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Sample records for carbon composite iron

  1. Iron-carbon composites for the remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunkara, Bhanu Kiran

    This research is focused on engineering submicron spherical carbon particles as effective carriers/supports for nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles to address the in situ remediation of soil and groundwater chlorinated contaminants. Chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) form a class of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) toxic contaminants in soil and groundwater. The in situ injection of NZVI particles to reduce DNAPLs is a potentially simple, cost-effective, and environmentally benign technology that has become a preferred method in the remediation of these compounds. However, unsupported NZVI particles exhibit ferromagnetism leading to particle aggregation and loss in mobility through the subsurface. This work demonstrates two approaches to prepare carbon supported NZVI (iron-carbon composites) particles. The objective is to establish these iron-carbon composites as extremely useful materials for the environmental remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and suitable materials for the in situ injection technology. This research also demonstrates that it is possible to vary the placement of iron nanoparticles either on the external surface or within the interior of carbon microspheres using a one-step aerosol-based process. The simple process of modifying iron placement has significant potential applications in heterogeneous catalysis as both the iron and carbon are widely used catalysts and catalyst supports. Furthermore, the aerosol-based process is applied to prepare new class of supported catalytic materials such as carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles for ex situ remediation of contaminated water. The iron-carbon composites developed in this research have multiple functionalities (a) they are reactive and function effectively in reductive dehalogenation (b) they are highly adsorptive thereby bringing the chlorinated compound to the proximity of the reactive sites and also serving as adsorption

  2. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  3. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part III. Shrinkage of composite pellets during reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  4. Magnetic studies of polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, T. L.; Zakharchuk, I.; Geydt, P.; Lahderanta, E.; Komlev, A. A.; Zyrianova, A. A.; Kanygin, M. A.; Sedelnikova, O. V.; Suslyaev, V. I.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Polystyrene/iron-filled multi-wall carbon nanotube composite films were prepared by solution processing, forge-rolling and stretching methods. Elongated iron carbide nanoparticles formed because of catalytic growth are situated inside the hollow cavity of the nanotubes. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as records of isothermal hysteresis loops performed in three perpendicular directions of magnetic field confirmed that the nanotubes have a preferential alignment in the matrix. Strong diamagnetic anisotropy in the composites emerges not only from the MWCNTs but also from the polystyrene matrix. The polymer sticks to the honeycomb lattice through the interaction of the π-orbitals of the phenyl ring and those of the carbon nanotube, contributing to anisotropic diamagnetic response. The contribution of iron nanoparticles to overall magnetic response strongly depends on nanotube concentration in the composite as well as on matrix-filler non-covalent stacking, which influences magnetic interparticle interactions.

  5. Effect of carbon species on the reduction and melting behavior of boron-bearing iron concentrate/carbon composite pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang; Ding, Yin-gui; Wang, Jing-song; She, Xue-feng; Xue, Qing-guo

    2013-06-01

    Iron nugget and boron-rich slag can be obtained in a short time through high-temperature reduction of boronbearing iron concentrate by carbonaceous material, both of which are agglomerated together as a carbon composite pellet. This is a novel flow sheet for the comprehensive utilization of boron-bearing iron concentrate to produce a new kind of man-made boron ore. The effect of reducing agent species (i.e., carbon species) on the reduction and melting process of the composite pellet was investigated at a laboratory scale in the present work. The results show that, the reduction rate of the composite pellet increases from bituminite, anthracite, to coke at temperatures ranging from 950 to 1300°C. Reduction temperature has an important effect on the microstructure of reduced pellets. Carbon species also affects the behavior of reduced metallic iron particles. The anthracite-bearing composite pellet melts faster than the bituminitebearing composite pellet, and the coke-bearing composite pellet cannot melt due to the high fusion point of coke ash. With anthracite as the reducing agent, the recovery rates of iron and boron are 96.5% and 95.7%, respectively. This work can help us get a further understanding of the new process mechanism.

  6. Development of carbon composite iron ore micropellets by using the microfines of iron ore and carbon-bearing materials in iron making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jagannath; Ghorai, Satadal; Das, Avimanyu

    2015-02-01

    Iron ore microfines and concentrate have very limited uses in sintering processes. They are used in pelletization; however, this process is cost intensive. Furthermore, the microfines of non-coking coal and other carbon-bearing materials, e.g., blast-furnace flue dust (BFD) and coke fines, are not used extensively in the metallurgical industry because of operational difficulties and handling problems. In the present work, to utilize these microfines, coal composite iron oxide micropellets (2-6 mm in size) were produced through an innovative technique in which lime and molasses were used as binding materials in the micropellets. The micropellets were subsequently treated with CO2 or the industrial waste gas to induce the chemical bond formation. The results show that, at a very high carbon level of 22wt% (38wt% coal), the cold crushing strength and abrasion index of the micropellets are 2.5-3 kg/cm2 and 5wt%-9wt%, respectively; these values indicate that the pellets are suitable for cold handling. The developed micropellets have strong potential as a heat source in smelting reduction in iron making and sintering to reduce coke breeze. The micropellets produced with BFD and coke fines (8wt%-12wt%) were used in iron ore sintering and were observed to reduce the coke breeze consumption by 3%-4%. The quality of the produced sinter was at par with that of the conventional blast-furnace sinter.

  7. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  8. Enhanced cathode performance of nano-sized lithium iron phosphate composite using polytetrafluoroethylene as carbon precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Ercan

    2014-12-01

    Herein we report a facile and efficient solid state synthesis of carbon coated lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4/C) cathode material achieved through the pyrolysis of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The current investigation is comparatively analyzed with the results of the composites of LiFePO4/C (LFP/C) synthesized using polystyrene-block-polybutadiene (PS-b-PBD), polyethyhylene (PE) and sucrose as carbon precursors. The optimized LFP/CPTFE composite is synthesized at 700 °C using 10 wt.% PTFE. The composite exhibits remarkable improvement in capacity, cyclability and rate capability compared to those of LFP/C synthesized using (PS-b-PBD), PE and sucrose. The specific discharge capacities as high as 166 mA h g-1 (theoretical capacity: 170 mA h g-1) at 0.2 C and 114 mA h g-1 at 10 C rates were achieved with LFP/CPTFE. In addition, the composite exhibits a long-term cycling stability with the capacity loss of only 11.4% after 1000 cycles. PTFE shifts the size distribution of the composite to nanometer scale (approximately 120 nm), however the addition of sucrose and other polymers do not have such an effect. According to TEM and XPS analysis, LFP/CPTFE particles are mostly coated with a few nanometers thick carbon layer forming a core-shell structure. Residual carbon does not contain fluorine.

  9. Low temperature charge transport and microwave absorption of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polymer composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Carbon coated Fe nanoparticle–PVC composite films were prepared by solution casting method. ► A low electrical percolation threshold of 2.2 was achieved. ► The low temperature electrical conductivity follows variable range hopping type conduction. ► An EMI shielding of 18 dB was achieved in 200 micron thick film. -- Abstract: In this paper, the low temperature electrical conductivity and microwave absorption properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polyvinyl chloride composite films are investigated for different filler fractions. The filler particles are prepared by the pyrolysis of ferrocene at 980 °C and embedded in polyvinyl chloride matrix. The high resolution transmission electron micrographs of the filler material have shown a 5 nm thin layer graphitic carbon covering over iron particles. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the composite film changes by 10 orders of magnitude with the increase of filler concentration. A percolation threshold of 2.2 and an electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency (EMI SE) of ∼18.6 dB in 26.5–40 GHz range are observed for 50 wt% loading. The charge transport follows three dimensional variable range hopping conduction.

  10. Carbon isotopic composition of graphite grains in the EL Taco IAB iron meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipfel, J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Marti, K.

    1997-03-01

    Carbon isotopes have been analyzed in individual graphite grains of the El Taco iron meteorite. Graphite is present in four distinct petrographic associations and a total of 28 grains has been analyzed from all areas. The C isotopic composition varies from delta-C-13 = +4 to -29 percent and exhibits well-defined correlations with graphite morphology. The El Taco graphites contain much less N, with CN/C ratios of 0.0027 to 0.005, than graphites from Acapulco or unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. Graphite appears to retain an isotopic record of precursor materials despite high peak temperatures and may be an important tracer of early solar system proceses.

  11. Enhanced Fenton-like removal of nitrobenzene via internal microelectrolysis in nano zerovalent iron/activated carbon composite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sihai; Wu, Yaoguo; Yao, Hairui; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Chengjun

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of Fenton-like catalysis using nano zerovalent iron (nZVI) is limited by nZVI aggregation and activity loss due to inactive ferric oxide forming on the nZVI surface, which hinders electron transfer. A novel iron-carbon composite catalyst consisting of nZVI and granular activated carbon (GAC), which can undergo internal iron-carbon microelectrolysis spontaneously, was successfully fabricated by the adsorption-reduction method. The catalyst efficiency was evaluated in nitrobenzene (NB) removal via the Fenton-like process (H2O2-nZVI/GAC). The results showed that nZVI/GAC composite was good for dispersing nZVI on the surface of GAC, which permitted much better removal efficiency (93.0%) than nZVI (31.0%) or GAC (20.0%) alone. Moreover, iron leaching decreased from 1.28 to 0.58 mg/L after reaction of 240 min and the oxidation kinetic of the Fenton-like reaction can be described well by the second-order reaction kinetic model (R2=0.988). The composite catalyst showed sustainable catalytic ability and GAC performed as a medium for electron transfer in internal iron-carbon microelectrolysis to promote Fe2+ regeneration and Fe3+/Fe2+ cycles. Therefore, this study represents an important method to design a low cost and high efficiency Fenton-like catalyst in practical application.

  12. Arsenic removal from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto iron oxide/activated carbon magnetic composite

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work the adsorption features of activated carbon and the magnetic properties of iron oxides were combined in a composite to produce magnetic adsorbent. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption behavior of arsenate onto the synthetic magnetic adsorbent. The effects of initial solution pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and co-existing anionic component on the adsorption of arsenate were investigated. The results showed that the removal percentage of arsenate could be over 95% in the conditions of adsorbent dosage 5.0 g/L, initial solution pH 3.0-8.0, and contact time 1 h. Under the experimental conditions, phosphate and silicate caused greater decrease in arsenate removal percentage among the anions, and sulfate had almost no effect on the adsorption of arsenate. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of arsenate was illustrated by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the arsenate adsorption data was tested. Both the models adequately describe the experimental data. Moreover, the magnetic composite adsorbent could be easily recovered from the medium by an external magnetic field. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by arsenate. PMID:24602339

  13. Effects of iron deficiency on the composition of the leaf apoplastic fluid and xylem sap in sugar beet. Implications for iron and carbon transport.

    PubMed

    López-Millán, A F; Morales, F; Abadía, A; Abadía, J

    2000-10-01

    The effects of iron deficiency on the composition of the xylem sap and leaf apoplastic fluid have been characterized in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris Monohil hybrid). pH was estimated from direct measurements in apoplastic fluid and xylem sap obtained by centrifugation and by fluorescence of leaves incubated with 5-carboxyfluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran. Iron deficiency caused a slight decrease in the pH of the leaf apoplast (from 6.3 down to 5.9) and xylem sap (from 6.0 down to 5.7) of sugar beet. Major organic acids found in leaf apoplastic fluid and xylem sap were malate and citrate. Total organic acid concentration in control plants was 4.3 mM in apoplastic fluid and 9.4 mM in xylem sap and increased to 12.2 and 50.4 mM, respectively, in iron-deficient plants. Inorganic cation and anion concentrations also changed with iron deficiency both in apoplastic fluid and xylem sap. Iron decreased with iron deficiency from 5.5 to 2.5 microM in apoplastic fluid and xylem sap. Major predicted iron species in both compartments were [FeCitOH](-1) in the controls and [FeCit(2)](-3) in the iron-deficient plants. Data suggest the existence of an influx of organic acids from the roots to the leaves via xylem, probably associated to an anaplerotic carbon dioxide fixation by roots.

  14. Development of monolithic eco-composites from carbonized blocks of solid iron bamboo (Dendrocalamus strictus) by impregnation with furfuryl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Krzesińska, M; Zachariasz, J; Lachowski, A I

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to manufacture the porous biomorphous composite using carbonized shapes cut from solid stem of solid iron bamboo, Dendrocalamus strictus, as a monolithic support. Bamboo carbonized at 800 degrees C was next infiltrated with liquid filler--furfuryl alcohol. After the polymerization and cross-linking of the filler, the shapes were carbonized again to obtain carbon/carbon composite. TGA method was used to investigate the thermal decomposition of the resulting composite as well as of the raw and carbonized bamboo. The ultrasonic measurements, optical microscopy observations, the adsorption of N(2) at -196 degrees C and mercury porosimetry were applied to characterize the structure of the investigated materials. The obtained composite was found to be highly porous (over 80%), thermo-resistant in inert atmosphere (up to 940 degrees C). It possessed stiff hierarchically ordered pore structure with elastic moduli >4 GPa along the stem, and >1 GPa perpendicularly to the stem. Furthermore, the layer of carbon from the polymer coated the support accurately and did not affect the shape of the monolithic pieces of carbonized bamboo. The resulting composite possessed also more uniform, mesoporous structure than the support.

  15. Simulation of reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Sabuj

    The primary motivation of this work is to evaluate a new alternative ironmaking process which involves the combination of a Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF) with an iron bath smelter. This work is concerned primarily, with the productivity of the RHF. It is known that the reduction in the RHF is controlled by chemical kinetics of the carbon oxidation and wustite reduction reactions as well as by heat transfer to the pellet surface and within the pellet. It is heat transfer to the pellet which limits the number of layers of pellets in the pellet bed in the RHF and thus, the overall productivity. Different types of carbon like graphite, coal-char and wood charcoal were examined. Part of the research was to investigate the chemical kinetics by de-coupling it from the influence of heat and mass transfer. This was accomplished by carrying out reduction experiments using small iron-oxide-carbon powder composite mixtures. The reaction rate constants were determined by fitting the experimental mass loss with a mixed reaction model. This model accounts for the carbon oxidation by CO2 and wustite reduction by CO, which are the primary rate controlling surface-chemical reactions in the composite system. The reaction rate constants have been obtained using wustite-coal-char powder mixtures and wustite-wood-charcoal mixtures. The wustite for these mixtures was obtained from two iron-oxide sources: artificial porous analytical hematite (PAH) and hematite ore tailings. In the next phase of this study, larger scale experiments were conducted in a RHF simulator using spherical composite pellets. Measurement of the reaction rates was accomplished using off-gas analysis. Different combinations of raw materials for the pellets were investigated. These included artificial ferric oxide as well as naturally existing hematite and taconite ores. Graphite, coal-char and wood-charcoal were the reductants. Experiments were conducted using a single layer, a double layer and a triple layer of

  16. Preparation of iron oxide-impregnated spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composite and its photocatalytic removal of methylene blue in the presence of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Kadirova, Zukhra C; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Katsumata, Ken-Ichi; Isobe, Toshihiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Akira; Sharipov, Khasan; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The spherical granular activated carbon-carbon composites (GAC-Fe) with different iron oxide contents (Fe mass% = 0.6-10) were prepared by a pore volume impregnation method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2-adsorption results confirm the presence of amorphous iron oxide, pyrolytic carbon, and graphitized globular carbon nanoparticles covered with amorphous carbon in the CAG-Fe. The rate of photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under UV light in the presence of oxalic acid correlates with porosity of the prepared materials. The total MB removal includes the combination of adsorption and photodegradation without the addition of H2O2. The results of total organic carbon (TOC) analysis reveal that the decolorization of MB in aqueous solution containing oxalic acid corresponds to the decomposition of organic compounds to CO2 and H2O.

  17. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth’s interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ13C ≈ −5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼−40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ13C distributions to the observed low δ13C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe−C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe−Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in 13C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe−C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ13C values. The sharp contrast in the δ13C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5–3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ13C values and that an average δ13C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼−5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ13C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion−differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  18. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-06

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth.

  19. Synthesis of granular activated carbon/zero valent iron composites for simultaneous adsorption/dechlorination of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Su, Jhih-Gang; Liang, Chenju

    2011-08-30

    The coupling adsorption and degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) through dechlorination using synthetic granular activated carbon and zerovalent iron (GAC-ZVI) composites was studied. The GAC-ZVI composites were prepared from aqueous Fe(2+) solutions by impregnation with and without the use of a PEG dispersant and then heated at 105°C or 700°C under a stream of N(2). Pseudo-first-order rate constant data on the removal of TCE demonstrates that the adsorption kinetics of GAC is similar to those of GAC-ZVI composites. However, the usage of GAC-ZVI composites liberated a greater amount of Cl than when ZVI was used alone. The highest degree of reductive dechlorination of TCE was achieved using a GAC-ZVI700P composite (synthesized using PEG under 700°C). A modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law was employed to depict the behavior of Cl liberation. As a result, a zero-order Cl liberation reaction was observed and the desorption limited TCE degradation rate constant decreased as the composite dosage was increased. The GAC-ZVI composites can be employed as a reactive GAC that is not subject to the limitations of using GAC and ZVI separately.

  20. Iron aluminide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    Iron aluminides with the B2 structure are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant. They are thermodynamically compatible with a wide range of ceramics such as TiC, WC, TiB{sub 2}, and ZrB{sub 2}. In addition, liquid iron aluminides wet these ceramics very well. Therefore, FeAl/ceramic composites may be produced by techniques such as liquid phase sintering of powder mixtures, or pressureless melt infiltration of ceramic powders with liquid FeAl. These techniques, the resulting microstructures, and their advantages as well as limitations are described. Iron aluminide composites can be very strong. Room temperature flexure strengths as high as 1.8 GPa have been observed for FeAl/WC. Substantial gains in strength of elevated temperatures (1,073 K) have also been demonstrated. Above 40 vol.% WC the room temperature flexure strength becomes flaw-limited. This is thought to be due to processing flaws and limited interfacial strength. The fracture toughness of FeAl/WC is unexpectedly high and follows a rule of mixtures. Interestingly, sufficiently thin ({lt}1 {micro}m) FeAl ligaments between adjacent WC particles fracture not by cleavage, but in a ductile manner. For these thin ligaments the dislocation pile-ups formed during deformation are not long enough to nucleate cleavage fracture, and their fracture mode is therefore ductile. For several reasons, this brittle-to-ductile size transition does not improve the fracture toughness of the composites significantly. However, since no cleavage cracks are nucleated in sufficiently thin FeAl ligaments, slow crack growth due to ambient water vapor does not occur. Therefore, as compared to monolithic iron aluminides, environmental embrittlement is dramatically reduced in iron aluminide composites.

  1. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  2. Silver/iron oxide/graphitic carbon composites as bacteriostatic catalysts for enhancing oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; You, Shijie; Gong, Xiaobo; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jinlong; Fu, Honggang

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms from anode heterotrophic bacteria are inevitably formed over cathodic catalytic sites, limiting the performances of single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Graphitic carbon (GC) - based nano silver/iron oxide (AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC) composites are prepared from waste pomelo skin and used as antibacterial oxygen reduction catalysts for MFCs. AgNPs and Fe3O4 are introduced in situ into the composites by one-step carbothermal reduction, enhancing their conductivity and catalytic activity. To investigate the effects of Fe species on the antibacterial and catalytic properties, AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC is washed with sulfuric acid (1 mol L-1) for 0.5 h, 1 h, and 5 h and marked as AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-x (x = 0.5 h, 1 h and 5 h, respectively). A maximum power density of 1712 ± 35 mW m-2 is obtained by AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-1 h, which declines by 4.12% after 17 cycles. Under catalysis of all AgNP-containing catalysts, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeds via the 4e- pathway, and no toxic effects to anode microorganisms result from inhibiting the cathodic biofilm overgrowth. With the exception of AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-5 h, the AgNPs-containing composites exhibit remarkable power output and coulombic efficiency through lowering proton transfer resistance and air-cathode biofouling. This study provides a perspective for the practical application of MFCs using these efficient antibacterial ORR catalysts.

  3. A microfibre assembly of an iron-carbon composite with giant magnetisation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying; Liu, Pu; Xiao, Jun; Li, Hongbo; Wang, Chengxin; Yang, Guowei

    2013-01-01

    Iron carbide is among the oldest known materials. The utility of this ancient advanced material is greatly extended in its nanostructured forms. We demonstrate for the first time that one-dimensional iron carbide microfibres can be assembled in liquid using strong magnetic field-assisted laser ablation. The giant saturation magnetisation of these particles was measured a 261 emu/g at room temperature, which is the best value reported to date for iron nitride and carbide nanostructures, is 5.5 times greater than the 47 emu/g reported for Fe3C nanoparticles, and exceeds the 212 emu/g for bulk Fe. The magnetic field-induced dipolar interactions of the magnetic nanospheres and the nanochains played a key role in determining the shape of the product. These findings lead to a variety of promising applications for this unique nanostructure including its use as a magnetically guided transporter for biomedicine and as a magnetic recording material. PMID:24165864

  4. Carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1992-01-01

    The current applications of C-C composites extend to aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles, missile nosetips, and leading edges of the Space Shuttle. More advanced, secondary and even primary structure applications in cyclic, high-temperature oxidizing environments depend on effective oxidation protection for repeated missions. Accounts are presently given of state-of-the-art methods in substrate fabrication, carbon deposition, and SiC and Si3N4 protective coatings. Attention is given to current levels of high temperature oxidation protection for various mission and vehicle types, as well as to performance projections for C-C composites used by a representative National Aerospace Plane airframe structure. Future technology requirements in C-C composites are projected.

  5. Process to Produce Iron Nanoparticle Lunar Dust Simulant Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a method for producing nanophase iron lunar dust composite simulant by heating a mixture of carbon black and current lunar simulant types (mixed oxide including iron oxide) at a high temperature to reduce ionic iron into elemental iron. The product is a chemically modified lunar simulant that can be attracted by a magnet, and has a surface layer with an iron concentration that is increased during the reaction. The iron was found to be -iron and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The simulant produced with this method contains iron nanoparticles not available previously, and they are stable in ambient air. These nanoparticles can be mass-produced simply.

  6. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part II. Rates of reduction of composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO{sub 2} generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O{sub 3}-to-Fe3O{sub 4} transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O{sub 4}. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

  7. Effect of Amount of Carbon on the Reduction Efficiency of Iron Ore-Coal Composite Pellets in Multi-layer Bed Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Srinibash; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2016-08-01

    The effect of carbon-to-hematite molar ratio has been studied on the reduction efficiency of iron ore-coal composite pellet reduced at 1523 K (1250 °C) for 20 minutes in a laboratory scale multi-layer bed rotary hearth furnace (RHF). Reduced pellets have been characterized through weight loss measurement, estimation of porosity, shrinkage, qualitative and quantitative phase analysis by XRD. Performance parameters such as the degree of reduction, metallization, carbon efficiency, productivity, and compressive strength have been calculated to compare the process efficacy at different carbon levels in the pellets. Pellets with optimum carbon-to-hematite ratio (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) that is much below the stoichiometric carbon required for direct reduction of hematite yielded maximum reduction, better carbon utilization, and productivity for all three layers. Top layer exhibited maximum reduction at comparatively lower carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio <2.33) in the pellet, while bottom layer exceeded top layer reduction at higher carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio >2.33). Correlation between degree of reduction and metallization indicated non-isothermal kinetics influenced by heat and mass transfer in multi-layer bed RHF. Compressive strength of the partially reduced pellet with optimum carbon content (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) showed that they could be potentially used as an alternate feed in a blast furnace or any other smelting reactor.

  8. Alignment of carbon iron into polydimethylsiloxane to create conductive composite with low percolation threshold and high piezoresistivity: experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shuai; Wang, Xiaojie

    2017-04-01

    In this study, various amounts of carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) were cured into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix under a magnetic field up to 1.0 T to create anisotropy of conductive composite materials. The electrical resistivity for the longitudinal direction was measured as a function of filler volume fraction to understand the electrical percolation behavior. The electrical percolation threshold (EPT) of CIPs–PDMS composite cured under a magnetic field can be as low as 0.1 vol%, which is much less than most of those studies in particulate composites. Meanwhile, the effects of compressive strain on the electrical properties of CIPs–PDMS composites were also investigated. The strain sensitivity depends on filler volume fraction and decreases with the increasing of compressive strain. It has been found that the composites containing a small amount of CI particles curing under a magnetic field exhibit a high strain sensitivity of over 150. Based on the morphological observation of the composite structures, a two-dimensional stick percolation model for the CIPs–PDMS composites has been established. The Monte Carlo simulation is performed to obtain the percolation probability. The simulation results in prediction of the values of EPTs are close to that of experimental measurements. It demonstrates that the low percolation behavior of CIPs–PDMS composites is due to the average length of particle chains forming by external magnetic field.

  9. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  10. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  11. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  12. Pitch carbon microsphere composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Petroleum pitch carbon microspheres were prepared by flash heating emulsified pitch and carbonizing the resulting microspheres in an inert atmosphere. Microsphere composites were obtained from a mixture of microspheres and tetraester precursor pyrrone powder. Scanning electron micrographs of the composite showed that it was an aggregate of microspheres bonded together by the pyrrone at the sphere contact points, with voids in and among the microspheres. Physical, thermal, and sorption properties of the composite are described. Composite applications could include use as a honeycomb filler in elevated-temperature load-bearing sandwich boards or in patient-treatment tables for radiation treatment of tumors.

  13. Effect of carbon, sulfur and silicon on iron melting at high pressure: Implications for composition and evolution of the planetary terrestrial cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Liwei; Fei, Yingwei; Liu, Xi; Gong, Zizheng; Shahar, Anat

    2013-08-01

    High-pressure melting experiments in the Fe-S-C ternary and Fe-S-Si-C quaternary systems have been conducted in the range of 3.5-20 GPa and 920-1700 °C in the multi-anvil press. The mutual solubility, melting relations, and crystallization sequences were systematically investigated with changes of pressure, temperature and bulk composition. Five starting materials of Fe(84.69 wt%)-C(4.35 wt%)-S(7.85 wt%), Fe(84.87 wt%)-C(2.08 wt%)-S(11.41 wt%), Fe(86.36 wt%)-C(0.96 wt%)-S(10.31 wt%), Fe(85.71 wt%)-C(0.33 wt%)-S(11.86 wt%) and Fe(82.95 wt%)-C(0.66 wt%)-S(13.7 wt%)-Si(2.89 wt%) were employed. For Fe(84.69 wt%)-C(4.35 wt%)-S(7.85 wt%), the first crystallized phase is Fe3C at 5 GPa and Fe7C3 at 10-20 GPa. For Fe(84.87 wt%)-C(2.08 wt%)-S(11.41 wt%), Fe3C is the stable carbide at subsolidus temperature at 5-15 GPa. For Fe(86.36 wt%)-C(0.96 wt%)-S(10.31 wt%) and Fe(85.71 wt%)-C(0.33 wt%)-S(11.86 wt%), the first crystallized phase is metallic Fe instead of iron carbide at 5-10 GPa. The cotectic curves in Fe-S-C ternary system indicate only a small amount of C is needed to form an iron carbide solid inner core with the presence of S. Experiments on Fe(82.95 wt%)-C(0.66 wt%)-S(13.7 wt%)-Si(2.89 wt%) showed that a small amount of C does not significantly change the closure pressure of miscibility gap compared with that in Fe-S-Si system. It is observed that S preferentially partitions into molten iron while a significant amount of Si enters the solid phase with temperature decrease. Meanwhile, the C concentration in the liquid and solid iron metal changes little with temperature variations. If S, C and Si partitioning behavior between molten iron and solid iron metal with temperature remains the same under Earth's present core pressure conditions, the solid inner core should be iron dominated with dissolved Si. On the other hand, the liquid outer core will be S rich and Si poor. Moderate carbon will be evenly present in both solid and liquid cores. Based on our melting data

  14. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (<1 nM) due to the low solubility of iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to

  15. Removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution using multiwalled carbon nanotubes/iron oxide magnetic composites.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Zhao, Donglin; Wang, Xiangke

    2011-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/iron oxide magnetic composites (named as MCs) were prepared by co-precipitation method, and were characterised by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in detail. The prepared MCs were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions from wastewater in heavy metal ion pollution cleanup. The results demonstrated that the sorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions was strongly dependent on pH and temperature. The experimental data were well described by Langmuir model, and the monolayer sorption capacity of MCs was found to vary from 10.02 to 31.25 mg/g for Pb(II) and from 3.11 to 8.92 mg/g for Cu(II) at temperature increasing from 293.15 to 353.15 K at pH 5.50. The sorption capacity of Pb(II) on MCs was higher than that of Cu(II), which was attributed to their ionic radius, hydration energies and hydrolysis of their hydroxides. The thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ΔH(0), ΔS(0) and ΔG(0)) were calculated from temperature dependent sorption isotherms, and the results indicated that the sorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions on MCs were spontaneous and endothermic processes.

  16. Investigation of heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr) stabilization in river sediment by nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon composite.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-fang; Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Xiaomao; Wang, Weiya; Li, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon (nZVI/AC) composite was evaluated for its effectiveness in the stabilization of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr in dredged river sediment. Synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) were adopted to compare the effects of nZVI/AC dosage, particle size, time duration, and temperature on heavy metal leachability. The results show that leachability dropped considerably with the addition of nZVI/AC and powdered particles in the size of 0.075-0.18 mm was more effective in stabilization than granular ones. Stabilization effect was stable in long-term and robust against changes in temperature. Tessier sequential extraction revealed that heavy metals were associated with solid particle, inorganic or organic matters in sediment. The addition of nZVI/AC was able to convert relatively weakly bound heavy metals into more strongly bound species and thus reduce the bioavailability and toxicity. Also, the standard potential of heavy metals may decide the mechanism of stabilization process.

  17. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Engle, Glen B.

    1993-01-01

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  18. A Holocene record of endogenic iron and manganese precipitation, isotopic composition of endogenic carbonate, and vegetation history in a lake-fen complex in northwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, Walter E.; Doner, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    percent in the LSL-B core and 15.5 percent in the LSF-10 core. Values of delta18O in mollusk (Pisidium) and ostracode shells increase by only about 20 per mil from the bottom to the top of the LSL-B core (about 12600-2200 calendar years). The remarkably constant oxygen-isotope composition throughout the Holocene suggests that environmental conditions affecting values of delta18O (temperature, salinity, composition of the water, composition of precipitation) did not change greatly. Values of delta13C in carbonate shells generally decreased by about 2 per mil from 9000 calendar years to 6000 calendar years, but they did not increase in organic carbon. This mid-Holocene increase in delta13C in shells but not in organic carbon is likely due to an increase in residence time. A late Pleistocene forest dominated by spruce was replaced in the early Holocene by a pine forest. The pine forest migrated east during the middle Holocene and was replaced by an open sagebrush-oak savanna. The western migration of forests into northwestern Minnesota is marked first by a hardwood forest and finally a pine forest.

  19. Interfaces in carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Peebles, L.H.; Meyer, R.A.; Jortner, J.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites, consisting of a carbon matrix reinforced with carbon fibers, have complex microstructures. Several types of interfaces, microcracks, and various degress of local anisotropy were observed. This paper provides examples of microstructures seen in carbon-carbon composites, with emphasis on the interfaces. Information relating to the degree of bonding at interfaces, and its effects on composite behavior, is reviewed. The causes and effects of the various observed microstructures are beginning to be understood, but there remain many questions deserving further study.

  20. The continental shelf benthic iron flux and its isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severmann, Silke; McManus, James; Berelson, William M.; Hammond, Douglas E.

    2010-07-01

    Benthic iron fluxes from sites along the Oregon-California continental shelf determined using in situ benthic chambers, range from less than 10 μmol m -2 d -1 to values in excess of ˜300 μmol m -2 d -1. These fluxes are generally greater than previously published iron fluxes for continental shelves contiguous with the open ocean (as opposed to marginal seas, bays, or estuaries) with the highest fluxes measured in the regions around the high-sediment discharge Eel River and the Umpqua River. These benthic iron fluxes do not covary with organic carbon oxidation rates in any systematic fashion, but rather seem to respond to variations in bottom water oxygen and benthic oxygen demand. We hypothesize that the highest rates of benthic iron efflux are driven, in part, by the greater availability of reactive iron deposited along these river systems as compared to other more typical continental margin settings. Bioirrigation likely plays an important role in the benthic Fe flux in these systems as well. However, the influence of bottom water oxygen concentrations on the iron flux is significant, and there appears to be a threshold in dissolved oxygen (˜60-80 μM), below which sediment-ocean iron exchange is enhanced. The isotope composition of this shelf-derived benthic iron is enriched in the lighter isotopes, and appears to change by ˜3‰ (δ 56Fe) during the course of a benthic chamber experiment with a mean isotope composition of -2.7 ± 1.1‰ (2 SD, n = 9) by the end of the experiment. This average value is slightly heavier than those from two high benthic Fe flux restricted basins from the California Borderland region where δ 56Fe is -3.4 ± 0.4‰ (2 SD, n = 3). These light iron isotope compositions support previous ideas, based on sediment porewater analyses, suggesting that sedimentary iron reduction fractionates iron isotopes and produces an isotopically light iron pool that is transferred to the ocean water column. In sum, our data suggest that

  1. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, G.B.

    1993-06-08

    A method for fabricating a high-strength, high-modulus and high thermal and electrical conducting 2D laminate carbon-carbon composite is described comprising the steps of: (a) forming a green laminate composite comprising: (1) graphitizible carbon cloth plies, (2) fine graphitizible pitch powder; said cloth plies comprising mesophase derived pitch fiber tow with moduli in a range of 25 to 140 Msi, and (3) thermal conductivity enhancers; (b) heating the green laminate composite to a temperature high enough to cause the pitch powder to soften and pressing the composite to form a pressed green laminate composite comprised of graphitizible carbon cloth, pitch matrix and thermal conductivity enhancers; (c) heating the pressed green composite to at least 500 C. to: (1) carbonize the pitch, (2) form a carbon matrix and (3) shrink and crack the matrix carbon; (d) impregnating the composite with additional graphitizible pitch by covering the composite with the pitch and heating the covered composite to at least 200 C. to melt the pitch and permit it to flow into the composite and then increasing the pressure to at least 15 Psi; (e) heating the composites to at least 900 C.; (f) repeating steps d and e at least once; (g) heating the composite to between 2,400 to 3,100 C to graphitize the fibers and the pitch matrix carbon in the composites to produce a graphitized composite having cracks and pores; and (h) reimpregnating the graphitized composites by infiltrating the cracks and pores of the composites with a hydrocarbon gas at a temperature in the range 982 to 1,490 C. and depositing pyrolytic carbon in the pores and cracks.

  2. High Thermal Conductivity Carbon/Carbon Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop a lowcost, high thermal conductivity carbon/carbon composite with a mesophase pitch -based matrix. A low...carbonization technique and heat treatment of the mesophase pitch was utilized to enhance composite properties by increasing the composite density...Three different fibers, T300 PAN-based, P55 pitch -based, and an experimental high thermal conductivity mesophase pitch -based, were incorporated as the

  3. Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  4. The elements just beyond iron - Formation during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, J. P.; Schramm, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Pridmore-Brown, D.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the details of the synthesis of the elements just beyond iron are unclear. Thus, a reexamination of the role played by neutron-capture reactions during explosive carbon burning is indicated. A description is given of calculations of explosive carbon-burning nucleosynthesis using a complete neutron capture (n-process) computer code with a network extending from Cr through Zr and including not only (n,gamma), (gamma,n) reactions and beta-decay but also (p,n), (n,p), (p,gamma), and (p,alpha) reactions. Initial conditions indicative of the composition of a massive star following core helium burning were selected, and a comparison is made with conditions similar to those used by Howard et al. (1972). It is found that neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning are an important source for the elements just beyond iron.

  5. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, G.B.

    1991-10-29

    A process is described for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500 to 3000 C to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000 to 1300 C at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

  6. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Engle, Glen B.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

  7. Segregation of carbon in iron and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabczyk, W.; Narkiewicz, U.

    1996-05-01

    The segregation of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur and carbon in iron causes the formation of FeXX bonds on the surface. The system metal (Fe(111),Mo(100))-carbon has been studied using the AES method. The bonds FeC observed for lower surface coverages were transformed to FeCC bonds for higher coverages and the interaction between iron atoms and carbon atoms decreased. In the case of molybdenum the two different adsorption states were observed without a formation of CC bonding. The enthalpy of segregation for both adsorption states for iron and molybdenum has been determined using the Langmuir-McLean equation. The enthalpy of carbon segregation at the first adsorption state (lower carbon coverages) was - 140 and - 68 kJ/mol for Fe(111) and Mo(100) surfaces, respectively, and for the second adsorption state - 60 and - 47 kJ/mol, respectively. The further increase of the carbon surface concentration caused the formation of 3D graphite on the Fe(111) surface and of carbide-like compounds on the Mo(100) surface.

  8. Iron cycling at corroding carbon steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason S; McBeth, Joyce M; Ray, Richard I; Little, Brenda J; Emerson, David

    2013-01-01

    Surfaces of carbon steel (CS) exposed to mixed cultures of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in seawater media under aerobic conditions were rougher than surfaces of CS exposed to pure cultures of either type of microorganism. The roughened surface, demonstrated by profilometry, is an indication of loss of metal from the surface. In the presence of CS, aerobically grown FeOB produced tight, twisted helical stalks encrusted with iron oxides. When CS was exposed anaerobically in the presence of FeRB, some surface oxides were removed. However, when the same FeOB and FeRB were grown together in an aerobic medium, FeOB stalks were less encrusted with iron oxides and appeared less tightly coiled. These observations suggest that iron oxides on the stalks were reduced and solubilized by the FeRB. Roughened surfaces of CS and denuded stalks were replicated with culture combinations of different species of FeOB and FeRB under three experimental conditions. Measurements of electrochemical polarization resistance established different rates of corrosion of CS in aerobic and anaerobic media, but could not differentiate rate differences between sterile controls and inoculated exposures for a given bulk concentration of dissolved oxygen. Similarly, total iron in the electrolyte could not be used to differentiate treatments. The experiments demonstrate the potential for iron cycling (oxidation and reduction) on corroding CS in aerobic seawater media.

  9. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  10. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  11. Structure and properties of a steel/white-cast-iron bimetal produced by method of carbonizing the steel melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, S. Z.

    1985-11-01

    Centrifugal bimetallization by the method of carbonizing the steel melt makes it possible to obtain a steel/white-cast-iron composition with a cladding layer close to the eutectic in terms of composition.

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in activated carbons prepared from hydrothermally treated waste biomass.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenming; Björkman, Eva; Yun, Yifeng; Lilliestråle, Malte; Hedin, Niklas

    2014-03-01

    Particles of iron oxide (Fe3O4 ; 20–40 nm) were embedded within activated carbons during the activation of hydrothermally carbonized (HTC) biomasses in a flow of CO2. Four different HTC biomass samples (horse manure, grass cuttings, beer production waste, and biosludge) were used as precursors for the activated carbons. Nanoparticles of iron oxide formed from iron catalyst included in the HTC biomasses. After systematic optimization, the activated carbons had specific surface areas of about 800 m2g1. The pore size distributions of the activated carbons depended strongly on the degree of carbonization of the precursors. Activated carbons prepared from highly carbonized precursors had mainly micropores, whereas those prepared from less carbonized precursors contained mainly mesopores. Given the strong magnetism of the activated carbon–nano-Fe3O4 composites, they could be particularly useful for water purification.

  13. Uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide–carbon nanospheres for superior sodium–iron sulfide batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Xiao; Yang, Jianping; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua Kun; Zhang, Wei-xian; Zhao, Dongyuan; Dou, Shi Xue

    2015-01-01

    Sodium–metal sulfide battery holds great promise for sustainable and cost-effective applications. Nevertheless, achieving high capacity and cycling stability remains a great challenge. Here, uniform yolk-shell iron sulfide–carbon nanospheres have been synthesized as cathode materials for the emerging sodium sulfide battery to achieve remarkable capacity of ∼545 mA h g−1 over 100 cycles at 0.2 C (100 mA g−1), delivering ultrahigh energy density of ∼438 Wh kg−1. The proven conversion reaction between sodium and iron sulfide results in high capacity but severe volume changes. Nanostructural design, including of nanosized iron sulfide yolks (∼170 nm) with porous carbon shells (∼30 nm) and extra void space (∼20 nm) in between, has been used to achieve excellent cycling performance without sacrificing capacity. This sustainable sodium–iron sulfide battery is a promising candidate for stationary energy storage. Furthermore, this spatially confined sulfuration strategy offers a general method for other yolk-shell metal sulfide–carbon composites. PMID:26507613

  14. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures on iron nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshanova, A.; Partizan, G.; Mansurov, B.; Medyanova, B.; Mansurova, M.; Aliev, B.; Jiang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the results of experiments on synthesis of carbon nanostructures (CNs) by the method of thermal chemical vapor deposition using iron nanopowders obtained by the method of electrical explosion of wires as catalysts. To study the process of nucleation and growth of individual carbon nanostructures, experiments were conducted not only on nanopowders, but also on the separated clusters. To determine the optimum conditions of the carbon nanostructures synthesis and lower temperature limit, experiments were performed at different temperatures (300-700°C) and pressures (100-400 mbar). The experiments have shown that the lower temperature limit for carbon nanostructures synthesis on the iron nanopowders is 350°C and in this process the growth of carbon nanostructures is not so massive. Stable growth of carbon nanostructures for nanopowders began from 400°C during the entire range of pressures. The analysis of Raman spectroscopy showed that the most optimum conditions for obtaining nanotubes of high quality are P = 100 mbar and T = 425°C.

  15. Microwave-synthesized freestanding iron-carbon nanotubes on polyester composites of woven Kevlar fibre and silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K.; Kim, DoYoung; Kong, Kyungil; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized Ag nanoparticle-decorated multilayered graphene nanosheets (Ag-graphene) from graphite nanoplatelets and silver nitrate through 90–100 s of microwave exposure, without the use of any mineral acids or harsh reducing agents. Fe nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs) were grown on polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on woven Kevlar fibre (WKF), using ferrocene as a catalyst, under microwave irradiation. Fe-CNTs grown on WKF and Ag-graphene dispersed in polyester resin (PES) were combined to fabricate Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites by vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding. The combined effect of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene in the resulting composites resulted in a remarkable enhancement of tensile properties (a 192.56% increase in strength and 100.64% increase in modulus) as well as impact resistance (a 116.33% increase). The electrical conductivity significantly increased for Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites. The effectiveness of electromagnetic interference shielding, which relies strongly on the Ag-graphene content in the composites, was 25 times higher in Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES than in neat WKF/PES composites. The current work offers a novel route for fabricating highly promising, cost effective WKF/PES composites through microwave-assisted synthesis of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene. PMID:28074877

  16. Microwave-synthesized freestanding iron-carbon nanotubes on polyester composites of woven Kevlar fibre and silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K.; Kim, Doyoung; Kong, Kyungil; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized Ag nanoparticle-decorated multilayered graphene nanosheets (Ag-graphene) from graphite nanoplatelets and silver nitrate through 90–100 s of microwave exposure, without the use of any mineral acids or harsh reducing agents. Fe nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs) were grown on polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on woven Kevlar fibre (WKF), using ferrocene as a catalyst, under microwave irradiation. Fe-CNTs grown on WKF and Ag-graphene dispersed in polyester resin (PES) were combined to fabricate Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites by vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding. The combined effect of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene in the resulting composites resulted in a remarkable enhancement of tensile properties (a 192.56% increase in strength and 100.64% increase in modulus) as well as impact resistance (a 116.33% increase). The electrical conductivity significantly increased for Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites. The effectiveness of electromagnetic interference shielding, which relies strongly on the Ag-graphene content in the composites, was 25 times higher in Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES than in neat WKF/PES composites. The current work offers a novel route for fabricating highly promising, cost effective WKF/PES composites through microwave-assisted synthesis of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene.

  17. Microwave-synthesized freestanding iron-carbon nanotubes on polyester composites of woven Kevlar fibre and silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K; Kim, DoYoung; Kong, Kyungil; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-01-11

    We synthesized Ag nanoparticle-decorated multilayered graphene nanosheets (Ag-graphene) from graphite nanoplatelets and silver nitrate through 90-100 s of microwave exposure, without the use of any mineral acids or harsh reducing agents. Fe nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs) were grown on polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on woven Kevlar fibre (WKF), using ferrocene as a catalyst, under microwave irradiation. Fe-CNTs grown on WKF and Ag-graphene dispersed in polyester resin (PES) were combined to fabricate Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites by vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding. The combined effect of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene in the resulting composites resulted in a remarkable enhancement of tensile properties (a 192.56% increase in strength and 100.64% increase in modulus) as well as impact resistance (a 116.33% increase). The electrical conductivity significantly increased for Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites. The effectiveness of electromagnetic interference shielding, which relies strongly on the Ag-graphene content in the composites, was 25 times higher in Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES than in neat WKF/PES composites. The current work offers a novel route for fabricating highly promising, cost effective WKF/PES composites through microwave-assisted synthesis of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene.

  18. Randomly oriented carbon/carbon composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raunija, Thakur Sudesh Kumar; Babu, S.

    2013-06-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop an alternate, rapid and cost effective process for the fabrication of carbon/carbon (C/C) composite. Slurry moulding technique is adopted for the fabrication of C/C composite. Randomly oriented hybrid discrete carbon fiber (CF) reinforced and mesophase pitch (MP) derived matrix C/C composite is fabricated. Process parameters are optimized and repeatability is proved. The electrical conductivity of the composite fabricated through the developed process is found to be better than that fabricated through conventional processes. The other properties are also found to be competent. The randomly oriented C/C composite because of its mouldability is found suitable for various applications which require complex shapes.

  19. Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1979-01-01

    A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

  20. Kevlar and carbon composites compared

    SciTech Connect

    Demmler, A.W.

    1985-02-01

    Characteristics of advanced composites are investigated. The fibers considered are Kevlar and carbon. The greatest advantage of composites over metals is emphasized, and lies in their permitting designers to obtain properties in exactly the locations desired. Kevlar replaced S-glass on the Trident 2 missile, saving 800 lbs. and adding 800 miles to its range. Military aircraft builders find that advanced carbon composites more often than not win out over Kevlar.

  1. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  2. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  3. Removal of arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions using iron-oxide-coated modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q L; Gao, Nai-Yun; Lin, Y C; Xu, Bin; Le, Lin-sheng

    2007-08-01

    Removal of arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions was evaluated with the following three different sorption materials: coal-based activated carbon 12 x 40 (activated carbon), iron(II) oxide (FeO)/activated carbon-H, and iron oxide. The apparent characteristics and physical chemistry performances of these adsorbents were investigated by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, and scanning electronic microscope. Also, batch experiments for arsenic removal were performed, and the effects of pH value on arsenic(V) removal were studied. The results suggest that the main phases of the iron oxide surface are magnetite, maghemite, hematite, and goethite; fine and uniform iron oxide particles can cover activated carbon surfaces and affect the surface area or pore structures of activated carbon; adsorption kinetics obey a pseudo-first-order rate equation; and adsorption capacities of adsorbents are affected by the values of pH. The optimum value of pH for iron oxide lies in a narrow range between 4.0 and 5.5, and arsenic(V) removal by FeO/activated carbon-H is ideal and stable in the pH range 3 to 7, while activated carbon has the lowest adsorption capacity in the entire pH range. Also, the adsorption characteristics of FeO/activated carbon-H composites and virgin activated carbon match well the Langmuir adsorption model, while those of iron oxide fit well the Freundlich adsorption model.

  4. Electrically conductive reticulated carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, A.P.; Clough, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports a new type of electrically conductive composite which offers advantageous properties and controlled processing. These new composites consist of a conductive open-celled, low-density, microcellular, carbonized foam filled with a nonconductive polymer or resin. The open-celled nature of the carbon foam provides a porous three-dimensional reticulated carbon structure. The large continuous-void volume can be readily filled with an insulating polymer or resin resulting in a three-dimensional conductive composite material. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Dissolution of carbon from alumina-carbon mixtures into liquid iron: Influence of carbonaceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Rita; Sahajwalla, Veena; Rodgers, Brenton; McCarthy, Fiona

    2006-08-01

    Due to their excellent thermal shock and wear resistance at high temperatures, alumina-carbon based refractories are used extensively in the steel industry. A clear understanding of factors affecting the dissolution of carbon from refractories is of crucial importance, as carbon depletion from the refractory can significantly deteriorate refractory performance and metal quality. Atomistic simulations on the alumina-graphite/liquid iron system have shown that nonwetting between alumina and liquid iron is an important factor inhibiting the penetration of liquid metal in the refractory matrix and limiting carbon dissolution. This study investigates the role played by the carbonaceous material in the dissolution of carbon from the refractory composite. Two carbonaceous materials, namely, petroleum coke and natural graphite, respectively, containing 0.35 and 5.26 pct ash, were used in this study. Substrates were prepared from mixtures of alumina and carbon over a wide concentration range. Using a sessile drop arrangement, carbon pickup by liquid iron from alumina-carbon mixtures was measured at 1550 °C and was compared with the carbon pickup from alumina-synthetic graphite mixtures. These studies were supplemented with wettability measurements and microscopic investigations on the interfacial region. For high alumina concentrations (>40 wt pct), carbon dissolution from refractory mixtures was found to be negligible for all carbonaceous materials under investigation. Significant differences however were observed at lower alumina concentrations. Carbon dissolution from alumina-petroleum coke mixtures was much lower than the corresponding dissolution from alumina synthetic graphite-mixtures and was attributed to poor wettability of petroleum coke with liquid iron, its structural disorder, and the presence of sulfur. Very high levels of carbon dissolution, however, were observed from alumina-natural graphite mixtures, with carbon pickup by liquid iron from mixtures with up

  6. Fabrication of Iron-Containing Carbon Materials From Graphite Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh

    1996-01-01

    Carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, iron oxide or iron halide were fabricated. Typical samples of these metals were estimated to contain 1 iron atom per 3.5 to 5 carbon atoms. Those carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, and/or Fe3O4 were magnetic. The kinetics of the fabrication process were studied by exposing graphite fluoride (CF(0.68)) to FeCl3 over a 280 to 420 C temperature range. Between 280 and 295 C, FeCl3 quickly entered the structure of CF(0.68), broke the carbon-fluorine bonds, and within 10 to 30 min, completely converted it to carbon made up of graphite planes between which particles of crystalline FeF3 and noncrystalline FeCl3 were located. Longer reaction times (e.g., 28 hr) or higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 420 C) produced materials containing graphite, a FeCl3-graphite intercalation compound, FeCl2(center dot)4H2O, and FeCl2(center dot)2H2O. These products were further heat treated to produce iron-containing carbon materials. When the heating temperature was kept in the 750 to 850 C range, and the oxygen supply was kept at the optimum level, the iron halides in the carbon structure were converted to iron oxides. Raising the heat to temperatures higher than 900 C reduced such iron oxides to iron metal. The kinetics of these reactions were used to suggest processes for fabricating carbon materials containing iron alloy. Such processes were then tested experimentally. In one of the successful trial runs, commercially purchased CF(0.7) powder was used as the reactant, and NiO was added during the final heating to 1200 C as a source of both nickel and oxygen. The product thus obtained was magnetic and was confirmed to be a nickel-iron alloy in carbon.

  7. Nitrogen isotopic compositions of iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prombo, Carol A.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1993-01-01

    Iron meteorites analyzed in this study have nitrogen concentrations 70 microg/g or less and delta N-15 from -90 to +150 percent. Although the iron meteorites have a large range of delta N-15, most have values more negative than -50 percent. The nitrogen isotopic compositions were established by cosmochemical processes and were little modified by fractional crystallization or other chemical processes within the parent bodies. The data do not suggest the existence of a well-mixed solar nebular reservoir for nitrogen, as was already inferred from data from stony meteorites. The range of greater than 1100 percent observed for delta N-15 in bulk meteorites is probably too large to be accounted for by physical and chemical mass-dependent fractionation processes in the solar nebula, and thus reflects nebular inhomogeneities of nucleosynthetic origin.

  8. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  9. Construction of an improved amperometric acrylamide biosensor based on hemoglobin immobilized onto carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes/iron oxide nanoparticles/chitosan composite film.

    PubMed

    Batra, Bhawna; Lata, Suman; Pundir, C S

    2013-11-01

    A method is described for construction of an improved amperometric acrylamide biosensor based on covalent immobilization of hemoglobin (Hb) onto nanocomposite of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (cMWCNT) and iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4NPs) electrodeposited onto Au electrode through chitosan (CHIT) film. The Hb/cMWCNT-Fe3O4NP/CHIT/Au electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and differential pulse voltammetry at different stages of its construction. The biosensor was based on interaction between acrylamide and Hb, which led to decrease in the electroactivity of Hb, i.e., current generated during its reversible conversion [Fe(II)/Fe(III)]. The biosensor showed optimum response within 8 s at pH 5.0 and 30 °C. The linear working range for acrylamide was 3-90 nM, with a detection limit of 0.02 nM and sensitivity of 36.9 μA/nM/cm(2). The biosensor was evaluated and employed for determination of acrylamide in potato crisps.

  10. Fracture Toughness of Carbon/Carbon Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-27

    during which tensile stresses develop in the matrix as a result of the thermal expansion coefficient differential between the matrix and yarns. In...thermal expansion differential . Figure 3.4 depicts the sample surface along the R-C plane. The circumferential yarns are horizontal and the radial yarns...Milieko), Elsevier, Amsterdam, (1981), pp. 109-175. 5 126 3 U 127 16). C.T. Robinson, "Damage Mechanisums and Failure of 3-D Carbon-Carbon Composites," SRI

  11. Mechanical behavior of carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozak, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A general background, test plan, and some results of preliminary examinations of a carbon-carbon composite material are presented with emphasis on mechanical testing and inspection techniques. Experience with testing and evaluation was gained through tests of a low modulus carbon-carbon material, K-Karb C. The properties examined are the density - 1.55 g/cc; four point flexure strength in the warp - 137 MPa (19,800 psi) and the fill - 95.1 MPa (13,800 psi,) directions; and the warp interlaminar shear strength - 14.5 MPa (2100 psi). Radiographic evaluation revealed thickness variations and the thinner areas of the composite were scrapped. The ultrasonic C-scan showed attenuation variations, but these did not correspond to any of the physical and mechanical properties measured. Based on these initial tests and a survey of the literature, a plan has been devised to examine the effect of stress on the oxidation behavior, and the strength degradation of coated carbon-carbon composites. This plan will focus on static fatigue tests in the four point flexure mode in an elevated temperature, oxidizing environment.

  12. Resistivity of Carbon-Carbon Composites Halved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites have become the material of choice for applications requiring strength and stiffness at very high temperatures (above 2000 C). These composites comprise carbon or graphite fibers embedded in a carbonized or graphitized matrix. In some applications, such as shielding sensitive electronics in very high temperature environments, the performance of these materials would be improved by lowering their electrical resistivity. One method to lower the resistivity of the composites is to lower the resistivity of the graphite fibers, and a proven method to accomplish that is intercalation. Intercalation is the insertion of guest atoms or molecules into a host lattice. In this study the host fibers were highly graphitic pitch-based graphite fibers, or vapor-grown carbon fibers (VGCF), and the intercalate was bromine. Intercalation compounds of graphite are generally thought of as being only metastable, but it has been shown that the residual bromine graphite fiber intercalation compound is remarkably stable, resisting decomposition even at temperatures at least as high as 1000 C. The focus of this work was to fabricate composite preforms, determine whether the fibers they were made from were still intercalated with bromine after processing, and determine the effect on composite resistivity. It was not expected that the resistivity would be lowered as dramatically as with graphite polymer composites because the matrix itself would be much more conductive, but it was hoped that the gains would be substantial enough to warrant its use in high-performance applications. In a collaborative effort supporting a Space Act Agreement between the NASA Glenn Research Center and Applied Sciences, Inc. (Cedarville, OH), laminar preforms were fabricated with pristine and bromine-intercalated pitch-based fibers (P100 and P100-Br) and VGCF (Pyro I and Pyro I-Br). The green preforms were carbonized at 1000 C and then heat treated to 3000 C. To determine whether the

  13. Process of making carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Kowbel, Witold (Inventor); Bruce, Calvin (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A carbon composite structure, for example, an automotive engine piston, is made by preparing a matrix including of a mixture of non crystalline carbon particulate soluble in an organic solvent and a binder that has a liquid phase. The non crystalline particulate also contains residual carbon hydrogen bonding. An uncured structure is formed by combining the matrix mixture, for example, carbon fibers such as graphite dispersed in the mixture and/or graphite cloth imbedded in the mixture. The uncured structure is cured by pyrolyzing it in an inert atmosphere such as argon. Advantageously, the graphite reinforcement material is whiskered prior to combining it with the matrix mixture by a novel method involving passing a gaseous metal suboxide over the graphite surface.

  14. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  15. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    1998-07-07

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

  16. Wear and Friction Behavior of Metal Impregnated Microporous Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goller, Gultekin; Koty, D. P.; Tewari, S. N.; Singh, M.; Tekin, A.

    1996-01-01

    Metal-matrix composites have been prepared by pressure-infiltration casting of copper-base alloy melts into microporous carbon preforms. The carbon preforms contained varying proportions of amorphous carbon and graphite. Load dependence of the wear and friction behavior of the composite pins has been examined under ambient conditions against cast-iron plates, using a pin-on-plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance of the composite is significantly improved, as compared with the base alloy. Contrary to the normally expected behavior, the addition of graphite to the amorphous carbon does not reduce the friction coefficient, especially at high loads. The wear and friction behavior of the composites is very sensitive to the size and distribution of the microstructural constituents.

  17. Wear and friction behavior of metal impregnated microporous carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Goller, G.; Koty, D.P.; Tewari, S.N.; Singh, M.; Tekin, A.

    1996-11-01

    Metal-matrix composites have been prepared by pressure-infiltration casting of copper-base alloy melts into microporous carbon preforms. The carbon preforms contained varying proportions of amorphous carbon and graphite. Load dependence of the wear and friction behavior of the composite pins has been examined under ambient conditions against cast-iron plates, using a pin-on-plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance of the composite is significantly improved, as compared with the base alloy. Contrary to the normally expected behavior, the addition of graphite to the amorphous carbon does not reduce the friction coefficient, especially at high loads. The wear and friction behavior of the composites is very sensitive to the size and distribution of the microstructural constituents.

  18. Parameterized electronic description of carbon cohesion in iron grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Nicholas; Madsen, Georg K H; Drautz, Ralf

    2014-04-09

    We employ a recently developed iron-carbon orthogonal tight-binding model in calculations of carbon in iron grain boundaries. We use the model to evaluate the properties of carbon near and on the Σ5 (3 1 0)[0 0 1] symmetric tilt grain boundary (GB) in iron, and calculations show that a carbon atom lowers the GB energy by 0.29 eV/atom in accordance with DFT. Carbon segregation to the GB is analyzed, and we find an energy barrier of 0.92 eV for carbon to segregate to the carbon-free interface while segregation to a fully filled interface is disfavored. Local volume (via Voronoi tessellation), magnetic, and electronic effects are correlated with atomic energy changes, and we isolate two different mechanisms governing carbon's behavior in iron: a volumetric strain which increases the energy of carbon in interstitial α iron and a non-strained local bonding which stabilizes carbon at the GB.

  19. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  20. Equilibrium carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [1-3]) have suggested that Si- and Fe-isotopic signatures can be used to characterize the compositions and conditions of segregation of metallic cores in planetary interiors. This study expands the theoretical framework to include carbon and hydrogen, which may also be alloying elements. Hydrogen (D/H) and carbon (13C/12C) fractionations in iron-rich metallic melts are estimated by modeling analogous iron-rich crystals, i.e., dhcp-FeH and η-Fe2C. C- and H-atoms in these crystals are completely coordinated by iron. The driving energy for equilibrium fractionation is assumed to come from the reduction of vibrational frequencies when heavy isotopes are substituted for light ones; vibrations are assumed to be harmonic. This treatment is crude at high temperature, and for the relatively anharmonic vibrations typical of hydrogen-bearing substances, but may provide a reasonably accurate, semi-quantitative approximation of real fractionation behavior. Vibrational frequencies of all crystals are modeled with density functional theory, using gradient-corrected functionals and ultrasoft pseudopotentials. For both carbon and hydrogen, the models suggest that the metal phase will be strongly depleted in heavy isotopes. At 2000 K, 1 atm, η-Fe2C will have 3‰ lower 13C/12C than coexisting diamond. Combining this result with previous high-temperature theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [4]), metal-graphite fractionation is expected to be very similar, while metal-CO2 fractionation will be almost twice as large, ca. -5‰. Deuterium/hydrogen fractionations are expected to be an order of magnitude larger, with 50-70‰ lower D/H in dhcp-FeH than in coexisting H2 gas at 2000 K, and approximately 100‰ lower D/H than water vapor. These fractionations are much larger than those inferred for silicon and iron, as expected given the differences in atomic mass. References: 1. Georg et al. (2007) Nature 447:1102; 2. Rustad & Yin

  1. Interstitially protected oxidation resistant carbon-carbon composite

    SciTech Connect

    Strangman, T.E.; Keiser, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    The carbon fiber bundles in a carbon-carbon composite are protected against oxidation by coating the fiber bundles with at least one protective layer consisting of an underlayer portion of boron carbide and an overlayer portion of silicon carbide.

  2. Pistons and Cylinders Made of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved reciprocating internal combustion engine has a plurality of engine pistons, which are fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials, in operative association with an engine cylinder block, or an engine cylinder tube, or an engine cylinder jug, all of which are also fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials.

  3. The relationship between the iron isotopic composition of human whole blood and iron status parameters.

    PubMed

    Van Heghe, Lana; Delanghe, Joris; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2013-11-01

    As the iron status of an individual cannot be adequately assessed on the basis of the (total) Fe concentration in whole blood or serum, in medicine a number of parameters, such as the serum concentrations of ferritin, transferrin and soluble transferrin receptor and the transferrin saturation, are routinely determined instead. As previous research has shown that also the isotopic composition of Fe in blood and tissues is dependent on the metabolism, the present study assessed whether Fe isotopic composition in whole blood provides information as to an individual's iron status. Fe isotopic analysis of whole blood samples from a reference population (healthy volunteers) was carried out using multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (after chromatographic target element isolation) and the results obtained were investigated by statistical means as to their potential relation with the iron status parameters conventionally used in medicine. A low δ(56)Fe value was demonstrated to coincide with high iron status and a high δ(56)Fe value with low iron status, thus reflecting the response of the body to this iron status in terms of iron uptake, distribution between blood and stores and mobilization of storage iron. In a second phase, the iron isotopic composition in blood from patients treated for hemochromatosis type I and from patients with anemia of chronic disease (ACD) was determined. The results for hemochromatosis patients plotted with the values of low iron status, while those for ACD patients plotted with the values of high iron status. By taking a closer look at the aberrant iron metabolism that comes with these diseases, it can be seen that the patient samples confirm the conclusions drawn for the reference population. Patients with hemochromatosis type I have a strongly upregulated iron uptake, like healthy individuals with low iron status. The metabolism of patients suffering from ACD tries to remove iron from the circulation by downregulating the iron uptake

  4. Iron Hydroxy Carbonate Formation in Zerovalent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: Characterization and Evaluation of Phase Stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently obs...

  5. Iron and carbon metabolism by a mineral-oxidizing Alicyclobacillus-like bacterium.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Adibah; Hallberg, Kevin B; Johnson, D Barrie

    2008-04-01

    A novel iron-oxidizing, moderately thermophilic, acidophilic bacterium (strain "GSM") was isolated from mineral spoil taken from a gold mine in Montana. Biomolecular analysis showed that it was most closely related to Alicyclobacillus tolerans, although the two bacteria differed in some key respects, including the absence (in strain GSM) of varpi-alicyclic fatty acids and in their chromosomal base compositions. Isolate GSM was able to grow in oxygen-free media using ferric iron as terminal electron acceptor confirming that it was a facultative anaerobe, a trait not previously described in Alicyclobacillus spp.. The acidophile used both organic and inorganic sources of energy and carbon, although growth and iron oxidation by isolate GSM was uncoupled in media that contained both fructose and ferrous iron. Fructose utilization suppressed iron oxidation, and oxidation of ferrous iron occurred only when fructose was depleted. In contrast, fructose catabolism was suppressed when bacteria were harvested while actively oxidizing iron, suggesting that both ferrous iron- and fructose-oxidation are inducible in this acidophile. Isolate GSM accelerated the oxidative dissolution of pyrite in liquid media either free of, or amended with, organic carbon, although redox potentials were significantly different in these media. The potential of this isolate for commercial mineral processing is discussed.

  6. Tensile Strength of Carbon/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Hiroshi; Aoi, Tatsuji; Kawahara, Itaru; Kogo, Yasuo; Shiota, Ichiro

    In order to identify ruling mechanisms of tensile fracture of Carbon/Carbon composites (C/Cs), tensile tests were carried out for various C/Cs as functions of the density, heat treatment temperature, and interfacial strength between fiber and matrix. Three processing routes of preformed yarn, resin char, and HIP processes were adopted to densify C/Cs. These C/Cs were finally heat-treated at temperatures from 2273K to 3300K. The interfacial strength between fiber and matrix was varied by the selection of processing routes. As a result, two ruling failure mechanisms were identified. At density lower than 1.6g/cm3, the tensile fracture was controlled by stress transfer capability from the matrix to reinforcing fibers. However, at higher density than 1.6g/cm3, tensile strength was primarily governed by the interfacial strength between the matrix and fibers. Thus the latter mechanism is nearly same as ceramic matrix composites.

  7. Iron-carbon compacts and process for making them

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes iron-carbon compacts and a process for making them. The process includes preparing a slurry comprising iron powder, furfuryl alcohol, and a polymerization catalyst for initiating the polymerization of the furfuryl alcohol into a resin, and heating the slurry to convert the alcohol into the resin. The resulting mixture is pressed into a green body and heated to form the iron-carbon compact. The compact can be used as, or machined into, a magnetic flux concentrator for an induction heating apparatus.

  8. Iron-carbon compacts and process for making them

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinberg, H.

    2000-07-25

    The present invention includes iron-carbon compacts and a process for making them. The process includes preparing a slurry comprising iron powder, furfuryl alcohol, and a polymerization catalyst for initiating the polymerization of the furfuryl alcohol into a resin, and heating the slurry to convert the alcohol into the resin. The resulting mixture is pressed into a green body and heated to form the iron-carbon compact. The compact can be used as, or machined into, a magnetic flux concentrator for an induction heating apparatus.

  9. Ruthenium Isotopic Composition of Terrestrial Materials, Iron Meteorites and Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, H.; Walker, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Ru isotopic compositions of magmatic iron meteorites and chondrites overlap with terrestrial Ru at the 0.3 to 0.9 (epsilon) level. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Structure and ductility of eutectic type iron-carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizhnikovskaya, P. F.

    1984-09-01

    The ductility of iron-carbon alloys of the eutectic type is governed by the structure of eutectic carbides and it may be increased by two methods. The first envisages formation during prior heat treatment of dislocations in eutectic carbides and creation of subgrain boundaries along which during deformation there is carbide fragmentation. This method, as a result of the specific effect of the metal base on formation of dislocations in carbides and prevention of carbide failure under the action of compressive stresses from the surrounding solid solution, may only be used for alloys in which the carbide phase reinforces a metal matrix. The second method involves a marked increase in carbide ductility as a result of transformation occurring in them under the action of deformation [10]. This method may be used to increase the ductility of cast irons around the eutectic composition with eutectics whose matrix phase is carbide. In this way forming may be accomplished by rolling in the range of rates used in metallurgical production practice.

  11. Composition and origin of the unusual Oktibbeha County iron meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kracher, A.; Willis, J.

    1981-01-01

    Oktibbeha County, the most Ni-rich iron meteorite, has been analyzed for Ni, Co, Cu, Ga, Ge, As, Sb, Ir, and Au. Cu and Sb are higher than in any other iron, but other trace elements are within the ranges typically found in iron meteorites. Extrapolation of trace element trends in group IAB indicates that Oktibbeha County is a member of this group. This sheds light on the origin of groups IAB and IIICD, which are thought to be derived from impact melts on parent bodies of chondritic composition. Lafayette (iron), another sample reported in the literature to have a similarly high Ni content, is probably a pseudometeorite.

  12. The Preparation and Reduction Behavior of Charcoal Composite Iron Oxide Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Hirokazu; Usui, Tateo; Harada, Takeshi

    In the energy conversion, biomass has novel advantage, i.e., no CO2 emission, because of carbon neutral. Charcoal composite iron oxide pellets were proposed to decrease CO2 emission for the ironmaking. These pellets were promising to decrease the initial temperature for reduction reaction of carbon composite iron ore agglomerate under a rising temperature condition, such as in a blast furnace shaft. In order to obtain charcoal, Japanese cedar and cypress were carbonized from room temperature to maximum carbonization temperature (TC, max = 1273 K) at a heating rate of 200 K/h, and kept at TC, max until arrival time of 6 h. Reducing gases of CO and CH4 started releasing from relatively low temperature (500 K). In the total gas volume of carbonization, H2 gas of Japanese cedar was more than that of Japanese cypress. These woods have more CO gas volume than Newcastle blend coal has. The obtained charcoal was mixed with reagent grade hematite in the mass ratio of one to four. Then, a small amount of Bentonite was added to the mixture as a binder, and the charcoal composite iron oxide pellets were prepared and reduced at 1273, 1373 and 1473 K in nitrogen gas atmosphere. It was conirmed by the generated gas analysis during reduction reaction that charcoal composite iron oxide pellets had higher reducibility than char composite pellets using Newcastle blend coal. From the XRD analysis of the reduced pellets, it was found that the original Fe2O3 was almost reduced to Fe for 60 min at 1273 K, 20 min at 1373 K and 5~15 min at 1473 K.

  13. Enriched Iron(III)-Reducing Bacterial Communities are Shaped by Carbon Substrate and Iron Oxide Mineralogy.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Christopher J; Wankel, Scott D; Hansel, Colleen M

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) oxides exist in a spectrum of structures in the environment, with ferrihydrite widely considered the most bioavailable phase. Yet, ferrihydrite is unstable and rapidly transforms to more crystalline Fe(III) oxides (e.g., goethite, hematite), which are poorly reduced by model dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms. This begs the question, what processes and microbial groups are responsible for reduction of crystalline Fe(III) oxides within sedimentary environments? Further, how do changes in Fe mineralogy shape oxide-hosted microbial populations? To address these questions, we conducted a large-scale cultivation effort using various Fe(III) oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite) and carbon substrates (glucose, lactate, acetate) along a dilution gradient to enrich for microbial populations capable of reducing Fe oxides spanning a wide range of crystallinities and reduction potentials. While carbon source was the most important variable shaping community composition within Fe(III)-reducing enrichments, both Fe oxide type and sediment dilution also had a substantial influence. For instance, with acetate as the carbon source, only ferrihydrite enrichments displayed a significant amount of Fe(III) reduction and the well-known dissimilatory metal reducer Geobacter sp. was the dominant organism enriched. In contrast, when glucose and lactate were provided, all three Fe oxides were reduced and reduction coincided with the presence of fermentative (e.g., Enterobacter spp.) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., Desulfovibrio spp.). Thus, changes in Fe oxide structure and resource availability may shift Fe(III)-reducing communities between dominantly metal-respiring to fermenting and/or sulfate-reducing organisms which are capable of reducing more recalcitrant Fe phases. These findings highlight the need for further targeted investigations into the composition and activity of speciation-directed metal-reducing populations within natural environments.

  14. Removal of copper from carbon-saturated steel with an aluminum sulfide/iron sulfide slag

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.; Blander, M.

    1995-12-01

    Scrap iron and steel has long been considered a resource in the steel-making industry, and its value is largely determined by its impurity content. As the mini-mills, the major consumers of scrap iron and steel, expand into producing flat-rolled sheet, the demand for high-quality scrap will increase. Of the impurities present in scrap, copper is particularly troublesome because of its role in causing hot shortness. Therefore, the copper content of scrap should be kept below {approx} 0.1 wt%. A method for removing copper from steel could be used to improve the quality of scrap and make it more available for use by mini-mills. To determine the effectiveness of a binary slag consisting of aluminum sulfide and iron sulfide on the removal of copper from steel and iron, the distribution coefficient of copper between the slag and a carbon-saturated iron melt was investigated at 1,365 C. The composition of the slag was varied from nearly pure aluminum sulfide to pure iron sulfide. A maximum distribution coefficient of 30 was found, and the copper level in the iron melt was reduced to as low as 0.07 wt.% with a 4:1 ratio of iron to slag.

  15. Chromium removal by combining the magnetic properties of iron oxide with adsorption properties of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K; Agarwal, Shilpi; Saleh, Tawfik A

    2011-03-01

    The adsorption features of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with the magnetic properties of iron oxides have been combined in a composite to produce a magnetic adsorbent. Composites of MWCNT/nano-iron oxide were prepared, and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). XRD suggests that the magnetic phase formed is maghemite and/or magnetite. FESEM image shows nano-iron oxides attached to a network of MWCNTs. The adsorption capability of the composites was tested in batch and fixed bed modes. The composites have demonstrated a superior adsorption capability to that of activated carbon. The results also show that the adsorptions of Cr(III) on the composites is strongly dependent on contact time, agitation speed and pH, in the batch mode; and on flow rate and the bed thickness in the fixed bed mode. Along with the high surface area of the MWCNTs, the advantage of the magnetic composite is that it can be used as adsorbent for contaminants in water and can be subsequently controlled and removed from the medium by a simple magnetic process.

  16. Toughening mechanisms in iron-containing hydroxyapatite/titanium composites.

    PubMed

    Chang, Q; Chen, D L; Ru, H Q; Yue, X Y; Yu, L; Zhang, C P

    2010-03-01

    Pure hydroxyapatite (HA) is brittle and it cannot be directly used for the load-bearing biomedical applications. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a new iron-containing HA/titanium composite via pressureless sintering at a relatively low temperature with particular emphasis on identifying the underlying toughening mechanisms. The addition of iron to HA/titanium composites led to a unique and favorable core/shell microstructure of Ti-Fe particles that consisted of outer titanium and inner iron, and good interfacial bonding with HA matrix. While the relative density, hardness and Young's modulus reduced, the flexural strength, fracture toughness, fatigue resistance, and the related fracture surface roughness increased significantly with increasing amount of Ti-Fe particles. Different toughening mechanisms including crack bridging, branching and deflection were observed in the composites, thus effectively increasing the crack propagation resistance and resulting in a substantial improvement in the mechanical properties of the composites.

  17. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Beukes, N J; Klein, C; Kaufman, A J; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  18. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beukes, N. J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  19. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  20. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid partides being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  1. Method for fabricating composite carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

  2. Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-04-27

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  3. Carbon in the Metal of Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, N.; Beckett, J. R.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Stolper, E. M.

    1996-03-01

    Magmatic iron meteorites (e.g., group IIIAB) are believed to represent the slowly cooled cores of asteroidal-sized bodies. Concentration gradients of Ni in taenite (gamma-alloy) adjacent to kamacite (alpha-alloy) have been studied extensively following the early work of Wood and Goldstein and Ogilvie, and can be used to constrain the rate at which the meteorite cooled through -700 degrees-400 degrees C. Studies on non-anomalous irons have also shown zoning profiles in C, Co, Cu, Zn, Ga, and Ge. Zoning patterns of elements other than Ni can provide independent constraints on the thermal histories of iron meteorites at lower temperatures, provided as in the case of C, N and P, that the elements diffuse significantly faster than Ni. We report here ion microprobe measurements of the distribution

  4. Response of carbon-carbon composites to challenging environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.; Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Barrett, David M.; Ransone, Philip O.; Sawyer, J. Wayne

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results from material performance evaluations of oxidation-resistant carbon-carbon composites intended for multiuse aerospace applications, which cover the effects of the following environmental parameters: the oxidizing nature of the environments (including both high and low oxygen partial pressures), high temperatures, moisture, cyclic temperature service, and foreign-object impact. Results are presented for the carbon-carbon material currently in use as the thermal-protection-system material on Space Shuttle, as well as for newer and more advanced structural forms of carbon-carbon composites.

  5. Multifunctional carbon nano-paper composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhichun; Chu, Hetao; Wang, Kuiwen; Liu, Yanjv; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-08-01

    Carbon Nanotube (CNT), for its excellent mechanical, electrical properties and nano size, large special surface physical property, become the most promising material. But carbon nanotube can still fabricated in micro dimension, and can't be made into macro size, so to the carbon nanotube filled composite can't explore the properties of the CNT. Carbon nano-paper is made of pure CNT, with micro pore, and it turn micro sized CNT into macro shaped membrane. Based on the piezo-resistivity and electrical conductivity of the carbon nano-paper, we used the carbon nano-paper as functional layers fabricate functional composite, and studies its strain sensing, composite material deicing and shape memory polymer (SMP) material electric actuation performance. The results shown that the resin can pregnant the nano paper, and there was good bond for nano paper and composite. The functional composite can monitoring the strain with high sensitivity comparing to foil strain gauge. The functional composite can be heated via the carbon nano paper with low power supply and high heating rate. The composite has good deicing and heat actuation performance to composite material. For the good strain sensing, electric conductivity and self-heating character of the carbon nano-paper composite, it can be used for self sensing, anti lightning strike and deicing of composite materials in aircrafts and wind turbine blades.

  6. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  7. Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1997-07-15

    A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to ``wick`` into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy. 1 fig.

  8. Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to "wick" into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy.

  9. Thermodynamics of the iron-carbon-zinc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wenzhong; Schlesinger, Mark E.

    1994-08-01

    A two-zone isopiestic experimental technique was used to determine the solubility of zinc vapor in liquid and solid iron-carbon alloys as a function of zinc partial pressure (0.1 to 1 atm), carbon content (0 to 4.6 wt Pct), and temperature (1473 to 1873 K). The solubility of zinc at a given partial pressure decreases with both increasing temperature and carbon content in both liquid alloys and solid austenite; its activity in these solutions, and in pure δ-ferrite, deviates more positively from ideality than previous model-based predictions have suggested. The Bale-Pelton unified interaction parameter formalism was successfully applied to the results of liquid-alloy experiments, but the degree of experimental scatter in the austenite equilibrations was too great to allow its application in the calculation of solid-solution iron-carbon-zinc thermodynamic parameters. Using the available results, values were calculated for the equilibrium partition coefficient K zn in solidifying iron-carbon alloys as a function of alloy carbon content; the results suggest that significant segregation of zinc between solid and liquid phases is not likely.

  10. Carbo-Iron - An Fe/AC composite - As alternative to nano-iron for groundwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Katrin; Bleyl, Steffen; Georgi, Anett; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2012-08-01

    Carbo-Iron(®)(1) is a novel colloidal composite consisting of activated carbon colloids (ACC) with a d(50) particle size of 0.8 μm and anchored deposits of zero-valent iron clusters. This study discusses the principal material properties of Carbo-Iron colloids (CIC) relevant for groundwater treatment in comparison to commercially available nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI). CIC with 10-25 wt% Fe(0) have been developed and tested in laboratory studies for their suitability as dehalogenation reagent and are especially designed to overcome some limitations known from the utilization of nZVI: CIC combine the sorption properties of ACC and the chemical reactivity of nZVI. In column tests, flushed-in CIC showed an enhanced mobility in sediment material compared to nZVI, without the need for colloid stabilizers. However, adding 1-3 wt-% of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) related to CIC as colloid stabilizer was found to assure long-lived stable suspensions under laboratory conditions which may additionally support the already improved mobility of the CIC and the homogeneity of particle deposition on the sediment matrix. The hydrophobic character of the ACC carrier provides a high affinity of CIC to non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). In undisturbed flow, the reactive particles are collected at the water-NAPL interface. The reagent accumulation at the organic phase is necessary for a successful source attack.

  11. Iron Cycling at Corroding Carbon Steel Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    transport chain in anaerobic respiration , or by using Fe3+ as an electron sink during fermentation. FeRB can be either strict anaerobes (eg members of the...acceptors in anaerobic respiration . Coleman et al. (1993) demonstrated that some sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB) can reduce Fe3+. Investigators have...the presence of CS, aerobically grown FeOB produced tight, twisted helical stalks encrusted with iron oxides. When CS was exposed anaerobically in the

  12. [Study on implant material of carbon/carbon composites].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohui; Yu, Shu; Zhu, Shaihong; Liu, Yong; Miu, Yunliang; Huang, Boyun

    2010-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the biocompatibility and mechanical property of carbon/carbon composites. At first, carbon/carbon composites were prepared by chemical vapor deposition, and the mechanical property of carbon/carbon composites was tested. The biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites was evaluated by cytotoxicity test, sensitization test, micronucleus test and implantation test. Mechanical property test showed such carbon/carbon composites are of good compression property and tension property. Cytotoxicity test showed that the leaching liquor of samples has no effect on the growth and proliferation of L-929 cells. The medullary micronucleus frequency of mouse was 2.3 per thousand +/- 0.7 per thousand in experiment group. The sensitization test showed that the skin of the subjects of experiment group had slight erythema and edema, which was 0.188 +/- 0.40 according to Magnusson and Kligman classification. Implantation test revealed that there was slight inflammation around the tissue after the implantation of sample. At 12 weeks, scanning electron microscopy and histopathological exam indicated that the samples of experiment group were of good histocompatibility; and in comparison with control group, there was no significant differences (P > 0.05). So these kinds of samples have good biocompatibility, mechanical property and prospects of clinical application.

  13. Formation of magnetite and iron-rich carbonates by thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Liu, S.; Roh, Y.; Cole, D.; Phelps, T.; Vali, H.; Kirschvink, J.L.; Onsttot, T.; McKay, D.

    1997-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the formation of iron minerals by a thermophilic (45 to 75 C) fermentative iron-reducing bacterial culture (TOR39) obtained from the deep subsurface. Using amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide as an electron acceptor and glucose as an electron donor, TOR39 produced magnetite and iron-rich carbonates at conditions consistent, on a thermodynamic basis, with Eh ({minus}200 mV to {minus}415 mV) and pH (6.2 to 7.7) values determined for these experiments. Analyses of the precipitating solid phases by X-ray diffraction showed that the starting amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide was nearly completely converted to magnetite and Fe-rich carbonate after 20 days of incubation. Increasing bicarbonate concentration in the chemical milieu resulted in increased proportions of siderite relative to magnetite and the addition of MgCl{sub 2} caused the formation of magnesium-rich carbonate in addition to siderite. The results suggest that the TOR39 bacterial culture may have the capacity to form magnetite and iron-rich carbonates in a variety of geochemical conditions. These results may have significant implications for studying the past biogenic activities in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  14. Lithographically defined microporous carbon-composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-12-06

    A microporous carbon scaffold is produced by lithographically patterning a carbon-containing photoresist, followed by pyrolysis of the developed resist structure. Prior to exposure, the photoresist is loaded with a nanoparticulate material. After pyrolysis, the nanonparticulate material is dispersed in, and intimately mixed with, the carbonaceous material of the scaffold, thereby yielding a carbon composite structure.

  15. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Junqing (Inventor); Newman, Aron (Inventor); Lennhoff, John (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A carbon nanofiber can have a surface and include at least one crystalline whisker extending from the surface of the carbon nanofiber. A battery anode composition can be formed from a plurality of carbon nanofibers each including a plurality of crystalline whiskers.

  16. Development of carbon-carbon composites from solvent extracted pitch

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-24

    There are several methods used to fabricate carbon-carbon composites. One used extensively in the fabrication of aerospace components such as rocket nozzles and reentry vehicle nosetips, as well as commercial components for furnace fixturing and glass manufacturing, is the densification of a woven preform with molten pitch, and the subsequent conversion of the pitch to graphite through heat treatment. Two types of pitch are used in this process; coal tar pitch and petroleum pitch. The objective of this program was to determine if a pitch produced by the direct extraction of coal could be used as a substitute for these pitches in the fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. The program involved comparing solvent extracted pitch with currently accepted pitches and rigidizing a carbon-carbon preform with solvent extracted pitch for comparison with carbon-carbon fabricated with currently available pitch.

  17. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

  19. Prospects for using carbon-carbon composites for EMI shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Since pyrolyzed carbon has a higher electrical conductivity than most polymers, carbon-carbon composites would be expected to have higher electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding ability than polymeric resin composites. A rule of mixtures model of composite conductivity was used to calculate the effect on EMI shielding of substituting a pyrolyzed carbon matrix for a polymeric matrix. It was found that the improvements were small, no more than about 2 percent for the lowest conductivity fibers (ex-rayon) and less than 0.2 percent for the highest conductivity fibers (vapor grown carbon fibers). The structure of the rule of mixtures is such that the matrix conductivity would only be important in those cases where it is much higher than the fiber conductivity, as in metal matrix composites.

  20. Method of Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for forming a carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines is discussed. The process includes the steps of braiding carbon fiber into a rope thereby forming a cylindrically shaped valve stem portion and continuing to braid said fiber while introducing into the braiding carbon fiber rope a carbon matrix plug having an outer surface in a net shape of a valve head thereby forming a valve head portion. The said carbon matrix plug acting as a mandrel over which said carbon fiber rope is braided, said carbon fiber rope and carbon matrix plug forming a valve head portion suitable for mating with a valve seat; cutting said braided carbon valve stem portion at one end to form a valve tip and cutting said braided carbon fiber after said valve head portion to form a valve face and thus provide a composite valve preform; and densifying said preform by embedding the braided carbon in a matrix of carbon to convert said valve stem portion to a valve stem and said valve head portion to a valve head thereby providing said composite valve.

  1. Structural investigation of carbon/carbon composites by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prem, Manfred; Krexner, Gerhard; Peterlik, Herwig

    2006-11-01

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) composite material was investigated by means of small-angle as well as wide-angle elastic neutron scattering. The C/C-composites were built up from bi-directionally woven fabrics from PAN-based carbon fibers. Pre-impregnation with phenolic resin was followed by pressure curing and carbonization at 1000 °C and a final heat treatment at either 1800 or 2400 °C. Measurements of the samples were performed in orientations arranging the carbon fibers, respectively, parallel and perpendicular to the incoming beam. Structural features of the fibers as well as the inherently existing pores are presented and the influence of the heat treatment is discussed. The results are compared to earlier X-ray investigations of carbon fibers and C/C-composites.

  2. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  3. Effect of carbon content on friction and wear of cast irons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with cast irons and wrought steels containing various amounts of carbon in the alloy structure in contact with 52100 steel. Gray cast irons were found to exhibit lower friction and wear characteristics than white cast irons. Further, gray cast iron wear was more sensitive to carbon content than was white. Wear with gray cast iron was linearly related to load, and friction was found to be sensitive to relative humidity and carbon content. The form, in which the carbon is present in the alloy, is more important, as the carbon content and no strong relationship seems to exist between hardness of these ferrous alloys and wear.

  4. Coefficients of thermal expansion for a carbon-carbon composite

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, W.W.; Hoheisel, T.H.

    1989-11-17

    From the published data, carbon-carbon composites possess many unique properties at high temperature. They retain their room temperature strength in excess of 2200{degrees}C. The low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) and the property of non-wetting by molten metals make carbon-carbon composites excellent candidates for applications in the LIS program. Among these unique properties, CTE is the most important factor for the LIS program. In seeking to evaluate typical CTE's we obtained complementary samples of selected carbon-carbon specimens. These samples were laminates with (0{sub 2}){sub s}, (0{sub 2}90{sub 2}){sub s} and ({plus minus}45){sub s} orientations. These results indicated that the selected carbon-carbon composites are almost isotropic in thermal expansion. The CTE's are slightly negative at low temperature and become positive at high temperature. The exact values are shown in the figures. In order to determine the outgassing of carbon-carbon composites, two samples were tested in vacuum. The results have shown that the outgassing can not be neglected. 8 figs.

  5. Entrapment of ancient and modern organic carbon by iron on the Eurasian Arctic Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvado, Joan A.; Tesi, Tommaso; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2015-04-01

    Given the potential for climate-carbon feedbacks in the Siberian-Arctic land-ocean system, there is a need for improved understanding of carbon cycle processes (Vonk et al., 2012). The entrapment of organic carbon in sediments is a key factor to attenuate the outgassing of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. In this context, there is a pressing need to understand the mechanisms that control preservation and accumulations of organic carbon in marine sediments. Recently, the role of iron oxides in the preservation of organic matter globally has been outlined (Lalonde et al., 2012). In the present study, the composition of organic carbon associated to reactive iron (OC-Fe) on the Eurasian Arctic Shelf is evaluated. For this purpose, sediment cores and grab samples were collected in the shelves of the Kara Sea, Laptev Sea and East Siberian Sea from 9 to 69 m water depth. Experiments were conducted to extract the OC-Fe from the sediments by applying a citrate-dithionite iron reduction method -accurately control corrected- and analyze the δ13C, % OC and Δ14C of the bulk and iron-associated fractions. The results show that 11.0 ± 5.5% of organic carbon in surface-sediments of the Siberian Arctic Shelf is attached to reactive iron. The Δ14C and δ13C signatures presented sharply contrasting offsets between the sedimentary bulk and the OC-Fe. The OC-Fe is much younger than the OC-bulk in the eastern East Siberian Sea and older in the Laptev Sea. The same offsets were observed using a dual-carbon endmember mixing model showing that the iron fraction is mainly composed by young marine plankton organic carbon in the eastern East Siberian Sea and pre-aged thawing permafrost in the Laptev Sea. Overall, it seems that (i) some of this pre-aged organic carbon still remains bound to iron oxides after permafrost thawing and (ii) the iron oxides are transferring dissolved organic carbon to the sediment. This study presents the first analyses of Δ14C ever done in the OC

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  7. Carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  8. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Williams, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The removal of CO{sub 2} is of significance in several energy applications. The combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas, releases large volumes of CO{sub 2} to the environment. Several options exist to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, including substitution of nuclear power for fossil fuels, increasing the efficiency of fossil plants and capturing the CO{sub 2} prior to emission to the environment. All of these techniques have the attractive feature of limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere, but each has economic, technical, or societal limitations. In the production of natural gas, the feed stream from the well frequently contains contaminants and diluents which must be removed before the gas can enter the pipeline distribution system. Notable amongst these diluent gasses is CO{sub 2}, which has no calorific value. Currently, the pipeline specification calls for <2 mol % CO{sub 2} in the gas. Gas separation is thus a relevant technology in the field of energy production. A novel separation system based on a parametric swing process has been developed that utilizes the unique combination of properties exhibited by our carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS).

  9. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron.

    PubMed

    Veiga, R G A; Perez, M; Becquart, C S; Domain, C

    2013-01-16

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  10. Effects of carbon on intergranular fracture of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, K.S.; Meshii, M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of carbon on the grain boundary strength of iron which had been already reduced by sulfur segregation was investigated by a slow strain-rate tensile test at 77/sup 0/K. The amounts of sulfur and carbon segregation at grain boundaries were controlled by carbon contents and heat treatments of specimens and were determined by Auger electron spectroscopy after in-situ fracture under ultra-high vacuum. It was found that the primary effect of carbon is to displace sulfur from grain boundaries and thus to improve the grain boundary strength by reducing the embrittling effect of sulfur. The second effect of carbon is to increase the resistance to dislocation motion and thus to increase the apparent stress for intergranular fracture.

  11. Acetone Sensing Properties of a Gas Sensor Composed of Carbon Nanotubes Doped With Iron Oxide Nanopowder

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qiulin; Fang, Jiahua; Liu, Wenyi; Xiong, Jijun; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanopowder was prepared by a precipitation method and then mixed with different proportions of carbon nanotubes. The composite materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A fabricated heater-type gas sensor was compared with a pure Fe2O3 gas sensor under the influence of acetone. The effects of the amount of doping, the sintering temperature, and the operating temperature on the response of the sensor and the response recovery time were analyzed. Experiments show that doping of carbon nanotubes with iron oxide effectively improves the response of the resulting gas sensors to acetone gas. It also reduces the operating temperature and shortens the response recovery time of the sensor. The response of the sensor in an acetone gas concentration of 80 ppm was enhanced, with good repeatability. PMID:26569253

  12. Carbon-carbon composites: Emerging materials for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1989-01-01

    An emerging class of high temperature materials called carbon-carbon composites are being developed to help make advanced aerospace flight become a reality. Because of the high temperature strength and low density of carbon-carbon composites, aerospace engineers would like to use these materials in even more advanced applications. One application of considerable interest is as the structure of the aerospace vehicle itself rather than simply as a protective heat shield as on Space Shuttle. But suitable forms of these materials have yet to be developed. If this development can be successfully accomplished, advanced aerospace vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) and other hypersonic vehicles will be closer to becoming a reality. A brief definition is given of C-C composites. Fabrication problems and oxidation protection concepts are examined. Applications of C-C composites in the Space Shuttle and in advanced hypersonic vehicles as well as other applications are briefly discussed.

  13. Low-temperature synthesis of carbon nanotubes on iron nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partizan, G.; Mansurov, B. Z.; Medyanova, B. S.; Koshanova, А B.; Mansurova, M. E.; Aliyev, B. А; Jiang, Xin

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the results of experiments on synthesis of carbon nanostructures by the method of thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using iron nanopowders obtained by the method of electrical explosion of wires as catalysts. The process parameters that are optimal for low-temperature growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been identified during performed experiments. Results of Raman spectroscopy and x-ray analysis showed that samples grown at temperatures below the normally used have the highest crystallinity. Studies by scanning electron microscopy using SE2 mode and results of transmission electron microscopy indicate that the synthesized structures are multi-walled CNTs with the metal clusters inside the channel of the tube. The experimental modes of synthesis of CNTs by low-temperature CVD using iron nanopowders as catalyst have been found for the first time.

  14. Simulations of carbon fiber composite delamination tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, G

    2007-10-25

    Simulations of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness tests of a carbon-reinforced composite material (BMS 8-212) were conducted with LSDYNA. The fracture toughness tests were performed by U.C. Berkeley. The simulations were performed to investigate the validity and practicality of employing decohesive elements to represent interlaminar bond failures that are prevalent in carbon-fiber composite structure penetration events. The simulations employed a decohesive element formulation that was verified on a simple two element model before being employed to perform the full model simulations. Care was required during the simulations to ensure that the explicit time integration of LSDYNA duplicate the near steady-state testing conditions. In general, this study validated the use of employing decohesive elements to represent the interlaminar bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures, but the practicality of employing the elements to represent the bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures during penetration events was not established.

  15. Thermodynamic estimation on the reduction behavior of iron-chromium ore with carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Mitsutaka; Higuchi, Kenichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya; Banya, Shiro

    1998-04-01

    Recently, a number of efforts have been made to produce a crude stainless steel melt by direct smelting of iron-chromium ore in a basic oxygen furnace (BOF) without use of ferrochromium alloys, in order to save electric energy and production costs. In this paper, the thermodynamics for reduction of iron-chromium ore by carbon is discussed. The thermodynamic properties of iron-chromium ore were evaluated from previous work on the activities of constituents in the FeO {center_dot} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-MgO {center_dot} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-MgO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} iron-chromite spinel-structure solid solution saturated with (Cr, Al){sub 2}O{sub 3}, and those of the Fe-Cr-C alloy were estimated by a sublattice model. The stability diagrams were drawn for carbon reduction of pure FeO {center_dot} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Fe{sub 0.5}Mg{sub 0.5})O {center_dot} (Cr{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}){sub 2}O{sub 3} iron-chromite solid solution, and South African iron-chromium ore. The evaluated stability diagrams agreed well with the literature data. It was concluded that the lowest temperature for reduction of FeO {center_dot} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the iron-chromium ore was 1390 K and a temperature higher than 1470 K would be necessary to reduce Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in MgO {center_dot} (Cr,Al){sub 2}O{sub 3} in the prereduction process of iron-chromium ore. The composition of liquid Fe-Cr-C alloy in equilibrium with iron-chromium ore was also estimated under 1 atm of CO at steelmaking temperature. The predicted metal composition showed reasonable agreement with the literature values.

  16. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanotube using laser ablation in liquid and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Khashan, Khawla S; Sulaiman, Ghassan M; Mahdi, Rafal

    2017-02-01

    The antimicrobial activity was investigated for iron oxide IO nanoparticles (NPs)-decorated carbon nanotubes CNT prepared successfully by Nd:YAG-pulsed laser ablation in the liquid process. TEM reveals the composite NP and exhibits semispherical of iron oxide NPs, which aggregate around rolled and unrolled graphene sheet. XRD pattern proved the presence of carbon and different phases of IO NPs. Then, the antibacterial activity of the NPs was examined against different bacteria using nutrient broth and nutrient agar methods, which was enhanced using IO. In addition, the wound-healing activity for the best antibacterial concentration is tested by using animal models successfully.

  17. Distinct iron isotope signatures in suspended matter in the northern Baltic Sea; implications for cycling of organic carbon and phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingri, Johan; Conrad, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Two distinct groups of iron isotope signatures can be identified both in river water and in the Bothnian Bay, northern Baltic Sea. Particles and colloids with negative iron isotope signatures (enriched in the light isotope) are mobilised in the riparian zone during high discharge. Due to high concentration of DOC the oxidation of Fe(II) is incomplete, and un-oxidised Fe(II) is associated with Fe(III)-OH and OC (organic carbon), forming Fe(II,III)-OC colloids, and particles, with a negative iron isotope signature. Colloidal iron with a negative signature is a labile fraction that transforms during freshwater transport. Photo reduction of Fe(II,III)-OC particles and colloids will release Fe(II) and reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), and formed Fe(II) is oxidised forming Fe(III)-OH colloids with a heavy iron isotope signature. Phosphorus and organic carbon are to different extent associated to these two suspended iron complexes during transport and early diagenesis. Flocculation of negative Fe(II,III)-OC colloids produce negative Fe(II,III)-OC particles, without changes in the isotopic composition. Most of the suspended iron is rapidly removed below 1.0 psu, due to flocculation and sedimentation. Negative Fe(II,III)-OC particles may serve as an efficient 'rusty sink' for organic carbon, when deposited in the coastal zone.

  18. Electro- and thermotransport of carbon in iron-nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Okafor, I.C.I.

    1980-03-01

    Results of studies on the electrotransport, thermotransport and chemical diffusion of carbon in ..gamma..-phase iron - 32.5 wt % nickel alloys are described. The transport parameters, Z, Q and D were measured as a fucntion of temperature and carbon concentration and values for the activation energies for diffusion and electrotransport were obtained. The solubility limit of carbon in ..gamma..-Fe-32.5 wt % Ni for the temperature range 850 to 1200/sup 0/C and the electrical resistivity versus temperature for carbon concentrations of 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.86 wt % C between 25 and 1350/sup 0/C were determined. An anomalously large mass transport effect observed in two-phase alloy during thermotransport experiments was investigated for the Fe-Ni-C system.

  19. CO₂ sequestration through mineral carbonation of iron oxyhydroxides.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Kristin; Murphy, Riley; Riendeau, Amber; Smirnov, Alexander; Schoonen, Martin A A; Strongin, Daniel R

    2011-12-15

    Carbon dioxide sequestration via the use of sulfide reductants and mineral carbonation of the iron oxyhydroxide polymorphs lepidocrocite, goethite, and akaganeite with supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) was investigated using in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The exposure of the different iron oxyhydroxides to aqueous sulfide in contact with scCO(2) at ∼70-100 °C resulted in the partial transformation of the minerals to siderite (FeCO(3)) and sulfide phases such as pyrite (FeS(2)). The relative yield of siderite to iron sulfide bearing mineral product was a strong function of the initial sulfide concentration. The order of mineral reactivity with regard to the amount of siderite formation in the scCO(2)/sulfide environment for a specific reaction time was goethite < lepidocrocite ≤ akaganeite. Given the presence of goethite in sedimentary formations, this conversion reaction may have relevance to the subsurface sequestration and geologic storage of carbon dioxide.

  20. Iron isotope composition of depleted MORB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, J.; Sio, C. K. I.; Shahar, A.

    2015-12-01

    In terrestrial basalts, iron isotope ratios are observed to weakly fractionate as a function of olivine and pyroxene crystallization. However, a ~0.1‰ difference between chondrites and MORB had been reported (Dauphas et al. 2009, Teng et al. 2013 and ref. therein). This observation could illustrate an isotope fractionation occurring during partial melting, as a function of the Fe valence in melt versus crystals. Here, we present high-precision Fe isotopic data measured by MC-ICP-MS on well-characterized samples from the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge (PAR, n=9) and from the Garrett Transform Fault (n=8). These samples allow exploring the Fe isotope fractionation between melt and magnetite, and the role of partial melting on Fe isotope fractionation. Our average δ56Fe value is +0.095±0.013‰ (95% confidence, n=17), indistinguishable from a previous estimate of +0.105±0.006‰ (95% confidence, n=43, see ref. 2). Our δ56Fe values correlate weakly with MgO contents, and correlate positively with K/Ti ratios. PAC1 DR10 shows the largest Ti and Fe depletion after titanomagnetite fractionation, with a δ56Fe value of +0.076±0.036‰. This is ~0.05‰ below other samples at a given MgO. This may illustrate a significant Fe isotope fractionation between the melt and titanomagnetite, in agreement with experimental determination (Shahar et al. 2008). GN09-02, the most incompatible-element depleted sample, has a δ56Fe value of 0.037±0.020‰. This is the lowest high-precision δ56Fe value recorded for a MORB worldwide. This basalt displays an incompatible-element depletion consistent with re-melting beneath the transform fault of mantle source that was depleted during a first melting event, beneath the ridge axis (Wendt et al. 1999). The Fe isotope observation could indicate that its mantle source underwent 56Fe depletion after a first melting event. It could alternatively indicate a lower Fe isotope fractionation during re-melting, if the source was depleted of its Fe3

  1. Disclinations in Carbon-Carbon Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    matrices reinforced with high- strength, high-modulus graphite fibers from rayon, polyacrylonitrile or mesophase pitch . These composites exhibit some...matrix precursors such as * petroleum and coal-tar pitches to the carbonaceous mesophase . Discltnations can exist in this liquid crystal because as the...the molten pitch as a liquid crystal, the carbonaceous mesophase . Initially, this mesophase forms as small spherules of a simple structure, but, after

  2. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  3. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  4. Development of ferrous laminated composites with unique microstructures by control of carbon diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, D. W.; Oyama, T.; Ruano, O. A.; Sherby, O. D.

    1986-09-01

    A novel method is described for preparing ferrous laminated composites, containing ultrahigh carbon steel as one of the components, which results in hard and soft layers bounded by sharp and discrete interfaces. The method is based on increasing the activity of carbon in iron by silicon addition; in this manner, the carbon is made to segregate into specific layers by heat treatment at low temperatures (˜770 °C). The results are ferrous laminated composites with discrete and sharp interfaces that consist of hard layers containing spherical carbide particles embedded in a matrix of ultrafine martensite or ferrite adjoining soft layers of a coarse grained iron alloy. In addition, the high activity of carbon is shown to result in total depletion of carbon in a silicon containing UHC steel ribbon bonded to mild steel.

  5. Tracing iron-fueled microbial carbon production within the hydrothermal plume at the Loihi seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Sarah A.; Hansman, Roberta L.; Sessions, Alex L.; Nakamura, Ko-ichi.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-10-01

    The Loihi hydrothermal plume provides an opportunity to investigate iron (Fe) oxidation and microbial processes in a system that is truly Fe dominated and distinct from mid-ocean ridge spreading centers. The lack of hydrogen sulfide within the Loihi hydrothermal fluids and the presence of an oxygen minimum zone at this submarine volcano's summit, results in a prolonged presence of reduced Fe within the dispersing non-buoyant plume. In this study, we have investigated the potential for microbial carbon fixation within the Loihi plume. We sampled for both particulate and dissolved organic carbon in hydrothermal fluids, microbial mats growing around vents, and the dispersing plume, and carried out stable carbon isotope analysis on the particulate fraction. The δ13C values of the microbial mats ranged from -23‰ to -28‰, and are distinct from those of deep-ocean particulate organic carbon (POC). The mats and hydrothermal fluids were also elevated in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compared to background seawater. Within the hydrothermal plume, DOC and POC concentrations were elevated and the isotopic composition of POC within the plume suggests mixing between background seawater POC and a 13C-depleted hydrothermal component. The combination of both DOC and POC increasing in the dispersing plume that cannot solely be the result of entrainment and DOC adsorption, provides strong evidence for in-situ microbial productivity by chemolithoautotrophs, including a likelihood for iron-oxidizing microorganisms.

  6. Influence of atmospheric processes on the solubility and composition of iron in Saharan dust

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Amelia F.; Feng, Yan; Lai, Barry; Landing, William M.; Shelley, Rachel U.; Nenes, Athanasios; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Violaki, Kalliopi; Ingall, Ellery D.

    2016-06-10

    Aerosol iron was examined in Saharan dust plumes using a combination of iron near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical techniques. Aerosol samples were collected at three sites located in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and Bermuda to characterize iron at different atmospheric transport lengths and time scales. Iron(III) oxides were a component of aerosols at all sampling sites and dominated the aerosol iron in Mediterranean samples. In Atlantic samples, iron(II and III) sulfate, iron(III) phosphate, and iron(II) silicates were also contributors to aerosol composition. With increased atmospheric transport time, iron(II) sulfates are found to become more abundant, aerosol iron oxidation state became more reduced, and aerosol acidity increased. As a result, atmospheric processing including acidic reactions and photoreduction likely influence the form of iron minerals and oxidation state in Saharan dust aerosols and contribute to increases in aerosol-iron solubility.

  7. Influence of atmospheric processes on the solubility and composition of iron in Saharan dust

    DOE PAGES

    Longo, Amelia F.; Feng, Yan; Lai, Barry; ...

    2016-06-10

    Aerosol iron was examined in Saharan dust plumes using a combination of iron near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical techniques. Aerosol samples were collected at three sites located in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and Bermuda to characterize iron at different atmospheric transport lengths and time scales. Iron(III) oxides were a component of aerosols at all sampling sites and dominated the aerosol iron in Mediterranean samples. In Atlantic samples, iron(II and III) sulfate, iron(III) phosphate, and iron(II) silicates were also contributors to aerosol composition. With increased atmospheric transport time, iron(II) sulfates are found to become more abundant, aerosol iron oxidation statemore » became more reduced, and aerosol acidity increased. As a result, atmospheric processing including acidic reactions and photoreduction likely influence the form of iron minerals and oxidation state in Saharan dust aerosols and contribute to increases in aerosol-iron solubility.« less

  8. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  9. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  10. Influence of matrix structure on the abrasion wear resistance and toughness of a hot isostatic pressed white iron matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagounis, E.; Lindroos, V. K.; Talvitie, M.

    1996-12-01

    The influence of the matrix structure on the mechanical properties of a hot isostatic pressed (hipped) white iron matrix composite containing 10 vol pct TiC is investigated. The matrix structure was systematically varied by heat treating at different austenitizing temperatures. Various subsequent treatments were also employed. It was found that an austenitizing treatment at higher temperatures increases the hardness, wear resistance, and impact toughness of the composite. Although after every different heat treatment procedure the matrix structure of the composite was predominantly martensitic, with very low contents of retained austenite, some other microstructural features affected the mechanical properties to a great extent. Abrasion resistance and hardness increased with the austenitizing temperature because of the higher carbon content in martensite in the structure of the composite. Optimum impact energy values were obtained with structures containing a low amount of M (M7C3+M23C6) carbides in combination with a decreased carbon content martensite. Structure austenitized at higher temperatures showed the best tempering response. A refrigerating treatment was proven beneficial after austenitizing the composite at the lower temperature. The greatest portion in the increased martensitic transformation in comparison to the unreinforced alloy, which was observed particularly after austenitizing the composite at higher temperatures,[1] was confirmed to be mechanically induced. The tempering cycle might have caused some additional chemically induced transformation. The newly examined iron-based composite was found to have higher wear resistance than the most abrasion-resistant ferroalloy material (white cast iron).

  11. Iron status and body composition of competitive female ice skaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, P.J.; Caldwell, M.J.; Gerber, L.E.; Rand, A.G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of training and competition on iron status and body composition of ice skaters were evaluated pre-season (PS), during competitive season (CS), and out of season (OS). Eighteen females, aged 14 to 16, with mean heights and weights of 158.2 +/- 4.1cm, and 50.9 +/- 5.2 kg, respectively, participated. During each season, fasted, cenous blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin (Mg), serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and serum ferritin (F). Percent body fat was estimated from skinfolds (SF) and from underwater weighting (UW). Mean percent PS body fat was 20% by both UW and SF. UW values did not change significantly with seasons. In contrast, percent SF body fat were significantly higher OS than PS and CS. Heights and weights did not differ significantly during the year. Mean Hcts were normal throughout the seasons, however mean Hbs were significantly lower during CS than OS (14.5 vs. 15.5gm/dl, respectively). Mean F did not vary significantly PS and OS. Mean SI and TIBC were in normal ranges although OS means were significantly higher than PS and CS. The results indicate that the iron status of the ice skaters in the study varied with the training seasons and was lower during CS.

  12. Pallasites - Metal composition, classification and relationships with iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted of the metal composition of 34 pallasites in order to shed further light on the origin of these meteorites. Concentrations of Au, As, Co, Ga, Ge, Ir, Ni, and W in pallasitic metal were determined. Most pallasites are found to have similar compositions indicating a close genetic relationship, and are designated as main group. The Eagle Station Trio is unrelated to the main group as indicated by higher Ni, Ge, and Ir and lower As, Au, and Ga contents in the metal, and olivine richer in Fe and Sc and poorer in Mg and Mn. The trio of Springwater, Rawlinna and Phillips County have metal compositions appropriate to high-Ni main group members, but their fayalite contents suggest they are not closely related to it. Pavlodar and Glorieta Mountain appear to be unique pallasites, and Brenham an anomalous main group member. Krasnoyarsk is classified as a main group member. Main group pallasites have metal compositions which overlap those of IIIAB iron meteorites on a Ga-Ge plot, and they have similar Au, As, Cr, Ir, Ni and W contents to high-Ni IIIAB irons.

  13. Allotropic composition of amorphous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrebov, S. G. Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    Using the concept of an inhomogeneous broadening of spectral lines of the basic oscillators responsible for forming the spectrum, the experimental dependences of the dispersion of the imaginary part of permittivity are analyzed for amorphous carbon. It turned out that four types of oscillators contribute to this dependence. The first three types represent the electron transitions from the energy-spectrum ground state for {pi} and {sigma} electrons of amorphous carbon to an excited state. The fourth type is related to the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by free charge carriers. The absolute values of squared plasma frequencies of oscillators are estimated, and, using them, the relative fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded atoms forming the amorphous-carbon skeleton is calculated. This estimate agrees closely with the theoretical predictions for amorphous carbon of the same density as the material under study. The dependence of the relative fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded atoms contained in amorphous hydrogenised carbon on annealing temperature is determined. The developed method is also applied to the analysis of the normalized curve for the light extinction in the interstellar medium. The contribution to the extinction of two varieties of interstellar matter is detected.

  14. Iron hydroxy carbonate formation in zerovalent iron permeable reactive barriers: Characterization and evaluation of phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, Richard T.; Lee, T.R.

    2010-10-22

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently observed as a secondary mineral precipitate in granular iron PRBs. Mineralogical characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy on materials collected from three field-based PRBs in the US (East Helena, MT; Elizabeth City, NC; Denver Federal Center, CO). These PRBs were installed to treat a range of contaminants, including chlorinated organics, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Results obtained indicate that chukanovite is a prevalent secondary precipitate in the PRBs. Laboratory experiments on high-purity chukanovite separates were carried out to constrain the room-temperature solubility for this mineral. An estimated Gibbs energy of formation ({Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}) for chukanovite is - 1174.4 {+-} 6 kJ/mol. A mineral stability diagram is consistent with observations from the field. Water chemistry from the three reactive barriers falls inside the predicted stability field for chukanovite, at inorganic carbon concentrations intermediate to the stability fields of siderite and ferrous hydroxide. These new data will aid in developing better predictive models of mineral accumulation in zerovalent iron PRBs.

  15. Effect of temperature on the kinetics of acetylene decomposition over reduced iron oxide catalyst for the production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khedr, M. H.; Abdel Halim, K. S.; Soliman, N. K.

    2008-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized by the catalytic decomposition of acetylene over nanosized metallic iron. A high metal loading was chosen in order to obtain a longer catalytic activity. Different nanosized iron oxides were prepared using chemical methods. A catalyst of the composition 40% Fe 2O 3:60% Al 2O 3 is prepared by wet impregnation method. The prepared samples of iron oxides supported in alumina were completely reduced by hydrogen gas at 500 °C and then constant rate of acetylene gas was passed over the freshly reduced samples at different reaction conditions. The kinetics of CNTs synthesis on reduced nanosized Fe 2O 3 supported on alumina was investigated as a function of crystal size of iron oxide catalyst (35-150 nm) and decomposition temperature (400-700 °C). The microstructure and morphology of the synthesized catalyst and CNTs were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and XRD analysis. The results revealed that both the crystal size of iron oxide and decomposition temperature have a significant effect on the percentage yield of carbon deposited. It increased by decreasing crystal size of the catalyst and increasing decomposition temperature to certain limit. The maximum yield of carbon deposited (426%) was obtained at decomposition temperature 600 °C and over nanosized iron oxide catalyst with crystal size of average 35 nm.

  16. Carbon nanotube integrated multifunctional multiscale composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jingjing; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben; Liang, Richard

    2007-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) demonstrate extraordinary properties and show great promise in enhancing out-of-plane properties of traditional polymer composites and enabling functionality, but current manufacturing challenges hinder the realization of their potential. This paper presents a method to fabricate multifunctional multiscale composites through an effective infiltration-based vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) process. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were infused through and between glass-fibre tows along the through-thickness direction. Both pristine and functionalized MWNTs were used in fabricating multiscale glass-fibre-reinforced epoxy composites. It was demonstrated that the mechanical properties of multiscale composites were remarkably enhanced, especially in the functionalized MWNT multiscale composites. With only 1 wt% loading of functionalized MWNTs, tensile strength was increased by 14% and Young's modulus by 20%, in comparison with conventional fibre-reinforced composites. Moreover, the shear strength and short-beam modulus were increased by 5% and 8%, respectively, indicating the improved inter-laminar properties. The strain-stress tests also suggested noticeable enhancement in toughness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization confirmed an enhanced interfacial bonding when functionalized MWNTs were integrated into epoxy/glass-fibre composites. The coefficient thermal expansion (CTE) of functionalized nanocomposites indicated a reduction of 25.2% compared with epoxy/glass-fibre composites. The desired improvement of electrical conductivities was also achieved. The multiscale composites indicated a way to leverage the benefits of CNTs and opened up new opportunities for high-performance multifunctional multiscale composites.

  17. Voronoi analysis of the short–range atomic structure in iron and iron–carbon melts

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-17

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron–carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short–range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  18. Iron Catalyst Chemistry in High Pressure Carbon Monoxide Nanotube Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is analyzed using a chemical reaction model coupled with properties calculated along streamlines. Streamline properties for mixing jets are calculated by the FLUENT code using the k-e turbulent model for pure carbon monixide. The HiPco process introduces cold iron pentacarbonyl diluted in CO, or alternatively nitrogen, at high pressure, ca. 30 atmospheres into a conical mixing zone. Hot CO is also introduced via three jets at angles with respect to the axis of the reactor. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Cluster reaction rates are from Krestinin, et aI., based on shock tube measurements. Another model is from classical cluster theory given by Girshick's team. The calculations are performed on streamlines that assume that a cold mixture of Fe(CO)5 in CO is introduced along the reactor axis. Then iron forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs from the Boudouard reaction on Fe-containing clusters by reaction with CO. To simulate the chemical process along streamlines that were calculated by the fluid dynamics code FLUENT, a time history of temperature and dilution are determined along streamlines. Alternative catalyst injection schemes are also evaluated.

  19. Iron nanoparticles embedded in carbon films: structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Shafiekhani, Azizollah; Sebt, Seyed Ali

    2016-06-01

    In the present work amorphous hydrogenated carbon films with sputtered iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs @ a-C:H) were deposited by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods using acetylene gas and iron target on quartz and silicon substrates. Samples were prepared in different initial pressures and during constant deposition time. The crystalline structure of Fe NPs @ a-C:H was studied using X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis presents that increasing the initial pressure decreases the atomic ratio of Fe/C and the sp3-hybridized carbon content in prepared samples. The transmission electron microscope image shows the encapsulated Fe NPs in carbon films. The optical properties and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of samples were studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry, which is shown that increasing of Fe content decreases the intensity of LSPR peak and increases the optical band gap.

  20. Low temperature synthesis of iron containing carbon nanoparticles in critical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasumura, Takashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Whitby, Raymond L. D.; Aschenbrenner, Ortrud; Maekawa, Toru

    2011-01-01

    We develop a low temperature, organic solvent-free method of producing iron containing carbon (Fe@C) nanoparticles. We show that Fe@C nanoparticles are self-assembled by mixing ferrocene with sub-critical (25.0 °C), near-critical (31.0 °C) and super-critical (41.0 °C) carbon dioxide and irradiating the solutions with UV laser of 266-nm wavelength. The diameter of the iron particles varies from 1 to 100 nm, whereas that of Fe@C particles ranges from 200 nm to 1 μm. Bamboo-shaped structures are also formed by iron particles and carbon layers. There is no appreciable effect of the temperature on the quantity and diameter distributions of the particles produced. The Fe@C nanoparticles show soft ferromagnetic characteristics. Iron particles are crystallised, composed of bcc and fcc lattice structures, and the carbon shells are graphitised after irradiation of electron beams.

  1. [Hydroxyapatite bioactive coating on carbon/carbon composites].

    PubMed

    Sui, Jinling; Li, Musen; Lü, Yupeng; Bai, Yunqiang

    2005-04-01

    A simple plasma spraying method was employed in coating hydroxyapaptite (HA) on to carbon/carbon composites (C/C composites). The morphology of the coating was examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The phase constitutions of the HA coating were determined by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The shear strength of the HA coating-C/C composite substrates was detected. A hydroxyapatite coating with rough surface was observed. A considerable amount of amorphous phase appeared as a result from the coating process, which could be transformed into the morphous phase crystalline HA after subsequent heat treatment. The shear strength between the HA coating and C/C composite substrates was 7.15 MPa.

  2. Novel low Wigner energy amorphous carbon-carbon composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Prakash, Jyoti; Tripathi, B. M.

    2014-02-01

    A novel amorphous carbon-carbon composite has been developed using carbon black dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin matrix in order to avoid Wigner energy problem associated with graphite. The as prepared sample showed a density of 1320 kg m-3. This has been further densified by resin impregnation and chemical vapour infiltration. The effect of processing parameters on final density (1517 kg m-3) has been investigated. This composite possesses the compressive strength of 65 Mpa, coefficient of thermal expansion of 3 × 10-6 K-1 and the specific heat of 1.2 J g-1 K-1. This novel composite was subjected to 145 MeV Ne+6 heavy ion irradiation at different doses. The highest dose was kept at 3 × 10-4 dpa. The stored energy in the composite was found to be 212 J g-1 at the highest dose of irradiation, which is much below than that of graphite. The composite remained amorphous after irradiation as confirmed by X-ray diffraction.

  3. Resistive switching in iron-oxide-filled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cava, Carlos E; Persson, Clas; Zarbin, Aldo J G; Roman, Lucimara S

    2014-01-07

    Iron-oxide-filled carbon nanotubes exhibit an intriguing charge bipolarization behavior which allows the material to be applied in resistive memory devices. Raman analysis conducted with an electric field applied in situ shows the Kohn anomalies and a strong modification of the electronic properties related to the applied voltage intensity. In addition, the I(D)/I(G) ratio indicated the reversibility of this process. The electrical characterization indicated an electronic transport governed by two main kinds of charge hopping, one between the filling and the nanotube and the other between the nanotube shells.

  4. Carbon Isotopic Heterogeneity of Graphite in the San Juan Mass of the Campo Del Cielo IAB Iron Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maruoka, T.; Kurat, G.; Zinner, E.; Varela, M. E.; Ametrano, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of IAB iron meteorites is still a matter of debate. It is generally believed that iron meteorites originated from molten cores in small planetesimals because the fractionation trend of trace elements (e.g., Ir, Ge, Ga, etc. vs. Ni) for most iron meteorites can be more or less explained by fractional crystallization from metal melts. However, this process cannot produce trace element characteristics of the IAB (and other) iron meteorites. To explain these trace element abundance patterns, several models have been proposed. Although most of these models require a high temperature, clear evidence has recently been obtained for a sub-solidus formation of IAB iron meteorites from noble gas analyses. Moreover, heterogeneous distributions of some trace elements in metal and other phases also suggest a low temperature origin of at least some IAB iron meteorites. Here we use the carbon isotopic compositions of graphite to constrain the origin of IAB iron meteorites. Our data confirm a possible low temperature origin of IAB iron meteorites.

  5. Molybdenum Isotopic Composition of Iron Meteorites, Chondrites and Refractory Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, H.; Walker, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Recent Mo isotopic studies of meteorites reported evidence for differences in isotopic compositions for whole rocks of some primitive and differentiated meteorites relative to terrestrial materials. Enrichments of r- and p-process isotopes of up to 3-4 units (e unit = parts in 10(exp 4) over s-process dominated isotopes are the most prominent features. Certain types of presolar grains show large enrichments in s-process isotopes, however, it was concluded on grounds of mass balance that incomplete digestion of such grains cannot explain the enrichments of r- and p-process isotopes in whole rocks of primitive chondrites. If the reported variability in r- and p-process isotope enrichments reflects the true isotopic characteristics of the whole rocks, the implications are quite profound. It would suggest the presence of large scale Mo isotopic heterogeneity within the solar accretion disk with likely collateral effects for other elements. However, such effects were not found for Ru isotopes, nor for Zr isotopes. Another recent Mo isotopic study by multi collector ICP-MS could not confirm the reported deviations in Allende, Murchison or iron meteorites. Here, we present new results for the Mo isotopic composition of iron meteorites, chondrites and CAIs obtained by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTIMS). We discuss analytical aspects and the homogeneity of Mo isotopic compositions in solar system materials.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotube buckypaper and mesophase pitch carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Gyu; Yun, Nam Gyun; Park, Young Bin; Liang, Richard; Lumata, Lloyd; Brooks, James; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben; High-Performance Materials Institute, Fsu Collaboration; National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Fsu Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    Carbon/carbon composites consisting of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) buckypaper (BP) and mesophase pitch resin have been produced through impregnation of BP with pitch using toluene as a solvent. Drying, stabilization and carbonization processes were performed sequentially, and repeated to increase the pitch content. Voids in the carbon/carbon composite samples decreased with increasing impregnation process cycles. Electrical conductivity and density of the composites increased with carbonization by two to three times that of pristine BP. These results indicate that discontinuity and intertube contact barriers of SWCNTs in the BP are partially overcome by the carbonization process of pitch. The temperature dependence of the Raman shift shows that mechanical strain is increased since carbonized pitch matrix surrounds the nanotubes. High-Performance Materials Institute, NSF DMR-0602859, NSF DMR-0654118.

  7. Multiwalled Carbon nanotube - Strength to polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravin, Jagdale; Khan, Aamer. A.; Massimo, Rovere; Carlo, Rosso; Alberto, Tagliaferro

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a rather fascinating material, are among the pillars of nanotechnology. CNTs exhibit unique electrical, mechanical, adsorption, and thermal properties with high aspect ratio, exceptional stiffness, excellent strength, and low density, which can be exploited in the manufacturing of revolutionary smart nano composite materials. The demand for lighter and stronger polymer composite material in various applications is increasing every day. Among all the possibilities to research and exploit the exceptional properties of CNTs in polymer composites we focused on the reinforcement of epoxy resin with different types of multiwalled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs). We studied mechanical properties such as stress, strain, ultimate tensile strength, yield point, modulus and fracture toughness, and Young's modulus by plotting and calculating by means of the off-set method. The mechanical strength of epoxy composite is increased intensely with 1 and 3 wt.% of filler.

  8. Applications for carbon fibre recovered from composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering; Liu, Z.; Turner, TA; Wong, KH

    2016-07-01

    Commercial operations to recover carbon fibre from waste composites are now developing and as more recovered fibre becomes available new applications for recovered fibre are required. Opportunities to use recovered carbon fibre as a structural reinforcement are considered involving the use of wet lay processes to produce nonwoven mats. Mats with random in-plane fibre orientation can readily be produced using existing commercial processes. However, the fibre volume fraction, and hence the mechanical properties that can be achieved, result in composites with limited mechanical properties. Fibre volume fractions of 40% can be achieved with high moulding pressures of over 100 bar, however, moulding at these pressures results in substantial fibre breakage which reduces the mean fibre length and the properties of the composite manufactured. Nonwoven mats made from aligned, short carbon fibres can achieve higher fibre volume fractions with lower fibre breakage even at high moulding pressure. A process for aligning short fibres is described and a composite of over 60% fibre volume fraction has been manufactured at a pressures up to 100 bar with low fibre breakage. Further developments of the alignment process have been undertaken and a composite of 46% fibre volume fraction has been produced moulded at a pressure of 7 bar in an autoclave, exhibiting good mechanical properties that compete with higher grade materials. This demonstrates the potential for high value applications for recovered carbon fibre by fibre alignment.

  9. Prestressed Carbon Fiber Composite Overwrapped Gun Tube

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-15

    DD-MM-YYYY) 15-10-2008 2. REPORT TYPE FINAL 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PRESTRESSED CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE...mismatch between the steel substrate and the composite jacket causing a gap, and the lack of favorable prestress in the jacket. Dealing with these...eliminated, and a favorable prestress has been achieved. A 120mm barrel has been manufactured using this process with IM7 fibers in a PEEK matrix and

  10. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  11. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2003-12-02

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  12. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  13. Pitch-based carbon foam and composites

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2003-12-16

    A process for producing carbon foam or a composite is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  14. Properties of Diamond Composite Films Grown on Iron Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-22

    surface area is designed to be approximately 50 -75 % of the total substrate surface . Figure 2 depicts a cross sectional view of the diamond and 3...in OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Grant # N0001489Jl848 R&T Code 413n003 Technical Report No. 2 Properties of Diamond Composite Films grown on Iron... Surfaces bv T.P. Ona ano k.P.H. Chanq Preoared tor DIuoiicatlon in the Applied Physics Letters D TIC 0% ELECTE Northwestern University FEBO41991 Department

  15. The multiple sulfur isotopic composition of iron meteorites: Implications for nebular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Michael Ariel

    2013-12-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopic measurements of troilite from 61 different iron meteorites were undertaken in order to test for sulfur isotopic homogeneity within (and between) 8 different iron meteorite groups. It was found that different members within a given group of iron meteorites have homogeneous Delta 33S compositions, but that these Delta33S compositions differ between groups. This thesis shows that iron meteorites from the groups IC, IIAB, IIIAB, IIIF, and IVA have small yet resolvable enrichments or depletions in Delta33S relative to Canyon Diablo Troilite (CDT) and troilite from other non-magmatic (IAB and IIE) iron meteorites. The observed anomalous sulfur isotopic compositions in magmatic iron meteorites are most consistent with Lyman-alpha photolysis of H2S, pointing towards inheritance of an unexpected photolytically-derived sulfur component in magmatic iron meteorite groups which is absent in non-magmatic iron meteorites, chondrites, and the Earth-Moon System.

  16. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Bernhard C.; Baehtz, Carsten; Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan; Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C.; Goddard, Caroline J. L.

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  17. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  18. Mossbauer effect in the ion-implanted iron-carbon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1976-01-01

    The concentration dependence of Mossbauer effect in four carbon ion-implanted iron absorbers, which contain carbon as the solute atoms, has been investigated over the range of concentration 0.05 through 1 atomic percent. The specimens were prepared by implanting carbon atoms on each reference iron foil with four different bombarding energies of 250 keV, 160 keV, 140 keV and 80 keV, respectively. Thus, the specimen contains a uniform dosage of carbon atoms which penetrated up to 3,000 A depth of the reference iron. In the measurement of Mossbauer spectra, the backscattering conversion electron counting geometry was used. Typical results of Mossbauer parameters of iron-carbon alloys show that the isomer shift, quadrupole shift, the effective hyperfine splitting of Fe-57, and the intensity ratio exhibit a large variation with the increase of carbon concentration in the environment of iron atoms.

  19. A statistical model of carbon/carbon composite failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, Kerry T.

    1991-01-01

    A failure model which considers the stochastic nature of the damage accumulation process is essential to assess reliability and to accurately scale the results from standard test specimens to composite structures. A superior filamentary composite for high temperature applications is composed of carbon fibers in a carbon matrix. Carbon-carbon composites are the strongest known material at very high temperatures. Since there appears to be a significant randomness in C-C material strength which cannot be controlled or detected with current technology, a better model of the material failure based upon statistical principles should be used. Simple applications of the model based upon the limited data provide encouraging results that indicate that better design of test specimens would provide a substantially higher prediction for the design strength of C-C composites. An A-basis strength for the C-C tensile rings from a first stage D-5 billets was estimated. A statistical failure model was developed for these rings which indicates that this strength may be very conservative for larger C-C parts. The analysis may be improved by use of a heterogeneous/noncontinuum finite element approach on the minimechanical level.

  20. CARBON MONOXIDE REVERSIBLY DISRUPTS IRON HOMEOSTATIS AND RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron dissociation from heme is a major factor in iron metabolism and cellular concentrations of the metal correlate inversely with the expression of heme oxygenase (HO). We tested the hypothesis that 1) exposure to a product of HO, carbon monoxide (CO), disturbs iron homeostas...

  1. Inhibition of catalytic oxidation of carbon/carbon composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianxian

    An investigation coupling experimental efforts with computational chemistry analysis was conducted to study the inhibition effects of phosphorous or boron on the oxidation of carbon/carbon composite materials catalyzed by potassium or calcium acetate (KAC or CaAC). Commercial aircraft brakes were used, which are exposed during use to K- or Ca-containing runway deicing agents. The reactivity of inhibitor-doped carbon materials was determined by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and isothermal oxidation in 1 atm O2. The structure and surface chemistry of inhibitor-doped samples were characterized, and the inhibition mechanisms were explored with the help of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The catalytic effects of KAC or CaAC were found to be dependent on catalyst loading, pretreatment procedure, temperature and O2 partial pressure. Experimental observations showed that K is a more effective catalyst for carbon composite oxidation than Ca as expected from prior studies of catalyzed carbon gasification. This was attributed to its ability to form and maintain good interfacial contact with carbon, as well as to its insensitivity to carbon structure because of its excellent wetting ability and mobility. The experimental results suggested that the interfacial catalyst/carbon contact is the critical factor determining the catalytic effectiveness. Thermally deposited phosphorus, upon heat treatment of P-containing compounds such as CH3OP(OH)2 and POCl3 at around 600°C in the presence of inert gas, exhibited a good inhibition effect in the oxidation of C/C composites used in aircraft brake systems. These P compounds were also effective inhibitors for Ca- or K-catalyzed oxidation. The P loading up to a certain amount (ca. 4.0 wt%) was found to suppress Ca-catalyzed oxidation completely. It also improved the resistance of carbon to K-catalyzed oxidation, but the effect was much less significant than in the case of Ca-catalyzed reaction. The characterization of P

  2. Functionally Graded Nanophase Beryllium/Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Beryllium, beryllium alloys, beryllium carbide, and carbon are the ingredients of a class of nanophase Be/Be2C/C composite materials that can be formulated and functionally graded to suit a variety of applications. In a typical case, such a composite consists of a first layer of either pure beryllium or a beryllium alloy, a second layer of B2C, and a third layer of nanophase sintered carbon derived from fullerenes and nanotubes. The three layers are interconnected through interpenetrating spongelike structures. These Be/Be2C/C composite materials are similar to Co/WC/diamond functionally graded composite materials, except that (1) W and Co are replaced by Be and alloys thereof and (2) diamond is replaced by sintered carbon derived from fullerenes and nanotubes. (Optionally, one could form a Be/Be2C/diamond composite.) Because Be is lighter than W and Co, the present Be/Be2C/C composites weigh less than do the corresponding Co/WC/diamond composites. The nanophase carbon is almost as hard as diamond. WC/Co is the toughest material. It is widely used for drilling, digging, and machining. However, the fact that W is a heavy element (that is, has high atomic mass and mass density) makes W unattractive for applications in which weight is a severe disadvantage. Be is the lightest tough element, but its toughness is less than that of WC/Co alloy. Be strengthened by nanophase carbon is much tougher than pure or alloy Be. The nanophase carbon has an unsurpassed strength-to-weight ratio. The Be/Be2C/C composite materials are especially attractive for terrestrial and aerospace applications in which there are requirements for light weight along with the high strength and toughness of the denser Co/WC/diamond materials. These materials could be incorporated into diverse components, including cutting tools, bearings, rocket nozzles, and shields. Moreover, because Be and C are effective as neutron moderators, Be/Be2C/C composites could be attractive for some nuclear applications.

  3. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-11

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the thirteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made on the testing of the system hardware and software. H{sub 2} chemisorption capacities and activity selectivity data were also measured for three iron catalysts promoted with 1% alumina. 47 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Complex Multifunctional Polymer/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Pritesh; Balasubramaniyam, Gobinath; Chen, Jian

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for developing complex multifunctional materials that consist of or contain polymer/carbon-nanotube composites has been conceived. As used here, "multifunctional" signifies having additional and/or enhanced physical properties that polymers or polymer-matrix composites would not ordinarily be expected to have. Such properties include useful amounts of electrical conductivity, increased thermal conductivity, and/or increased strength. In the present methodology, these properties are imparted to a given composite through the choice and processing of its polymeric and CNT constituents.

  5. Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, N. N.; Kuvyrkin, G. N.

    2016-09-01

    Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composites (CCC) intended for describing the processes of deformation of structures produced by using CCC under high-temperature loading are considered. A phenomenological theory of CCC inelastic deformation is proposed, where such materials are considered as homogeneous ones with effective characteristics and where their high anisotropy of mechanical characteristics and different ways of resistance to extension and compression are taken into account. Micromechanical models are proposed for spatially reinforced CCC, where the difference between mechanical characteristics of components and the reinforcement scheme are taken into account. Themodel parameters are determined from the results of experiments of composite macrospecimens in the directions typical of the material. A version of endochronictype theory with several internal times "launched" for each composite component and related to some damage accumulation mechanisms is proposed for describing the inelastic deformation. Some practical examples are considered.

  6. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Composite Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Altalhi, Tariq; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Han, Ninghui; Clarke, Stephen; Losic, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA) membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm), and thickness (5–100 μm), was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal) used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule. PMID:24957494

  7. Importance of Iron and Soil Physicochemical Properties to Stabilize Organic Carbon in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Yang, Y.; Obrist, D.; Poulson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming can potentially accelerate the decomposition of forest soil organic matter (SOM), as a source of greenhouse gas emissions. Understanding the fate of forest SOM is important for evaluating and managing the global carbon cycle during climate change. Iron minerals play an important role in stabilizing organic carbon (OC) and regulating the biogeochemical cycle in the soil environment, but there is only limited information available concerning how iron-mediated OC stabilization is affected by physicochemical properties of soil. This study investigated the behavior of iron-bound OC in soils collected from 14 forests across the United States, and the impact of soil physicochemical properties on the stabilization of OC by iron minerals. The bicarbonate-citrate-dithionite (BCD) method was used to reduce iron in soil samples, and OC content was characterized prior and after reduction to quantify iron-bound OC. We found that iron-bound OC contributed 1.2 - 57.7 weight % of total OC in forest soils. Atomic ratios of iron-bound OC:Fe ranged from 0.006 to 0.178, indicating the importance of sorptive interactions. The fraction of iron-bound OC was more closely correlated to the molar ratio of iron-bound OC:Fe than the absolute concentration of reactive iron, which is ranged from 0.08 to 19.31 mg/g. Iron-bound OC was enriched in 13C compared to the non-iron-bound SOM. There were significant correlations between the total N concentration and total or non-iron bound OC, but not with iron-bound OC. Overall, iron minerals mainly stabilize 13C-enriched non-nitrogenous OC, which was almost regulated by the sorptive association between iron and OC. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding the stabilization of OC in soil, and the coupled biogeochemical processes of carbon and iron.

  8. Liquid crystal polyester-carbon fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) have been developed as a thermoplastic matrix for high performance composites. A successful melt impregnation method has been developed which results in the production of continuous carbon fiber (CF) reinforced LCP prepreg tape. Subsequent layup and molding of prepreg into laminates has yielded composites of good quality. Tensile and flexural properties of LCP/CF composites are comparable to those of epoxy/CF composites. The LCP/CF composites have better impact resistance than the latter, although epoxy/CF composites possess superior compression and shear strength. The LCP/CF composites have good property retention until 200 F (67 % of room temperature value). Above 200 F, mechanical properties decrease significantly. Experimental results indicate that the poor compression and shear strength may be due to the poor interfacial adhesion between the matrix and carbon fiber as adequate toughness of the LCP matrix. Low mechanical property retention at high temperatures may be attributable to the low beta-transition temperature (around 80 C) of the LCP matrix material.

  9. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  10. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Charles David; Das, Sujit; Jeon, Dr. Saeil

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  11. The isotopic composition of iron-group galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Leske, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Results from studies of the isotopic composition of iron group elements in the galactic cosmic radiation are reviewed, emphasizing recently reported measurements from the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The observed isotope distributions for the elements Ti through Mn are in good agreement with those expected for a propagated solar-like source composition, with the possible exception of an enhanced abundance of Ti-50. It is found that a significant fraction of the radioactive secondary nuclide Mn-54 has decayed, indicating a confinement time of iron group cosmic rays in the galaxy of at least 2 Myr. The source ratio Fe-54/Fe-56 is found to be consistent with the solar value, but the ratio Ni-60/Ni-58 is greater than solar by a factor of 2.8+/-1.0. The measured abundance of Co-59 is significantly greater than the calculated secondary contribution, suggesting that this nuclide has been produced in the source regions by the electron capture decay of Ni-59 and implying a time delay between nucleosynthesis and acceleration approximately greater than 10(exp 5) yr.

  12. Carbon-depleted outer core revealed by sound velocity measurements of liquid iron-carbon alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yoichi; Imada, Saori; Hirose, Kei; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Haruka; Tateno, Shigehiko; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2015-11-01

    The relative abundance of light elements in the Earth's core has long been controversial. Recently, the presence of carbon in the core has been emphasized, because the density and sound velocities of the inner core may be consistent with solid Fe7C3. Here we report the longitudinal wave velocity of liquid Fe84C16 up to 70 GPa based on inelastic X-ray scattering measurements. We find the velocity to be substantially slower than that of solid iron and Fe3C and to be faster than that of liquid iron. The thermodynamic equation of state for liquid Fe84C16 is also obtained from the velocity data combined with previous density measurements at 1 bar. The longitudinal velocity of the outer core, about 4% faster than that of liquid iron, is consistent with the presence of 4-5 at.% carbon. However, that amount of carbon is too small to account for the outer core density deficit, suggesting that carbon cannot be a predominant light element in the core.

  13. Low density bismaleimide-carbon microballoon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of composite laminate.structures of glass cloth preimpregnated with polybismaleimide resin and adhered to a polybismaleimide glass or aromatic polyamide paper honeycomb cell structure that is filled or partially filled with a syntactic foam consisting of a mixture of bismaleimide resin and carbon microballoons. The carbon microballoons are prepared by pyrolyzing phenolic microballoons and subsequently bonded using a 2% bismaleimide solution. The laminate structures are cured for two hours at 477 deg K and are adhered to the honeycomb bismaleimide adhesive using a pressure of 700 KN/sq m pressure at 450 deg K. The laminate composite is then post-cured for two hours at 527 deg K to produce a composite laminate having a density in the range from about 95 kilograms per cubic meter to 130 kilograms per cubic meter.

  14. Fabrication of aluminum-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    A screening, optimization, and evaluation program is reported of unidirectional carbon-aluminum composites. During the screening phase both large diameter monofilament and small diameter multifilament reinforcements were utilized to determine optimum precursor tape making and consolidation techniques. Difficulty was encountered in impregnating and consolidating the multifiber reinforcements. Large diameter monofilament reinforcement was found easier to fabricate into composites and was selected to carry into the optimization phase in which the hot pressing parameters were refined and the size of the fabricated panels was scaled up. After process optimization the mechanical properties of the carbon-aluminum composites were characterized in tension, stress-rupture and creep, mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermal aging, thermal expansion, and impact.

  15. Single-walled carbon nanotube formation on iron oxide catalysts in diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unrau, Chad J.; Axelbaum, Richard L.; Fraundorf, Phil

    2010-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are shown to grow rapidly on iron oxide catalysts on the fuel side of an inverse ethylene diffusion flame. The pathway of carbon in the flame is controlled by the flame structure, leading to formation of SWCNTs free of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) or soot. By using a combination of oxygen-enrichment and fuel dilution, fuel oxidation is favored over pyrolysis, PAH growth, and subsequent soot formation. The inverse configuration of the flame prevents burnout of the SWCNTs while providing a long carbon-rich region for nanotube formation. Furthermore, flame structure is used to control oxidation of the catalyst particles. Iron sub-oxide catalysts are highly active toward SWCNT formation while Fe and Fe2O3 catalysts are less active. This can be understood by considering the effects of particle oxidation on the dissociative adsorption of gas-phase hydrocarbons. The optimum catalyst particle composition and flame conditions were determined in near real-time using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to measure the catalyst and SWCNT size distributions. In addition, SMPS results were combined with flame velocity measurement to measure SWCNT growth rates. SWCNTs were found to grow at rates of over 100 μm/s.

  16. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.F.; Hoopes, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl3 within a NaBH4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe3O4 particles (100–190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (HC) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:25301983

  17. Fracture morphology of 2-D carbon-carbon composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, W. B.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Out-of-plane tensile tests of a woven fabric carbon-carbon composite were performed in a scanning electron microscope equipped with a tensile stage and a videotape recording system. The composite was prepared from T-300 8-harness satin graphite fabric and a phenolic resin. The (0/90/0/90/0 sub 1/2) sub 2 laminate, with a Theta describing the orientation of the warp fibers of the fabric, was cured at 160 C and pyrolized at 871 C. This was followed by four cycles of resin impregnation, curing, and pyrolysis. A micrograph of the cross section of the composite is presented. Inspection of the specimen fracture surface revealed that the filaments had no residual matrix bonded to them. Further inspection revealed that the fracture was interlaminar in nature. Failure occurred where filaments of adjacent plies had the same orientation. Thus it is postulated that improvement in transverse tensile strength of 2-D carbon-carbon depends on the improvement of the filament-matrix bond strength.

  18. Thermal Cycling of Thermal Control Paints on Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites and carbon-polyimide composites are being considered for space radiator applications owing to their light weight and high thermal conductivity. For those radiator applications where sunlight will impinge on the surface, it will be necessary to apply a white thermal control paint to minimize solar absorptance and enhance infrared emittance. Several currently available white thermal control paints were applied to candidate carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites and were subjected to vacuum thermal cycling in the range of -100 C to +277 C. The optical properties of solar absorptance and infrared emittance were evaluated before and after thermal cycling. In addition, adhesion of the paints was evaluated utilizing a tape test. The test matrix included three composites: resin-derived carbon-carbon and vapor infiltrated carbon-carbon, both reinforced with pitch-based P-120 graphite fibers, and a polyimide composite reinforced with T-650 carbon fibers, and three commercially available white thermal control paints: AZ-93, Z-93-C55, and YB-71P.

  19. Spectroscopic Investigations on Polypropylene -- Carbon Nanofibers Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipara, Mircea; Brian, Jones; Lozano, Karen; Villareal, John R.; Cristian Chipara, Alin; Hernandez, Anna; Dorina Chipara, Magdalena; Sellmyer, David J.

    2008-03-01

    Nanocomposites were obtained by high-shear mixing of isotactic polypropylene (Marlex HLN-120-01; Philips Sumika Polypropylene Company) with various amounts of vapor grown carbon nanofibers (PR-24AG; Pyrograf Products, Inc) by utilizing a HAAKE Rheomix at 65 rpm and 180 ^oC for 9 min followed by an additional mixing at 90 rpm for 5 min. Composites loaded with various amounts of vapor grown carbon nanofibers have been prepared. Wide angle X-Ray scattering investigations focus on the effect of carbon nanofibers on the crystalline phases of polypropylene and on the overall crystallinity degree of the polymeric matrix. Raman spectroscopy analysis concentrates on D and G bands. X-band electron spin resonance investigations aim at a better understanding of the purity of carbon nanofibers and of the ratio between conducting and paramagnetic.

  20. Intracellular degradation of functionalized carbon nanotube/iron oxide hybrids is modulated by iron via Nrf2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Elgrabli, Dan; Dachraoui, Walid; Marmier, Hélène de; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Bégin, Dominique; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Bianco, Alberto; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    The in vivo fate and biodegradability of carbon nanotubes is still a matter of debate despite tremendous applications. In this paper we describe a molecular pathway by which macrophages degrade functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) designed for biomedical applications and containing, or not, iron oxide nanoparticles in their inner cavity. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy show that intracellularly-induced structural damages appear more rapidly for iron-free CNTs in comparison to iron-loaded ones, suggesting a role of iron in the degradation mechanism. By comparing the molecular responses of macrophages derived from THP1 monocytes to both types of CNTs, we highlight a molecular mechanism regulated by Nrf2/Bach1 signaling pathways to induce CNT degradation via NOX2 complex activation and O2•−, H2O2 and OH• production. CNT exposure activates an oxidative stress-dependent production of iron via Nrf2 nuclear translocation, Ferritin H and Heme oxygenase 1 translation. Conversely, Bach1 was translocated to the nucleus of cells exposed to iron-loaded CNTs to recycle embedded iron. Our results provide new information on the role of oxidative stress, iron metabolism and Nrf2-mediated host defence for regulating CNT fate in macrophages. PMID:28120861

  1. Southern Ocean deep-water carbon export enhanced by natural iron fertilization.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Raymond T; Salter, Ian; Sanders, Richard J; Lucas, Mike I; Moore, C Mark; Mills, Rachel A; Statham, Peter J; Allen, John T; Baker, Alex R; Bakker, Dorothee C E; Charette, Matthew A; Fielding, Sophie; Fones, Gary R; French, Megan; Hickman, Anna E; Holland, Ross J; Hughes, J Alan; Jickells, Timothy D; Lampitt, Richard S; Morris, Paul J; Nédélec, Florence H; Nielsdóttir, Maria; Planquette, Hélène; Popova, Ekaterina E; Poulton, Alex J; Read, Jane F; Seeyave, Sophie; Smith, Tania; Stinchcombe, Mark; Taylor, Sarah; Thomalla, Sandy; Venables, Hugh J; Williamson, Robert; Zubkov, Mike V

    2009-01-29

    The addition of iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions induces phytoplankton blooms that take up carbon. Carbon export from the surface layer and, in particular, the ability of the ocean and sediments to sequester carbon for many years remains, however, poorly quantified. Here we report data from the CROZEX experiment in the Southern Ocean, which was conducted to test the hypothesis that the observed north-south gradient in phytoplankton concentrations in the vicinity of the Crozet Islands is induced by natural iron fertilization that results in enhanced organic carbon flux to the deep ocean. We report annual particulate carbon fluxes out of the surface layer, at three kilometres below the ocean surface and to the ocean floor. We find that carbon fluxes from a highly productive, naturally iron-fertilized region of the sub-Antarctic Southern Ocean are two to three times larger than the carbon fluxes from an adjacent high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll area not fertilized by iron. Our findings support the hypothesis that increased iron supply to the glacial sub-Antarctic may have directly enhanced carbon export to the deep ocean. The CROZEX sequestration efficiency (the amount of carbon sequestered below the depth of winter mixing for a given iron supply) of 8,600 mol mol(-1) was 18 times greater than that of a phytoplankton bloom induced artificially by adding iron, but 77 times smaller than that of another bloom initiated, like CROZEX, by a natural supply of iron. Large losses of purposefully added iron can explain the lower efficiency of the induced bloom(6). The discrepancy between the blooms naturally supplied with iron may result in part from an underestimate of horizontal iron supply.

  2. Synthesis of binary iron-carbon nanoparticles by UV laser photolysis of Fe(CO)5 with various hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Musikhin, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this study the laser photolysis of the mixtures containing vapors of various hydrocarbons and iron pentacarbonyl was implemented to nanoparticle formation. The radiation source used for photo-dissociation of precursors was a pulsed Nd:Yag laser operated at a wavelength of 266 nm. Under UV radiation the molecules of Fe(CO)5 decomposed, forming atomic iron vapor and unsaturated carbonyls at well-known and readily controllable parameters. The subsequent condensation of supersaturated metal vapor resulted in small iron clusters and nanoparticles formation. The growth process of the nanoparticles was observed by a method of laser light extinction. Laser induced incandescence technique was applied for particle sizing during the process of their formation. Additionally nanoparticle samples were investigated by a transmission electron microscope. The particle size distribution was measured by statistical treatment of microphotographs. The elemental analysis by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction pattern gave the composition and structure of nanoparticles. The core-shell iron-carbon nanoparticles were synthesized by joint laser photolysis of iron pentacarbonyl with benzene and acetylene. The photolysis of the mixtures of toluene, butanol and methane with iron pentacarbonyl revealed in a pure iron particles formation which fast oxidized in air when were extracted out of the reactor.

  3. Oxygen Reactivity of a Carbon Fiber Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Theron Devol; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2002-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are often suggested as armor material for the first wall of a fusion plasma chamber due to carbon's low atomic number, high thermal conductivity, and high melting point. However, carbon is chemically reactive in air and will react with ingress air during a Loss of Vacuum Accident and release tritium fuel that has been retained in the carbon. Tritium mobilization and carbon monoxide generation via CFC oxidation are both safety concerns. This paper discusses chemical reactivity experiments that were performed using the state-of-the-art 3-dimensional NB31 CFC produced by SNECMA and a laminar reaction gas of Ar–21 vol% O2. Oxidation reaction rates were measured for CFC temperatures of 525, 600, 700, 800, 900, and 1000 °C and a 100 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) Ar–O2 flow rate. Experiments were also performed at CFC temperatures of 700 and 1000 °C and a 1000 sccm Ar–O2 flow rate. Mass spectral analyses of the exhaust reaction gas suggested that carbon monoxide was the primary reaction at the CFC surface and carbon dioxide was readily produced in the exiting reaction gas. The measured reaction rates compare well with the literature and were used to produce a CFC oxidation curve that is recommended for use in fusion safety analyses.

  4. Effects of iron and calcium carbonate on the variation and cycling of carbon source in integrated wastewater treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhimiao, Zhao; Xinshan, Song; Yufeng, Zhao; Yanping, Xiao; Yuhui, Wang; Junfeng, Wang; Denghua, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Iron and calcium carbonate were added in wastewater treatments as the adjusting agents to improve the contaminant removal performance and regulate the variation of carbon source in integrated treatments. At different temperatures, the addition of the adjusting agents obviously improved the nitrogen and phosphorous removals. TN and TP removals were respectively increased by 29.41% and 23.83% in AC-100 treatment under 1-day HRT. Carbon source from dead algae was supplied as green microbial carbon source and Fe(2+) was supplied as carbon source surrogate. COD concentration was increased to 30mg/L and above, so the problem of the shortage of carbon source was solved. Dead algae and Fe(2+) as carbon source supplement or surrogate played significant role, which was proved by microbial community analysis. According to the denitrification performance in the treatments, dead algae as green microbial carbon source combined with iron and calcium carbonate was the optimal supplement carbon source in wastewater treatment.

  5. Temporal changes in community composition of heterotrophic bacteria during in situ iron enrichment in the western subarctic Pacific (SEEDS-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Takafumi; Suzuki, Koji; Hayakawa, Maki; Kudo, Isao; Higashi, Seigo; Tsuda, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    Little is known about the effects of iron enrichment in high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters on the community composition of heterotrophic bacteria, which are crucial to nutrient recycling and microbial food webs. Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA fragments, we investigated the heterotrophic eubacterial community composition in surface waters during an in situ iron-enrichment experiment (SEEDS-II) in the western subarctic Pacific in the summer of 2004. DGGE fingerprints representing the community composition of eubacteria differed inside and outside the iron-enriched patch. Sequencing of DGGE bands revealed that at least five phylotypes of α-proteobacteria including Roseobacter, Cytophaga-Flavobacteria- Bacteroides (CFB), γ-proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria occurred in almost all samples from the iron-enriched patch. Diatoms did not bloom during SEEDS-II, but the eubacterial composition in the iron-enriched patch was similar to that in diatom blooms observed previously. Although dissolved organic carbon (DOC) accumulation was not detected in surface waters during SEEDS-II, growth of the Roseobacter clade might have been particularly stimulated after iron additions. Two identified phylotypes of CFB were closely related to the genus Saprospira, whose algicidal activity might degrade the phytoplankton assemblages increased by iron enrichment. These results suggest that the responses of heterotrophic bacteria to iron enrichment could differ among phylotypes during SEEDS-II.

  6. Multifunctional Carbon Fibre Tapes for Automotive Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koncherry, V.; Potluri, P.; Fernando, A.

    2017-04-01

    Cabon fibre composites are used where mechanical performance such as strength, stiffness and impact properties at low density is a critical parameter for engineering applications. Carbon fibre flat tape is one material which is traditionally used to manufacture three-dimensional composites in this area. Modifying the carbon fibre tape to incorporate other functions such as stealth, electromagnetic interference, shielding, de-icing, self-repair, energy storage, allows us to create multi-functional carbon fibre tape. Researchers have been developing such material and the technology for their manufacture in order to produce multifunctional carbon fibre based components more economically and efficiently. This paper presents the manufacturing process of a metallised carbon fibre material for a chopped fibre preforming process that uses electromagnets for preforming instead of traditional suction airflow fibre deposition. In addition, the paper further presents mechanical and magneto-static modelling that is carried out to investigate the bending properties of the material produced and its suitability for creating 3D preforms.

  7. Multifunctional Carbon Fibre Tapes for Automotive Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koncherry, V.; Potluri, P.; Fernando, A.

    2016-11-01

    Cabon fibre composites are used where mechanical performance such as strength, stiffness and impact properties at low density is a critical parameter for engineering applications. Carbon fibre flat tape is one material which is traditionally used to manufacture three-dimensional composites in this area. Modifying the carbon fibre tape to incorporate other functions such as stealth, electromagnetic interference, shielding, de-icing, self-repair, energy storage, allows us to create multi-functional carbon fibre tape. Researchers have been developing such material and the technology for their manufacture in order to produce multifunctional carbon fibre based components more economically and efficiently. This paper presents the manufacturing process of a metallised carbon fibre material for a chopped fibre preforming process that uses electromagnets for preforming instead of traditional suction airflow fibre deposition. In addition, the paper further presents mechanical and magneto-static modelling that is carried out to investigate the bending properties of the material produced and its suitability for creating 3D preforms.

  8. Carbon Fiber Foam Composites and Methods for Making the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leseman, Zayd Chad (Inventor); Atwater, Mark Andrew (Inventor); Phillips, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Exemplary embodiments provide methods and apparatus of forming fibrous carbon foams (FCFs). In one embodiment, FCFs can be formed by flowing a fuel rich gas mixture over a catalytic material and components to be encapsulated in a mold to form composite carbon fibers, each composite carbon fiber having a carbon phase grown to encapsulate the component in situ. The composite carbon fibers can be intertwined with one another to form FCFs having a geometry according to the mold.

  9. Structural study of nanometer-sized iron crystallites in single crystalline iron-MgO composite films.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Nagao, M; Yoshizaki, F; Mihama, K

    1989-07-01

    Single crystalline composite films of iron and MgO are prepared by a simultaneous vacuum deposition technique. The structures of the composite films, especially of the iron crystallites embedded, are studied by high-resolution electron microscopy and nanometer-area electron diffraction. The alpha-iron (b.c.c.) crystallites of 1 nm in size are epitaxially embedded in single crystalline MgO films, the orientation being (011)[100]Fe parallel (001)[100]MgO and (001)[110]Fe parallel (001)[100]MgO. A heat treatment of the as-grown films at 500-1,000 degrees C brings about a phase transformation of the crystallites from alpha-iron to gamma-iron (f.c.c.), followed by a grain growth of alpha-iron and finally the growth of the spinel, MgFe2O4. The gamma-iron crystallites transformed are circular plates and have strains at the periphery to accommodate the surrounding MgO-matrix. The magnetic property of the composite films is also reported.

  10. Polyaniline-Carbon Nanotubes Composite Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Sabrina; Camargo, Carlos; Campo, Eva; Esteve, Jaume; Ramos, Idalia

    2012-02-01

    The understanding of photoactuation in Carbon Nanotubes (CNT)-polymer composites can contribute to the development of micro- and nano-optical-mechanical systems for applications that include intracellular motors, artificial muscles, and tactile displays for blind people. The integration of CNTs into polymers combines the good processability of polymers with the functional properties of CNTs. CNTs-polymer composite fibers were fabricated using the electrospinning technique. electrospinning process orients the CNTs along the precursor stream and can contribute to enhance photo actuation properties. The addition of polyaniline, an electroactive conductive polymer is expected to enhance the actuation strain of the composite. aim of this research is to study photoactuation in MWCNT-Polyanilile electrospun fibers. fibers were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and X-Ray Diffraction. Results demonstrate evidence of photo-actuation after irradiating the fibers with visible light. tests are being conducted to understand the mechanisms of the composites response to light stimulation.

  11. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  12. A Versatile Iron-Tannin-Framework Ink Coating Strategy to Fabricate Biomass-Derived Iron Carbide/Fe-N-Carbon Catalysts for Efficient Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Liang, Yan; Hu, Yaoxin; Kong, Biao; Simon, George P; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, San Ping; Wang, Huanting

    2016-01-22

    The conversion of biomass into valuable carbon composites as efficient non-precious metal oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts is attractive for the development of commercially viable polymer electrolyte membrane fuel-cell technology. Herein, a versatile iron-tannin-framework ink coating strategy is developed to fabricate cellulose-derived Fe3 C/Fe-N-C catalysts using commercial filter paper, tissue, or cotton as a carbon source, an iron-tannin framework as an iron source, and dicyandiamide as a nitrogen source. The oxygen reduction performance of the resultant Fe3C/Fe-N-C catalysts shows a high onset potential (i.e. 0.98 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)), and large kinetic current density normalized to both geometric electrode area and mass of catalysts (6.4 mA cm(-2) and 32 mA mg(-1) at 0.80 V vs RHE) in alkaline condition. This method can even be used to prepare efficient catalysts using waste carbon sources, such as used polyurethane foam.

  13. Processing and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Can, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Hull, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of large-scale quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have provided the opportunity to study the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites using these novel materials as reinforcement. Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. currently supplies large sheets with dimensions up to 122 cm x 244 cm containing both single-wall and few-wall CNTs. The tubes are approximately 1 mm in length with diameters ranging from 8 to 12 nm. In the present study being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), single and multiple layers of CNT sheets were infused or coated with various polymer solutions that included commercial toughened-epoxies and bismaleimides, as well as a LaRC developed polyimide. The resulting CNT composites were tested in tension using a modified version of ASTM D882-12 to determine their strength and modulus values. The effects of solvent treatment and mechanical elongation/alignment of the CNT sheets on the tensile performance of the composite were determined. Thin composites (around 50 wt% CNT) fabricated from acetone condensed and elongated CNT sheets with either a BMI or polyimide resin solution exhibited specific tensile moduli approaching that of toughened epoxy/ IM7 carbon fiber unidirectional composites.

  14. Ultrastrong, Stiff and Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Yong, Zhenzhong; Li, Qingwen; Bradford, Philip D.; Liu, Wei; Tucker, Dennis S.; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Zhu, Yuntian

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an order of magnitude stronger than any current engineering fiber. However, for the past two decades it has been a challenge to utilize their reinforcement potential in composites. Here we report CNT composites with unprecedented multifunctionalities, including record high strength (3.8 GPa), Young s modulus (293 GPa), electrical conductivity (1230 S cm-1) and thermal conductivity (41 W m-1 K-1). These superior properties are derived from the long length, high volume fraction, good alignment and reduced waviness of the CNTs, which were produced by a novel processing approach that can be easily scaled up for industrial production.

  15. Fabrication of angleply carbon-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to fabricate and test angleply composite consisting of NASA-Hough carbon base monofilament in a matrix of 2024 aluminum. The effect of fabrication variables on the tensile properties was determined, and an optimum set of conditions was established. The size of the composite panels was successfully scaled up, and the material was tested to measure tensile behavior as a function of temperature, stress-rupture and creep characteristics at two elevated temperatures, bending fatigue behavior, resistance to thermal cycling, and Izod impact response.

  16. Detection of Carbon Monoxide Using Polymer-Carbon Composite Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon monoxide (CO) sensor was developed that can be incorporated into an existing sensing array architecture. The CO sensor is a low-power chemiresistor that operates at room temperature, and the sensor fabrication techniques are compatible with ceramic substrates. Sensors made from four different polymers were tested: poly (4-vinylpryridine), ethylene-propylene-diene-terpolymer, polyepichlorohydrin, and polyethylene oxide (PEO). The carbon black used for the composite films was Black Pearls 2000, a furnace black made by the Cabot Corporation. Polymers and carbon black were used as received. In fact, only two of these sensors showed a good response to CO. The poly (4-vinylpryridine) sensor is noisy, but it does respond to the CO above 200 ppm. The polyepichlorohydrin sensor is less noisy and shows good response down to 100 ppm.

  17. Development of Carbon-Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a short discussion of one company's effort to develop composites of carbon nanotubes in epoxy and other polymer matrices. The focus of the discussion is on the desirability of chemically modifying carbon nanotubes to overcome their inherent chemical nonreactivity and thereby enable the formation of strong chemical bonds between nanotubes and epoxies (or other polymeric matrix materials or their monomeric precursors). The chemical modification is effected in a process in which discrete functional groups are covalently attached to the nanotube surfaces. The functionalization process was proposed by the company and demonstrated in practice for the first time during this development effort. The covalently attached functional groups are capable of reacting with the epoxy or other matrix resin to form covalent bonds. Furthermore, the company uses this process to chemically modify the nanotube surfaces, affording tunable adhesion to polymers and solubility in select solvents. Flat-sheet composites containing functionalized nanotubes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.

  18. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens

    PubMed Central

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J. S.; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen’s sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration. PMID:27050837

  19. Bio-Inspired Ceramic/Carbon Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    be observed (Fig. 6). 3 µm Spark Plasma Sintering We have developed an approach for the SPS of the ceramic scaffolds filled with CNTs...with other C precursors such as pitch. Spark plasma sintering can be used to compress these infiltrated materials to create brick-and-mortar structures...objective to fabricate bio-inspired ceramic/CNT or ceramic/carbon composites with nacre-like structures by combining freeze casting with spark plasma

  20. Carbon nanotube polymer composites for photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardaci, V.; Rozhin, A. G.; Hennrich, F.; Milne, W. I.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2007-03-01

    We report the fabrication of high optical quality single wall carbon nanotube polyvinyl alcohol composites and their application in nanotube based photonic devices. These show a broad absorption of semiconductor tubes centred at ∼1.55 μm, the spectral range of interest for optical communications. The films are used as mode-lockers in an erbium doped fibre laser, achieving ∼700 fs mode-locked pulses. Raman spectroscopy shows no damage after a long time continuous laser operation.

  1. On the test of carbon carbon composite turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Okura, A.; Tanatsugu, N.; Naruo, Y.; Tachibana, M.; Yamashita, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Ueda, T.

    1993-12-31

    The research on C/C composites has reached the step of practical application of engineering materials in many countries in the world. C/C composites show high specific strength in comparison with other materials. It is important as structural materials for space vehicles and air craft. C/C composites have good thermal expansion, excellent heat impact resistance and high temperature strength, except that it has oxidation resistance. The authors have done research and development on an air turbo ramjet engine which is intended for space vehicles (ultra-high speed air craft). Carbon fiber reinforced yarn has been examined under the actual loading and rotor. The objective of this experiment is to obtain information on the environmental resistance (above 30.000 rpm, test atmosphere 70% H{sub 2}, 30% H{sub 2}O) of a ACC turbine blade. There is a difference in the fabrication method, as well as the fiber orientation and weaving method. Test results show that the fracture behavior of C/C composite turbine blade is strongly dependent on the weaving orientation of carbon fibers.

  2. Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2005-12-01

    A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

  3. Modeling Carbon-Black/Polymer Composite Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hua; Pitt, William G.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford K.

    2012-01-01

    Conductive polymer composite sensors have shown great potential in identifying gaseous analytes. To more thoroughly understand the physical and chemical mechanisms of this type of sensor, a mathematical model was developed by combining two sub-models: a conductivity model and a thermodynamic model, which gives a relationship between the vapor concentration of analyte(s) and the change of the sensor signals. In this work, 64 chemiresistors representing eight different carbon concentrations (8–60 vol% carbon) were constructed by depositing thin films of a carbon-black/polyisobutylene composite onto concentric spiral platinum electrodes on a silicon chip. The responses of the sensors were measured in dry air and at various vapor pressures of toluene and trichloroethylene. Three parameters in the conductivity model were determined by fitting the experimental data. It was shown that by applying this model, the sensor responses can be adequately predicted for given vapor pressures; furthermore the analyte vapor concentrations can be estimated based on the sensor responses. This model will guide the improvement of the design and fabrication of conductive polymer composite sensors for detecting and identifying mixtures of organic vapors. PMID:22518071

  4. Utilization of waste polyethylene terephthalate as a reducing agent in the reduction of iron ore composite pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Gökhan; Birol, Burak; Sarıdede, Muhlis Nezihi

    2014-08-01

    The increasing consumption of plastics inevitably results in increasing amounts of waste plastics. Because of their long degradation periods, these wastes negatively affect the natural environment. Numerous studies have been conducted to recycle and eliminate waste plastics. The potential for recycling waste plastics in the iron and steel industry has been underestimated; the high C and H contents of plastics may make them suitable as alternative reductants in the reduction process of iron ore. This study aims to substitute plastic wastes for coal in reduction melting process and to investigate their performance during reduction at high temperature. We used a common type of waste plastic, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), because of its high carbon and hydrogen contents. Composite pellets containing PET wastes, coke, and magnetite iron ore were reduced at selected temperatures of 1400 and 1450°C for reduction time from 2 to 10 min to investigate the reduction melting behavior of these pellets. The results showed that an increased temperature and reduction time increased the reduction ratio of the pellets. The optimum experimental conditions for obtaining metallic iron (iron nuggets) were reduction at 1450°C for 10 min using composite pellets containing 60% PET and 40% coke.

  5. Removal of Trace Arsenic to Meet Drinking Water Standards Using Iron Oxide Coated Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ntim, Susana Addo; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-05-12

    This study presents the removal of trace level arsenic to meet drinking water standards using an iron oxide-multi-walled carbon nanotube (Fe-MWCNT) hybrid as a sorbent. The synthesis was facilitated by the high degree of nanotube functionalization using a microwave assisted process, and a controlled assembly of iron oxide was possible where the MWCNT served as an effective support for the oxide. In the final product, 11 % of the carbon atoms were attached to Fe. The Fe-MWCNT was effective in arsenic removal to below the drinking water standard levels of 10 µg L(-1). The absorption capacity of the composite was 1723 µg g(-1) and 189 µg g(-1) for As(III) and As(V) respectively. The adsorption of As(V) on Fe-MWCNT was faster than that of As(III). The pseudo-second order rate equation was found to effectively describe the kinetics of arsenic adsorption. The adsorption isotherms for As(III) and As(V) fitted both the Langmuir and Freundlich models.

  6. Microbial Community Composition Impacts Pathogen Iron Availability during Polymicrobial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Apollo; Whiteley, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for bacterial pathogenesis, but in the host, iron is tightly sequestered, limiting its availability for bacterial growth. Although this is an important arm of host immunity, most studies examine how bacteria respond to iron restriction in laboratory rather than host settings, where the microbiome can potentially alter pathogen strategies for acquiring iron. One of the most important transcriptional regulators controlling bacterial iron homeostasis is Fur. Here we used a combination of RNA-seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq to characterize the iron-restricted and Fur regulons of the biofilm-forming opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We discovered that iron restriction and Fur regulate 4% and 3.5% of the genome, respectively. While most genes in these regulons were related to iron uptake and metabolism, we found that Fur also directly regulates the biofilm-dispersing enzyme Dispersin B, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to escape from iron-scarce environments. We then leveraged these datasets to assess the availability of iron to A. actinomycetemcomitans in its primary infection sites, abscesses and the oral cavity. We found that A. actinomycetemcomitans is not restricted for iron in a murine abscess mono-infection, but becomes restricted for iron upon co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Furthermore, in the transition from health to disease in human gum infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans also becomes restricted for iron. These results suggest that host iron availability is heterogeneous and dependent on the infecting bacterial community. PMID:27973608

  7. A method for preparing ferric activated carbon composites adsorbents to remove arsenic from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao Li; Lin, Y C; Chen, X; Gao, Nai Yun

    2007-09-30

    Iron oxide/activated carbon (FeO/AC) composite adsorbent material, which was used to modify the coal-based activated carbon (AC) 12 x 40, was prepared by the special ferric oxide microcrystal in this study. This composite can be used as the adsorbent to remove arsenic from drinking water, and Langmuir isotherm adsorption equation well describes the experimental adsorption isotherms. Then, the arsenic desorption can subsequently be separated from the medium by using a 1% aqueous NaOH solution. The apparent characters and physical chemistry performances of FeO/AC composite were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch and column adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate and compare the arsenic removal capability of the prepared FeO/AC composite material and virgin activated carbon. It can be concluded that: (1) the main phase present in this composite are magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)), hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) and goethite (alpha-FeO(OH)); (2) the presence of iron oxides did not significantly affect the surface area or the pore structure of the activated carbon; (3) the comparisons between the adsorption isotherms of arsenic from aqueous solution onto the composite and virgin activated carbon showed that the FeO/AC composite behave an excellent capacity of adsorption arsenic than the virgin activated carbon; (4) column adsorption experiments with FeO/AC composite adsorbent showed that the arsenic could be removed to below 0.01 mg/L within 1250 mL empty bed volume when influent concentration was 0.5mg/L.

  8. Polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite films.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huina; Minus, Marilyn L; Jagannathan, Sudhakar; Kumar, Satish

    2010-05-01

    Reinforcement efficiency of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been compared in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) films at nanotube loadings of 5, 10, and 20 wt %. The films are characterized for mechanical, dynamic-mechanical, and thermomechanical properties, electrical conductivity, as well as structural analysis. PAN/CNT composite films exhibit electrical conductivities up to 5500 S/m. Based on X-ray diffraction, PAN crystallinity was shown to increase with the presence of CNT. PAN-CNT interactions in the various composites were compared using conventional activation energy analysis. The strongest physical interaction between PAN and CNT was found in samples containing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). CNT surface area was also measured using nitrogen gas adsorption and correlated with PAN-CNT composite film mechanical properties, in an effort to better understand PAN-CNT interactions for different CNT morphologies. Solvent behavior of various composite films has also been investigated. The presence of CNT was found to improve PAN solvent resistance.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composite Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Quoc; Cruden, Brett A.; Cassell, Alan M.; Walker, Megan D.; Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.; Li, Jun; Yang, Cary Y.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art ICs for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/sq cm. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies, and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. Our approach involves finding new and efficient thermally conductive materials. Exploiting carbon nanotube (CNT) films and composites for their superior axial thermal conductance properties has the potential for such an application requiring efficient heat transfer. In this work, we present thermal contact resistance measurement results for CNT and CNT-Cu composite films. It is shown that Cu-filled CNT arrays enhance thermal conductance when compared to as-grown CNT arrays. Furthermore, the CNT-Cu composite material provides a mechanically robust alternative to current IC packaging technology.

  10. Preservation of iron(II) by carbon-rich matrices in a hydrothermal plume

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Brandy M.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Manganini, Steven J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moffett, James W.; Rouxel, Olivier; German, Christopher R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-09-20

    Hydrothermal venting associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism is globally widespread. This venting is responsible for a dissolved iron flux to the ocean that is approximately equal to that associated with continental riverine runoff. For hydrothermal fluxes, it has long been assumed that most of the iron entering the oceans is precipitated in inorganic forms. However, the possibility of globally significant fluxes of iron escaping these mass precipitation events and entering open-ocean cycles is now being debated, and two recent studies suggest that dissolved organic ligands might influence the fate of hydrothermally vented metals. Here we present spectromicroscopic measurements of iron and carbon in hydrothermal plume particles at the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We show that organic carbon-rich matrices, containing evenly dispersed iron(II)-rich materials, are pervasive in hydrothermal plume particles. The absence of discrete iron(II) particles suggests that the carbon and iron associate through sorption or complexation. We suggest that these carbon matrices stabilize iron(II) released from hydrothermal vents in the region, preventing its oxidation and/or precipitation as insoluble minerals. Our findings have implications for deep-sea biogeochemical cycling of iron, a widely recognized limiting nutrient in the oceans.

  11. Preparation of mesoporous carbon-carbon nanotube composites using the template method.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kidon; Lim, Seongyop; Kim, Sang-Kyung; Peck, Donghyun; Jung, Doohwan

    2011-07-01

    Reported herein is a simple template method for preparing mesoporous carbons (MPCs) from a mesophase pitch, using homemade nano-sized MgOs and MgO-carbon nanotube (CNT) composites as templates. Nano-sized MgO particles containing iron-molybdenum were synthesized through the heat treatment of the precursor ash, and the MgO-CNT composites were prepared via catalytic chemical vapor deposition of CH4 over the MgO-based particles. MPCs with a high surface area of 443-578 m2/g were obtained through the heat treatment of well-mixed mesophase pitch-MgO (or MgO-CNT), followed by mild-acid treatment to remove the MgO and other catalyst components. All the materials (the precursors, nano-particles, and MPCs) were analyzed via powder X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The formation of the pore structure in the MPCs is discussed, and the potential application of the MPC-CNT composite is demonstrated through cyclic voltammetry.

  12. The archetype gamma-class carbonic anhydrase (Cam) contains iron when synthesized in vivo.

    PubMed

    Macauley, Sheridan R; Zimmerman, Sabrina A; Apolinario, Ethel E; Evilia, Caryn; Hou, Ya-Ming; Ferry, James G; Sowers, Kevin R

    2009-02-10

    A recombinant protein overproduction system was developed in Methanosarcina acetivorans to facilitate biochemical characterization of oxygen-sensitive metalloenzymes from strictly anaerobic species in the Archaea domain. The system was used to overproduce the archetype of the independently evolved gamma-class carbonic anhydrase. The overproduced enzyme was oxygen sensitive and had full incorporation of iron instead of zinc observed when overproduced in Escherichia coli. This, the first report of in vivo iron incorporation for any carbonic anhydrase, supports the need to reevaluate the role of iron in all classes of carbonic anhydrases derived from anaerobic environments.

  13. Carbon nanomaterial Formation on Fresh-Reduced Iron by Converted Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebesnyi, A.; Kotov, V.; Sviatenko, A.; Filonenko, D.; Khovavko, A.; Bondarenko, B.

    2017-02-01

    The mechanism of carbon nanomaterial formation at moderate temperatures while processing fresh-reduced iron by products of air conversion of natural gas is considered. It is shown that under given conditions, the size and the shape of the resulting carbon are dependent on the temperature and the size of microscopic iron grains formed during reduction. These iron grains are the catalyzer of the reaction of carbon monoxide disproportionation. It is concluded that the formation of a nucleus of the new carbon phase occurs at the contact boundaries of neighboring grains of newly reduced iron with the subsequent formation in these places of ring-shaped carbon cuffs. Nanotubes are forming as a result of further carbon crystallization, and separation of iron particles from the main mass is occurring, i.e., there is a fragmentation of the substance of the catalyst. According to the results of laboratory studies, the optimum temperature of carbon nanotube formation in the environment of converted gas is 600-650 °C. The evidence of the hypothesis that the mechanism of the reaction of carbon monoxide disproportionation flows through the intermediate stage of iron oxides formation is given.

  14. Synthesis and properties of a novel structural binder utilizing the chemistry of iron carbonation.

    PubMed

    Das, Sumanta; Souliman, Beshoy; Stone, David; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2014-06-11

    This paper explores, for the first time, the possibility of carbonating waste metallic iron powder to develop sustainable binder systems for concrete. The fundamental premise of this work is that metallic iron will react with aqueous CO2 under controlled conditions to form complex iron carbonates which have binding capabilities. Chosen additives containing silica and alumina are added to facilitate iron dissolution and to obtain beneficial rheological and later-age properties. Water is generally only a medium for mass transfer in these systems thereby making the common reaction schemes in portland cement concretes inapplicable. The compressive and flexural strengths of the chosen iron-based binder systems increase with carbonation duration and the specimens carbonated for 4 days exhibit mechanical properties that are comparable to those of companion ordinary portland cement systems that are most commonly used as the binder in building and infrastructural construction. The influence of the additives, carbonation duration, and the air curing duration after carbonation are explored in detail. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrate the presence of an organic carbonate complex (the dissolution agent used to dissolve iron is organic), the amount of which increases with carbonation duration. Thermal analysis also confirms the participation of some amount of limestone powder in the reaction product formation. The viability of this binder type for concrete applications is proved in this study.

  15. Electron Beam Exposure of Thermal Control Paints on Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites are being considered for use as radiator face sheets or fins for space radiator applications. Several traditional white thermal control paints are being considered for the surface of the composite face sheets or fins. One threat to radiator performance is high energy electrons. The durability of the thermal control paints applied to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites was evaluated after extended exposure to 4.5 MeV electrons. Electron exposure was conducted under argon utilizing a Mylar(TradeMark) bag enclosure. Solar absorptance and infrared emittance was evaluated before and after exposure to identify optical properties degradation. Adhesion of the paints to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composite substrates was also of interest. Adhesion was evaluated on pristine and electron beam exposed coupons using a variation of the ASTM D-3359 tape test. Results of the optical properties evaluation and the adhesion tape tests are summarized.

  16. Novel apparatus for joining of carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeremiah D. E.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.; La Forest, Mark L.; Simpson, Allen H.

    2007-01-01

    A novel apparatus for joining carbon-carbon (C-C) composites is presented. This device was designed and built based on the concept of self-sustained oxygen-free high-temperature reactions. A layer of reactive mixture is contained between two disks of C-C composite that are to be joined. The stack is held in place between two electrodes, which are connected to a dc power supply. dc current is used to uniformly initiate the reaction in the reactive layer. The electrodes are also part of the pneumatic system, which applies a load to the stack. The designed hydraulic system is effective, lending to low cost and simplified, rapid, accurate operation. It provides a very short response time (˜10ms), which is important for the considered applications. All operational parameters such as initial and final loads, applied current, delay time between ignition and final load application, duration of Joule heating, and safety interlocks are controlled by a programable logic controller system. These features make it an efficient, user-friendly and safe machine to join refractory materials. The entire joining process takes place on the order of seconds, rather than hours as required for solid-state joining methods. The mechanical properties of the obtained joints are higher than those for the C-C composites.

  17. Martian mantle primary melts - An experimental study of iron-rich garnet lherzolite minimum melt composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertka, Constance M.; Holloway, John R.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum melt composition in equilibrium with an iron-rich garnet lherzolite assemblage is ascertained from a study of the liquidus relations of iron-rich basaltic compositions at 23 kb. The experimentally determined primary melt composition and its calculated sodium content reveal that Martian garnet lherzolite minimum melts are picritic alkali olivine basalts. Martian primary melts are found to be more picritic than terrestrial garnet lherzolite primary melts.

  18. The composition of Earth's oldest iron formations: The Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt (Québec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mloszewska, Aleksandra M.; Pecoits, Ernesto; Cates, Nicole L.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; O'Neil, Jonathan; Robbins, Leslie J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2012-02-01

    The composition of iron formations in the ≥ 3.75 Ga yr old Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt in northern Québec provides a proxy for seawater composition of the Eoarchean, and perhaps Hadean oceans, as well as constraints on the types of nutrients available to Earth's earliest life forms. Integrated petrologic and geochemical relationships, mapped between mineral phases in thin section and whole-rock chemistry, provide a framework for interpreting bulk and micro-scale variations in these chemical sedimentary precipitates. Results show that there are two distinct chemical sedimentary units in the Nuvvuagittuq belt: i) a banded iron formation (BIF) consisting of alternating micro-bands of magnetite, Ca-Mg-Fe-silicates and quartz, and ii) a more silicate-rich (Fe-poor) unit, the banded silicate-formation (BSF), of alternating micro-bands of quartz and Ca-Mg-Fe silicates. Precursor BIF and BSF deposits were likely layered amorphous silica and ferric-oxyhydroxides, fine-grained carbonate oozes and/or Ca-Mg-Fe rich silicate gels deposited in a marine setting. Low Al2O3, TiO2 and HFSE concentrations show that they are relatively detritus-free, with distinctively seawater-like REE + Y profiles and consistently positive Eu anomalies. These features suggest that the rocks preserved their seawater-like compositions despite metamorphic overprinting. The most significant trace elements in the sediments are Ni and Zn. Experimentally-derived partitioning coefficients show that Ni was enriched in Eoarchean seawater as compared to today (up to 300 nM), while Zn was fairly similar (up to 20 nM). Compositional resemblances between the Nuvvuagittuq sediments and those documented in the ca. 3.8 Ga Isua supracrustals (West Greenland) provide a plausible case that global ocean processes - in terms of trace metal abundances - had reached steady-state by the Eoarchean.

  19. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions

    DOEpatents

    Mrazek, Franklin C.; Smaga, John A.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  20. Study of adsorption process of iron colloid substances on activated carbon by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machekhina, K. I.; Shiyan, L. N.; Yurmazova, T. A.; Voyno, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The paper reports on the adsorption of iron colloid substances on activated carbon (PAC) Norit SA UF with using ultrasound. It is found that time of adsorption is equal to three hours. High-frequency electrical oscillation is 35 kHz. The adsorption capacity of activated carbon was determined and it is equal to about 0.25 mg iron colloid substances /mg PAC. The iron colloid substances size ranging from 30 to 360 nm was determined. The zeta potential of iron colloid substances which consists of iron (III) hydroxide, silicon compounds and natural organic substances is about (-38mV). The process of destruction iron colloid substances occurs with subsequent formation of a precipitate in the form of Fe(OH)3 as a result of the removal of organic substances from the model solution.

  1. Smart absorbing property of composites with MWCNTs and carbonyl iron as the filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-10-01

    A smart absorbing composite was prepared by mixing silicone rubber, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and flaky carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) in a two-roll mixer. The complex permittivity and permeability of composites with variable compression strain was measured by the transmission method and dc electric conductivity was measured by the standard four-point contact method, then the reflection loss (RL) could be calculated to evaluate the microwave absorbing ability. The results showed that the applied compression strain made the complex permittivity decrease but not obviously due to the broken original conductive network. The enforcement of the strain on the complex permeability was attributed to the orientation of flaky CIPs. With the compressing strain applied on the composites with thickness 1 mm or 1.5 mm, the RL value decreased (minimum -13.2 dB and -25.1 dB) and the absorbing band (RL<-10 dB) was widened (5.2-10.6 GHz and 4.0-8.4 GHz). While as the composite thickness decreased caused by the compression strain, the RL value still decreased (minimum -12.4 dB and -18.6 dB) and the absorbing band was also broadened (6.5-10.7 GHz and 4.4-10.0 GHz). Thus the smart absorbing property was effective on preparing absorbers with wide absorption band and high absorption ratio.

  2. Processing, characterization and modeling of carbon nanofiber modified carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samalot Rivera, Francis J.

    Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites are used in high temperature applications because they exhibit excellent thermomechanical properties. There are several challenges associated with the processing of C/C composites that include long cycle times, formation of closed porosity within fabric woven architecture and carbonization induced cracks that can lead to reduction of mechanical properties. This work addresses various innovative approaches to reduce processing uncertainties and thereby improve thermomechanical properties of C/C by using vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) in conjunction with carbon fabric and precursor phenolic matrix. The different aspects of the proposed research contribute to understanding of the translation of VGCNFs properties in a C/C composite. The specific objectives of the research are; (a) To understand the mechanical properties and microstructural features of phenolic resin precursor with and without modification with VGCNFs; (b) To develop innovative processing concepts that incorporate VGCNFs by spraying them on carbon fabric and/or adding VGCNFs to the phenolic resin precursor; and characterizing the process induced thermal and mechanical properties; and (c) To develop a finite element model to evaluate the thermal stresses developed in the carbonization of carbon/phenolic with and without VGCNFs. Addition of VGCNFs to phenolic resin enhanced the thermal and physical properties in terms of flexure and interlaminar properties, storage modulus and glass transition temperature and lowered the coefficient of thermal expansion. The approaches of spraying VGCNFs on the fabric surface and mixing VGCNFs with the phenolic resin was found to be effective in enhancing mechanical and thermal properties of the resulting C/C composites. Fiber bridging, improved carbon yield and minimization of carbonization-induced damage were the benefits of incorporating VGCNFs in C/C composites. Carbonization induced matrix cracking predicted by the finite

  3. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  4. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  5. Friction and wear of PAN/pitch-, PAN/CVI- and pitch/resin/CVI-based carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. D.; Ju, C. P.

    1994-05-01

    We compared the tribological behavior under a high speed condition (1.7 MPa, 2000 rev/min) of six different carbon/carbon composites including three two-dimensional PAN/pitch composites (TH, TM, and TL), one two-dimensional PAN/CVI composite (E), one two-dimensional pitch/resin/CVI composite (A), and one three-dimensional PAN/pitch composite (T3D). Results indicated that, among the five two-dimensional composites, TM and E performed significantly better than the other three composites under the present condition. Both TM and E exhibited a reasonably low friction coefficient (both about 0.4) and a wear rate that was an order of magnitude lower than those of the other three. A transition in friction occurred for A, TH, and TM, but not for E or TL. The pretransitional friction coefficients of the three composites were 0.1-0.2, similar to those measured under the low speed condition. During transition, the initially formed thin, smooth lubricative film was suddenly disrupted and turned into a thick powdery debris layer that caused the friction coefficient to rise abruptly to 0.5-0.9. The powdery debris on TM and E was easily 'ironed' into a smooth and tight lubricative film to cause both friction and wear to decline. The three-dimensional composite T3D was not suitable for high speed applications owing to extensive structural damage.

  6. Synthesis of lithium iron phosphate/carbon microspheres by using polyacrylic acid coated iron phosphate nanoparticles derived from iron(III) acrylate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongwei; He, Yan-Bing; Chu, Xiaodong; Ding, Zhaojun; Li, Baohua; He, Jianfu; Du, Hongda; Qin, Xianying; Kang, Feiyu

    2015-03-01

    Lithium iron phosphate/carbon (LiFePO4 /C) microspheres with high rate and cycling performance are synthesized from iron phosphate/polyacrylic acid (FePO4 /PAA) nanoparticles. Iron(III) acrylate is used as a precursor for both the iron and carbon sources. FePO4 nanoparticles are first produced by a coprecipitation reaction. The byproduct, acrylic acid ions, is polymerized in situ to form a uniform PAA layer on the surface of the FePO4 nanoparticles. The as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres are composed of primary nanoparticles with sizes of 40-50 nm. The nanoparticles are fully coated with a thin, uniform carbon layer derived from the decomposition of the PAA layer. The uniform carbon-coating layer cooperates with interstitial and boundary carbon derived from sucrose successfully to construct an excellent interconnecting conductive network in the microspheres. As a result of the unique structure, the as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres display both high electronic and ionic conductivities, which contribute to their high rate performance (162.9 mAh g(-1) at 0.1C and 126.1 mAh g(-1) at 5C) and excellent cycling stability (97.1% of capacity retention after 500 cycles at 5C/5C).

  7. Stress rupture behavior of silicon carbide coated, low modulus carbon/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rozak, G.A.; Wallace, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The disadvantages of carbon-carbon composites, in addition to the oxidation problem, are low thermal expansion, expensive fabrication procedures, and poor off axis properties. The background of carbon-carbon composites, their fabrication, oxidation, oxidation protection and mechanical testing in flexure are discussed.

  8. Magnetic composite prepared from palm shell-based carbon and application for recovery of residual oil from POME.

    PubMed

    Ngarmkam, Worawan; Sirisathitkul, Chitnarong; Phalakornkule, Chantaraporn

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic separation combined with adsorption by activated carbon has been found to be a useful method for removing pollutants. In this paper, the use of palm shell as a source of activated carbon for the removal and recovery of oil from palm oil mill effluent (POME) is studied. In the first part of the study, the properties of samples of activated carbon prepared from palm shell under a variety of different conditions were characterized for their hydrophobicity, surface areas and pore size distribution. The most effective of the activated carbon samples was prepared by impregnation with ZnCl(2) followed by combined physical/chemical activation under carbon dioxide flow at 800 °C. Four grams of these samples adsorbed 90% of the oil from 50 mL POME. In the second part, the palm shell-based carbon samples were given magnetic properties by the technique of iron oxide deposition. Ninety-four percent of the activated carbon/iron oxide composite containing the adsorbed oil could be extracted from the POME by a magnetic bar of 0.15 T. Four grams of the composite can remove 85% of oil from 50 mL POME and a total of 67% of the initial oil can then be recovered by hexane extraction. Powder X-ray diffractometry showed the presence of magnetite and maghemite in the activated carbon/iron oxide composite.

  9. Extraction of dielectric and magnetic properties of carbonyl iron powder composites at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivkovic, I.; Murk, A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we examine carbonyl iron composites in silicone rubber and epoxy matrices. Transmission measurements were performed at W (70 to 110 GHz) and Ka (26 to 40 GHz) bands and effective permittivity and permeability of composites with 10% volume fraction of carbonyl iron powder (CIP) were extracted at these frequencies. To extract permittivity and permeability of carbonyl iron powder in W and Ka bands, we use Looyenga formula. We extract permittivity and permeability of CIP from both silicone rubber and epoxy based composites and good agreement is achieved.

  10. Fibrous composites comprising carbon nanotubes and silica

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Huisheng; Zhu, Yuntian Theodore; Peterson, Dean E.; Jia, Quanxi

    2011-10-11

    Fibrous composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes; and a silica-containing moiety having one of the structures: (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NR.sub.1R.sub.2) or (SiO).sub.3Si--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--NCO; where n is from 1 to 6, and R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each independently H, CH.sub.3, or C.sub.2H.sub.5.

  11. Degradation of nitrobenzene-containing wastewater by carbon nanotubes immobilized nanoscale zerovalent iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Weizhou; Feng, Zhirong; Liu, Youzhi; Jiang, Huihui

    2016-07-01

    Nanoscaled zerovalent iron (NZVI)-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite materials were prepared by in situ reduction of Fe2+ onto CNTs for nitrobenzene (NB) degradation. The morphologies and the composites of the prepared materials were characterized by SEM, TEM, and XRD. The results showed that the agglomeration of NZVI decreased with NZVI dispersed well onto the surfaces of CNTs, the particle size of NZVI on CNTs was about 20-50 nm. The BET surface areas of NZVI-CNTs was about 95.8 m2/g, which was 39 % higher than that of bare NZVI. For storage, the prepared NZVI-CNTs were concentrated into slurry and stored in situ as fresh slurry without drying. Contrast experiment results showed that the removal efficiency of NB by NZVI-CNTs fresh slurry was 30 % higher than that of vacuum-dried NZVI-CNTs, which indicates that storing in situ as fresh slurry can be an alternative strategy for nanoparticle storage. Batch experiment results showed that NB could be degraded to aniline by NZVI-CNTs rapidly, and the appropriate pH can be conducted at a relatively wide range from 2.0 to 9.0. The optimum mass ratio of iron-carbon was 1:1, and removal efficiency of NB by NZVI-CNTs with this mass ratio can achieve 100 % within 1 min. The degradation process of NB to intermediates was accelerated significantly by NZVI-CNTs, however, there was still a long term for the intermediates to transfer completely into the final product of aniline. The existence of CNTs can improve the formation of aniline through accelerating the electron transfer by forming microscopic galvanic cells with NZVI.

  12. Responses of Sugar Beet Roots to Iron Deficiency. Changes in Carbon Assimilation and Oxygen Use1

    PubMed Central

    López-Millán, Ana Flor; Morales, Fermín; Andaluz, Sofía; Gogorcena, Yolanda; Abadía, Anunciación; Rivas, Javier De Las; Abadía, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Different root parts with or without increased iron-reducing activities have been studied in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient control sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. Monohil hybrid). The distal root parts of iron-deficient plants, 0 to 5 mm from the root apex, were capable to reduce Fe(III)-chelates and contained concentrations of flavins near 700 μm, two characteristics absent in the 5 to 10 mm sections of iron-deficient plants and the whole root of iron-sufficient plants. Flavin-containing root tips had large pools of carboxylic acids and high activities of enzymes involved in organic acid metabolism. In iron-deficient yellow root tips there was a large increase in carbon fixation associated to an increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity. Part of this carbon was used, through an increase in mitochondrial activity, to increase the capacity to produce reducing power, whereas another part was exported via xylem. Root respiration was increased by iron deficiency. In sugar beet iron-deficient roots flavins would provide a suitable link between the increased capacity to produce reduced nucleotides and the plasma membrane associated ferric chelate reductase enzyme(s). Iron-deficient roots had a large oxygen consumption rate in the presence of cyanide and hydroxisalycilic acid, suggesting that the ferric chelate reductase enzyme is able to reduce oxygen in the absence of Fe(III)-chelates. PMID:11027736

  13. Rapid oxidation/stabilization technique for carbon foams, carbon fibers and C/C composites

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Seng; Tan, Cher-Dip

    2004-05-11

    An enhanced method for the post processing, i.e. oxidation or stabilization, of carbon materials including, but not limited to, carbon foams, carbon fibers, dense carbon-carbon composites, carbon/ceramic and carbon/metal composites, which method requires relatively very short and more effective such processing steps. The introduction of an "oxygen spill over catalyst" into the carbon precursor by blending with the carbon starting material or exposure of the carbon precursor to such a material supplies required oxygen at the atomic level and permits oxidation/stabilization of carbon materials in a fraction of the time and with a fraction of the energy normally required to accomplish such carbon processing steps. Carbon based foams, solids, composites and fiber products made utilizing this method are also described.

  14. Resilient carbon encapsulation of iron pyrite (FeS2) cathodes in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Tara S.; Tussing, Matthew; Cloud, Jacqueline E.; Yang, Yongan

    2015-01-01

    Converting iron pyrite (FeS2) from a non-cyclable to a cyclable cathode material for lithium ion batteries has been an ongoing challenge in recent years. Herein we report a promising mitigation strategy: wet-chemistry based conformal encapsulation of synthetic FeS2 nanocrystals in a resilient carbon (RC) matrix (FeS2@RC). The FeS2@RC composite was fabricated by dispersing autoclave-synthesized FeS2 nanocrystals in an aqueous glucose solution, polymerizing the glucose in a hydrothermal reactor, and finally heating the polymer/FeS2 composite in a tube furnace to partially carbonize the polymer. The FeS2@RC electrodes showed superior cyclability compared with the FeS2 electrodes, that is, 25% versus 1% of retention at the 20th cycle. Based on electrochemical analysis, XRD study, and SEM characterization, the performance enhancement was attributed to RC's ability to accommodate volume fluctuation, enhance charge transfer, alleviate detrimental side reactions, and suppress loss of the active material. Furthermore, the remaining issues associated with the current system were identified and future research directions were proposed.

  15. Total Iron Absorption by Young Women from Iron-Biofortified Pearl Millet Composite Meals Is Double That from Regular Millet Meals but Less Than That from Post-Harvest Iron-Fortified Millet Meals123

    PubMed Central

    Cercamondi, Colin I.; Egli, Ines M.; Mitchikpe, Evariste; Tossou, Felicien; Zeder, Christophe; Hounhouigan, Joseph D.; Hurrell, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Iron biofortification of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) is a promising approach to combat iron deficiency (ID) in the millet-consuming communities of developing countries. To evaluate the potential of iron-biofortified millet to provide additional bioavailable iron compared with regular millet and post-harvest iron-fortified millet, an iron absorption study was conducted in 20 Beninese women with marginal iron status. Composite test meals consisting of millet paste based on regular-iron, iron-biofortified, or post-harvest iron-fortified pearl millet flour accompanied by a leafy vegetable sauce or an okra sauce were fed as multiple meals for 5 d. Iron absorption was measured as erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Fractional iron absorption from test meals based on regular-iron millet (7.5%) did not differ from iron-biofortified millet meals (7.5%; P = 1.0), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the meals based on iron-biofortified millet (1125 vs. 527 μg; P < 0.0001). Fractional iron absorption from post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (10.4%) was higher than from regular-iron and iron-biofortified millet meals (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (1500 μg; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Results indicate that consumption of iron-biofortified millet would double the amount of iron absorbed and, although fractional absorption of iron from biofortification is less than that from fortification, iron-biofortified millet should be highly effective in combatting ID in millet-consuming populations. PMID:23884388

  16. The rate of iron corrosion for different organic carbon sources during biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Park, S K; Choi, S C; Kim, Y K

    2007-01-01

    The effects of total organic carbon and biofilm on microbial corrosion were quantified using serum bottles in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Both organic carbon and biofilm bacteria had a significant effect on the iron corrosion rate, irrespective of the levels of the other variable (p = 0.05). There was no evidence of interaction between organic carbon and biofilm bacteria. Within the tested levels, the addition of exogenous organic carbon increased the corrosion rate by an average of 3.838 mg dm(-2) day(-1) (mdd), but the presence of biofilm bacteria decreased the rate by an average of 2.305 mdd. More iron was released from the coupon in response to organic carbon. Powder x-ray diffractometry indicated that the scales deposited on the corroded iron surface consisted primarily of lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe3O4) and hematite (alpha-Fe203). Corrosion rates by different organic carbon sources, i.e. acetate, glucose and humic substances, were compared using an annular biofilm reactor. One-way ANOVA suggested that the effect of each carbon source on corrosion was not the same, with the iron corrosion rate highest for glucose, followed by acetate, humic substances and the control. Magnetite was a major constituent of the corrosion products scraped from iron slides. Examination of community-level physiological profile patterns on the biofilms indicated that acetate was a carbon source that could promote the metabolic and functional potentials of biofilm communities.

  17. Impact of carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of microscale zerovalent iron particles on its reactivity towards chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Larsson, Per-Olof; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2013-11-01

    Zerovalent iron (ZVI) abiotically degrades several chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) via reductive dechlorination, which offers perspectives for in situ groundwater remediation applications. The difference in reactivity between ZVI particles is often linked with their specific surface area. However, other parameters may influence the reactivity as well. Earlier, we reported for a set of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles the disappearance kinetic of different CAHs which were collected under consistent experimental conditions. In the present study, these kinetic data were correlated with the carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of mZVI particles. It was confirmed that not only the specific surface area affects the disappearance kinetic of CAHs, but also the chemical composition of the mZVI particles. The chemical composition, in addition, influences CAHs removal mechanism inducing sorption onto mZVI particles instead of dechlorination. Generally, high disappearance kinetic of CAHs was observed for particles containing less oxygen. A high carbon content, on the other hand, induced nonreactive sorption of the contaminants on the mZVI particles. To obtain efficient remediation of CAHs by mZVI particles, this study suggested that the carbon and oxygen content should not exceed 0.5% and 1% respectively. Finally, the efficiency of the mZVI particles may be improved to some extent by enriching them with sulfur. However, the impact of sulfur content on the reactivity of mZVI particles is less pronounced than that of the carbon and oxygen content.

  18. Morphology of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticle-Dispersed Glass Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketomi, Susamu

    2004-10-01

    We obtained dispersed-nanocrystal/glass composites by impregnating amorphous yttrium iron garnet (YIG) nanoparticles (produced by an alkoxide method) into the 49 nm diameter pores in the spongelike structure of porous silica glass (controlled pore glass or CPG) followed by heat treatment at 1000°C for 0.1 h. We observed the surface and cross section of the sample by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The backscattered electron image (BSEI) of the sample surface clearly showed the nanoparticles while the secondary electron image (SEI) showed them obscurely. A similar observation of the sample cross section revealed that the CPG fused together ˜2 μm in depth from the surface while its inner core preserved the spongelike network structure. The particles were independently dispersed with sizes ranging from 20 nm to 40 nm in this fused shell with an average particle density of approximately 100 μm-2. No particles were found in the inner core. Even in the fused shell, no particles were found in those areas in which the spongelike structure was preserved. It is concluded that the particles act as seeds for triggering the fusion of the spongelike glass.

  19. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  20. Elemental and iron isotopic composition of aerosols collected in a parking structure.

    PubMed

    Majestic, Brian J; Anbar, Ariel D; Herckes, Pierre

    2009-09-01

    The trace metal contents and iron isotope composition of size-resolved aerosols were determined in a parking structure in Tempe, AZ, USA. Particulate matter (PM)<2.5 microm in diameter (the fine fraction) and PM>2.5 microm were collected. Several air toxics (e.g., arsenic, cadmium, and antimony) were enriched above the crustal average, implicating automobiles as an important source. Extremely high levels of fine copper (up to 1000 ng m(-3)) were also observed in the parking garage, likely from brake wear. The iron isotope composition of the aerosols were found to be +0.15+/-0.03 per thousand and +0.18+/-0.03 per thousand for the PM<2.5 microm and PM>2.5 microm fractions, respectively. The similarity of isotope composition indicates a common source for each size fraction. To better understand the source of iron in the parking garage, the elemental composition in four brake pads (two semi-metallic and two ceramic), two tire tread samples, and two waste oil samples were determined. Striking differences in the metallic and ceramic brake pads were observed. The ceramic brake pads contained 10-20% copper by mass, while the metallic brake pads contained about 70% iron, with very little copper. Both waste oil samples contained significant amounts of calcium, phosphorous, and zinc, consistent with the composition of some engine oil additives. Differences in iron isotope composition were observed between the source materials; most notably between the tire tread (average=+0.02 per thousand) and the ceramic brake linings (average=+0.65 per thousand). Differences in isotopic composition were also observed between the metallic (average=+0.18 per thousand) and ceramic brake pads, implying that iron isotope composition may be used to resolve these sources. The iron isotope composition of the metallic brake pads was found to be identical to the aerosols, implying that brake dust is the dominant source of iron in a parking garage.

  1. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  2. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Day, D.E.

    1998-05-12

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe{sup 3+} provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided. 21 figs.

  3. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Day, Delbert E.

    1998-01-01

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

  4. Iron [Fe(0)]-rich substrate based on iron-carbon micro-electrolysis for phosphorus adsorption in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shihai; Li, Desheng; Yang, Xue; Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Zhang, Qi

    2017-02-01

    The phosphorus (P) adsorption properties of an iron [Fe(0)]-rich substrate (IRS) composed of iron scraps and activated carbon were investigated based on iron-carbon micro-electrolysis (IC-ME) and compared to the substrates commonly used in constructed wetlands (CWs) to provide an initial characterization of the [Fe(0)]-rich substrate. The results showed that P was precipitated by Fe(III) dissolved from the galvanic cell reactions in the IRS and the reaction was suppressed by the pH and stopped when the pH exceeded 8.90 ± 0.09. The adsorption capacity of the IRS decreased by only 4.6% in the second round of adsorption due to Fe(0) consumption in the first round. Substrates with high Ca- and Mg-oxide contents and high Fe- and Al-oxide contents had higher P adsorption capacities at high and low pH values, respectively. Substrates containing high Fe and Al concentrations and low Ca concentrations were more resistant to decreases in the P adsorption capacity resulting from organic matter (OM) accumulation. The IRS with an iron scrap to activated carbon volume ratio of 3:2 resulted in the highest P adsorption capacity (9.34 ± 0.14 g P kg(-1)), with minimal pH change and strong adaptability to OM accumulation. The Fe(0)-rich substrate has the considerable potential for being used as a CW substrate.

  5. Preparation of iron-impregnated granular activated carbon for arsenic removal from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qigang; Lin, Wei; Ying, Wei-chi

    2010-12-15

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) was impregnated with iron through a new multi-step procedure using ferrous chloride as the precursor for removing arsenic from drinking water. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis demonstrated that the impregnated iron was distributed evenly on the internal surface of the GAC. Impregnated iron formed nano-size particles, and existed in both crystalline (akaganeite) and amorphous iron forms. Iron-impregnated GACs (Fe-GACs) were treated with sodium hydroxide to stabilize iron in GAC and impregnated iron was found very stable at the common pH range in water treatments. Synthetic arsenate-contaminated drinking water was used in isotherm tests to evaluate arsenic adsorption capacities and iron use efficiencies of Fe-GACs with iron contents ranging from 1.64% to 12.13% (by weight). Nonlinear regression was used to obtain unbiased estimates of Langmuir model parameters. The arsenic adsorption capacity of Fe-GAC increased significantly with impregnated iron up to 4.22% and then decreased with more impregnated iron. Fe-GACs synthesized in this study exhibited higher affinity for arsenate as compared with references in literature and shows great potential for real implementations.

  6. Influence of carbon chain length on the synthesis and yield of fatty amine-coated iron-platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert M.; Monson, Todd C.; Gullapalli, Rama R.

    2014-06-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are among the most widely used and characterized magnetic nanoparticles. However, metal alloys such as superparamagnetic iron-platinum particles (SIPPs), which have better magnetic properties, are receiving increased attention. Scalable techniques to routinely synthesize SIPPs in bulk need further study. Here, we focus on the role played by the fatty amine ligand in the formation of the bimetallic FePt nanocrystal. More specifically, we compare the effect of varying lengths of fatty amine ligands on the shape, structure, uniformity, composition, and magnetic properties of the SIPPs. We synthesized SIPPs by employing a `green' thermal decomposition reaction using fatty amine ligands containing 12 to 18 carbons in length. Greater fatty amine chain length increased the polydispersity, particle concentration, iron concentration, and the stability of the SIPPs. Additionally, longer reflux times increased the diameter of the particles, but decreased the iron concentration, suggesting that shorter reaction times are preferable. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the SIPPs indicates that the ligands are successfully bound to the FePt cores through the amine group. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry measurements suggest that all of the SIPPs were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that SIPPs synthesized using tetradecylamine had the highest saturation magnetization. Our findings indicate that the octadecylamine ligand, which is currently used for the routine synthesis of SIPPs, may not be optimal. Overall, we found that using tetradecylamine and a 30-min reflux reaction resulted in optimal particles with the highest degree of monodispersity, iron content, stability, and saturation magnetization.

  7. Closed Die Deformation Behavior of Cylindrical Iron-Alumina Metal Matrix Composites During Cold Sinter Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Kumar, Undeti Jacob; Gupta, Pallav; Jha, Arun Kant; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims to study the closed die deformation behavior of cylindrical Fe-Al2O3 metal matrix composites (MMCs). Closed die was manufactured by machining the high carbon steel block followed by oil quenching and then finishing. Samples sintered at a temperature of 1100 °C for 1 h were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which showed the formation of Fe, Al2O3 and nano size FeAl2O4 phases respectively. Density and hardness of the composite samples were determined after sintering. Closed die deformation studies of the prepared composite samples were carried under three different interfacial frictional conditions i.e. dry, solid lubricating and liquid lubricating. Hardness, density and metallographic characterizations were also done for the deformed samples. On comparing the micrographs of the samples before and after deformation it was revealed that in deformed specimens recrystallization has taken place due to the difference in the energy between the strained iron matrix and unstrained alumina reinforcement during closed die forging process. Experimental density of the samples was also verified with the theoretical density using the standard equations. It is expected that the results of the present investigations will be helpful in developing quality MMC components for wide industrial applications.

  8. a Simple Method of Applying Carbon Foam Coating for Carbon/carbon Composites to Modulate Cell Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Li, Hejun; Lu, Jinhua; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Xueni; Cao, Sheng; He, Zibo; Zeng, Xierong

    2013-01-01

    A simple slurry method was used to prepare carbon foam coatings on biomedical carbon/carbon composites to modulate the cell compatibility. The surface morphology and microstructure of the coatings were characterized and the effect of applying carbon foam coatings on cell morphology and cell proliferation was investigated. The results showed that the carbon foam coatings, consisting of carbon microspheres, resin carbon matrices and pores, covered the carbon/carbon composites entirely and uniformly with amorphous structures. There were large numbers of pores with a size ranging from submicron to tens of micrometers being found for the coatings. The cell culture experiments exhibited that both the cell spreading and the cell proliferation were improved after the preparation of the carbon foam coatings. It could be demonstrated that applying carbon foam coatings by a simple slurry method was an effective way to improve the cell compatibility of carbon/carbon composites.

  9. Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Seng; Zhou, Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Pitch-based nanocomposite carbon fibers were prepared with various percentages of carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and the fibers were used for manufacturing composite structures. Experimental results show that these nanocomposite carbon fibers exhibit improved structural and electrical conductivity properties as compared to unreinforced carbon fibers. Composite panels fabricated from these nanocomposite carbon fibers and an epoxy system also show the same properties transformed from the fibers. Single-fiber testing per ASTM C1557 standard indicates that the nanocomposite carbon fiber has a tensile modulus of 110% higher, and a tensile strength 17.7% times higher, than the conventional carbon fiber manufactured from pitch. Also, the electrical resistance of the carbon fiber carbonized at 900 C was reduced from 4.8 to 2.2 ohm/cm. The manufacturing of the nanocomposite carbon fiber was based on an extrusion, non-solvent process. The precursor fibers were then carbonized and graphitized. The resultant fibers are continuous.

  10. Application of Conductive Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Composites: Gas Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Application of Conductive Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Composites: Gas Sensor by Padraig G. Moloney and Enrique V. Barrera ARL-CR-0714 May...2013 Application of Conductive Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Composites: Gas Sensor Padraig G. Moloney and Enrique V. Barrera Dept. of...From - To) June 2011 to April 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Application of Conductive Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Composites: Gas Sensor 5a

  11. Impact Damage Tolerance of a Carbon Fibre Composite Laminate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    design of composite structures. 8 CONCLUSIONS These carbon fibre/ epoxy resin laminates are susceptible :: low e ;rt., - .. impact damage, especially...ROYAL AIRCRAFT ESTABLISHMENT0 Technical Report 84049 May 1984 GARTEUR/TP-007 IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANCE OF A CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE LAMINATE by DTIC G...007 Received for printing 3 May 1984 IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANCE OF A CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE LAMINATE by G. Dorey P. Sigety* K. Stellbrink** W. G. J. ’t

  12. Iron Framing Axonometric, Stringer, IBeam, Channel, Composite TieBeam, and Small ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Iron Framing Axonometric, Stringer, I-Beam, Channel, Composite Tie-Beam, and Small and Large Phoenix Columns - Washington Monument, High ground West of Fifteenth Street, Northwest, between Independence & Constitution Avenues, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. Recent progress in magnetic iron oxide-semiconductor composite nanomaterials as promising photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Changzhong Jiang, Affc; Roy, Vellaisamy A. L.

    2014-11-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of toxic organic pollutants is a challenging tasks in ecological and environmental protection. Recent research shows that the magnetic iron oxide-semiconductor composite photocatalytic system can effectively break through the bottleneck of single-component semiconductor oxides with low activity under visible light and the challenging recycling of the photocatalyst from the final products. With high reactivity in visible light, magnetic iron oxide-semiconductors can be exploited as an important magnetic recovery photocatalyst (MRP) with a bright future. On this regard, various composite structures, the charge-transfer mechanism and outstanding properties of magnetic iron oxide-semiconductor composite nanomaterials are sketched. The latest synthesis methods and recent progress in the photocatalytic applications of magnetic iron oxide-semiconductor composite nanomaterials are reviewed. The problems and challenges still need to be resolved and development strategies are discussed.

  14. Catalytic effect of different forms of iron in purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Sakae; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    In the arc plasma jet (APJ) method, a large amount of soot including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be produced in a short time. However, as-grown soot contains a lot of impurities, such as metallic particles used as catalyst and amorphous carbon. Hence it is necessary to purify the soot to obtain pure SWNTs. The biggest problem in purifying APJ-SWNTs is how to remove the thick amorphous carbon covering the catalyst metal particles. By refluxing APJ-SWNTs in hydrogen peroxide using iron particle as catalyst, it can be purified. The added fine particle of pure iron is found to be effective. Then, we examine whether SWNTs can be purified more effectively by adding solution containing the Fe ion instead of the iron particle. We used iron (III) nitrate nonahydrate, hydrogen peroxide decomposing agent which contains catalase and ammonium iron (II) sulfate hexahydrate. In the case of iron (III) nitrate and catalase, purification effect is not obvious. Under these conditions hydrogen peroxide was decomposed into H2O and O2, and the hydroxyl radical was not generated. On the other hand, ammonium iron (II) sulfate is effective. Because of existence of Fe2+ in solution Fenton's reaction takes place. Reaction rate is increased at high temperature. Therefore, APJ-SWNT is purified more effectively if refluxed in hydrogen peroxide using ammonium iron (II) sulfate as catalyst.

  15. High Temperature Creep Effects in Carbon Yarns and Composites,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-05

    investigation focuses on changes caused by creep under uniaxial tension in unidirectional composites of HM3000 PAN-based and P55 mesophase - pitch -based...carbon yarn with a carbon matrix produced from a 15V pitch precursor. Those changes were monitored by microscopy and elastic properties measurements...unidirectional carbon-carbon composite yarn were prepared from HM3000 yarn and 15V pitch by immersing yarn in melted *.j pitch , then calcining it up to

  16. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  17. Evidence for Localization of Reaction Upon Reduction of Carbon Tetrachloride by Granular Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Miehr, R.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2002-10-01

    The distribution of reaction sites on iron particles exposed to water containing carbon tetrachloride has been examined by measuring the locations of reaction products. The uniformity or localization of reaction sites has implications for understanding and modeling the reduction of environmental contaminants by iron in ground water systems. Granular iron surfaces similar to those being used for environmental remediation applications were studied using surfaces analysis techniques to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical structure of the surface and oxide films. Scanning Auger microscopy and imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed that granular iron exposed to carbon tetrachloride-saturated water exhibits chloride-enriched regions occurred at pits rather than on the passive oxide film on the metal. Understanding the nature of the local solute reduction sites will play an important role in modeling the kinetics of reaction at passive iron oxide films in environmental systems.

  18. Chemical Degradation of the Cathodic Electrical Contact Between Carbon and Cast Iron in Aluminum Production Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassard, Martin; Désilets, Martin; Soucy, Gervais; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Forté, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The cathodic carbon to cast iron electrical contact degradation is one of the factors to consider in the cathode voltage drop (CVD) increase over the lifetime of aluminum production cells. Lab-scale experiments were carried out to study the cast iron to carbon interface chemical degradation and the impact of important cell parameters like temperature and bath chemistry. Laboratory degradation results were compared with industrial samples. A thermoelectric Ansys numerical model was then used to predict the effect of cast iron surface degradation over CVD. Results show that the aluminum formation on the cast iron surface and its subsequent diffusion creates an immiscible mixture of Fe-Al metal alloy and electrolytic bath. Disparities were also observed between industrial samples taken from two different technologies, suggesting that the degradation can be slowed down. Thermoelectric calculations finally revealed that the impact of the contact resistance augmentation is by far greater than the cast iron degradation.

  19. Novel synthesis of carbon spheres supported nanoscale zero-valent iron for removal of metronidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Du, Yi; Ma, Jun

    2016-12-01

    For the first time, carbon spheres-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI/CSs) were successfully synthesized as functionalized composite via liquid phase reduction method and adopted for removal of a typical antibiotic, metronidazole (MNZ), from wastewater. The resultant composite (NZVI/CSs) exhibit higher reactivity, excellent stability, enhanced dispersion, and improved longevity over the reaction course due to the presence of the charged carboxyl groups and hydroxyl groups on the surfaces of CSs. The results show that 94.18% of MNZ was removed using NZVI/CSs after 6 min, while only 36.45% and 8.78% of MNZ were removed using NZVI and CSs, respectively. The galvanic cell system between NZVI and CSs was essential for enhancing MNZ reduction in aqueous solution. Furthermore, the new findings include kinetics for MNZ removal by NZVI/CSs composite could be well expressed by a revised two-parameter pseudo-first-order model. Finally, the possible degradation mechanism was proposed, which was based on the analysis of degraded products by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Different important factors impacting on MNZ removal (including mass ratio of NZVI to CSs, initial concentration, pH value and solution temperature) were investigated as well. Overall, this study provides a promising alternative material and environmental pollution management option for antibiotic wastewater treatment.

  20. Millimeter-scale variations of stable isotope abundances in carbonates from banded iron-formations in the Hamersley Group of Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baur, M. E.; Hayes, J. M.; Studley, S. A.; Walter, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several diamond drill cores from formations within the Hamersley Group of Western Australia have been studied for evidence of short-range variations in the isotopic compositions of the carbonates. For a set of 32 adjacent microbands analyzed in a specimen from the Marra Mamba Iron Formation, carbon isotope compositions of individual microbands ranged from -2.8 to -19.8 per mil compared to PDB and oxygen isotope compositions ranged from 10.2 to 20.8 per mil compared to SMOW. A pattern of alternating abundances was present, with the average isotopic contrasts between adjacent microbands being 3.0 per mil for carbon and 3.1 per mil for oxygen. Similar results were obtained for a suite of 34 microbands (in four groups) from the Bruno's Band unit of the Mount Sylvia Formation. Difficulties were experienced in preparing samples of single microbands from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, but overall isotopic compositions were in good agreement with values reported by previous authors. Chemical analyses showed that isotopically light carbon and oxygen were correlated with increased concentrations of iron. The preservation of these millimeter-scale variations in isotopic abundances is interpreted as inconsistent with a metamorphic origin for the isotopically light carbon in the BIF carbonates. A biological origin is favored for the correlated variations in 13C and Fe, and it is suggested that the 13C-depleted carbonates may derive either from fermentative metabolism or from anaerobic respiration. A model is presented in which these processes occur near the sediment-water interface and are coupled with an initial oxidative precipitation of the iron.

  1. Influence of Iron Deprivation on the Membrane Composition of Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Guikema, J A; Sherman, L A

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans were grown under iron-deficient conditions and then restored by the addition of iron. Membrane proteins from iron-deficient and iron-restored cells were analyzed by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. The incorporation of [(35)S]sulfate into membrane proteins and lactoperoxidase-catalyzed (125)I iodination were used to monitor the rates of polypeptide biosynthesis and surface exposure of membrane proteins, respectively. These polypeptide profiles revealed major differences in the membrane composition of iron-deficient and normal cells. Iron deficiency caused a decrease in the amount of certain important membrane proteins, reflecting a decreased rate of biosynthesis of these peptides. Several photosystem II peptides also showed an increase in surface exposure after iron stress. In addition, iron deficiency led to the synthesis of proteins at 34 and 52 kilodaltons which were not present in normal cells. When iron was restored to a deficient culture, a metabolic sequence was initiated within the first 12 h after the addition of iron which led to phenotypically normal cells. Pulse labeling with [(35)S]sulfate during this period demonstrated that iron addition initiates a coordinated pattern of synthesis that leads to the assembly of normal membranes.

  2. Surface characterization of LDEF carbon fiber/polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammer, Holly L.; Wightman, James P.; Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.

    1995-01-01

    XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) analysis of both carbon fiber/epoxy matrix and carbon fiber/polysulfone matrix composites revealed significant changes in the surface composition as a result of exposure to low-earth orbit. The carbon 1s curve fit XPS analysis in conjunction with the SEM photomicrographs revealed significant erosion of the polymer matrix resins by atomic oxygen to expose the carbon fibers of the composite samples. This erosion effect on the composites was seen after 10 months in orbit and was even more obvious after 69 months.

  3. The oxidation behavior of carbon-carbon composites and their coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The oxidation of carbon-carbon composites and coatings in oxygen at temperatures between 300 and 1400 C was investigated. State-of-the-art systems were characterized prior to the oxidation studies using optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was determined that uncoated carbon-carbon composites cannot be used at temperatures above about 400 C for extended periods of time because of oxidation. Oxidation does occur at temperatures below 400 C but at very low rates. Boron was found to be an ineffective inhibitor for carbon-carbon oxidation. Coatings were useful in protecting carbon-carbon composites from oxidation under isothermal test conditions but these coatings failed under cyclic conditions. The factors leading to the failure of coatings on carbon-carbon composites are described.

  4. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  5. Electrophoretic deposition of iron catalyst on C-fiber textiles for the growth of carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2014-11-01

    In this study, carbon nanofibers synthesis has been conducted by chemical vapor deposition on C-fiber textiles coated with an iron catalyst via electrophoretic deposition. C-fiber textiles were oxidized with nitric acid before the iron catalyst was plated by electrophoretic deposition. Due to oxidation, the hydroxyl group was created on the C-fiber textiles and was used as an active site for iron catalyst deposition. It was verified that the iron catalyst was deposited on the C-fiber textiles, while current, voltage, and deposition time varied and the concentration of electrolyte was kept constant in electrophoretic deposition. After being deposited, the iron particles were dried in oven for 24 hours and reduced by hydrogen gas in a furnace. Ethylene gas was introduced for the growth of carbon nanofibers and the growth temperature was then varied to find the optimal growth temperature of the carbon nanofibers. Thus, the characteristics of carbon nanofibers were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), N2-sorption (BET), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It is verified that the iron particles were most evenly deposited at 0.1 A for 3 minutes. Carbon nanofibers grew to 150-200 nm most evenly at 600 degrees C via temperature variations in CVD.

  6. Pore- and micro-structural characterization of a novel structural binder based on iron carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumanta; Stone, David; Convey, Diana; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2014-12-15

    The pore- and micro-structural features of a novel binding material based on the carbonation of waste metallic iron powder are reported in this paper. The binder contains metallic iron powder as the major ingredient, followed by additives containing silica and alumina to facilitate favorable reaction product formation. Compressive strengths sufficient for a majority of concrete applications are attained. The material pore structure is investigated primarily through mercury intrusion porosimetry whereas electron microscopy is used for microstructural characterization. Reduction in the overall porosity and the average pore size with an increase in carbonation duration from 1 day to 4 days is noticed. The pore structure features are used in predictive models for gas and moisture transport (water vapor diffusivity and moisture permeability) through the porous medium which dictates its long-term durability when used in structural applications. Comparisons of the pore structure with those of a Portland cement paste are also provided. The morphology of the reaction products in the iron-based binder, and the distribution of constituent elements in the microstructure are also reported. - Highlights: • Carbonation of iron produces a dense microstructure. • Pore volume in iron carbonate lower, critical size higher than those in OPC pastes • Reaction product contains iron, carbon, silicon, aluminum and calcium. • Power-law for porosity-moisture permeability relationship was established.

  7. Magnetic carbon composites with a hierarchical structure for adsorption of tetracycline, prepared from sugarcane bagasse via hydrothermal carbonization coupled with simple heat treatment process.

    PubMed

    Rattanachueskul, Natthanan; Saning, Amonrada; Kaowphong, Sulawan; Chumha, Nawapong; Chuenchom, Laemthong

    2017-02-01

    Sugarcane bagasse, an agricultural waste, was successfully converted into novel magnetic carbon composites by low temperature hydrothermal carbonization at 230°C for 24h, followed by heat treatment at 400°C for only 1h in air. Effects of NaOH and iron loading on the chemical properties of the composites were studied. In addition, various techniques were employed to investigate the physicochemical properties of the composites. Adsorption kinetics and isotherms were investigated with tetracycline (TC) for the magnetic composites. The magnetic carbon composite exhibited 48.35mg/g maximum adsorption capacity and was highly stable chemically and mechanically, with also good magnetic properties. The adsorption of TC by the magnetic adsorbent was mainly attributed to H-bonds and π-π interactions. The results indicate that waste sugarcane bagasse from the sugar industries can be efficiently transformed to a magnetic adsorbent for TC removal via a facile environmentally friendly method.

  8. Ultra low friction carbon/carbon composites for extreme temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Busch, Donald E.; Fenske, George R.; Lee, Sam; Shepherd, Gary; Pruett, Gary J.

    2001-01-01

    A carbon/carbon composite in which a carbon matrix containing a controlled amount of boron or a boron compound is reinforced with carbon fiber exhibits a low coefficient of friction, i.e., on the order of 0.04 to 0.1 at temperatures up to 600.degree. C., which is one of the lowest frictional coefficients for any type of carbonaceous material, including graphite, glassy carbon, diamond, diamond-like carbon and other forms of carbon material. The high degree of slipperiness of the carbon composite renders it particularly adapted for limiting friction and wear at elevated temperatures such as in seals, bearings, shafts, and flexible joints

  9. Properties and effects of remaining carbon from waste plastics gasifying on iron scale reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Chen, Shuwen; Miao, Xincheng; Yuan, Hao

    2011-06-01

    The carbonous activities of three kinds of carbon-bearing materials gasified from plastics were tested with coal coke as reference. The results showed that the carbonous activities of these remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. Besides, the fractal analyses showed that the porosities of remaining carbon-bearing materials were higher than that of coal-coke. It revealed that these kinds of remaining carbon-bearing materials are conducive to improve the kinetics conditions of gas-solid phase reaction in iron scale reduction.

  10. Effective reinforcement in carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Ciselli, P; Kuznetsov, E; Peijs, T; Barber, A H

    2008-05-13

    Carbon nanotubes have mechanical properties that are far in excess of conventional fibrous materials used in engineering polymer composites. Effective reinforcement of polymers using carbon nanotubes is difficult due to poor dispersion and alignment of the nanotubes along the same axis as the applied force during composite loading. This paper reviews the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes and their polymer composites to highlight how many previously prepared composites do not effectively use the excellent mechanical behaviour of the reinforcement. Nanomechanical tests using atomic force microscopy are carried out on simple uniaxially aligned carbon nanotube-reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibres prepared using electrospinning processes. Dispersion of the carbon nanotubes within the polymer is achieved using a surfactant. Young's modulus of these simple composites is shown to approach theoretically predicted values, indicating that the carbon nanotubes are effective reinforcements. However, the use of dispersant is also shown to lower Young's modulus of the electrospun PVA fibres.

  11. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  12. Carbon composition with hierarchical porosity, and methods of preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for fabricating a porous carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic component, (iii) a dione component in which carbonyl groups are adjacent, and (iv) an acidic component, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity comprised of mesopores and macropores. Also described are the resulting hierarchical porous carbon material, a capacitive deionization device in which the porous carbon material is incorporated, as well as methods for desalinating water by use of said capacitive deionization device.

  13. Radiation damage in carbon-carbon composites: Structure and property effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation tokamak reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require high thermal conductivity carbon-carbon composites and other materials, such as beryllium, to protect their plasma facing components from the anticipated high heat fluxes. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce a large neutron flux. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HAIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORAL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (da) at an irradiation temperature of {approximately}600{degrees}C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated here included unidirectional, two- directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Irradiation induced dimensional changes are reported for the materials and related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, carbon-carbon composite material dimensional changes are discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. Neutron irradiation induced reductions in the thermal conductivity of two, three-directional carbon-carbon composites are reported, and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is demonstrated. Irradiation induced strength changes are reported for several carbon-carbon composite materials and are explained in terms of in-crystal and composite structural effects.

  14. Fatigue characterization of advanced carbon-carbon composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Das, Partha S.; Jeelani, Shaik; Baker, Dean M.; Johnson, Sigured A.

    1992-01-01

    Response of quasi-isotropic laminates of SiC coated Carbon-Carbon (C/C) composites under flexural fatigue are investigated at room temperature. Virgin as well as mission cycled specimens are tested to study the effects of thermal and pressure cycling on the fatigue performance of C/C. Tests were conducted in three point bending with a stress ratio of 0.2 and frequency of 1 Hz. Fatigue strength of C/C has been found to be considerably high - approximately above 85 percent of the ultimate flexural strength. The fatigue strength appears to be decreasing with the increase in the number of mission cycling of the specimens. This lower strength with the mission cycled specimens is attributed to the loss of interfacial bond strength due to thermal and pressure cycling of the material. C/C is also found to be highly sensitive to the applied stress level during cyclic loading, and this sensitivity is observed to increase with the mission cycling. Weibull characterization on the fatigue data has been performed, and the wide scatter in the Weibull distribution is discussed. Fractured as well as untested specimens were C-scanned, and the progressive damage growth during fatigue is presented.

  15. Iron defecation by sperm whales stimulates carbon export in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Trish J; Roudnew, Ben; Gill, Peter; Seymour, Justin; Seuront, Laurent; Johnson, Genevieve; Mitchell, James G; Smetacek, Victor

    2010-11-22

    The iron-limited Southern Ocean plays an important role in regulating atmospheric CO(2) levels. Marine mammal respiration has been proposed to decrease the efficiency of the Southern Ocean biological pump by returning photosynthetically fixed carbon to the atmosphere. Here, we show that by consuming prey at depth and defecating iron-rich liquid faeces into the photic zone, sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) instead stimulate new primary production and carbon export to the deep ocean. We estimate that Southern Ocean sperm whales defecate 50 tonnes of iron into the photic zone each year. Molar ratios of C(export):Fe(added) determined during natural ocean fertilization events are used to estimate the amount of carbon exported to the deep ocean in response to the iron defecated by sperm whales. We find that Southern Ocean sperm whales stimulate the export of 4 × 10(5) tonnes of carbon per year to the deep ocean and respire only 2 × 10(5) tonnes of carbon per year. By enhancing new primary production, the populations of 12 000 sperm whales in the Southern Ocean act as a carbon sink, removing 2 × 10(5) tonnes more carbon from the atmosphere than they add during respiration. The ability of the Southern Ocean to act as a carbon sink may have been diminished by large-scale removal of sperm whales during industrial whaling.

  16. Iron defecation by sperm whales stimulates carbon export in the Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, Trish J.; Roudnew, Ben; Gill, Peter; Seymour, Justin; Seuront, Laurent; Johnson, Genevieve; Mitchell, James G.; Smetacek, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The iron-limited Southern Ocean plays an important role in regulating atmospheric CO2 levels. Marine mammal respiration has been proposed to decrease the efficiency of the Southern Ocean biological pump by returning photosynthetically fixed carbon to the atmosphere. Here, we show that by consuming prey at depth and defecating iron-rich liquid faeces into the photic zone, sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) instead stimulate new primary production and carbon export to the deep ocean. We estimate that Southern Ocean sperm whales defecate 50 tonnes of iron into the photic zone each year. Molar ratios of Cexport ∶Feadded determined during natural ocean fertilization events are used to estimate the amount of carbon exported to the deep ocean in response to the iron defecated by sperm whales. We find that Southern Ocean sperm whales stimulate the export of 4 × 105 tonnes of carbon per year to the deep ocean and respire only 2 × 105 tonnes of carbon per year. By enhancing new primary production, the populations of 12 000 sperm whales in the Southern Ocean act as a carbon sink, removing 2 × 105 tonnes more carbon from the atmosphere than they add during respiration. The ability of the Southern Ocean to act as a carbon sink may have been diminished by large-scale removal of sperm whales during industrial whaling. PMID:20554546

  17. Trace-Element Analyses of Carbonate Minerals in the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pun, Aurora; Papike, James J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the petrography, mineralogy and trace-element abundances of individual carbonate grains in the Early Proterozoic Gunflint BIF (Banded Iron Formation). Trace-element data may be used as environmental recorders of the fluid evolution from which the various carbonate phases precipitated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Large-diameter carbon-composite monofilaments. [production method and characteristics of carbon composite monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, W. G.; Pinoli, P. C.; Karlak, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Large-diameter carbon composite monofilaments with high strength and high modulus were produced by pregging multifiber carbon bundles with suitable organic resins and pyrolysing them together. Two approaches were developed to increase the utilization of fiber tensile strength by minimizing stress concentration defects induced by dissimilar shrinkage during pyrolysis. These were matrix modification to improve char yield and strain-to-failure and fiber-matrix copyrolysis to alleviate matrix cracking. Highest tensile strength and modulus were obtained by heat treatments to 2873 K to match fiber and matrix strain-to-failure and develop maximum monofilament tensile-strength and elastic modulus.

  19. The role of the iron catalyst in the toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).

    PubMed

    Visalli, Giuseppa; Facciolà, Alessio; Iannazzo, Daniela; Piperno, Anna; Pistone, Alessandro; Di Pietro, Angela

    2017-01-20

    This study aimed to investigate the role of iron, used as a catalyst, in the biological response to pristine and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p/fMWCNTs) with an iron content of 2.5-2.8%. Preliminarily, we assessed the pro-oxidant activity of MWCNTs-associated iron by an abiotic test. To evaluate iron bioavailability, we measured intracellular redox-active iron in A549 cells exposed to both MWCNT suspensions and to the cell medium preconditioned by MWCNTs, in order to assess the iron dissolution rate under physiological conditions. Moreover, in exposed cells, we detected ROS levels, 8-oxo-dG and mitochondrial function. The results clearly highlighted that MWCNTs- associated iron was not redox-active and that iron leakage did not occur under physiological conditions, including the oxidative burst of specialized cells. Despite this, in MWCNTs exposed cells, higher level of intracellular redox-active iron was measured in comparison to control and a significant time-dependent ROS increase was observed (P<0.01). Higher levels of 8-oxo-dG, a marker of oxidative DNA damage, and decreased mitochondrial function, confirmed the oxidative stress induced by MWCNTs. Based on the results we believe that oxidative damage could be attributable to the release of endogenous redox-active iron. This was due to the damage of acidic vacuolar compartment caused by endocytosis-mediated MWCNT internalization.

  20. Impacts of amount of impregnated iron in granular activated carbon on arsenate adsorption capacities and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qigang; Lin, Wei; Ying, Wei-Chi

    2012-06-01

    Iron-impregnated granular activated carbons (Fe-GAC) can remove arsenic effectively from water. In this study, Fe-GACs with iron content of 1.64 to 28.90% were synthesized using a new multi-step procedure for the investigation of effects of iron amount on arsenic adsorption capacities and kinetics. Langmuir model satisfactorily fit arsenic adsorption on Fe-GACs. The maximum arsenic adsorption capacity (q(m)) increased significantly with iron impregnation and reached 1,867 to 1,912 microg/g with iron content of 9.96 to 13.59%. Further increase of iron content (> 13.59%) caused gradual decrease of q(m). It was found that the amount of impregnated iron showed little impact on the affinity for arsenate. Kinetic study showed that the amount of impregnated iron affected the arsenic intraparticle diffusion rate greatly. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fit arsenic adsorption kinetics on Fe-GACs better than the pseudo-first-order model. The arsenic adsorption rate increased with increasing of iron content from 1.64% to 13.59%, and then decreased with more impregnated iron (13.59 to 28.90%).

  1. Characterization and Damage Evaluation of Coal Tar Pitch Carbon Matrix Used in Carbon/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Atul Ramesh; Mahajan, Puneet

    2016-09-01

    Flexure, compressive, and shear properties of the carbon matrix in carbon/carbon (C/C) composites made via a pitch impregnation method have been determined. The pitch carbon matrix was made using the same densification cycle used in making the C/C composite. Cyclic compression tests were performed on the matrix specimens. While unloading, a reduction in modulus was observed and residual strains were observed on complete unloading. These features were attributed to the presence of damage and plasticity in the densified matrix. A J 2 plasticity model with damage was used to simulate this behavior numerically. The parameters required for plasticity and damage model were evaluated iteratively by comparing the results in experiments with simulation.

  2. The Modification of Carbon with Iron Oxide Synthesized in Electrolysis Using the Arc Discharge Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endah Saraswati, Teguh; Dewi Indah Prasiwi, Oktaviana; Masykur, Abu; Handayani, Nestri; Anwar, Miftahul

    2017-02-01

    The modification of carbon-based nanomaterials with metals is widely studied due to its unique properties. Here, the modification of carbon nanomaterial with iron oxide has been successfully carried out. This modification was achieved using arc discharge in 50% ethanol liquid media. The anode used in the arc discharge was prepared from a mixture of carbon and iron oxide that was synthesized in electrolysis and was then calcined at 250°C with silicon binder with a mass ratio of 3:1:1, and the cathode used was graphite rod. Both electrodes were set in the nearest gap that could provide an arc during arc-discharging, leading to carbon-based nanoparticle formation. The diffractogram pattern of the X-ray diffraction of the fabricated nanoparticles confirmed the typical peak of carbon, iron oxide and iron. The magnetization value of the result analysis of the vibrating sample magnetometer was 9.9 emu/g. The bandgap energy measurement using diffuse reflectance ultra violet was estimated to be 2.18 eV. Using the transmission electron microscopy, the structure of the nanomaterial produced was observed as carbon-encapsulated iron compound nanoparticles.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  4. Iron and Carbon Dynamics during Aging and Reductive Transformation of Biogenic Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Cismasu, A Cristina; Williams, Kenneth H; Nico, Peter S

    2016-01-05

    Natural organic matter is often associated with Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, and may be stabilized as a result of coprecipitation or sorption to their surfaces. However, the significance of this association in relation to Fe and C dynamics and biogeochemical cycling, and the mechanisms responsible for organic matter stabilization as a result of interaction with minerals under various environmental conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, etc.) are not entirely understood. The preservation of mineral-bound OM may be affected by OM structure and mineral identity, and bond types between OM and minerals may be central to influencing the stability, transformation and composition of both organic and mineral components under changing environmental conditions. Here we use bulk and submicron-scale spectroscopic synchrotron methods to examine the in situ transformation of OM-bearing, biogenic ferrihydrite stalks (Gallionella ferruginea-like), which formed following injection of oxygenated groundwater into a saturated alluvial aquifer at the Rifle, CO field site. A progression from oxidizing to reducing conditions during an eight-month period triggered the aging and reductive transformation of Gallionella-like ferrihydrite stalks to Fe (hydroxy)carbonates and Fe sulfides, as well as alteration of the composition and amount of OM. Spectromicroscopic measurements showed a gradual decrease in reduced carbon forms (aromatic/alkene, aliphatic C), a relative increase in amide/carboxyl functional groups and a significant increase in carbonate in the stalk structures, and the appearance of organic globules not associated with stalk structures. Biogenic stalks lost ∼30% of their initial organic carbon content. Conversely, a significant increase in bulk organic matter accompanied these transformations. The character of bulk OM changed in parallel with mineralogical transformations, showing an increase in aliphatic, aromatic and amide functional groups. These changes likely occurred as a result of an

  5. Phosphorus Migration During Direct Reduction of Coal Composite High-Phosphorus Iron Ore Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Xue, Qingguo; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jingsong

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the direct reduction process and phosphorus migration features of high-phosphorus iron ores using simulated experiments. Results show that iron oxide was successfully reduced, and a Fe-Si-Al slag formed in carbon-bearing pellets at 1473 K (1200 °C). Fluorapatite then began to decompose into Ca3(PO4)2 and CaF2. As the reaction continued, Ca3(PO4)2 and Fe-Si-Al slag reacted quickly with each other to generate CaAl2Si2O8 and P2, while CaF2 turned into SiF4 gas in the presence of high SiO2. A small amount remained in the slag phase and formed CaAl2Si2O8. Further analysis detailed the migration process of the phosphorus into iron phases, as well as the relationship between carburization and phosphorus absorption in the iron phases. As carbon content in the iron phase increased, the austenite grain boundary melted and formed a large quantity of liquid iron which quickly absorbed the phosphorus. Based on the results of simulation and analysis, this paper proposed a method which reduced the absorption of P by the metallic iron formed and reduced P content in metallic iron during direct reduction.

  6. Collector surface for a microwave tube comprising a carbon-bonded carbon-fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Johnson, A.C.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1998-07-28

    In a microwave tube, an improved collector surface coating comprises a porous carbon composite material, preferably a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite having a bulk density less than about 2 g/cc. Installation of the coating is readily adaptable as part of the tube manufacturing process. 4 figs.

  7. Collector surface for a microwave tube comprising a carbon-bonded carbon-fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    In a microwave tube, an improved collector surface coating comprises a porous carbon composite material, preferably a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite having a bulk density less than about 2 g/cc. Installation of the coating is readily adaptable as part of the tube manufacturing process.

  8. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  9. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Tsouris, Costas; Burchell, Timothy D

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  10. Asynchronous Reductive Release of Iron and Organic Carbon from Hematite-Humic Acid Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, D.; Poulson, S.; Sumaila, S.; Dynes, J.; McBeth, J. M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Association with solid-phase iron plays an important role in the accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Ferric minerals are subject to redox reactions, which can compromise the stability of iron-bound SOM. To date, there is limited information available concerning the fate of iron-bound SOM during redox reactions. In this study, we investigated the release kinetics of hematite-bound organic carbon (OC) during the abiotic reduction of hematite-humic acid (HA) complexes by dithionite, as an analog for the fate of iron-bound SOM in natural redox reactions. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used to examine the ratio of the aromatic, phenolic and carboxylic/imide functional groups of the adsorbed OC before and after reduction. Our results indicate that the reductive release of iron obeyed first-order kinetics with release rate constants of 6.67×10-3 to 13.0×10-3 min-1. The iron-bound OC was released rapidly during the initial stage with release rate constants of 0.011 to 1.49 min-1, and then became stable with residual fractions of 4.6% to 58.2% between 120 and 240 min. The release rate of aromatic OC was much faster than for the non-aromatic fraction of HA, and 90% of aromatic OC was released within the first hour for most samples. The more rapid release of aromatic OC was attributed to its potential distribution on the outer layer because of steric effects and the possible reduction of quinoids. Our findings show that in the reductive reaction the mobilization of iron-bound organic carbon was asynchronous with the reduction of iron, and aromatic carbon was released more readily than other organic components. This study illustrates the importance of evaluating the stability of iron-bound SOM, especially under aerobic-anaerobic transition conditions.

  11. Flexural Strength and Toughness of Austenitic Stainless Steel Reinforced High-Cr White Cast Iron Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, H. E. M.; Abd El-Aziz, Kh.; Abd El-Raouf, H.; Elbanna, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flexural behavior of high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) reinforced with different shapes, i.e., I- and T-sections, and volume fractions of austenitic stainless steel (310 SS) were examined under three-point bending test. The dimensions of casted beams used for bending test were (50 × 100 × 500 mm3). Carbon and alloying elements diffusion enhanced the metallurgical bond across the interface of casted beams. Carbon diffusion from high-Cr WCI into 310 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-carbides in 310 SS near the interface and Ni diffusion from 310 SS into high-Cr WCI led to the formation of austenite within a network of M7C3 eutectic carbides in high-Cr WCI near the interface. Inserting 310 SS plates into high-Cr WCI beams resulted in a significant improvement in their toughness. All specimens of this metal matrix composite failed in a ductile mode with higher plastic deformation prior to failure. The high-Cr WCI specimen reinforced with I-section of 310 SS revealed higher toughness compared to that with T-section at the same volume fraction. The presence of the upper flange increased the reinforcement efficiency for delaying the crack growth.

  12. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2016-11-29

    Compositions for detecting and/or destroying cancer tumors and/or cancer cells via photodynamic therapy are disclosed, as well as methods of use thereof. The compositions comprise a linking protein or peptide attached to or otherwise physically associated with a carbon nanotube to form a targeted protein-carbon nanotube complex.

  13. Redox Interactions between Iron and Carbon in Planetary Mantles: Implications for Degassing and Melting Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Righter, K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon stability in planetary mantles has been studied by numerous authors because it is thought to be the source of C-bearing atmospheres and of C-rich lavas observed at the planetary surface. In the Earth, carbonaceous peridotites and eclogites compositions have been experimentally studied at mantle conditions [1] [2] [3]. [4] showed that the fO2 variations observed in martian meteorites can be explained by polybaric graphite-CO-CO2 equilibria in the Martian mantle. Based on thermodynamic calculations [4] and [5] inferred that the stable form of carbon in the source regions of the Martian basalts should be graphite (and/or diamond), and equilibrium with melts would be a source of CO2 for the martian atmosphere. Considering the high content of iron in the Martian mantle (approx.18.0 wt% FeO; [6]), compared to Earth s mantle (8.0 wt% FeO; [7]) Fe/C redox interactions should be studied in more detail.

  14. Macroporous Fe3O4/carbon composite microspheres with a short Li+ diffusion pathway for the fast charge/discharge of lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Ho; Ko, You Na; Jung, Kyeong Youl; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-08-25

    Macroporous Fe3O4/carbon composite and core-shell Fe3O4@carbon composite microspheres have been prepared by means of one-pot spray pyrolysis. The addition of polystyrene (PS) nanobeads to a spray solution containing an iron salt and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) led to macroporous Fe3O4/carbon composite microspheres, the carbon and iron components of which are uniformly distributed over the entire composite microsphere. The pore-size distribution curve for the macroporous Fe3O4/carbon composite shows distinct peaks at around 10 and 80 nm. An electrode prepared from the macroporous Fe3O4/carbon composite microspheres showed better cycling and rate performances than an electrode formed from core-shell Fe3O4@carbon composite microspheres. The initial discharge and charge capacities of the macroporous Fe3O4/carbon composite microsphere electrode were determined to be 1258 and 908 mA h g(-1) at 2 A g(-1), respectively, and the corresponding initial coulombic efficiency was 72 %. The composite microsphere electrode cycled 500 times at 5 A g(-1) showed a high discharge capacity of 733 mA h g(-1).

  15. Study of nonisothermal reduction of iron ore-coal/char composite pellet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S. K.; Ghosh, A.

    1994-01-01

    Cold-bonded composite pellets, consisting of iron ore fines and fines of noncoking coal or char, were prepared by steam curing at high pressure in an autoclave employing inorganic binders. Dry compressive strength ranged from 200 to 1000 N for different pellets. The pellets were heated from room temperature to 1273 K under flowing argon at two heating rates. Rates of evolution of product gases were determined from gas Chromatographie analysis, and the temperature of the sample was monitored by thermocouple as a function of time during heating. Degree of reduction, volume change, and compressive strength of the pellets upon reduction were measured subsequently. Degree of reduction ranged from 46 to 99 pct. Nonisothermal devolatilization of coal by this procedure also was carried out for comparison. It has been shown that a significant quantity (10 to 20 pct of the pellet weight) of extraneous H2O and CO2 was retained by dried pellets. This accounted for the generation of additional quantities of H2 and CO during heating. Carbon was the major reductant, but reduction by H2 also was significant. Ore-coal and ore-char composites exhibited a comparable degree of reduction. However, the former showed superior postreduction strength due to a smaller amount of swelling upon reduction.

  16. Ion microprobe analyses of carbon in Fe-Ni metal in iron meteorites and mesosiderites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Huss, Gary R.; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon concentrations in kamacite, taenite, and plessite (kamacite-taenite intergrowths) were measured in 18 iron meteorites and 2 mesosiderites using the Cameca ims 1280 ion microprobe at the University of Hawai'i with a 5-7 μm beam and a detection limit of <1 ppm. Our goal was to investigate the effects of carbon on the microstructure of iron meteorites during cooling and to evaluate how carbon partitions between metal phases and other carbon-bearing minerals (graphite, haxonite, cohenite) in various meteorite groups. Carbon concentrations range from ∼100 to ∼1000 ppm in taenite and plessite in groups IAB, IIICD, and IIIAB, which contain graphite and/or carbides, but only 2-6 ppm in groups IVA, IVB and the ungrouped iron, Tishomingo, which lack graphite and carbides. Carbon contents in kamacite range from ∼2 to ∼10 ppm in most studied meteorites, including IIAB, but higher abundances were found in kamacite from IAB Pitts subgroup meteorites Pitts and Woodbine (12-15 ppm). Our carbon abundances for kamacite are lower than most published ion probe data, indicating that earlier carbon measurements had contamination problems. Grains of taenite and fine-grained plessite in carbon-rich meteorites, which all have normal M-shaped nickel profiles due to slow cooling, have diverse carbon contents and zoning profiles. This is because taenite decomposed by diverse mechanisms over a range of temperatures, when nickel could only diffuse over sub-μm distances. Carbon diffusion through taenite to growing carbides was rapid at the upper end of this temperature range, but was very limited at the lower end of the temperature range. In mesosiderites, carbon increases from 12 ppm in tetrataenite to 40-115 ppm in cloudy taenite as nickel decreases from 50% to 35%. Low carbon levels in tetrataenite may reflect ordering of iron and nickel; higher carbon in cloudy taenite is attributed to metastable bcc phase, possibly martensite, with ∼300 ppm carbon intergrown with

  17. Electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Samuel; Fàbregas, Esteve; Pumera, Martin

    2009-01-07

    Electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polysulfone composite electrodes for enhanced heterogeneous electron transfer is studied. The physicochemical insight into the electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polymer composites was provided by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Dopamine, ascorbic acid, NADH, and ferricyanide are used as a model redox system for evaluating the performance of activated carbon nanotube/polymer composite electrodes. We demonstrate that polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes is subject to defects and to partial removal during activation. Such tunable activation of electrodes would enable on-demand activation of electrodes for satisfying the needs of sensing or energy storage devices.

  18. Giant Magnetoresistance Behavior of an Iron/Carbonized Polyurethane Nanocomposite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    SIP method, both the catalyst (a liquid containing aliphatic amine, parachlorobenzotrifluoride and methyl propyl ketone) and the accelerator...polyurethane STD-102, containing organo -titanate) are added into an iron-nanoparticle suspended tetrahydrofuran solution. The two-part monomers

  19. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  20. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  1. Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and their Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, K. J.; Srivastava, Deepak; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the folloving: carbon nanotube (CNT): structures, application of carbon nanotubes, simulation method, Elastic properties of carbon nanotubes, yield strain of CNT, yielding under tensile stress, yielding: strain-rate and temperature dependence, yield strain under tension, yielding at realistic conditions, nano fibers, polymer CNT composite, force field, density dependency on temperature, diffusion coefficients, young modulus, and conclusions.

  2. Pigments, elemental composition (C, N, P, and Si), and stoichiometry of particulate matter in the naturally iron fertilized region of Kerguelen in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasbleiz, M.; Leblanc, K.; Blain, S.; Ras, J.; Cornet-Barthaux, V.; Hélias Nunige, S.; Quéguiner, B.

    2014-10-01

    The particulate matter distribution and phytoplankton community structure of the iron-fertilized Kerguelen region were investigated in early austral spring (October-November 2011) during the KEOPS2 cruise. The iron-fertilized region was characterized by a complex mesoscale circulation resulting in a patchy distribution of particulate matter. Integrated concentrations over 200 m ranged from 72.2 to 317.7 mg m-2 for chlorophyll a 314 to 744 mmol m-2 for biogenic silica (BSi), 1106 to 2268 mmol m-2 for particulate organic carbon, 215 to 436 mmol m-2 for particulate organic nitrogen, and 29.3 to 39.0 mmol m-2 for particulate organic phosphorus. Three distinct high biomass areas were identified: the coastal waters of Kerguelen Islands, the easternmost part of the study area in the polar front zone, and the southeastern Kerguelen Plateau. As expected from previous artificial and natural iron-fertilization experiments, the iron-fertilized areas were characterized by the development of large diatoms revealed by BSi size-fractionation and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigment signatures, whereas the iron-limited reference area was associated with a low biomass dominated by a mixed (nanoflagellates and diatoms) phytoplankton assemblage. A major difference from most previous artificial iron fertilization studies was the observation of much higher Si : C, Si : N, and Si : P ratios (0.31 ± 0.16, 1.6 ± 0.7 and 20.5 ± 7.9, respectively) in the iron-fertilized areas compared to the iron-limited reference station (0.13, 1.1, and 5.8, respectively). A second difference is the patchy response of the elemental composition of phytoplankton communities to large scale natural iron fertilization. Comparison to the previous KEOPS1 cruise also allowed to address the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton bloom over the southeastern plateau. From particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate organic nitrogen (PON), and BSi evolutions, we showed that the elemental composition

  3. Interfacial Reactions between Alumina and Carbon Refractories and Molten Iron at 1,823 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikram-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Khanna, Rita; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2016-10-01

    High temperature interactions of alumina-carbon refractories with molten iron were investigated at 1,823 K in argon atmosphere. These studies were specifically focussed on the decomposition of alumina in the simultaneous presence of carbon and iron, and associated refractory degradation. Refractory mixtures were prepared by blending 90 wt% alumina with 10 wt% synthetic graphite; 5-15 wt% iron powder was then mixed with the refractory mixture. Using phenol formaldehyde as a binder, pellets were prepared from various blends; these were heat treated at 1,823 K for 30 min in Ar atmosphere. The presence of molten iron significantly enhanced the decomposition of alumina resulting in an enhanced refractory degradation as well as the formation of a new reactant product. This product was identified as a Fe-Al intermetallic phase from SEM/EDS (scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy) and x-ray microdiffraction investigations.

  4. Carbon-14 dating of an iron bloom associated with the voyages of Sir Martin Frobisher

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, E.V.; Harbottle, G.; Stoenner, R.W. Washburn, W.; Olin, J.S.; Fitzhugh, W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper recounts the history of the iron bloom associated with the English Elizabethan explorer Sir Martin Frobisher who made 3 voyages to the North American mainland in the 1570's. Specifically the paper deals with the use of proportional counters in carbon-14 dating of the Frobisher iron bloom which is located at the Smithsonian Institution. The procedures for preparing the samples for counting are described. (KRM)

  5. Iron-catalysed carbon-heteroatom and heteroatom-heteroatom bond forming processes.

    PubMed

    Correa, Arkaitz; García Mancheño, Olga; Bolm, Carsten

    2008-06-01

    Given its ready availability, low price and environmentally friendly character, iron is an attractive and often advantageous alternative to other transition metals in the field of catalysis. This tutorial review summarises recent progress in the development of novel and practical iron-catalysed reactions with a particular focus on those which provide access to new carbon-heteroatom and heteroatom-heteroatom linkages. It shall be of interest for both the academic as well as the industrial community.

  6. Silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber composite electrodes for ibuprofen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Florica; Motoc, Sorina; Pop, Aniela; Remes, Adriana; Schoonman, Joop

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare and characterize two types of silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite electrodes, i.e., silver-decorated CNF-epoxy and silver-modified natural zeolite-CNF-epoxy composite electrodes suitable for ibuprofen detection in aqueous solution. Ag carbon nanotube composite electrode exhibited the best electroanalytical parameters through applying preconcentration/differential-pulsed voltammetry scheme.

  7. Energy of interaction between carbon impurities in paramagnetic γ-iron

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomareva, A. V.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2015-04-15

    The energies of interaction between carbon impurity atoms in paramagnetic fcc iron (austenite) are calculated using electron density functional theory. Point defects in the paramagnetic matrix are described using a statistical approach that takes into account local magnetic fluctuations and atomic relaxation in the environment of impurity atoms. It is shown that, in addition to local deformations, magnetism significantly contributes to the energies of dissolution and interaction of carbon atoms. The values of the carbon-carbon interaction energy are indicative of a significant repulsion between these atoms in the first and second coordination spheres. The results of calculations are consistent with estimates obtained from experimental data on the activity of carbon impurity atoms in iron.

  8. Development of iron-containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes for MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Singh, Ravi; Burke, Andrew; Hatcher, Heather; Olson, John; Kraft, Robert A; Schmid, Michael; Carroll, David; Bourland, J Daniel; Akman, Steven; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2011-01-01

    Aims To test iron-containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as bifunctional nanomaterials for imaging and thermal ablation of tumors. Materials & Methods MWCNTs entrapping iron were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The T2-weighted contrast enhancement properties of MWCNTs containing increasing amounts of iron were determined in vitro. Suspensions of these particles were injected into tumor-bearing mice and tracked longitudinally over 7 days by MRI. Heat-generating abilities of these nanomaterials following exposure to near infrared (NIR) laser irradiation was determined in vitro and in vivo. Results The magnetic resonance contrast properties of carbon nanotubes were directly related to their iron content. Iron-containing nanotubes were functional T2-weighted contrast agents in vitro and could be imaged in vivo long-term following injection. Iron content of nanotubes did not affect their ability to generate thermoablative temperatures following exposure to NIR and significant tumor regression was observed in mice treated with MWCNTs and NIR laser irradiation. Conclusion These data demonstrate that iron-containing MWCNTs are functional T2-weighted contrast agents and efficient mediators of tumor-specific thermal ablation in vivo. PMID:21506687

  9. Modeling of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, G.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet stringent environmental, safety and performance requirements from respective regulatory bodies, various technology-based industries are promoting the use of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced lightweight and high strength polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) as a substitute to conventional materials both in structural and non-structural applications. The superior mechanical properties of PNCs made up of CNTs or bundles of CNTs can be attributed to the interfacial interaction between the CNTs and matrix, CNT's morphologies and to their uniform dispersion in the matrix. In PNCs, CNTs physically bond with polymeric matrix at a level where the assumption of continuum level interactions is not applicable. Modeling and prediction of mechanical response and failure behavior of CNTs and their composites becomes a complex task and is dealt with the help of up-scale modeling strategies involving multiple spatial and temporal scales in hierarchical or concurrent manner. Firstly, the article offers an insight into various modeling techniques in studying the mechanical response of CNTs; namely, equivalent continuum approach, quasi-continuum approach and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In the subsequent steps, these approaches are combined with analytical and numerical micromechanics models in a multiscale framework to predict the average macroscopic response of PNCs. The review also discusses the implementation aspects of these computational approaches, their current status and associated challenges with a future outlook.

  10. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  11. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.

    1996-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The friction factor for flow through the composites can be correlated using the fiber Reynolds number, and is affected by the composite bulk density.

  12. Carbon and graphite matrices in carbon-carbon composites: An overview of their formation, structure, and properties. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rellick, G.S.

    1992-10-23

    Carbon-carbon (C/C) composites, so called because they combine carbon-fiber reinforcement in an all-carbon matrix, can best be viewed as part of the broader category of carbon-fiber-based composites, all of which seek to utilize the light weight and exceptional strength and stiffness of carbon fibers. In C/C particularly, the structural benefits of carbon-fiber reinforcement are combined with the high-temperature capability of an all-carbon materials system, making C/C composites the material of choice for severe-environment applications. Their dimensional stability, laser hardness, and low outgassing also make such composites ideal candidates for various space structural applications. In this overview report, the various fiber architectures used in composite fabrication, i.e., the manner in which the fibers are oriented relative to each other, are discussed briefly. However, the main topic is the carbon matrix and leads to a review of the different approaches for obtaining carbon matrices; specifically, the use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of carbon from natural gas (methane), coal-tar and petroleum pitches, and thermosetting resins. In the latter two approaches, the pitch- or resin-matrix composite first produced is baked or fired, to pyrolyze the organic matrix and yield a carbon matrix. The structure of the carbon matrix is characterized by a variety of techniques: X-ray diffraction, laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy, density measurements, polarized-light microscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM).

  13. Characterization of pure iron and (130 ppm) carbon-iron binary alloy by Barkhausen noise measurements: Study of the influence of stress and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Gatelier-Rothea, C.; Chicois, J.; Fougeres, R.; Fleischmann, P.

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this work is to measure and characterize the ferromagnetic noise from high purity iron and 130 ppm carbon-iron alloy in various physical and metallurgical conditions. This is the basis of an industrial development of Barkhausen noise as a non-destructive evaluation technique of microstructural changes. The amplitudes and shapes of Barkhausen signals are correlated with the grain size in pure iron and with the presence of interstitial carbon atoms in the iron matrix (magnetic after effect phenomena) in 130 ppm carbon-iron alloy. This technique is also very sensitive to the location (inter- or intragranular precipitations), the nature (cementite or epsilon carbide), the density and size (coalescence effect) of carbide precipitates and internal stresses. The influence of microstructure is analyzed in terms of Bloch wall interactions with crystal defects as pinning joints, closure domains or dislocation configurations.

  14. Composition of diatom communities and their contribution to plankton biomass in the naturally iron-fertilized region of Kerguelen in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lasbleiz, Marine; Leblanc, Karine; Armand, Leanne K; Christaki, Urania; Georges, Clément; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Quéguiner, Bernard

    2016-11-01

    In the naturally iron-fertilized surface waters of the northern Kerguelen Plateau region, the early spring diatom community composition and contribution to plankton carbon biomass were investigated and compared with the high nutrient, low chlorophyll (HNLC) surrounding waters. The large iron-induced blooms were dominated by small diatom species belonging to the genera Chaetoceros (Hyalochaete) and Thalassiosira, which rapidly responded to the onset of favorable light-conditions in the meander of the Polar Front. In comparison, the iron-limited HNLC area was typically characterized by autotrophic nanoeukaryote-dominated communities and by larger and more heavily silicified diatom species (e.g. Fragilariopsis spp.). Our results support the hypothesis that diatoms are valuable vectors of carbon export to depth in naturally iron-fertilized systems of the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, our results corroborate observations of the exported diatom assemblage from a sediment trap deployed in the iron-fertilized area, whereby the dominant Chaetoceros (Hyalochaete) cells were less efficiently exported than the less abundant, yet heavily silicified, cells of Thalassionema nitzschioides and Fragilariopsis kerguelensis Our observations emphasize the strong influence of species-specific diatom cell properties combined with trophic interactions on matter export efficiency, and illustrate the tight link between the specific composition of phytoplankton communities and the biogeochemical properties characterizing the study area.

  15. Thermal performance enhancement of erythritol/carbon foam composites via surface modification of carbon foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Lu, Wu; Luo, Zhengping; Zeng, Yibing

    2017-03-01

    The thermal performance of the erythritol/carbon foam composites, including thermal diffusivity, thermal capacity, thermal conductivity and latent heat, were investigated via surface modification of carbon foam using hydrogen peroxide as oxider. It was found that the surface modification enhanced the wetting ability of carbon foam surface to the liquid erythritol of the carbon foam surface and promoted the increase of erythritol content in the erythritol/carbon foam composites. The dense interfaces were formed between erythritol and carbon foam, which is due to that the formation of oxygen functional groups C=O and C-OH on the carbon surface increased the surface polarity and reduced the interface resistance of carbon foam surface to the liquid erythritol. The latent heat of the erythritol/carbon foam composites increased from 202.0 to 217.2 J/g through surface modification of carbon foam. The thermal conductivity of the erythritol/carbon foam composite before and after surface modification further increased from 40.35 to 51.05 W/(m·K). The supercooling degree of erythritol also had a large decrease from 97 to 54 °C. Additionally, the simple and effective surface modification method of carbon foam provided an extendable way to enhance the thermal performances of the composites composed of carbon foams and PCMs.

  16. Removal of arsenic from water by supported nano zero-valent iron on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huijie; Jia, Yongfeng; Wu, Xing; Wang, He

    2009-12-30

    Nano-sized zero-valent iron is an effective adsorbent for arsenic removal from drinking water. However, its application may be limited in public water system and small scale water treatment system due to its tiny particle size. In the present work, nanoscale zero-valent iron was supported onto activated carbon (NZVI/AC) by impregnating carbon with ferrous sulfate followed by chemical reduction with NaBH(4). Approximate 8.2 wt% of iron was loaded onto carbon and SEM analysis showed that the iron particles in the pores of carbon were needle-shaped with the size of 30-500 x 1000-2000 nm. Kinetics study revealed that adsorption of arsenite and arsenate by NZVI/AC was fast in the first 12h and the equilibrium was achieved in approximately 72 h. The adsorption capacity of the synthesized sorbent for arsenite and arsenate at pH 6.5 calculated from Langmuir adsorption isotherms in batch experiments was 18.2 and 12.0mg/g, respectively. Phosphate and silicate markedly decreased the removal of both arsenite and arsenate, while the effect of other anions and humic acid was insignificant. Common metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) enhanced arsenate adsorption but ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was found to suppress arsenite adsorption. NZVI/AC can be effectively regenerated by elution with 0.1M NaOH.

  17. Composition, speciation and distribution of iron minerals in Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Amils, Ricardo; de la Fuente, Vicenta; Rodríguez, Nuria; Zuluaga, Javier; Menéndez, Nieves; Tornero, Jesús

    2007-05-01

    A comparative study of the roots, rhizomes and leaves of an iron hyperaccumulator plant, Imperata cylindrica, isolated from the banks of an extreme acidic environment, using complementary techniques: Mösbauer spectroscopy (MS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has shown that two main biominerals, jarosite and ferrihydrate-ferritin, accumulate in the different tissues. Jarosite accumulates mainly in roots and rhizomes, while ferritin has been detected in all the structures. A model of iron management in I. cylindrica is presented.

  18. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R.; Farsad, Kasra; Camire, Chris; Chen, Irvin

    2011-04-12

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  19. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R [Portola Valley, CA; Farsad, Kasra [San Jose, CA; Camire, Chris [San Jose, CA; Chen, Irvin [Santa Clara, CA; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew [Los Gatos, CA; Fernandez, Miguel [San Jose, CA

    2012-05-15

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  20. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R [Portola Valley, CA; Farsad, Kasra [San Jose, CA; Camire, Chris [San Jose, CA; Patterson, Joshua [Freedom, CA; Fernandez, Miguel [San Jose, CA; Yaccato, Karin [San Jose, CA; Thatcher, Ryan [Sunnyvale, CA; Stagnaro, John [Santa Clara, CA; Chen, Irvin [Santa Clara, CA; Omelon, Sidney [Willowdale, CA; Hodson, Keith [Palo Alto, CA; Clodic, Laurence [Sunnyvale, CA; Geramita, Katharine [Seattle, CA; Holland, Terence C [Auburn Township, OH; Ries, Justin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2012-02-14

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  1. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R [Portola Valley, CA; Farsad, Kasra [San Jose, CA; Camire, Chris [San Jose, CA; Patterson, Joshua [Freedom, CA; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew [Los Gatos, CA; Yaccato, Karin [San Jose, CA; Stagnaro, John [Santa Clara, CA; Devenney, Martin [Mountain View, CA; Ries, Justin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2012-03-20

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  2. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Constantz, Brent R [Portola Valley, CA; Farsad, Kasra [San Jose, CA; Camire, Chris [San Jose, CA; Patterson, Joshua [Freedom, CA; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew [Los Gatos, CA; Yaccato, Karin [San Jose, CA; Stagnaro, John [Santa Clara, CA; Devenney, Martin [Mountain View, CA; Ries, Justin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-11-22

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  3. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Irvin; Fernandez, Miguel; Patterson, Joshua; Devenney, Martin

    2015-01-13

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  4. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Irvin; Fernandez, Miguel; Patterson, Joshua; Devenney, Martin

    2015-06-16

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  5. NARloy-Z-Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: (1) NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Zr) is the state of the art, high thermal conductivity structural alloy used for making liquid rocket engine main combustion chamber liner. It has a Thermal conductivity approx 80% of pure copper. (2) Improving the thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z will help to improve the heat transfer efficiency of combustion chamber. (3)Will also help to reduce the propulsion system mass and increase performance. It will also increases thrust to weight ratio. (4) Improving heat transfer helps to design and build better thermal management systems for nuclear propulsion and other applications. Can Carbon nanotubes (CNT) help to improve the thermal conductivity (TC)of NARloy-Z? (1)CNT's have TC of approx 20X that of copper (2) 5vol% CNT could potentially double the TC of NARloy-Z if properly aligned (3) Improvement will be less if CNT s are randomly distributed, provided there is a good thermal bond between CNT and matrix. Prior research has shown poor results (1) No TC improvement in the copper-CNT composite reported (2)Reported values are typically lower (3) Attributed to high contact thermal resistance between CNT and Cu matrix (4)Results suggest that a bonding material between CNT and copper matrix is required to lower the contact thermal resistance It is hypothesized that Zr in NARloy-Z could act as a bonding agent to lower the contact thermal resistance between CNT and matrix.

  6. Thick-walled carbon composite multifunctional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haake, John M.; Jacobs, Jack H.; McIlroy, Bruce E.

    1997-06-01

    Satellite programs are moving in the direction of smaller and lighter structures. Technological advances have permitted more sophisticated equipment to be consolidated into compact spaces. Micro-satellites, between 10 and 100 kg, will incorporate micro-electric devices into the lay-up of the satellite structure. These structures will be designed to carry load, provide thermal control, enhance damping, and include integrated passive electronics. These multifunctional structures offer lighter weight, reduced volume, and a 'smarter' overall package for incorporation of sensors, electronics, fiber optics, powered appendages or active components. McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) has applied technology from the synthesis and processing of intelligent cost effective structures (SPICES) and independent research and development (IRAD) programs to the modular instrument support system (MISS) for multifunctional space structures and micro-satellites. The SPICES program was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop affordable manufacturing processes for smart materials to be used in vibration control, and the MISS program was funded by NASA-Langley. The MISS program was conceived to develop concepts and techniques to make connections between different multifunctional structures. MDA fabricated a trapezoidal carbon composite structure out of IM7/977-3 tape prepreg. Flex circuits, thermal and optical conduits were embedded to realize a utility modular connector. These provide electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical connections between micro- satellite components. A quick disconnect mount was also developed to accommodate a variety of devices such as solar arrays, power sources, thermal transfer and vibration control modules.

  7. The synthesis, structure, and properties of carbon-containing nanocomposites based on nickel, palladium, and iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, A. E.; Uimin, M. A.; Lokteva, E. S.; Mysik, A. A.; Kachevskii, S. A.; Turakulova, A. O.; Gaviko, V. S.; Lunin, V. V.

    2009-07-01

    Nickel, iron, palladium, and bimetallic nickel-palladium nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon were synthesized by contactless levitation fusion of metals in a magnetic field in a flow of an inert gas containing a hydrocarbon. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and adsorption. A layered carbon shell preventing agglomeration and oxidation formed on the surface of nickel- and iron-containing particles. The size of particles depended on preparation conditions and could be of 5-15 nm.

  8. Metal organic frameworks derived porous lithium iron phosphate with continuous nitrogen-doped carbon networks for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Gu, Junjie; Zhang, Jinli; Yu, Feng; Dong, Lutao; Nie, Ning; Li, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) nanoparticles embedded in the continuous interconnected nitrogen-doped carbon networks (LFP/N-CNWs) is an optimal architecture to fast electron and Li+ conduction. This paper, for the first time, reports a reasonable design and successful preparation of porous hierarchical LFP/N-CNWs composites using unique Fe-based metal organic framework (MIL-100(Fe)) as both template and starting material of Fe and C. Such nitrogen-doped carbon networks (N-CNWs) surrounding the lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles facilitate the transfer of Li+ and electrons throughout the electrodes, which significantly decreases the internal resistance for the electrodes and results in the efficient utilization of LiFePO4. The synthesized LFP/N-CNWs composites possess a porous structure with an amazing surface area of 129 m2 g-1, considerably enhanced electrical conductivities of 7.58 × 10-2 S cm-1 and Li+ diffusion coefficient of 8.82 × 10-14 cm2 s-1, thereby delivering excellent discharge capacities of 161.5 and 93.6 mAh·g-1 at 0.1C and 20C, respectively.

  9. Enhanced graphitization of carbon around carbon nanotubes during the formation of carbon nanotube/graphite composites by pyrolysis of carbon nanotube/polyaniline composites.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dong Hoon; Cha, Seung Il; Jeong, Yong Jin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are actively applied to the reinforcements for composite materials during last decade. One of the attempts is development of CNT/Carbon composites. Although there are some reports on the enhancement of mechanical properties by addition of CNTs in carbon or carbon fiber, it is far below the expectation. Considering the microstructure of carbon materials such as carbon fiber, the properties of them can be modified and enhanced by control of graphitization and alignment of graphene planes. In this study, enhanced graphitization of carbon has been observed the vicinity of CNTs during the pyrolysis of CNT/Polyaniline composites. As a result, novel types of composite, consisting of treading CNTs and coated graphite, can be fabricated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed a specific orientation relationship between the graphene layers and the CNTs, with an angle of 110 degrees between the layers and the CNT axis. The possibility of graphene alignment control in the carbon by the addition of CNTs is demonstrated.

  10. Development of CNT based carbon-carbon composites for thermal management system (TMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jhon; Krishnakumar, G.; Rajarajan, A.; Rakesh, S.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon-Fibre-Carbon matrix composites having high thermal conductivity per unit density is a competitive material for thermal management for aerospace applications. Due to anisotropic nature of Carbon-Carbon(C-C) composites, the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction which is dominated by the matrix carbon is comparatively low. In the present study, work is carried to increase the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction of 2D-CC composites. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNT) were functionalised and dispersed in Phenolic Resin. C-C composites were densified with MWNT dispersed Phenolic Resin through impregnation, curing & carbonisation cycle. CNT-CC composites were densified through Chemical Vapor Infiltration process and further graphitised. The effects of MWNT in amorphous carbon for thermal conductivity were investigated. The result shows that Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNT) can induce the ordered arrangement of micro-crystallites in amorphous carbon leading to increase in thermal conductivity of the bulk composites. There exists an optimum MWNT concentration in resin to enhance the thermal conductivity of C-C composites in the perpendicular direction. However, excess MWNT in resin is disadvantageous to enhance the thermal conductivity due to problems like agglomeration, resulting in reduced thermal conductivity. This can be attributed to the interfacial contact resistance due to improper heat transmission channels arising due to agglomeration. Investigation has been carried out to study the effect of agglomeration for the thermal conductivity of the bulk composites.

  11. STUDY ON ELASTO-PLASTIC BEHAVIOR OF DIFFERENT CARBON TYPES IN CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Tezcan, Jale; Howe, Jane Y; Filip, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Indentation tests combined with the knowledge of corresponding microstructure of carbonaceous materials offer valuable information that cannot be extracted from the conventional indentation tests alone. Since mechanical properties of carbon are sensitive to the crystal orientation, inelastic mechanisms can be detected by studying the stress-strain behavior of carbon/carbon composites. The aim of this paper is to investigate the elasto-plastic behavior and related microstructure of pan-fiber reinforced carbon matrix composites heat-treated at 2100 C. The microstructure was characterized using polarized light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy. Elastic modulus of each constituent of the composites was measured. Nanoindentation tests were carried out to obtain loading-unloading cycles at different indentation depths using a berkovich-type diamond indenter tip. The residual displacement at complete unloading was correlated with the microstructure data to reveal the extent of the deformation mechanisms of crystallites and graphene sheets. The pitch fiber and rough laminar pyrocarbon exhibited plastic behavior, which can be attributed to the low shear resistance due to weak bonding between the well-organized graphene sheets. On the other hand, the PAN fiber, charred resin and isotropic pyrocarbon, exhibited almost full elasticity within applied displacement limits.

  12. Some Observations on Stress Graphitization in Carbon-Carbon Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-15

    expansion ( CTE ) versus heat-treatment temperature for T-50/PAA carbon-carbon com posites...are derived from asphaltic precursors such as coal -tar and petroleum pitches. These materials are unique in passing through a liquid-crystalline...at a lower tem- perature and, for a given temperature, proceeded more extensively in the hard carbon than in a graphitizing polyvinylchloride coke

  13. Reaction of carbon and water as catalyzed by nickel and iron surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, S.R.

    1986-01-01

    The individual steps of the reaction of carbon and water to produce CO and H/sub 2/ were quantified on nickel and iron surfaces using temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surface graphite and carbide, two metastable surface carbon forms, were prepared by dehydrogenation of C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and served as reactant carbon. UPS of the graphite monolayer in contact with the metal yielded a valence electronic structure that could be interpreted in terms of the bulk band structure of graphite. The CO formation step is rate limiting in the uncatalyzed H/sub 2/O gasification reaction of graphite. The nickel surface in contact with graphitic carbon lowers the barrier for the CO formation step. The catalytic action occurs directly without isolated prior breaking of carbon-carbon bonds. The estimated activation energy for the direct reaction was 44 kcal/mole. The fully carbided surfaces of Ni and Fe were active for H/sub 2/O dissociation with an estimated activation energy between 5.0 and 10.0 kcal/mole. A different catalytic reaction cycle involving carbon-carbon bond breaking followed by oxidation of the carbide is energetically more demanding. The activation energy for direct carbon-carbon bond breaking was estimated between 65-70 kcal/mole on both nickel and iron. Following this demanding step, the reaction between carbidic carbon and oxygen proceeded on nickel and iron with estimated activation energies of 31 and 39 kcal/mole, respectively. This indirect carbide reaction cycle changed the energetics of the steam gasification of carbon.

  14. Effect of carbon nanofibers on the infiltration and thermal conductivity of carbon/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jinsong; Luo, Ruiying; Yan, Ying

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} The CNFs improve the infiltration rate and thermal properties of carbon/carbon composites. {yields} The densification rate increases with the CNF content increasing at the beginning of infiltration. {yields} The values of the thermal conductivity of the composite obtain their maximum values at 5 wt.%. -- Abstract: Preforms containing 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.% carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were fabricated by spreading layers of carbon cloth, and infiltrated using the electrified preform heating chemical vapor infiltration method (ECVI) under atmospheric pressure. Initial thermal gradients were determined. Resistivity and density evolutions with infiltration time have been recorded. Scanning electron microscopy, polarized light micrograph and X-ray diffraction technique were used to analyze the experiment results. The results showed that the infiltration rate increased with the rising of CNF content, and after 120 h of infiltration, the density was the highest when the CNF content was 5 wt.%, but the composite could not be densified efficiently as the CNF content ranged from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. CNF-reinforced C/C composites have enhanced thermal conductivity, the values at 5 wt.% were increased by nearly 5.5-24.1% in the X-Y direction and 153.8-251.3% in the Z direction compared to those with no CNFs. When the additive content was increased to 20 wt.%, due to the holes and cavities in the CNF web and between carbon cloth and matrix, the thermal conductivities in the X-Y and Z directions decreased from their maximum values at 5 wt.%.

  15. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, T. D.; Eatherly, W. P.; Robbins, J. M.; Strizak, J. P.

    1992-09-01

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER wilt produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.58 dpa (displacements per atom) at 600°C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models.

  16. Structural changes in iron oxide and gold catalysts during nucleation of carbon nanotubes studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Liu, Chang; Yu, Wan-Jing; Zhang, Li-Li; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Li, Jin-Cheng; Li, Feng; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2014-01-28

    We report a simple, versatile in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) approach for investigating the nucleation and growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), by which the composition, phase transition, and physical state of various catalysts can be clearly resolved. In our approach, catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) are placed in a multiwall CNT "tubular furnace" with two open ends, and a high temperature is obtained by Joule heating in the specimen chamber of a TEM. The carbon is supplied by electron irradiation-induced injection of carbon atoms. Comparative studies on the catalytic behavior of traditional iron oxide and recently discovered gold catalysts were performed. It was found that the growth of CNTs from iron oxide involves the reduction of Fe2O3 to Fe3C, nucleation and growth of CNTs from partially liquefied Fe3C, and finally the formation of elemental Fe when the growth stops. In contrast, while changes in shape, size, and orientation were also observed for the fluctuating Au NPs, no chemical reactions or phase transitions occurred during the nucleation of CNTs. These two distinct nucleation and growth processes and mechanisms would be valuable for the structure-controlled growth of CNTs by catalyst design and engineering.

  17. Cold catalytic recovery of loaded activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bach, Altai; Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach for the recovery of spent activated carbon by an advanced oxidation process using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts was proposed and investigated. Model organic contaminants, such as ethylene glycol and phenol, were chosen for this study as water pollutants. It was shown that there are several advantages in using catalytic oxidation recovery of activated carbon with iron oxide-based nanocatalysts: low temperature reactivity of catalytic recovery without heating; and a relatively large number of adsorption-recovery cycles, without a reduction in the adsorptive properties of the virgin activated carbon or without a performance decrease from the first adsorption-recovery cycle of the new modified adsorptive properties of the activated carbon. The catalytic recovery takes place without ultraviolet light or any visible radiation sources. Results show a high efficiency of catalytic recovery of spent activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts. A 97-99% efficiency of spent activated carbon catalytic regeneration was achieved under chosen conditions after 15-20 min of reaction. The process may be also considered as cold in situ recovery of active carbon.

  18. Iron-mediated stabilization of soil carbon amplifies the benefits of ecological restoration in degraded lands.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lucas C R; Doane, Timothy A; Corrêa, Rodrigo S; Valverde, Vinicius; Pereira, Engil I P; Horwath, William R

    2015-07-01

    Recent observations across a 14-year restoration chronosequence have shown an unexpected accumulation of soil organic carbon in strip-mined areas of central Brazil. This was attributed to the rapid plant colonization that followed the incorporation of biosolids into exposed regoliths, but the specific mechanisms involved in the stabilization of carbon inputs from the vegetation remained unclear. Using isotopic and elemental analyses, we tested the hypothesis that plant-derived carbon accumulation was triggered by the formation of iron-coordinated complexes, stabilized into physically protected (occluded) soil fractions. Confirming this hypothesis, we identified a fast formation of microaggregates shortly after the application of iron-rich biosolids, which was characterized by a strong association between pyrophosphate-extractable iron and plant-derived organic matter. The formation of microaggregates preceded the development of macroaggregates, which drastically increased soil carbon content (-140 Mg C/ha) a few years after restoration. Consistent with previous theoretical work, iron-coordinated organic complexes served as nuclei for aggregate formation, reflecting the synergistic effect of biological, chemical, and physical mechanisms of carbon stabilization in developing soils. Nevertheless, iron was not the only factor affecting soil carbon content. The highest carbon accumulation was observed during the period of highest plant diversity (> 30 species; years 3-6), declining significantly with the exclusion of native species by invasive grasses (years 9-14). Furthermore, the increasing dominance of invasive grasses was associated with a steady decline in the concentration of soil nitrogen and phosphorus per unit of accumulated carbon. These results demonstrate the importance of interdependent ecological and biogeochemical processes, and the role of soil-plant interactions in determining the success of restoration efforts. In contrast with previous but

  19. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The pressure drop of air through the composites correlated with the gas velocity, and showed a dependence on sample density.

  20. Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Deborah; Crocket, Kirsty; Brand, Tim; Stutter, Marc; Wilson, Clare; Schröder, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers Wood, D.A¹, Crocket, K², Brand, T², Stutter, M³, Wilson, C¹ & Schröder, C¹ ¹Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA ²Scottish Association for Marine Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Dunbeg, Oban, PA37 1QA ³James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH The biogeochemical iron cycle exerts significant control on the carbon cycle¹. Iron is a limiting nutrient in large areas of the world's oceans and its bioavailability controls CO2 uptake by marine photosynthesizing microorganisms. While atmospheric iron inputs to the open ocean have been extensively measured, global river inputs have likely been underestimated because most major world rivers exhibit extensive iron removal by flocculation and sedimentation during seawater mixing. Iron minerals and organic matter mutually stabilise each other², which results in a 'rusty carbon sink' in sediments³ on the one hand but may also enhance transport beyond the salinity gradient on the other. Humic-rich, high latitude rivers have a higher iron-carrying capacity⁴-⁶ but are underrepresented in iron flux calculations. The West Coast sea lochs in Scotland are fed by predominantly peatland drainage catchments, and the rivers entering the sea lochs carry a high load of organic matter. The short distance between many of these catchments and the coastal ocean facilitates source-to-sea research investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids providing a good analogue for similar high latitude fjordic systems. We use SeaFAST+ICP-MS and Mössbauer spectroscopy to survey trace metal concentrations, with emphasis on iron concentrations, speciation and mineralogy, across salinity gradients. In combination with ultra-filtration techniques, this allows

  1. Characterization of calcium carbonate/chitosan composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, K.E.; Zhang, S.

    1995-12-31

    The crystal growth of calcium carbonate on a chitosan substrate was achieved using a supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, by using various additives, polyacrylic acid (PAA). Polyacrylic acid modified the chitosan-film surface and promoted the nucleation of calcium carbonate crystals.

  2. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    DOEpatents

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  3. Effects of precursor thermal aging and fiber arrangement on the properties of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.C.M.; Chang, W.C.; Tai, N.H.

    1993-12-31

    Carbon/carbon composites fabricated by the pyrolysis of high strength carbon fiber fabrics reinforced phenolic resin were investigated. A liquid impregnation process has been used to fabricate composite precursor for 2-D carbon/carbon composite and an unique pultrusion process also used to fabricate the 1-D carbon/carbon composite precursor. Effects of thermal aging of the precursor on flexural strength of the resulted carbon/carbon composites are studied. Results shows that suitable thermal aging improves the flexural properties of carbon/carbon composites in this study. And based on the SEM examination and flexural tests, they show that the 2-D plain woven fiber arrangement results the significant degradation of the carbon fiber and the decreasing of composites flexural properties.

  4. Diffusivity of carbon in iron and steels at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbetts, Gary G.

    1980-09-01

    Although the literature contains many measurements of the diffusivity of carbon in Fe and steels, recent progress in plasma carburizing has made this regime around 1050 °C and over 1% carbon concentration of great interest. We have measured the diffusivity of carbon in steel from 975 to 1075 °C up to 1.3% carbon concentration by the steady-state method. Our results are in agreement with previous measurements of Smith and Wells, Batz, and Mehl in the regime of low temperatures and carbon concentrations. Using activation energies determined over a wider temperature range by the latter authors, we derive as an empirical expression for D throughout the range of temperatures and concentrations investigated, D=0.47 exp (-1.6 C) ×exp[-(37 000-6600 C)/RT] cm2/sec. Here, C is expressed in weight percent carbon and the energies are in cal/mole.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotube incorporated novel three phase carbon/epoxy composite with enhanced properties.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sohel; Alagirusamy, Ramasamy; Joshi, Mangala

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, single-walled carbon nanotubes were dispersed within the matrix of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites in order to develop novel three phase carbon/epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube composites. A combination of ultrasonication and high speed mechanical stirring at 2000 rpm was used to uniformly disperse carbon nanotubes in the epoxy resin. The state of carbon nanotube dispersion in the epoxy resin and within the nanocomposites was characterized with the help of optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Pure carbon/epoxy and three phase composites were characterized for mechanical properties (tensile and compressive) as well as for thermal and electrical conductivity. Fracture surfaces of composites after tensile test were also studied in order to investigate the effect of dispersed carbon nanotubes on the failure behavior of composites. Dispersion of only 0.1 wt% nanotubes in the matrix led to improvements of 95% in Young's modulus, 31% in tensile strength, 76% in compressive modulus and 41% in compressive strength of carbon/epoxy composites. In addition to that, electrical and thermal conductivity also improved significantly with addition of carbon nanotubes.

  6. Metal matrix composite of an iron aluminide and ceramic particles and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1997-06-10

    A metal matrix composite comprising an iron aluminide binder phase and a ceramic particulate phase such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide is made by heating a mixture of iron aluminide powder and particulates of one of the ceramics such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide in a alumina crucible at about 1,450 C for about 15 minutes in an evacuated furnace and cooling the mixture to room temperature. The ceramic particulates comprise greater than 40 volume percent to about 99 volume percent of the metal matrix composite.

  7. Metal matrix composite of an iron aluminide and ceramic particles and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Schneibel, Joachim H.

    1997-01-01

    A metal matrix composite comprising an iron aluminide binder phase and a ceramic particulate phase such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide is made by heating a mixture of iron aluminide powder and particulates of one of the ceramics such as titanium diboride, zirconium diboride, titanium carbide and tungsten carbide in a alumina crucible at about 1450.degree. C. for about 15 minutes in an evacuated furnace and cooling the mixture to room temperature. The ceramic particulates comprise greater than 40 volume percent to about 99 volume percent of the metal matrix composite.

  8. A carbon-carbon composite materials development program for fusion energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P. ); Engle, G.B. ); Hollenberg, G.W. )

    1992-10-01

    Carbon-carbon composites increasingly are being used for plasma-facing component (PFC) applications in magnetic-confinement plasma-fusion devices. They offer substantial advantages such as enhanced physical and mechanical properties and superior thermal shock resistance compared to the previously favored bulk graphite. Next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), will require advanced carbon-carbon composites possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated extreme thermal heat loads. This report outlines a program that will facilitate the development of advanced carbon-carbon composites specifically tailored to meet the requirements of ITER and BPX. A strategy for developing the necessary associated design data base is described. Materials property needs, i.e., high thermal conductivity, radiation stability, tritium retention, etc., are assessed and prioritized through a systems analysis of the functional, operational, and component requirements for plasma-facing applications. The current Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Program on carbon-carbon composites is summarized. Realistic property goals are set based upon our current understanding. The architectures of candidate PFC carbon-carbon composite materials are outlined, and architectural features considered desirable for maximum irradiation stability are described. The European and Japanese carbon-carbon composite development and irradiation programs are described. The Working Group conclusions and recommendations are listed. It is recommended that developmental carbon-carbon composite materials from the commercial sector be procured via request for proposal/request for quotation (RFP/RFQ) as soon as possible.

  9. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  10. Understanding and assessing the feasibility of ocean iron fertilization to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesseler, K.; Lampitt, R. S.; de Baar, H. J.; Blain, S.; Chai, F.; Coale, K. H.; Dai, M.; Karl, D. M.; Leinen, M.; Lohan, M. C.; Rothstein, L.; Trull, T. W.; Whaley, D.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Zhou, M.

    2011-12-01

    Regardless of the strategy for fossil fuel use, atmospheric CO2 is predicted to increase and then decrease such that after 10,000 years, levels will still be much higher than pre-industrial. The objectives of geoengineering CO2 reduction techniques are to reduce the rate of CO2 increase and the height of the CO2 peak. Because the oceans represent such a large reservoir of carbon, small perturbations of the system could cause large changes to carbon flows. The objective of ocean carbon sequestration would be to encourage the oceans to take up carbon at a faster rate than they currently do but with predictable and acceptable consequences. From iron addition experiments in the laboratory and in the open ocean and from studies where there are natural additions of iron to the ocean several conclusions can be drawn. Relief of iron stress increases the biomass of marine phytoplankton and as a consequence reduces surface water CO2. This leads to increased export of carbon from the upper ocean and probably enhanced sequestration in the deep ocean. However, the experiments were not planned from the perspective of geoengineering and conclusions about the potential of this approach as a means of reducing atmospheric CO2 have large uncertainties. In addition, few experiments have addressed the unintended consequences of deliberate additions. This has been a major focus of recent discussion of a risk assessment framework for experimentation by the London Convention and London Protocol. Given the uncertainties, there is an urgent requirement to carry out more studies on ocean iron fertilization with three clear objectives 1: To develop coupled global scale computation models so that predictions can become more reliable and so that in situ experiments are effective. 2: To carry out experiments on a sufficiently large scale and duration to determine the extent, efficiencies and time scales of carbon sequestration. 3: To explore the consequences of ocean iron fertilization, and not

  11. Synthesis of Li2FeSiO4/carbon nano-composites by impregnation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shijiao; Matei Ghimbeu, Camelia; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Masquelier, Christian; Janot, Raphaël

    2015-06-01

    Nanocrystalline lithium iron silicate/carbon (Li2FeSiO4/C) composites were successfully prepared by impregnation of a commercial porous carbon using ethanolic solutions of the different metallic precursors, followed by thermal annealing at 600 °C. The effects of Li2FeSiO4 loading content on the structure and organization of the Li2FeSiO4/C composites at the nanoscale were investigated. Through optimization of the synthesis conditions, small Li2FeSiO4 nanocrystals (4-12 nm) are formed and well dispersed in the porous conductive carbon. The electrochemical performances of these composites were tested as positive electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. The Li2FeSiO4/C composite with the lowest Li2FeSiO4 loading exhibits the best rate capability with a significant capacity contribution from carbon. It was found that the presence of carbon delays the lowering of the Fe3+/Fe2+ redox voltage usually reported for Li2FeSiO4 (from 3.1/3.0 to 2.8/2.7 V vs. Li+/Li), due to a stabilization effect of the initial Li2FeSiO4 crystal structure. For the Li2FeSiO4/C composite (81/19 weight ratio), a discharge capacity of 81 mAh g-1 can be achieved at 55 °C for a charge/discharge rate of 2C, with 86% capacity retention after 500 cycles, showing the positive effect of the porous carbon addition for long term cycling stability.

  12. Pigments, elemental composition (C, N, P, Si) and stoichiometry of particulate matter, in the naturally iron fertilized region of Kerguelen in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasbleiz, M.; Leblanc, K.; Blain, S.; Ras, J.; Cornet-Barthaux, V.; Hélias Nunige, S.; Quéguiner, B.

    2014-06-01

    The particulate matter distribution and phytoplankton community structure of the iron-fertilized Kerguelen region were investigated in early austral spring (October-November 2011) during the KEOPS2 cruise. The iron-fertilized region was characterized by a complex mesoscale circulation resulting in a patchy distribution of particulate matter. Integrated concentrations over 200 m ranged from 72.2 to 317.7 mg m-2 for chlorophyll a, 314 to 744 mmol m-2 for biogenic silica (BSi), 1106 to 2268 mmol m-2 for particulate organic carbon, 215 to 436 mmol m-2 for particulate organic nitrogen, and 29.3 to 39.0 mmol m-2 for particulate organic phosphorus. Three distinct high biomass areas were identified: the coastal waters of Kerguelen Islands, the easternmost part of the study area in the Polar Front Zone, and the southeastern Kerguelen Plateau. As expected from previous artificial and natural iron-fertilization experiments, the iron-fertilized areas were characterized by the development of large diatoms revealed by BSi size-fractionation and HPLC pigment signatures, whereas the iron-limited reference area was associated to a low biomass dominated by a mixed (nanoflagellates and diatoms) phytoplankton assemblage. A major difference from previous artificial iron fertilization studies was the observation of much higher Si : C, Si : N, and Si : P ratios (respectively 0.31 ± 0.16, 1.6 ± 0.7 and 20.5 ± 7.9) in the iron-fertilized areas compared to the iron-limited reference station (respectively 0.13, 1.1, 5.8). A second difference is the patchy response of the elemental composition of phytoplankton communities to large scale natural iron fertilization. Comparison to the previous KEOPS1 cruise also allowed to address the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton bloom over the southeastern plateau. From POC, PON, and BSi evolutions, we showed that the elemental composition of the particulate matter also varies at the seasonal scale. This temporal evolution followed changes of the

  13. Iron-catalyzed hydrogenation of bicarbonates and carbon dioxide to formates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengxiang; Zhu-Ge, Ling; Yang, Guangfu; Zhou, Shaolin

    2015-02-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate to formate has been explored extensively. The vast majority of the known active catalyst systems are based on precious metals. Herein, we describe an effective, phosphine-free, air- and moisture-tolerant catalyst system based on Knölker's iron complex for the hydrogenation of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide to formate. The catalyst system can hydrogenate bicarbonate at remarkably low hydrogen pressures (1-5 bar).

  14. Influence of carbon chain length on the synthesis and yield of fatty amine-coated iron-platinum nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are among the most widely used and characterized magnetic nanoparticles. However, metal alloys such as superparamagnetic iron-platinum particles (SIPPs), which have better magnetic properties, are receiving increased attention. Scalable techniques to routinely synthesize SIPPs in bulk need further study. Here, we focus on the role played by the fatty amine ligand in the formation of the bimetallic FePt nanocrystal. More specifically, we compare the effect of varying lengths of fatty amine ligands on the shape, structure, uniformity, composition, and magnetic properties of the SIPPs. We synthesized SIPPs by employing a ‘green’ thermal decomposition reaction using fatty amine ligands containing 12 to 18 carbons in length. Greater fatty amine chain length increased the polydispersity, particle concentration, iron concentration, and the stability of the SIPPs. Additionally, longer reflux times increased the diameter of the particles, but decreased the iron concentration, suggesting that shorter reaction times are preferable. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the SIPPs indicates that the ligands are successfully bound to the FePt cores through the amine group. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry measurements suggest that all of the SIPPs were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that SIPPs synthesized using tetradecylamine had the highest saturation magnetization. Our findings indicate that the octadecylamine ligand, which is currently used for the routine synthesis of SIPPs, may not be optimal. Overall, we found that using tetradecylamine and a 30-min reflux reaction resulted in optimal particles with the highest degree of monodispersity, iron content, stability, and saturation magnetization. PACS 81.07.-b; 75.75.Fk; 61.46.Df PMID:25006334

  15. A field investigation on transport of carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Busch, J; Meißner, T; Potthoff, A; Bleyl, S; Georgi, A; Mackenzie, K; Trabitzsch, R; Werban, U; Oswald, S E

    2015-10-01

    The application of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for subsurface remediation of groundwater contaminants is a promising new technology, which can be understood as alternative to the permeable reactive barrier technique using granular iron. Dechlorination of organic contaminants by zero-valent iron seems promising. Currently, one limitation to widespread deployment is the fast agglomeration and sedimentation of nZVI in colloidal suspensions, even more so when in soils and sediments, which limits the applicability for the treatment of sources and plumes of contamination. Colloid-supported nZVI shows promising characteristics to overcome these limitations. Mobility of Carbo-Iron Colloids (CIC) - a newly developed composite material based on finely ground activated carbon as a carrier for nZVI - was tested in a field application: In this study, a horizontal dipole flow field was established between two wells separated by 5.3m in a confined, natural aquifer. The injection/extraction rate was 500L/h. Approximately 1.2kg of CIC was suspended with the polyanionic stabilizer carboxymethyl cellulose. The suspension was introduced into the aquifer at the injection well. Breakthrough of CIC was observed visually and based on total particle and iron concentrations detected in samples from the extraction well. Filtration of water samples revealed a particle breakthrough of about 12% of the amount introduced. This demonstrates high mobility of CIC particles and we suggest that nZVI carried on CIC can be used for contaminant plume remediation by in-situ formation of reactive barriers.

  16. Enhanced chromium (VI) removal using activated carbon modified by zero valent iron and silver bimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kakavandi, Babak; Kalantary, Roshanak Rezaei; Farzadkia, Mahdi; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Esrafili, Ali; Azari, Ali; Yari, Ahmad Reza; Javid, Allah Bakhsh

    2014-01-01

    Recently, adsorption process has been introduced as a favorable and effective technique for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions. In the present study, bimetallic nanoparticles consisting of zero valent iron and silver were loaded on the activated carbon powder for the preparation of a new adsorbent (PAC-Fe(o)/Ag). The above adsorbent was characterized by using XRD, SEM and TEM techniqes. Experimental data were exploited for kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic evaluations related to the adsorption processes. The Cr(VI) adsorption process was found to be favorable at pH 3 and it reached equilibrium state within 60 min. The stirring rate did not have a significant effect on the adsorption efficiency. Furthermore, the monolayer adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) based on the Langmuir model was measured to be 100 mg/g. The experimental equilibrium data were fitted to the Freundlich adsorption and pseudo second-order models. According to the thermodynamic study, the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature, indicating the adsorption capacity increases with increasing the temperature. The results also revealed that the synthesized composite can be potentially applied as a magnetic adsorbent to remove Cr(VI) contaminants from aqueous solutions.

  17. Sequestration of non-pure carbon dioxide streams in iron oxyhydroxide-containing saline repositories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, S.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Palandri, James L.; Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    Iron oxyhydroxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), was evaluated as a potential formation mineral reactant for trapping CO2 in a mineral phase such as siderite (FeCO3), when a mixture of CO2-SO 2 flue gas is injected into a saline aquifer. Two thermodynamic simulations were conducted, equilibrating a CO2-SO2 fluid mixture with a NaCl-brine and Fe-rich rocks at 150 °C and 300 bar. The modeling studies evaluated mineral and fluid composition at equilibrium and the influence of pH buffering in the system. Results show siderite precipitates both in the buffered and unbuffered system; however, the presence of an alkaline pH buffer enhances the stability of the carbonate. Based on the model, an experiment was designed to compare with thermodynamic predictions. A CO2-SO2 gas mixture was reacted in 150 ml of NaCl-NaOH brine containing 10 g of goethite at 150 °C and 300 bar for 24 days. Mineralogical and brine chemistry confirmed siderite as the predominant reaction product in the system. Seventy-six mg of CO2 are sequestered in siderite per 10 g of goethite.

  18. Iron isotope and REE+Y composition of the Cauê banded iron formation and related iron ores of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Mônica; Lobato, Lydia M.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2017-02-01

    The Minas Supergroup banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Brazilian Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) mineral province experienced multiple deformational events synchronous with hypogene mineralization, which resulted in the metamorphism of BIFs to itabirites and their upgrade to high-grade iron ore. Here, we present rare earth element and yttrium (REE+Y) compositions together with iron isotope ratios of itabirites and their host iron orebodies from 10 iron deposits to constrain environmental conditions during BIF deposition and the effects of hypogene iron enrichment. The REE+Y characteristics of itabirites (positive Eu anomaly and LREE depletion) indicate hydrothermal iron contribution to the Minas basin. Iron isotope data and Ce anomalies suggest BIFs were precipitated by a combination of anoxic biological-mediated ferrous iron oxidation and abiotic oxidation in an environment with free oxygen (such as an oxygen oasis), perhaps related to increase in oxygen concentrations before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). The similarity of the REE+Y composition of the itabirites from the different QF deformational domains, as well as to other Superior-type BIFs, indicates that the metamorphism and synchronous hydrothermal mineralization did not significantly affect the geochemical signature of the original BIFs. However, iron isotope compositions of iron ore vary systematically between deformational domains of the QF, likely reflecting the specific mineralization features in each domain.

  19. Iron isotope and REE+Y composition of the Cauê banded iron formation and related iron ores of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Mônica; Lobato, Lydia M.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2016-04-01

    The Minas Supergroup banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Brazilian Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) mineral province experienced multiple deformational events synchronous with hypogene mineralization, which resulted in the metamorphism of BIFs to itabirites and their upgrade to high-grade iron ore. Here, we present rare earth element and yttrium (REE+Y) compositions together with iron isotope ratios of itabirites and their host iron orebodies from 10 iron deposits to constrain environmental conditions during BIF deposition and the effects of hypogene iron enrichment. The REE+Y characteristics of itabirites (positive Eu anomaly and LREE depletion) indicate hydrothermal iron contribution to the Minas basin. Iron isotope data and Ce anomalies suggest BIFs were precipitated by a combination of anoxic biological-mediated ferrous iron oxidation and abiotic oxidation in an environment with free oxygen (such as an oxygen oasis), perhaps related to increase in oxygen concentrations before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). The similarity of the REE+Y composition of the itabirites from the different QF deformational domains, as well as to other Superior-type BIFs, indicates that the metamorphism and synchronous hydrothermal mineralization did not significantly affect the geochemical signature of the original BIFs. However, iron isotope compositions of iron ore vary systematically between deformational domains of the QF, likely reflecting the specific mineralization features in each domain.

  20. Isotopic composition of dissolved iron in the Equatorial Pacific and the Southern oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radic, A.; Lacan, F.; Jeandel, C.; Poitrasson, F.; Sarthou, G.

    2009-12-01

    Iron is a fundamental element linking ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Iron isotopes are a very promising tool for the study of the iron oceanic cycle, notably for tracing its sources to the ocean and/or for studying its speciation. Several studies reports iron isotopic data in the marine environment: in plankton tows, pore waters, aerosols, seafloor or marginal seas (Bergquist and Boyle, 2006; Severmann et al., 2006; De Jong et al., 2007). To link these isotopic data together and to fully study the iron isotope marine cycle, we need to document the central reservoir in the marine environment : dissolved iron in seawater, espacially in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (NHLC) areas. So far there are very few comunicated data of dissolved iron isotopic composition in the open ocean (Rouxel, 2008; Lacan et al., 2008; John and Andkins, 2009;). Here, the first profiles in HNLC areas will be presented : 2 full-depth profiles in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (EUCFe 2006), 2 full-depth profiles in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean (Bonus-GoodHope 2008) and some data from the Kerguelen area (Southern Ocean, KEOPS 2005). δ56Fe values range from -0.7‰ to more than 1.0‰. All the samples from the Equatorial Pacific Ocean display positive values (heavy iron) whereas samples from the Sourthern Ocean display rather negative values (light iron), especially around 450 m deepth. These results will be discussed in terms of iron sources to ocean. Potential applications of this new tracer for studying internal oceanic processes, such as biological uptake, will be discussed.

  1. Removal of arsenic from simulation wastewater using nano-iron/oyster shell composites.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liwei; Zhang, Shuili; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Hua; Lu, Zexiang; Wang, Siqun

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a nano-iron/oyster shell composite (NI/OS) was firstly prepared by an in-situ synthesis method to explore an efficient treatment technology for arsenic (As) contaminated wastewater. The micromorphologies and composition of the composite were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The effects of the preparation parameters, as well as the treatment conditions, on the removal of As(Ⅲ) were also investigated. The characterization results showed that iron nanoparticles with a diameter of 60 nm were introduced into the composite by an in-situ reduction method. The physicochemical properties of the iron nanoparticles, such as diameter and aggregation, were influenced by the iron source more than the choice of reductant and temperature in the synthesis process, and these properties were closely related to the treatment performance of the composite. Under the suitable reaction conditions of a pH value of 6.8, a temperature of 20 °C, and an initial concentration of As(Ⅲ) of 1.8 mg/L, As(Ⅲ) was almost completely removed from the simulation wastewater.

  2. Carbon fiber composites for cryogenic filament-wound vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. V.; Simon, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced unidirectional and bidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were evaluated for physical and mechanical properties over a cryogenic to room temperature range for potential application to cryogenic vessels. The results showed that Courtaulds HTS carbon fiber was the superior fiber in terms of cryogenic strength properties in epoxy composites. Of the resin systems tested in ring composites, CTBN/ERLB 4617 exhibited the highest composite strengths at cryogenic temperatures, but very low interlaminar shear strengths at room temperature. Tests of unidirectional and bidirectional composite bars showed that the Epon 828/Empol 1040 resin was better at all test temperatures. Neither fatigue cycling nor thermal shock had a significant effect on composite strengths or moduli. Thermal expansion measurements gave negative values in the fiber direction and positive values in the transverse direction of the composites.

  3. Differential Sputtering Behavior of Pyrolytic Graphite and Carbon-Carbon Composite Under Xenon Bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Johnson, Mark L.; Williams, Desiree D.

    2003-01-01

    A differential sputter yield measurement technique is described, which consists of a quartz crystal monitor that is swept at constant radial distance from a small target region where a high current density xenon ion beam is aimed. This apparatus has been used to characterize the sputtering behavior of various forms of carbon including polycrystalline graphite, pyrolytic graphite, and PVD-infiltrated and pyrolized carbon-carbon composites. Sputter yield data are presented for pyrolytic graphite and carbon-carbon composite over a range of xenon ion energies from 200 eV to 1 keV and angles of incidence from 0 deg (normal incidence) to 60 deg .

  4. Mössbauer Effect Study of Iron Thin Films on Si/SiOx Substrate and Iron Phases at Deposited Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweiss, O.; Davida, B.; Jašek, O.; Zajíčková, L.; Vondráček, M.; Zbořil, R.; Mašlán, M.

    2010-07-01

    A phase composition of ˜10 nm thick Fe film placed on the silicon substrate with 200 nm thick SiOx layer after annealing in vacuum and in H2+CH4 was investigated using Conversion Electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). CEMS spectra show that the original iron film was formed by Fe3+ phase. This phase is stable after the annealing in vacuum or in H2+CH4 below 500 °C but formation of phases with Fe2+ and Fe0 (γ-Fe and α-Fe) was observed after annealing at 500 °C and higher temperatures. Formation of fayalite (Fe2SiO4) occurred during vacuum annealing at 700 °C. SEM and CEMS study of the sample with grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes shows that the dominating part of iron atoms is present in Fe3C and Fe5C2 carbide phases. Besides their stoichiometric forms, the spectrum components which can be ascribed to the amorphous Fe5-xC2+x carbides, γ-Fe, and Fe3+ were observed.

  5. Effects of calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite on zinc and iron retention in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson-Hughes, B.; Seligson, F.H.; Hughes, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    We measured the effect of calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite on whole-body retention of zinc-65 in 11 and iron-59 in 13 healthy, postmenopausal women. In a single-blind, controlled, crossover study, each subject, on three occasions, ingested a standard test meal supplemented with iron-59 or zinc-65 and capsules containing placebo or 500 mg elemental calcium as calcium carbonate or hydroxyapatite. Whole-body countings were performed prior to, 30 min after, and 2 wk after each meal. Mean (SEM) zinc retention was 18.1 +/- 1.0% with placebo (control) and did not vary significantly with calcium carbonate (110.0 +/- 8.6% of control) or hydroxyapatite (106.0 +/- 7.9% of control). Iron retention, 6.3 +/- 2.0% with placebo, was significantly reduced with both calcium carbonate (43.3 +/- 8.8% of control, p = 0.002) and hydroxyapatite (45.9 +/- 10.0% of control, p = 0.003). Iron absorption may be significantly reduced when calcium supplements are taken with meals.

  6. [Removal of arsenite from drinking water by activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui-Jie; Jia, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xing; Wang, He

    2009-06-15

    Nano zero-valent iron was loaded onto activated carbon by deoxidizing Fe2+ in aqueous solution and approximately 8.2% (wt) of iron was loaded it. The size of the needle-shaped iron particles in the pores of carbon was (30-500) x (1 000-3 000) nm. The adsorption capacity for arsenic was approximately 1.997 mg/g activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron (NZVI/AC) in the 2 mg/L As(III) solution at pH 6.5 and (25 +/- 2) degrees C. The uptake of arsenic by NZVI/AC was rapid in the first 12 h (94.3%) and equilibrium was achieved at 72 h (99.86%). As(III) was partly oxidized by the absorbent in the process of absorption. The presence of phosphate and silicate ions significantly decreased arsenic removal rate while the effect of other common ions such as sulfate, carbonate and oxalate was insignificant. NZVI/AC was effectively regenerated after adsorption of arsenic when elution was applied with 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. The results suggest that NZVI/AC is an ideal candidate for the treatment of arsenic contaminated drinking water.

  7. Iron Amendment and Fenton Oxidation of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven regeneration of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves Fe amendment to the GAC to catalyze H2O2 reactions and to enhance the rate of MTBE oxidation and GAC regeneration. Four forms of iron (ferric sulfate, ferric chloride, fer...

  8. THE EFFECT OF PH AND DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON ON THE PROPERTIES OF IRON COLLOIDAL SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discolored water resulting from suspended iron particles is a relatively common drinking water consumer complaint. These particles result from the oxygenation of Fe(II), and this study shows that pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) have important effects on their properties....

  9. Computer simulation of cascade damage in -iron with carbon in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, Andrew F; Bacon, David J; Barashev, Aleksandr; Osetsky, Nickolai

    2008-01-01

    Computer simulation of cascade damage in -iron with carbon in solution Original Research Article Journal of Nuclear Materials, Volume 382, Issues 2 3, 1 December 2008, Pages 91-95 Andrew F. Calder, David J. Bacon, Alexander V. Barashev, Yuri N. Osetsky

  10. IRON OPTIMIZATION FOR FENTON-DRIVEN OXIDATION OF MTBE-SPENT GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven chemical regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) is accomplished through the addition of H2O2 and iron (Fe) to spent GAC. The overall objective of this treatment process is to transform target contaminants into less toxic byproducts, re-establish the sorpti...

  11. In-Situ Regeneration of Saturated Granular Activated Carbon by an Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) can remove trace organic pollutants and natural organic matter (NOM) from industrial and municipal waters. This paper evaluates an iron nanocatalyst approach, based on Fenton-like oxidation reactions, to regenerate spent GAC within a packed bed con...

  12. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q.

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  13. Detection of Carbon Monoxide Using Polymer-Composite Films with a Porphyrin-Functionalized Polypyrrole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Lara, Liana M.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Kisor, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Post-fire air constituents that are of interest to NASA include CO and some acid gases (HCl and HCN). CO is an important analyte to be able to sense in human habitats since it is a marker for both prefire detection and post-fire cleanup. The need exists for a sensor that can be incorporated into an existing sensing array architecture. The CO sensor needs to be a low-power chemiresistor that operates at room temperature; the sensor fabrication techniques must be compatible with ceramic substrates. Early work on the JPL ElectronicNose indicated that some of the existing polymer-carbon black sensors might be suitable. In addition, the CO sensor based on polypyrrole functionalized with iron porphyrin was demonstrated to be a promising sensor that could meet the requirements. First, pyrrole was polymerized in a ferric chloride/iron porphyrin solution in methanol. The iron porphyrin is 5, 10, 15, 20-tetraphenyl-21H, 23Hporphine iron (III) chloride. This creates a polypyrrole that is functionalized with the porphyrin. After synthesis, the polymer is dried in an oven. Sensors were made from the functionalized polypyrrole by binding it with a small amount of polyethylene oxide (600 MW). This composite made films that were too resistive to be measured in the device. Subsequently, carbon black was added to the composite to bring the sensing film resistivity within a measurable range. A suspension was created in methanol using the functionalized polypyrrole (90% by weight), polyethylene oxide (600,000 MW, 5% by weight), and carbon black (5% by weight). The sensing films were then deposited, like the polymer-carbon black sensors. After deposition, the substrates were dried in a vacuum oven for four hours at 60 C. These sensors showed good response to CO at concentrations over 100 ppm. While the sensor is based on a functionalized pyrrole, the actual composite is more robust and flexible. A polymer binder was added to help keep the sensor material from delaminating from the

  14. Geochemical and mineralogical composition of bog iron ore as a resource for prehistoric iron production - A case study of the Widawa catchment area in Eastern Silesia, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelemann, Michael; Bebermeier, Wiebke; Hoelzmann, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Spreading from the Near East in the declining Bronze Age from the 2nd millennium BCE onwards, the technique of iron smelting reached Eastern Silesia, Poland, in approximately the 2nd century BCE (pre-Roman Iron Age). At this time the region of the Widawa catchment area was inhabited by the Przeworsk culture. While the older moraine landscape of the study area lacks ores from geological rock formations, bog iron ores were relatively widespread and, due to their comparatively easy accessibility, were commonly exploited for early iron production. In this poster the mineralogical and elemental composition of local bog iron ore deposits and iron slag finds, as a by-product of the smelting process, are investigated. The crystalline mineralogical composition of local bog iron ores is dominated by quartz (SiO2) and goethite (α FeO(OH)), in contrast to slag samples in which fayalite (Fe2SiO4), wüstite (FeO) and quartz, with traces of goethite, represent the main minerals. Ores and slags are both characterized by notable hematite (Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) contents. Analyzed bog iron ore samples show iron contents of up to 64.9 mass% Fe2O3 (45.4 mass% Fe), whereas the iron contents of bloomery slags vary between 48.7 and 72.0 mass% FeO (37.9 and 56.0 mass% Fe). A principal component analysis of the element contents, which were quantified by portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (p-ED-XRF), indicates local variations in the elemental composition. Our results show that bog iron ores are relatively widely distributed with spatially varying iron contents along the Widawa floodplain but present-day formation conditions (e.g. different ground-water levels) are negatively affected by modern land-use practices, such as agriculture and melioration measures.

  15. Bioactive carbon-PEEK composites prepared by chemical surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Matsunami, Chisato; Shirosaki, Yuki

    2017-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much attention as an artificial intervertebral spacer for spinal reconstruction. Furthermore, PEEK plastic reinforced with carbon fiber has twice the bending strength of pure PEEK. However, the PEEK-based materials do not show ability for direct bone bonding, i.e., bioactivity. Although several trials have been conducted for enabling PEEK with bioactivity, few studies have reported on bioactive surface modification of carbon-PEEK composites. In the present study, we attempted the preparation of bioactive carbon-PEEK composites by chemical treatments with H2SO4 and CaCl2. Bioactivity was evaluated by in vitro apatite formation in simulated body fluid (SBF). The apatite formation on the carbon-PEEK composite was compared with that of pure PEEK. Both pure PEEK and carbon-PEEK composite formed the apatite in SBF when they were treated with H2SO4 and CaCl2; the latter showed higher apatite-forming ability than the former. It is conjectured that many functional groups able to induce the apatite nucleation, such as sulfo and carboxyl groups, are incorporated into the dispersed carbon phase in the carbon-PEEK composites.

  16. Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

  17. Novel preparation of carbon-TiO2 composites.

    PubMed

    Elizalde-González, María P; García-Díaz, Esmeralda; Sabinas-Hernández, Sergio A

    2013-12-15

    Carbon-TiO2 sulfated composites were obtained from TiOSO4 · xH2O and glycerol as the TiO2 and carbon sources, respectively. The precursor xerogels were prepared in a one-step ultrasonic-assisted sol-gel reaction, followed by thermal treatment at 400°C under a nitrogen atmosphere to produce carbon-TiO2 sulfated composites. XRD, micro-Raman, SEM, and TEM studies showed that the composites consisted of nanocrystalline clusters of TiO2 and carbon. Ultrasonication in glycerol promoted the crystallinity of the xerogel precursors prior to thermal treatment. X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies confirmed that glycerol also facilitated the formation of small crystallites. The band gaps of carbon-TiO2 composites with two different carbon loadings were found to be 3.06 eV and 2.69 eV. By contrast, the band gap of TiO2 prepared by our method was 3.53 eV. Calcination of the precursors led to an unusual increase in the specific surface and porosity of the composites compared to TiO2. The photocatalytic activities of the prepared composites were tested in a decomposition assay of Acid Orange 7. The reaction was monitored by UV-vis spectrophotometry and by LC-ESI-(Qq)-TOF-MS-DAD. Some intermediate species were identified by LC-ESI-QTOF-MS.

  18. Effects of Iron Limitation on Photosystem II Composition and Light Utilization in Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    PubMed

    Vassiliev, I. R.; Kolber, Z.; Wyman, K. D.; Mauzerall, D.; Shukla, V. K.; Falkowski, P. G.

    1995-11-01

    The effects of iron limitation on photosystem II (PSII) composition and photochemical energy conversion efficiency were studied in the unicellular chlorophyte alga Dunaliella tertiolecta. The quantum yield of photochemistry in PSII, inferred from changes in variable fluorescence normalized to the maximum fluorescence yield, was markedly lower in iron-limited cells and increased 3-fold within 20 h following the addition of iron. The decrease in the quantum yield of photochemistry was correlated with increased fluorescence emission from the antenna. In iron-limited cells, flash intensity saturation profiles of variable fluorescence closely followed a cumulative one-hit Poisson model, suggesting that PSII reaction centers are energetically isolated, whereas in iron-replete cells, the slope of the profile was steeper and the calculated probability of energy transfer between reaction centers increased to >0.6. Immunoassays revealed that in iron-limited cells the reaction center proteins, D1, CP43, and CP47, were markedly reduced relative to the peripheral light-harvesting Chl-protein complex of PSII, whereas the [alpha] subunit of cytochrome b559 was about 10-fold higher. Spectroscopic analysis established that the cytochrome b559 peptide did not contain an associated functional heme. We conclude that the photochemical conversion of absorbed excitation energy in iron-limited cells is limited by the number of photochemical traps per unit antenna.

  19. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    Nardone , "Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications", Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-85-C-0332, Report R86... Nardone and K M. Prewo, "Tensile Performance of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass", J. Mater. Sci. accepted for publication, 1987. 27. R. F. Cooper and K

  20. Isotopic compositions of carbonates and organic carbon from upper Proterozoic successions in Namibia: stratigraphic variation and the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.; Knoll, A. H.; Germs, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Proterozoic seawater. Within the Damara basin, carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates provide a potentially useful tool for the correlation of units between the Kalahari and Congo cratons. Carbonates depleted in 13C were deposited during and immediately following three separate glacial episodes in Namibia. The correspondence between ice ages and negative delta 13C excursions may reflect the effects of lowered sea levels; enhanced circulation of deep, cold, O2-rich seawater; and/or the upwelling of 13C-depleted deep water. Iron-formation is additionally associated with one of the glacial horizons, the Chuos tillite. Carbon-13 enriched isotopic abundances in immediately pre-glacial carbonates suggest that oceanographic conditions favored high rates of organic burial. It is likely that marine waters were stratified, with deep waters anoxic. A prolonged period of ocean stratification would permit the build-up of ferrous iron, probably from hydrothermal sources. At the onset of glaciation, upwelling would have brought 13C-depleted and iron-rich deep water onto shallow shelves where contact with cold, oxygenated surface waters led to the precipitation of ferric iron.

  1. Isotopic compositions of carbonates and organic carbon from upper Proterozoic successions in Namibia: stratigraphic variation and the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A J; Hayes, J M; Knoll, A H; Germs, G J

    1991-01-01

    Proterozoic seawater. Within the Damara basin, carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates provide a potentially useful tool for the correlation of units between the Kalahari and Congo cratons. Carbonates depleted in 13C were deposited during and immediately following three separate glacial episodes in Namibia. The correspondence between ice ages and negative delta 13C excursions may reflect the effects of lowered sea levels; enhanced circulation of deep, cold, O2-rich seawater; and/or the upwelling of 13C-depleted deep water. Iron-formation is additionally associated with one of the glacial horizons, the Chuos tillite. Carbon-13 enriched isotopic abundances in immediately pre-glacial carbonates suggest that oceanographic conditions favored high rates of organic burial. It is likely that marine waters were stratified, with deep waters anoxic. A prolonged period of ocean stratification would permit the build-up of ferrous iron, probably from hydrothermal sources. At the onset of glaciation, upwelling would have brought 13C-depleted and iron-rich deep water onto shallow shelves where contact with cold, oxygenated surface waters led to the precipitation of ferric iron.

  2. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Marcinek, Marek [Warszawa, PL; Kostecki, Robert [Lafayette, CA

    2012-07-17

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Joining Carbon-Carbon Composites and High-Temperature Materials with High Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Daniel; Singler, Robert

    1998-01-01

    1. Program goals addressed during this period. Experimental work was directed at formation of a low-stress bond between carbon- carbon and aluminum, with the objective of minimizing the heating of the aluminum substrate, thereby minimizing stresses resulting from the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) difference between the aluminum and carbon-carbon. A second objective was to form a bond between carbon-carbon and aluminum with good thermal conductivity for electronic thermal management (SEM-E) application. 2. Substrates and joining materials selected during this period. Carbon-Carbon Composite (CCC) to Aluminum. CCC (Cu coated) to Aluminum. Soldering compounds based on Sn/Pb and Sn/Ag/Cu/Bi compositions. 3. Soldering experiments performed. Conventional techniques. High Energy Electron Beam (HEEB) process.

  4. Adsorbent 2D and 3D carbon matrices with protected magnetic iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carreño, N L V; Escote, M T; Valentini, A; McCafferty, L; Stolojan, V; Beliatis, M; Mills, C A; Rhodes, R; Smith, C T G; Silva, S R P

    2015-11-07

    We report on the synthesis of two and three dimensional carbonaceous sponges produced directly from graphene oxide (GO) into which functionalized iron nanoparticles can be introduced to render it magnetic. This simple, low cost procedure, wherein an iron polymeric resin precursor is introduced into the carbon framework, results in carbon-based materials with specific surface areas of the order of 93 and 66 m(2) g(-1), compared to approx. 4 m(2) g(-1) for graphite, decorated with ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles giving coercivity fields postulated to be 216 and 98 Oe, values typical for ferrite magnets, for 3.2 and 13.5 wt% Fe respectively. The strongly magnetic iron nanoparticles are robustly anchored to the GO sheets by a layer of residual graphite, on the order of 5 nm, formed during the pyrolysis of the precursor material. The applicability of the carbon sponges is demonstrated in their ability to absorb, store and subsequently elute an organic dye, Rhodamine B, from water as required. It is possible to regenerate the carbon-iron hybrid material after adsorption by eluting the dye with a solvent to which it has a high affinity, such as ethanol. The use of a carbon framework opens the hybrid materials to further chemical functionalization, for enhanced chemical uptake of contaminants, or co-decoration with, for example, silver nanoparticles for bactericidal properties. Such analytical properties, combined with the material's magnetic character, offer solutions for environmental decontamination at land and sea, wastewater purification, solvent extraction, and for the concentration of dilute species.

  5. Adsorbent 2D and 3D carbon matrices with protected magnetic iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, N. L. V.; Escote, M. T.; Valentini, A.; McCafferty, L.; Stolojan, V.; Beliatis, M.; Mills, C. A.; Rhodes, R.; Smith, C. T. G.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the synthesis of two and three dimensional carbonaceous sponges produced directly from graphene oxide (GO) into which functionalized iron nanoparticles can be introduced to render it magnetic. This simple, low cost procedure, wherein an iron polymeric resin precursor is introduced into the carbon framework, results in carbon-based materials with specific surface areas of the order of 93 and 66 m2 g-1, compared to approx. 4 m2 g-1 for graphite, decorated with ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles giving coercivity fields postulated to be 216 and 98 Oe, values typical for ferrite magnets, for 3.2 and 13.5 wt% Fe respectively. The strongly magnetic iron nanoparticles are robustly anchored to the GO sheets by a layer of residual graphite, on the order of 5 nm, formed during the pyrolysis of the precursor material. The applicability of the carbon sponges is demonstrated in their ability to absorb, store and subsequently elute an organic dye, Rhodamine B, from water as required. It is possible to regenerate the carbon-iron hybrid material after adsorption by eluting the dye with a solvent to which it has a high affinity, such as ethanol. The use of a carbon framework opens the hybrid materials to further chemical functionalization, for enhanced chemical uptake of contaminants, or co-decoration with, for example, silver nanoparticles for bactericidal properties. Such analytical properties, combined with the material's magnetic character, offer solutions for environmental decontamination at land and sea, wastewater purification, solvent extraction, and for the concentration of dilute species.

  6. Size- and composition-dependent radio frequency magnetic permeability of iron oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hongseok; Liu, Xiyu; Paik, Taejong; Palanisamy, Duraivelan; Kim, Jungkwun; Vogel, William D; Viescas, Arthur J; Chen, Jun; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C; Kikkawa, James M; Allen, Mark G; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-12-23

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores.

  7. Size- and Composition-Dependent Radio Frequency Magnetic Permeability of Iron Oxide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, H; Liu, XY; Paik, T; Palanisamy, D; Kim, J; Vogel, WD; Viescas, AJ; Chen, J; Papaefthymiou, GC; Kikkawa, JM; Allen, MG; Murray, CB

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores.

  8. Highly magnetic nanoporous carbon/iron-oxide hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Alam, Sher; Anand, Chokkalingam; Lakhi, Kripal Singh; Choy, Jin-Ho; Cha, Wang Soo; Elzhatry, Ahmed; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Ohya, Yutaka; Vinu, Ajayan

    2014-11-10

    The preparation of size-controllable Fe2O3 nanoparticles grown in nanoporous carbon with tuneable pore diameters is reported. These hybrid materials exhibit strong non-linear magnetic properties and a magnetic moment of approximately 229 emu g(-1), which is the highest value ever reported for nanoporous hybrids, and can be attributed to the nanosieve effect and the strong interaction between the nanoparticles and the carbon walls.

  9. Ionic Liquids as Versatile Precursors for Functionalized Porous Carbon and Carbon-Oxide Composite Materials by Confined Carbonization

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2010-01-01

    Thermolysis of an ionic liquid (IL) gives no char residue, whereas heating the same IL trapped within an oxide framework affords high carbonization yields (see picture). This confinement method allows incorporation of heteroatoms from the parent IL in the final products, for the development of functionalized porous carbon and carbon-oxide composite materials.

  10. Surface complexation of ferrous iron and carbonate on ferrihydrite and the mobilization of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Appelo, C A J; Van Der Weiden, M J J; Tournassat, C; Charlet, L

    2002-07-15

    Surface complexation models are commonly used to predict the mobility of trace metals in aquifers. For arsenic in groundwater, surface complexation models cannot be used because the database is incomplete. Both carbonate and ferrous iron are often present at a high concentration in groundwater and will influence the sorption of arsenic, but the surface complexation constants are absent in the database of Dzombak and Morel. This paper presents the surface complexation constants for carbonate and ferrous iron on ferrihydrite as derived for the double-layer model. For ferrous iron the constants were obtained from published data supplemented by new experiments to determine the sorption on the strong sites of ferrihydrite. For carbonate the constants were derived from experiments by Zachara et al., who employed relatively low concentrations of carbonate. The double-layer model, optimized for low concentrations, was tested against sorption experiments of carbonate on goethite at higher concentration by Villalobos and Leckie, and reasonable agreement was found. Sorption was also estimated using linear free energy relations (LFER), and results compared well with our derived constants. Model calculations confirm that sorption of particularly carbonate at common soil and groundwater concentrations reduces the sorption capacity of arsenic on ferrihydrite significantly. The displacing effect of carbonate on sorbed arsenate and arsenite has been overlooked in many studies. It may be an important cause for the high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater in Bangladesh. Sediments containing high amounts of sorbed arsenic are deposited in surface water with low carbonate concentrations. Subsequently the sediments become exposed to groundwater with a high dissolved carbonate content, and arsenic is mobilized by displacement from the sediment surface.

  11. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  12. Microstructure and properties of pitch-based carbon composites

    PubMed

    Blanco; Santamaria; Bermejo; Bonhomme; Menendez

    1999-11-01

    Pitches prepared in the laboratory by thermal treatment and air-blowing of a commercial coal-tar pitch were used as matrix precursors of carbon composites using granular petroleum coke, foundry coke, amorphous graphite and anthracite. Pitches were characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis, softening point, solubility tests and carbon yield) and light microscopy (mesophase content). Pitch pyrolysis behaviour was monitored by thermogravimetric analysis and from the optical texture of cokes. Pitch wettability to the different carbons, at different temperatures, was also studied. Experimental conditions selected for the preparation of composites were based on pitch composition and properties. The main microstructural features of composites were determined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Composite properties were described in terms of their density, porosity and compressive strength, and related to composite microstructure and the characteristics of the precursors. Thermal treatment and air-blowing of pitch improved carbon composite structure and properties. The lowest porosities and best mechanical properties were observed in those composites obtained with the thermally treated pitches combined with foundry coke and anthracite.

  13. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2010-10-12

    A method for forming a reinforced rigid anode monolith and fuel and product of such method. The method includes providing a solution of organic aerogel or xerogel precursors including at least one of a phenolic resin, phenol (hydroxybenzene), resorcinol(1,3-dihydroxybenzene), or catechol(1,2-dihydroxybenzene); at least one aldehyde compound selected from the group consisting of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and furfuraldehyde; and an alkali carbonate or phosphoric acid catalyst; adding internal reinforcement materials comprising carbon to said precursor solution to form a precursor mixture; gelling said precursor mixture to form a composite gel; drying said composite gel; and pyrolyzing said composite gel to form a wettable aerogel/carbon composite or a wettable xerogel/carbon composite, wherein said composites comprise chars and said internal reinforcement materials, and wherein said composite is suitable for use as an anode with the chars being fuel capable of being combusted in a molten salt electrochemical fuel cell in the range from 500 C to 800 C to produce electrical energy. Additional methods and systems/compositions are also provided.

  14. Aerogel and xerogel composites for use as carbon anodes

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2008-08-12

    Disclosed herein are aerogel and xerogel composite materials suitable for use as anodes in fuel cells and batteries. Precursors to the aerogel and xerogel compounds are infused with inorganic polymeric materials or carbon particles and then gelled. The gels are then pyrolyzed to form composites with internal structural support.

  15. Proteomics, pigment composition, and organization of thylakoid membranes in iron-deficient spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Timperio, Anna Maria; D'Amici, Gian Maria; Barta, Csengele; Loreto, Francesco; Zolla, Lello

    2007-01-01

    The changes induced in the photosynthetic apparatus of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) seedlings exposed to iron deficiency shortly after germination were characterized with two proteomic approaches coupled with chlorophyll and xanthophyll analysis and in vivo measurements of photosynthesis. During the first 10 d of iron deficiency the concentrations of chlorophyll b and violaxanthin were greatly reduced, but all xanthophylls recovered after 13-17 d of iron deficiency, when both chlorophylls were negatively affected. No new protein was formed in iron-deficient leaves, and no protein disappeared altogether. Photosystem I (PSI) proteins were largely reduced, but the stoichiometry of the antenna composition of PSI was not compromised. On the contrary, PSII proteins were less affected by the stress, but the specific antennae Lhcb4 and Lhcb6, Lhcb2 and its isoform Lhcb1.1 were all reduced, while the concentration of Lhcb3 increased. A strong reduction in thylakoid bending and an altered distribution pattern for the reduced PSI and PSII complexes were observed microscopically in iron-deficient leaves. Supercomplex organization was also affected by the stress. The trimeric organization of Lhcb and the dimerization of Lhca were reduced, while monomerization of Lhcb increased. However, the trimerization of Lhcb was partially recovered after 13-17 d of iron deficiency. In iron-deficient leaves, photosynthesis was strongly inhibited at different light intensities, and a high de-epoxidation status of the xanthophylls was observed, in association with a strong impairment of photochemical efficiency and an increase of heat dissipation as monitored by the non-photochemical quenching of fluorescence. All these negative effects of iron deficiency were attenuated but not fully reversed after again supplying iron to iron-deficient leaves for 7-13 d. These results indicate that iron deficiency has a strong impact on the proteomic structure of spinach photosystems and suggest that, in

  16. The structural-phase state of iron-carbon coatings formed by the ultradispersed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Manakova, Irina A. Ozernoy, Alexey N. Tuleushev, Yuriy Zh. Vereshchak, Mikhail F. Volodin, Valeriy N. Zhakanbayev, Yeldar A.

    2014-10-27

    The methods of nuclear gamma-resonance spectroscopy, elemental microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to study nanoscale coatings. The samples were prepared by magnetron sputtering of carbon and iron particles. They alternately were deposited on monocrystalline silicon or polycrystalline corundum substrate moving relative to the plasma flows in the form of sublayers with a thickness of less than 0.6 nm up to the total thickness of 150-500 nm. Solid solutions with the carbon concentrations of up to 7.5, 12.0, 17.6, and 23.9 at% were produced by co-precipitation of ultradispersed particles of iron and carbon. Using method of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, we detected the anisotropy of orientation of magnetic moments of iron atoms due to texturing of the formed coatings. The deviation of the crystallite orientation from the average value depends on the degree of carbonization. At 550°C, the pearlite eutectic α‐Fe(C)+Fe{sub 3}C is formed from the amorphous structure without formation of intermediate carbides. The relative content of cementite correlates with the amount of carbon in the coating. The formation of the solid solutions-alloys directly during the deposition process confirms the theory of thermal-fluctuation melting of small particles.

  17. Fabrication of polytetrafluoroethylene/carbon fiber composites using radiation crosslinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Udagawa, Akira; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2001-07-01

    A fabrication method for fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) composites based on carbon fibers and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) which was crosslinked by electron beam (EB) irradiation under specific conditions was studied. Though the fabricated composite showed high mechanical properties compared with a ready-made PTFE composite (non-crosslinked PTFE with 5˜20 wt% filler), mechanical properties of laminated panels were a bit poor compared with those of usual FRP. It was found that the toughness of the PTFE matrix is poor in the composite. On the other hand, the one-ply sheet of carbon fibers and crosslinked PTFE composite showed good mechanical properties for sheet-shape materials. The wettability of the obtained crosslinked PTFE composite is hardly changed by crosslinking and reinforcement.

  18. Enhancement of the in-plane shear properties of carbon fiber composites containing carbon nanotube mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hansang

    2015-01-01

    The in-plane shear property of carbon fiber laminates is one of the most important structural features of aerospace and marine structures. Fiber-matrix debonding caused by in-plane shear loading is the major failure mode of carbon fiber composites because of the stress concentration at the interfaces. In this study, carbon nanotube mats (CNT mat) were incorporated in two different types of carbon fiber composites. For the case of woven fabric composites, mechanical interlocking between the CNTs and the carbon fibers increased resistance to shear failure. However, not much improvement was observed for the prepreg composites as a result of incorporation of the CNT mats. The reinforcement mechanism of the CNT mat layer was investigated by a fractographic study using scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the CNT mat was functionalized by three different methods and the effectiveness of the functionalization methods was determined and the most appropriate functionalization method for the CNT mat was air oxidation.

  19. Mössbauer study of carbon coated iron magnetic nanoparticles produced by simultaneous reduction/pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Fernanda G.; Ardisson, José D.; Rosmaninho, Marcelo G.; Lago, Rochel M.; Tristão, Juliana C.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic iron nanoparticles immersed in a carbon matrix were produced by a combined process of controlled dispersion of Fe3 + ions in sucrose, thermal decomposition with simultaneous reduction of iron cores and the formation of the porous carbonaceous matrix. The materials were prepared with iron contents of 1, 4 and 8 in %wt in sucrose and heated at 400, 600 and 800°. The samples were analyzed by XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, TG, SEM and TEM. The materials prepared at 400° are composed essentially of Fe3O4 particles and carbon, while treatments at higher temperatures, e.g. 600 and 800° produced as main phases Fe0 and Fe3C. The Mössbauer spectra of samples heated at 400° showed two sextets characteristic of a magnetite phase and other contributions compatible with Fe3 + and Fe2 + phases in a carbonaceous matrix. Samples treated at temperatures above 600° showed the presence of metallic iron with concentrations between 16-43%. The samples heated at 800° produced higher amounts of Fe3C (between 20% and 58%). SEM showed for the iron 8% sample treated at 600-800°C particle sizes smaller than 50 nm. Due to the presence of Fe0 particles in the carbonaceous porous matrix the materials have great potential for application as magnetic adsorbents.

  20. Effects and characterization of an environmentally-friendly, inexpensive composite Iron-Sodium catalyst on coal gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monterroso, Rodolfo

    Coal gasification has been commercially used for more than 60 years in the production of fuels and chemicals. Recently, and due to the lowered environmental impacts and high efficiency derived from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), this process has received increased attention. Furthermore, upcoming strict CO2 emissions regulations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will no longer be achievable by traditional means of coal combustion, therefore, growing dependence on different energy sources has drawn attention to clean coal technologies, such as coal-to-liquids processing, and the core of this process is also gasification. Gasification is an energy intensive process that can be substantially improved in terms of efficiency through the use of catalysts. In this study, the effect of the composite catalyst, FeCO3-Na2CO3, on gasification of a low-sulfur sub-bituminous Wyodak coal from the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming was investigated. The catalytic effects of the composite catalysts were evaluated by comparing their effluent gas compositions and carbon conversion kinetics to those achieved in the presence of either FeCO3 or Na2CO3 catalyst alone or without the presence of any catalyst. All of the evaluation work was conducted in a fixed bed gasifier at atmospheric pressure. Compared to raw coal with no catalyst, the composite catalyst is efficient in increasing the carbon conversion rate constant by as much as two times within the 700-800°C range due to its ability to reduce the activation energy of gasification by about 30-40%. Compared to pure sodium and iron catalysts, the composite catalyst can increase the yields of desired products H2 and CO at 800°C by 15% and 40%, respectively. The composite catalyst can not only synergize the advantages, but also overcome the challenges of pure iron or pure sodium based catalytic coal gasification processes. Moreover, the mechanisms of this particular catalytic coal gasification process

  1. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Argade, Shyam

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a critical review of the processing techniques for fabricating continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs for possible applications at elevated temperatures. Some of the issues affecting durability of the composite materials such as fiber coatings and cracking of the matrix because of shrinkage in PIP-process are also examined. An assessment of the potential inexpensive processes is also provided. Finally three potential routes of manufacturing C/SiC composites using a technology that NC A&T developed for carbon/carbon composites are outlined. Challenges that will be encountered are also listed.

  2. Low-carbon transition of iron and steel industry in China: carbon intensity, economic growth and policy intervention.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Li, Xiao; Qiao, Yuanbo; Shi, Lei

    2015-02-01

    As the biggest iron and steel producer in the world and one of the highest CO2 emission sectors, China's iron and steel industry is undergoing a low-carbon transition accompanied by remarkable technological progress and investment adjustment, in response to the macroeconomic climate and policy intervention. Many drivers of the CO2 emissions of the iron and steel industry have been explored, but the relationships between CO2 abatement, investment and technological expenditure, and their connections with the economic growth and governmental policies in China, have not been conjointly and empirically examined. We proposed a concise conceptual model and an econometric model to investigate this crucial question. The results of regression, Granger causality test and impulse response analysis indicated that technological expenditure can significantly reduce CO2 emissions, and that investment expansion showed a negative impact on CO2 emission reduction. It was also argued with empirical evidence that a good economic situation favored CO2 abatement in China's iron and steel industry, while achieving CO2 emission reduction in this industrial sector did not necessarily threaten economic growth. This shed light on the dispute over balancing emission cutting and economic growth. Regarding the policy aspects, the year 2000 was found to be an important turning point for policy evolution and the development of the iron and steel industry in China. The subsequent command and control policies had a significant, positive effect on CO2 abatement.

  3. Creep of carbon-yarn and carbon-carbon composites at high temperatures and high stresses. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sines, G.; Yang, Z.; Vickers, B.D.

    1988-05-01

    To better understand the creep-behavior of carbon yarn and carbon-carbon composites, creep experiments were developed that permitted testing at high temperatures (up to 2500 C) and at high stresses (up to 850 MPa) on specially prepared, uniaxial specimens that had a known gage length. Using a Dorn-type power-law relation to model steady-state creep, the apparent activation energy for the carbon-yarn and carbon-composite specimens was determined to be 1082 kj/mol. This value represents a single thermally activated process, vacancy diffusion, that compares favorably with the various types of graphitizable carbon. The value determined for the stress exponent was 7.5. It too was found to be independent of the carbon-matrix's presence and independent of the specimens' loading history. Values of the pre-exponential constant for the carbon yarn and carbon composites were also calculated. The carbon matrix greatly improves the creep resistance of the carbon composite. This improvement was attributed to the matrix's microstructure. It distributes applied loads more evenly and it may also impose a triaxial stress state in the yarns's filaments. It is proposed that such a stress state may inhibit the flux of vacancies, thus accounting in part for this increase in creep resistance.

  4. Formation and transformation of a short range ordered iron carbonate precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bovet, Nicolas; Wallace, Adam F.; Sel, Ozlem; Arbour, Tyler; Navrotsky, Alexandra; De Yoreo, James J.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-09-01

    Fe(II)-carbonates, such as siderite, form in environments where O2 is scarce, e.g., during marine sediment diagenesis, corrosion and possibly CO2 sequestration, but little is known about their formation pathways. We show that early precipitates from carbonate solutions containing 0.1 M Fe(II) with varying pH produced broad peaks in X-ray diffraction and contained dominantly Fe and CO3 when probed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Reduced pair distribution function (PDF) analysis shows only peaks corresponding to interatomic distances below 15 Å, reflecting a material with no long range structural order. Moreover, PDF peak positions differ from those for known iron carbonates and hydroxides. Mössbauer spectra also deviate from those expected for known iron carbonates and suggest a less crystalline structure. These data show that a previously unidentified iron carbonate precursor phase formed. Its coherent scattering domains determined from PDF analysis are slightly larger than for amorphous calcium carbonate, suggesting that the precursor could be nanocrystalline. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of Fe-carbonate polynuclear complexes yield PDF peak positions that agree well with those from experiments, offering the possibility that the material is a condensate of such complexes, assembled in a relatively unorganised fashion. If this is the case, the material could be nearly amorphous, rather than being composed of well defined nanocrystals. PDF measurements of samples ageing in solution coupled with refinement with the software PDFgui show that the material transforms to siderite or siderite/chukanovite mixtures within hours and that the transformation rate depends on pH. The identified Fe-carbonate precursor may potentially form during anaerobic corrosion or bacterial Fe reduction.

  5. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  6. SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER STRUCTURING

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Chen, Jian; Jones, Jonaaron F.; Alexandra, Hackett; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Daniel, Claus; Warren, Charles David; Rehkopf, Jackie D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composite (CFPC) as a lightweight material in automotive and aerospace industries requires the control of surface morphology. In this study, the composites surface was prepared by ablating the resin in the top fiber layer of the composite using an Nd:YAG laser. The CFPC specimens with T700S carbon fiber and Prepreg - T83 resin (epoxy) were supplied by Plasan Carbon Composites, Inc. as 4 ply thick, 0/90o plaques. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and wavelength was investigated to remove resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. In addition, resin ablation due to the power variation created by a laser interference technique is presented. Optical property measurements, optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and high-resolution optical profiler images were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology.

  7. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  8. Removal of trichloroethylene by zerovalent iron/activated carbon derived from agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuh-fan; Cheng, Yu-ling; Shih, Yang-hsin

    2013-11-15

    Activated carbon (AC) and zerovalent iron (ZVI) have been widely used in the adsorption and dehalogenation process, respectively, for the removal of organic compounds in environmental treatments. This study aims to prepare ZVI/AC derived from an agricultural waste, coir pith, through simple one-step pyrolysis. The effect of activation temperature and time on the surface area, iron content, and zerovalent iron ratio of ZVI/AC was systemically investigated. The results indicated that the activation of AC by FeSO4 significantly increased surface area of AC and distributed elemental iron over the AC. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of ZVI/AC revealed that zerovalent iron was present. As compared to AC without FeSO4 activation, ZVI/AC increased the trichloroethylene removal rate constant by 7 times. The dechlorination ability of ZVI/AC was dominated by the zerovalent iron content. We have shown that lab-made ZVI/AC from coir pith can effectively adsorb and dehalogenate the chlorinated compounds in water.

  9. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen; Kerr, John B.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  10. Prestressed Carbon Fiber Composite Overwrapped Gun Tube

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Organic Fiberglass 105mm (No Pre-stress) – Titanium Jacketed 120mm ( Swage Pre-stress) – Metal Matrix Composite 120mm ( Swage Pre-stress) – Organic...Composite 120mm ( Swage Pre-stress) – Organic Thermoset 105mm MRAAS (Lay-up Tailoring – No Pre-stress) – Electromagnetic Railgun Tubes – E-Beam and Tape

  11. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  12. Degradation of carbon tetrachlorine in the presence of iron and sulphur containing compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, S.; Lipczynska-Kochany, E.; Milburn, R.

    1995-12-01

    The effect of several sulphur compounds: sodium sulphate, sodium sulphide, ferrous sulphide, pyrite and organosulphonic acid on the kinetics of the iron (Fe{sup 0}) induced degradation of carbon tetrachloride was examined under aerobic conditions. It was observed that all of the sulphur compounds investigated significantly accelerated the reaction. The mechanisms of the processes studied as well as their possible influence of the efficiency of the iron-induced dehalogenation of pollutants, both in situ and in above-ground treatment are discussed.

  13. Iron filled carbon nanotubes as novel monopole-like sensors for quantitative magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolny, F.; Mühl, T.; Weissker, U.; Lipert, K.; Schumann, J.; Leonhardt, A.; Büchner, B.

    2010-10-01

    We present a novel ultrahigh stability sensor for quantitative magnetic force microscopy (MFM) based on an iron filled carbon nanotube. In contrast to the complex magnetic structure of conventional MFM probes, this sensor constitutes a nanomagnet with defined properties. The long iron nanowire can be regarded as an extended dipole of which only the monopole close to the sample surface is involved in the imaging process. We demonstrate its potential for high resolution imaging. Moreover, we present an easy routine to determine its monopole moment and prove that this calibration, unlike other approaches, is universally applicable. For the first time this enables straightforward quantitative MFM measurements.

  14. Composite protective coating for carbon-carbon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J.W.; Forcht, B.A.; Moss, R.W.

    1985-02-19

    Composite protective coatings for protecting carbonaceous substrates from degrading in oxygen containing environments are provided. The composite protective coatings include a first coating layer applied to the surface of the substrate. The first coating layer is a silicon carbide type coating. The second coating layer is applied to the surface of a first coating layer and is a sputter deposited phase stabilized zirconium oxide having a columnar microstructure. Carbonaceous substrates having the composite protective coatings are able to withstand temperatures of about 4100/sup 0/ F. in oxygen containing environments.

  15. Carbon diffusion in solid iron as function of pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagno, V.; Crispin, K. L.; Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of carbon diffusion in metallic iron is of importance for both industrial and geological applications. In industry the diffusion properties of carbon apply to the massive production of steel through carburizing and galvanization processes at high temperature with the aim to improve the hardness and rust resistance of such materials. In geoscience the diffusion of carbon in metallic phases at high pressure and temperature is important for determining the rate of reactions and crystal growth of carbide phases likely coexisting with mantle silicates. Due to a small atomic radius, carbon is expected to dissolve by interstitial diffusion in solid metals. However, to date there are no experimental data available to understand the role that pressure plays on the mobilization of carbon through solid iron. Further, for light elements such as carbon or sulfur the activation energy is assumed to be lower than in case of lattice diffusion. However, with increasing pressure the activation volume must be taken into account to better understand diffusion processes at the atomic scale. We performed experiments using multianvil and piston cylinder devices at pressures between 1.5 and 6 GPa and temperature of 700-1200°C. Experiments were carried out using cylindrical glassy carbon sandwiched between layers of pure iron rods of known thickness enclosed in MgO capsule. Analytical techniques included FE-SEM for textural observation and accurate analyses of the interface between layers, while concentration profiles were measured using the electron microprobe with an optimized standardization procedure. Concentration profiles of carbon in iron were computed to determine the diffusion coefficients based on Fick's second law formulation assuming isotropic one dimension diffusion. Preliminary results confirm the positive temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient for carbon widely discussed in literature. However, our results also show that a significant increase in

  16. Iron aluminide-titanium carbide composites: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, R.; Schneibel, J.H.; Alexander, K.B.

    1996-09-01

    Composites of intermetallics and carbides (with binder contents less that 50 vol.%) are considered as potential candidates for applications requiring high wear resistance in corrosive environments. Intermetallics, especially aluminides, provide the corrosion resistance, and the high hardness of the carbide phase contributes to increased wear resistance of the composites. In this study, cost effective and simple processing techniques to obtain FeAl-TiC composites, over a wide range of binder volume fractions, are demonstrated. Binder volume fractions range from 0.15 to 0.7 (18 to 75 wt. % binder). Two techniques - liquid phase sintering of mixed powders and pressureless melt infiltration of TiC preforms was found to be very successful for obtaining fully dense composites with binder volume fractions from 0.15 to 0.3 (18 to 34 wt. %), whereas for higher binder contents liquid phase sintering of mixed powders was the best approach. Mechanical properties of these composites including the 3-point bend strength, fracture toughness and hardness are presented.

  17. Carbon fiber/copper mesh reinforced carbon composite for sliding contact material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chaoyong; Zhang, Hongbo; Yin, Jian; Xiong, Xiang; Wang, Pei; Sun, Miao

    2017-02-01

    A novel carbon fiber/copper mesh knitted fabric reinforced carbon (Cf/Cu/C) composite was fabricated by a CVI-I/C technique. The mechanical, electrical, arc discharge and tribological properties of the Cf/Cu/C composite were compared with those of a traditional C/Cu composite fabricated by powder metallurgy. The results show that the copper mesh distributes uniformly in the Cf/Cu/C composite, and it exhibits higher mechanical property and more excellent electrical resistivity than those of the C/Cu composite. Meanwhile, the arc resistance property of Cf/Cu/C composite is also better than the C/Cu composite under the same testing conditions. The wear rate is about 80% of the C/Cu composite.

  18. Covalent entrapment of cobalt-iron sulfides in N-doped mesoporous carbon: extraordinary bifunctional electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mengxia; Ruan, Changping; Chen, Yan; Jiang, Chunhuan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2015-01-21

    To alleviate the kinetic barriers associated with ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) and OER (oxygen evolution reaction) in electrochemical systems, efficient nonprecious electrocatalysts are urgently required. Here we report a facile soft-template mediated approach for fabrication of nanostructured cobalt-iron double sulfides that are covalently entrapped in nitrogen-doped mesoporous graphitic carbon (Co0.5Fe0.5S@N-MC). Notably, with a positive half-wave potential (0.808 V) and a high diffusion-limiting current density, the composite material delivers unprecedentedly striking ORR electrocatalytic activity among recently reported nonprecious late transition metal chalcogenide materials in alkaline medium. Various characterization techniques, including X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, are conducted to elucidate the correlation between structural features and catalytic activities of the composite. Moderate substitution and well-dispersion of iron in bimetallic sulfide composites are believed to have positive effect on the adsorption and activation of oxygen-containing species, thus leading to conspicuous ORR and OER catalytic enhancement compared to their monometallic counterparts. Besides, the covalent bridge between active sulfide particles and mesoporous carbon shells provides facile pathways for electron and mass transport. Beneficially, the intimate coupling interaction renders prolonged electrocatalytic performances to the composite. Our results may possibly lend a new impetus to the rational design of bi- or multimetallic sulfides encapsulated in porous carbon with improved performance for electrocatalysis and energy storage applications.

  19. Binary iron-carbon nanoparticle synthesis in photolysis of Fe(CO)5 with methane and acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Mikheyeva, E. Yu; Musikhin, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The experimental investigation of iron-carbon nanoparticles synthesis by joint laser photolysis of iron pentacarbonyl in the mixture with methane or acetylene has been carried out. The radiation source used for photo-dissociation of precursors was a pulsed Nd:Yag laser operated at a wavelength of 266 nm. Under uv radiation the molecules of Fe(CO)5 decomposed, forming atomic iron vapor and unsaturated carbonyls at well-known and readily controllable parameters. The subsequent condensation of supersaturated metal vapor resulted in small iron clusters and nanoparticles formation. It was assumed that the active catalytic surface of metal nanoparticles could activate the hydrocarbon molecules up to carbon layer formation on their surface. The growth process of the nanoparticles was observed by a method of laser light extinction. Additionally nanoparticle samples were investigated by a transmission electron microscope. The particle sizes were measured by microphotographs treatment. The sizes of synthesized particles from methane-iron-pentacarbonyl mixture were found to be in a range of 4-16 nm with a count median diameter of 8.9 nm and standard deviation of 1.13. These particles consisted of iron oxide without any carbon content. The particles formed in photolysis of acetylene-iron-pentacarbonyl mixture had the sizes of 3-7 nm with count median diameter of 4 nm and standard deviation of 1.28 and contained the essential amount of carbon. The iron cores were surrounded with a carbon shell.

  20. Internal iron biomineralization in Imperata cylindrica, a perennial grass: chemical composition, speciation and plant localization.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, N; Menéndez, N; Tornero, J; Amils, R; de la Fuente, V

    2005-03-01

    * The analysis of metal distribution in Imperata cylindrica, a perennial grass isolated from the banks of Tinto River (Iberian Pyritic Belt), an extreme acidic environment with high content in metals, has shown a remarkable accumulation of iron. This property has been used to study iron speciation and its distribution among different tissues and structures of the plant. * Mossbauer (MS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to determine the iron species, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to locate iron biominerals among plant tissue structures, and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX), X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-MS) to confirm their elemental composition. * The MS spectral analysis indicated that iron accumulated in this plant mainly as jarosite and ferritin. The presence of jarosite was confirmed by XRD and the distribution of both minerals in structures of different tissues was ascertained by SEM-EDAX analysis. * The convergent results obtained by complementary techniques suggest a complex iron management system in I. cylindrica, probably as a consequence of the environmental conditions of its habitat.

  1. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  2. Behaviour of Structural Carbonate Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Compositions in Bioapatite During Burning of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, L. E.; Longstaffe, F. J.; White, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Bioapatite, the principal inorganic phase comprising bone, commonly contains a small fraction of carbonate, which has been substituted into the phosphate structure during bone formation. The isotopic compositions of both the phosphate oxygen and the structural carbonate oxygen are now commonly used in palaeoclimatological and bioarchaeological investigations. The potential for post-mortem alteration of these isotopic compositions, therefore, is of interest, with the behaviour of structural carbonate being of most concern. In bioarchaeological studies, alteration of bone isotopic compositions has the potential to occur not only during low-temperature processes associated with burial but also during food preparation involving heating (burning, boiling). Here, we examine the stable isotopic behaviour of structural carbonate oxygen and carbon, and coexisting phosphate oxygen during the burning of bone. Freshly deceased (6<8 months) white-tailed deer leg bones (Odocoileus virginianus) were collected from Pinery Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Each long bone was sectioned and incrementally heated from 25 to 900° C, in 25° intervals. The samples were then ground to a standardized grain-size (45<63μ m), and changes in bioapatite crystallinity (CI) were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). Combined differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TG) were used to evaluate weight loss and associated reactions during heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of the bioapatite remain relatively constant (+/-1‰ ) during heating to 650° C. A 4‰ increase in stable carbon isotopic composition then occurs between 650-750° C, accompanied by an increase in CI, followed by a 10‰ decline at temperatures above 800° C, as carbonate carbon is lost. Carbonate and phosphate oxygen isotopic compositions are correlated over the entire heating range, with carbonate being enriched relative to phosphate by

  3. Superplasticity in an ultrahigh carbon steel-aluminum bronze laminated composite

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.C.; Higashi, K.; Sherby, O.D.

    1993-12-31

    Metal laminated composites based on ultrahigh carbon steel (UHCS) and aluminum bronze can be readily prepared by solid state bonding procedures at relatively low temperatures (670 to 700{degree}C). This is attributed to the fine grain size present in each component. No apparent interdiffusion occurs between the UHCS and aluminum bronze layers either during the solid state bonding steps or during superplastic flow below the transformation temperature of UHCS (770{degree}C). Interdiffusion does occur between the UHCS and aluminum bronze layers when the laminated composite is heated above 770{degree}C as a result of the dissolution of the iron carbides to form austenite. It is shown that a high strain-rate-sensitivity exponent (m = 0.5) can be achieved in the UHCS/bronze laminated composite at elevated temperatures (750 to 850{degree}C) and at low strain rates. High elongations are observed in the laminated composite under these conditions, with a maximum elongation of 650% noted at 750{degree}C. The UHCS/bronze laminated composite shows different mechanical characteristics from a UHCS/brass laminated composite. Brass readily cracks at elevated temperature and prevents the achievement of high elongations in a UHCS/brass composite even when the strain-rate-sensitivity is high. The aluminum bronze is fine-grained and does not form cracks during elevated temperature deformation.

  4. EFFECT OF IRON SUPPLEMENTATION ON THE EROSIVE POTENTIAL OF CARBONATED OR DECARBONATED BEVERAGE

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Melissa Thiemi; Maria, Andrea Gutierrez; Vaz, Luís Guilherme Matiazi; Italiani, Flávia de Moraes; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the effect of iron (previously exposed with enamel powder or added directly to the beverage) on the erosive potential of carbonated or decarbonated beverage. Four sets of experiments were done. For groups E1 and E3, a solution containing 30 mmol/L FeSO4 was added to bovine enamel powder (particles between 75-106 mm) before exposure to the carbonated or decarbonated beverage (Sprite Zero®), respectively. For groups E2 and E4, 15 mmol/L FeSO4 was added directly to the carbonated or decarbonated beverage, respectively. Control groups were included for comparison. In controls C1 and C3, the experiments E1 and E3 were repeated, but the iron solution was replaced by deionized water. For controls C2 and C4, the carbonated and decarbonated beverage, respectively, was used, without addition of iron. After addition of the beverage to the powdered enamel (40 mg enamel powder/400 µL of final volume), the sample was vortexed for 30 s and immediately centrifuged for 30 s (11,000 rpm). The supernatant was removed after 1 min 40 s. This procedure was repeated in quintuplicate and the phosphate released was analyzed spectrophotometrically. The results were analyzed by Student’s t-test (p<0.05). E2 presented the best results with a significant inhibition (around 36%) of phosphate released. For E3 and E4 a non-significant inhibition (around 4 and 12%, respectively), was observed. For E1 an increase in phosphate loss was detected. Thus, the protective effect of iron seems to be better when this ion is directly added to the carbonated beverage. PMID:19089102

  5. Effects of iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon on aggregate stability of bauxite residues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Li, Yubing; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William; Wu, Hao

    2016-05-01

    In order to successfully establish vegetation on bauxite residue, properties such as aggregate structure and stability require improvement. Spontaneous plant colonization on the deposits in Central China over the last 20 years has revealed that natural processes may improve the physical condition of bauxite residues. Samples from three different stacking ages were selected to determine aggregate formation and stability and its relationship with iron-aluminium oxides and organic carbon. The residue aggregate particles became coarser in both dry and wet sieving processes. The mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometry mean diameter (GMD) increased significantly, and the proportion of aggregate destruction (PAD) decreased. Natural stacking processes could increase aggregate stability and erosion resistant of bauxite residues. Free iron oxides and amorphous aluminium oxides were the major forms in bauxite residues, but there was no significant correlation between the iron-aluminium oxides and aggregate stability. Aromatic-C, alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C were the major functional groups present in the residues. With increasing stacking age, total organic carbon content and aggregate-associated organic carbon both increased. Alkanes-C, aliphatic-C and alkenes-C increased and were mainly distributed in macro-aggregates, whereas aromatic-C was mainly distributed in <0.05-mm aggregates. Organic carbon stability in micro-aggregates was higher than that in macro-aggregates and became more stable. Organic carbon contents in total residues, and within different aggregate sizes, were all negatively correlated with PAD. It indicated that organic materials had a more significant effect on macro-aggregate stability and the effects of iron-aluminium oxides maybe more important for stability of micro-aggregates.

  6. Perovskite/Carbon Composites: Applications in Oxygen Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinlong; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen electrocatalysis, i.e., oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), plays an extremely important role in oxygen-based renewable-energy technologies such as rechargeable metal-air batteries, regenerative fuel cells and water splitting. Perovskite oxides have recently attracted increasing interest and hold great promise as efficient ORR and OER catalysts to replace noble-metal-based catalysts, owing to their high intrinsic catalytic activity, abundant variety, low cost, and rich resources. The introduction of perovskite-carbon interfaces by forming perovskite/carbon composites may bring a synergistic effect between the two phases, thus benefiting the oxygen electrocatalysis. This review provides a comprehensive overview of recent advances in perovskite/carbon composites for oxygen electrocatalysis in alkaline media, aiming to provide insights into the key parameters that influence the ORR/OER performance of the composites, including the physical/chemical properties and morphologies of the perovskites, the multiple roles of carbon, the synthetic method and the synergistic effect. A special emphasis is placed on the origin of the synergistic effect associated with the interfacial interaction between the perovskite and the carbon phases for enhanced ORR/OER performance. Finally, the existing challenges and the future directions for the synthesis and development of more efficient oxygen catalysts based on perovskite/carbon composites are proposed.

  7. Nanomodified Carbon/Carbon Composites for Intermediate Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-31

    hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...completing and reviewing this collection of information, Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information...and several types of nanoparticles: chemically modified montmorillonite (MMT) organoclays , polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS®), carbon

  8. Bio-Inspired Ceramic/Carbon Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    the links between CNTs and the ceramic when the CNT is previously synthesized. Spark Plasma Sintering of SiC/CNTs composites Composites containing...5% of CVD MWCNTs and 95% of SiC nanoparticles (size  100nm) were prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering under different conditions. Table I shows the...additives when necessary (additives were added to help to improve the sintering increasing the density values), and the mixture continuously stirred until

  9. Preparation and structure analysis of carbon/carbon composite made from phenolic resin impregnation into exfoliated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Zheng, Y. P.; Kang, F.; Shen, W. C.

    2006-05-01

    Exfoliated graphite-based carbon/carbon composites were prepared using sequence processes of phenolic resin alcohol solution impregnation, carbonization and carbon dioxide (or steam) activation. The textural/structural characteristics of the composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry. The results indicated that the composites were composed of graphite and amorphous carbon. On the surface, the worm-like particles were covered by pyrolytic carbon, which also penetrated into parts of the interior pores of the particles. Macropores still remained in the composite, whereas micropores which were formed by the activation of pyrolytic carbon contributed to most of the pore volume.

  10. A general approach towards carbon nanotube and iron oxide coaxial architecture and its lithium storage capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Ni, Jiangfeng; Wang, Wencong; Li, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Coaxial architectures consisting of metal oxide and carbon nanotube are promising for many energy applications due to their synergetic interaction. The engineering and development of coaxial structures through a simple approach are highly desirable but remain a challenge. Herein, we present a general and facile ethylene glycol bath approach to fabricate coaxial architectures in which the metal oxide component is sandwiched by carbon nanotube and amorphous carbon. These unique architectures can serve as efficient electrode for lithium storage. The internal carbon nanotube allows rapid electron transport, while the external amorphous carbon acts as flexible buffer to accommodate volume variation upon lithium uptake. When evaluated in lithium cells, the carbon nanotube and iron oxide coaxial material exhibits a remarkable electrochemical lithium storage. It affords a capacity of 1083 mAh g-1 over 60 cycles, and retains 529 mAh g-1 at a high rate of 5 A g-1, drastically outperforming the pure iron oxide counterpart. This facile approach is in principle applicable to constructing other coaxial electrodes, and thus holds great potential in the manipulation of battery materials for lithium storage application.

  11. Dislocation core reconstruction induced by carbon segregation in bcc iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventelon, Lisa; Lüthi, B.; Clouet, E.; Proville, L.; Legrand, B.; Rodney, D.; Willaime, F.

    2015-06-01

    The relative stability of dislocation core configurations in body-centered-cubic metals is profoundly modified by the presence of solutes. Considering the Fe(C) system, we demonstrate by using density functional theory that carbon atoms destabilize the usual easy core to the benefit of the hard core configuration of the screw dislocation, which is unstable in pure metals. The carbon atom is at the center of a regular prism in a cementitelike local environment. The same dislocation core reconstruction is also found with other solutes (B, N, O) and in W(C). This unexpected low-energy configuration induces a strong solute-dislocation attraction, leading to dislocation core saturation by solute atoms, even for very low bulk solute concentrations. This core reconstruction will constitute an essential factor to account for in solute-segregation related phenomena, such as strain aging.

  12. Characterization of biological iron sulfide composites and its application in the treatment of cadmium-contaminated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Xie, Yifei; Li, Xudong

    2015-03-01

    A strain of sulfate reducing bacteria, which could generate biological iron sulfide composites, was applied for Cd (II) removal from wastewater. The influence of biological iron sulfide composites dosage, initial pH and temperature on the rate of Cd (II) removal from wastewater by biological iron sulfide composites were investigated. The microscopic morphological characteristics and elemental composition changes of the biological iron sulfide before and after treatment was compared, using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry, then the mechanism of Cd (II) removal was explored. The results showed that Cd (II) reduction rate increased with increase in dosage of biological iron sulfide composites and initial temperature. At 25 degrees C, pH 4.0, with dosage of sulfide and cadmium ions molar equal to 99.93% Cd (II) was removed from cadmium wastewater (100 mg l(-1)), and the residual concentration of cadmium reached Chinese Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard (GB8978-1996). The present study revealed that bio- precipitation of FeS, the main component of biological iron sulfide composites, played leading role in the process of Cd (II) reduction. Therefore, it is prospective to apply biological iron sulfide composites in the emergency treatment of cadmium-contaminated wastewater.

  13. Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Tin-Iron-Carbon Nanocomposite as the Anode of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Rongyu; Bie, Xiaofei; Wang, Chunzhong; Li, Malin; Chen, Nan; Wei, Yingjin; Chen, Gang; Du, Fei

    2015-11-01

    Tin-iron-carbon nanocomposite is successfully prepared by a sol-gel method followed by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process with acetylene gas as the carbon source. The structural properties, morphology, and electrochemical performances of the nanocomposite are comprehensively studied in comparison with those properties of tin-carbon and iron-carbon nanocomposites. Sheet-like carbon architecture and different carbon contents are induced thanks to the catalytic effect of iron during CVD. Among three nanocomposites, tin-iron-carbon demonstrates the highest reversible capacity of 800 mA h g(-1) with 96.9% capacity retention after 50 cycles. It also exhibits the best rate capability with a discharge capacity of 420 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1). This enhanced performance is strongly related to the carbon morphology and content, which can not only accommodate the large volume change, but also improve the electronic conductivity of the nanocomposite. Hence, the tin-iron-carbon nanocomposite is expected to be a promising anode for lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material Comprising Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  15. Trypsin purification using magnetic particles of azocasein-iron composite.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maria Helena Menezes Estevam; Nascimento, Gabriela Ayres; Cabrera, Mariana Paola; Silvério, Sara Isabel da Cruz; Nobre, Clarisse; Teixeira, José António; de Carvalho, Luiz Bezerra

    2017-07-01

    This work presents an inexpensive, simple and fast procedure to purify trypsin based on affinity binding with ferromagnetic particles of azocasein composite (mAzo). Crude extract was obtained from intestines of fish Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) homogenized in buffer (01g tissue/ml). This extract was exposed to 100mg of mAzo and washed to remove unbound proteins by magnetic field. Trypsin was leached off under high ionic strength (3M NaCl). Preparation was achieved containing specific activity about 60 times higher than that of the crude extract. SDS-PAGE showed that the purified protein had molecular weight (24kDa) in concordance with the literature for the Nile tilapia trypsin. The mAzo composite can be reused and applied to purify trypsin from other sources.

  16. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  17. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  18. Geochemical modeling of iron, sulfur, oxygen and carbon in a coastal plain aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. J.; Schoonen, M. A. A.; Candela, J. L.

    2000-11-01

    Fe(III) reduction in the Magothy aquifer of Long Island, NY, results in high dissolved-iron concentrations that degrade water quality. Geochemical modeling was used to constrain iron-related geochemical processes and redox zonation along a flow path. The observed increase in dissolved inorganic carbon is consistent with the oxidation of sedimentary organic matter coupled to the reduction of O 2 and SO 42- in the aerobic zone, and to the reduction of SO 42- in the anaerobic zone; estimated rates of CO 2 production through reduction of Fe(III) were relatively minor by comparison. The rates of CO 2 production calculated from dissolved inorganic carbon mass transfer (2.55×10 -4 to 48.6×10 -4 mmol l -1 yr-1) generally were comparable to the calculated rates of CO 2 production by the combined reduction of O 2, Fe(III) and SO 42- (1.31×10 -4 to 15×10 -4 mmol l -1 yr-1). The overall increase in SO 42- concentrations along the flow path, together with the results of mass-balance calculations, and variations in δ34S values along the flow path indicate that SO 42- loss through microbial reduction is exceeded by SO 42- gain through diffusion from sediments and through the oxidation of FeS 2. Geochemical and microbial data on cores indicate that Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings on sediment grains in local, organic carbon- and SO 42--rich zones have been depleted by microbial reduction and resulted in localized SO 42--reducing zones in which the formation of iron disulfides decreases dissolved iron concentrations. These localized zones of SO 42- reduction, which are important for assessing zones of low dissolved iron for water-supply development, could be overlooked by aquifer studies that rely only on groundwater data from well-water samples for geochemical modeling.

  19. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils.

    PubMed

    House, C H; Schopf, J W; McKeegan, K D; Coath, C D; Harrison, T M; Stetter, K O

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  20. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, C. H.; Schopf, J. W.; McKeegan, K. D.; Coath, C. D.; Harrison, T. M.; Stetter, K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  1. Soil Carbon: Compositional and Isotopic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Alexander, M. L.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    This is a short chapter to be included in the next edition of the Encyclopedia of Soil Science. The work here describes techniques being developed at PNNL for investigating organic carbon in soils. Techniques discussed include: laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry, laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometry, and nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  2. Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater by a Mixture of Iron and Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoxin; Liu, Fei; Jin, Aifang; Qin, Xiaopeng

    2010-11-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater has become a major environmental and health problem worldwide. The aim of the present study is to remediate groundwater contaminated by nitrate and develop potential reactive materials to be used in PRBs (Permeable Reactive Barriers). A new approach was proposed for abiotic groundwater remediation by reactive materials of iron chips and granular activated carbon particles. Batch tests were conducted and remediation mechanisms were discussed. The results show that nitrate decreases from 86.31 to 33.79 mgṡL-1 under the conditions of near neutral pH and reaction time of 1h. The combination of iron chips and activated carbon particles is cost-effective and suitable for further use as denitrification media in PRBs. Nitrogen species don't change significantly with the further increase in reaction time (>1 h). The iron-activated carbon-water-nitrate system tends to be steady-state. Small amounts of ammonium and nitrite (0.033-0.039 and 0.14-3.54 mgṡL-1, respectively) appear at reaction time from 0 h to 5 h. There is no substantial accumulation of nitrogen products in the system. The removal rate of nitrate only reaches 16.11% by sole iron chips at reaction time of 5 h, while 63.57% by the mixture of iron chips and activated carbon particles. There is significantly synergistic and promotive effect of mixing the two different types of materials on nitrate treatment. Fe/C ratio (1/1.5-1/2.5) doesn't cause dramatically different residual nitrate concentrations (24.09-26.70 mgṡL-1). Nitrate can't be limitlessly decreased with decreasing Fe/C ratio. The concomitant occurrences of chemical reduction, galvanic cell reaction, electrophoretic accumulation, chemical coagulation, and physical adsorption are all responsible for the overall nitrate removal by iron allied with activated carbon. To accurately quantify various nitrogen species, further studies on adsorption mechanisms of nitrite and nitrate are needed.

  3. Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC) - A Historical Perspective.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    metals, hydrogen , and other compounds. Unprotected CCCs start to vaporize in high-temperature air as low as 4()()"C (752°F). The rate of carbon... vaporization is primarily kinetically controlled up to about 1375°C (2507°F), and at higher temperatures, it is diffusion controlled (rate of oxidizing...densification by (a) chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process, (b) liquid matrix phase impregnation, or (c) combinations thereof. The specific manufacturing

  4. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  5. Chemical compositional study of 35 iron meteorites and its application in taxonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D.; Malvin, D. J.; Wasson, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Structural and compositional data are reported as a guide to the classification of 35 iron meteorites. The Xinjiang iron meteorite, previously classified as III AB, is reclassified as III E on the basis of its lower Ga/Ni and Ge/Ni ratios, its wider, swollen kamacite bands, and the ubiquitous presence of haxonite, (Fe,Ni)22C. The Dongling (III CD) appears not to be a new meteorite, but to be paired with the Nantan. Four Antarctic iron meteorites, IAB Allan Hills A77250, A77263, A77289, and A77290, are classified as a paired meteorite because of their similarities in structure and in concentrations of various elements. It is shown that Cu shares certain properties with Ga and Ge, which makes them excellent taxonomic parameters.

  6. Gold nanotriangles decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: a compositional and microstructural study

    DOE PAGES

    Hachtel, J. A.; Yu, S.; Lupini, A. R.; ...

    2016-03-11

    The combination of iron oxide and gold in a single nanoparticle results in both magnetic and plasmonic properties that can stimulate novel applications in bio-sensing, medical imaging, or therapeutics. Microwave assisted heating allows the fabrication of multi-component, multi-functional nanostructures by promoting selective heating at desired sites. Recently, we reported a microwave-assisted polyol route yielding gold nanotriangles decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we present an in-depth microstructural and compositional characterization of the system by using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss (EELS) spectroscopy. A method to remove the iron oxide nanoparticles from the gold nanocrystals and somemore » insights on crystal nucleation and growth mechanisms are also provided.« less

  7. Gold nanotriangles decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: a compositional and microstructural study

    SciTech Connect

    Hachtel, J. A.; Yu, S.; Lupini, A. R.; Pantelides, S. T.; Gich, M.; Laromaine, A.; Roig, A.

    2016-03-11

    The combination of iron oxide and gold in a single nanoparticle results in both magnetic and plasmonic properties that can stimulate novel applications in bio-sensing, medical imaging, or therapeutics. Microwave assisted heating allows the fabrication of multi-component, multi-functional nanostructures by promoting selective heating at desired sites. Recently, we reported a microwave-assisted polyol route yielding gold nanotriangles decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we present an in-depth microstructural and compositional characterization of the system by using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss (EELS) spectroscopy. A method to remove the iron oxide nanoparticles from the gold nanocrystals and some insights on crystal nucleation and growth mechanisms are also provided.

  8. Stress Rupture Behavior of Silicon Carbide Coated, Low Modulus Carbon/Carbon Composites. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozak, Gary A.; Wallace, John F.

    1988-01-01

    The disadvantages of carbon-carbon composites, in addition to the oxidation problem, are low thermal expansion, expensive fabrication procedures, and poor off axis properties. The background of carbon-carbon composites, their fabrication, oxidation, oxidation protection and mechanical testing in flexure are discussed.

  9. Soil organic carbon stabilization by iron in permafrost regions of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, C. C.; Zhang, T. J.; Zhao, Q.; Guo, H.; Zhong, W.; Su, H.; Wu, Q. B.

    2016-10-01

    A close relationship exists between soil organic carbon (SOC) and reactive iron; however, little is known about the role of iron in SOC preservation in permafrost regions. We determined the amount of SOC associated with reactive iron phases (OC-Fe) in the permafrost regions of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP). The results showed that the percentage of OC-Fe ranged between 0.9% and 59.5% in the upper 30 cm of soil and that the OC-Fe represented 19.5 ± 12.3% of the total SOC pool. No clear vertical distribution pattern in OC-Fe was present in the upper 1 m of soil. Throughout the year, the OC-Fe accounted for relatively stable proportions of the total SOC pool. This study suggests that approximately 20% of SOC is a potential rusty OC pool in the permafrost regions of the QTP. Biogeochemical processes related to the reaction of iron may play important roles in soil carbon cycles in permafrost regions.

  10. The environmental applications of activated carbon/zeolite composite materials.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2011-02-17

    Over the past couple of years, the resurgence of placing an effective and sustainable amendment to combat against the auxiliary industrial entities, remains a highly contested agenda from a global point. With the renaissance of activated carbon, there has been a steadily growing interest in the research field. Recently, the adoption of zeolite composite, a prestigious advanced catalyst which formulates the enhancement of adsorption rate and hydrogen storage capability, has fore fronted to be a new growing branch in the scientific community. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of art review of activated carbon/zeolite composite technology, its fundamental background studies, and environmental implications. Moreover, its major challenges together with the future expectation are summarized and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of activated carbon/zeolite composite represents a potentially viable and powerful tool, leading to the plausible improvement of environmental preservation.

  11. MODELING FUNCTIONALLY GRADED INTERPHASE REGIONS IN CARBON NANOTUBE REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, G. D.; Lagoudas, D. C.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2006-01-01

    A combination of micromechanics methods and molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the effective properties of the carbon nanotube reinforced composites with functionally graded interphase regions. The multilayer composite cylinders method accounts for the effects of non-perfect load transfer in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer matrix composites using a piecewise functionally graded interphase. The functional form of the properties in the interphase region, as well as the interphase thickness, is derived from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix. Results indicate that the functional form of the interphase can have a significant effect on all the effective elastic constants except for the effective axial modulus for which no noticeable effects are evident.

  12. Laser sintering of separated and uniformly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes integrated iron nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dong; Richard Liu, C.; Cheng, Gary J.

    2014-03-01

    Uniform distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in metal matrix during additive manufacturing of nanocomposites is always a challenge since the CNTs tend to aggregate in the molten pool. In this study, Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were separated and distributed uniformly into iron matrix by laser sintering process. MWNTs and iron powders were mixed together by magnetic stir, coated on steel 4140 surface, followed by laser sintering. Due to the fast heating and cooling rate, the CNTs are evenly distributed in the metal matrix. The temperature field was calculated by multiphysics simulation considering size effects, including size dependent melting temperature, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. The SEM, TEM, and XRD were used to understand the laser sintering of CNT integrated nanocomposites. The results proved the feasibility of this technique to synthesize MWNTS integrated metal matrix nanocomposites.

  13. "Conjugate channeling" effect in dislocation core diffusion: carbon transport in dislocated BCC iron.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Akio; Li, Ju; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Dislocation pipe diffusion seems to be a well-established phenomenon. Here we demonstrate an unexpected effect, that the migration of interstitials such as carbon in iron may be accelerated not in the dislocation line direction ξ, but in a conjugate diffusion direction. This accelerated random walk arises from a simple crystallographic channeling effect. c is a function of the Burgers vector b, but not ξ, thus a dislocation loop possesses the same everywhere. Using molecular dynamics and accelerated dynamics simulations, we further show that such dislocation-core-coupled carbon diffusion in iron has temperature-dependent activation enthalpy like a fragile glass. The 71° mixed dislocation is the only case in which we see straightforward pipe diffusion that does not depend on dislocation mobility.

  14. “Conjugate Channeling” Effect in Dislocation Core Diffusion: Carbon Transport in Dislocated BCC Iron

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Akio; Li, Ju; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Dislocation pipe diffusion seems to be a well-established phenomenon. Here we demonstrate an unexpected effect, that the migration of interstitials such as carbon in iron may be accelerated not in the dislocation line direction , but in a conjugate diffusion direction. This accelerated random walk arises from a simple crystallographic channeling effect. is a function of the Burgers vector b, but not , thus a dislocation loop possesses the same everywhere. Using molecular dynamics and accelerated dynamics simulations, we further show that such dislocation-core-coupled carbon diffusion in iron has temperature-dependent activation enthalpy like a fragile glass. The 71° mixed dislocation is the only case in which we see straightforward pipe diffusion that does not depend on dislocation mobility. PMID:23593255

  15. Measuring the Kinetics of the Reduction of Iron Oxide with Carbon Monoxide in a Fluidized Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnt, C. D.; Cleeton, J. P.; Miiller, C. M.; Scotr, S. A.; Dennis, J. S.

    Combusting a solid fuel in the presence of a metal oxide rather than air, chemical looping combustion, generates CO2suitable for sequestration and the reduced metal. For the case of iron, the reduced oxide can be re-oxidized with steam to produce high-purity hydrogen. The reduction reactions of iron oxide in carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide mixtures were investigated in a fluidized bed. Activation energies and pre-exponential factors for the reactions (i) 3 Fe2O3+CO⇌2 Fe3O4+CO2 and⇌(ii)0.947 Fe3O4+0.788 CO⇌3 Fe0.947O+0.788 CO2⇌were determined. The reaction order was verified to be unity, and the change in rate with conversion was examined.

  16. Multifunctional composites using reinforced laminae with carbon-nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veedu, Vinod P.; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Xuesong; Ma, Kougen; Soldano, Caterina; Kar, Swastik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2006-06-01

    Traditional fibre-reinforced composite materials with excellent in-plane properties fare poorly when out-of-plane through-thickness properties are important. Composite architectures with fibres designed orthogonal to the two-dimensional (2D) layout in traditional composites could alleviate this weakness in the transverse direction, but all of the efforts so far have only produced limited success. Here, we unveil an approach to the 3D composite challenge, without altering the 2D stack design, on the basis of the concept of interlaminar carbon-nanotube forests that would provide enhanced multifunctional properties along the thickness direction. The carbon-nanotube forests allow the fastening of adjacent plies in the 3D composite. We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the surface of micro-fibre fabric cloth layouts, normal to the fibre lengths, resulting in a 3D effect between plies under loading. These nanotube-coated fabric cloths serve as building blocks for the multilayered 3D composites, with the nanotube forests providing much-needed interlaminar strength and toughness under various loading conditions. For the fabricated 3D composites with nanotube forests, we demonstrate remarkable improvements in the interlaminar fracture toughness, hardness, delamination resistance, in-plane mechanical properties, damping, thermoelastic behaviour, and thermal and electrical conductivities making these structures truly multifunctional.

  17. Effect Of Reaction Environments On The Reactivity Of PCB (2-Chlorobiphenyl) Over Activated Carbon Impregnated With Palladized Iron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles has been developed to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we evaluated the effects of various reaction environments on the adsorption-mediated dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-...

  18. Effects Of Aging And Oxidation Of Palladized Iron Embedded In Activated Carbon On The Dechlorination Of 2-Chlorobiphenyl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron has been developed to effectively treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment by coupling adsorption and dechlorination of PCBs. In this study, we addressed the dechlorination reactivity and capacity ...

  19. Growth Kinetics of a Reaction Rim Between Iron and Graphite/Diamond and the Carbon Diffusion Mechanism at High Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagno, V.; Crispin, K. L.; Shahar, A.; Fei, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of the fo2 on modeled bulk silicate Earth mantle composition predict the formation of Fe-Ni metal alloy at about 250-300 km in depth. At such conditions the speciation of subducted carbon will be mainly affected by the local Fe(Ni)/C ratio, with diamond, Fe3C and C-bearing Fe-Ni alloys being the most likely stable phases. To date however, no data are available to determine the effect of pressure and temperature on 1) the transport of carbon by diffusion in iron metal and 2) the kinetics of formation of carbide phases. We performed multianvil experiments between 3 and 10 GPa and temperatures of 700-1200 ºC with the aim of measuring C diffusion in γ-Fe. Glassy carbon and synthetic diamond were used as diffusants, placed directly in contact with pure iron rod rods with a thickness of 800-1400 μm. FE-SEM was used for accurate analyses of the Fe-C interface and concentration profiles of carbon in iron were measured by electron microprobe. Results show that the diffusion coefficient for carbon in iron metal (~3x10-11 m2s-1) and the activation energy (~62 kJ/mol) are similar to previous data from 1 atm and suggest a small pressure effect. The activation volume (~1.5x10-6 m3/mol) determined from isothermal runs is in agreement with that determined for other elements for which an interstitial diffusion mechanism in iron has been established. At the interface between carbon and Fe the growth of a reaction rim was often observed. Time series experiments were therefore performed, to investigate the growth kinetics of iron carbide (Fe3C). Results will be used to 1) determine a model for the storage of C in metallic phases in the Earth's interior and 2) provide an experimental constraint on the formation of carbide phases during subduction, with implications for the deep carbon cycle and isotopic fractionation.

  20. Exploration of Multilayer Concepts for Oxidation Protection of Carbon- Carbon Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Microstructural Evaluations 14 Compliant Layer Properties 18 Oxidation Results 19 CONCLUSIONS 21I SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS 23 REFERENCES 25 I APPENDIX \\ 26...ABSTRACT The development of multilayer coating concepts for oxidation protection of carbon-carbon composites is the subject of this work. Property ...components. Since elevated temperature properties were lacking for many components, the study was relegated to fabrication and assessment rather than

  1. Does iron fertilization lead to rapid carbon export in the Southern Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charette, Matthew A.; Buesseler, Ken O.

    2000-10-01

    The Southern Ocean has the potential to influence climate due to its large inventory of excess macronutrients such as nitrate and phosphate. It has been hypothesized that if the supply of the micronutrient iron increased, it would lead to enhanced uptake of atmospheric CO2 and hence the sequestration of carbon via sinking particles [Martin, 1990]. While much has been learned about iron limitation and low phytoplankton biomass in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions [Martin, 1991; Coale et al., 1996], less is known about the effect of Fe on particle export. Here we present results from the first detailed study of particle export during a mesoscale iron fertilization experiment (the Southern Ocean Iron Release Experiment (SOIREE)). Measurements of the natural tracer thorium-234 indicate negligible particle export within 14 days after the initial infusion of iron. We attribute this lack of response to colder water temperatures that promote slower cell metabolism in phytoplankton and hence slower secondary responses of herbivores and particle aggregation.

  2. Influence of compositional modifications on the corrosion of iron aluminides of molten nitrate salts

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Bishop, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion of iron-aluminum alloys by molten nitrate salt as a function of aluminum, chromium, and other minor elements has been studied as part of an alloy design effort aimed at the development of a strong, ductile, corrosion-resistant FeAl type of aluminide. Short- term weight change data were used to examine the compositional dependence of the corrosion processes that occurred upon exposure of iron aluminides to highly oxidizing nitrate salts of 650{degrees}C. Corrosion resistance was found to increase with increasing aluminum concentrations of the alloy up to approximately 30 at. % Al. Chromium additions to the aluminide were not detrimental and may have improved the corrosion behavior for certain aluminum concentrations. No effects of minor alloying additions (C, B, Ti, and Zr) could be determined. The best overall corrosion resistance as measured by weight change results were obtained for an Fe-35.8 at. % Al aluminide containing some chromium. Based on linear weight loss kinetics, the weight change measurements for the most resistant compositions predict corrosion rates of 300 {mu}m/year or less at 650{degrees}C. These rates are substantially better than typical nickel-based alloys and stainless steels. From a consideration of the weight changes; the microstructural, thermodynamic, and X-ray diffraction data; and the salt analyses, corrosion of iron aluminides by the molten nitrate salt appears to be controlled by oxidation of base metal components and a slow release of material from an aluminum-rich product layer into the salt. The rate of release was substantially lower than that previously found for iron and iron-based alloys. This would imply that corrosion of iron aluminides could be minimized by maximizing the surface coverage of this aluminum-rich layer either by alloying or by an appropriate preoxidation treatment.

  3. Reduction and melting behavior of carbon composite lateritic bauxite pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-yi; Zhao, Jie; Qi, Yuan-hong; Cheng, Xiang-li; Zou, Zong-shu

    2015-04-01

    Direct reduction of low-grade lateritic bauxite was studied at high temperature to recover Fe and beneficiate Al2O3 slag. The results show that a metallization rate of 97.9% and a nugget recovery rate of 85.1% can be achieved when the reducing and melting temperatures are 1350 and 1480°C, respectively. Moreover, a higher-grade calcium aluminate slag (Al2O3 = 50.52wt%) can also be obtained, which is mainly composed of α-Al2O3, hercynite (FeAl2O4), and gehlenite (Ca2Al2SiO7). In addition, high-quality iron nuggets have been produced from low-grade lateritic bauxite. The nugget is mainly composed of iron (93.82wt%) and carbon (3.86wt%), with almost no gangue (slag).

  4. Functionalized carbon nanotube-polymer composites and interactions with radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Wilkins, Richard (Inventor); Shofner, Meisha (Inventor); Pulikkathara, Merlyn X. (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranjii (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention involves the interaction of radiation with functionalized carbon nanotubes that have been incorporated into various host materials, particularly polymeric ones. The present invention is directed to chemistries, methods, and apparatuses which exploit this type of radiation interaction, and to the materials which result from such interactions. The present invention is also directed toward the time dependent behavior of functionalized carbon nanotubes in such composite systems.

  5. Functionalized Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites and Interactions with Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Wilkins, Richard (Inventor); Shofner, Meisha (Inventor); Pulikkathara, Merlyn X. (Inventor); Vaidyanathan, Ranjii (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention involves the interaction of radiation with functionalized carbon nanotubes that have been incorporated into various host materials, particularly polymeric ones. The present invention is directed to chemistries, methods, and apparatuses which exploit this type of radiation interaction, and to the materials which result from such interactions. The present invention is also directed toward the time dependent behavior of functionalized carbon nanotubes in such composite systems.

  6. Comparison of Ultrastructural Cytotoxic Effects of Carbon and Carbon/Iron Particulates on Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Long, John F.; Waldman, W. James; Kristovich, Robert; Williams, Marshall; Knight, Deborah; Dutta, Prabir K.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the presence of iron in carbon particulates enhances ultrastructural perturbation in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) after phagocytosis. We used 1-μm synthetic carbon-based particulates, designed to simulate environmental particulates of mass median aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5). Cultures of human MDMs or T-lymphocytes (as a nonphagocytic control) were exposed to carbon or carbon/iron particulates for various time periods and examined by transmission electron microscopy for ultrastructural changes. T-cells failed to internalize either of the particulates and showed no organelle or nuclear changes. Conversely, MDMs avidly phagocytized the particulates. MDMs treated with C particulates exhibited morphologic evidence of macrophage activation but no evidence of lysis of organelles. In contrast, MDMs treated with C/Fe particulates exhibited coalescence of particulate-containing lysosomes. This phenomenon was not observed in the case of C particulates. By 24 hr there was a tendency of the C/Fe particulates to agglomerate into loose or compact clusters. Surrounding the compact C/Fe agglomerates was a uniform zone of nearly total organelle lysis. The lytic changes diminished in proportion to the distance from the agglomerate. In such cells, the nucleus showed loss of chromatin. Although C particles induced no detectable oxidative burst on treated MDMs, C/Fe particles induced a nearly 5-fold increase in the extracellular oxidative burst by treated MDMs compared with untreated controls. Iron bound to C particles catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals. Results of these studies suggest that, among particulates of similar size, biologic activity can vary profoundly as a function of particulate physicochemical properties. PMID:15687054

  7. Aspects regarding wearing behaviour in case of aluminium composite materials reinforced with carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliman, R.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a study regarding wear comportment of sintered composite materials obtained by mixture of aluminium with short carbon fibers. The necessity to satisfying more and more the specific functions during design of high performance structures leads to perform multi-materials such as reinforced composite parts. The wear tests were made on three different orientations of fibers on a standard machine of tribology, pin disk type. Counter-disk was made of cast iron with a superficial hardness of 92 HB. The wear rate and friction coefficient decreased exponentially with time of friction and reached a stationary value. This behaviour was attributed to the development of a lubricating film on the friction surface. To conduct this work was performed measurements on samples from the Al matrix composites and carbon fiber 43%, wear mechanism was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. In addition to fiber orientation, the tribological behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with fiber is influenced by the interfacial reaction of fiber-matrix. The characteristics and the dimensions of the interface depend on the cycle of temperature and time at which the material has been subjected during the manufacturing process and thereafter.

  8. A new nanoscale metastable iron phase in carbon steels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianwei; Zhang, Danxia; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Yanjun; Su, Yanjing; Zhao, Xinqing; Yin, Jiang; Song, Minghui; Ping, Dehai

    2015-10-27

    Metastable ω phase is common in body-centred cubic (bcc) metals and alloys, including high-alloying steels. Recent theoretical calculations also suggest that the ω structure may act as an intermediate phase for face-centred cubic (fcc)-to-bcc transformation. Thus far, the role of the ω phase played in fcc-bcc martensitic transformation in carbon steels has not been reported. In previous investigations on martensitic carbon steels, extra electron diffraction spots were frequently observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and these spots were historically ascribed to the diffraction arising from either internal twins or carbides. In this paper, an intensive TEM investigation revealed that the extra spots are in fact attributed to the metastable ω phase in particle-like morphology with an overall size of several or dozens of nanometres. The strict orientation relationships between the ω phase and the ferrite matrix are in good agreement with those of the hexagonal (P6/mmm) ω phase in other bcc metals and alloys. The identification of the ω phase as well as the extra diffraction spots might provide a clue to help understand the physical mechanism of martensitic transformation in steels.

  9. A new nanoscale metastable iron phase in carbon steels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianwei; Zhang, Danxia; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Yanjun; Su, Yanjing; Zhao, Xinqing; Yin, Jiang; Song, Minghui; Ping, Dehai

    2015-01-01

    Metastable ω phase is common in body-centred cubic (bcc) metals and alloys, including high-alloying steels. Recent theoretical calculations also suggest that the ω structure may act as an intermediate phase for face-centred cubic (fcc)-to-bcc transformation. Thus far, the role of the ω phase played in fcc-bcc martensitic transformation in carbon steels has not been reported. In previous investigations on martensitic carbon steels, extra electron diffraction spots were frequently observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and these spots were historically ascribed to the diffraction arising from either internal twins or carbides. In this paper, an intensive TEM investigation revealed that the extra spots are in fact attributed to the metastable ω phase in particle-like morphology with an overall size of several or dozens of nanometres. The strict orientation relationships between the ω phase and the ferrite matrix are in good agreement with those of the hexagonal (P6/mmm) ω phase in other bcc metals and alloys. The identification of the ω phase as well as the extra diffraction spots might provide a clue to help understand the physical mechanism of martensitic transformation in steels. PMID:26503890

  10. A new nanoscale metastable iron phase in carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianwei; Zhang, Danxia; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Yanjun; Su, Yanjing; Zhao, Xinqing; Yin, Jiang; Song, Minghui; Ping, Dehai

    2015-10-01

    Metastable ω phase is common in body-centred cubic (bcc) metals and alloys, including high-alloying steels. Recent theoretical calculations also suggest that the ω structure may act as an intermediate phase for face-centred cubic (fcc)-to-bcc transformation. Thus far, the role of the ω phase played in fcc-bcc martensitic transformation in carbon steels has not been reported. In previous investigations on martensitic carbon steels, extra electron diffraction spots were frequently observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and these spots were historically ascribed to the diffraction arising from either internal twins or carbides. In this paper, an intensive TEM investigation revealed that the extra spots are in fact attributed to the metastable ω phase in particle-like morphology with an overall size of several or dozens of nanometres. The strict orientation relationships between the ω phase and the ferrite matrix are in good agreement with those of the hexagonal (P6/mmm) ω phase in other bcc metals and alloys. The identification of the ω phase as well as the extra diffraction spots might provide a clue to help understand the physical mechanism of martensitic transformation in steels.

  11. Thermally Conductive Metal-Tube/Carbon-Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of fabricating joints between metal and carbon-fiber-based composite materials in lightweight radiators and heat sinks has been devised. Carbon-fiber-based composite materials have been used in such heat-transfer devices because they offer a combination of high thermal conductivity and low mass density. Metal tubes are typically used to carry heat-transfer fluids to and from such heat-transfer devices. The present fabrication method helps to ensure that the joints between the metal tubes and the composite-material parts in such heat-transfer devices have both (1) the relatively high thermal conductances needed for efficient transfer of heat and (2) the flexibility needed to accommodate differences among thermal expansions of dissimilar materials in operation over wide temperature ranges. Techniques used previously to join metal tubes with carbon-fiber-based composite parts have included press fitting and bonding with epoxy. Both of these prior techniques have been found to yield joints characterized by relatively high thermal resistances. The present method involves the use of a solder (63 percent Sn, 37 percent Pb) to form a highly thermally conductive joint between a metal tube and a carbon-fiber-based composite structure. Ordinarily, the large differences among the coefficients of thermal expansion of the metal tube, solder, and carbon-fiber-based composite would cause the solder to pull away from the composite upon post-fabrication cooldown from the molten state. In the present method, the structure of the solder is modified (see figure) to enable it to deform readily to accommodate the differential thermal expansion.

  12. Growth of bridging carbon nanofibers in cracks formed by heat-treating iron oxide thin sheets in acetylene gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikata, Takeshi; Okubo, Soichiro; Higashi, Yugo; Matsuba, Teruaki; Utsunomiya, Risa; Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Murakami, Katsuhisa; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2013-04-01

    We produced novel carbon nanofibers (CNFs) by oxidizing high-purity iron foil and then carburizing it in acetylene gas flow. This formed cracks in the heat-treated iron foil with CNFs bridging the two walls of each crack. The CNFs were drawn out from the walls as the crack opened during heat treatment. This will be a new method to grow and arrange carbon nanotubes and nanosheets without using metal nanoparticles or template substrates.

  13. Theory of the caking of carbon compositions and coal charges

    SciTech Connect

    Syskov, K.I.; Lapina, N.A.; Gromova, O.B.; Petrov, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of theoretical studies and experimental investigations of the mechanism of caking of coal charges and carbon compositions. The caking of carbon compositions and of coal charges is due to the sorption of the binder (the liquid component of the plastic coal mass) by the filler (the noncaking components). The influence of the main factors (degree of grinding of the filler, molding pressure, rate of heating) on the size of the increase in the yield of coke from binder has been studied. 18 refs.

  14. Microscopic insight into the bilateral formation of carbon spirals from a symmetric iron core

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Stangl, Andreas; Cox, David C.; Silva, S. Ravi P.; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Pichler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mirrored carbon-spirals have been produced from pressured ferrocene via the bilateral extrusion of the spiral pairs from an iron core. A parametric plot of the surface geometry displays the fractal growth of the conical helix made with the logarithmic spiral. Electron microscopy studies show the core is a crystalline cementite which grows and transforms its shape from spherical to biconical as it extrudes two spiralling carbon arms. In a cross section along the arms we observe graphitic flakes arranged in a herringbone structure, normal to which defects propagate. Local-wave-pattern analysis reveals nanoscale defect patterns of two-fold symmetry around the core. The data suggest that the bilateral growth originates from a globular cementite crystal with molten surfaces and the nano-defects shape emerging hexagonal carbon into a fractal structure. Understanding and knowledge obtained provide a basis for the controlled production of advanced carbon materials with designed geometries. PMID:23670649

  15. Silicon carbide nanowires and composites obtained from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuejian

    In this dissertation a simple route has been developed to synthesize Silicon Carbide (beta-SiC) nanothreads and C-SiC coaxial nanotubes by solid/liquid-state reaction between multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon conducted at 1473 K and 1723 K, respectively. Through the kinetics study of SiC formation from carbon nanotubes and Si, our results demonstrated that carbon nanotubes may have higher chemical reactivity than other forms of elemental Carbon. Based on the above investigation, CNT/SiC and diamond/CNT/SiC were manufactured. Key factors influencing the mechanical properties of final products, such as phase composition, grain size, stress-strain, sintering time, and sintering temperature were thoroughly studied with Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM techniques. Taking advantage of high elasticity of Carbon nanotube and its ability to block the microcrack propagation and dislocation movement, both composites showed enhanced fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes composites trigger a new field in fundamental science and manifest potential application in multiple industries.

  16. The carbon components in SNC meteorites of feldspathic harzburgite composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    Two meteorites collected in Antarctica, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516, have characteristics which link them to the shergottite group of SNC meteorites. Essentially, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 are feldspathic harzburgites, being comprised of roughly equal quantities of olivine and pyroxene, with an additional few percent of feldspar which has subsequently been converted to maskelynite by shock. The meteorites represent samples of a cumulate rock which is itself composed of two different lithologies: in one, large pyroxenes poikilitically enclose olivine crystals, while the other consists of interstitial areas made up of pyroxene, olivine, maskelynite, whitlockite, troilite, ilmenite and chlorapatite. It has been proposed that meteorites such as ALH A77005 (and LEW 88516) are relict samples of the source peridotite from which the other shergottites formed. As such it should be informative to study in detail the carbon components present within these samples, in order to make comparisons with data from other shergottites. Although not plutonic in origin, and therefore not sampling a truly deep source, analyses of ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 should assist with attempts to define the bulk carbon isotopic composition of Mars. This has been assessed previously through analyses of carbon of presumed magmatic origin in other SNC meteorites, but the carbon isotopic compositions obtained seem to be at variance with what might be expected. It is important to constrain the carbon isotopic composition of Mars as well as possible so that models of atmospheric evolution, based on carbon isotopic data, can yield the most reliable results.

  17. The rectorite/carbon composites: Fabrication, modification and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhitao; Liu, Dan; Ma, Xiaofei

    2016-02-01

    The rectorite (REC)/carbon composites (RECCs) were prepared with hydrothermal carbonization using starch as carbon source and REC as the template. RECCs were modified with carbon disulfide (CS2) to obtain RECC xanthate (RECCX) composites. The hydrothermal process introduced a large number of oxygen-containing groups by depositing carbon layers onto the surface of REC, and the CS2 modification brought xanthate groups into REC. The adsorption process of Pb(2+) was investigated. Compared with REC, both RECC and RECCX could absorb more Pb(2+). The oxygen-containing groups increased the Pb(2+) adsorption in RECC. With the increasing of CS2 dosages, the adsorption capacities of RECCXs obviously improved due to the formation of the chelation between Pb(2+) and xanthate groups. The kinetic adsorption and the isotherm data matched the pseudo-second-order model and the Langmuir model well. The maximum adsorption capacities could reach 225.7 and 431.0 mg/g for RECC and RECCX, respectively. RECCXs were competitive with other absorbents, because REC, carbon layers and xanthate groups in RECCX composites all contributed to the Pb(2+) adsorption. RECCX could be easily regenerated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA) solution.

  18. Reactive Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shpargel, Tarah; Singh, M.; Morscher, Gregory; Asthana, Rajiv

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint and possible metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion, which led to good wetting and spreading.

  19. Active Metal Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G.; Asthana, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint which led to good wetting, spreading, and metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion.

  20. [Removal of arsenate from drinking water by activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui-jie; Jia, Yong-feng; Yao, Shu-hu; Wu, Xing; Wang, Shu-ying

    2009-12-01

    A new adsorbent, activated carbon impregnated with nano zero-valent iron was prepared, which size of the needle-shaped iron particles in the pores of carbon was (30-500) nm x (1000-3000) nm and approximately 8.2% of iron was loaded onto it. The arsenate removal percentage was 99.5% by 1.5 g/L NZVI/AC in the 2 mg/L arsenic solution at pH 6.5 and (25 +/- 2) degrees C. The adsorption capacity was about 15.4 mg/g when equilibrium concentration was 1.0 mg/L. Kinetics revealed that uptake of arsenate ion by NZVI/AC was 91.4% in the first 12 h and equilibrium time was about 72 h. The intraparticle diffusion model was applied to study the mechanics of arsenate in the activated carbon. The presence of phosphate and silicate could significantly decrease arsenate removal while the effects of the other anions and cations on the arsenic removal were neglectable. NZVI/AC can be effectively regenerated when elution is done with 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. Our results suggest that NZVI/AC is a suitable candidate for drinking water treatment due to its high reactivity.