11 Section 1739.11 Agriculture... BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.11 Eligible project. To be eligible for a grant, the Project must: (a) Serve a Rural Area where Broadband Transmission Service does not...

  5. 7 CFR 1735.11 - Area coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Area coverage. 1735.11 Section 1735.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... effect this requirement. See 7 CFR 1737.11(a), Preapplication Determinations: Area to be Served....

  6. 37 CFR 11.702 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Advertising. 11.702 Section... Professional Conduct Information About Legal Services § 11.702 Advertising. (a) Subject to the requirements of §§ 11.701 and 11.703, a practitioner may advertise services through written, recorded or...

  7. 37 CFR 11.702 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Advertising. 11.702 Section... Professional Conduct Information About Legal Services § 11.702 Advertising. (a) Subject to the requirements of §§ 11.701 and 11.703, a practitioner may advertise services through written, recorded or...

  8. 47 CFR 11.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 11.2 Section 11.2 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.2 Definitions. The definitions of terms used in part 11 are: (a) Primary Entry Point (PEP) System. The PEP system...

  9. 7 CFR 1739.11 - Eligible project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible project. 1739.11 Section 1739.11 Agriculture... BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.11 Eligible project. To be eligible for a grant, the Project must: (a) Serve a Rural Area where Broadband Transmission Service does not...

  10. 7 CFR 1739.11 - Eligible project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligible project. 1739.11 Section 1739.11 Agriculture... BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.11 Eligible project. To be eligible for a grant, the Project must: (a) Serve a Rural Area where Broadband Transmission Service does not...

  11. 7 CFR 1739.11 - Eligible project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligible project. 1739.11 Section 1739.11 Agriculture... BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.11 Eligible project. To be eligible for a grant, the Project must: (a) Serve a Rural Area where Broadband Transmission Service does not...

  12. 50 CFR 296.11 - Final determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Final determination. 296.11 Section 296.11 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTINENTAL SHELF FISHERMEN'S CONTINGENCY FUND § 296.11...

  13. Growth of carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber: a linear electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ha Jin; Jong Bae, Min; Kim, Yong C.; Cho, Eun S.; Sohn, Y. C.; Kim, D. Y.; Lee, S. E.; Kang, H. S.; Han, In T.; Kim, Young H.; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji Beom

    2011-03-01

    The multi-stage effect has been revisited through growing carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber with a thickness of 11 µm. A prepared linear electron source exhibits a turn-on field as low as 0.4 V µm - 1 and an extremely high field enhancement factor of 19 300, when compared with those results from reference nanotube emitters grown on flat silicone wafer; 3.0 V µm - 1 and 2500, respectively. In addition, we introduce a novel method to grow nanotubes uniformly around the circumference of carbon fibers by using direct resistive heating on the continuously feeding carbon threads. These results open up not only a new path for synthesizing nanocomposites, but also offer an excellent linear electron source for special applications such as backlight units for liquid crystal displays and multi-array x-ray sources.

  14. Water for Carbon, Carbon for Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Andrea; Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez A. A.; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Holz, Maire; Ghezzehei, Teamrat

    2015-04-01

    Plant roots exude approximately 10% of the carbon assimilated through photosynthesis into the soil, a process referred to as rhizodeposition. Although this may look like a waste of energy, it has been shown that the carbon exuded into the soil helps roots to take up nutrients and promote positive interactions with microorganisms. Here, we show that the mucilaginous fraction of the rhizodeposits, referred to as mucilage, plays also a crucial role on soil-plant water relations and triggers positive feedbacks between the water and carbon cycles. Mucilage is a gel that can absorb large volumes of water, altering the physical properties of the rhizosphere and maintaining the rhizosphere wet and conductive when the soil dries. Acting as a hydraulic bridge between roots and the soil, mucilage facilitates root water uptake and maintains transpiration and photosynthesis in dry soils. By employing a simplified model of root water uptake coupled with mucilage dynamics, we found that indeed the carbon exuded in form of mucilage maintains photosynthesis in dry soils resulting a in a net gain of carbon. In summary, by exuding mucilage, plants modify the physical soil environment, have a better access to water when water is scarce, and maintain photosynthesis for a prolonged time during drought. We propose that mucilage exudation is a plant trait conferring drought resistance. In other words: water for carbon, but also carbon for water.

  15. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, G.B.

    1993-06-08

    A method for fabricating a high-strength, high-modulus and high thermal and electrical conducting 2D laminate carbon-carbon composite is described comprising the steps of: (a) forming a green laminate composite comprising: (1) graphitizible carbon cloth plies, (2) fine graphitizible pitch powder; said cloth plies comprising mesophase derived pitch fiber tow with moduli in a range of 25 to 140 Msi, and (3) thermal conductivity enhancers; (b) heating the green laminate composite to a temperature high enough to cause the pitch powder to soften and pressing the composite to form a pressed green laminate composite comprised of graphitizible carbon cloth, pitch matrix and thermal conductivity enhancers; (c) heating the pressed green composite to at least 500 C. to: (1) carbonize the pitch, (2) form a carbon matrix and (3) shrink and crack the matrix carbon; (d) impregnating the composite with additional graphitizible pitch by covering the composite with the pitch and heating the covered composite to at least 200 C. to melt the pitch and permit it to flow into the composite and then increasing the pressure to at least 15 Psi; (e) heating the composites to at least 900 C.; (f) repeating steps d and e at least once; (g) heating the composite to between 2,400 to 3,100 C to graphitize the fibers and the pitch matrix carbon in the composites to produce a graphitized composite having cracks and pores; and (h) reimpregnating the graphitized composites by infiltrating the cracks and pores of the composites with a hydrocarbon gas at a temperature in the range 982 to 1,490 C. and depositing pyrolytic carbon in the pores and cracks.

  16. Instrumental carbon monoxide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stetter, J R; Rutt, D R

    1980-10-01

    Modern technology for the ambient monitoring of carbon monoxide has been developed to produce a portable electrochemical instrument capable of the personal exposure to carbon monoxide. The performance characteristics of this device have been studied so that the unambiguous interpretation of field data could be performed. A study of the carbon monoxide exposure in a light manufacturing facility illustrate that effective dosimetry can be performed with expectations of accuracy typically better than +/- 15%, and that voluntary carbon monoxide exposures such as smoking were a significant contribution to the individual's exposure. Significant definition of the carbon monoxide exposure profile can be achieved with an instrument approach to the collection of the dosimetric data.

  17. Manufacture of finely divided carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.G.

    1980-01-22

    Finely divided carbon is manufactured by a process producing a gaseous stream containing carbon monoxide by reacting coal and air in a slagging ash gasifier, separating carbon monoxide from the gaseous mixture, and disproportionating the carbon monoxide to produce finely divided carbon and carbon dioxide, the latter of which is recycled to the gasifier.

  18. A comparison of black carbon measurement methods for combustion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, A. L.; Pavlovic, J.; Yelverton, T.; Hagler, G.; Aurell, J.; Ebersviller, S.; Seay, B.; Jetter, J.; Gullett, B.; Hays, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon is an important short-term climate forcer that has been linked with adverse health effects. Multiple black carbon measurement methodologies exist, but no standard measurement method or calibration material has been agreed upon. Moreover, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses elemental carbon in its ambient monitoring networks and in its emissions inventory, assuming that elemental carbon is equivalent to black carbon. Instrument comparisons with ambient aerosols have demonstrated considerable differences between black carbon and elemental carbon, as well as among different black carbon measurements. However, there have been few published comparable studies for source emissions. We used multiple measurement methods to quantify black carbon and elemental carbon emissions from a range of combustion sources (diesel gensets, coal fired boilers, prescribed fires and cookstoves) emitting particles of varying composition and physical characteristics. The ratio of black carbon to elemental carbon (BC/EC) ranged from 0.50 to 2.8 and depended upon the combustion source. The greatest agreement was observed for emissions from cookstoves (BC/EC = 1.1 ± 0.3). The largest differences were seen for emissions from large stationary diesel genset (BC/EC = 2.3 ± 0.5) and were most pronounced when a diesel particulate filter was used (BC/EC 2.5 ± 0.6). This suggests that this source category may be underrepresented in emissions inventories based on elemental carbon. Black carbon concentrations derived from filter-based attenuation were highly correlated with photo-acoustic absorption measurements, but were generally 50% greater. This is likely due to the choice of calibration factor, which is currently ambiguously defined. These results highlight the importance of developing a standard calibration material to improve comparability among measurements.

  19. (11)C-Methionine uptake in secondary brain epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lopci, E; Bello, L; Chiti, A

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-11 methionine ((11)C-Methionine) is a radio-labeled amino acid currently utilized in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for imaging primary and metastatic brain tumors. Its clinical use relies mostly on oncologic applications, but the tracer has the potential to investigate other non-malignant conditions. So far, very limited evidence concerns the use of (11)C-Methionine in patients suffering from seizure; however, the tracer can find a proper utilization in this setting especially as a diagnostic complement to (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Herein we report the case of a 57-year-old patient presenting with epileptic crises secondary to a brain metastasis from bladder carcinoma, who was investigated in our institution with (11)C-Methionine PET. The scan documented the disease recurrence in the left parietal lobe associated with a diffused tracer uptake in the surrounding cerebral circumvolutions, derived from the comitial status. After surgical removal of the metastatic lesion, the patient experienced a complete recovery of symptoms and no further onset of secondary seizure.

  20. Final report on SNAC 11

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Patrick

    2013-06-26

    This report details how the $5,000 DOE grant to support the workshop titled “Sterile Neutrinos at the Crossroads” (or SNAC11) was allocated and spent. The SNAC11 workshop covered three days during which there were 28 talks, multiple discussion sessions, a poster session with 9 posters delivered, and an impromptu public lecture on the OPERA superluminal neutrino result by the former project manager of OPERA (this was the first official OPERA talk on the subject in North America). The workshop scientific agenda can be viewed at http://www.cpe.vt.edu/snac/program.html. Emerging out of the workshop discussions, was the idea to write a comprehensive white paper describing the current state of the light sterile neutrino. This effort soon became an international collaboration. The final document, titled “Light Sterile Neutrinos: A White Paper” has nearly 200 authors, is 267 pages long, and cites 730 unique references. It has been posted the preprint archive as arXiv:1204.5379 [hep-ph]. Workshop local organizing committee co-chairs, Patrick Huber and Jonathan Link, are the white paper’s head editors. The white paper’s sections and section editors are as follows: 1. Theory and Motivation (Gabriela Barenboim, Valencia and Werner Rodejohann, MPI Heidelberg) 2. Astrophysical Evidence (Kev Abazajian, UC Irvine and Yvonne Wong, Aachen) 3. Evidence from Oscillation Experiments (Joachim Kopp, FNAL and Bill Louis, LANL) 4. Global Picture (Thierry Lasserre, CEA Saclay and Thomas Schwetz, MPI Heidelberg) 5. Requirements for Future Measurements (Bonnie Fleming, Yale and Joe Formaggio, MIT) 6. Appendix: Possible Future Experiments (Patrick Huber, Virginia Tech and Jon Link, Virginia Tech) In all 56 people participated in the workshop, of these 11 were young scientists. The workshop was covered in a feature article in Science (Science, 334, (2011), 304-306.). The DOE award was spent, as budgeted, as contractual services to VT CPE, which is the unit within the University

  1. The Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigley, T. M. L.; Schimel, D. S.

    2005-08-01

    Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is imperative to stabilizing our future climate. Our ability to reduce these emissions combined with an understanding of how much fossil-fuel-derived CO2 the oceans and plants can absorb is central to mitigating climate change. In The Carbon Cycle, leading scientists examine how atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have changed in the past and how this may affect the concentrations in the future. They look at the carbon budget and the "missing sink" for carbon dioxide. They offer approaches to modeling the carbon cycle, providing mathematical tools for predicting future levels of carbon dioxide. This comprehensive text incorporates findings from the recent IPCC reports. New insights, and a convergence of ideas and views across several disciplines make this book an important contribution to the global change literature.

  2. Perturbations in the carbon budget of the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Grace, John; Mitchard, Edward; Gloor, Emanuel

    2014-01-01

    The carbon budget of the tropics has been perturbed as a result of human influences. Here, we attempt to construct a ‘bottom-up’ analysis of the biological components of the budget as they are affected by human activities. There are major uncertainties in the extent and carbon content of different vegetation types, the rates of land-use change and forest degradation, but recent developments in satellite remote sensing have gone far towards reducing these uncertainties. Stocks of carbon as biomass in tropical forests and woodlands add up to 271 ± 16 Pg with an even greater quantity of carbon as soil organic matter. Carbon loss from deforestation, degradation, harvesting and peat fires is estimated as 2.01 ± 1.1 Pg annum−1; while carbon gain from forest and woodland growth is 1.85 ± 0.09 Pg annum−1. We conclude that tropical lands are on average a small carbon source to the atmosphere, a result that is consistent with the ‘top-down’ result from measurements in the atmosphere. If they were to be conserved, they would be a substantial carbon sink. Release of carbon as carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning in the tropics is 0.74 Pg annum−1 or 0.57 MgC person−1 annum−1, much lower than the corresponding figures from developed regions of the world. PMID:24902948

  3. Perturbations in the carbon budget of the tropics.

    PubMed

    Grace, John; Mitchard, Edward; Gloor, Emanuel

    2014-10-01

    The carbon budget of the tropics has been perturbed as a result of human influences. Here, we attempt to construct a 'bottom-up' analysis of the biological components of the budget as they are affected by human activities. There are major uncertainties in the extent and carbon content of different vegetation types, the rates of land-use change and forest degradation, but recent developments in satellite remote sensing have gone far towards reducing these uncertainties. Stocks of carbon as biomass in tropical forests and woodlands add up to 271 ± 16 Pg with an even greater quantity of carbon as soil organic matter. Carbon loss from deforestation, degradation, harvesting and peat fires is estimated as 2.01 ± 1.1 Pg annum(-1); while carbon gain from forest and woodland growth is 1.85 ± 0.09 Pg annum(-1). We conclude that tropical lands are on average a small carbon source to the atmosphere, a result that is consistent with the 'top-down' result from measurements in the atmosphere. If they were to be conserved, they would be a substantial carbon sink. Release of carbon as carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning in the tropics is 0.74 Pg annum(-1) or 0.57 MgC person(-1) annum(-1) , much lower than the corresponding figures from developed regions of the world.

  4. Slc4a11 Gene Disruption in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ivan A.; Rosenblatt, Mark I.; Kim, Charles; Galbraith, Gary C.; Jones, Sherri M.; Kao, Liyo; Newman, Debra; Liu, Weixin; Yeh, Stacey; Pushkin, Alexander; Abuladze, Natalia; Kurtz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    NaBC1 (the SLC4A11 gene) belongs to the SLC4 family of sodium-coupled bicarbonate (carbonate) transporter proteins and functions as an electrogenic sodium borate cotransporter. Mutations in SLC4A11 cause either corneal abnormalities (corneal hereditary dystrophy type 2) or a combined auditory and visual impairment (Harboyan syndrome). The role of NaBC1 in sensory systems is poorly understood, given the difficulty of studying patients with NaBC1 mutations. We report our findings in Slc4a11−/− mice generated to investigate the role of NaBC1 in sensorineural systems. In wild-type mice, specific NaBC1 immunoreactivity was detected in fibrocytes of the spiral ligament, from the basal to the apical portion of the cochlea. NaBC1 immunoreactivity was present in the vestibular labyrinth, in stromal cells underneath the non-immunoreactive sensory epithelia of the macula utricle, sacule, and crista ampullaris, and the membranous vestibular labyrinth was collapsed. Both auditory brain response and vestibular evoked potential waveforms were significantly abnormal in Slc4a11−/− mice. In the cornea, NaBC1 was highly expressed in the endothelial cell layer with less staining in epithelial cells. However, unlike humans, the corneal phenotype was mild with a normal slit lamp evaluation. Corneal endothelial cells were morphologically normal; however, both the absolute height of the corneal basal epithelial cells and the relative basal epithelial cell/total corneal thickness were significantly increased in Slc4a11−/− mice. Our results demonstrate for the first time the importance of NaBC1 in the audio-vestibular system and provide support for the hypothesis that SLC4A11 should be considered a potential candidate gene in patients with isolated sensorineural vestibular hearing abnormalities. PMID:19586905

  5. The Apollo 11 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Portrait of the prime crew of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. From left to right they are: Commander, Neil A. Armstrong, Command Module Pilot, Michael Collins, and Lunar Module Pilot, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. On July 20th 1969 at 4:18 PM, EDT the Lunar Module 'Eagle' landed in a region of the Moon called the Mare Tranquillitatis, also known as the Sea of Tranquillity. After securing his spacecraft, Armstrong radioed back to earth: 'Houston, Tranquility Base here, the Eagle has landed'. At 10:56 p.m. that same evening and witnessed by a worldwide television audience, Neil Armstrong stepped off the 'Eagle's landing pad onto the lunar surface and said: 'That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.' He became the first human to set foot upon the Moon.

  6. Ocean sciences after September 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    The terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington D.C. on September 11, 2001 shocked the world with their audacity and destruction. Shortly thereafter, bioterrorists struck through the U.S. postal system. Virtually overnight, major policy shifts took place in the United States that catapulted national security and homeland defense to the top of the political agenda. The consequences were unimaginable just a few months before: an international coalition at war against the Taliban in Afghanistan, major increases in U.S. defense spending, tightened security measures at airports, government facilities, and research laboratories, and a new sense of vulnerability in the post-cold war era. AGU itself was directly affected: three of its members perished in the hijacked planes, or on the ground in New York City.

  7. Aerosol and graphitic carbon content of snow

    SciTech Connect

    Chy-acute-accentlek, P.; Srivastava, V.; Cahenzli, L.; Pinnick, R.G.; Dod, R.L.; Novakov, T.; Cook, T.L.; Hinds, B.D.

    1987-08-20

    Snow samples from southern New Mexico, west Texas, Antarctica, and Greenland were analyzed for aerosol and graphitic carbon. Graphitic carbon contents were found to be between 2.2 and 25 ..mu..g L/sup -1/ of snow meltwater; water-insoluble aerosol content varied between 0.62 and 8.5 mg L/sup -1/. For comparison, two samples of Camp Century, Greenland, ice core, having approximate ages of 4,000 and 6,000 years, were also analyzed. Ice core graphitic carbon contents were found to be 2.5 and 1.1 ..mu..g L/sup -1/. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

  8. Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Delnick, F.M.; Ingersoll, D.; Firsich, D.

    1993-11-01

    We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: Gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14) and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

  9. Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnick, F. M.; Ingersoll, D.; Firsich, D.

    We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14), and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

  10. Process of making carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Kowbel, Witold (Inventor); Bruce, Calvin (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A carbon composite structure, for example, an automotive engine piston, is made by preparing a matrix including of a mixture of non crystalline carbon particulate soluble in an organic solvent and a binder that has a liquid phase. The non crystalline particulate also contains residual carbon hydrogen bonding. An uncured structure is formed by combining the matrix mixture, for example, carbon fibers such as graphite dispersed in the mixture and/or graphite cloth imbedded in the mixture. The uncured structure is cured by pyrolyzing it in an inert atmosphere such as argon. Advantageously, the graphite reinforcement material is whiskered prior to combining it with the matrix mixture by a novel method involving passing a gaseous metal suboxide over the graphite surface.

  11. CARBON STARS WITH INFRARED SPECTRA IN GROUP P OF THE IRAS/LRS DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.

    2012-10-01

    Sources with infrared spectra in Group P of the IRAS/LRS database all show polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. They are often planetary nebulae, H II regions, reflection/dark nebulae, Wolf-Rayet stars, or external galaxies. However, we noted that some carbon stars are also included in this group. We searched for and investigated all infrared spectra in Group P of the IRAS/LRS database. Finally, we found 11 previously known carbon stars and identified 8 new candidate carbon stars in Group P. Infrared spectra of these stars may present the 11.2 {mu}m SiC emission features indicative of their carbon-rich properties.

  12. Fracture Toughness of Carbon/Carbon Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-27

    during which tensile stresses develop in the matrix as a result of the thermal expansion coefficient differential between the matrix and yarns. In...thermal expansion differential . Figure 3.4 depicts the sample surface along the R-C plane. The circumferential yarns are horizontal and the radial yarns...Milieko), Elsevier, Amsterdam, (1981), pp. 109-175. 5 126 3 U 127 16). C.T. Robinson, "Damage Mechanisums and Failure of 3-D Carbon-Carbon Composites," SRI

  13. 40 CFR 600.115-11 - Criteria for determining the fuel economy label calculation method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 600.115-11 Criteria for... derived 5-cycle method for determining fuel economy label values, as specified in § 600.210-08(a)(2) or (b... economy label values must be determined according to the vehicle-specific 5-cycle method specified...

  14. 40 CFR 600.115-11 - Criteria for determining the fuel economy label calculation method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 600.115-11 Criteria for... derived 5-cycle method for determining fuel economy label values, as specified in § 600.210-08(a)(2) or (b... economy label values must be determined according to the vehicle-specific 5-cycle method specified...

  15. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Absorbers, condensers, carbon... Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices. (a)...

  16. Mechanical behavior of carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozak, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A general background, test plan, and some results of preliminary examinations of a carbon-carbon composite material are presented with emphasis on mechanical testing and inspection techniques. Experience with testing and evaluation was gained through tests of a low modulus carbon-carbon material, K-Karb C. The properties examined are the density - 1.55 g/cc; four point flexure strength in the warp - 137 MPa (19,800 psi) and the fill - 95.1 MPa (13,800 psi,) directions; and the warp interlaminar shear strength - 14.5 MPa (2100 psi). Radiographic evaluation revealed thickness variations and the thinner areas of the composite were scrapped. The ultrasonic C-scan showed attenuation variations, but these did not correspond to any of the physical and mechanical properties measured. Based on these initial tests and a survey of the literature, a plan has been devised to examine the effect of stress on the oxidation behavior, and the strength degradation of coated carbon-carbon composites. This plan will focus on static fatigue tests in the four point flexure mode in an elevated temperature, oxidizing environment.

  17. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  18. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  19. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dutta, Prabir K [Worthington, OH; Lee, Inhee [Columbus, OH; Akbar, Sheikh A [Hilliard, OH

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  20. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    includes, but is not limited to, cobalt oxide [8] and phospho-olivine [9] nanoparticles, cobalt oxide [10] and silicon ∗ Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 937...wpafb.af.mil (M.F. Durstock). [11] nanowires , and iron oxide/copper [12] and tin/copper [13] nanorods. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have also been examined as...MWNTs (without any polymeric binders or conduc- tive carbon additives) as the electrodes. A porous polypropylene film infiltrated with a solution of

  1. Majorana fermion wavefunctions in carbon nanotubes and carbynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, N. R.; Aporoski, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    Electron properties of semiconducting zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be described by two uncoupled Dirac equations of dimension (1+1) for the particle with nonzero mass. The solutions of these equations are two charge-neutral Majorana fields. An analogous equation is obtained for the carbon chains. We use the approach, wherein wavefunction of charged particle is represented as the production of a rapidly oscillating exponent and the slowly varying function amplitude depending on the longitudinal coordinate.

  2. Hard, amorphous carbon deposited from a fullerene discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Maiken, E.B.; Taborek, P.

    1995-12-31

    Hard, amorphous carbon films were deposited from an ion source using fullerite as carbon feedstock. For fixed ion energies, the film resistivities decreased exponentially with substrate temperature, suggesting activated growth of a conductive phase. Resistivity at 300 K ranged from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 4} {Omega}m. E{sub -4} optical gaps of conductive films ranged from 0.1 to 1.1 eV.

  3. Global Uncertainty Accounting for Forest Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, R. M.; Saatchi, S. S.; Hagen, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainty in Global Forest Carbon There are 11.3 E9 global hectares of biologically productive surface, of which approximately 4E9 are forested. The terrestrial biosphere reservoir contains carbon in organic compounds in vegetation living biomass (450 to 650 PgC, IPCC AR5 ). Houghton et al (2009) give 385 - 650 GtC, of which 70 ~90% is forest. Using 80%, that gives a range of 360 ~ 520 (IPCC) or 308 ~ 520 (Houghton) GtC in Earth's forests. The IPCC values give a forest carbon global density range of 90 ~ 130 tC/ha. Assuming that 360 and 520 GtC are two independent samples from our uncertainty on the global forest carbon pool, we may ballpark this uncertainty as STD(global forest carbon pool) ~ [½(160)2 [GtC]2]½= 113 E9 [tC].If Xi,…XN have average variance s2 and average covariance c then VAR(SXi) = s2N + N(N-1)c, and: 1) 28.3 = s(2.5E-10 + r)½. where s is the root of the average variance of forest carbon in [t/ha], and r = c/s2 is the "global correlation". r is equal to the average correlation over all pairs of hectares if the variances per hectare are constant, but r £ 1 holds in any case. Uncertainty accounting.If r = 0, then (1) entails that s = 1.8 E6 tC, which is not defensible. Suppose an uncertainty requirement for carbon monitoring systems stipulates that the standard deviation per hectare should not exceed 10% of the mean. With a mean of 110 tC/ha, s = 11, and substitution in (1) would give r½ = 2.6, which is impossible. If r = 1, then s = 28.3 which is 26% of the mean. In this case it can be shown that the error in the estimate in any hectare is perfectly correlated with errors in every other hectare: removing the uncertainty in ONE hectare on the Earth would remove uncertainty in ALL hectares. Neither r = 0, r = 1 are reasonable. Uncertainty accounting requires consistent estimates of global forest carbon uncertainty, uncertainty in hectare-wise estimates and global correlation. Consistent estimates do not exist at present. This research charts

  4. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  5. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2012-02-14

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  6. Creating With Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A subsidiary of SI Diamond Technology, Inc., Applied Nanotech, of Austin, Texas, is creating a buzz among various technology firms and venture capital groups interested in the company s progressive research on carbon-related field emission devices, including carbon nanotubes, filaments of pure carbon less than one ten-thousandth the width of human hair. Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have gained considerable attention due to their unique physical properties. For example, a single perfect carbon nanotube can range from 10 to 100 times stronger than steel, per unit weight. Recent studies also indicate that the nanotubes may be the best heat-conducting material in existence. These properties, combined with the ease of growing thin films or nanotubes by a variety of deposition techniques, make the carbon-based material one of the most desirable for cold field emission cathodes.

  7. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2084 - Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2084 Carbon oxyfluoride (Carbonic difluoride). (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance carbon oxyfluoride (CAS...

  12. Detection of a new carbon-chain molecule, CCO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi; Ishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Yamada, Chikashi; Kanamori, Hideto; Irvine, William M.; Brown, Ronald D.; Godfrey, Peter D.; Kaifu, Norio; Suzuki, Hiroko

    1991-01-01

    A new carbon-chain molecule, CCO 3Sigma(-), has been detected in the cold dark molecular cloud TMC-1. The excitation temperature and the column density of CCO are, respectively, about 6 K and about 6 x 10 to the 11th/sq cm. This column density corresponds to a fractional abundance relative to H2 of about 6 x 10 to the -11th. This value is two orders of magnitude less than the abundance of the related carbon-chain molecule CCS, and about half that of C3O. The formation mechanism for CCO is discussed.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Absorbents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-05-17

    carbondioxide content of the solution was then determined. A gas mixture containing 2.6% carbon dioxide and 97.4% nitrogen was prepared in the...which carbon dioxide is removed by heat0 Since this step is usually carried out by "steam stripping ", that is, contacting the solution at its boiling...required to produce the steam required for stripping the carbon dioxide from the s olution. The method ueed in this investigation for determining the

  14. Nanostructured Carbon Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    carbon coatings and explores a very broad range of potentially important carbon nanostructures that may be used in future technologies. A new method ...for the synthesis of nanostructured carbon coatings on the surface of SiC and other metal carbides is described. This method is accomplished through the...With the fall in cost of fullerene powders, this method may become important in the future as a method to produce nanocrystalline diamond free of metal

  15. Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Polymers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...REVIEW Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Polymers J.N. Baucom, A. Rohatgi, W.R. Pogue III, and J.P. Thomas Materials Science and Technology Division...of mass-produced and inexpensive, discontinuous carbon nanofibers to create a percolated fiber network within a polymeric matrix that will result in

  16. Carbon plasma gun

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Zagar, D.M.; Mills, G.S.; Humphries, S. Jr.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1980-12-01

    A family of plasma guns supplying highly ionized carbon plasma is described. The guns are simple and inexpensive to construct and are pulsed by small capacitor banks of a few hundred joules. The output consists of 10/sup 17/--10/sup 18/ multiply ionized carbon ions traveling at about 10/sup 7/ cm/s. Neutral output is very low and arrives well after the ionized carbon. The guns and pulsers are very reliable.

  17. The carbon dioxide cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, P.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Titus, T.N.

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal CO2 cycle on Mars refers to the exchange of carbon dioxide between dry ice in the seasonal polar caps and gaseous carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This review focuses on breakthroughs in understanding the process involving seasonal carbon dioxide phase changes that have occurred as a result of observations by Mars Global Surveyor. ?? 2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 29 CFR 2200.11 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 2200.11 Section 2200.11 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE General Provisions §...

  19. 28 CFR 545.11 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... participation in residential drug treatment programs. ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedures. 545.11 Section 545.11 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT WORK...

  20. 28 CFR 545.11 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... participation in residential drug treatment programs. ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedures. 545.11 Section 545.11 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT WORK...

  1. 28 CFR 545.11 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... participation in residential drug treatment programs. ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures. 545.11 Section 545.11 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT WORK...

  2. 28 CFR 545.11 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... participation in residential drug treatment programs. ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedures. 545.11 Section 545.11 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT WORK...

  3. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  4. CARBON DIOXIDE REDUCTION SYSTEM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBON DIOXIDE , *SPACE FLIGHT, RESPIRATION, REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), RESPIRATION, AEROSPACE MEDICINE, ELECTROLYSIS, INSTRUMENTATION, ELECTROLYTES, VOLTAGE, MANNED, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, NICKEL.

  5. Carbon Materials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Hurley, P.M. Liu, and T.W. Owens, "The Surface Topography of Non-Shear Treated Pitch and PAN Carbon Fibers as viewed by the STM,” J Mat. Res., 6...Effects in Pitch Wetting,” Proceedings Carbon 2003, Oviedo, Spain , July 2003 5 K. M. Chioujones, W. Ho, P. C. Chau, B. Fathollahi, P. G...Wapner, and W. P. Hoffman, “Microstructural Studies of In-Situ Mesophase Transformation in the Fabrication of Carbon-Carbon Composites,” Proceedings

  6. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  7. Environmental carbon dioxide control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Baker, B.; Gidaspow, D.

    1974-01-01

    A study of environmental carbon dioxide control for NASA EVA missions found solid potassium carbonate to be an effective regenerable absorbent in maintaining low carbon dioxide levels. The supported sorbent was capable of repeated regeneration below 150 C without appreciable degradation. Optimum structures in the form of thin pliable sheets of carbonate, inert support and binder were developed. Interpretation of a new solid-gas pore closing model helped predict the optimum sorbent and analysis of individual sorbent sheet performance in a thin rectangular channel sorber can predict packed bed performance.

  8. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  9. Calcination of calcium carbonate and blend therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, W.A.; Dziuk, J.J. Jr.

    1989-05-09

    This patent describes a method for the accelerated calcination of a calcium carbonate material. It comprises: heating the calcium carbonate material to a temperature and for a time sufficient to calcine the material to the degree desired while in the presence of a fused salt catalyst consisting of particles having a size above or below that of the calcium carbonate material; the catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula M{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. CaCO{sub 3}-CaO-H{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}}, wherein M is an alkali metal selected from sodium or potassium and x is 0 to 1 and the salt is formed by fusing M{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} in a molar ratio of about 1:2 to 2:1 when the alkali metal is sodium and about 1:1 to 2:1 when the alkali metal is potassium. This patent also describes a blend adapted to be heated to form CaO. It comprises: a calcium carbonate material and a catalyst consisting of particles having a size above or below that of the calcium carbonate material; the catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula M{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-CaCO{sub 3}CaO-H{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}}.

  10. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin David C.; O'Connor William K.; Penner Larry R.

    2003-11-01

    Concerns about global warming caused by the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the earth’s atmosphere have resulted in the need for research to reduce or eliminate emissions of these gases. Carbonation of magnesium and calcium silicate minerals is one possible method to achieve this reduction. It is possible to carry out these reactions either in situ (storage underground and subsequent reaction with the host rock to trap CO2 as carbonate minerals) or ex situ (above ground in a more traditional chemical processing plant). Research at the Department of Energy’s Albany Research Center has explored both of these routes. This paper will explore parameters that affect the direct carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4) and olivine (Mg2SiO4) to produce magnesite (MgCO3), as well as the calcium silicate mineral, wollastonite (CaSiO3), to form calcite (CaCO3). The Columbia River Basalt Group is a multi-layered basaltic lava plateau that has favorable mineralogy and structure for storage of CO2. Up to 25% combined concentration of Ca, Fe2+, and Mg cations could react to form carbonates and thus sequester large quantities of CO2. Core samples from the Columbia River Basalt Group were reacted in an autoclave for up to 2000 hours at temperatures and pressures to simulate in situ conditions. Changes in core porosity, secondary minerals, and solution chemistry were measured.

  11. Electrochemical Studies of Nitrate-Induced Pitting in Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    1998-12-07

    The phenomenon of pitting in carbon steel exposed to alkaline solutions of nitrate and chloride was studied with the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization technique. Open-circuit and pitting potentials were measured on specimens of ASTM A537 carbon steel in pH 9.73 salt solutions at 40 degrees Celsius, with and without the inhibiting nitrite ion present. Nitrate is not so aggressive a pitting agent as is chloride. Both nitrate and chloride did induce passive breakdown and pitting in nitrite-free solutions, but the carbon steel retained passivity in solutions with 0.11-M nitrite even at a nitrate concentration of 2.2 M.

  12. Cadherin-11 endocytosis through binding to clathrin promotes cadherin-11-mediated migration in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Satcher, Robert L; Pan, Tianhong; Bilen, Mehmet A; Li, Xiaoxia; Lee, Yu-Chen; Ortiz, Angelica; Kowalczyk, Andrew P; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-12-15

    Cadherin-11 (Cad11) cell adhesion molecule plays a role in prostate cancer cell migration. Because disassembly of adhesion complexes through endocytosis of adhesion proteins has been shown to play a role in cell migration, we examined whether Cad11 endocytosis plays a role in Cad11-mediated migration. The mechanism by which Cad11 is internalized is unknown. Using a GST pulldown assay, we found that clathrin binds to the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain but not to that of E-cadherin. Using deletion analysis, we identified a unique sequence motif, VFEEE, in the Cad11 membrane proximal region (amino acid residues 11-15) that binds to clathrin. Endocytosis assays using K(+)-depletion buffer showed that Cad11 internalization is clathrin dependent. Proximity ligation assays showed that Cad11 colocalizes with clathrin, and immunofluorescence assays showed that Cad11 localizes in vesicles that stain for the early endosomal marker Rab5. Deletion of the VFEEE sequence from the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain (Cad11-cla-Δ5) leads to inhibition of Cad11 internalization and reduces Cad11-mediated cell migration in C4-2B and PC3-mm2 prostate cancer cells. These observations suggest that clathrin-mediated internalization of Cad11 regulates surface trafficking of Cad11 and that dynamic turnover of Cad11 regulates the migratory function of Cad11 in prostate cancer cells.

  13. Spatial dynamics of carbon storage: a case study from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sivrikaya, Fatih; Baskent, Emin Zeki; Bozali, Nuri

    2013-11-01

    Forest ecosystems have an important role in carbon cycle at both regional and global scales as an important carbon sink. Forest degradation and land cover changes, caused by deforestation and conversion to non-forest area, have a strong impact on carbon storage. The carbon storage of forest biomass and its changes over time in the Hartlap planning unit of the southeastern part of Turkey have been estimated using the biomass expansion factor method based on field measurements of forests plots with forest inventory data between 1991 and 2002. The amount of carbon storage associated with land use and land cover changes were also analyzed. The results showed that the total forested area of the Hartlap planning unit slightly increased by 2.1%, from 27,978.7 ha to 28,282.6 ha during the 11-year period, and carbon storage increased by 9.6%, from 390,367.6 to 427,826.9 tons. Carbon storage of conifer and mixed forests accounted for about 70.6% of carbon storage in 1991, and 67.8% in 2002 which increased by 14,274.6 tons. Land use change and increasing forest area have a strong influence on increasing biomass and carbon storage.

  14. 39 CFR 447.11 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability. 447.11 Section 447.11 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PERSONNEL RULES OF CONDUCT FOR POSTAL EMPLOYEES Applicability and Definitions § 447.11 Applicability. This part contains rules of conduct for the employees of the...

  15. 25 CFR 11.300 - Complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complaints. 11.300 Section 11.300 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Procedure § 11.300 Complaints. (a) A complaint is a written statement of the essential...

  16. 25 CFR 11.600 - Marriages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Marriages. 11.600 Section 11.600 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Domestic Relations § 11.600 Marriages. (a) A magistrate of the Court of Indian Offenses shall have the authority to perform marriages. (b) A valid marriage shall be constituted by: (1) The issuance of a...

  17. 25 CFR 11.601 - Marriage licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marriage licenses. 11.601 Section 11.601 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Domestic Relations § 11.601 Marriage licenses. A marriage license shall be issued by the clerk of the court in the absence of any showing that the proposed marriage would be invalid under...

  18. 25 CFR 11.601 - Marriage licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Marriage licenses. 11.601 Section 11.601 Indians BUREAU OF... Domestic Relations § 11.601 Marriage licenses. A marriage license shall be issued by the clerk of the court in the absence of any showing that the proposed marriage would be invalid under any provision of...

  19. 25 CFR 11.600 - Marriages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Marriages. 11.600 Section 11.600 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Domestic Relations § 11.600 Marriages. (a) A magistrate of the Court of Indian Offenses shall have the authority to perform marriages. (b) A valid marriage shall be constituted by: (1) The issuance of a...

  20. 25 CFR 11.601 - Marriage licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Marriage licenses. 11.601 Section 11.601 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Domestic Relations § 11.601 Marriage licenses. A marriage license shall be issued by the clerk of the court in the absence of any showing that the proposed marriage would be invalid under...

  1. 25 CFR 11.600 - Marriages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Marriages. 11.600 Section 11.600 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Domestic Relations § 11.600 Marriages. (a) A magistrate of the Court of Indian Offenses shall have the authority to perform marriages. (b) A valid marriage shall be constituted by: (1) The issuance of a...

  2. 25 CFR 11.601 - Marriage licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Marriage licenses. 11.601 Section 11.601 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Domestic Relations § 11.601 Marriage licenses. A marriage license shall be issued by the clerk of the court in the absence of any showing that the proposed marriage would be invalid under...

  3. 25 CFR 11.601 - Marriage licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Marriage licenses. 11.601 Section 11.601 Indians BUREAU... ORDER CODE Domestic Relations § 11.601 Marriage licenses. A marriage license shall be issued by the clerk of the court in the absence of any showing that the proposed marriage would be invalid under...

  4. 25 CFR 11.600 - Marriages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Marriages. 11.600 Section 11.600 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Domestic Relations § 11.600 Marriages. (a) A magistrate of the Court of Indian Offenses shall have the authority to perform marriages. (b) A valid marriage shall be constituted by: (1) The issuance of a...

  5. 10 CFR 1800.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions. 1800.11 Section 1800.11 Energy NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMMISSION DECLARATION OF PARTY STATE ELIGIBILITY FOR NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMPACT § 1800.11 Definitions. The definitions contained in Article...

  6. 10 CFR 1800.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions. 1800.11 Section 1800.11 Energy NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMMISSION DECLARATION OF PARTY STATE ELIGIBILITY FOR NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMPACT § 1800.11 Definitions. The definitions contained in Article...

  7. 10 CFR 1800.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions. 1800.11 Section 1800.11 Energy NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMMISSION DECLARATION OF PARTY STATE ELIGIBILITY FOR NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMPACT § 1800.11 Definitions. The definitions contained in Article...

  8. 10 CFR 60.11 - Deliberate misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Deliberate misconduct. 60.11 Section 60.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.11 Deliberate misconduct. (a) Any licensee, applicant for a license, employee of a...

  9. 10 CFR 1800.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions. 1800.11 Section 1800.11 Energy NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMMISSION DECLARATION OF PARTY STATE ELIGIBILITY FOR NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMPACT § 1800.11 Definitions. The definitions contained in Article...

  10. 10 CFR 60.11 - Deliberate misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deliberate misconduct. 60.11 Section 60.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.11 Deliberate misconduct. (a) Any licensee, applicant for a license, employee of a...

  11. 10 CFR 60.11 - Deliberate misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Deliberate misconduct. 60.11 Section 60.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.11 Deliberate misconduct. (a) Any licensee, applicant for a license, employee of a...

  12. 10 CFR 60.11 - Deliberate misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Deliberate misconduct. 60.11 Section 60.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.11 Deliberate misconduct. (a) Any licensee, applicant for a license, employee of a...

  13. 10 CFR 60.11 - Deliberate misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Deliberate misconduct. 60.11 Section 60.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES General Provisions § 60.11 Deliberate misconduct. (a) Any licensee, applicant for a license, employee of a...

  14. 10 CFR 1800.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 1800.11 Section 1800.11 Energy NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMMISSION DECLARATION OF PARTY STATE ELIGIBILITY FOR NORTHEAST INTERSTATE LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE COMPACT § 1800.11 Definitions. The definitions contained in Article...

  15. 9 CFR 309.11 - Vaccine livestock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vaccine livestock. 309.11 Section 309.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.11 Vaccine livestock. Vaccine livestock with unhealed lesions...

  16. 9 CFR 309.11 - Vaccine livestock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vaccine livestock. 309.11 Section 309.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.11 Vaccine livestock. Vaccine livestock with unhealed lesions...

  17. 9 CFR 309.11 - Vaccine livestock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vaccine livestock. 309.11 Section 309.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.11 Vaccine livestock. Vaccine livestock with unhealed lesions...

  18. 9 CFR 309.11 - Vaccine livestock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vaccine livestock. 309.11 Section 309.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.11 Vaccine livestock. Vaccine livestock with unhealed lesions...

  19. 9 CFR 309.11 - Vaccine livestock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vaccine livestock. 309.11 Section 309.11 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.11 Vaccine livestock. Vaccine livestock with unhealed lesions...

  20. PEX11B — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    PEX11B, or peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11 beta, is involved in peroxisomal proliferation and interacts with PEX19. PEX11B is located in the peroxisomal membrane and is thought to regulate peroxisome division by recruiting the dynamin-related GTPase DNM1L to the peroxisomal membrane.

  1. 7 CFR 1781.11 - Other considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other considerations. 1781.11 Section 1781.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... ADVANCES § 1781.11 Other considerations. (a) Technical assistance. When pipelines from reservoirs...

  2. 12 CFR 508.11 - Relevant considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relevant considerations. 508.11 Section 508.11 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REMOVALS, SUSPENSIONS, AND PROHIBITIONS WHERE A CRIME IS CHARGED OR PROVEN § 508.11 Relevant considerations. (a) In determining...

  3. 23 CFR 777.11 - Other considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other considerations. 777.11 Section 777.11 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT MITIGATION OF IMPACTS TO WETLANDS AND NATURAL HABITAT § 777.11 Other considerations. (a) The development of...

  4. 10 CFR 602.11 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding. 602.11 Section 602.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS EPIDEMIOLOGY AND OTHER HEALTH STUDIES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.11 Funding. (a) The project period during which DOE expects to provide support for an...

  5. 14 CFR 398.11 - Funding reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding reductions. 398.11 Section 398.11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.11...

  6. 14 CFR 398.11 - Funding reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding reductions. 398.11 Section 398.11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.11...

  7. 10 CFR 602.11 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding. 602.11 Section 602.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS EPIDEMIOLOGY AND OTHER HEALTH STUDIES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.11 Funding. (a) The project period during which DOE expects to provide support for an...

  8. 14 CFR 398.11 - Funding reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding reductions. 398.11 Section 398.11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.11...

  9. 10 CFR 602.11 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding. 602.11 Section 602.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS EPIDEMIOLOGY AND OTHER HEALTH STUDIES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.11 Funding. (a) The project period during which DOE expects to provide support for an...

  10. 14 CFR 398.11 - Funding reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding reductions. 398.11 Section 398.11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.11...

  11. 10 CFR 602.11 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding. 602.11 Section 602.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS EPIDEMIOLOGY AND OTHER HEALTH STUDIES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.11 Funding. (a) The project period during which DOE expects to provide support for an...

  12. 10 CFR 602.11 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding. 602.11 Section 602.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS EPIDEMIOLOGY AND OTHER HEALTH STUDIES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.11 Funding. (a) The project period during which DOE expects to provide support for an...

  13. 14 CFR 398.11 - Funding reductions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding reductions. 398.11 Section 398.11 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.11...

  14. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  15. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  16. 22 CFR 120.11 - Public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public domain. 120.11 Section 120.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.11 Public domain. (a) Public domain means information which is published and which is generally...

  17. 49 CFR 198.11 - Grant authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grant authority. 198.11 Section 198.11... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY REGULATIONS FOR GRANTS TO AID STATE PIPELINE SAFETY PROGRAMS Grant Allocation § 198.11 Grant authority. The pipeline safety laws (49...

  18. 46 CFR 98.33-11 - Smoking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Smoking. 98.33-11 Section 98.33-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT... Combustible Liquids and Other Regulated Materials § 98.33-11 Smoking. No person may smoke when— (a) Within...

  19. 46 CFR 98.33-11 - Smoking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Smoking. 98.33-11 Section 98.33-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT... Combustible Liquids and Other Regulated Materials § 98.33-11 Smoking. No person may smoke when— (a) Within...

  20. 46 CFR 98.33-11 - Smoking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Smoking. 98.33-11 Section 98.33-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT... Combustible Liquids and Other Regulated Materials § 98.33-11 Smoking. No person may smoke when— (a) Within...

  1. 46 CFR 98.33-11 - Smoking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Smoking. 98.33-11 Section 98.33-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT... Combustible Liquids and Other Regulated Materials § 98.33-11 Smoking. No person may smoke when— (a) Within...

  2. 46 CFR 98.33-11 - Smoking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Smoking. 98.33-11 Section 98.33-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT... Combustible Liquids and Other Regulated Materials § 98.33-11 Smoking. No person may smoke when— (a) Within...

  3. 10 CFR 1.11 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The Commission. 1.11 Section 1.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.11 The Commission. (a) The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, composed of five members, one of whom is designated by...

  4. 7 CFR 3430.11 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Competition. 3430.11 Section 3430.11 Agriculture... Pre-award: Solicitation and Application § 3430.11 Competition. (a) Standards for competition. Except... agreements, unless restricted by statute, only after competition. (b) Exception. The CSREES ADO and...

  5. 7 CFR 3430.11 - Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Competition. 3430.11 Section 3430.11 Agriculture...-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Pre-award: Solicitation and Application § 3430.11 Competition. (a) Standards for competition. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, CSREES will enter...

  6. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...

  7. 33 CFR 214.11 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Costs. 214.11 Section 214.11... SUPPLIES OF DRINKING WATER § 214.11 Costs. Costs incurred by the Corps of Engineers in furnishing emergency... by the community generally will not be required. Costs of necessary measures for the...

  8. 33 CFR 214.11 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Costs. 214.11 Section 214.11... SUPPLIES OF DRINKING WATER § 214.11 Costs. Costs incurred by the Corps of Engineers in furnishing emergency... by the community generally will not be required. Costs of necessary measures for the...

  9. 25 CFR 11.316 - Probation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Probation. 11.316 Section 11.316 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Criminal Procedure § 11.316 Probation. (a) Where a sentence of imprisonment has been imposed on a convicted... release the person on probation under any reasonable conditions deemed appropriate by the court,...

  10. 25 CFR 11.316 - Probation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Probation. 11.316 Section 11.316 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Criminal Procedure § 11.316 Probation. (a) Where a sentence of imprisonment has been imposed on a convicted... release the person on probation under any reasonable conditions deemed appropriate by the court,...

  11. 7 CFR 1.11 - Review services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review services. 1.11 Section 1.11 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.11 Review services. (a) Review services are services of agency personnel—clerical or professional—in examining...

  12. 7 CFR 1.11 - Review services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Review services. 1.11 Section 1.11 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.11 Review services. (a) Review services are services of agency personnel—clerical or professional—in examining...

  13. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11.203 Section 11.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer...

  14. 8 CFR 236.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions. 236.11 Section 236.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF INADMISSIBLE AND DEPORTABLE ALIENS; REMOVAL OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Family Unity Program § 236.11...

  15. 21 CFR 898.11 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Applicability. 898.11 Section 898.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PERFORMANCE STANDARD FOR ELECTRODE LEAD WIRES AND PATIENT CABLES § 898.11 Applicability. Electrode lead...

  16. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD... Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be component insulated. (c) Wire, other than in switchboards, must meet the requirements in sections 24.6.7...

  17. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD... Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be component insulated. (c) Wire, other than in switchboards, must meet the requirements in sections 24.6.7...

  18. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD... Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be component insulated. (c) Wire, other than in switchboards, must meet the requirements in sections 24.6.7...

  19. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD... Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be component insulated. (c) Wire, other than in switchboards, must meet the requirements in sections 24.6.7...

  20. 46 CFR 111.60-11 - Wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wire. 111.60-11 Section 111.60-11 Shipping COAST GUARD... Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-11 Wire. (a) Wire must be in an enclosure. (b) Wire must be component insulated. (c) Wire, other than in switchboards, must meet the requirements in sections 24.6.7...

  1. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b)...

  2. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b)...

  3. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be approved. (b)...

  4. 38 CFR 3.11 - Homicide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Homicide. 3.11 Section 3.11 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.11 Homicide. Any person who...

  5. 38 CFR 3.11 - Homicide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Homicide. 3.11 Section 3.11 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.11 Homicide. Any person who...

  6. 38 CFR 3.11 - Homicide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Homicide. 3.11 Section 3.11 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.11 Homicide. Any person who...

  7. 38 CFR 3.11 - Homicide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Homicide. 3.11 Section 3.11 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.11 Homicide. Any person who...

  8. 38 CFR 3.11 - Homicide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Homicide. 3.11 Section 3.11 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.11 Homicide. Any person who...

  9. 10 CFR 55.11 - Specific exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specific exemptions. 55.11 Section 55.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Exemptions § 55.11 Specific exemptions. The Commission may, upon application by an interested person, or upon its own initiative, grant such exemptions...

  10. 46 CFR 160.171-11 - Performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance. 160.171-11 Section 160.171-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Immersion Suits § 160.171-11 Performance. (a) Buoyancy....

  11. 46 CFR 160.176-11 - Performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance. 160.176-11 Section 160.176-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Inflatable Lifejackets § 160.176-11 Performance. (a)...

  12. 46 CFR 160.176-11 - Performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance. 160.176-11 Section 160.176-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Inflatable Lifejackets § 160.176-11 Performance. (a)...

  13. 8 CFR 236.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 236.11 Section 236.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF INADMISSIBLE AND DEPORTABLE ALIENS; REMOVAL OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Family Unity Program § 236.11...

  14. 25 CFR 11.713 - Small estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Small estates. 11.713 Section 11.713 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings § 11.713 Small estates. An estate having an appraised value which does not exceed...

  15. 25 CFR 11.713 - Small estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Small estates. 11.713 Section 11.713 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings § 11.713 Small estates. An estate having an appraised value which does not exceed...

  16. 12 CFR 1271.11 - Trustee powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trustee powers. 1271.11 Section 1271.11 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS MISCELLANEOUS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OPERATIONS AND AUTHORITIES Miscellaneous Bank Authorities § 1271.11 Trustee powers. A Bank may...

  17. 25 CFR 11.1101 - Warrant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Warrant. 11.1101 Section 11.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Minor-in-Need-of-Care Procedure § 11.1101 Warrant. The children's court may issue a warrant, directing...

  18. 25 CFR 11.1101 - Warrant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Warrant. 11.1101 Section 11.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Minor-in-Need-of-Care Procedure § 11.1101 Warrant. The children's court may issue a warrant, directing...

  19. 12 CFR 23.11 - Lease term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lease term. 23.11 Section 23.11 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEASING CEBA Leases § 23.11 Lease term. A CEBA Lease must have an initial term of not less than 90 days. A national bank may acquire...

  20. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480 Shipping COAST... ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for National Deck Officer Endorsements § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains the requirements that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (b) If...

  1. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480 Shipping COAST... ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains the requirements that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (Part 15 of this chapter specifies...

  2. 12 CFR 1402.11 - Current index.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Current index. 1402.11 Section 1402.11 Banks... the Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation § 1402.11 Current index. The Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation will make available for public inspection and copying a current index to provide...

  3. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence by...

  4. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence...

  5. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence...

  6. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence...

  7. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence...

  8. 31 CFR 50.11 - Definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition. 50.11 Section 50.11 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Disclosures as Conditions for Federal Payment § 50.11 Definition. For purposes of this subpart, unless...

  9. 29 CFR 511.11 - Pertinent data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pertinent data. 511.11 Section 511.11 Labor Regulations... FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.11 Pertinent data. Among the types of data which may be considered pertinent... as reflected in profit and loss statements and balance sheets; and (e) Data bearing on...

  10. 49 CFR 630.11 - Data adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Data adjustments. 630.11 Section 630.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.11 Data adjustments. Errors in the data used...

  11. 49 CFR 630.11 - Data adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Data adjustments. 630.11 Section 630.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.11 Data adjustments. Errors in the data used...

  12. 49 CFR 630.11 - Data adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Data adjustments. 630.11 Section 630.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.11 Data adjustments. Errors in the data used...

  13. 49 CFR 630.11 - Data adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Data adjustments. 630.11 Section 630.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.11 Data adjustments. Errors in the data used...

  14. 29 CFR 511.11 - Pertinent data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pertinent data. 511.11 Section 511.11 Labor Regulations... FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.11 Pertinent data. Among the types of data which may be considered pertinent... as reflected in profit and loss statements and balance sheets; and (e) Data bearing on...

  15. 29 CFR 511.11 - Pertinent data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pertinent data. 511.11 Section 511.11 Labor Regulations... FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.11 Pertinent data. Among the types of data which may be considered pertinent... as reflected in profit and loss statements and balance sheets; and (e) Data bearing on...

  16. 49 CFR 630.11 - Data adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Data adjustments. 630.11 Section 630.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.11 Data adjustments. Errors in the data used...

  17. 29 CFR 511.11 - Pertinent data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pertinent data. 511.11 Section 511.11 Labor Regulations... FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.11 Pertinent data. Among the types of data which may be considered pertinent... as reflected in profit and loss statements and balance sheets; and (e) Data bearing on...

  18. 29 CFR 511.11 - Pertinent data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pertinent data. 511.11 Section 511.11 Labor Regulations... FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.11 Pertinent data. Among the types of data which may be considered pertinent... as reflected in profit and loss statements and balance sheets; and (e) Data bearing on...

  19. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  20. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...