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Sample records for carbon fibre tips

  1. Applications for carbon fibre recovered from composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering; Liu, Z.; Turner, TA; Wong, KH

    2016-07-01

    Commercial operations to recover carbon fibre from waste composites are now developing and as more recovered fibre becomes available new applications for recovered fibre are required. Opportunities to use recovered carbon fibre as a structural reinforcement are considered involving the use of wet lay processes to produce nonwoven mats. Mats with random in-plane fibre orientation can readily be produced using existing commercial processes. However, the fibre volume fraction, and hence the mechanical properties that can be achieved, result in composites with limited mechanical properties. Fibre volume fractions of 40% can be achieved with high moulding pressures of over 100 bar, however, moulding at these pressures results in substantial fibre breakage which reduces the mean fibre length and the properties of the composite manufactured. Nonwoven mats made from aligned, short carbon fibres can achieve higher fibre volume fractions with lower fibre breakage even at high moulding pressure. A process for aligning short fibres is described and a composite of over 60% fibre volume fraction has been manufactured at a pressures up to 100 bar with low fibre breakage. Further developments of the alignment process have been undertaken and a composite of 46% fibre volume fraction has been produced moulded at a pressure of 7 bar in an autoclave, exhibiting good mechanical properties that compete with higher grade materials. This demonstrates the potential for high value applications for recovered carbon fibre by fibre alignment.

  2. Carbon nanotubes for ultrafast fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Rozhin, Aleksey; Fedotov, Yuri; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; Kobtsev, Sergey M.; Dianov, Evgeny M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess both remarkable optical properties and high potential for integration in various photonic devices. We overview, here, recent progress in CNT applications in fibre optics putting particular emphasis on fibre lasers. We discuss fabrication and characterisation of different CNTs, development of CNT-based saturable absorbers (CNT-SA), their integration and operation in fibre laser cavities putting emphasis on state-of-the-art fibre lasers, mode locked using CNT-SA. We discuss new design concepts of high-performance ultrafast operation fibre lasers covering ytterbium (Yb), bismuth (Bi), erbium (Er), thulium (Tm) and holmium (Ho)-doped fibre lasers.

  3. Carbon nanotubes for ultrafast fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Rozhin, Aleksey; Fedotov, Yuri; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; Kobtsev, Sergey M.; Dianov, Evgeny M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess both remarkable optical properties and high potential for integration in various photonic devices. We overview, here, recent progress in CNT applications in fibre optics putting particular emphasis on fibre lasers. We discuss fabrication and characterisation of different CNTs, development of CNT-based saturable absorbers (CNT-SA), their integration and operation in fibre laser cavities putting emphasis on state-of-the-art fibre lasers, mode locked using CNT-SA. We discuss new design concepts of high-performance ultrafast operation fibre lasers covering ytterbium (Yb), bismuth (Bi), erbium (Er), thulium (Tm) and holmium (Ho)-doped fibre lasers.

  4. Super-tough carbon-nanotube fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Alan B.; Collins, Steve; Muñoz, Edgar; Razal, Joselito M.; Ebron, Von Howard; Ferraris, John P.; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Kim, Bog G.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2003-06-01

    The energy needed to rupture a fibre (its toughness) is five times higher for spider silk than for the same mass of steel wire, which has inspired efforts to produce spider silk commercially. Here we spin 100-metre-long carbon-nanotube composite fibres that are tougher than any natural or synthetic organic fibre described so far, and use these to make fibre supercapacitors that are suitable for weaving into textiles.

  5. Multifunctional Carbon Fibre Tapes for Automotive Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koncherry, V.; Potluri, P.; Fernando, A.

    2017-04-01

    Cabon fibre composites are used where mechanical performance such as strength, stiffness and impact properties at low density is a critical parameter for engineering applications. Carbon fibre flat tape is one material which is traditionally used to manufacture three-dimensional composites in this area. Modifying the carbon fibre tape to incorporate other functions such as stealth, electromagnetic interference, shielding, de-icing, self-repair, energy storage, allows us to create multi-functional carbon fibre tape. Researchers have been developing such material and the technology for their manufacture in order to produce multifunctional carbon fibre based components more economically and efficiently. This paper presents the manufacturing process of a metallised carbon fibre material for a chopped fibre preforming process that uses electromagnets for preforming instead of traditional suction airflow fibre deposition. In addition, the paper further presents mechanical and magneto-static modelling that is carried out to investigate the bending properties of the material produced and its suitability for creating 3D preforms.

  6. Multifunctional Carbon Fibre Tapes for Automotive Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koncherry, V.; Potluri, P.; Fernando, A.

    2016-11-01

    Cabon fibre composites are used where mechanical performance such as strength, stiffness and impact properties at low density is a critical parameter for engineering applications. Carbon fibre flat tape is one material which is traditionally used to manufacture three-dimensional composites in this area. Modifying the carbon fibre tape to incorporate other functions such as stealth, electromagnetic interference, shielding, de-icing, self-repair, energy storage, allows us to create multi-functional carbon fibre tape. Researchers have been developing such material and the technology for their manufacture in order to produce multifunctional carbon fibre based components more economically and efficiently. This paper presents the manufacturing process of a metallised carbon fibre material for a chopped fibre preforming process that uses electromagnets for preforming instead of traditional suction airflow fibre deposition. In addition, the paper further presents mechanical and magneto-static modelling that is carried out to investigate the bending properties of the material produced and its suitability for creating 3D preforms.

  7. Low Cost Carbon Fibre for Automotive Applications Part 1: Low Cost Carbon Fibre Development

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Charles David; Das, Sujit; Wheatley, Dr. Alan

    2014-01-01

    In pursuit of the goal to produce ultra-lightweight fuel efficient vehicles, there has been great excitement during the last few years about the potential for using carbon fibre reinforced composites in high volume applications. Currently, the greatest hurdle that inhibits wider implementation of carbon fibre composites in transportation is the high cost of carbon fibre when compared to other candidate materials. However, significant research is being conducted to develop lower cost, high volume technologies for producing carbon fibre. This chapter will highlight ongoing research in this area.

  8. Measurement of sound field in cavitating media by an optical fibre-tip hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold

    2008-04-01

    A fibre-optic technique was applied to measure the sound field in an ultrasonic cleaning vessel under practical conditions. A metal-coated fibre-tip is used as a sensor and a heterodyne interferometer detects the change in the optical path resulting from the movement of the fibre-tip in the sound field. Spectrally resolved sound field parameters such as the fundamental, the subharmonic or cavitation noise are extracted from the measurements and compared with results obtained by a piezo-electric hydrophone. It was found that the fibre sensor provides a signal related to the velocity in the sound field, but the information about cavitation-related parameters is similar to the information for pressure sensing techniques. The fibre-optic sensors have a uniquely high spatial resolution and the sound detection process is strongly influenced by single cavitation events close to the small fibre-tip. This paper shows that fibre-tip sensors are an alternative to common hydrophone techniques. They can open up new possibilities for measurement problems for which so far no solution exists, in particular when a high spatial resolution is required or when the measurement site is small.

  9. Carbon tips for all-carbon single-molecule electronics.

    PubMed

    Dappe, Y J; González, C; Cuevas, J C

    2014-06-21

    We present here an exhaustive ab initio study of the use of carbon-based tips as electrodes in single-molecule junctions. Motivated by recent experiments, we show that carbon tips can be combined with other carbon nanostructures, such as graphene, to form all-carbon molecular junctions with molecules like benzene or C60. Our results show that the use of carbon tips can lead to relatively conductive molecular junctions. However, contrary to junctions formed with standard metals, the conductance traces recorded during the formation of the all-carbon single-molecule junctions do not exhibit clear conductance plateaus, which can be attributed to the inability of the hydrogenated carbon tips to form chemical bonds with the organic molecules. Additionally, we explore here the use of carbon tips for scanning tunneling microscopy and show that they are well suited for obtaining sample images with atomic resolution.

  10. A Dual Sensor for pH and Hydrogen Peroxide Using Polymer-Coated Optical Fibre Tips

    PubMed Central

    Purdey, Malcolm S.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.; Schartner, Erik P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the first single optical fibre tip probe for concurrent detection of both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration and pH of a solution. The sensor is constructed by embedding two fluorophores: carboxyperoxyfluor-1 (CPF1) and seminaphtharhodafluor-2 (SNARF2) within a polymer matrix located on the tip of the optical fibre. The functionalised fibre probe reproducibly measures pH, and is able to accurately detect H2O2 over a biologically relevant concentration range. This sensor offers potential for non-invasive detection of pH and H2O2 in biological environments using a single optical fibre. PMID:26694413

  11. Impact Damage Tolerance of a Carbon Fibre Composite Laminate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    design of composite structures. 8 CONCLUSIONS These carbon fibre/ epoxy resin laminates are susceptible :: low e ;rt., - .. impact damage, especially...ROYAL AIRCRAFT ESTABLISHMENT0 Technical Report 84049 May 1984 GARTEUR/TP-007 IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANCE OF A CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE LAMINATE by DTIC G...007 Received for printing 3 May 1984 IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANCE OF A CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE LAMINATE by G. Dorey P. Sigety* K. Stellbrink** W. G. J. ’t

  12. Fibre Tip Sensors for Localised Temperature Sensing Based on Rare Earth-Doped Glass Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Erik P.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a point temperature sensor, based on monitoring upconversion emission from erbium:ytterbium-doped tellurite coatings on the tips of optical fibres. The dip coating technique allows multiple sensors to be fabricated simultaneously, while confining the temperature-sensitive region to a localised region on the end-face of the fibre. The strong response of the rare earth ions to changing temperature allows a resolution of 0.1–0.3 °C to be recorded over the biologically relevant range of temperatures from 23–39 °C. PMID:25407907

  13. Fabrication of integrated optic fibre tip for micron CMMs touch trigger probe application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Hsu, H. Y.; Chua, J.; Kong, L. X.; Wedding, A. B.; She, M.; Lin, G. C. I.; Fan, K. C.

    2005-12-01

    In the last decade the general miniaturisation of complex products has lead to an increased importance of high precision machining and assembly. Together with increasing precision of products, the need for highly accurate dimensional inspection increases. CMMs (Coordinate Measuring Machines), as a versatile and widespread dimensional metrology tool, can efficiently perform complex measurement with a resolution of about 0.1μm and a repeatability of about 0.3μm. The existing probes for CMMs tend to be very bulky and result in high probing forces for geometrical measurements of high accuracy on small parts. In this paper, an economical flexible method, which is based on optical fibre splicer, is proposed to fabricate an integrated micro scale silicon probe with spherical tip for micron CMMs. Based on Taguchi method, a combination of optimised process parameters has been obtained to control the fabrication conditions that will ensure the manufacturing of tips of a high and consistent quality. With proper control of the process parameters, an optic fibre probe tip with the diameter dimension in the range of 200 to 400μm is achieved and there is a great potential to fabricate a smaller tip with a diameter of 50-100μm in the future.

  14. Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John

    2008-07-07

    Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

  15. Acoustic fatigue of carbon fibre structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, G.; Gruenewald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Based on the acoustic fatigue endurance curve of CFRP-probes (Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic) obtained within the BRITE EURAM PROGRAMME - ACOUFAT further investigations have been carried out with respect to (1) nonlinearities in the measurements for the calibration of the different transducers; (2) effects of residual strength for the coupons; (3) effects of moisture and temperature in the material due to storage and testing in humid environment. For one chosen coupon type, the sum of these effects leads to a reduction of the allowable strain in the range of high cycles by a factor of approximately 4 compared to the value obtained originally for the coupon using the 2 percent failure criterion and tested at room temperature. The modifications are considered step by step and the resulting curve is given in this paper.

  16. Multiwalled carbon nanotube reinforced biomimetic bundled gel fibres.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Haruko; Sasaki, Naruo; Matsunaga, Yukiko T

    2016-08-19

    This work describes the fabrication and characterization of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based biomimetic bundled gel fibres. The bundled gel fibres were reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A phase-separated aqueous solution with MWCNT and HPC was transformed into a bundled fibrous structure after being injected into a co-flow microfluidic device and applying the sheath flow. The resulting MWCNT-bundled gel fibres consist of multiple parallel microfibres. The mechanical and electrical properties of MWCNT-bundled gel fibres were improved and their potential for tissue engineering applications as a cell scaffold was demonstrated.

  17. Preparation of hollow-fibre and composite hollow-fibre carbon membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Linkov, V.M.; Sanderson, R.D.; Jacobs, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    Interest in carbon membranes world-wide has increased remarkably since Softer et al. introduced, in 1983, hollow-fibre carbon membranes produced by the pyrolysis of commercial cellulose membranes. The scientific community was attracted by the high permselectivities of these membranes and their stability at high temperatures. Scientific organizations in Japan, France, Germany and other countries have made efforts to prepare mechanically stable carbon hollow fibres by various techniques. Materials other than cellulose, such as phenolic resins and polyacrylonitrile (PAN), were used for this purpose. Although some Positive results have been reported in the literature, mechanically strong and flexible carbon hollow-fibre membranes with high porosity and highly asymmetrical structure have not yet been produced. Here, the production of hollow-fiber carbon membranes, the modification of their porous structure, and the investigation into various techniques for coating them with inorganic and organic materials, are presented.

  18. Energy distributions of field emitted electrons from carbide tips and tungsten tips with diamondlike carbon coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.L. |; Kim, H.; Hussey, B.W.; Chang, T.H.; Mackie, W.A.

    1996-11-01

    We have measured the energy distributions of electrons field emitted from tungsten carbide, HfC{l_angle}100{r_angle}, and ZrC{l_angle}100{r_angle} tips, and tungsten field emitters with diamondlike carbon coatings. Multiple-peaked energy distributions were observed from instability induced emission sites on the carbide tips. Energy distributions of electrons field emitted from the diamondlike carbon coated tungsten tips were broader than those from metal tips. They also showed a shift towards lower energies with increases in the emission current. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  19. Fibre tip pH sensor for tumor detection during surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Matthew R.; Schartner, Erik P.; Callen, David F.; Gill, P. Grantley; Monro, Tanya M.

    2015-05-01

    Surgery on tumours commonly involves a lumpectomy method, where a section of tissue containing the tumour is removed, to improve cosmetic outcomes and quality of life. Following surgery, the margins of the removed section are checked by pathology tests to ensure that the entire tumour has been removed. Unfortunately, approximately 15-20% of margins show incomplete removal and require a subsequent operation to remove the remaining tumour. Tumour detection during surgery could allow the removed section to be enlarged appropriately, reducing the likelihood of requiring subsequent surgery. A change in the extracellular pH in the vicinity of a tumour, when compared to normal tissue, has been shown previously in literature. We have fabricated an optical fibre tip pH sensor by embedding a fluorophore within a photopolymerised acrylamide polymer on the tip of a 200 micron diameter silica fibre. Preliminary measurements of human melanoma samples have shown a significant difference in the measured pH values between tumour and normal tissue. This demonstration paves to way to highly accurate margin detection during surgery.

  20. Can We Avoid the Permafrost Carbon Tipping Point?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Zhang, T.; Bruhwiler, L.; Barrett, A. P.; Li, Z.

    2011-12-01

    If we reduce fossil fuel emissions and slow the Arctic warming rate, can we delay or even avoid the permafrost carbon tipping point? Permafrost currently contains about 1466 Gt of carbon frozen during or since the last ice age. The permafrost carbon tipping point occurs when the release of carbon from thawing permafrost overpowers enhanced uptake due to warmer temperatures. The tipping point indicates when the Arctic irreversibly changes from a carbon sink to a source relative to the atmosphere and marks the start of the Permafrost Carbon Feedback. The tipping point is irreversible because once the carbon thaws and decays into the atmosphere, there is no way to put the carbon back into the permafrost. Projections based on the A1B IPCC scenario indicate that the PCF tipping point will occur between 2020 and 2030, with a total of 190±64 Gt of carbon released into the atmosphere by 2300. We ran a series of model projections out to 2300 based on the A1B scenario, but capped emissions at various levels, each representing a different overall Arctic warming. We present the area of permafrost lost, the permafrost carbon tipping point, and total permafrost carbon flux as a function of Arctic temperature increase. We show the maximum allowed Arctic temperature increase before initiating the permafrost carbon feedback.

  1. Surface characterisation of carbon fibre recycled using fluidised bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, G.; Pickering, S. J.; Walker, G. S.; Wong, K. H.; Rudd, C. D.

    2008-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the surface of carbon fibres recycled using a high-temperature fluidised bed. The interfacial shear strength of the recycled carbon fibres with epoxy resin was examined using a micro-droplet test. The corresponding as received carbon fibres were used as control samples. It was shown that the recycling process converted some of the surface hydroxyl groups into carbonyl and carboxylic groups due to the effect of heat in atmosphere of air. The overall O/C ratio was not changed significantly. The interfacial shear strength with epoxy resin was not affected by the change of surface oxygen composition. It was also shown that surface texture may play a dominant role in interfacial bonding performance.

  2. Thermal properties of continuously spun carbon nanotube fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziol, Krzysztof K.; Janas, Dawid; Brown, Elisabetta; Hao, Ling

    2017-04-01

    As indicated by theory and experimental measurements individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have very high values of thermal conductivity. One of the challenges is to achieve high thermal conductivity in macroscopic assemblies of CNTs such as fibres, films and composites, paving the way to a wide range of applications. CNT fibres have tremendous potential in succeeding as the future materials for a variety of applications when properties at the nanoscale are translated to their macroscopic assemblies. In this paper we report the measurements of thermal conductivity of continuously spun CNT fibres and its dependence on temperature. Thermal conductivity measurements were performed using in-house built temperature sensing microscope probe. Specific thermal conductivity of CNT fibres showed an order of magnitude advantage over the traditional materials used for heat dissipation.

  3. Optical fibre-coupled cryogenic radiometer with carbon nanotube absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livigni, David J.; Tomlin, Nathan A.; Cromer, Christopher L.; Lehman, John H.

    2012-04-01

    A cryogenic radiometer was constructed for direct-substitution optical-fibre power measurements. The cavity is intended to operate at the 3 K temperature stage of a dilution refrigerator or 4.2 K stage of a liquid cryostat. The optical fibre is removable for characterization. The cavity features micromachined silicon centring rings to thermally isolate the optical fibre as well as an absorber made from micromachined silicon on which vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown. Measurements of electrical substitution, optical absorption and temperature change indicate that the radiometer is capable of measuring a power level of 10 nW with approximate responsivity of 155 nW K-1 and 1/e time constant of 13 min. An inequivalence between optical and electrical power of approximately 10% was found, but the difference was largely attributable to unaccounted losses in the optical fibre.

  4. Carbon fibre composites: integrated electrochemical sensors for wound management.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Duncan; Forsythe, Stephen; Davis, James

    2008-07-01

    The applicability of employing a carbon fibre mesh as an electrochemical sensing substructure for assessing urate transformations within wound exudates is evaluated. Prototype sensor assemblies have been designed and their response characteristics towards uric acid and other common physiological components are detailed. Modification of the carbon fibre sensor through surface anodization and the application of cellulose acetate permselective barriers have been shown to lead to optimized responses and much greater sensitivity (1440% increase) and specificity. These could enable the accurate periodic monitoring of uric acid in wound fluid. The performance characteristics of the composite sensors in whole blood, serum and blister fluid have been investigated.

  5. Transport properties of polymer-vapour grown carbon fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeyev, S. A.; Macedo, F. J.; Ferreira, J. A.; van Hattum, F. W. J.; Bernardo, C. A.

    2000-04-01

    DC electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of polypropylene (PP) filled with vapour grown carbon fibre (VGCF) was studied. This was done for a wide range of fibre content and compared to systems produced under the same conditions in which a conventional carbon fibre was used as filler. The composites studied exhibit characteristic percolating behaviour. Because of the low degree of graphite perfection in the VGCF used in this work, the fraction of VGCF required to achieve percolation was higher than expected. Non-linear I- V characteristics and time dependent electrical resistivity effects are only observed in PP filled with VGCF. Several mechanisms must be called upon to explain the observed electrical behaviour of the PP/VGCF composite. The thermal conductivity of the composites is in agreement with the effective medium theories.

  6. Penetration of living cell membranes with fortified carbon nanotube tips.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Brown, Scott C; Higashitani, Ko; Moudgil, Brij M

    2007-10-23

    We have fabricated robust nanosurgical needles suitable for single cell operations by modifying multiwalled carbon nanotube (MCNT)-terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips. Extra-long MCNT AFM tips were prepared and fortified with molecular layers of carbon to overcome mechanical instabilities and then coated with an outer shell of gold to promote chemical versatility. The terminal diameters of the final fabricated tips were approximately 30-40 nm, and the MCNT probes were several micrometers in length. We illustrate the capability of these modified MCNT tips to carry nanoparticulate payloads and to penetrate the plasma membrane of living pleural mesothelial cells at the smallest indentation depths (100-200 nm) and lowest penetration forces (100-200 pN) currently reported for these procedures.

  7. Investigation of interfacial interaction between uncoated and coated carbon fibres and the magnesium alloy AZ91.

    PubMed

    Dorner-Reisel, A; Nishida, Y; Klemm, V; Nestler, K; Marx, G; Müller, E

    2002-10-01

    Unidirectionally reinforced metal-matrix composites with a fibre volume content between 63 and 68% were processed by squeeze casting using T800 H carbon fibres and the magnesium alloy AZ91. The surface of the fibres was prepared by thermal desizing of the fibres or by deposition of a pyrolytic carbon (pyC) coating. Different interfacial conditions could be identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the single-fibre push-in test. TEM confirmed the formation of needle-like phases at the fibre surface or, for coated fibres, within the pyrolytic carbon coating. During loading by the Vickers type indenter an intense response was observed for composites of coated fibres and the magnesium alloy. This could by caused by stick-slip effects within the pyrolytic carbon coating.

  8. Carbon fibre composite for ventilation air methane (VAM) capture.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatachari, Ramesh; Su, Shi; Yu, Xin Xiang

    2009-12-30

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a hazardous greenhouse gas but is also a wasted energy resource, if not utilised. This paper evaluates a novel adsorbent material developed for capturing methane from ventilation air methane (VAM) gas in underground coal mines. The adsorbent material is a honeycomb monolithic carbon fibre composite (HMCFC) consisting of multiple parallel flow-through channels and the material exhibits unique features including low pressure drop, good mechanical properties, ability to handle dust-containing gas streams, good thermal and electrical conductivity and selective adsorption of gases. During this study, a series of HMCFC adsorbents (using different types of carbon fibres) were successfully fabricated. Experimental data demonstrated the proof-of-concept of using the HMCFC adsorbent to capture methane from VAM gas. The adsorption capacity of the HMCFC adsorbent was twice that of commercial activated carbon. Methane concentration of 0.56% in the inlet VAM gas stream is reduced to about 0.011% after it passes through the novel carbon fibre composite adsorbent material at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. This amounts to a maximum capture efficiency of 98%. These encouraging laboratory scale studies have prompted further large scale trials and economic assessment.

  9. Multi-Functional Carbon Fibre Composites using Carbon Nanotubes as an Alternative to Polymer Sizing

    PubMed Central

    Pozegic, T. R.; Anguita, J. V.; Hamerton, I.; Jayawardena, K. D. G. I.; Chen, J-S.; Stolojan, V.; Ballocchi, P.; Walsh, R.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP) were introduced to the aerospace, automobile and civil engineering industries for their high strength and low weight. A key feature of CFRP is the polymer sizing - a coating applied to the surface of the carbon fibres to assist handling, improve the interfacial adhesion between fibre and polymer matrix and allow this matrix to wet-out the carbon fibres. In this paper, we introduce an alternative material to the polymer sizing, namely carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the carbon fibres, which in addition imparts electrical and thermal functionality. High quality CNTs are grown at a high density as a result of a 35 nm aluminium interlayer which has previously been shown to minimise diffusion of the catalyst in the carbon fibre substrate. A CNT modified-CFRP show 300%, 450% and 230% improvements in the electrical conductivity on the ‘surface’, ‘through-thickness’ and ‘volume’ directions, respectively. Furthermore, through-thickness thermal conductivity calculations reveal a 107% increase. These improvements suggest the potential of a direct replacement for lightning strike solutions and to enhance the efficiency of current de-icing solutions employed in the aerospace industry. PMID:27876858

  10. Multi-Functional Carbon Fibre Composites using Carbon Nanotubes as an Alternative to Polymer Sizing.

    PubMed

    Pozegic, T R; Anguita, J V; Hamerton, I; Jayawardena, K D G I; Chen, J-S; Stolojan, V; Ballocchi, P; Walsh, R; Silva, S R P

    2016-11-23

    Carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP) were introduced to the aerospace, automobile and civil engineering industries for their high strength and low weight. A key feature of CFRP is the polymer sizing - a coating applied to the surface of the carbon fibres to assist handling, improve the interfacial adhesion between fibre and polymer matrix and allow this matrix to wet-out the carbon fibres. In this paper, we introduce an alternative material to the polymer sizing, namely carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the carbon fibres, which in addition imparts electrical and thermal functionality. High quality CNTs are grown at a high density as a result of a 35 nm aluminium interlayer which has previously been shown to minimise diffusion of the catalyst in the carbon fibre substrate. A CNT modified-CFRP show 300%, 450% and 230% improvements in the electrical conductivity on the 'surface', 'through-thickness' and 'volume' directions, respectively. Furthermore, through-thickness thermal conductivity calculations reveal a 107% increase. These improvements suggest the potential of a direct replacement for lightning strike solutions and to enhance the efficiency of current de-icing solutions employed in the aerospace industry.

  11. Multi-Functional Carbon Fibre Composites using Carbon Nanotubes as an Alternative to Polymer Sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozegic, T. R.; Anguita, J. V.; Hamerton, I.; Jayawardena, K. D. G. I.; Chen, J.-S.; Stolojan, V.; Ballocchi, P.; Walsh, R.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP) were introduced to the aerospace, automobile and civil engineering industries for their high strength and low weight. A key feature of CFRP is the polymer sizing - a coating applied to the surface of the carbon fibres to assist handling, improve the interfacial adhesion between fibre and polymer matrix and allow this matrix to wet-out the carbon fibres. In this paper, we introduce an alternative material to the polymer sizing, namely carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the carbon fibres, which in addition imparts electrical and thermal functionality. High quality CNTs are grown at a high density as a result of a 35 nm aluminium interlayer which has previously been shown to minimise diffusion of the catalyst in the carbon fibre substrate. A CNT modified-CFRP show 300%, 450% and 230% improvements in the electrical conductivity on the ‘surface’, ‘through-thickness’ and ‘volume’ directions, respectively. Furthermore, through-thickness thermal conductivity calculations reveal a 107% increase. These improvements suggest the potential of a direct replacement for lightning strike solutions and to enhance the efficiency of current de-icing solutions employed in the aerospace industry.

  12. Charge effect in point projection images of carbon fibres

    PubMed

    Prigent; Morin

    2000-09-01

    Nanometre-sized carbon fibres across holes have been observed in a lensless point projection field-emission microscope operating between 100 and 300 eV. At sufficiently high magnification fringe patterns appear; with the help of simulations we show that they are strongly dependent on the charge density of the fibres. These patterns are characterized by an odd number of fringes with a central fringe that becomes very bright as the charge increases. Average diameter and linear charge density have been obtained with remarkable precision from analysis of fringes. Charge distribution from the middle to the edge of fibres has been investigated as well as narrowings at localized places on the fringe pattern. From these two examples, the limits of the models used for the simulations and those of the data acquisition system are discussed. Finally, this work emphasizes the fact that the fringe pattern masks the actual form of the fibre and that it is necessary to take account of the charge effect to interpret this diffraction pattern.

  13. Modelling the side impact of carbon fibre tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudharsan, Ms R.; Rolfe, B. F., Dr; Hodgson, P. D., Prof

    2010-06-01

    Metallic tubes have been extensively studied for their crashworthiness as they closely resemble automotive crash rails. Recently, the demand to improve fuel economy and reduce vehicle emissions has led automobile manufacturers to explore the crash properties of light weight materials such as fibre reinforced polymer composites, metallic foams and sandwich structures in order to use them as crash barriers. This paper discusses the response of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) tubes and their failure mechanisms during side impact. The energy absorption of CFRP tubes is compared to similar Aluminium tubes. The response of the CFRP tubes during impact was modelled using Abaqus finite element software with a composite fabric material model. The material inputs were given based on standard tension and compression test results and the in-plane damage was defined based on cyclic shear tests. The failure modes and energy absorption observed during the tests were well represented by the finite element model.

  14. Framed carbon nanostructures: synthesis and applications in functional SPM tips.

    PubMed

    Mukhin, I S; Fadeev, I V; Zhukov, M V; Dubrovskii, V G; Golubok, A O

    2015-01-01

    We present a synthesis method to fabricate framed carbon-based nanostructures having highly anisotropic shapes, in particular, the nanofork and nanoscalpel structures which are obtained systematically under optimized growth conditions. A theoretical model is developed to explain the formation of such nanostructures on Si cantilevers and W etched wires exposed to a focused electron beam. We then demonstrate the potentials of these nanostructures as functional tips for scanning probe microscopy. Owing to their anisotropic shapes, such tips can be very useful for nanolithography, nanosurgery of biological objects, and precise manipulation with surface particles. Overall, our method provides a simple and robust way to produce functional scanning probe microscopy tips with variable shapes and enhanced capabilities for different applications compared to standard cantilevers.

  15. On the high-rate failure of carbon fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frias, C.; Parry, S.; Bourne, N. K.; Townsend, D.; Soutis, C.; Withers, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    The Taylor test is an important means to determine the response of materials to dynamic loading. In this work it is used to determine the dynamic response of heterogeneous orthotropic carbon-fibre-epoxy laminates. Experiments record the fracture of a series of multi-layered composite plates with high-speed photography. The ensuing damage occurs during the shock compression phase but three other tensile and shear loading modes operate during the test. This hierarchy of damage across the scales is key in determining the suite of operating mechanisms; such information cannot be correlated using traditional sectioning and observation using optical or electron beam microscopy or post mortem examination of recovered cylinders. Only dynamic imaging and damage characterisation will advance quantitative damage and thus constitutive model development. It is shown that fibre and ply orientations influence the fracture response, but most important is the impact speed. The 0° Taylor cylinder impacted at 268 m s-1 in addition to extensive interlaminar fracture demonstrates a pseudo-plastic behaviour due to progressive fibre crushing, dissipating larger amounts of energy in comparison to that tested at the lower speed of 148 m s-1.

  16. Gbit/s data transmission on carbon fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, T.; Glitza, K.-W.; Kappen, G. C.; Mättig, P.; Möller, J.; Sanny, B.

    2016-03-01

    Data transmission at the upgraded Large Hadron Collider experiments, foreseen for mid 2020s, will be in the multi Gbit/s range per connection for the innermost detector layers. This paper reports on first tests on the possible use of carbon cables for electrical data transmission close to the interaction point. Carbon cables have the potential advantage of being light, having a low activation and easy integration into the detector components close to the interaction point. In these tests commercially available carbon fibres were used, in which the filaments had a very thin nickel coating. For these cables data rates beyond 1 Gbit/s over more than 1 m with an error rate of less than 10-12 could be reached. The characteristics of the cables have been measured in terms of S-parameters and could be converted to a SPICE model. Some outlook on potential further improvements is presented.

  17. Tribological behaviour of unidirectional carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Y.; De Baets, P.

    2017-02-01

    Tribological behaviour of unidirectional carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy composites containing 42wt.% (CU42) and 52wt.% (CU52) carbon fibres fabricated by moulding technique was investigated on a pin-on-flat plate configuration. It is the first time to measure static and dynamic coefficient of frictions and wear rates of epoxy composites under heavy loading conditions. Microstructures of composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The experimental results indicated the carbon fiber improved the tribological properties of thermoset epoxy by reducing wear rate, but increased the coefficient of friction. At higher load, average wear rates were about 10.8x10-5 mm3/N.m for composites while it was about 38.20x10-5 mm3/N.m for epoxy resin. The wear rate decreased with decreasing load while friction coefficient increased with decreasing load. Moreover, friction coefficient of composites of CU42 tested at 90 N load was measured to be in the range 0.35 and 0.13 for static and dynamic component, respectively.

  18. High heat flux erosion of carbon fibre composite materials in the TEXTOR tokamak.

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.

    1998-03-10

    During plasma disruptions, ELMs, or vertical displacement events (VDEs) high transient heat loads to the plasma facing materials an cause damage such as thermal erosion, cracking, or melting. Self shielding processes, which take place when a material surface is exposed to a high heat flux from an incident plasma, can lead to a reduction of the deposited energy. Experiments using the fast pneumatic probe of the TEXTOR tokamak were carried out to investigate these effects. The materials tested were carbon fibre reinforced materials with and without Si-addition. The probe with the material specimens was introduced into the edge plasma up to a depth of 9 cm in front of the ALT41 main limiter with a residence time of 80 ms. After the repeated exposure to the TEXTOR-plasma, the material specimens were examined by profilometry and electron microscopy to determine the damage and erosion. It was found that only a very limited zone of the probe tip of about 2.5 mm extension in radial direction showed erosion. The maximum erosion was observed at the very tip of the probe with approx. 30 {micro}m per exposure. The results of the erosion quantification are compared with the results from numerical simulations and from plasma diagnostic measurements during the exposure of the specimens.

  19. Development of flax/carbon fibre hybrid composites for enhanced properties.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, H N; Zhang, Z Y; Guthrie, R; Macmullen, J; Bennett, N

    2013-07-01

    Uni-directional (UD) and cross-ply (CP) cellulosic flax fibre epoxy composites were produced by hybridising UD carbon fibre prepreg onto flax system. A compression moulding technique was used to produce both flax and carbon/flax hybridised laminates. The effect of carbon fibre hybridisation on the water absorption behaviour, thermal and mechanical properties of both UD and CP flax specimens were investigated by means of water absorption, tensile, thermogravemetric analysis and flexural testing. The results showed that water absorption behaviour of hybrid samples are markedly improved compared to those without hybridisation. Similarly, the thermal stability, tensile and flexural properties of the hybrid composites are significantly improved in comparison with UD and CP flax composites without hybridisation. The experimental results suggest that cellulosic flax fibre reinforcement contributed to improve the toughness properties by promoting crack propagation whereas the carbon fibre contributed in improving thermal stability, water absorption behaviour and the overall strength and the stiffness of the hybrid composites.

  20. Multimode fibre: Light-sheet microscopy at the tip of a needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöschner, Martin; Kollárová, Věra; Dostál, Zbyněk; Nylk, Jonathan; Barton-Owen, Thomas; Ferrier, David E. K.; Chmelík, Radim; Dholakia, Kishan; Čižmár, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a powerful platform for 3-D volumetric imaging in the life sciences. Here, we introduce an important step towards its use deep inside biological tissue. Our new technique, based on digital holography, enables delivery of the light-sheet through a multimode optical fibre - an optical element with extremely small footprint, yet permitting complex control of light transport processes within. We show that this approach supports some of the most advanced methods in light-sheet microscopy: by taking advantage of the cylindrical symmetry of the fibre, we facilitate the wavefront engineering methods for generation of both Bessel and structured Bessel beam plane illumination. Finally, we assess the quality of imaging on a sample of fluorescent beads fixed in agarose gel and we conclude with a proof-of-principle imaging of a biological sample, namely the regenerating operculum prongs of Spirobranchus lamarcki.

  1. High-temperature tensile cell for in situ real-time investigation of carbon fibre carbonization and graphitization processes.

    PubMed

    Behr, Michael; Rix, James; Landes, Brian; Barton, Bryan; Billovits, Gerry; Hukkanen, Eric; Patton, Jasson; Wang, Weijun; Keane, Denis; Weigand, Steven

    2016-11-01

    A new high-temperature fibre tensile cell is described, developed for use at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory to enable the investigation of the carbonization and graphitization processes during carbon fibre production. This cell is used to heat precursor fibre bundles to temperatures up to ∼2300°C in a controlled inert atmosphere, while applying tensile stress to facilitate formation of highly oriented graphitic microstructure; evolution of the microstructure as a function of temperature and time during the carbonization and higher-temperature graphitization processes can then be monitored by collecting real-time wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns. As an example, the carbonization and graphitization behaviour of an oxidized polyacrylonitrile fibre was studied up to a temperature of ∼1750°C. Real-time WAXD revealed the gradual increase in microstructure alignment with the fibre axis with increasing temperature over the temperature range 600-1100°C. Above 1100°C, no further changes in orientation were observed. The overall magnitude of change increased with increasing applied tensile stress during carbonization. As a second example, the high-temperature graphitizability of PAN- and pitch-derived commercial carbon fibres was studied. Here, the magnitude of graphitic microstructure evolution of the pitch-derived fibre far exceeded that of the PAN-derived fibres at temperatures up to ∼2300°C, indicating its facile graphitizability.

  2. Low temperature synthesis of fibres composed of carbon-nickel nanoparticles in super-critical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasumura, Takashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Whitby, Raymond L. D.; Aschenbrenner, Ortrud; Maekawa, Toru

    2010-06-01

    We show that fibres composed of carbon-nickel nanoparticles are self-assembled by mixing nickelocene and oxygen with super-critical carbon dioxide in a dc electric field. The fibres grow in the direction of the electric field and the growth rate increases with an increase in the strength of the electric field. We also irradiate the fibres with electron beams and find that crystallized nickel particles are captured by carbon particles. The present result suggests that a low temperature method of creating carbon-metal hybrid nanostructures may be developed by mixing metallocene and trigger molecules with super-critical fluids subjected to a dc electric field.

  3. Filtration properties of hierarchical carbon nanostructures deposited on carbon fibre fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzyp, M.; Mills, C. A.; Rhodes, R.; Pozegic, T. R.; Smith, C. T. G.; Beliatis, M. J.; Rozanski, L. J.; Werbowy, A.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-03-01

    Hierarchical carbon nanostructures have been produced and examined for their use in liquid filtration experiments. The nanostructures are based on carbon nanotube growth and graphite oxide sponge deposition on the surface of commercially available carbon fibre fabrics. The hierarchical nanomaterial construction on the carbon fibre fabric is made possible due to the chemical vapour deposited carbon nanotubes which act as anchoring sites for the solution deposited sponge nanomaterial. The nanomaterials show a high capacity for Rhodamine B filtration, with the carbon fibre—carbon nanotube—graphite oxide sponge fabric showing filtering performance comparable to a commercial activated carbon filter. After 40 successive filtrations of 10 mg ml-1 Rhodamine B solution, the filtrate of dual modified fabrics returned an increase in transparency of 94% when measured at approx. 550 nm compared to 72% for the commercial carbon filter. When normalised with respect to the areal density of the commercial filter, the increase in optical transparency of the filtrate from the dual modified fabrics reduces to 65%. The Rhodamine B is found to deposit in the carbon nanomaterials via a nucleation, growth and saturation mechanism.

  4. Deformation mechanisms of carbon nanotube fibres under tensile loading by in situ Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu; Kang, Yi-Lan; Qiu, Wei; Li, Ya-Li; Huang, Gan-Yun; Guo, Jian-Gang; Deng, Wei-Lin; Zhong, Xiao-Hua

    2011-06-03

    Deformation mechanisms of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibres under tensile loading are studied by means of in situ Raman spectroscopy to detect the CNT deformation and stress distributions in the fibres. The G' band in the Raman spectrum responds distinctly to the tensile stress in Raman shift, width and intensity. The G' band changes with the tensile deformation of the fibre at different stages, namely elastic deformation, strengthening and damage-fracture. It is deduced that the individual CNTs only deform elastically without obvious damage or bond breaking. The yield and fracture of fibres can be due to the slippage among the CNTs.

  5. Development of a universal stress sensor for graphene and carbon fibres

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Otakar; Tsoukleri, Georgia; Riaz, Ibtsam; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Parthenios, John; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Geim, Andre K.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Galiotis, Costas

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fibres are a significant volume fraction of modern structural airframes. Embedded into polymer matrices, they provide significant strength and stiffness gains by unit weight compared with competing structural materials. Here we use the Raman G peak to assess the response of carbon fibres to the application of strain, with reference to the response of graphene itself. Our data highlight the predominance of the in-plane graphene properties in all graphitic structures examined. A universal master plot relating the G peak strain sensitivity to tensile modulus of all types of carbon fibres, as well as graphene, is presented. We derive a universal value of—average—phonon shift rate with axial stress of around −5ω0−1 (cm−1 MPa−1), where ω0 is the G peak position at zero stress for both graphene and carbon fibre with annular morphology. The use of this for stress measurements in a variety of applications is discussed.

  6. Modelling and simulation of randomly oriented carbon fibre-reinforced composites under thermal load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treffler, R.; Fröschl, J.; Drechsler, K.; Ladstätter, E.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced sheet moulding compounds (CF-SMC) already exhibit a complex material behaviour under uniaxial loads due to the random orientation of the fibres in the matrix resin. Mature material models for metallic materials are generally not transferable. This paper proposes an approach for modelling the fatigue behaviour of CF-SMC based on extensive static and cyclic tests using low cost secondary carbon fibres (SCF). The main focus is on describing the stiffness degradation considering the dynamic modulus of the material. Influence factors such as temperature, orientation, rate dependence and specimen thickness were additionally considered.

  7. Recycling of woven carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer composites using supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Knight, Chase C; Zeng, Changchun; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has been great deal of interest in recycling carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer composites. One method that has shown promising results involves the use of supercritical fluids to achieve separation between matrix and fibres by effectively degrading the resin into lower molecular weight compounds. In addition, the solvents used are environmentally benign and can also be recovered and reused. In this study, supercritical water with 0.05 M KOH as the catalyst was used for the recycling of an aerospace-grade high-performance epoxy carbon fibre composite (Hexcel 8552/IM7). The morphology of the reclaimed fibres was observed by scanning electron microscopy, and the tensile properties of the fibres were measured by single filament testing. The effects of processing time on the resin elimination efficiency and fibre property retention were investigated. With the process developed in this research, as much as 99.2 wt% resin elimination was achieved, resulting in the recovery of clean, undamaged fibres. The reclaimed fibres retained the original tensile strength. The feasibility of recycling multiple layer composites was also explored.

  8. N-type thermoelectric recycled carbon fibre sheet with electrochemically deposited Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, E. J. X.; Pickering, S. J.; Chan, A.; Wong, K. H.

    2012-06-01

    An N-type thermoelectric recycled carbon fibre sheet with bismuth telluride coating has been successfully synthesised through an electrodeposition technique. The Seebeck coefficient and electrical properties of the combined recycled carbon fibre sheet and bismuth telluride films are reported. Classification of the crystal structure, surface morphology and the elemental composition of the resulting deposits are methodically characterised by XRD, SEM and EDX correspondingly. Cyclic voltammetry is also carried out in nitric acid solutions to investigate the right range of deposition potential. An N-type thermoelectric sheet was successfully synthesised with the highest attainable Seebeck coefficient of -54 μV/k with an electrical resistivity of 8.9 × 10-5 ohm m. The results shows slight differences in morphologies and thermoelectric properties for the films deposited at varying deposition potential. The increase in thermoelectrical properties of the recycled carbon fibre is in line with the development of using coated recycled fibre for thermoelectrical applications.

  9. N-type thermoelectric recycled carbon fibre sheet with electrochemically deposited Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, E. J. X.; Pickering, S. J.; Chan, A.; Wong, K. H.; Lau, P. L.

    2012-09-01

    An N-type thermoelectric recycled carbon fibre sheet with bismuth telluride coating has been successfully synthesised through an electro-deposition technique. The Seebeck coefficient and electrical properties of the combined recycled carbon fibre sheet and bismuth telluride films are reported. Classification of the crystal structure, surface morphology and the elemental composition of the resulting deposits are methodically characterised by XRD, SEM and EDX. Cyclic voltammetry is also carried out in nitric acid solutions to investigate the right range of deposition potential. The synthesis N-type thermoelectric sheet has a highest attainable Seebeck coefficient of -54 μV K-1 and an electrical resistivity of 8.9×10-5 Ω m. The results show slight differences in morphologies and thermoelectric properties for the films deposited at varying deposition potential. The increase in thermoelectrical properties of the recycled carbon fibre is in line with the development of using coated recycled fibre for thermoelectrical applications.

  10. Self-tapping ability of carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Feerick, Emer M; Wilson, Joanne; Jarman-Smith, Marcus; Ó'Brádaigh, Conchur M; McGarry, J Patrick

    2014-10-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the self-tapping ability of carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) has been conducted. Six CFR-PEEK suture anchor designs were investigated using PEEK-OPTIMA® Reinforced, a medical grade of CFR-PEEK. Experimental tests were conducted to investigate the maximum axial force and torque required for self-taping insertion of each anchor design. Additional experimental tests were conducted for some anchor designs using pilot holes. Computational simulations were conducted to determine the maximum stress in each anchor design at various stages of insertion. Simulations also were performed to investigate the effect of wall thickness in the anchor head. The maximum axial force required to insert a self-tapping CFR-PEEK suture anchor did not exceed 150 N for any anchor design. The maximum torque required to insert a self-tapping CFR-PEEK suture anchor did not exceed 0.8 Nm. Computational simulations reveal significant stress concentrations in the region of the anchor tip, demonstrating that a re-design of the tip geometry should be performed to avoid fracture during self-tapping, as observed in the experimental component of this study. This study demonstrates the ability of PEEK-OPTIMA Reinforced suture anchors to self-tap polyurethane foam bone analogue. This provides motivation to further investigate the self-tapping ability of CFR-PEEK suture anchors in animal/cadaveric bone. An optimised design for CFR-PEEK suture anchors offers the advantages of radiolucency, and mechanical properties similar to bone with the ability to self-tap. This may have positive implications for reducing surgery times and the associated costs with the procedure.

  11. Carbon laminates with RE doped optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miluski, Piotr; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Żmojda, Jacek; Silva, AbíLio P.; Reis, Paulo N. B.; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    A new type of luminescent optical fibre sensor for structural health monitoring of composite laminates (CFRP) is proposed. The Nd3+ doped multi-core doubleclad fibre incorporated in composite structure was used as a distributed temperature sensor. The change of luminescence intensity (Nd3+ ions) at the wavelength of 880 nm (4F3/2 → 4I9/2) and 1060 nm (4F3/2 → 4I11/2) was used for internal temperature monitoring. The special construction of optical fibre was used as it assures an efficient pumping mechanism and, at same time, it increases the measuring sensitivity. The linear response with relative sensitivity 0.015 K-1 was obtained for temperature range from 30 up to 75ºC. The manufacturing process of CFRP with embedded optical fibre sensor is also discussed.

  12. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; AlAraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-04-11

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a 'Yin-Yang' all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser.

  13. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; AlAraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a ‘Yin-Yang’ all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser. PMID:27063511

  14. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; Alaraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-04-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a ‘Yin-Yang’ all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser.

  15. Shielding Effectiveness of Non-Woven Carbon Fibre Sheets: Modelling the Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, J. F.; Flintoft, I. D.; Austin, A. N.; Marvin, A. C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes work undertaken to understand how the structure of a nonwoven carbon fibre material determines its shielding effectiveness, including the effects of fibre orientation, and contact resistance. In order to facilitate understanding of the material behaviour, software has been written to generate Monte Carlo Models (MCMs) of the material structure. The results of our MCMs are compared with measurements and some empirical expressions.

  16. Low Cost Carbon Fibre: Applications, Performance and Cost Models - Chapter 17

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Charles David; Wheatley, Dr. Alan; Das, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    Weight saving in automotive applications has a major bearing on fuel economy. It is generally accepted that, typically, a 10% weight reduction in an automobile will lead to a 6-8% improvement in fuel economy. In this respect, carbon fibre composites are extremely attractive in their ability to provide superlative mechanical performance per unit weight. That is why they are specified for high-end uses such as Formula 1 racing cars and the latest aircraft (e.g. Boeing 787, Airbus A350 and A380), where they comprise over 50% by weight of the structure However, carbon fibres are expensive and this renders their composites similarly expensive. Research has been carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Tennessee, USA for over a decade with the aim of reducing the cost of carbon fibre such that it becomes a cost-effective option for the automotive industry. Aspects of this research relating to the development of low cost carbon fibre have been reported in Chapter 3 of this publication. In this chapter, the practical industrial applications of low-cost carbon fibre are presented, together with considerations of the performance and cost models which underpin the work.

  17. Ibuprofen-loaded poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-ε-caprolactone) electrospun fibres for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pires, Liliana R; Guarino, Vincenzo; Oliveira, Maria J; Ribeiro, Cristina C; Barbosa, Mário A; Ambrosio, Luigi; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2016-03-01

    The development of scaffolds that combine the delivery of drugs with the physical support provided by electrospun fibres holds great potential in the field of nerve regeneration. Here it is proposed the incorporation of ibuprofen, a well-known non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in electrospun fibres of the statistical copolymer poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-ε-caprolactone) [P(TMC-CL)] to serve as a drug delivery system to enhance axonal regeneration in the context of a spinal cord lesion, by limiting the inflammatory response. P(TMC-CL) fibres were electrospun from mixtures of dichloromethane (DCM) and dimethylformamide (DMF). The solvent mixture applied influenced fibre morphology, as well as mean fibre diameter, which decreased as the DMF content in solution increased. Ibuprofen-loaded fibres were prepared from P(TMC-CL) solutions containing 5% ibuprofen (w/w of polymer). Increasing drug content to 10% led to jet instability, resulting in the formation of a less homogeneous fibrous mesh. Under the optimized conditions, drug-loading efficiency was above 80%. Confocal Raman mapping showed no preferential distribution of ibuprofen in P(TMC-CL) fibres. Under physiological conditions ibuprofen was released in 24 h. The release process being diffusion-dependent for fibres prepared from DCM solutions, in contrast to fibres prepared from DCM-DMF mixtures where burst release occurred. The biological activity of the drug released was demonstrated using human-derived macrophages. The release of prostaglandin E2 to the cell culture medium was reduced when cells were incubated with ibuprofen-loaded P(TMC-CL) fibres, confirming the biological significance of the drug delivery strategy presented. Overall, this study constitutes an important contribution to the design of a P(TMC-CL)-based nerve conduit with anti-inflammatory properties.

  18. Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes on tips of cantilevers and nanowires

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Eres, Gyula; Wei, Yayi; Greenbaum, Elias; Lee, Ida

    2004-06-29

    A method is described for catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructures on the tips of nanowires, cantilevers, conductive micro/nanometer structures, wafers and the like. The method can be used for production of carbon nanotube-anchored cantilevers that can significantly improve the performance of scaning probe microscopy (AFM, EFM etc). The invention can also be used in many other processes of micro and/or nanofabrication with carbon nanotubes/fibers. Key elements of this invention include: (1) Proper selection of a metal catalyst and programmable pulsed electrolytic deposition of the desired specific catalyst precisely at the tip of a substrate, (2) Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes/fibers at the catalyst-deposited tips, (3) Control of carbon nanotube/fiber growth pattern by manipulation of tip shape and growth conditions, and (4) Automation for mass production.

  19. Biological and physicochemical properties of carbon-graphite fibre-reinforced polymers intended for implant suprastructures.

    PubMed

    Segerström, Susanna; Sandborgh-Englund, Gunilla; Ruyter, Eystein I

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine water sorption, water solubility, dimensional change caused by water storage, residual monomers, and possible cytotoxic effects of heat-polymerized carbon-graphite fibre-reinforced composites with different fibre loadings based on methyl methacrylate/poly(methyl methacrylate) (MMA/PMMA) and the copolymer poly (vinyl chloride-co-vinyl acetate). Two different resin systems were used. Resin A contained ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate (1,4-BDMA); the cross-linker in Resin B was diethylene glycol dimethacrylate (DEGDMA). The resin mixtures were reinforced with 24, 36 and 47 wt% surface-treated carbon-graphite fibres. In addition, polymer B was reinforced with 58 wt% fibres. Water sorption was equal to or below 3.34±1.18 wt%, except for the 58 wt% fibre loading of polymer B (5.27±1.22 wt%). Water solubility was below 0.36±0.015 wt%, except for polymer B with 47 and 58 wt% fibres. For all composites, the volumetric increase was below 0.01±0.005 vol%. Residual MMA monomer was equal to or below 0.68±0.05 wt% for the fibre composites. The filter diffusion test and the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay demonstrated no cytotoxicity for the carbon-graphite fibre-reinforced composites, and residual cross-linking agents and vinyl chloride were not detectable by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis.

  20. Standard Operating Procedure - Manufacture of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic Waveguides and Slotted Waveguide Antennas, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    aerospace grade carbon fibre reinforced plastic ( CFRP ) prepreg. RELEASE LIMITATION Approved for public release UNCLASSIFIED Report...arrays manufactured from aerospace grade carbon fibre reinforced plastic ( CFRP ) prepreg. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION... CFRP ) prepreg tape and fabric. This report details Version 1.0 of a Standard Operating Procedure for this manufacture. UNCLASSIFIED

  1. The oxidative stability of carbon fibre reinforced glass-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Batt, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The environmental stability of carbon fibre reinforced glass-matrix composites is assessed. Loss of composite strength due to oxidative exposure at elevated temperatures under no load, static load and cyclic fatigue as well as due to thermal cycling are all examined. It is determined that strength loss is gradual and predictable based on the oxidation of carbon fibres. The glass matrix was not found to prevent this degradation but simply to limit it to a gradual process progressing from the composite surfaces inward.

  2. The Dependance of Damage Accumulation in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Composites on Matrix Properties.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Diguuibutiofl Unlimited 0- Contract U.S. AIR FORCE/ARMINES- Centre des Matdriaux No A.F.O.S.R. 84-0397 - Final Report December 1985 THE DEPENDANCE OF DAMAGE...61102F 2301 D1 185 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) THE DEPENDANCE OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN CARBON FIBRE REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES ON...ATN OF: LTS/Autovon 235-4299 26 March 1986 SUBJECT: EOARD-TR-86-04, Final Scientific Report, "The Dependance of Damage Accumu- lation in Carbon Fibre

  3. Theoretical study of carbon-based tips for scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    González, C; Abad, E; Dappe, Y J; Cuevas, J C

    2016-03-11

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present here a detailed theoretical analysis of the use of carbon-based conductive tips in scanning tunnelling microscopy. In particular, we employ ab initio methods based on density functional theory to explore a graphitic, an amorphous carbon and two diamond-like tips for imaging with a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM), and we compare them with standard metallic tips made of gold and tungsten. We investigate the performance of these tips in terms of the corrugation of the STM images acquired when scanning a single graphene sheet. Moreover, we analyse the impact of the tip-sample distance and show that it plays a fundamental role in the resolution and symmetry of the STM images. We also explore in depth how the adsorption of single atoms and molecules in the tip apexes modifies the STM images and demonstrate that, in general, it leads to an improved image resolution. The ensemble of our results provides strong evidence that carbon-based tips can significantly improve the resolution of STM images, as compared to more standard metallic tips, which may open a new line of research in scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  4. Carbon-fiber tips for scanning probe microscopes and molecular electronics experiments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We fabricate and characterize carbon-fiber tips for their use in combined scanning tunneling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is used to yield reproducible sub-100-nm apex. We also study electron transport through single-molecule junctions formed by a single octanethiol molecule bonded by the thiol anchoring group to a gold electrode and linked to a carbon tip by the methyl group. We observe the presence of conductance plateaus during the stretching of the molecular bridge, which is the signature of the formation of a molecular junction. PMID:22587692

  5. Synergistic toughening of composite fibres by self-alignment of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Lee, Bommy; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Lee, Jae Ah; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Gambhir, Sanjeev; Wallace, Gordon G.; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes motivate the development of methods for their use in producing continuous, strong, tough fibres. Previous work has shown that the toughness of the carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer fibres exceeds that of previously known materials. Here we show that further increased toughness results from combining carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide flakes in solution-spun polymer fibres. The gravimetric toughness approaches 1,000 J g−1, far exceeding spider dragline silk (165 J g−1) and Kevlar (78 J g−1). This toughness enhancement is consistent with the observed formation of an interconnected network of partially aligned reduced graphene oxide flakes and carbon nanotubes during solution spinning, which act to deflect cracks and allow energy-consuming polymer deformation. Toughness is sensitive to the volume ratio of the reduced graphene oxide flakes to the carbon nanotubes in the spinning solution and the degree of graphene oxidation. The hybrid fibres were sewable and weavable, and could be shaped into high-modulus helical springs. PMID:22337128

  6. Synergistic toughening of composite fibres by self-alignment of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Lee, Bommy; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Lee, Jae Ah; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Gambhir, Sanjeev; Wallace, Gordon G.; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2012-01-01

    The extraordinary properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes motivate the development of methods for their use in producing continuous, strong, tough fibres. Previous work has shown that the toughness of the carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer fibres exceeds that of previously known materials. Here we show that further increased toughness results from combining carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide flakes in solution-spun polymer fibres. The gravimetric toughness approaches 1,000 J g-1, far exceeding spider dragline silk (165 J g-1) and Kevlar (78 J g-1). This toughness enhancement is consistent with the observed formation of an interconnected network of partially aligned reduced graphene oxide flakes and carbon nanotubes during solution spinning, which act to deflect cracks and allow energy-consuming polymer deformation. Toughness is sensitive to the volume ratio of the reduced graphene oxide flakes to the carbon nanotubes in the spinning solution and the degree of graphene oxidation. The hybrid fibres were sewable and weavable, and could be shaped into high-modulus helical springs.

  7. Synergistic toughening of composite fibres by self-alignment of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Lee, Bommy; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Lee, Jae Ah; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Gambhir, Sanjeev; Wallace, Gordon G; Kozlov, Mikhail E; Baughman, Ray H; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2012-01-31

    The extraordinary properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes motivate the development of methods for their use in producing continuous, strong, tough fibres. Previous work has shown that the toughness of the carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer fibres exceeds that of previously known materials. Here we show that further increased toughness results from combining carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide flakes in solution-spun polymer fibres. The gravimetric toughness approaches 1,000 J g(-1), far exceeding spider dragline silk (165 J g(-1)) and Kevlar (78 J g(-1)). This toughness enhancement is consistent with the observed formation of an interconnected network of partially aligned reduced graphene oxide flakes and carbon nanotubes during solution spinning, which act to deflect cracks and allow energy-consuming polymer deformation. Toughness is sensitive to the volume ratio of the reduced graphene oxide flakes to the carbon nanotubes in the spinning solution and the degree of graphene oxidation. The hybrid fibres were sewable and weavable, and could be shaped into high-modulus helical springs.

  8. The electro-structural behaviour of yarn-like carbon nanotube fibres immersed in organic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Jeronimo; Windle, Alan H.; Elliott, James A.

    2014-10-01

    Yarn-like carbon nanotube (CNT) fibres are a hierarchically-structured material with a variety of promising applications such as high performance composites, sensors and actuators, smart textiles, and energy storage and transmission. However, in order to fully realize these possibilities, a more detailed understanding of their interactions with the environment is required. In this work, we describe a simplified representation of the hierarchical structure of the fibres from which several mathematical models are constructed to explain electro-structural interactions of fibres with organic liquids. A balance between the elastic and surface energies of the CNT bundle network in different media allows the determination of the maximum lengths that open junctions can sustain before collapsing to minimize the surface energy. This characteristic length correlates well with the increase of fibre resistance upon immersion in organic liquids. We also study the effect of charge accumulation in open interbundle junctions and derive expressions to describe experimental data on the non-ohmic electrical behaviour of fibres immersed in polar liquids. Our analyses suggest that the non-ohmic behaviour is caused by progressively shorter junctions collapsing as the voltage is increased. Since our models are not based on any property unique to carbon nanotubes, they should also be useful to describe other hierarchical structures.

  9. The electro-structural behaviour of yarn-like carbon nanotube fibres immersed in organic liquids.

    PubMed

    Terrones, Jeronimo; Windle, Alan H; Elliott, James A

    2014-10-01

    Yarn-like carbon nanotube (CNT) fibres are a hierarchically-structured material with a variety of promising applications such as high performance composites, sensors and actuators, smart textiles, and energy storage and transmission. However, in order to fully realize these possibilities, a more detailed understanding of their interactions with the environment is required. In this work, we describe a simplified representation of the hierarchical structure of the fibres from which several mathematical models are constructed to explain electro-structural interactions of fibres with organic liquids. A balance between the elastic and surface energies of the CNT bundle network in different media allows the determination of the maximum lengths that open junctions can sustain before collapsing to minimize the surface energy. This characteristic length correlates well with the increase of fibre resistance upon immersion in organic liquids. We also study the effect of charge accumulation in open interbundle junctions and derive expressions to describe experimental data on the non-ohmic electrical behaviour of fibres immersed in polar liquids. Our analyses suggest that the non-ohmic behaviour is caused by progressively shorter junctions collapsing as the voltage is increased. Since our models are not based on any property unique to carbon nanotubes, they should also be useful to describe other hierarchical structures.

  10. The electro-structural behaviour of yarn-like carbon nanotube fibres immersed in organic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Terrones, Jeronimo; Windle, Alan H; Elliott, James A

    2014-01-01

    Yarn-like carbon nanotube (CNT) fibres are a hierarchically-structured material with a variety of promising applications such as high performance composites, sensors and actuators, smart textiles, and energy storage and transmission. However, in order to fully realize these possibilities, a more detailed understanding of their interactions with the environment is required. In this work, we describe a simplified representation of the hierarchical structure of the fibres from which several mathematical models are constructed to explain electro-structural interactions of fibres with organic liquids. A balance between the elastic and surface energies of the CNT bundle network in different media allows the determination of the maximum lengths that open junctions can sustain before collapsing to minimize the surface energy. This characteristic length correlates well with the increase of fibre resistance upon immersion in organic liquids. We also study the effect of charge accumulation in open interbundle junctions and derive expressions to describe experimental data on the non-ohmic electrical behaviour of fibres immersed in polar liquids. Our analyses suggest that the non-ohmic behaviour is caused by progressively shorter junctions collapsing as the voltage is increased. Since our models are not based on any property unique to carbon nanotubes, they should also be useful to describe other hierarchical structures. PMID:27877720

  11. Strength and toughness of structural fibres for composite material reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Herráez, M; Fernández, A; Lopes, C S; González, C

    2016-07-13

    The characterization of the strength and fracture toughness of three common structural fibres, E-glass, AS4 carbon and Kevlar KM2, is presented in this work. The notched specimens were prepared by means of selective carving of individual fibres by means of the focused ion beam. A straight-fronted edge notch was introduced in a plane perpendicular to the fibre axis, with the relative notch depth being a0/D≈0.1 and the notch radius at the tip approximately 50 nm. The selection of the appropriate beam current during milling operations was performed to avoid to as much as possible any microstructural changes owing to ion impingement. Both notched and un-notched fibres were submitted to uniaxial tensile tests up to failure. The strength of the un-notched fibres was characterized in terms of the Weibull statistics, whereas the residual strength of the notched fibres was used to determine their apparent toughness. To this end, the stress intensity factor of a fronted edge crack was computed by means of the finite-element method for different crack lengths. The experimental results agreed with those reported in the literature for polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibres obtained by using similar techniques. After mechanical testing, the fracture surface of the fibres was analysed to ascertain the failure mechanisms. It was found that AS4 carbon and E-glass fibres presented the lower toughness with fracture surfaces perpendicular to the fibre axis, emanating from the notch tip. The fractured region of Kevlar KM2 fibres extended along the fibre and showed large permanent deformation, which explains their higher degree of toughness when compared with carbon and glass fibres. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  12. Antenna Patterns from Single Slots in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic Waveguides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    manufactured from carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP), specifically T650/F584 plain weave fabric prepreg . This cross-section is the same as that...sandwich panels Attenuation losses in waveguides manufactured from metal and typical CFRP prepregs (AS4/3501-6 and IM7/5250-4 unidirectional tape, and...CFRP waveguides were manufactured from Hexcel T650/F584 plain weave carbon/epoxy prepreg , with a [45 -45]s stacking sequence, in accordance with the

  13. Imaging of soft material with carbon nanotube tip using near-field scanning microwave microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe; Sun, Wei-qiang; Feng, Tao; Tang, Shawn Wenjie; Li, Gang; Jiang, Kai-li; Xu, Sheng-yong; Ong, Chong Kim

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, a near-field scanning microwave microscope (NSMM) of our own design is introduced while using a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundle as the tip (referred to as 'CNT tip'). Clear images of gold-patterned numbers, photoresist stripes and corneal endothelial cells (cell line B4G12) were obtained by mapping the resonant frequency fr and S11 amplitude of a given area while the NSMM is operating in tapping mode. The CNT tip helps to improve image quality and reveals more information about the sample as compared to a traditional metallic tip. The CNT tip is flexible and does not scratch the surface of the sample during the scan, which is useful for imaging soft material in biological science. In the imaging of the B4G12 endothelial cells, the nuclei and cytoplasm can be clearly distinguished from the rest of the cell and its surrounding medium.

  14. Electrochemical characteristics of a carbon fibre composite and the associated galvanic effects with aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Curioni, M.; Jamshidi, P.; Walker, A.; Prengnell, P.; Thompson, G. E.; Skeldon, P.

    2014-09-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of a carbon fibre reinforced epoxy matrix composite in 3.5% NaCl and 3.5% NaCl + 0.5 M CuSO4 electrolytes was examined by potentiodynamic polarisation, potentiostatic polarisation and scanning electron microscopy. Exposed carbon fibres on two defined regions (“front” and “side”) are a focus of the investigation. The large size of the exposed carbon fibres on the side region is responsible for a higher cathodic current density than the front region in the NaCl electrolyte. The deposition of copper on the front surface of composite confirmed that the significantly higher cathodic current resulted from the exposure of the fibres to the NaCl electrolyte. Galvanic coupling between the composite and individual aluminium alloys (AA7075-T6 and AA1050) was used to measure galvanic potentials and galvanic current densities. The highly alloyed AA7075-T6 alloy and its high population density of cathodic sites compared to the AA1050 acted to reduce the galvanic effect when coupled to the composite front or side regions.

  15. Behavior of Catalyst Particle at Tip of Carbon Nanotube during Field Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Tadashi; Okai, Makoto; Hidaka, Kishio; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    A catalyst particle at the tip of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) during field emission inside a transmission electron microscope was observed in-situ. The particle streamed from the tip like a liquid as the emission current abruptly increased from 20 to 40 µA. This was due to the temperature rise at the tip of the MWNT, resulting from the increased emission current and dipole moment in the particle caused by the electric field. Maintenance of this high emission current led to an electrical discharge, which severely damaged the MWNT electron emitter. Under high emission currents, in particular, the catalyst particle caused an unstable emission.

  16. Nanoscale Etching and Indentation of Silicon(001) Surface with Carbon Nanotube Tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzegilenko, Fendor N.; Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash

    1998-01-01

    The possibility of nanoscale etching and indentation of Si(001)(2x1) surface by (8,0) and (10,10) carbon nanotube tips is demonstrated, for the first time, by classical molecular dynamics simulations employing Tersoff's many-body potential for a mixed C/Si/Ge system. In the nanotube tip barely touching the surface scenario atomistic etching is observed, where as in the nanoindentation scenario nanotube tip penetrates the surface without much hindrance. The results are explained in terms of the relative strength of C-C, C-Si, and Si-Si bonds.

  17. Fluoro-edenite and carbon nanotubes: The health impact of ‘asbestos-like’ fibres

    PubMed Central

    MIOZZI, EDOARDO; RAPISARDA, VENERANDO; MARCONI, ANDREA; COSTA, CHIARA; POLITO, IRENE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; LIBRA, MASSIMO; FENGA, CONCETTINA

    2016-01-01

    Several decades have passed since Wagner et al demonstrated a causal link between asbestos fibre inhalation and the development of pleural mesothelioma in 1960. It was later suggested that pleural plaques are a benign consequence of exposure to these fibres. Most recently, a significant association between exposure to asbestos and cancer diagnosed at various sites, such as the peritoneum, stomach, pharynx, colon and ovaries has been demonstrated. The great concerns about public health that arose from the scientific evidence presented above have led to the banning of asbestos in several countries. Over the years, the suspicion that particles with a high aspect ratio may have asbestos-like pathogenicity has been supported by increasing evidence. Natural occurring minerals, as well as man-made fibres, have proven capable of inducing either chronic inflammation of serous membranes, or, in some cases, the development of peritoneal and pleural mesothelioma. The pathogenic role of both fluoro-edenite and carbon nanotubes, two ‘asbestos-like’ fibres is summarized and discussed in this review. The data presented herein support the notion that occupational exposure to these two types of fibre contributes to the development of different types of cancer. PMID:26889212

  18. Ultrasound detection of damage in complex carbon fibre/metal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thursby, G. J.; MacLean, A.; Hogg, H.; Culshaw, B.

    2006-03-01

    We describe work carried out to monitor the structural health of a complex structure comprising both carbon fibre and metal components using ultrasound techniques. The work is designed to be used in a high performance car, but could find applications in other areas such as the aerospace industry. There are two different types of potential problem that need to be examined; the first is damage (e.g. holes, delaminations) to carbon fibre structure, and the second is damage to joints either between two carbon fibre components or between a carbon fibre component and a metallic one. The techniques used are based around the use of PZT transducers for both the generation and detection of ultrasonic Lamb waves. To date we have been carrying out experiments on mock-up samples, but are due to conduct tests on an actual vehicle. Lamb waves propagate in modes whose order is determined by the frequency thickness product. Their properties, such as phase and amplitude can be modified by the presence of damage, such as holes and delaminations. If we record the response of a healthy structure, we can then compare it with signals obtained on subsequent occasions to determine if any significant change has taken place. It is essential, however, to be able to differentiate between the effects of damage and those of environmental changes such as temperature. For this reason we have monitored the response of a sample at different temperatures both before and after drilling a hole in it to simulate damage. Depending on the positions of the transducers with respect to the damaged area, it is possible to detect either attenuation of the entire signal or changes in a specific portion of the signal produced by reflections. Results from these experiments will be presented at the conference. Signal processing techniques for separating damage from the effects of temperature will also be discussed. We also look at the deterioration of joints, which can either be epoxy bonded (carbon fibre to

  19. High-temperature tensile cell for in situ real-time investigation of carbon fibre carbonization and graphitization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Behr, Michael; Rix, James; Landes, Brian; Barton, Bryan; Billovits, Gerry; Hukkanen, Eric; Patton, Jasson; Wang, Weijun; Keane, Denis; Weigand, Steven

    2016-10-17

    A new high-temperature fibre tensile cell is described, developed for use at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory to enable the investigation of the carbonization and graphitization processes during carbon fibre production. This cell is used to heat precursor fibre bundles to temperatures up to ~2300°C in a controlled inert atmosphere, while applying tensile stress to facilitate formation of highly oriented graphitic microstructure; evolution of the microstructure as a function of temperature and time during the carbonization and higher-temperature graphitization processes can then be monitored by collecting real-time wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns. As an example, the carbonization and graphitization behaviour of an oxidized polyacrylonitrile fibre was studied up to a temperature of ~1750°C. Real-time WAXD revealed the gradual increase in microstructure alignment with the fibre axis with increasing temperature over the temperature range 600–1100°C. Above 1100°C, no further changes in orientation were observed. The overall magnitude of change increased with increasing applied tensile stress during carbonization. As a second example, the high-temperature graphitizability of PAN- and pitch-derived commercial carbon fibres was studied. Here, the magnitude of graphitic microstructure evolution of the pitch-derived fibre far exceeded that of the PAN-derived fibres at temperatures up to ~2300°C, indicating its facile graphitizability.

  20. Ultra-pure single wall carbon nanotube fibres continuously spun without promoter.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Catharina; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2014-02-04

    We report a new strategy towards the control of carbon nanotube (CNT) structure and continuous fibre formation using a floating catalyst direct spinning CVD process. In the procedures used to date, a sulphur promoter precursor is added to significantly enhance the rate of CNT formation in the floating catalyst synthesis. Within the reaction zone, the rapidly grown nanotubes self-assemble into bundles, followed by their continuous spinning into fibres, yarns, films or tapes. In this paper we demonstrate a catalyst control strategy in the floating catalyst system, where the CNT formation process is independent of the presence of a promoter but leads to successful spinning of the macroscopic carbon nanotube assemblies with specific morphology, high purity (Raman D/G 0.03) and very narrow diameter range (0.8-2.5 nm). This can be achieved by the control of catalyst precursor decomposition and subsequent formation of homogeneous nano-sized catalyst particles.

  1. Ultra-pure single wall carbon nanotube fibres continuously spun without promoter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukner, Catharina; Koziol, Krzysztof K. K.

    2014-02-01

    We report a new strategy towards the control of carbon nanotube (CNT) structure and continuous fibre formation using a floating catalyst direct spinning CVD process. In the procedures used to date, a sulphur promoter precursor is added to significantly enhance the rate of CNT formation in the floating catalyst synthesis. Within the reaction zone, the rapidly grown nanotubes self-assemble into bundles, followed by their continuous spinning into fibres, yarns, films or tapes. In this paper we demonstrate a catalyst control strategy in the floating catalyst system, where the CNT formation process is independent of the presence of a promoter but leads to successful spinning of the macroscopic carbon nanotube assemblies with specific morphology, high purity (Raman D/G 0.03) and very narrow diameter range (0.8-2.5 nm). This can be achieved by the control of catalyst precursor decomposition and subsequent formation of homogeneous nano-sized catalyst particles.

  2. Ultra-pure single wall carbon nanotube fibres continuously spun without promoter

    PubMed Central

    Paukner, Catharina; Koziol, Krzysztof K. K.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new strategy towards the control of carbon nanotube (CNT) structure and continuous fibre formation using a floating catalyst direct spinning CVD process. In the procedures used to date, a sulphur promoter precursor is added to significantly enhance the rate of CNT formation in the floating catalyst synthesis. Within the reaction zone, the rapidly grown nanotubes self-assemble into bundles, followed by their continuous spinning into fibres, yarns, films or tapes. In this paper we demonstrate a catalyst control strategy in the floating catalyst system, where the CNT formation process is independent of the presence of a promoter but leads to successful spinning of the macroscopic carbon nanotube assemblies with specific morphology, high purity (Raman D/G 0.03) and very narrow diameter range (0.8–2.5 nm). This can be achieved by the control of catalyst precursor decomposition and subsequent formation of homogeneous nano-sized catalyst particles. PMID:24492677

  3. Computational local stiffness analysis of biological cell: High aspect ratio single wall carbon nanotube tip.

    PubMed

    TermehYousefi, Amin; Bagheri, Samira; Shahnazar, Sheida; Rahman, Md Habibur; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nanoscale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cells. The proposed software was ABAQUS 6.13 CAE/CEL provided by Dassault Systems, which is a powerful finite element (FE) tool to perform the numerical analysis and visualize the interactions between proposed tip and membrane of the cell. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic model of the cell allows the simulation to obtain a new method for estimating the stiffness and spring constant of the cell. Stress and strain curve indicates the yield stress point which defines as a vertical stress and plan stress. Spring constant of the cell and the local stiffness was measured as well as the applied force of CNT-AFM tip on the contact area of the cell. This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis.

  4. Analysis of mechanical properties anisotropy of nanomodified carbon fibre-reinforced woven composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruslantsev, A. N.; Portnova, Ya M.; Tairova, L. P.; Dumansky, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    The polymer binder cracking problem arises while designing and maintaining polymer composite-based aircraft load-bearing members. Some technological methods are used to solve this problem. In particular the injection of nanoagents can block the initiation and growth of microscopic cracks. Crack propagation can also be blocked if the strain energy release is not related with fracturing. One of the possible ways for such energy release is creep. Testing of the anisotropy of the woven carbon fibre reinforced plastic elastic characteristics and creep have been conducted. The samples with different layouts have been made of woven carbon fibre laminate BMI-3/3692 with nanomodified bismaleimide matrix. This matrix has a higher glass transition temperature and improved mechanical properties. The deformation regularities have been analyzed, layer elastic characteristics have been determined. The constitutive equations describing composite material creep have been obtained and its parameters have been defined. Experimental and calculated creep curves have been plotted. It was found that the effects of rheology arise as the direction of load does not match the direction of reinforcing fibres of the material.

  5. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  6. The use of rivets for electrical resistance measurement on carbon fibre-reinforced thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBaere, I.; Van Paepegem, W.; Degrieck, J.

    2007-10-01

    The use of fibre-reinforced thermoplastics, for example in the aeronautical industry, is increasing rapidly. Therefore, there is an increasing need for in situ monitoring tools, which preferably have limited influence on the behaviour of the material and which are easy to use. Furthermore, in the aeronautical industry composites are very often attached with rivets. In this study, the possibility of the use of rivets as contact electrodes for electrical resistance measurement is explored. The material used is a carbon fibre-reinforced polyphenylene sulphide. First, the set-up used is discussed. Then, static tensile tests on the laminate are performed. The possible influence of an extensometer on the measurements is examined. Furthermore, failure predictability is assessed. It may be concluded that the proposed set-up with the rivets can be used for electrical resistance measurement, with the ability to predict failure, and that the extensometer has a negative influence on the resistance measurement.

  7. Recycling carbon fibre reinforced polymers for structural applications: technology review and market outlook.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Soraia; Pinho, Silvestre T

    2011-02-01

    Both environmental and economic factors have driven the development of recycling routes for the increasing amount of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) waste generated. This paper presents a review of the current status and outlook of CFRP recycling operations, focusing on state-of-the-art fibre reclamation and re-manufacturing processes, and on the commercialisation and potential applications of recycled products. It is shown that several recycling and re-manufacturing processes are reaching a mature stage, with implementations at commercial scales in operation, production of recycled CFRPs having competitive structural performances, and demonstrator components having been manufactured. The major challenges for the sound establishment of a CFRP recycling industry and the development of markets for the recyclates are summarised; the potential for introducing recycled CFRPs in structural components is discussed, and likely promising applications are investigated.

  8. Optimal ferromagnetically-coated carbon nanotube tips for ultra-high resolution magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lisunova, Y; Heidler, J; Levkivskyi, I; Gaponenko, I; Weber, A; Caillier, Ch; Heyderman, L J; Kläui, M; Paruch, P

    2013-03-15

    Using single-walled carbon nanotubes homogeneously coated with ferromagnetic metal as ultra-high resolution magnetic force microscopy probes, we investigate the key image formation parameters and their dependence on coating thickness. The crucial step of introducing molecular beam epitaxy for deposition of the magnetic coating allows highly controlled fabrication of tips with small magnetic volume, while retaining high magnetic anisotropy and prolonged lifetime characteristics. Calculating the interaction between the tips and a magnetic sample, including hitherto neglected thermal noise effects, we show that optimal imaging is achieved for a finite, intermediate-thickness magnetic coating, in excellent agreement with experimental observations. With such optimal tips, we demonstrate outstanding resolution, revealing sub-10 nm domains in hard magnetic samples, and non-perturbative imaging of nanoscale spin structures in soft magnetic materials, all at ambient conditions with no special vacuum, temperature or humidity controls.

  9. In-situ monitoring of carbon dioxide emissions from a diesel engine using a mid-infrared optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Elfed; Clifford, John; Fitzpatrick, Colin; Dooly, Gerard; Zhao, Weizhong; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Ken; Lucas, James; Degner, Martin; Ewald, Hartmut; Lochmann, Steffan; Bramann, Gero; Merlone-Borla, Edoardo; Gili, Flavio

    2011-05-01

    A robust optical fibre based CO2 exhaust gas sensor operating in the mid infrared spectral range is described. It is capable of detecting on board carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from both diesel and petrol engines. The optical fibre sensor is not cross sensitive to other gaseous species in the exhaust such as water vapour (H2O), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) or oxides of sulphur (SOx).The response of the sensor to carbon dioxide present in the exhaust of Fiat Croma diesel engine are presented.

  10. Low Velocity Impacts of Variable Tip Radius on Carbon/Epoxy Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, Mac P.

    With a growing use of composite materials in aircraft structures, there is a greater need to understand the response of these materials to low velocity impacts. Low velocity impacts from tool drops or ground equipment collisions can be of varying bluntness and can leave little or no visible evidence of damage. Therefore, a need exists to investigate the initiation of internal damage and the relationship between this internal damage and the external visible damage with respect to the bluntness of the impactor. A pendulum impactor was used to impact 76.2 x 127 mm carbon/epoxy panels that were 8, 16, and 24 plies thick. The panels were impacted by hardened steel tips with radii of 12.7 to 76.2 mm. The experimental results show that the failure threshold energies for each panel thickness and tip radius combination occur at a distinct and consistent energy. This threshold increases with impactor bluntness, and this effect is greater for the 8 ply panel than it is for the 16 or 24 ply panels. To describe the visibility of impact damage, the area of delamination was compared to the depth of the dents resulting from the impacts. For the sharper impact tips, there is a clear relationship between the delamination area and the depth of the dents. However, these relationships are dependent on the radius of the impact tip, and for the blunter impact tips no strong correlation could be determined between the delamination area and the depth of the dents.

  11. Mapping local microstructure and mechanical performance around carbon nanotube grafted silica fibres: methodologies for hierarchical composites.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hui; Kalinka, Gerhard; Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G; Greenhalgh, Emile S; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modifies bulk polymer properties, depending on intrinsic quality, dispersion, alignment, interfacial chemistry and mechanical properties of the nanofiller. These effects can be exploited to enhance the matrices of conventional microscale fibre-reinforced polymer composites, by using primary reinforcing fibres grafted with CNTs. This paper presents a methodology that combines atomic force microscopy, polarised Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques, to study the distribution, alignment and orientation of CNTs in the vicinity of epoxy-embedded micrometre-scale silica fibres, as well as, the resulting local mechanical properties of the matrix. Raman maps of key features in the CNT spectra clearly show the CNT distribution and orientation, including a 'parted' morphology associated with long grafted CNTs. The hardness and indentation modulus of the epoxy matrix were improved locally by 28% and 24%, respectively, due to the reinforcing effects of CNTs. Moreover, a slower stress relaxation was observed in the epoxy region containing CNTs, which may be due to restricted molecular mobility of the matrix. The proposed methodology is likely to be relevant to further studies of nanocomposites and hierarchical composites.

  12. A Lamb waves based statistical approach to structural health monitoring of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Michele; Gianneo, Andrea; Giglio, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This research investigates a Lamb-wave based structural health monitoring approach matching an out-of-phase actuation of a pair of piezoceramic transducers at low frequency. The target is a typical quasi-isotropic carbon fibre reinforced polymer aeronautical laminate subjected to artificial, via Teflon patches, and natural, via suitable low velocity drop weight impact tests, delaminations. The performance and main influencing factors of such an approach are studied through a Design of Experiment statistical method, considering both Pulse Echo and Pitch Catch configurations of PZT sensors. Results show that some factors and their interactions can effectively influence the detection of a delamination-like damage.

  13. CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE MATERIALS PRODUCED BY GAMMA RADIATION INDUCED CURING OF EPOXY RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Dispenza, C.; Spadaro, G.; Alessi, S.

    2008-08-28

    It is well known that ionizing radiation can initiate polymerization of suitable monomers for many applications. In this work an epoxy difunctional monomer has been used as matrix of a carbon fibre composite in order to produce materials through gamma radiation, for aerospace and advanced automotive applications. Radiation curing has been performed at different absorbed doses and, as comparison, also thermal curing of the same monomer formulations has been done. Furthermore some irradiated samples have been also subjected to a post irradiation thermal curing in order to complete the polymerization reactions. The properties of the cured materials have been studied by moisture absorption isotherms, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and mechanical flexural tests.

  14. Focus Ion Beam Fabrication of Individual Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Guangyu; Byahut, Sitaram; Chow, Lee

    2003-11-01

    Individual CNTs are excellent candidates as electron sources for electron microscopes. Comparing to conventional electron sources, CNTs have the following advantages: (1) unique geometry, (2) highly coherent electron beams, and (3) stability. In our laboratory, carbon fibers with a nanotube core have been synthesized with a conventional chemical vapor deposition method. The whole assembly of nanotube/fiber is similar to a coaxial cable with CNT sticking out from one end of the carbon fiber. In order to pick up individual CNT field emitters, focus ion beam (FIB) technique is applied for cutting and adhering the samples. The carbon fiber with nanotube tip was first welded onto a micro-manipulator. Afterwards, by applying the FIB milling function, the fiber was cut from the base. This enables us to handle the individual CNT tips conveniently. By the same method, we can attach the nanotube tip on a sharpened clean tungsten wire for field emission experiment. FIB is proven to be appropriate and powerful for the nano-fabrication.

  15. Combining electrospinning and sputtering to improve rechargeable lithium battery cathodes: coating carbon fibre felt with nickel sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Kyu; Ryu, Ho Suk; Ahn, Chi Won; Jeon, Hwan-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Various nickel sulfide nanostructures have been developed for the fabrication of high surface area electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries. In this study, we fabricated a nickel sulfide covered carbon fibre felt with high uniformity, high density, and large area for cathode materials for use in rechargeable lithium batteries, by using a combined electrospinning and sputtering deposition technique. In particular, the nickel sulfide/carbon fibre felt is a multi-functional material that can act as a conducting electrode itself without the use of binders and conductive materials owing to the high conductivity of the interlinked carbon fibre structures. A Li/nickel sulfide cell with current density of 100 mA g-1 exhibits good cycle performance and high first discharge capacity (970.46 mAh g-1) and good coulombic efficiency of 99% at 20 cycles. This electrode has good structural and electrochemical properties and has a potential to be commercialized when the properties are matured.

  16. Scalable synthesis of hierarchically structured carbon nanotube-graphene fibres for capacitive energy storage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dingshan; Goh, Kunli; Wang, Hong; Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Zhang, Qiang; Dai, Liming; Chen, Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Micro-supercapacitors are promising energy storage devices that can complement or even replace batteries in miniaturized portable electronics and microelectromechanical systems. Their main limitation, however, is the low volumetric energy density when compared with batteries. Here, we describe a hierarchically structured carbon microfibre made of an interconnected network of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with interposed nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide sheets. The nanomaterials form mesoporous structures of large specific surface area (396 m(2) g(-1)) and high electrical conductivity (102 S cm(-1)). We develop a scalable method to continuously produce the fibres using a silica capillary column functioning as a hydrothermal microreactor. The resultant fibres show a specific volumetric capacity as high as 305 F cm(-3) in sulphuric acid (measured at 73.5 mA cm(-3) in a three-electrode cell) or 300 F cm(-3) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/H(3)PO(4) electrolyte (measured at 26.7 mA cm(-3) in a two-electrode cell). A full micro-supercapacitor with PVA/H(3)PO(4) gel electrolyte, free from binder, current collector and separator, has a volumetric energy density of ∼6.3 mWh cm(-3) (a value comparable to that of 4 V-500 µAh thin-film lithium batteries) while maintaining a power density more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of batteries, as well as a long cycle life. To demonstrate that our fibre-based, all-solid-state micro-supercapacitors can be easily integrated into miniaturized flexible devices, we use them to power an ultraviolet photodetector and a light-emitting diode.

  17. Scalable synthesis of hierarchically structured carbon nanotube-graphene fibres for capacitive energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dingshan; Goh, Kunli; Wang, Hong; Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Zhang, Qiang; Dai, Liming; Chen, Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Micro-supercapacitors are promising energy storage devices that can complement or even replace batteries in miniaturized portable electronics and microelectromechanical systems. Their main limitation, however, is the low volumetric energy density when compared with batteries. Here, we describe a hierarchically structured carbon microfibre made of an interconnected network of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with interposed nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide sheets. The nanomaterials form mesoporous structures of large specific surface area (396 m2 g-1) and high electrical conductivity (102 S cm-1). We develop a scalable method to continuously produce the fibres using a silica capillary column functioning as a hydrothermal microreactor. The resultant fibres show a specific volumetric capacity as high as 305 F cm-3 in sulphuric acid (measured at 73.5 mA cm-3 in a three-electrode cell) or 300 F cm-3 in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/H3PO4 electrolyte (measured at 26.7 mA cm-3 in a two-electrode cell). A full micro-supercapacitor with PVA/H3PO4 gel electrolyte, free from binder, current collector and separator, has a volumetric energy density of ~6.3 mWh cm-3 (a value comparable to that of 4 V-500 µAh thin-film lithium batteries) while maintaining a power density more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of batteries, as well as a long cycle life. To demonstrate that our fibre-based, all-solid-state micro-supercapacitors can be easily integrated into miniaturized flexible devices, we use them to power an ultraviolet photodetector and a light-emitting diode.

  18. Sugar-Starvation-Induced Changes of Carbon Metabolism in Excised Maize Root Tips.

    PubMed Central

    Dieuaide-Noubhani, M.; Canioni, P.; Raymond, P.

    1997-01-01

    Excised maize (Zea mays L.) root tips were used to study the early metabolic effects of glucose (Glc) starvation. Root tips were prelabeled with [1-13C]Glc so that carbohydrates and metabolic intermediates were close to steady-state labeling, but lipids and proteins were scarcely labeled. They were then incubated in a sugar-deprived medium for carbon starvation. Changes in the level of soluble sugars, the respiratory quotient, and the 13C enrichment of intermediates, as measured by 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, were studied to detect changes in carbon fluxes through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Labeling of glutamate carbons revealed two major changes in carbon input into the tricarboxylic acid cycle: (a) the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase flux stopped early after the start of Glc starvation, and (b) the contribution of glycolysis as the source of acetyl-coenzyme A for respiration decreased progressively, indicating an increasing contribution of the catabolism of protein amino acids, fatty acids, or both. The enrichment of glutamate carbons gave no evidence for proteolysis in the early steps of starvation, indicating that the catabolism of proteins was delayed compared with that of fatty acids. Labeling of carbohydrates showed that sucrose turnover continues during sugar starvation, but gave no indication for any significant flux through gluconeogenesis. PMID:12223877

  19. Analytical solutions to the free vibration of a double-walled carbon nanotube carrying a bacterium at its tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, Joel A.; Elishakoff, Isaac

    2013-11-01

    We calculate the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a cantilevered double-walled carbon nanotube carrying a rigid body—representative of a bacterium or virus—at the tip of the outer nanotube. By idealizing the nanotubes as Bernoulli-Euler beams, we are able to obtain exact expressions for both the mode shapes and characteristic frequency equation. Separate analyses are performed for the special case of a concentrated tip mass and the more complicated situation where the tip body also exhibits inertia and mass center offset from the beam tip.

  20. ZnO thin films on single carbon fibres fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, André; Engel, Sebastian; Sangiorgi, Nicola; Sanson, Alessandra; Bartolomé, Jose F.; Gräf, Stephan; Müller, Frank A.

    2017-03-01

    Single carbon fibres were 360° coated with zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films by pulsed laser deposition using a Q-switched CO2 laser with a pulse duration τ ≈ 300 ns, a wavelength λ = 10.59 μm, a repetition frequency frep = 800 Hz and a peak power Ppeak = 15 kW in combination with a 3-step-deposition technique. In a first set of experiments, the deposition process was optimised by investigating the crystallinity of ZnO films on silicon and polished stainless steel substrates. Here, the influence of the substrate temperature and of the oxygen partial pressure of the background gas were characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. ZnO coated carbon fibres and conductive glass sheets were used to prepare photo anodes for dye-sensitised solar cells in order to investigate their suitability for energy conversion devices. To obtain a deeper insight of the electronic behaviour at the interface between ZnO and substrate I-V measurements were performed.

  1. Microstructural Characterization of Nanocrystalline Sn-Coated Carbon Fibre Electrodes Cycled in Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sandeep; Shafiei, Mehdi; Alpas, Ahmet T.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms of electrochemical capacity retention and eventual degradation in composite anodes prepared by electrodepositing nanocrystalline Sn coating on carbon fibres (CF), Sn-CF, were studied using in situ optical microscopy, high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Specific capacity changes of Sn-CF anodes ( vs Li/Li+) were observed to take place in three stages: during the first two galvanostatic cycles, a rapid capacity decrease (from 1045 to 930 mAh g-1) occurred, which was followed by a steady-state stage where the capacity remained constant at 922 ± 22 mAh g-1. The fast capacity drop of Sn-CF in the first cycle was attributed to the partial decohesion of Sn from CFs although the carbon substrate remained unaffected due to formation of a layer from the solid electrolyte reduction products. The pure Sn electrode with a higher initial specific capacity than the Sn-CF displayed a rapid decrease in the same range, whereas the specific capacity of the uncoated CF was already much lower as the fibres were severely damaged in the first cycle.

  2. Modeling of Electronic Transport in Scanning Tunneling Microscope Tip-Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in a recent experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube. We claim that there are two mechanical contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube (semiconductor) junction (1) with or (2) without a tiny vacuum gap (0.1 - 0.2 nm). With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube; the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in I does not equal 0 only with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, and the bias polarities would be reversed for a p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type.

  3. Effect of TiN nano-coating on the interface microstructure of carbon fibres-AZ91 alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszówka-Myalska, A.; Botor-Probierz, A.

    2012-03-01

    Magnesium matrix composites reinforced with carbon fibres, Cf, without surface modification and coated with TiN nanolayer, (Cf)TiN, were investigated. AZ91 magnesium alloy and carbon fibres of T300B (Toray) PAN type were chosen as components. In the experiment infiltration in vacuum as a method of component consolidation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) for carbon fibres surface modification were applied. Structural investigations were performed in the Hitachi 3200S field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and on a FEI Tecnai G2 FEG high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detectors. SEM observations revealed that at the interface of AZ91-Cf composite destructive phases were formed. An application of TiN nano-coating as a surface modification ensured proper wettability of carbon fibres by liquid metal and protection against the destructive products formation. The microstructure of AZ91-(Cf)TiN composite interface was multilayered. TEM investigation revealed a continuous layer of mixed alumina and magnesia just at the carbon surface, followed by a layer with a dominant concentration of titanium, enriched with Al, O, Mg and C and subsequently a layer of nano-sized Al12Mg17 crystals in the magnesium matrix. Therefore, an applied TiN nano-coating can be classified as an active barrier in AZ91-Cf system.

  4. CRACK TIP OPENING DISPLACEMENT AND ANGLE FOR A GROWING CRACK IN CARBON STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    LAM, POH-SANG

    2005-01-18

    The crack tip opening displacements and angles (CTOD/CTOA) are calculated with finite element method based on the test data of a set of constraint-dependent J-R curves for A285 carbon steel. The values of the CTOD/CTOA are initially high at initiation, but rapidly decrease to a nearly constant value. When the common practice is adopted by using only the constant part of CTOD/CTOA as the fracture criterion, the crack growth behavior is shown to be severely underestimated. However, with a bilinear form of CTOD/CTOA fracture criterion which approximates the initial non-constant portion, the experimental load vs. crack extension curves can be closely predicted. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the CTOD/CTOA is crack tip constraint dependent. The values of CTOD/CTOA for specimens with various ratios of crack length to specimen width (a/W) are reflected by the J-R curves and their slopes.

  5. In-vitro MRI detectability of interbody test spacers made of carbon fibre-reinforced polymers, titanium and titanium-coated carbon fibre-reinforced polymers.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Thorsten; Buchhorn, Gottfried; Baums, Mike Herbert; Heidrich, Gabert

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how different materials affect the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detectability of interbody test spacers (ITS). We evaluated the post-implantation MRI scans with T1 TSE sequences for three different ITS made of titanium, carbon fibre-reinforced polymers (CFRP) and titanium-coated CFRP, respectively. The main target variables were total artefact volume (TAV) and median artefact area (MAA). Additionally, implant volume (IV)/TAV and cross section (CS)/MAA ratio were determined. The t test and Newman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons were used for statistical analysis. TAV and MAA did not differ significantly between CFRP and titanium-coated CFRP, but were approximately twice as high for the titanium ITS (p < 0.001). MRI detectability was optimum for CFRP and titanium-coated CFRP, but was limited at the implant-bone interface of the titanium ITS. The material's susceptibility and the implant's dimensions affected MRI artefacting. Based on TAV, the volume of titanium surface coating in the ITS studied has no influence on susceptibility in MRI scans with T1 TSE sequences.

  6. Spinning of carbon nanotube fibres using the floating catalyst high temperature route: purity issues and the critical role of sulphur.

    PubMed

    Gspann, T S; Smail, F R; Windle, A H

    2014-01-01

    The CVD process for the spinning of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibres combines the nucleation, growth and aggregation of CNTs in the form of an aerogel with fibre spinning into a single process step. The optimisation of the process requires agility in multi-dimensional parameter space, so one tends to find parameter 'islands' where spinning is possible, while exploration tends to follow 'routes' through this space. Here, we follow two such routes, one of which drastically improves fibre purity, the other changes the nature of the nanotubes comprising the fibres from multiwall to single wall. In the first case there is only a modest enhancement of the mechanical properties, but in the second a very considerable improvement is seen. In terms of the conditions required to make fibres comprising predominately single wall CNTs, the key factor appears to be the rigorous control of the sulphur addition, in trace quantities, coupled with the availability of carbon atoms at the earliest stage after injection, typically in the range 400-500 °C. A model is presented for the role of sulphur in floating catalysts CNT synthesis.

  7. Tip cooling effect and failure mechanism of field-emitting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Liu, Yang; Wei, Yang; Jiang, Kaili; Peng, Lian-Mao; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-01-01

    The cooling effect accompanying field electron emission has been considered for a single carbon nanotube (CNT) used as a field emission (FE) electron source. An improved model for the failure mechanism of field emitting CNTs has been proposed and validated. Our model predicts a maximum temperature (T-max) located at an interior point rather than the tip of the CNTs, and the failure of the CNT emitters tends to take place at the T-max point, inducing a segment by segment breakdown process. A combination of Joule heating and electrostatic force effect is proposed responsible for initiating the failure of the field emitting CNT and validated by in situ FE observation.

  8. Effect of High Velocity Ballistic Impact on Pretensioned Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar KAMARUDIN, Kamarul; HAMID, Iskandar ABDUL

    2017-01-01

    This work describes an experimental investigation of the pretensioned thin plates made of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) struck by hemispherical and blunt projectiles at various impact velocities. The experiments were done using a gas gun with combination of pretension equipment positioned at the end of gun barrel near the nozzle. Measurements of the initial and residual velocities were taken, and the ballistic limit velocity were calculated for each procedures. The pretension target results in reduction of ballistic limit compared to non-pretension target for both flat and hemispherical projectiles. Target impacted by hemispherical projectile experience split at earlier impact velocity compared to target by flat projectile. C-Scan images analysis technique was used to show target impact damaged by hemispherical and flat projectiles. The damage area was shown biggest at ballistic limit velocity and target splitting occurred most for pretention plate.

  9. High-power picosecond laser drilling/machining of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, A.; Li, L.; Mativenga, P.; Sabli, A.

    2016-02-01

    The large differences in physical and thermal properties of the carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite constituents make laser machining of this material challenging. An extended heat-affected zone (HAZ) often occurs. The availability of ultrashort laser pulse sources such as picosecond lasers makes it possible to improve the laser machining quality of these materials. This paper reports an investigation on the drilling and machining of CFRP composites using a state-of-the-art 400 W picosecond laser system. Small HAZs (<25 µm) were obtained on the entry side of 6-mm-diameter hole drilled on sample of 6 mm thickness, whereas no HAZ was seen below the top surface on the cut surfaces. Multiple ring material removal strategy was used. Furthermore, the effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, scanning speed and repetition rate on HAZ sizes and ablation depth was investigated.

  10. Repeated self-healing of microvascular carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Wass, D. F.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2014-11-01

    A self-healing, high performance, carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite is demonstrated by embedding a Lewis-acid catalytic curing agent within a laminate, manufactured using out of autoclave (OOA) composite manufacturing methods. Two configurations of healing agent delivery, pre-mixed and autonomous mixing, are investigated via injection of a healing agent through bio-inspired microvascular channels exposed on Mode I fractured crack planes. Healing is effected when an epoxy resin-solvent healing agent mixture reaches the boundary of embedded solid-state scandium(III) triflate (Sc(OTf)3) catalyst, located on the crack plane, to initiate the ring-opening polymerisation (ROP) of epoxides. Tailored self-healing agents confer high healing efficiency values after multiple healing cycles (69-108%) to successfully mitigate against crack propagation within the composite microstructure.

  11. Multiply fully recyclable carbon fibre reinforced heat-resistant covalent thermosetting advanced composites

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanchao; Sun, Yanxiao; Yan, Shijing; Zhao, Jianqing; Liu, Shumei; Zhang, Mingqiu; Zheng, Xiaoxing; Jia, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Nondestructive retrieval of expensive carbon fibres (CFs) from CF-reinforced thermosetting advanced composites widely applied in high-tech fields has remained inaccessible as the harsh conditions required to recycle high-performance resin matrices unavoidably damage the structure and properties of CFs. Degradable thermosetting resins with stable covalent structures offer a potential solution to this conflict. Here we design a new synthesis scheme and prepare a recyclable CF-reinforced poly(hexahydrotriazine) resin matrix advanced composite. The multiple recycling experiments and characterization data establish that this composite demonstrates performance comparable to those of its commercial counterparts, and more importantly, it realizes multiple intact recoveries of CFs and near-total recycling of the principal raw materials through gentle depolymerization in certain dilute acid solution. To our best knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time a feasible and environment-friendly preparation-recycle-regeneration strategy for multiple CF-recycling from CF-reinforced advanced composites. PMID:28251985

  12. Multiply fully recyclable carbon fibre reinforced heat-resistant covalent thermosetting advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yanchao; Sun, Yanxiao; Yan, Shijing; Zhao, Jianqing; Liu, Shumei; Zhang, Mingqiu; Zheng, Xiaoxing; Jia, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Nondestructive retrieval of expensive carbon fibres (CFs) from CF-reinforced thermosetting advanced composites widely applied in high-tech fields has remained inaccessible as the harsh conditions required to recycle high-performance resin matrices unavoidably damage the structure and properties of CFs. Degradable thermosetting resins with stable covalent structures offer a potential solution to this conflict. Here we design a new synthesis scheme and prepare a recyclable CF-reinforced poly(hexahydrotriazine) resin matrix advanced composite. The multiple recycling experiments and characterization data establish that this composite demonstrates performance comparable to those of its commercial counterparts, and more importantly, it realizes multiple intact recoveries of CFs and near-total recycling of the principal raw materials through gentle depolymerization in certain dilute acid solution. To our best knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time a feasible and environment-friendly preparation-recycle-regeneration strategy for multiple CF-recycling from CF-reinforced advanced composites.

  13. Milling damage on Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer using TiAlN coated End mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konneh, Mohamed; Izman, Sudin; Rahman Kassim, Abdullah Abdul

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the damage caused by milling Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composite (CFRP) with 2-flute 4 mm-diameter solid carbide end mills, coated with titanium aluminium nitride. The machining parameters considered in work are, rotation speed, feed rate and depth of cut. Experiments were designed based on Box-Behnken design and the experiments conducted on a Mikrotool DT-110 CNC micro machine. A laser tachometer was used to ascertain a rotational speed for conducting any machining trial. Optical microscopy examination reveals minimum delamination value of 4.05 mm at the spindle speed of 25,000 rpm, depth of cut of 50μm and feed rate of 3 mm/min and the maximum delamination value of 5.04 mm at the spindle speed of 35000 rpm, depth of cut of 150μm and feed rate of 9 mm/min A mathematical model relating the milling parameters and delamination has been established.

  14. Flexural testing on carbon fibre laminates taking into account their different behaviour under tension and compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serna Moreno, M. C.; Romero Gutierrez, A.; Martínez Vicente, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    An analytical model has been derived for describing the results of three-point-bending tests in materials with different behaviour under tension and compression. The shift of the neutral plane and the damage initiation mode and its location have been defined. The validity of the equations has been reviewed by testing carbon fibre-reinforced polymers (CFRP), typically employed in different weight-critical applications. Both unidirectional and cross-ply laminates have been studied. The initial failure mode produced depends directly on the beam span- thickness relation. Therefore, specimens with different thicknesses have been analysed for examining the damage initiation due to either the bending moment or the out-of-plane shear load. The experimental description of the damage initiation and evolution has been shown by means of optical microscopy. The good agreement between the analytical estimations and the experimental results shows the validity of the analytical model exposed.

  15. The use of carbon fibre material in radiographic cassettes: estimation of the dose and contrast advantages.

    PubMed

    Dance, D R; Lester, S A; Carlsson, G A; Sandborg, M; Persliden, J

    1997-04-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to estimate the dose and contrast advantages of replacing radiographic cassette fronts fabricated from aluminium with cassette fronts fabricated from low atomic number material (carbon fibre). The simulation used a realistic imaging geometry and calculations were made both with and without an anti-scatter grid. Account was taken of the scatter generated in the cassette front and the effect of beam hardening on primary contrast. Dose and contrast were evaluated for a range of cassette front thicknesses and tube potentials (60-150 kV) as well as for four examinations representative of situations with varying amounts of scatter. The results with an anti-scatter grid show a clear dose and contrast advantage in all cases when an aluminium cassette front is replaced with a low attenuation cassette front. The contrast advantage is dependent upon the examination and is generally greater for imaging bony structures than for imaging soft tissue. If a 1.74 mm aluminium cassette front is compared with a 1.1 mm carbon fibre cassette front, then the dose advantages are 16%, 9%, 8% and 6% and the contrast advantages are 10%, 7%, 4% and 5% for the AP paediatric pelvis examination at 60 kV, the anteroposterior (AP) lumbar spine examination at 80 kV, the lateral lumbar spine examination at 100 kV and the posteroanterior (PA) chest examination at 150 kV, respectively. The results without an anti-scatter grid show an increased dose advantage when a low attenuation cassette front is used, but the contrast advantage is small and in some situations negative.

  16. Investigating of the Field Emission Performance on Nano-Apex Carbon Fiber and Tungsten Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousa, Marwan S.; Alnawasreh, Shadi; Madanat, Mazen A.; Al-Rabadi, Anas N.

    2015-10-01

    Field electron emission measurements have been performed on carbon-based and tungsten microemitters. Several samples of both types of emitters with different apex radii have been obtained employing electrolytic etching techniques using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with different molarities depending on the material used. A suitable, home-built, field electron microscope (FEM) with 10 mm tip to screen separation distance was used to electrically characterize the electron emitters. Measurements were carried out under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions with base pressure of 10-9 mbar. The current-voltage characteristics (I-V) presented as Fowler-Nordheim (FN) type plots, and field electron emission images have been recorded. In this work, initial comparison of the field electron emission performance of these micro and nanoemitters has been carried out, with the aim of obtaining a reliable, stable and long life powerful electron source. We compare the apex radii measured from the micrographs obtained from the SEM images to those extracted from the FN-type _I-V_plots for carbon fibers and tungsten tips.

  17. Bolted Joints in Three Axially Braided Carbon Fibre/Epoxy Textile Composites with Moulded-in and Drilled Fastener Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataş, Akın; Gautam, Mayank; Soutis, Constantinos; Potluri, Prasad

    2016-10-01

    Experimental behaviour of bolted joints in triaxial braided (0°/±45°) carbon fibre/epoxy composite laminates with drilled and moulded-in fastener holes has been investigated in this paper. Braided laminates were manufactured by vacuum infusion process using 12 K T700S carbon fibres (for bias and axial tows) and Araldite LY-564 epoxy resin. Moulded-in fastener holes were formed using guide pins which were inserted in the braided structure prior to the vacuum infusion process. The damage mechanism of the specimens was investigated using ultrasonic C-Scan technique. The specimens were dimensioned to obtain a bearing mode of failure. The bearing strength of the specimens with moulded-in hole was reduced in comparison to the specimens with drilled hole, due to the increased fibre misalignment angle following the pin insertion procedure. An improvement on the bearing strength of moulded-in hole specimens might be developed if the specimen dimensions would be prepared for a net-tension mode of failure where the fibre misalignment would not have an effect as significant as in the case of bearing failure mode, but this mode should be avoided since it leads to sudden catastrophic failures.

  18. Bolted Joints in Three Axially Braided Carbon Fibre/Epoxy Textile Composites with Moulded-in and Drilled Fastener Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataş, Akın; Gautam, Mayank; Soutis, Constantinos; Potluri, Prasad

    2017-04-01

    Experimental behaviour of bolted joints in triaxial braided (0°/±45°) carbon fibre/epoxy composite laminates with drilled and moulded-in fastener holes has been investigated in this paper. Braided laminates were manufactured by vacuum infusion process using 12 K T700S carbon fibres (for bias and axial tows) and Araldite LY-564 epoxy resin. Moulded-in fastener holes were formed using guide pins which were inserted in the braided structure prior to the vacuum infusion process. The damage mechanism of the specimens was investigated using ultrasonic C-Scan technique. The specimens were dimensioned to obtain a bearing mode of failure. The bearing strength of the specimens with moulded-in hole was reduced in comparison to the specimens with drilled hole, due to the increased fibre misalignment angle following the pin insertion procedure. An improvement on the bearing strength of moulded-in hole specimens might be developed if the specimen dimensions would be prepared for a net-tension mode of failure where the fibre misalignment would not have an effect as significant as in the case of bearing failure mode, but this mode should be avoided since it leads to sudden catastrophic failures.

  19. Evaluation of the nanotube intrinsic resistance across the tip-carbon nanotube-metal substrate junction by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) at a controlled contact force, we report the electrical signal response of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) disposed on a golden thin film. In this investigation, we highlight first the theoretical calculation of the contact resistance between two types of conductive tips (metal-coated and doped diamond-coated), individual MWCNTs and golden substrate. We also propose a circuit analysis model to schematize the «tip-CNT-substrate» junction by means of a series-parallel resistance network. We estimate the contact resistance R of each contribution of the junction such as Rtip-CNT, RCNT-substrate and Rtip-substrate by using the Sharvin resistance model. Our final objective is thus to deduce the CNT intrinsic radial resistance taking into account the calculated electrical resistance values with the global resistance measured experimentally. An unwished electrochemical phenomenon at the tip apex has also been evidenced by performing measurements at different bias voltages with diamond tips. For negative tip-substrate bias, a systematic degradation in color and contrast of the electrical cartography occurs, consisting of an important and non-reversible increase of the measured resistance. This effect is attributed to the oxidation of some amorphous carbon areas scattered over the diamond layer covering the tip. For a direct polarization, the CNT and substrate surface can in turn be modified by an oxidation mechanism. PMID:21711904

  20. Contractile properties of skeletal muscle fibre bundles from mice deficient in carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Beekley, Matthew D; Wetzel, Petra; Kubis, Hans-Peter; Gros, Gerolf

    2006-07-01

    The function of cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozyme II is largely unknown in skeletal muscle. Because of this, we compared the in vitro contractile properties of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) fibre bundles from mice deficient in CA II (CAD) to litter mate controls (LM). Twitch rise, 1/2 relaxation time and peak twitch force at 22 degrees C of fibre bundles from CAD EDL [28.4+/-1.4 ms, 31.2+/-2.3 ms, 6.2+/-1.0 Newton/cm(2) (N/cm(2)), respectively] and CAD SOL (54.2+/-7.5 ms, 75.7+/-13.8 ms, 2.9+/-0.5 N/cm(2), respectively) were significantly higher compared to LM EDL (20.5+/-2.2 ms, 21.9+/-3.7 ms, 4.5+/-0.2 N/cm(2)) and LM SOL (42.8+/-3.5 ms, 51.4+/-2.4 ms, 2.1+/-0.4 N/cm(2)). However, in acidic Krebs-Henseleit solution, mimicking the pH, PCO(2), and HCO(3) (-) of arterial blood from CAD mice, twitch rise, 1/2 relaxation time, and peak twitch force of fibre bundles from CAD EDL (19.3+/-0.7 ms, 19.7+/-2.3 ms, 4.8+/-0.8 N/cm(2)) and CAD SOL (41.4+/-3.6 ms, 51.9+/-5.5 ms, 2.2+/-0.7 N/cm(2)) were not significantly different from LM fibre bundles in normal Krebs-Henseleit solution (EDL: 19.7+/-1.1 ms, 21.6+/-0.6 ms, 4.7+/-0.2 N/cm(2); SOL: 42.5+/-3.1 ms, 51.8+/-2.6 ms, 1.8+/-0.3 N/cm(2)). A higher pH(i) during exposure to acidic bathing solution was maintained by CAD EDL (7.37+/-0.02) and CAD SOL (7.33+/-0.05) compared to LM EDL (7.28+/-0.04) and LM SOL (7.22+/-0.02). This suggests that the skeletal muscle of CAD mice possesses an improved defense of pH(i) against elevated pCO(2). In support of this, apparent non-bicarbonate buffer capacity (in mequiv H(+) (pH unit)(-1) (kg cell H(2)O)(-1)) as determined by pH microelectrode was markedly increased in CAD EDL (75.7+/-4.1) and CAD SOL (85.9+/-3.3) compared to LM EDL (39.3+/-4.7) and LM SOL (37.5+/-3.8). Both latter phenomena may be related to the slowed rate of intracellular acidification seen in CAD SOL in comparison with LM SOL upon an increase in PCO(2) of the bath. In conclusion, skeletal

  1. Highly stable carbon nanotube field emitters on small metal tips against electrical arcing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters that exhibit extremely high stability against high-voltage arcing have been demonstrated. The CNT emitters were fabricated on a sharp copper tip substrate that produces a high electric field. A metal mixture composed of silver, copper, and indium micro- and nanoparticles was used as a binder to attach CNTs to the substrate. Due to the strong adhesion of the metal mixture, CNTs were not detached from the substrate even after many intense arcing events. Through electrical conditioning of the as-prepared CNT emitters, vertically standing CNTs with almost the same heights were formed on the substrate surface and most of loosely bound impurities were removed from the substrate. Consequently, no arcing was observed during the normal operation of the CNT emitters and the emission current remained constant even after intentionally inducing arcing at current densities up to 70 mA/cm2. PMID:23953847

  2. Nanoscale Analysis of Interwall Interaction in a Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube by Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaunchaiyakul, Songpol; Yano, Takeshi; Khoklang, Kamonchanok; Krukowski, Pawel; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for the study of carbon materials, but its spatial resolution is limited by the optical diffraction limit. Recently, we constructed a scanning tunneling microscope-based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (STM-TERS) system in ultrahigh vacuum, which overcomes the optical diffraction limit, and enables the investigation of single-molecular Raman spectra simultaneously with topographic imaging. We have investigated position-sensitive Raman spectra along the tube axis of an isolated multiwalled carbon nanotube, which is a result of the different number of nanotube walls at each location. We found that the intensity ratio between the 2D to the G band increases with the number of walls. This indicates that the quantum interference between Raman scattering pathways affects each Raman mode differently. The interaction between nanotube walls induces splitting of the π and π* bands which increases the number of the 2D band scattering pathways owing to double resonance, eventually increasing the probability of scattering for the 2D band relative to the G band. These results provide a deeper understanding of the single-molecule interaction of carbon materials in the nanoscale.

  3. The nanoindentation of a copper substrate by single-walled carbon nanocone tips: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jin-Yuan; Chen, Chuan; Chen, Jun-Liang; Chen, Chien-I; Hwang, Chi-Chuan

    2009-03-04

    This study dealt with deep nanoindentation of a copper substrate with single-walled carbon nanocones (SWCNCs) as the proximal probe tip, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. As an important feature, during the indentation the end part of the SWCNC tip will suffer a narrowing effect due to the radial component of resistant compression from the substrate and then forms into a somewhat flat arrowhead-like shape. The effective cross-sectional area of the SWCNC tip inside the substrate that the resistant force is acting on therefore is reduced to lower the normal resistant force on the tip. The narrowing effect is more significant for longer SWCNC tips. Two categories of SWCNCs are therefore classified according to whether the SWCNC tip buckles at its part inside or outside the substrate. SWCNCs of the first category defined in this paper are found able to indent into the substrate up to a desired depth. Further analyses demonstrate that a longer SWCNC tip of the first category will encounter smaller repulsive force during the indentation and thus require less net work to accomplish the indentation process. Raising temperatures will weaken the narrowing effect, so an SWCNC tip of the first category also encounters greater repulsive force and larger net work in the indentation process performed at a higher temperature. Notably, a permanent hollow hole with high aspect ratio will be produced on the copper substrate, while copper atoms in close proximity to the hole are only slightly disordered, especially when the indentation is manipulated at a lower temperature by using a longer SWCNC tip.

  4. Clinical application of carbon fibre reinforced plastic leg orthosis for polio survivors and its advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Hachisuka, K; Makino, K; Wada, F; Saeki, S; Yoshimoto, N; Arai, M

    2006-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out on the clinical application and features of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic leg orthosis (carbon orthosis) for polio survivors. The subjects comprised 9 polio survivors, and 11 carbon knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFOs) were prescribed, fabricated, and checked out at the authors' post-polio clinic. Walking was classified based on the functional ambulatory category, and the features of walking with a carbon orthosis were self-evaluated by using a visual analogue scale. The period from modelling a cast to completion was 55 +/- 25 days; the weight of a carbon KAFO was 27.8% lighter than that of the ordinary KAFO; the standard carbon KAFO was 50% more expensive than the ordinary KAFO. The carbon KAFO remained undamaged for at least 2 years. It improved the scores in the functional ambulation categories, but there was no difference between walking with an ordinary and with a carbon KAFO. The self-evaluation of walking with a carbon KAFO revealed that the subjects using a carbon KAFO were satisfied with their carbon KAFO. The carbon KAFO is lightweight, durable, slim and smart, and is positively indicated for polio survivors.

  5. Cryogenic performances of T700 and T800 carbon fibre- epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wang; Rongjin, Huang; Chuanjun, Huang; Zhao, Yuqiang; Li, Shaopeng; Laifeng, Li

    2015-12-01

    The temperature dependence of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of T700 carbon fibre (T700 CFs) /epoxy composite and T800 CF/epoxy composite were investigated. The mechanical and thermal properties of the unidirectional composite material laminates (0°/90°) at low temperature were studied. The results show that comparing the composite material T700 CFs with T800 CFs, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity performances of T800 CFs (0°/90°) are all smaller than those of T700 CFs. Typically, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of T800 CFs in 0° is very low in the temperature range of 120-300K, which reaches as low as -0.4×10-6 K-1. The value of thermal conductivity of this material at 0° is about 3.2 W.(m.K)-1 at room temperature. Tensile and compression tests indicate that the tensile strength of T800 CFs in 0° direction at 77K reaches 2310 MPa, while the compressive strength is about 852 MPa. This composite material may possibly be exploited to design the critical components for practical applications such as hydrogen storage tanks.

  6. Assessment of carbon fibre composite fracture fixation plate using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Saidpour, Seyed H

    2006-07-01

    In the internal fixation of fractured bone by means of bone-plates fastened to the bone on its tensile surface, an on-going concern has been the excessive stress shielding of the bone by the excessively-stiff stainless-steel plate. The compressive stress shielding at the fracture-interface immediately after fracture-fixation delays callus formation and bone healing. Likewise, the tensile stress shielding in the layer of bone underneath the plate can cause osteoporosis and decrease in tensile strength of this layer. In this study a novel forearm internal fracture fixation plate made from short carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) was used in an attempt to address the problem. Accordingly, it has been possible to analyse the stress distribution in the composite plates using finite-element modelling. A three-dimensional, quarter-symmetric finite element model was generated for the plate system. The stress state in the underlying bone was examined for several loading conditions. Based on the analytical results the composite plate system is likely to reduce stress-shielding effects at the fracture site when subjected to bending and torsional loads. The design of the plate was further optimised by reducing the width around the innermost holes.

  7. Pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre laser with a combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudyakov, D. V.; Borodkin, A. A.; Lobach, A. S.; Vartapetov, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes an all-normal-dispersion pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre ring laser mode-locked by a nonlinear combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes. We have demonstrated 1.7-ps pulse generation at 1.04 μm with a repetition rate of 35.6 MHz. At the laser output, the pulses were compressed to 180 fs. We have examined an intracavity nonlinear modulator which utilises nonlinear polarisation ellipse rotation in conjunction with a saturable absorber in the form of a polymer-matrix composite film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  8. Pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre laser with a combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Khudyakov, D V; Borodkin, A A; Vartapetov, S K; Lobach, A S

    2015-09-30

    This paper describes an all-normal-dispersion pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre ring laser mode-locked by a nonlinear combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes. We have demonstrated 1.7-ps pulse generation at 1.04 μm with a repetition rate of 35.6 MHz. At the laser output, the pulses were compressed to 180 fs. We have examined an intracavity nonlinear modulator which utilises nonlinear polarisation ellipse rotation in conjunction with a saturable absorber in the form of a polymer-matrix composite film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes. (lasers)

  9. The effect of two fibre impregnation methods on the cytotoxicity of a glass and carbon fibre-reinforced acrylic resin denture base material on oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Cumhur; Ozen, Julide; Ural, A Ugur; Dalkiz, Mehmet; Beydemir, Bedri

    2006-09-01

    Acrylic resin dentures may have cytotoxic effects on oral soft tissues. However, there is sparse data about the cytotoxic effect of fibre-reinforced acrylic resin denture base materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of two fibre impregnation methods on the cytotoxicity of a glass and carbon fibre-reinforced heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture base material on oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts. One hundred acrylic resin discs were assigned to five experimental groups (n = 20). One of the groups did not include any fibre. Two groups consisted of silane and monomer treated glass fibres (Vetrolex) impregnated into acrylic resin (QC-20) discs. The other two groups consisted of silane and monomer treated carbon fibres (Type Tenox J, HTA). Untreated cell culture was used as positive control. The human oral epithelial cell line and buccal fibroblast cultures were exposed to test specimens. The cytotoxicity of the test materials was determined by succinic dehydrogenase activity (MTT method) after 24 and 72 h exposures. Data were analysed with a statistical software program (SPSSFW, 9.0). A one-way analysis of variance (anova) test and Bonferroni test were used for the comparisons between the groups. All statistical tests were performed at the 0.95 confidence level (P < 0.05). After 24 and 72 h incubation, cell viability percentages of all experimental groups showed significant decrease according to the positive control cell culture. Fibroblastic cell viability percentages of silane and monomer treated fibre-reinforced groups were lower than the unreinforced group. Cell viability of monomer-treated groups displayed the lowest percentages. Elapsed incubation time decreased epithelial cell viability in silane-treated groups. Fibroblastic cell viability was not influenced by elapsed time except the unreinforced group.

  10. Carbon/Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) Composites from Green Pellets Contain CNTs and Self-adhesive Carbon Grains from Fibres of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraman, Mohamad; Saad, Siti Khatijah Md.; Ishak, Maria M.; Awitdrus, Taer, Erman; Talib, Ibrahim; Omar, Ramli; Jumali, Mohammad Hafizuddin Hj.

    2010-10-01

    Nano composites green pellets (GPs) were prepared from the mixtures of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at varying percentage (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10%) and self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) from fibres of oil palm empty fruit bunch. These GPs were carbonized and CO2 activated to produce activated carbon/CNTs composites in the form of pellets (ACPs). It was found that the density (ρ) and electrical conductivity (σ) of the ACPs varied nonlinearly with CNTs content; as for the CNTs content of 3-5%, we observed the peak values of ρ and σ at 1.3781 gcm-3 and 3.4146 (Ωcm)-1 respectively. The presence of the agglomerated and individual particles of CNTs in the pores of the ACPs was clearly shown by the micrograph of the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The nitrogen adsorption isotherm data showed the decrease in surface area, volume and diameter of pores due to the effect of CNTs. The effect of CNTs on the electrochemical behavior of the ACPs were investigated from the supercapacitor cells fabricated using the ACPs as composite electrodes. It was found that the specific capacitance, energy density and power density of the supercapacitor with electrodes containing 10% CNTs were lower than that with electrodes without CNTs. This result is consistent with the change of pores characteristic due to the presence of CNTs in the ACPs, suggesting the need to optimize the pore characteristic for improving the supercapacitor performance.

  11. Development of a novel test-setup for identifying the frictional characteristics of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites at high surface pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Prateek; Schinzel, Marie; Andrich, Manuela; Modler, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites are extensively used in industrial applications. They are light in weight and have excellent load bearing properties. To understand this material's behaviour when carrying loads at high pressure, a tensile-friction test device was developed that can apply a contact surface pressure between composite and counterpart of 50-300 MPa. A tribological investigation of carbon fibre reinforced epoxy composites was carried out, in which the influence of the surface morphology was investigated by using grinding and sandblasting techniques. The friction coefficient of the polymer composite was measured at 100 MPa surface pressure against uncoated and Diamond-Like Carbon coated stainless steel counterparts.

  12. Three-dimensional porous hollow fibre copper electrodes for efficient and high-rate electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kas, Recep; Hummadi, Khalid Khazzal; Kortlever, Ruud; de Wit, Patrick; Milbrat, Alexander; Luiten-Olieman, Mieke W. J.; Benes, Nieck E.; Koper, Marc T. M.; Mul, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous-phase electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide requires an active, earth-abundant electrocatalyst, as well as highly efficient mass transport. Here we report the design of a porous hollow fibre copper electrode with a compact three-dimensional geometry, which provides a large area, three-phase boundary for gas–liquid reactions. The performance of the copper electrode is significantly enhanced; at overpotentials between 200 and 400 mV, faradaic efficiencies for carbon dioxide reduction up to 85% are obtained. Moreover, the carbon monoxide formation rate is at least one order of magnitude larger when compared with state-of-the-art nanocrystalline copper electrodes. Copper hollow fibre electrodes can be prepared via a facile method that is compatible with existing large-scale production processes. The results of this study may inspire the development of new types of microtubular electrodes for electrochemical processes in which at least one gas-phase reactant is involved, such as in fuel cell technology. PMID:26888578

  13. Analysis, design and development of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic knee-ankle-foot orthosis prototype for myopathic patients.

    PubMed

    Granata, C; De Lollis, A; Campo, G; Piancastelli, L; Merlini, L

    1990-01-01

    A traditional knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) for myopathic patients has been studied for the assessment of loads and fatigue resistance. Starting from this basis a thermoplastic matrix carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite (CFRP) KAFO has been developed in order to reduce the weight. A finite-element simulation programme for deformation analysis was used to compare the behaviour of conventional and CFRP orthosis. There were no breakages either of the prototype or of its parts. The CFRP orthosis allows a weight reduction of more than 40 per cent.

  14. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotube tips allowing fabrication of new classes of nanoscale sensing and manipulation tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Lawrence A. (Inventor); Shapiro, Ian R. (Inventor); Collier, Charles Patrick (Inventor); Esplandiu, Maria J. (Inventor); Bittner, Jr., Vern Garrett (Inventor); Giapis, Konstantinos P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Embodiments in accordance with the present invention relate to techniques for the growth and attachment of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT), facilitating their use as robust and well-characterized tools for AFM imaging and other applications. In accordance with one embodiment, SWNTs attached to an AFM tip can function as a structural scaffold for nanoscale device fabrication on a scanning probe. Such a probe can trigger, with nanometer precision, specific biochemical reactions or conformational changes in biological systems. The consequences of such triggering can be observed in real time by single-molecule fluorescence, electrical, and/or AFM sensing. Specific embodiments in accordance with the present invention utilize sensing and manipulation of individual molecules with carbon nanotubes, coupled with single-molecule fluorescence imaging, to allow observation of spectroscopic signals in response to mechanically induced molecular changes. Biological macromolecules such as proteins or DNA can be attached to nanotubes to create highly specific single-molecule probes for investigations of intermolecular dynamics, for assembling hybrid biological and nanoscale materials, or for developing molecular electronics. In one example, electrical wiring of single redox enzymes to carbon nanotube scanning probes allows observation and electrochemical control over single enzymatic reactions by monitoring fluorescence from a redox-active cofactor or the formation of fluorescent products. Enzymes ''nanowired'' to the tips of carbon nanotubes in accordance with embodiments of the present invention, may enable extremely sensitive probing of biological stimulus-response with high spatial resolution, including product-induced signal transduction.

  15. Separation of CO2-CH4 mixtures on defective single walled carbon nanohorns--tip does matter.

    PubMed

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Terzyk, Artur P; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Kaneko, Katsumi; Gauden, Piotr A

    2013-10-21

    Using realistic models of single-walled carbon nanohorns and their single-walled carbon nanotube counterparts, we study the equilibrium separation of CO2-CH4 mixtures near ambient operating conditions by using molecular simulations. We show that regardless of the studied operating conditions (i.e., total CO2-CH4 mixture pressures and mole fractions of mixture components in the bulk phase), single-walled carbon nanohorns maximize the CO2-CH4 equilibrium separation factor. Optimized samples of single-walled carbon nanohorns consisting of narrow tubular parts capped with horn-shaped tips show highly selective adsorption of CO2 over the CH4 mixture component, with the CO2-CH4 equilibrium separation factor of ~8-12. A large surface-to-volume ratio (i.e., enhanced surface forces) and unique defective morphology (i.e., packing of adsorbed molecules in quasi-one/quasi-zero dimensional nanospaces) of single-walled carbon nanohorns are their key structural properties responsible for the excellent separation performance. Our theoretical simulation results are in quantitative agreement with a recent experimental/theoretical study of the CO2-CH4 adsorption and separation on oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns [Ohba et al., Chem. Lett., 40, 2011, 1089]. Both experiment and theory showed that the CO2-CH4 equilibrium separation factor of oxidized samples of single-walled nanohorns measured near ambient operating conditions is ~2-5. This reduction in the separation efficiency as compared to optimized samples of single-walled carbon nanohorns is theoretically justified by their lower surface-to-volume ratio (i.e., larger diameters of tubular parts and horn-shaped tips).

  16. High throughput nanofabrication of silicon nanowire and carbon nanotube tips on AFM probes by stencil-deposited catalysts.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Daniel S; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni; Bu, Ian Y Y; Milne, William I; Brugger, Juergen; Boggild, Peter

    2011-04-13

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer scale nanostencil lithography. Individual vertical SiNWs were grown epitaxially by a catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and MWNTs were grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process on the AFM probes. The AFM probes were tested for imaging micrometers-deep trenches, where they demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes.

  17. Effect of doping on growth and field emission properties of spherical carbon nanotube tip placed over cylindrical surface

    SciTech Connect

    Santolia, Isha; Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Rinku

    2014-06-15

    Theoretical investigations to study the effect of doping of hetero-atoms on the growth and field emission properties of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) tip placed over a cylindrical surface in complex plasma have been carried out. A theoretical model incorporating kinetics of plasma species such as electron, ions, and neutral atoms including doping elements like nitrogen (N) and boron (B) and energy balance of CNTs in a complex plasma has been developed. The effect of doping elements of N and B on the growth of CNTs, namely, the tip radius has been carried out for typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that N and B as doping elements affect the radius of CNTs extensively. We obtain small radii of CNT doped with N and large radius of CNT doped with B. The field emission characteristics from CNTs have therefore been suggested on the basis of results obtained. Some of theoretical results are in compliance with the existing experimental observations.

  18. Fibre based cellular transfection.

    PubMed

    Tsampoula, X; Taguchi, K; Cizmár, T; Garces-Chavez, V; Ma, N; Mohanty, S; Mohanty, K; Gunn-Moore, F; Dholakia, K

    2008-10-13

    Optically assisted transfection is emerging as a powerful and versatile method for the delivery of foreign therapeutic agents to cells at will. In particular the use of ultrashort pulse lasers has proved an important route to transiently permeating the cell membrane through a multiphoton process. Though optical transfection has been gaining wider usage to date, all incarnations of this technique have employed free space light beams. In this paper we demonstrate the first system to use fibre delivery for the optical transfection of cells. We engineer a standard optical fibre to generate an axicon tip with an enhanced intensity of the remote output field that delivers ultrashort (~ 800 fs) pulses without requiring the fibre to be placed in very close proximity to the cell sample. A theoretical model is also developed in order to predict the light propagation from axicon tipped and bare fibres, in both air and water environments. The model proves to be in good agreement with the experimental findings and can be used to establish the optimum fibre parameters for successful cellular transfection. We readily obtain efficiencies of up to 57 % which are comparable with free space transfection. This advance paves the way for optical transfection of tissue samples and endoscopic embodiments of this technique.

  19. Effect of UV and electrochemical surface treatments on the adsorption and reaction of linear alcohols on non-porous carbon fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbeck, S.; Ward, S.; Idriss, H.

    2013-04-01

    The adsorption properties of untreated, electrochemically treated and ultra-violet/ozone treated polyacrylonitrile based carbon fibres were investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) on a series of linear alcohols as probes in order to understand its surface properties. Surface uptake was found to be sensitive to both the surface treatment and the nature of the adsorbates. Surface coverage increased with increasing alcohol chain due to the increase in their polarizability. It also increased with the level of surface oxygen of the fibres most likely because it facilitates the Osbnd H bond dissociation of the alcohol functional group. In addition, the desorption temperature (during TPD) tracked the surface oxygen levels (as determined from XPS O1s signal) suggesting increasing in the adsorption energy. The reactions of C1-C4 linear alcohols were also investigated on the surface of the fibre carbon. The main reaction was dehydrogenation to the corresponding aldehydes; the dehydration reaction to olefins was not observed. The dehydrogenation reaction was sensitive to the length of the alky chain. It was highest for methanol (to formaldehyde) and decreased with increasing the carbon number. Overall TPD of linear alcohols was shown to be a promising method for quantifying the level and strength of bonding occurring on carbon fibre surfaces.

  20. Acoustic Emission Source Location in Unidirectional Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Plastic Plates Using Virtually Trained Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G.; Lopresto, V.; Leone, C.; Papa, I.

    2010-06-02

    Acoustic emission source location in a unidirectional carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plate was attempted employing Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technology. The acoustic emission events were produced by a lead break, and the response wave received by piezoelectric sensors, type VS150-M resonant at 150 kHz. The waves were detected by a Vallen AMSY4 eight-channel instrumentation. The time of arrival, determined through the conventional threshold crossing technique, was used to measure the dependence of wave velocity on fibre orientation. A simple empirical formula, relying on classical lamination and suggested by wave propagation theory, was able to accurately model the experimental trend. Based on the formula, virtual training and testing data sets were generated for the case of a plate monitored by three transducers, and adopted to select two potentially effective ANN architectures. For final validation, experimental tests were carried out, positioning the source at predetermined points evenly distributed within the plate area. A very satisfactory correlation was found between the actual source locations and the ANN predictions.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Tip Probes: Stability and Lateral Resolution in Scanning Probe Microscopy and Application to Surface Science to Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Chao, Kuo-Jen; Stevens, Ramsey M. D.; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present results on the stability and lateral resolution capability of carbon nanotube (CNT) scanning probes as applied to atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface topography images of ultra-thin films (2-5 nm thickness) obtained with AFM are used to illustrate the lateral resolution capability of single-walled carbon nanotube probes. Images of metal films prepared by ion beam sputtering exhibit grain sizes ranging from greater than 10 nm to as small as approximately 2 nm for gold and iridium respectively. In addition, imaging stability and lifetime of multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probes are studied on a relatively hard surface of silicon nitride (Si3N4). AFM images Of Si3N4 surface collected after more than 15 hrs of continuous scanning show no detectable degradation in lateral resolution. These results indicate the general feasibility of CNT tips and scanning probe microscopy for examining nanometer-scale surface features of deposited metals as well as non-conductive thin films. AFM coupled with CNT tips offers a simple and nondestructive technique for probing a variety of surfaces, and has immense potential as a surface characterization tool in integrated circuit manufacturing.

  2. Hydrofluoric-nitric-sulphuric-acid surface treatment of tungsten for carbon fibre-reinforced composite hybrids in space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanerva, M.; Johansson, L.-S.; Campbell, J. M.; Revitzer, H.; Sarlin, E.; Brander, T.; Saarela, O.

    2015-02-01

    Hybrid material systems, such as combinations of tungsten foils and carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP), are replacing metal alloy concepts in spacecraft enclosures. However, a good adhesion between the tungsten oxide scale and the epoxy resin used is required. Here, the effects of a hydrofluoric-nitric-sulphuric-acid (HFNS) treatment on tungsten oxides and subsequent adhesion to CFRP are analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fracture testing. The work shows that HFNS treatment results in decreased oxygen content, over 50% thinner tungsten trioxide (WO3) layer and increased nano-roughness on thin tungsten foils. Fracture testing established a 39% increase in the average critical strain for tungsten-CFRP specimens after HFNS treatment was carried out on tungsten. The effect of the oxide scale modification regarding the critical strain energy release rate was ΔGc≈ 8.4 J/m2.

  3. Corrosive effect of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic on stainless-steel screws during implantation into man.

    PubMed

    Tayton, K

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion of stainless-steel screws used to fix carbon-fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) plates to human fractures was compared with the corrosion on similar screws used to fix stainless-steel AO plates. Corrosive changes were noted in both sets of screws with similar frequency and severity; however, the stainless-steel plates were 'in situ' almost twice as long as the CFRP ones, showing that the corrosive changes occurred more rapidly on screws in contact with CFRP. Nevertheless, over the implantation time necessary for bone healing, corrosion was very mild and there is no clinical contra-indication to the use of stainless-steel and CFRP together in this particular application.

  4. Laser treatment of carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic matrix for adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genna, S.; Leone, C.; Ucciardello, N.; Giuliani, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, laser surface treatment of CFRP made of PPS thermoplastic matrix by means of a 30 W Q-Switched Yb:YAG fiber laser, is investigated with the aim to improve adhesive bonding. The process parameters pulse power, scanning speed, hatch distance and scanning strategy, were varied to the aim to study the influence of the process condition on the first top resin layer removal and fibre damage. The operating window was experimentally determined. The effectiveness of laser treatment was verified by single lap shear test.

  5. A preliminary biomechanical study of a novel carbon-fibre hip implant versus standard metallic hip implants.

    PubMed

    Bougherara, Habiba; Zdero, Rad; Dubov, Anton; Shah, Suraj; Khurshid, Shaheen; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2011-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a widespread surgical approach for treating severe osteoarthritis of the human hip. Aseptic loosening of standard metallic hip implants due to stress shielding and bone loss has motivated the development of new materials for hip prostheses. Numerically, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model that mimicked hip implants was used to compare a new hip stem to two commercially available implants. The hip implants simulated were a novel CF/PA12 carbon-fibre polyamide-based composite hip stem, the Exeter hip stem (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ, USA), and the Omnifit Eon (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ, USA). A virtual axial load of 3 kN was applied to the FE model. Strain and stress distributions were computed. Experimentally, the three hip stems had their distal portions rigidly mounted and had strain gauges placed along the surface at 3 medial and 3 lateral locations. Axial loads of 3 kN were applied. Measurements of axial stiffness and strain were taken and compared to FE analysis. The overall linear correlation between FE model versus experimental strains showed reasonable results for the lines-of-best-fit for the Composite (Pearson R(2)=0.69, slope=0.82), Exeter (Pearson R(2)=0.78, slope=0.59), and Omnifit (Pearson R(2)=0.66, slope=0.45), with some divergence for the most distal strain locations. From FE analysis, the von Mises stress range for the Composite stem was much lower than that in the Omnifit and Exeter implants by 200% and 45%, respectively. The preliminary experiments showed that the Composite stem stiffness (1982 N/mm) was lower than the metallic hip stem stiffnesses (Exeter, 2460 N/mm; Omnifit, 2543 N/mm). This is the first assessment of stress, strain, and stiffness of the CF/PA12 carbon-fibre hip stem compared to standard commercially-available devices.

  6. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-Y; Trask, R S; Bond, I P

    2010-08-06

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension.

  7. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.-Y.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension. PMID:20150337

  8. Effect of interaction between AC electric field and phonon oscillation of metal cluster on tip-growth of carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidi, Mohammadreza

    2015-06-01

    The paper reports effect of interaction between AC electric field and metal cluster sitting at tip end of the carbon nanotube (CNT) on CNT tip-growth in CVD theoretically. For this purpose, a theoretical model based on phonon oscillations of the metal catalyst and influence of AC electric field on these oscillations is presented. Results show that there is an optimum AC electric field which optimizes growth of ultra-long CNTs. Then it is demonstrated that, in comparison with CNTs in the absence of field, CNTs under optimum electric field grow more. In addition, relation between optimum temperature and amplitude of AC electric field is investigated and it is shown that increasing electric field leads to higher optimum temperature. Finally, Investigation of effect of catalyst type on optimum electric field demonstrates the optimum field for various catalysts is different due to their different characteristics including van der Waals interaction with carbon, atomic mass and number of free charge carriers per each atom. All results are discussed and interpreted.

  9. Carbon fibres and plasma-preserved tendon allografts for gap repair of flexor tendon in bovines: gross, microscopic and scanning electron microscopic observations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N; Sharma, A K; Sharma, A K; Kumar, S

    2002-06-01

    The efficacy of carbon fibres and plasma-preserved tendon allografts for gap repair in the superficial digital flexor tendon in the mid-metatarsal region was evaluated in 12 crossbred calves. Experimental tenectomies were performed, followed by implantation of carbon fibres in group I (12 legs) and plasma-preserved tendon allografts in group II (12 legs). Gross observations in group I showed filling of the defect with granulation tissue with more vascularity on day 7, which was less prominent at day 14. On day 30, the neotendon formed was slightly thicker and comparable to normal tendon in appearance and texture. On day 90, it exhibited all the characteristics of a fully developed tendon. Whereas, in group II increased vascularity at the site and encapsulation of the graft with connective tissue in early periods was observed. The gap between graft and host was filled with fibrous connective tissue. Peritendinous adhesions were maximum on day 7 which were gradually reduced in both groups. Microscopically, an acute inflammatory reaction in the periphery of carbon fibres was observed on day 7. Immature fibroblasts were arranged in a haphazard pattern at this stage. By day 14, numerous newly formed capillaries and comparatively more mature fibroblasts were present in between and around the carbon fibres which were aligning parallel to the longitudinal axis of the tendon. By day 30 the healing tissue exhibited longitudinal orientation of collagen fibres and was at a more advance stage of maturation. By day 90, the neotendon formed simulated the picture of normal tendon. In the grafted tendon group, there was normal healing tissue at the functional sites between host and grafted tendon. The fibroblastic activity appeared to be both extrinsic and intrinsic in origin. The connective tissue had invaded the graft to a variable distance and there was resorption of graft which was replaced by newly formed connective tissue on day 90. Scanning electron microscopic observation

  10. Ultra-sensitive and wide-dynamic-range sensors based on dense arrays of carbon nanotube tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gengzhi; Huang, Yinxi; Zheng, Lianxi; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Zhang, Yani; Pang, John H. L.; Wu, Tom; Chen, Peng

    2011-11-01

    Electrochemical electrodes based on dense and vertically aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were produced. The open tips of individual hollow nanotubes are exposed as active sites while the entangled nanotube stems encapsulated in epoxy collectively provide multiplexed and highly conductive pathways for charge transport. This unique structure together with the extraordinary electrical and electrochemical properties of MWCNTs offers a high signal-to-noise ratio (thus high sensitivity) and a large detection range, compared with other carbon-based electrodes. Our electrodes can detect K3FeCN6 and dopamine at concentrations as low as 5 nM and 10 nM, respectively, and are responsive in a large dynamic range that spans almost 5 orders of magnitude.Electrochemical electrodes based on dense and vertically aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were produced. The open tips of individual hollow nanotubes are exposed as active sites while the entangled nanotube stems encapsulated in epoxy collectively provide multiplexed and highly conductive pathways for charge transport. This unique structure together with the extraordinary electrical and electrochemical properties of MWCNTs offers a high signal-to-noise ratio (thus high sensitivity) and a large detection range, compared with other carbon-based electrodes. Our electrodes can detect K3FeCN6 and dopamine at concentrations as low as 5 nM and 10 nM, respectively, and are responsive in a large dynamic range that spans almost 5 orders of magnitude. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10899a

  11. Fibre laser machining for glassy carbon master mould and soft lithography based two-step printing for Ag nanoparticle structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qin; Chopra, Pranav

    2011-04-01

    Traditional manufacturing techniques widely used in semiconductor industries involve many processing steps that consume both time and material and lead to high cost. Soft Lithography (SL) offers a new way to print micro/nano structures, which is a fast and low cost alternative to the conventional route, although the high processing temperature of metals, semiconductors and ceramics limits the application SL techniques. In this paper we report the use of Ag nanoparticles as building blocks to make structures by combing the merits of SL, nanotechnology and laser engineering, which provide a simple additive route with low capital investment. Glassy carbon (GC) was chosen as the material for the rigid master mould, as no release coating is needed for replicating the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mould. GC moulds were machined by a nanosecond-pulsed Yb fibre laser. The machined GC moulds were further cleaned by PDMS and the same fibre laser system to remove the process debris. The master mould was further replicated by PDMS. PDMS replicas with either positive or negative features from the master mould were attainable. A two-step strategy was used to print patterns using PDMS mould and Ag nanoparticle paste. Metal patterns were formed on various substrates, and the PDMS mould was left clean and ready for reuse. The resultant printed patterns were found to be uniform over millimetre range, with negligible residual layer, and the thickness of up to several micrometres. The thermal responses of Ag nanoparticles at various sintering temperatures were investigated. The factors affecting the resolution of printed structures were discussed.

  12. Asbestos, carbon nanotubes and the pleural mesothelium: a review of the hypothesis regarding the role of long fibre retention in the parietal pleura, inflammation and mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The unique hazard posed to the pleural mesothelium by asbestos has engendered concern in potential for a similar risk from high aspect ratio nanoparticles (HARN) such as carbon nanotubes. In the course of studying the potential impact of HARN on the pleura we have utilised the existing hypothesis regarding the role of the parietal pleura in the response to long fibres. This review seeks to synthesise our new data with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) with that hypothesis for the behaviour of long fibres in the lung and their retention in the parietal pleura leading to the initiation of inflammation and pleural pathology such as mesothelioma. We describe evidence that a fraction of all deposited particles reach the pleura and that a mechanism of particle clearance from the pleura exits, through stomata in the parietal pleura. We suggest that these stomata are the site of retention of long fibres which cannot negotiate them leading to inflammation and pleural pathology including mesothelioma. We cite thoracoscopic data to support the contention, as would be anticipated from the preceding, that the parietal pleura is the site of origin of pleural mesothelioma. This mechanism, if it finds support, has important implications for future research into the mesothelioma hazard from HARN and also for our current view of the origins of asbestos-initiated pleural mesothelioma and the common use of lung parenchymal asbestos fibre burden as a correlate of this tumour, which actually arises in the parietal pleura. PMID:20307263

  13. Preparation of highly porous binderless activated carbon electrodes from fibres of oil palm empty fruit bunches for application in supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Farma, R; Deraman, M; Awitdrus, A; Talib, I A; Taer, E; Basri, N H; Manjunatha, J G; Ishak, M M; Dollah, B N M; Hashmi, S A

    2013-03-01

    Fibres from oil palm empty fruit bunches, generated in large quantities by palm oil mills, were processed into self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG). Untreated and KOH-treated SACG were converted without binder into green monolith prior to N2-carbonisation and CO2-activation to produce highly porous binderless carbon monolith electrodes for supercapacitor applications. Characterisation of the pore structure of the electrodes revealed a significant advantage from combining the chemical and physical activation processes. The electrochemical measurements of the supercapacitor cells fabricated using these electrodes, using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic charge-discharge techniques consistently found that approximately 3h of activation time, achieved via a multi-step heating profile, produced electrodes with a high surface area of 1704m(2)g(-1) and a total pore volume of 0.889cm(3)g(-1), corresponding to high values for the specific capacitance, specific energy and specific power of 150Fg(-1), 4.297Whkg(-1) and 173Wkg(-1), respectively.

  14. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon coatings used for reduction of pole tip recession in magnetic tape heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, William W.; Bhushan, Bharat; Lakshmikumaran, Anand V.

    2000-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited using a commercial direct ion beam deposition technique on thin-film Al2O3-TiC inductive write heads. The coating thicknesses used were 5, 10, and 20 nm. Accelerated wear tests were conducted with metal particle tapes in a linear tape drive. Atomic force microscopy was used to image the thin-film regions to measure pole tip recession (PTR), relative wear of the pole tip with respect to the air bearing surface. It is found that the coating wears off of the head substrate to a significant extent in the first 1000 km of sliding distance. The coating is worn off the substrate long before it wears off of the thin-film region. The existence of the coating on the thin-film region provides close enough wear characteristics between the substrate and thin film that the two wear at similar rates. This results in little growth in pole tip recession. Early in the wear test, the coated substrate wears at a slightly higher rate than the DLC coated thin-film region due to the difference in tape contact pressure between the two materials; decreasing PTR is the result. As the coating on the substrate wears significantly, PTR begins to increase with sliding distance. Failure does not actually occur until the coating has worn off of the thin-film region. Near failure, the coating delaminates locally. Results indicate that coatings of 20 nm thickness may provide protection against PTR in future tape drives.

  15. The influence of nominal stress on wear factors of carbon fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK-OPTIMA® Wear Performance) against zirconia toughened alumina (Biolox® delta ceramic).

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew; Horton, Henrietta; Unsworth, Anthony; Briscoe, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone is an attractive alternative to ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene in artificial joints, but little has been published on the influence of stress on the wear factor. We know that in ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, the wear factor reduces as the normal stress increases, which is counter-intuitive but very helpful in the case of non-conforming contacts. In this study, carbon fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK-OPTIMA(®) Wear Performance) has been investigated in a pin-on-plate machine under steady loads and under stresses typical of hip and knee joints. At stresses below about 6 MPa, wear factors are between 10 and a 100 times lower than for ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene but at higher stresses the wear factors increase substantially.

  16. Simultaneous Determination of Parathion, Malathion, Diazinon, and Pirimiphos Methyl in Dried Medicinal Plants Using Solid-Phase Microextraction Fibre Coated with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadkhaniha, Reza; Samadi, Nasrin; Salimi, Mona; Sarkhail, Parisa; Rastkari, Noushin

    2012-01-01

    A reliable and sensitive headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of different organophosphorus pesticides in dried medicinal plant samples is described. The analytes were extracted by single-walled carbon nanotubes as a new solid-phase microextraction adsorbent. The developed method showed good performance. For diazinon and pirimiphos methyl calibration, curves were linear (r2 ≥ 0.993) over the concentration ranges from 1.5 to 300 ng g−1, and the limit of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 0.3 ng g−1. For parathion and malathion, the linear range and limit of detection were 2.5–300 (r2 ≥ 0.991) and 0.5 ng g−1, respectively. In addition, a comparative study between the single-walled carbon nanotubes and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre for the determination of target analytes was carried out. Single-walled carbon nanotubes fibre showed higher extraction capacity, better thermal stability (over 350°C), and longer lifespan (over 250 times) than the commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre. The developed method was successfully applied to determine target organophosphorus pesticides in real samples. PMID:22645439

  17. Oxygen monitoring in supercritical carbon dioxide using a fibre optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Tservistas, M; Köneke, R; Comte, A; Scheper, T

    2001-05-07

    Investigations of enzymatic reactions in supercritical CO(2) are often hindered by the high pressure involved in these processes, making reaction monitoring extremely difficult. This paper describes the implementation of a fiber optic based oxygen sensor into a high pressure reactor for supercritical carbon dioxide. The sensor is pressure resistant, working in supercritical carbon dioxide and reusable after depressurisation. The sensor signal is found to be affected by pressure changes, but stable at constant pressure. Oxygen concentration in supercritical CO(2) is monitored using the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide as a simple oxygen producing reaction.

  18. Sewage sludge pretreatment by microwave irradiation combined with activated carbon fibre at alkaline pH for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dedong; Guo, Sixiao; Ma, Nina; Wang, Guowen; Ma, Chun; Hao, Jun; Xue, Mang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the effects of microwave-assisted activated carbon fibre (ACF) (MW-ACF) treatment on sewage sludge at alkaline pH. The disintegration and biodegradability of sewage sludge were studied. It was found that the MW-ACF process at alkaline pH provided a rapid and efficient process to disrupt the microbial cells in the sludge. The results suggested that when irradiated at 800 W MW for 110 s with a dose of 1.0 g ACF/g solid concentration (SS) at pH 10.5, the MW-ACF pretreatment achieved 55% SS disintegration, 23% greater than the value of MW alone (32%). The concentration of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, supernatant soluble chemical oxygen demand, protein, and polysaccharide increased by 60%, 144%, 145%, 74%, and 77%, respectively. An increase in biogas production by 63.7% was achieved after 20 days of anaerobic digestion (AD), compared to the control. The results indicated that the MW-ACF pretreatment process at alkaline pH provides novel sludge management options in disintegration of sewage sludge for further AD.

  19. Contrast Enhancement of MicroCT Scans to Aid 3D Modelling of Carbon Fibre Fabric Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djukic, Luke P.; Pearce, Garth M.; Herszberg, Israel; Bannister, Michael K.; Mollenhauer, David H.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a methodology for volume capture and rendering of plain weave and multi-layer fabric meso-architectures within a consolidated, cured laminate. Micro X-ray Computed Tomography (MicroCT) is an excellent tool for the non-destructive visualisation of material microstructures however the contrast between tows and resin is poor for carbon fibre composites. Firstly, this paper demonstrates techniques to improve the contrast of the microCT images by introducing higher density materials such as gold, iodine and glass into the fabric. Two approaches were demonstrated to be effective for enhancing the differentiation between the tows in the reconstructed microCT visualisations. Secondly, a method of generating three-dimensional volume models of woven composites using microCT scan data is discussed. The process of generating a model is explained from initial manufacture with the aid of an example plain weave fabric. These methods are to be used in the finite element modelling of three-dimensional fabric preforms in future work.

  20. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of 2-nitroaniline onto activated carbon prepared from cotton stalk fibre.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunquan; Zheng, Zheng; Huang, Xingfa; Zhao, Guohua; Feng, Jingwei; Zhang, Jibiao

    2009-07-15

    Activated carbon prepared from cotton stalk fibre has been utilized as an adsorbent for the removal of 2-nitroaniline from aqueous solutions. The influence of adsorbent mass, contact time and temperature on the adsorption was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The equilibrium data at different temperatures were fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin, Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir-Freundlich models. The Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm was found to best describe the experimental data. The adsorption amount increased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacity of 2-nitroaniline was found to be 383 mg/g for initial 2-nitroaniline concentration of 200mg/L at 45 degrees C. The kinetic rates were modeled by using the Lagergren-first-order, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. The pseudo-second-order model was found to explain the adsorption kinetics most effectively. It was also found that the pore diffusion played an important role in the adsorption, and intraparticle diffusion was the rate-limiting step at the first 30 min for the temperatures of 25, 35 and 45 degrees C. FTIR and (13)C NMR study revealed that the amino and isocyanate groups present on the surface of the adsorbent were involved in chemical interaction with 2-nitroaniline. The negative change in free energy (Delta G degrees) and positive change in enthalpy (Delta H degrees) indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  1. Flat nose low velocity drop-weight impact response of carbon fibre composites using non-destructive damage detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Umar; Myler, Peter

    2015-03-01

    This work is mainly concerned with the nondestructive post-impact damage evaluation of carbon fibre reinforced laminated composite panels subject to low velocity drop-weight impact by flat and round nose impactors. Quasi-isotropic laminates consisting of eight-, sixteen-, and twenty-four plies were impacted by flat and round nose impactors at different velocity levels. Load-time history data were recorded and plotted to correlate loaddrop as damage level to the impactor nose profiles. Test produced data, non-destructive damage detection techniques: visual, ultrasonic, and eddy- current, and computer simulations were utilised to identify and quantify status of the impact induced damage. To evaluate damage in relatively thick laminates (consisting of 24-Ply), the damage ratios and deflection quantities were correlated to the corresponding impactor nose profiles. Damage induced by the flat nose impactor to thick laminates was compared against the data produced by the round nose impactor. Results show that relatively thin laminates were largely affected by the impactor nose. Reasonable difference was observed in damage caused by flat and round impactor nose profiles to thick laminates impacted at relatively higher velocity impacts. Resultswere compared and validated against simulation produced data.

  2. Comparative Study of Achievable Quality Cutting Carbon Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastics Using Continuous Wave and Pulsed Laser Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluemel, S.; Jaeschke, P.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    Laser cutting of CFRP lightweight parts has the advantages of a contact-free, automatable and flexible processing for a prospective series production. For the development of strategies for laser cutting of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP), different scientific approaches exist to achieve a process with small heat affected zones (HAZ), and high cutting rates. Within this paper a cw laser, a nanosecond and a picosecond laser source emitting in the near infrared range have been used in combination with a scanning system to cut CFRP with a thermoplastic matrix. The influence of the scanning speed on the size of the HAZ and the corresponding tensile strength were investigated for each laser source. Furthermore, the authors compared the achievable HAZ and the effective cutting speeds of the different setups in order to evaluate the efficiency and quality of the chosen strategies. The results show that a nanosecond pulsed laser source with high average power is a good trade-off between attainable quality and cutting rate.

  3. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic knee-ankle-foot orthosis with a partially flexible thigh cuff: a modification for comfort while sitting on a toilet seat.

    PubMed

    Hachisuka, K; Arai, K; Arai, M

    2007-06-01

    At the request of a polio survivor, a partially flexible thigh cuff made of leather and canvas for a carbon KAFO was devised to allow the wearer to feel more comfortable while sitting on a toilet seat. The original, acrylic resin, thigh cuff was partially excised to make an opening (15x10 cm), which was stuffed with rubber sponge, and was sealed with leather and canvas. The opening's surround was vertically and horizontally reinforced with carbon fibres. This modification provided relief to the polio survivor from the discomfort previously experienced while sitting on a toilet seat, and satisfied her needs in daily life.

  4. High energy flux thermo-mechanical test of 1D-carbon-carbon fibre composite prototypes for the SPIDER diagnostic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    De Muri, M. Pasqualotto, R.; Dalla Palma, M.; Cervaro, V.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Tollin, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavallin, T.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.

    2014-02-15

    Operation of the thermonuclear fusion experiment ITER requires additional heating via injection of neutral beams from accelerated negative ions. In the SPIDER test facility, under construction in Padova, the production of negative ions will be studied and optimised. STRIKE (Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter Experiment) is a diagnostic used to characterise the SPIDER beam during short pulse operation (several seconds) to verify if the beam meets the ITER requirements about the maximum allowed beam non-uniformity (below ±10%). The major components of STRIKE are 16 1D-CFC (Carbon-Carbon Fibre Composite) tiles, observed at the rear side by a thermal camera. This contribution gives an overview of some tests under high energy particle flux, aimed at verifying the thermo-mechanical behaviour of several CFC prototype tiles. The tests were performed in the GLADIS facility at IPP (Max-Plank-Institut für Plasmaphysik), Garching. Dedicated linear and nonlinear simulations were carried out to interpret the experiments and a comparison of the experimental data with the simulation results is presented. The results of some morphological and structural studies on the material after exposure to the GLADIS beam are also given.

  5. High energy flux thermo-mechanical test of 1D-carbon-carbon fibre composite prototypes for the SPIDER diagnostic calorimeter.

    PubMed

    De Muri, M; Cavallin, T; Pasqualotto, R; Dalla Palma, M; Cervaro, V; Fasolo, D; Franchin, L; Tollin, M; Greuner, H; Böswirth, B; Serianni, G

    2014-02-01

    Operation of the thermonuclear fusion experiment ITER requires additional heating via injection of neutral beams from accelerated negative ions. In the SPIDER test facility, under construction in Padova, the production of negative ions will be studied and optimised. STRIKE (Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter Experiment) is a diagnostic used to characterise the SPIDER beam during short pulse operation (several seconds) to verify if the beam meets the ITER requirements about the maximum allowed beam non-uniformity (below ±10%). The major components of STRIKE are 16 1D-CFC (Carbon-Carbon Fibre Composite) tiles, observed at the rear side by a thermal camera. This contribution gives an overview of some tests under high energy particle flux, aimed at verifying the thermo-mechanical behaviour of several CFC prototype tiles. The tests were performed in the GLADIS facility at IPP (Max-Plank-Institut für Plasmaphysik), Garching. Dedicated linear and nonlinear simulations were carried out to interpret the experiments and a comparison of the experimental data with the simulation results is presented. The results of some morphological and structural studies on the material after exposure to the GLADIS beam are also given.

  6. High energy flux thermo-mechanical test of 1D-carbon-carbon fibre composite prototypes for the SPIDER diagnostic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Muri, M.; Cavallin, T.; Pasqualotto, R.; Dalla Palma, M.; Cervaro, V.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Tollin, M.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Serianni, G.

    2014-02-01

    Operation of the thermonuclear fusion experiment ITER requires additional heating via injection of neutral beams from accelerated negative ions. In the SPIDER test facility, under construction in Padova, the production of negative ions will be studied and optimised. STRIKE (Short-Time Retractable Instrumented Kalorimeter Experiment) is a diagnostic used to characterise the SPIDER beam during short pulse operation (several seconds) to verify if the beam meets the ITER requirements about the maximum allowed beam non-uniformity (below ±10%). The major components of STRIKE are 16 1D-CFC (Carbon-Carbon Fibre Composite) tiles, observed at the rear side by a thermal camera. This contribution gives an overview of some tests under high energy particle flux, aimed at verifying the thermo-mechanical behaviour of several CFC prototype tiles. The tests were performed in the GLADIS facility at IPP (Max-Plank-Institut für Plasmaphysik), Garching. Dedicated linear and nonlinear simulations were carried out to interpret the experiments and a comparison of the experimental data with the simulation results is presented. The results of some morphological and structural studies on the material after exposure to the GLADIS beam are also given.

  7. On the Motion of Carbon Nanotube Clusters near Optical Fiber Tips: Thermophoresis, Radiative Pressure, and Convection Effects.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Hernández-Cordero, J

    2015-09-15

    We analyze the motion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes clusters in water or ethanol upon irradiation with a 975 and 1550 nm laser beam guided by an optical fiber. Upon measuring the velocities of the nanotube clusters in and out of the laser beam cone, we were able to identify thermophoresis, convection and radiation pressure as the main driving forces that determine the equilibrium position of the dispersion at low optical powers: while thermophoresis and convection pull the clusters toward the laser beam axis (negative Soret coefficient), radiation pressure pushes the clusters away from the fiber tip. A theoretical solution for the thermophoretic velocity, which considers interfacial motion and a repulsive potential interaction between the nanotubes and the solvent (hydrophobic interaction), shows that the main mechanism implicated in this type of thermophoresis is the thermal expansion of the fluid, and that the clusters migrate to hotter regions with a characteristic thermal diffusion coefficient D(T) of 9 × 10(-7) cm(2) K(-1) s(-1). We further show that the characteristic length associated with thermophoresis is not that of the nanotube clusters size, O(1) μm, but that corresponding to the microstructure of the clusters, O(1) nm. We finally discuss the role of the formation of gas-liquid interfaces (microbubbles) at high optical powers on the deposition of carbon nanotubes on the optical fiber end faces.

  8. Polysiloxane optical fibres and fibre structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martincek, Ivan; Pudis, Dusan

    2016-12-01

    The polysiloxane fibres made of polysiloxanes such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and poly(dimethyl)(diphenil)siloxane (PDMDPS) can be attractive for different fibre applications and fibre structures. In this paper we describe the fabrication technological process of polysiloxane fibres and fibre structures integrated with conventional single-mode optical fibres. We present two-modes interferometer prepared from PDMS biconical optical fibre taper, PDMDPS optical fibre microloop interferometer and liquid microdroplet optical fibre interferometer. We achieved interesting optical properties all these fibre structures as was confirmed from the transmission characteristics what may be attractive for utilisation in various types of optical fibre sensors.

  9. Characterisation of the mechanical and fracture properties of a uni-weave carbon fibre/epoxy non-crimp fabric composite.

    PubMed

    Bru, Thomas; Hellström, Peter; Gutkin, Renaud; Ramantani, Dimitra; Peterson, Göran

    2016-03-01

    A complete database of the mechanical properties of an epoxy polymer reinforced with uni-weave carbon fibre non-crimp fabric (NCF) is established. In-plane and through-the-thickness tests were performed on unidirectional laminates under normal loading and shear loading. The response under cyclic shear loading was also measured. The material has been characterised in terms of stiffness, strength, and failure features for the different loading cases. The critical energy release rates associated with different failure modes in the material were measured from interlaminar and translaminar fracture toughness tests. The stress-strain data of the tensile, compressive, and shear test specimens are included. The load-deflection data for all fracture toughness tests are also included. The database can be used in the development and validation of analytical and numerical models of fibre reinforced plastics (FRPs), in particular FRPs with NCF reinforcements.

  10. Characterisation of the mechanical and fracture properties of a uni-weave carbon fibre/epoxy non-crimp fabric composite

    PubMed Central

    Bru, Thomas; Hellström, Peter; Gutkin, Renaud; Ramantani, Dimitra; Peterson, Göran

    2016-01-01

    A complete database of the mechanical properties of an epoxy polymer reinforced with uni-weave carbon fibre non-crimp fabric (NCF) is established. In-plane and through-the-thickness tests were performed on unidirectional laminates under normal loading and shear loading. The response under cyclic shear loading was also measured. The material has been characterised in terms of stiffness, strength, and failure features for the different loading cases. The critical energy release rates associated with different failure modes in the material were measured from interlaminar and translaminar fracture toughness tests. The stress–strain data of the tensile, compressive, and shear test specimens are included. The load–deflection data for all fracture toughness tests are also included. The database can be used in the development and validation of analytical and numerical models of fibre reinforced plastics (FRPs), in particular FRPs with NCF reinforcements. PMID:26958626

  11. Fibre typing of intrafusal fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thornell, Lars-Eric; Carlsson, Lena; Eriksson, Per-Olof; Liu, Jing-Xia; Österlund, Catharina; Stål, Per; Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    The first descriptions of muscle spindles with intrafusal fibres containing striated myofibrils and nervous elements were given approximately 150 years ago. It took, however, another 100 years to establish the presence of two types of intrafusal muscle fibres: nuclear bag and nuclear chain fibres. The present paper highlights primarily the contribution of Robert Banks in fibre typing of intrafusal fibres: the confirmation of the principle of two types of nuclear bag fibres in mammalian spindles and the variation in occurrence of a dense M-band along the fibres. Furthermore, this paper summarizes how studies from the Umeå University group (Laboratory of Muscle Biology in the Department of Integrative Medical Biology) on fibre typing and the structure and composition of M-bands have contributed to the current understanding of muscle spindle complexity in adult humans as well as to muscle spindle development and effects of ageing. The variable molecular composition of the intrafusal sarcomeres with respect to myosin heavy chains and M-band proteins gives new perspectives on the role of the intrafusal myofibrils as stretch-activated sensors influencing tension/stiffness and signalling to nuclei. PMID:26179023

  12. Scanning induction thermography (SIT) for imaging damages in carbon-fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. Renil; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    Scanning Induction Thermography (SIT) combines both Eddy Current Technique (ECT) and Thermographic Non-Destructive Techniques (TNDT) [1],[2]. This NDT technique has been earlier demonstrated for metallic components for the detection of cracks, corrosion, etc.[3]-[9] Even though Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) has a relatively less electrical conductivity compared to metals, it was observed that sufficient heat could be generated using induction heating that can be used for nondestructive evaluation using the Induction Thermography technique. Also, measurable temperatures could be achieved using relatively less currents, when compared to metals. In Scanning Induction Thermography (SIT) technique, the induction coil moves over the sample at optimal speeds and the temperature developed in the sample due to Joule heating effects is captured as a function of time and distance using an IR camera in the form of video images. A new algorithm is also presented for the analysis of the video images for improved analysis of the data obtained. Several CFRP components were evaluated for detection of impact damage and delaminations using the SIT technique.

  13. Defect Detection on Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics (cfrp) with Laser Generated Lamb Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focke, O.; Huke, P.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2011-06-01

    Standard ultrasound methods using a phased-array or a single transducer are commonly used for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) during manufacturing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) parts and certificated testing schemes were developed for individual parts and geometries. However, most testing methods need direct contact, matching gels and remain therefore time consuming. Laser-Ultrasonics is advantageous due to the contactless measurement technology and high accessibility even on complex parts. Despite the non-destructive testing with body waves, we show that the NDE can be expanded using two-dimensional surface (Lamb) waves for detection of delaminations close to the surface or small deteriorations caused by e.g. impacts. Lamb waves have been excited with a single transducer and with a short-pulse Laser with additionally producing A0-and S0-Lamb waves. The waves were detected with a shearography setup that allows for measuring two-dimensionally the displacement of a surface. Short integration times of the camera were realized using a pulsed ruby laser for illumination. As a consequence to the anisotropy the propagation in different directions exhibits individual characteristics like amplitude, damping and velocity. This has motivated to build up models for the propagation of Lamb waves and to compare them with experimental results.

  14. Packaging and Mounting of In-Fibre Bragg Grating Arrays for Structural Health Monitoring of Large Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    33 Abbreviations CFRP Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer FBG Fibre Bragg Grating FGI Fiberglass International FO... Fibre Optic FOS Fibre Optic Sensor GFRP Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer HDPE High Density Polyethylene LED Light Emitting Diode MHC Mine Hunter...subsequent paragraphs. An operational loads monitoring system for wind turbine blades was demonstrated [7] using FBGs surface-mounted onto glass fibre

  15. EVITA Project: Comparison Between Traditional Non-Destructive Techniques and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging Applied to Aerospace Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresil, Matthieu; Revol, Vincent; Kitsianos, Konstantinos; Kanderakis, Georges; Koulalis, Ilias; Sauer, Marc-Olivier; Trétout, Hervé; Madrigal, Ana-Maria

    2016-10-01

    The EU-project EVITA (Non-Destructive EValuation, Inspection and Testing of Primary Aeronautical Composite Structures Using Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging) aims at bringing Grating-based Phase Contrast X-ray imaging technology to Non-Destructive Evaluation and Inspection of advanced primary and/or complex aerospace composite structures. Grating-based Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging is based on the so-called Talbot-Lau interferometer, which is made of the combination of a standard X-ray apparatus with three transmission gratings as documented in the literature. This paper presents a comparison of two traditional non-destructive techniques (NDT): ultrasonic through transmission (immersed and water jet) and ultrasonic phased-array pulse echo, with the developed phase contrast X-Ray Imaging applied to advanced aerospace carbon fibre reinforced polymer. Typical defects produced during manufacture is examined as part of the testing and validation procedure. The following defects have been identified as being those most likely to be detected more effectively by the Grating-based Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging process than other state of the art industrial NDT techniques: porosity, foreign objects, cracks, resin rich, cut fibres, and wavy fibres. The introduction of this innovative methodology is expected to provide the aeronautical industry with a reliable and detailed insight of the integrity of thin and thick composite structures as well as of complex geometry ones, such as integrated closed boxes and sandwiches.

  16. EVITA Project: Comparison Between Traditional Non-Destructive Techniques and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging Applied to Aerospace Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresil, Matthieu; Revol, Vincent; Kitsianos, Konstantinos; Kanderakis, Georges; Koulalis, Ilias; Sauer, Marc-Olivier; Trétout, Hervé; Madrigal, Ana-Maria

    2017-04-01

    The EU-project EVITA (Non-Destructive EValuation, Inspection and Testing of Primary Aeronautical Composite Structures Using Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging) aims at bringing Grating-based Phase Contrast X-ray imaging technology to Non-Destructive Evaluation and Inspection of advanced primary and/or complex aerospace composite structures. Grating-based Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging is based on the so-called Talbot-Lau interferometer, which is made of the combination of a standard X-ray apparatus with three transmission gratings as documented in the literature. This paper presents a comparison of two traditional non-destructive techniques (NDT): ultrasonic through transmission (immersed and water jet) and ultrasonic phased-array pulse echo, with the developed phase contrast X-Ray Imaging applied to advanced aerospace carbon fibre reinforced polymer. Typical defects produced during manufacture is examined as part of the testing and validation procedure. The following defects have been identified as being those most likely to be detected more effectively by the Grating-based Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging process than other state of the art industrial NDT techniques: porosity, foreign objects, cracks, resin rich, cut fibres, and wavy fibres. The introduction of this innovative methodology is expected to provide the aeronautical industry with a reliable and detailed insight of the integrity of thin and thick composite structures as well as of complex geometry ones, such as integrated closed boxes and sandwiches.

  17. Ocean methane hydrates as a slow tipping point in the global carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Archer, David; Buffett, Bruce; Brovkin, Victor

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of the global methane inventory as hydrate and bubbles below the sea floor. The model predicts the inventory of CH4 in the ocean today to be ≈1600–2,000 Pg of C. Most of the hydrate in the model is in the Pacific, in large part because lower oxygen levels enhance the preservation of organic carbon. Because the oxygen concentration today may be different from the long-term average, the sensitivity of the model to O2 is a source of uncertainty in predicting hydrate inventories. Cold water column temperatures in the high latitudes lead to buildup of hydrates in the Arctic and Antarctic at shallower depths than is possible in low latitudes. A critical bubble volume fraction threshold has been proposed as a critical threshold at which gas migrates all through the sediment column. Our model lacks many factors that lead to heterogeneity in the real hydrate reservoir in the ocean, such as preferential hydrate formation in sandy sediments and subsurface gas migration, and is therefore conservative in its prediction of releasable methane, finding only 35 Pg of C released after 3 °C of uniform warming by using a 10% critical bubble volume. If 2.5% bubble volume is taken as critical, then 940 Pg of C might escape in response to 3 °C warming. This hydrate model embedded into a global climate model predicts ≈0.4–0.5 °C additional warming from the hydrate response to fossil fuel CO2 release, initially because of methane, but persisting through the 10-kyr duration of the simulations because of the CO2 oxidation product of methane. PMID:19017807

  18. Ocean methane hydrates as a slow tipping point in the global carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Archer, David; Buffett, Bruce; Brovkin, Victor

    2009-12-08

    We present a model of the global methane inventory as hydrate and bubbles below the sea floor. The model predicts the inventory of CH(4) in the ocean today to be approximately 1600-2,000 Pg of C. Most of the hydrate in the model is in the Pacific, in large part because lower oxygen levels enhance the preservation of organic carbon. Because the oxygen concentration today may be different from the long-term average, the sensitivity of the model to O(2) is a source of uncertainty in predicting hydrate inventories. Cold water column temperatures in the high latitudes lead to buildup of hydrates in the Arctic and Antarctic at shallower depths than is possible in low latitudes. A critical bubble volume fraction threshold has been proposed as a critical threshold at which gas migrates all through the sediment column. Our model lacks many factors that lead to heterogeneity in the real hydrate reservoir in the ocean, such as preferential hydrate formation in sandy sediments and subsurface gas migration, and is therefore conservative in its prediction of releasable methane, finding only 35 Pg of C released after 3 degrees C of uniform warming by using a 10% critical bubble volume. If 2.5% bubble volume is taken as critical, then 940 Pg of C might escape in response to 3 degrees C warming. This hydrate model embedded into a global climate model predicts approximately 0.4-0.5 degrees C additional warming from the hydrate response to fossil fuel CO(2) release, initially because of methane, but persisting through the 10-kyr duration of the simulations because of the CO(2) oxidation product of methane.

  19. Changing snow cover in tundra ecosystems tips the Arctic carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, D.; Hufkens, K.; Gioli, B.; Kalhori, A. A. M.; Oechel, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic environment has witnessed important changes due to global warming, resulting in increased surface air temperatures and rain events which both exacerbate snow cover deterioration (Semmens et al, 2013; Rennert et al, 2009; White et al, 2007; Min et al, 2008; Sharp et al, 2013; Schaeffer et al, 2013). Snow cover duration is declining by almost 20% per decade, a far higher rate than model estimates (Derksen and Brown, 2012). Concomitant with increasing temperatures and decreasing snow cover duration, the length of the arctic growing season is reported to have increased by 1.1 - 4.9 days per decade since 1951 (Menzel et al, 2006), and, plant productivity and CO2 uptake from arctic vegetation are strongly influenced by changes in growing season length (Myneni et al., 1997; Schaefer et al., 2005; Euskirchen et al., 2006). Based on more than a decade of eddy flux measurements in Arctic tundra ecosystems across the North slope of Alaska, and remotely sensed snow cover data, we show that earlier snow melt in the spring increase C uptake while an extended snow free period in autumn is associated with a higher C loss. Here we present the impacts of changes in snow cover dynamics between spring and autumn in arctic tundra ecosystems on the carbon dynamics and net C balance of the Alaskan Arctic. ReferencesDerksen, C., Brown R. (2012) Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2012GL053387 Euskirchen, E.S., et al. (2006) Glob. Change Biol., 12, 731-750. Menzel, A., et al. 2006. Glob. Change Biol., 12, 1969-1976. Min SK, Zhang X, Zweirs F (2008) Science 320: 518-520. Rennert K J, Roe G, Putkonen J and Bitz C M (2009) J. Clim. 22 2302-15. Schaefer, K., Denning A.S., Leonard O. (2005) Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 19, GB3017. Schaeffer, S. M., Sharp, E., Schimel, J. P. & Welker, J. M. (2013). Soil- plant N processes in a High Arctic ecosystem, NW Greenland are altered by long-term experimental warming and higher rainfall. Glob. Change Biol., 11, 3529-39. doi: 10.1111/gcb.12318

  20. Anterior cervical corpectomy: review and comparison of results using titanium mesh cages and carbon fibre reinforced polymer cages.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed M R; Alabi, J; Rezajooi, Kia; Casey, Adrian T H

    2010-10-01

    Different types of cages have recently become available for reconstruction following anterior cervical corpectomy. We review the results using titanium mesh cages (TMC) and stackable CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced polymer) cages. Forty-two patients who underwent anterior cervical corpectomy between November 2001 and September 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Pathologies included cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), cervical radiculopathy, OPLL (ossified posterior longitudinal ligament), metastasis/primary bone tumour, rheumatoid arthritis and deformity correction. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically. Outcome was assessed on the basis of the Odom's criteria, neck disability index (NDI) and myelopathy disability index (MDI). Mean age was 60 years and mean follow-up was 1½ years. Majority of the patients had single-level corpectomy. Twenty-three patients had TMC cages while 19 patients had CFRP cages. The mean subsidence noted with TMC cage was 1.91 mm, while with the stackable CFRP cage it was 0.5 mm. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant correlation noted between subsidence and clinical outcome (p > 0.05) or between subsidence and post-operative sagittal alignment (p > 0.05) in either of the groups. Three patients had significant subsidence (> 3 mm), one of whom was symptomatic. There were no hardware-related complications. On the basis of the Odom's criterion, 9 patients (21.4%) had an excellent outcome, 14 patients (33.3%) had a good outcome, 9 patients (21.4%) had a fair outcome and 5 patients (11.9%) had a poor outcome, i.e. symptoms and signs unchanged or exacerbated. Mean post-operative NDI was 26.27% and mean post-operative MDI was 19.31%. Fusion was noted in all 42 cases. Both TMC and stackable CFRP cages provide solid anterior column reconstruction with good outcome following anterior cervical corpectomy. However, more subsidence is noted with TMC cages though

  1. A novel method based on selective laser sintering for preparing high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy ternary composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Yan, Chunze; Shi, Yunsong; Wen, Shifeng; Liu, Jie; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-09-01

    A novel method based on selective laser sintering (SLS) process is proposed for the first time to prepare complex and high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy (CF/PA12/EP) ternary composites. The procedures are briefly described as follows: prepare polyamide12 (PA12) coated carbon fibre (CF) composite powder; build porous green parts by SLS; infiltrate the green parts with high-performance thermosetting epoxy (EP) resin; and finally cure the resin at high temperature. The obtained composites are a ternary composite system consisting of the matrix of novolac EP resin, the reinforcement of CFs and the transition thin layer of PA12 with a thickness of 595 nm. The SEM images and micro-CT analysis prove that the ternary system is a three-dimensional co-continuous structure and the reinforcement of CFs are well dispersed in the matrix of EP with the volume fraction of 31%. Mechanical tests show that the composites fabricated by this method yield an ultimate tensile strength of 101.03 MPa and a flexural strength of 153.43 MPa, which are higher than those of most of the previously reported SLS materials. Therefore, the process proposed in this paper shows great potential for manufacturing complex, lightweight and high-performance CF reinforced composite components in aerospace, automotive industries and other areas.

  2. A novel method based on selective laser sintering for preparing high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy ternary composites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Yan, Chunze; Shi, Yunsong; Wen, Shifeng; Liu, Jie; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-09-21

    A novel method based on selective laser sintering (SLS) process is proposed for the first time to prepare complex and high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy (CF/PA12/EP) ternary composites. The procedures are briefly described as follows: prepare polyamide12 (PA12) coated carbon fibre (CF) composite powder; build porous green parts by SLS; infiltrate the green parts with high-performance thermosetting epoxy (EP) resin; and finally cure the resin at high temperature. The obtained composites are a ternary composite system consisting of the matrix of novolac EP resin, the reinforcement of CFs and the transition thin layer of PA12 with a thickness of 595 nm. The SEM images and micro-CT analysis prove that the ternary system is a three-dimensional co-continuous structure and the reinforcement of CFs are well dispersed in the matrix of EP with the volume fraction of 31%. Mechanical tests show that the composites fabricated by this method yield an ultimate tensile strength of 101.03 MPa and a flexural strength of 153.43 MPa, which are higher than those of most of the previously reported SLS materials. Therefore, the process proposed in this paper shows great potential for manufacturing complex, lightweight and high-performance CF reinforced composite components in aerospace, automotive industries and other areas.

  3. LASERS: Ultrashort-pulse erbium-doped fibre laser using a saturable absorber based on single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc-discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausenev, A. V.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Lobach, A. S.; Konov, V. I.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, E. M.

    2007-09-01

    An erbium-doped fibre laser operating in self-mode-locked regime achieved with the help of a saturable absorber based on single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc-discharge method is fabricated and studied. Due to the development of an original method for preparing samples, films of the optical quality containing individual single-wall carbon nanotubes were synthesised. The study of the dependence of resonance absorption at a wavelength of 1.5 μm on the laser radiation intensity transmitted through a film showed that these films have nonlinear transmission and can be used in fibre lasers as saturable absorbers to provide self-mode locking. Stable transform-limited pulses having the shape of optical solitons were generated at a wavelength of 1557.5 nm in the laser with a ring resonator. The pulse duration was 1.13 ps at a pulse repetition rate of 20.5 MHz. The continuous output power achieved 1.1 mW upon pumping by a 25-mW laser diode at 980 nm.

  4. A novel method based on selective laser sintering for preparing high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy ternary composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Yan, Chunze; Shi, Yunsong; Wen, Shifeng; Liu, Jie; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel method based on selective laser sintering (SLS) process is proposed for the first time to prepare complex and high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy (CF/PA12/EP) ternary composites. The procedures are briefly described as follows: prepare polyamide12 (PA12) coated carbon fibre (CF) composite powder; build porous green parts by SLS; infiltrate the green parts with high-performance thermosetting epoxy (EP) resin; and finally cure the resin at high temperature. The obtained composites are a ternary composite system consisting of the matrix of novolac EP resin, the reinforcement of CFs and the transition thin layer of PA12 with a thickness of 595 nm. The SEM images and micro-CT analysis prove that the ternary system is a three-dimensional co-continuous structure and the reinforcement of CFs are well dispersed in the matrix of EP with the volume fraction of 31%. Mechanical tests show that the composites fabricated by this method yield an ultimate tensile strength of 101.03 MPa and a flexural strength of 153.43 MPa, which are higher than those of most of the previously reported SLS materials. Therefore, the process proposed in this paper shows great potential for manufacturing complex, lightweight and high-performance CF reinforced composite components in aerospace, automotive industries and other areas. PMID:27650254

  5. Forest dynamics and tip-up pools drive pulses of high carbon accumulation rates in a tropical peat dome in Borneo (Southeast Asia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommain, René; Cobb, Alexander R.; Joosten, Hans; Glaser, Paul H.; Chua, Amy F. L.; Gandois, Laure; Kai, Fuu-Ming; Noren, Anders; Salim, Kamariah A.; Su'ut, N. Salihah H.; Harvey, Charles F.

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands of Southeast Asia store large pools of carbon but the mechanisms of peat accumulation in tropical forests remain to be resolved. Patch dynamics and forest disturbance have seldom been considered as drivers that can amplify or dampen rates of peat accumulation. Here we used a modified piston corer, noninvasive geophysical measurements, and geochemical and paleobotanical techniques to establish the effect of tree fall on carbon accumulation rates in a peat swamp forest dominated by Shorea albida in Brunei (Borneo). Carbon initially accumulated in a mangrove forest at over 300 g C m-2 yr-1 but declined to less than 50 g C m-2 yr-1 with the establishment of a peat swamp forest. A rapid accumulation pulse of 720-960 g C m-2 yr-1 occurred around 1080 years ago as a tip-up pool infilled. Tip-up pools are common in the peatlands of northwest Borneo where windthrow and lightning strikes produce tree falls at a rate of 4 trees ha-1 every decade. A simulation model indicates that tip-up pools, which are formed across the entire forested peat dome, produce local discontinuities in the peat deposit, when peat is removed to create a pool that is rapidly filled with younger material. The resulting discontinuities in peat age at the base and sides of pool deposits obscure linkages between carbon accumulation rates and climate and require new approaches for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. Our results suggest that carbon accumulation in tropical peat swamps may be based on fundamentally different peat-forming processes than those of northern peatlands.

  6. Experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers under conditions of minimal roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Golyshev, A A; Malikov, A G; Orishich, A M; Shulyatyev, V B

    2014-10-31

    The results of an experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers are generalised. The dependence of roughness of the cut surface on the cutting parameters is investigated, and the conditions under which the surface roughness is minimal are formulated. It is shown that for both types of lasers these conditions can be expressed in the same way in terms of the dimensionless variables – the Péclet number Pe and the output power Q of laser radiation per unit thickness of the cut sheet – and take the form of the similarity laws: Pe = const, Q = const. The optimal values of Pe and Q are found. We have derived empirical expressions that relate the laser power and cutting speed with the thickness of the cut sheet under the condition of minimal roughness in the case of cutting by means of radiation from fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers. (laser technologies)

  7. Lung counting: comparison of detector performance with a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fibre end caps, and the effect on mda calculation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Hauck, Barry; Kramer, Gary H

    2012-08-01

    This study described the performance of an array of high-purity Germanium detectors, designed with two different end cap materials-steel and carbon fibre. The advantages and disadvantages of using this detector type in the estimation of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for different energy peaks of isotope (152)Eu were illustrated. A Monte Carlo model was developed to study the detection efficiency for the detector array. A voxelised Lawrence Livermore torso phantom, equipped with lung, chest plates and overlay plates, was used to mimic a typical lung counting protocol with the array of detectors. The lung of the phantom simulated the volumetric source organ. A significantly low MDA was estimated for energy peaks at 40 keV and at a chest wall thickness of 6.64 cm.

  8. Simulator trials to determine the wear of the combination aluminium oxide ceramic-carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) used as an insert in a hip socket.

    PubMed

    Scheller, G; Schwarz, M; Früh, H J; Jani, L

    1999-01-01

    Hip simulator trials were conducted to determine the initial wear between alumina femoral heads and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP, CAPROMAN) insert in a titanium socket. A force of 2500 N and a frequency of 0.857 H were applied. Using surface and sphericity measurement techniques, the amount of wear was determined. After 500,000 cycles, the centre of the head had moved by 10 microm into the insert, and the average radius increased by 2 microm. After 1 million cycles, the additional changes were less than 1 microm. Based on an examination of retrieved implants (wear rate: 6.1 microm/year) and based on the simulator results, the combination alumina-CFRP inserts could be approved for total hip replacement.

  9. How to make auxetic fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderson, K. L.; Simkins, V. R.; Coenen, V. L.; Davies, P. J.; Alderson, A.; Evans, K. E.

    2005-03-01

    Auxetic composite materials can be produced either from conventional components via specially designed configurations or from auxetic components. This paper reviews manufacturing methods for both these scenarios. It then looks at the possibility of property enhancements in both low velocity impact and fibre pull out due to the negative Poisson's ratio. Tests revealed that auxetic carbon fibre composites made from commercially available prepreg show evidence of increased resistance to low velocity impact and static indentation with a smaller area of damage. Also, using auxetic fibres in composite materials is shown to produce a higher resistance to fibre pullout.

  10. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Mode-Locker in Tm-doped Fibre Laser: A Novel Mechanism for Robust Bound-State Solitons Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Bednyakova, Anastasia; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Howe, Richard C. T.; Hu, Guohua; Hasan, Tawfique; Gambetta, Alessio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Rümmeli, Mark; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2017-03-01

    The complex nonlinear dynamics of mode-locked fibre lasers, including a broad variety of dissipative structures and self-organization effects, have drawn significant research interest. Around the 2 μm band, conventional saturable absorbers (SAs) possess small modulation depth and slow relaxation time and, therefore, are incapable of ensuring complex inter-pulse dynamics and bound-state soliton generation. We present observation of multi-soliton complex generation in mode-locked thulium (Tm)-doped fibre laser, using double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT-SA) and nonlinear polarisation evolution (NPE). The rigid structure of DWNTs ensures high modulation depth (64%), fast relaxation (1.25 ps) and high thermal damage threshold. This enables formation of 560-fs soliton pulses; two-soliton bound-state with 560 fs pulse duration and 1.37 ps separation; and singlet+doublet soliton structures with 1.8 ps duration and 6 ps separation. Numerical simulations based on the vectorial nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation demonstrate a transition from single-pulse to two-soliton bound-states generation. The results imply that DWNTs are an excellent SA for the formation of steady single- and multi-soliton structures around 2 μm region, which could not be supported by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The combination of the potential bandwidth resource around 2 μm with the soliton molecule concept for encoding two bits of data per clock period opens exciting opportunities for data-carrying capacity enhancement.

  11. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Mode-Locker in Tm-doped Fibre Laser: A Novel Mechanism for Robust Bound-State Solitons Generation

    PubMed Central

    Chernysheva, Maria; Bednyakova, Anastasia; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Howe, Richard C. T.; Hu, Guohua; Hasan, Tawfique; Gambetta, Alessio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Rümmeli, Mark; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2017-01-01

    The complex nonlinear dynamics of mode-locked fibre lasers, including a broad variety of dissipative structures and self-organization effects, have drawn significant research interest. Around the 2 μm band, conventional saturable absorbers (SAs) possess small modulation depth and slow relaxation time and, therefore, are incapable of ensuring complex inter-pulse dynamics and bound-state soliton generation. We present observation of multi-soliton complex generation in mode-locked thulium (Tm)-doped fibre laser, using double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT-SA) and nonlinear polarisation evolution (NPE). The rigid structure of DWNTs ensures high modulation depth (64%), fast relaxation (1.25 ps) and high thermal damage threshold. This enables formation of 560-fs soliton pulses; two-soliton bound-state with 560 fs pulse duration and 1.37 ps separation; and singlet+doublet soliton structures with 1.8 ps duration and 6 ps separation. Numerical simulations based on the vectorial nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation demonstrate a transition from single-pulse to two-soliton bound-states generation. The results imply that DWNTs are an excellent SA for the formation of steady single- and multi-soliton structures around 2 μm region, which could not be supported by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The combination of the potential bandwidth resource around 2 μm with the soliton molecule concept for encoding two bits of data per clock period opens exciting opportunities for data-carrying capacity enhancement. PMID:28287159

  12. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Mode-Locker in Tm-doped Fibre Laser: A Novel Mechanism for Robust Bound-State Solitons Generation.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, Maria; Bednyakova, Anastasia; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Howe, Richard C T; Hu, Guohua; Hasan, Tawfique; Gambetta, Alessio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Rümmeli, Mark; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2017-03-13

    The complex nonlinear dynamics of mode-locked fibre lasers, including a broad variety of dissipative structures and self-organization effects, have drawn significant research interest. Around the 2 μm band, conventional saturable absorbers (SAs) possess small modulation depth and slow relaxation time and, therefore, are incapable of ensuring complex inter-pulse dynamics and bound-state soliton generation. We present observation of multi-soliton complex generation in mode-locked thulium (Tm)-doped fibre laser, using double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT-SA) and nonlinear polarisation evolution (NPE). The rigid structure of DWNTs ensures high modulation depth (64%), fast relaxation (1.25 ps) and high thermal damage threshold. This enables formation of 560-fs soliton pulses; two-soliton bound-state with 560 fs pulse duration and 1.37 ps separation; and singlet+doublet soliton structures with 1.8 ps duration and 6 ps separation. Numerical simulations based on the vectorial nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation demonstrate a transition from single-pulse to two-soliton bound-states generation. The results imply that DWNTs are an excellent SA for the formation of steady single- and multi-soliton structures around 2 μm region, which could not be supported by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The combination of the potential bandwidth resource around 2 μm with the soliton molecule concept for encoding two bits of data per clock period opens exciting opportunities for data-carrying capacity enhancement.

  13. Microstructure characterization of advanced protective Cr/CrN+a-C:H/a-C:H:Cr multilayer coatings on carbon fibre composite (CFC).

    PubMed

    Major, L; Janusz, M; Lackner, J M; Kot, M; Major, B

    2016-06-01

    Studies of advanced protective chromium-based coatings on the carbon fibre composite (CFC) were performed. Multidisciplinary examinations were carried out comprising: microstructure transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HREM) studies, micromechanical analysis and wear resistance. Coatings were prepared using a magnetron sputtering technique with application of high-purity chromium and carbon (graphite) targets deposited on the CFC substrate. Selection of the CFC for surface modification in respect to irregularities on the surface making the CFC surface more smooth was performed. Deposited coatings consisted of two parts. The inner part was responsible for the residual stress compensation and cracking initiation as well as resistance at elevated temperatures occurring namely during surgical tools sterilization process. The outer part was responsible for wear resistance properties and biocompatibility. Experimental studies revealed that irregularities on the substrate surface had a negative influence on the crystallites growth direction. Chromium implanted into the a-C:H structure reacted with carbon forming the cubic nanocrystal chromium carbides of the Cr23 C6 type. The cracking was initiated at the coating/substrate interface and the energy of brittle cracking was reduced because of the plastic deformation at each Cr interlayer interface. The wear mechanism and cracking process was described in micro- and nanoscale by means of transmission electron microscope studies. Examined materials of coated CFC type would find applications in advanced surgical tools.

  14. TIP list

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, M E

    2006-06-22

    Subcontractors and vendors providing services, including the installation of purchased goods, are required to complete a TIP List. This list does not include every Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) related concern at LLNL. It is intended to highlight major concerns common to most on-site service activities.

  15. Technology Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohl, Hollylynne; Harper, Suzanne R.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the graphing capabilities of The Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) in the "Technology Tips" are introduced. The new graphing features of GSP allow teachers to implement the software not only in geometry classrooms but also into their algebra, precalculus and calculus classes.

  16. Technology Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic program for geometry called Cabri Geometry II is used to examine properties of figures like triangles and make connections with other mathematical ideas like ellipse. The technology tip includes directions for creating such a problem with technology and suggestions for exploring it.

  17. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles.

  18. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles.

  19. Focused ion beam preparation techniques dedicated for the fabrication of TEM lamellae of fibre-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Mucha, Herbert; Kato, Takeharu; Arai, Shigeo; Saka, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Kotaro; Wielage, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    Two Focused Ion Beam based transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin film preparation techniques are introduced. One is dedicated to the preparation of single fibres, the other to fibre/matrix interfaces of fibre reinforced composites. Due to their thin film quality, reliability and predictable processing times both techniques are suited for routine applications in material science like TEM studies of fibre microtextures and fibre/matrix interfaces. Exemplarily they are applied to Carbon Fibres and Carbon Fibre reinforced Carbon Matrix Composites (C/C). The achieved preparation standard in both cases is substantiated by TEM investigations.

  20. Fibre-reinforced materials.

    PubMed

    Brown, D

    2000-11-01

    This paper considers the role of fibres in the reinforcement of composite materials, and the significance of the form the fibre takes and the material from which it is made. The current dental applications of fibre reinforcement, including dental cements and splints, fibres made into structures for use in composites, denture bases and the contemporary use of fibres in fixed partial dentures, are reviewed. Their role in biomedical implants is surveyed and their future forecast.

  1. Preparation & characterization of SiO2 interface layer by dip coating technique on carbon fibre for Cf/SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kundan; Jariwala, C.; Pillai, R.; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon fibres (Cf) are one of the most important reinforced materials for ceramic matrix composites such as Cf - SiC composites and they are generally sought for high temperature applications in as space application, nuclear reactor and automobile industries. But the major problem arise when Cf reinforced composites exposed to high temperature in an oxidizing environment, Cf react with oxygen and burnt away. In present work, we have studied the effect of silica (SiO2) coating as a protective coating on Cf for the Cf / SiC composites. The silica solution prepared by the sol-gel process and coating on Cf is done by dip coating technique with varying the withdrawing speed i.e. 2, 5, 8 mm/s with fixed dipping cycle (3 Nos.). The uniform silica coating on the Cf is shown by the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis. The tensile test shows the increase in tensile strength with respect to increase in withdrawing speed. The isothermal oxidation analysis confirmed enhancement of oxidation resistance of silica coated Cf as compared tothe uncoated Cf.

  2. Tribological assessment of a flexible carbon-fibre-reinforced poly(ether-ether-ketone) acetabular cup articulating against an alumina femoral head.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Inman, I A; Unsworth, A; Jones, E

    2008-04-01

    New material combinations have been introduced as the bearing surfaces of hip prostheses in an attempt to prolong their life by overcoming the problems of failure due to wear-particle-induced osteolysis. This will hopefully reduce the need for revision surgery. The study detailed here used a hip simulator to assess the volumetric wear rates of large-diameter carbon-fibre-reinforced pitch-based poly(ether-ether-ketone) (CFR-PEEK) acetabular cups articulating against alumina femoral heads. The joints were tested for 25 x 10(6) cycles. Friction tests were also performed on these joints to determine the lubrication regime under which they operate. The average volumetric wear rate of the CFR-PEEK acetabular component of 54 mm diameter was 1.16 mm(3)/10(6) cycles, compared with 38.6 mm(3)/10(6) cycles for an ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene acetabular component of 28 mm diameter worn against a ceramic head. This extremely low wear rate was sustained over 25 x 10(6) cycles (the equivalent of up to approximately 25 years in vivo). The frictional studies showed that the joints worked under the mixed-boundary lubrication regime. The low wear produced by these joints showed that this novel joint couple offers low wear rates and therefore may be an alternative material choice for the reduction of osteolysis.

  3. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by urea loaded on activated carbon fibre (ACF) and CeO2/ACF at 30 degrees C: the SCR mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zheng; Lu, Pei; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming; Jiang, Xiao; Zhai, Yunbo; Fan, Xiaopeng

    2012-06-01

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by urea loaded on rayon-based activated carbon fibre (ACF) and CeO2/ACF (CA) was studied at ambient temperature (30 degrees C) to establish a basic scheme for its reduction. Nitric oxide was found to be reduced to N2 with urea deposited on the ACF and CA. When oxygen was present, the greater the amount of loaded urea (20-60%), the greater the NO(x) conversions, which were between 72.03% and 77.30%, whereas the NO(x) conversions were about 50% when oxygen was absent. Moreover, when the urea was loaded on CA, a catalyst containing 40% urea/ACF loaded with 10% CeO2 (UCA4) could yield a NO(x) conversion of about 80% for 24.5 h. Based on the experimental results, the catalytic mechanisms of SCR with and without oxygen are discussed. The enhancing effect of oxygen resulted from the oxidation of NO to NO2, and urea was the main reducing agent in the SCR of loaded catalysts. ACF-C was the catalytic centre in the SCR of NO of ACF, while CeO2 of urea-loaded CA was the catalytic centre.

  4. Preparation & characterization of SiO{sub 2} interface layer by dip coating technique on carbon fibre for C{sub f}/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Kundan; Jariwala, C. Pillai, R.; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.

    2015-08-28

    Carbon fibres (C{sub f}) are one of the most important reinforced materials for ceramic matrix composites such as C{sub f} - SiC composites and they are generally sought for high temperature applications in as space application, nuclear reactor and automobile industries. But the major problem arise when C{sub f} reinforced composites exposed to high temperature in an oxidizing environment, C{sub f} react with oxygen and burnt away. In present work, we have studied the effect of silica (SiO{sub 2}) coating as a protective coating on C{sub f} for the C{sub f} / SiC composites. The silica solution prepared by the sol-gel process and coating on C{sub f} is done by dip coating technique with varying the withdrawing speed i.e. 2, 5, 8 mm/s with fixed dipping cycle (3 Nos.). The uniform silica coating on the C{sub f} is shown by the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis. The tensile test shows the increase in tensile strength with respect to increase in withdrawing speed. The isothermal oxidation analysis confirmed enhancement of oxidation resistance of silica coated C{sub f} as compared tothe uncoated C{sub f}.

  5. Pitch-based carbon-fibre-reinforced poly (ether-ether-ketone) OPTIMA assessed as a bearing material in a mobile bearing unicondylar knee joint.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of unicondylar knee prostheses has allowed the preservation of the non-diseased compartment of the knee while replacing the diseased or damaged compartment. In an attempt to reduce the likelihood of aseptic loosening, new material combinations have been investigated within the laboratory. Tribological tests (friction, lubrication, and wear) were performed on metal-on-carbon-fibre-reinforced (CFR) poly (ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) (pitch-based) mobile unicondylar knee prostheses up to 5 x 10(6) cycles. Both a loaded soak control and an unloaded soak control (both medial and lateral components) were used to compensate for weight change due to lubricant absorption. For this material combination the loaded soak control gave slightly lower wear for both the medial and the lateral components than did the unloaded soak control. The medial components gave higher steady state wear than the lateral components (1.70 mm3 per 10(6) cycles compared with 1.02 mm3 per 10(6) cycles with the loaded soak control). The results show that the CFR PEEK unicondylar knee joints performed well in these wear tests. They gave lower volumetric wear rates than conventional metal-on-ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene prostheses have given in the past when tested under similar conditions. The friction tests showed that, at physiological viscosities, these joints operated in the boundary-mixed-lubrication regime. The low wear produced by these joints seems to be a function of the material combination and not of the lubrication regime.

  6. Self-mode-locking in erbium-doped fibre lasers with saturable polymer film absorbers containing single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausenev, Anton V.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Lobach, A. S.; Chernov, A. I.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, Evgenii M.

    2007-03-01

    We studied the ring and linear schemes of erbium-doped fibre lasers in which passive mode locking was achieved with the help of saturable absorbers made of high-optical quality films based on cellulose derivatives with dispersed single-wall carbon nanotubes. The films were prepared by the original method with the use of nanotubes synthesised by the arc discharge method. The films exhibit nonlinear absorption at a wavelength of 1.5 μm. Pulses in the form of optical solitons of duration 1.17 ps at a avelength of 1.56 μm were generated in the ring scheme of the erbium laser. The average output power was 1.1 mW at a pulse repetition rate of 20.5 MHz upon pumping by the 980-nm, 25-mW radiation from a laser diode. The pulse duration in the linear scheme was reduced to 466 fs for the output power up to 4 mW and a pulse repetition rate of 28.5 MHz. The specific feature of these lasers is a low pump threshold in the regime of generation of ultrashort pulses.

  7. Non-contact characterization of hybrid aluminium/carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic sheets using multi-frequency eddy-current sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Li, X.; Withers, P. J.; Peyton, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The characterization of hybrid aluminium/carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) sheets using multi-frequency eddy-current sensors is presented in this paper. Both air-cored circular sensors and highly directional ferrite-cored sensors are designed for bulk conductivity measurements and directionality characterization. An analytical model describing the interaction of the circular sensors with the hybrid planar structure is developed. Finite element (FE) models that take into account the anisotropicity of CFRP have also been proposed. Both models are in good agreement with experimental results. The features of the sensor output signals are analysed and explained. It is proved that an anisotropic model (tensor expression for conductivity) is appropriate for the CFRP materials under investigation. A formula to link the bulk conductivity with the conductivity tensor is proposed and verified. Lift-off effects are also discussed. It is believed that this is amongst the first published reports of using eddy-current techniques for characterizing the hybrid aluminium/CFRP material.

  8. Treatment of dye works wastewater using anaerobic-oxic biological filter reactor packed with carbon fibre and aerated with micro-bubbles.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, T; Yamamoto-Ikemoto, R; Sakurai, E

    2006-01-01

    A new anaerobic-oxic biological filter reactor, which was packed with carbon fibre and aerated with micro-bubbles, was proposed. The reactor performance was examined using dye works wastewater compared with the activated sludge reactor. Effluent SS from the experimental reactor was significantly lower than that from the activated sludge reactor, and transparency was higher. Temperatures of the activated sludge reactor were over 35 degrees C and DOC removal ratios were 40-80% depending on the influent wastewater. On the other hand, the DOC removal efficiency of the experimental reactor was over 70%, when the reactor temperature was over 22 degrees C. In the anaerobic zone, sulphate reduction occurred predominantly and acetate was produced. In the oxic reactor, sulphur oxidation and organic removal occurred. When the amount of sulphate reduction in the anaerobic zone increased, DOC and colour in effluent decreased. The sulphate reducing activity of biofilm at 30 degrees C was three times higher than those at 20 degrees C. The sulphate reducing activity of biofilm in the oxic zone was higher than those in the anaerobic zone, meaning that the sulphate reduction-oxidation cycles were established in the biofilm of the oxic zone. Microbial community of sulphate reducing bacteria was examined by in situ hybridisation with 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes. Desulfobulbus spp. was most common sulphate reducing bacteria in the anaerobic zone. In the oxic zone, Desulfobulbus spp. and Desulfococcus spp. were observed.

  9. Microwave-synthesized freestanding iron-carbon nanotubes on polyester composites of woven Kevlar fibre and silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K.; Kim, DoYoung; Kong, Kyungil; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized Ag nanoparticle-decorated multilayered graphene nanosheets (Ag-graphene) from graphite nanoplatelets and silver nitrate through 90–100 s of microwave exposure, without the use of any mineral acids or harsh reducing agents. Fe nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs) were grown on polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on woven Kevlar fibre (WKF), using ferrocene as a catalyst, under microwave irradiation. Fe-CNTs grown on WKF and Ag-graphene dispersed in polyester resin (PES) were combined to fabricate Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites by vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding. The combined effect of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene in the resulting composites resulted in a remarkable enhancement of tensile properties (a 192.56% increase in strength and 100.64% increase in modulus) as well as impact resistance (a 116.33% increase). The electrical conductivity significantly increased for Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites. The effectiveness of electromagnetic interference shielding, which relies strongly on the Ag-graphene content in the composites, was 25 times higher in Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES than in neat WKF/PES composites. The current work offers a novel route for fabricating highly promising, cost effective WKF/PES composites through microwave-assisted synthesis of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene. PMID:28074877

  10. Microwave-synthesized freestanding iron-carbon nanotubes on polyester composites of woven Kevlar fibre and silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K.; Kim, Doyoung; Kong, Kyungil; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized Ag nanoparticle-decorated multilayered graphene nanosheets (Ag-graphene) from graphite nanoplatelets and silver nitrate through 90–100 s of microwave exposure, without the use of any mineral acids or harsh reducing agents. Fe nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs) were grown on polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on woven Kevlar fibre (WKF), using ferrocene as a catalyst, under microwave irradiation. Fe-CNTs grown on WKF and Ag-graphene dispersed in polyester resin (PES) were combined to fabricate Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites by vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding. The combined effect of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene in the resulting composites resulted in a remarkable enhancement of tensile properties (a 192.56% increase in strength and 100.64% increase in modulus) as well as impact resistance (a 116.33% increase). The electrical conductivity significantly increased for Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites. The effectiveness of electromagnetic interference shielding, which relies strongly on the Ag-graphene content in the composites, was 25 times higher in Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES than in neat WKF/PES composites. The current work offers a novel route for fabricating highly promising, cost effective WKF/PES composites through microwave-assisted synthesis of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene.

  11. Microwave-synthesized freestanding iron-carbon nanotubes on polyester composites of woven Kevlar fibre and silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Ankita; Deka, Biplab K; Kim, DoYoung; Kong, Kyungil; Park, Young-Bin; Park, Hyung Wook

    2017-01-11

    We synthesized Ag nanoparticle-decorated multilayered graphene nanosheets (Ag-graphene) from graphite nanoplatelets and silver nitrate through 90-100 s of microwave exposure, without the use of any mineral acids or harsh reducing agents. Fe nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs) were grown on polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on woven Kevlar fibre (WKF), using ferrocene as a catalyst, under microwave irradiation. Fe-CNTs grown on WKF and Ag-graphene dispersed in polyester resin (PES) were combined to fabricate Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites by vacuum-assisted resin transfer moulding. The combined effect of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene in the resulting composites resulted in a remarkable enhancement of tensile properties (a 192.56% increase in strength and 100.64% increase in modulus) as well as impact resistance (a 116.33% increase). The electrical conductivity significantly increased for Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES composites. The effectiveness of electromagnetic interference shielding, which relies strongly on the Ag-graphene content in the composites, was 25 times higher in Ag-graphene/Fe-CNT/PPy-coated WKF/PES than in neat WKF/PES composites. The current work offers a novel route for fabricating highly promising, cost effective WKF/PES composites through microwave-assisted synthesis of Fe-CNTs and Ag-graphene.

  12. Phosphate glass fibres and their role in neuronal polarization and axonal growth direction.

    PubMed

    Vitale-Brovarone, C; Novajra, G; Lousteau, J; Milanese, D; Raimondo, S; Fornaro, M

    2012-03-01

    Phosphate glass fibres with composition 50P(2)O(5)-30CaO-9Na(2)O-3SiO(2)-3MgO-(5-x)K(2)O-xTiO(2)mol.% (x=0, 2.5, 5, respectively coded as TiPS(0), TiPS(2.5) and TiPS(5)) were drawn following the preform drawing approach. A 20-day solubility test in bi-distilled water was carried out on glass fibres with different compositions and diameters ranging between 25 and 82 μm. The results show that the glass composition, the initial fibre diameter and the thermal treatment are the main factors influencing the dissolution kinetics and that the fibres maintain their structural integrity and composition during dissolution. Biological tests were carried out on aligned TiPS(2.5) glass fibres using Neonatal Olfactory Bulb Ensheathing Cell Line (NOBEC) and Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG) neurons. The fibres showed to be permissive substrates for cell adhesion and proliferation. The aligned configuration of the fibres seemed to provide a directional cue for growing axons of DRG neurons, which showed to sprout and grow long neurites along the fibre axis direction. These promising findings encourages further studies to evaluate the potential use of resorbable glass fibres (e.g.in combination with a nerve guidance tube) for the enhancement of the peripheral nerve healing with the role of supporting and guiding the cells involved in the nerve regeneration.

  13. Nonvascular, Symplasmic Diffusion of Sucrose Cannot Satisfy the Carbon Demands of Growth in the Primary Root Tip of Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Bret-Harte, M. S.; Silk, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    Nonvascular, symplasmic transport of sucrose (Suc) was investigated theoretically in the primary root tip of maize (Zea mays L. cv WF9 x Mo 17) seedlings. Symplasmic diffusion has been assumed to be the mechanism of transport of Suc to cells in the root apical meristem (R.T. Giaquinta, W. Lin, N.L. Sadler, V.R. Franceschi [1983] Plant Physiol 72: 362-367), which grow apical to the end of the phloem and must build all biomass with carbon supplied from the shoot or kernel. We derived an expression for the growth-sustaining Suc flux, which is the minimum longitudinal flux that would be required to meet the carbon demands of growth in the root apical meristem. We calculated this flux from data on root growth velocity, area, and biomass density, taking into account construction and maintenance respiration and the production of mucilage by the root cap. We then calculated the conductivity of the symplasmic pathway for diffusion, from anatomical data on cellular dimensions and the frequency and dimensions of plasmodesmata, and from two estimates of the diffusive conductance of a plasmodesma, derived from independent data. Then, the concentration gradients required to drive a growth-sustaining Suc flux by diffusion alone were calculated but were found not to be physiologically reasonable. We also calculated the hydraulic conductivity of the plasmodesmatal pathway and found that mass flow of Suc solution through plasmodesmata would also be insufficient, by itself, to satisfy the carbon demands of growth. However, much of the demand for water to cause cell expansion could be met by the water unloaded from the phloem while unloading Suc to satisfy the carbon demands of growth, and the hydraulic conductivity of plasmodesmata is high enough that much of that water could move symplasmically. Either our current understanding of plasmodesmatal ultrastructure and function is flawed, or alternative transport mechanisms must exist for Suc transport to the meristem. PMID:12232183

  14. Restorative Case Report: Flexibility of Fibre-Posts.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Paula E

    2015-06-01

    Restoration of an anterior root-filled tooth with little remaining coronal tooth-tissue can utilise a post to retain a core, enabling definitive restoration. Post material was, until recently, primarily metal--be it cast or prefabricated. Currently, fibre-posts are promoted as being advantageous due to a favourable failure mechanism which may protect the root from fracture. This Case Report demonstrates failure of the structural integrity of a fibre-post in a maxillary lateral incisor, with a proposed explanation. Retreatment employed a diamond-coated ultrasonic tip for removal of the residual fibre-post and restoration with a cast-post and metal ceramic crown.

  15. Mode I fracture toughness behavior of hydro-thermally aged carbon fibre reinforced DGEBA-HHPA-PES systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, Sabina; Pitarresi, Giuseppe; Spadaro, Giuseppe; Tumino, Davide

    2012-07-01

    In this work the Mode I fracture toughness behavior of unidirectional CFRP laminates is investigated by means of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests. The composite samples were manufactured by thermal curing after impregnation of a Carbon fabric with a DGEBA epoxy and anhydride HHPA curing agent. One resin batch was also mixed with a PES thermoplastic monomer to enhance the matrix toughness. Two lots of samples, toughened and untoughened, were then left to soak in hot water to achieve various degrees of aging. The influence of matrix toughening and hydrothermal aging on the delamination behavior of the composite have then been assessed and correlated with characterization data from Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  16. Investigations into the damage for various types of unprotected carbon fibre composites with a variety of lightning arc attachments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Very little quantitative information exists on the extent and nature of damage caused to unprotected carbon fiber composites (CFC's) due to lightning arc attachment. An initial investigation into the arc damage to three different types and various thickness of CFC's from A and C component type lightning discharges is described. The difference in damage which the two types of waveform produced and the way the area of damage varies with different levels of action integral and charge transfer is compared. In some cases, the temperature rise at the rear of the panels was recorded for various levels of action integral and charge transfer. A comparison was made of the area of damage from visual inspection and soft x ray photography, using a suitable penetrant in the damage area. It is concluded there is a need for a more detailed analysis of the damage.

  17. Use of a novel carbon fibre composite material for the femoral stem component of a THR system: in vitro biological assessment.

    PubMed

    Scotchford, Colin A; Garle, Michael J; Batchelor, J; Bradley, John; Grant, David M

    2003-11-01

    A novel, low elastic modulus femoral component for THR has been developed using a composite of polyetheretherketone and carbon fibre. The objectives of this study were to investigate human osteoblast-like cell and macrophage responses to this material in vitro. Cells were grown on composite discs and controls. Osteoblast attachment and proliferation was not significantly different to that on Ti6Al4V. The levels of alkaline phosphatase activity, Type I collagen production and osteocalcin production were not significantly different to that on Ti6Al4V by the end of the experimental period. Hydrogen peroxide production by macrophages was significantly less than that detected for cells cultured on copper, but was still greater than that detected for cells cultured on tissue culture plastic and Ti6Al4V. Beta-glucoronidase activity was not significantly different to that detected for cells cultured on tissue culture plastic. The in vitro biocompatibility assessment of this composite undertaken in this study showed initial osteoblast attachment at least comparable to that of the tissue culture plastic and Ti6Al4V controls, with proliferation similar to the controls at all time points up to 11 days. Alkaline phosphatase activity was similar to that of Ti6Al4V but reduced compared to tissue culture plastic controls. Whilst hydrogen peroxide production by macrophages was raised on composite surfaces compared to controls, beta-glucoronidase activity and osteoblastic production of Type I collagen and osteocalcin were similar to levels detected on Ti6Al4V.

  18. Molecularly imprinted polymer solid-phase extraction coupled to square wave voltammetry at carbon fibre microelectrodes for the determination of fenbendazole in beef liver.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Vázquez de Prada, A; Loaiza, Oscar A; Serra, B; Morales, D; Martínez-Ruiz, P; Reviejo, A J; Pingarrón, J M

    2007-05-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer was developed and used for solid-phase extraction (MISPE) of the antihelmintic fenbendazole in beef liver samples. Detection of the analyte was accomplished using square wave voltammetry (SWV) at a cylindrical carbon fibre microelectrode (CFME). A mixture of MeOH/HAc (9:1) was employed both as eluent in the MISPE system and as working medium for electrochemical detection of fenbendazole. The limit of detection was 1.9x10(-7) mol L-1 (57 microg L-1), which was appropriate for the determination of fenbendazole at the maximum residue level permitted by the European Commission (500 microg kg-1 in liver). Given that the SW voltammetric analysis could not be directly performed in the sample extract as a consequence of interference from some sample components, a sample clean-up with a MIP for selectively retaining fenbendazole was performed. The MIP was synthesized using a 1:8:22 template/methacrylic acid/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate ratio. A Britton-Robinson Buffer of pH 9.0 was selected for retaining fenbendazole in the MIP cartridges, and an eluent volume of 5.0 mL at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min-1 was chosen in the elution step. Cross-reactivity with the MIP was observed for other benzimidazoles. The synthesized MIP exhibited a good selectivity for benzimidazoles with respect to other veterinary drugs. The applicability of the MISPE-SWV method was tested with beef liver samples, spiked with fenbendazole at 5,000 and 500 microg kg-1. Results obtained for ten different liver samples yielded mean recoveries of (95+/-12)% and (96+/-11)% for the upper and lower concentration level, respectively.

  19. Tips for Daily Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips and Gadgets for Daily Activities Dressing Tips Shopping Tips Modifying the Bathroom Driving After Stroke Medication ... and resources. Find a group in your area . Online Support If there is not a support group ...

  20. First Aid Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEI for Kids > First Aid Tips All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun ...

  1. In situ self-sensing fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, S.; Liu, T.; Brooks, D.; Monteith, S.; Ralph, B.; Vickers, S.; Fernando, G. F.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses the development of a novel composite system in which some of the reinforcing fibres act as the light guide. The reinforcing fibre light guide was made by applying an appropriate cladding material onto commercially available 9 0964-1726/6/4/007/img1m diameter silica fibres. The resultant light guide was termed a `self-sensing' fibre. The self-sensing fibres were embedded within a 16-ply carbon fibre reinforced epoxy prepreg system and cured to produce a composite panel. The composite panels were impact tested to investigate the feasibility of using the self-sensing fibres as an impact damage sensor system. Similarly, three types of conventional optical fibre, with outer diameters of 30, 50 and 125 0964-1726/6/4/007/img1m respectively, were also embedded within composite panels. The results indicated that the self-sensing fibres were capable of detecting impact damage as low as 2 J for impacts carried out using a 20 mm hemispherical tup. The self-sensing fibres proved more sensitive to impact damage than the conventional optical fibres used in this study.

  2. Fibre Optics In Automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmer, A. L.

    1984-08-01

    Optical fibres are used in three application areas in automobiles. Illumination of the dashboard is done with a single lamp and monofilament fibres or woven tapes which illuminate the front panel. Fibre-optic multiplexing can replace the conventional wiring harness. Different trial systems (two-fibre links, bidirectional transmission, star-coupled architecture) are reviewed. Problems still exist in component performance, high costs and unknown reliability of optoelectronic systems. Fibre-optics are also used in sensors; for headlight monitoring, liquid-level sensing and other applications.

  3. Compaction in optical fibres and fibre Bragg gratings under nuclear reactor high neutron and gamma fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Remy, L.; Cheymol, G.; Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S.

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the development by CEA and SCK.CEN of a Fabry Perot Sensor (FPS) able to measure dimensional changes in Material Testing Reactor (MTR), the first goal of the SAKE 1 (Smirnof extention - Additional Key-tests on Elongation of glass fibres) irradiation was to measure the linear compaction of single mode fibres under high fast neutron fluence. Indeed, the compaction of the fibre which forms one side of the Fabry Perot cavity, may in particular cause a noticeable measurement error. An accurate quantification of this effect is then required to predict the radiation-induced drift and optimize the sensor design. To achieve this, an innovative approach was used. Approximately seventy uncoated fibre tips (length: 30 to 50 mm) have been prepared from several different fibre samples and were installed in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). After 22 days of irradiation a total fast (E > 1 MeV) fluence of 3 to 5x10{sup 19} n{sub fast}/cm{sup 2}, depending on the sample location, was accumulated. The temperature during irradiation was 291 deg. C, which is not far from the condition of the intended FPS use. A precise measurement of each fibre tip length was made before the irradiation and compared to the post irradiation measurement highlighting a decrease of the fibres' length corresponding to about 0.25% of linear compaction. The amplitude of the changes is independent of the capsule, which could mean that the compaction effect saturates even at the lowest considered fluence. In the prospect of performing distributed temperature measurement in MTR, several fibre Bragg gratings written using a femtosecond laser have been also irradiated. All the gratings were written in radiation hardened fibres, and underwent an additional treatment with a procedure enhancing their resistance to ionizing radiations. A special mounting made it possible to test the reflection and the transmission of the gratings on fibre samples cut down to 30 to 50 mm. The comparison of

  4. Tip-modulation scanned gate microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Neil R; Cobden, David H

    2008-08-01

    We introduce a technique that improves the sensitivity and resolution and eliminates the nonlocal background of scanned gate microscopy (SGM). In conventional SGM, a voltage bias is applied to the atomic force microscope tip and the sample conductance is measured as the tip is scanned. In the new technique, which we call tip-modulation SGM (tmSGM), the biased tip is oscillated and the induced oscillation of the sample conductance is measured. Applied to single-walled carbon nanotube network devices, tmSGM gives sharp, low-noise and background-free images.

  5. Children Health Tips in Other Languages

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These tips for protecting children from environmental risks/exposures are available in spanish, chinese, vietnamese, and korean. They cover topics such as lead, pesticides, carbon monoxide, air pollution, drinking water contaminants, and radon.

  6. Fibre mapping analysis in composite forming: Experimental and numerical comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmars, J.; Rusanov, A.; Ta, A. T.; Naouar, N.; Boisse, P.

    2016-10-01

    The work presented here is part of European project "FibreMap", which aims at the development of an automatic quality control and feedback mechanism to improve draping of carbon fibres on complex parts. The technology that is being developed in the project include a sensor system for robust detection of fibre orientation combined with a robotic system to scan complex parts. This paper focus on a comparison procedure made to compare experimental fibre orientation with finite element simulations results. First comparison results will be shown on a complex part chosen for the project.

  7. Tips for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan, Comp.; Morningstar, Mary E., Comp.

    2009-01-01

    The Tips for Transition contains 134 Transition Tips submitted from all over the country by practitioners. The purpose of the Tips was to identify grassroots transition practices being used by practitioners. Tips are categorized into the following domains: (1) Transition Planning; (2) Student Involvement; (3) Family Involvement; (4) Curriculum and…

  8. Probe tip heating assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  9. Therapeutic role of dietary fibre.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R.; Fedorak, R.; Frohlich, J.; McLennan, C.; Pavilanis, A.

    1993-01-01

    The current status of dietary fibre and fibre supplements in health and disease is reported, and the components of dietary fibre and its respective mechanical and metabolic effects with emphasis on its therapeutic potential are reviewed. Practical management guidelines are provided to help physicians encourage patients identified as having fibre deficiency to increase dietary fibre intake to the recommended level. PMID:8388284

  10. Development of novel composites through fibre and interface/interphase modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bismarck, A.; Blaker, JJ; Anthony, DB; Qian, H.; Maples, HA; Robinson, P.; Shaffer, MSP; Greenhalgh, ES

    2016-07-01

    We show how fibre/matrix interface (or interphase) modification can be used to develop a range of novel carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites that open up new applications far beyond those of standard CFRPs. For example, composites that undergo pseudo-ductile failure have been created through laser treatment of carbon fibres. Composites manufactured with thermo-responsive interphases can undergo significant reductions in stiffness at elevated temperatures. Additionally, structural supercapacitors have been developed through a process that involves encapsulating carbon fibres in carbon aerogel.

  11. In-situ process and condition monitoring of advanced fibre-reinforced composite materials using optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, C.; Martin, A.; Liu, T.; Wu, M.; Hayes, S.; Crosby, P. A.; Powell, G. R.; Brooks, D.; Fernando, G. F.

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a general overview of a number of optical fibre sensor systems which have been developed and used in advanced fibre-reinforced composites for in-situ process and condition monitoring. The in-situ process monitoring techniques were optical-fibre-based evanescent wave spectroscopy, transmission near-infrared spectroscopy and refractive index monitoring. The optical fibre sensors were successful in tracking the cure reaction. The condition monitoring of advanced fibre-reinforced composites was carried out using two intensity-based optical fibre sensor systems: an extrinsic multi-mode Fabry-Pérot sensor and Bragg gratings. In addition to this, the feasibility of using the reinforcing fibre as a light guide was demonstrated. These sensor systems were evaluated under quasi-static, impact and fatigue loading. The test specimens consisted of prepreg-based carbon-fibre-reinforced epoxy and glass-fibre-reinforced epoxy filament-wound tubes. Excellent correlation was obtained between surface-mounted strain gauges and the embedded optical fibre sensors. The feasibility of using these sensor systems for the detection of impact damage and stiffness reduction in the composite due to fatigue damage was successfully demonstrated.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Fibre-Reinforced Composites Tested under Superposed Hydrostatic Pressures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    The carbon fibres were Harwell Type II surface treated with a smn strength of 2240 K1v-2 and a noen diameter of 9.08 Pa. The glans fibres were Owens ... Corning type 810C. The fibres were pulled by means of a slteel cord cast, via a brasum scro, into the end of the 4 fibre b6ndles. The rods produced

  13. Sensitive determination of bisphenol A and bisphenol F in canned food using a solid-phase microextraction fibre coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes before GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Rastkari, N; Ahmadkhaniha, R; Yunesian, M; Baleh, L J; Mesdaghinia, A

    2010-10-01

    A reliable and sensitive method for simultaneous determination of bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol F (BPF) in canned food by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is described after extraction and pre-concentration by a new solid-phase microextraction (SPME) adsorbent. The potential of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as SPME adsorbent for the pre-concentration of environmental contaminants has been investigated in recent years. This work was carried out to investigate the feasibility of SWCNTs as a headspace SPME adsorbent for the determination of bisphenol derivatives in canned food. Potential factors affecting the extraction efficiency, including extraction time, extraction temperature, desorption time, desorption temperature, and salinity were optimized. Calibration curves were linear (r(2)> or = 0.994) over the concentration range from 0.30 to 60 microg kg(-1). For both target analytes, the limit of detection (LOD) at signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 3 was 0.10 microg kg(-1). In addition, a comparative study between the SWCNT and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fibre for the determination of bisphenol derivatives in canned food was conducted. SWCNT fibre showed higher extraction capacity, better thermal stability (over 350 degrees C) and longer life span (over 150 times) than the commercial PDMS fibre. The method was successfully applied to determine BPA in canned food samples which were purchased from local markets. BPA was found in some of the samples within the concentration range from 0.5 to 5.2 microg kg(-1).

  14. Slender tip laser scalpel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-01-06

    A laser scalpel includes a ribbon optical waveguide extending therethrough and terminating at a slender optical cutting tip. A laser beam is emitted along the height of the cutting tip for cutting tissue therealong.

  15. Healthy Vision Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEI for Kids > Healthy Vision Tips All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  16. Fibre and enteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D B

    1989-01-01

    The recent launch of a number of fibre enriched polymeric diet in the United States and Europe has stimulated considerable interest in the topic of fibre and enteral nutrition, and several commercial concerns appear to be under considerable pressures from their consumers to produce similar products. As a means of identifying areas of potential application of fibre to enteral nutrition some of the recent knowledge gained about the physical properties of dietary fibre and the processes involved in the intestinal assimilation of fibre has been reviewed. Two areas of interest are identifiable. The first relates to the bulking properties of fibre and the application of this to the regulation of bowel function in enterally fed patients. It is clear from the clinical studies that have been reviewed that there remains a paucity of controlled data, and a great deal more research is needed before widespread use of fibre supplemented diets can be supported. Perhaps of greater interest academically is the potentially beneficial effects that appear to be exerted by the VFA's, liberated as a consequence of colonic bacterial fermentation of fibre, on morphology and function of ileal and colonic mucosa. Although there are a number of potential applications of fibre supplemented enteral diets in this area, more research is required before any firm recommendations can be made about recommending their use. The one exception concerns patients with the nutritionally inadequate short bowel syndrome. There does seem to be sufficient experimental evidence to suggest that clinical studies should be commenced using a pectin supplemented predigested 'elemental' diet in these patients. Overall therefore, one is forced to conclude that the increasing interest and use of fibre supplemented enteral diets is being driven more by market than scientific forces. Nevertheless, the promotion of these diets has already provided a powerful stimulus to the scientific community, and it remains entirely

  17. Child Transportation Safety Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents nine tips regarding safe infant and child transportation, each tip explained in one to two pages. The tips are as follows: (1) quick safety seat checkup; (2) where should your child ride? (3) how to protect your new baby in the car; (4) what safety seat to use for a big baby or toddler? (5) how should preschool and school…

  18. New generation of optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Dianov, E M; Semjonov, S L; Bufetov, I A

    2016-01-31

    The growing need for information in contemporary society is the motivating force behind the development of fibre optics in general and optical fibre communications in particular. Intensive research effort has been concentrated on designing new types of optical fibres and extending their application field. This paper reviews results of research on new types of optical fibres: bismuthdoped active fibres, multicore fibres and hollow-core fibres, which can be used as key components of systems that ensure further increase in optical information transfer rate. (invited paper)

  19. Economics of tipping the climate dominoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Derek; Traeger, Christian P.

    2016-05-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions can trigger irreversible regime shifts in the climate system, known as tipping points. Multiple tipping points affect each other’s probability of occurrence, potentially causing a `domino effect’. We analyse climate policy in the presence of a potential domino effect. We incorporate three different tipping points occurring at unknown thresholds into an integrated climate-economy model. The optimal emission policy considers all possible thresholds and the resulting interactions between tipping points, economic activity, and policy responses into the indefinite future. We quantify the cost of delaying optimal emission controls in the presence of uncertain tipping points and also the benefit of detecting when individual tipping points have been triggered. We show that the presence of these tipping points nearly doubles today’s optimal carbon tax and reduces peak warming along the optimal path by approximately 1 °C. The presence of these tipping points increases the cost of delaying optimal policy until mid-century by nearly 150%.

  20. Arctic climate tipping points.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the Arctic are briefly reviewed. Then, the current behaviour of a range of Arctic systems is summarised. Looking ahead, a range of potential tipping phenomena are described. This leads to a revised and expanded list of potential Arctic climate tipping elements, whose likelihood is assessed, in terms of how much warming will be required to tip them. Finally, the available responses are considered, especially the prospects for avoiding Arctic climate tipping points.

  1. Experimental comparison of laser energy losses in high-quality laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using radiation from fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Golyshev, A A; Malikov, A G; Orishich, A M; Shulyat'ev, V B

    2015-09-30

    We report a comparative experimental study of laseroxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using a fibre laser with a wavelength of 1.07 μm and a CO{sub 2} laser with a wavelength of 10.6 μm at the sheet thickness of 3 – 16 mm. For the two lasers we have measured the dependence of the cutting speed on the radiation power and determined the cutting speed at which the surface roughness is minimal. The coefficient of laser radiation absorption in the laser cutting process is measured for these lasers at different values of the cutting speed and radiation power. It is found that the minimal roughness of the cut surface is reached at the absorbed laser energy per unit volume of the removed material, equal to 11 – 13 J mm{sup -3}; this value is the same for the two lasers and does not depend on the sheet thickness. (laser technologies)

  2. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G.; Abboud, Zeinab; Bressler, David C.

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  3. Fibres get functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham-Rowe, Duncan

    2011-02-01

    New forms of advanced optical fibres featuring exotic glasses, carefully designed microstructures and cores that are either hollow, fluidic, semiconductor or piezoelectric are giving light guides a new lease of life, reports Duncan Graham-Rowe.

  4. Ultrafast fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermann, Martin E.; Hartl, Ingmar

    2013-11-01

    Ultrafast fibre lasers are fundamental building blocks of many photonic systems used in industrial and medical applications as well as for scientific research. Here, we review the essential components and operation regimes of ultrafast fibre lasers and discuss how they are instrumental in a variety of applications. In regards to laser technology, we discuss the present state of the art of large-mode-area fibres and their utilization in high-power, chirped-pulse amplification systems. In terms of commercial applications, we introduce industrial micromachining and medical imaging, and describe emerging applications in the mid-infrared and extreme-ultraviolet spectral regions, as facilitated by frequency shifting induced by fibre frequency combs.

  5. Localization and attempted quantification of various functional groups on pulpwood fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klash, A.; Ncube, E.; Meincken, M.

    2009-04-01

    The distribution of different free chemical functional groups on wood and pulp fibres has been determined by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with chemically modified tips. Because these functional groups show a higher affinity to similar groups on the substrate surface during scanning, AFM images determined with an additional digital pulsed-force mode (DPFM) controller allow the distribution of the chemical components to be imaged and to a degree also to be quantified. The investigated tip coatings showed a different sensitivity towards the major chemical components present in wood fibres, determined on spin-coated films and on wood fibres. A clear distinction between cellulose and lignin was possible in both cases. This technique could therefore be used to differentiate between cellulose and lignin present on pulp fibre surfaces and confirm the successful removal of lignin by pulping.

  6. Helicopter blade tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyothier, R.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of improving helicopter performance and vibration level by proper shaping of helicopter blade tips are considered. The principle involved consists of reducing the extent of the supersonic zone above the advancing tip and of the turbulent interaction. For stationary and advancing flight, the influence of the rotor and the problems posed by blade tips are reviewed. The theoretical methods of dealing with the two types of flight are briefly stated, and the experimental apparatus is described, including model triple and quadruple rotors. Different blade tip shapes are shown and briefly discussed. The theoretical results include an advancing speed of 309 km/H and a blade tip rotational speed of 215 m/s. The experimental values are advancing speed of 302 km/h and blade tip Mach number 0.86 for both types of rotors.

  7. Investigating the particle to fibre transition threshold during electrohydrodynamic atomization of a polymer solution.

    PubMed

    Husain, O; Lau, W; Edirisinghe, M; Parhizkar, M

    2016-08-01

    Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) is a key research area for producing micro and nano-sized structures. This process can be categorized into two main operating regimes: electrospraying for particle generation and electrospinning for fibre production. Producing particles/fibres of the desired size or morphology depends on two main factors; properties of the polymeric solution used and the processing conditions including flow rate, applied voltage and collection distance. In this work the particle-fibre transition region was analyzed by changing the polymer concentration of PLGA poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) in acetone between 2 and 25wt%. Subsequently the processing conditions were adjusted to study the optimum transition parameters. Additionally the EHDA configuration was also modified by adding a metallic plate to observe the deposition area. The diameter and the distance of the plate from the capillary tip were adjusted to investigate variations in particle and fibre morphologies as well. It was found that complete transition from particles to fibres occurs at 20wt% indicating concentration to be the dominant criterion. Low flow rates yielded fibres without beads. However the applied voltage and distance between the tip of the nozzle jetting the polymer solution and collector (working distance) did not yield definitive results. Reducing the collector distance and increasing applied voltages produces smooth as well as beaded fibres. Addition of a metal plate reduces particle size by ~1μm; the fibre size increases especially with increasing plate diameter while bead density and size reduces when the disc is fixed closer to the capillary tip. Additionally, the deposition area is reduced by 70% and 57% with the addition of metal plates of 30mm and 60mm, respectively. The results indicate that a metal plate can be utilized further to tune the particle/fibre size and morphology and this also significantly increases the yield of EHDA process which is currently a

  8. Hot Weather Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... FCA - A A + A You are here Home HOT Weather Tips Printer-friendly version We all suffer in hot weather. However, for elderly and disabled people and ... stress and following these tips for dealing with hot weather. Wear cool clothing: See that the person ...

  9. Total Telephone Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Lloyd E.; And Others

    This manual of telephone behavior tips for business and sales professionals offers ways to handle the disgruntled caller and makes suggestions on topics relevant to the telephone. The manual is divided into the following sections and subsections: (1) Common Courtesy (staff tips, answering the telephone, screening calls, transferring calls, taking…

  10. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOEpatents

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  11. [Pleural lymphatics and pleural diseases related to fibres].

    PubMed

    Fleury Feith, J; Jaurand, M-C

    2013-12-01

    It is now well established that some pleural diseases, pleural plaques and malignant mesothelioma are related to asbestos fibre exposure although the mechanism of action of asbestos fibres is not fully understood. The development of artificial mineral fibres and carbon nanotubes, which share some morphological characteristics similar to asbestos fibres, is a present concern in the context of pleural diseases. Pleural plaques develop only in the parietal pleura, and in the 1990s, clinical observations have shown that the early development of mesothelioma also occurred on the parietal pleura. The peculiarity of the parietal pleura in contrast to the visceral pleura is the presence of "stomas" which are communication holes between the pleural cavity and the parietal pleura lymphatics. Morphological observations by thoracoscopy and experimental studies have shown that inhaled fibres translocate to the pleural space and, in human, are present in the parietal pleura at specific anthracotic areas (blackspots). Fibres accumulate on the stomas, up to block and locally induce an inflammatory reaction with cytokines release, that can be the bed of mesothelioma. However, despite the experimental data and observations in human pathology, the mechanisms of fibre translocation into the pleura is not yet clearly established.

  12. Parameters influencing the thermal expansion of polymers and fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baschek, G.; Hartwig, G.

    Thermal expansion of polymers and fibre composites is an important design parameter in cryogenics. Measurements have been carried out with a laser interference dilatometer and an inductive dilatometer. Parameters which might influence the thermal expansion have been investigated. For polymers the influence of annealing has been studied. Annealing at a temperature near to the main glass transition yielded deviations of about 5% compared to those of untreated samples. The very large expansion of polymers can be drastically varied by reinforcement with fibres of different fibre arrangements. For carbon fibre angle-plies even negative expansion can be achieved (Humphreys, E.A. and Rosen, B.W., Properties analysis of laminates. In Engineered Materials Handbook, Vol. 1, Composites. ASM International, USA, 1987, p. 226). This behaviour arises from thermally induced shear stresses between the laminates. For carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CRPs) with different fibre angles the influences of thermal cycling, mechanical creep loading and geometrical shape (plates, half-tubes and tubes) on the expansion behaviour has been investigated. The expansion is influenced in a different manner by thermal cycling and mechanical creep loading. The largest effects arise from thermal cycling and mechanical creep loading of CRPs. The geometrical shape of the specimens influences the expansion behaviour remarkably. The expansion of tubes is smaller compared to that of plates. The reason is coupling of radial and azimuthal components existing for cylindrical samples.

  13. The effect of the addition of different fibres on the transverse and impact strength of acrylic resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Rahamneh, A; Jagger, D C; Harrison, A

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the addition of different types of fibres on the transverse and impact strength of acrylic resin denture base material. The addition of glass fibres (strand) and polyethylene fibres produced a non significant increase in the modulus of elasticity, compared with the control of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin. The addition of glass fibres (woven and strand), polyethylene and carbon fibres to acrylic resin produced a non significant increase in the modulus of rupture. The addition of carbon, glass (strand) and polyethylene fibres produced a significant increase in the impact strength. Within the limitations of this study the addition of silk fibres did not produce an improvement in the mechanical properties.

  14. Bed Bug Tips

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    How to deal with bed bugs in one printable page. Ten tips include ensuring correct insect identification, reducing clutter, understand integrated pest management, using mattress and box spring encasements, and heat treatment.

  15. Tips for labor coaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... some tips for getting prepared. Before the big day Arrives Labor coaches should go to childbirth classes ... get through her labor and delivery. When the day Arrives You might be at the hospital for ...

  16. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  17. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Jim; Ashcraft, Nikki; Clarke, Paul M.; Wolf, Grant S.

    1999-01-01

    Four tips for use in the English-as-a-Second-Language classroom are highlighted: Mr. Bean in the Classroom; Defining Your Future; Coin Questions; Our Futures: Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. (Author/VWL)

  18. Tips for Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Tips for Chronic Pain The SSF thanks Stuart S. Kassan, MD, FACP, Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, for authoring ...

  19. Eye Drop Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  20. Intraoperative fracture of phacoemulsification tip.

    PubMed

    Angmo, Dewang; Khokhar, Sudarshan K; Ganguly, Anasua

    2014-01-01

    Phacoemulsification (phaco) is an established procedure for cataract extraction and has undergone a significant advances in techniques, machines and phaco tips. The Aspiration Bypass System (ABS) phaco tip was introduced for phacoemulsification in 1998. The ABS tip allows fluid to be drawn through the opening when the phaco tip is occluded by nuclear material. The ABS tip allowed the safe use of high vacuum and flow rates and improved chamber stability by decreasing surge and therefore reducing intraoperative complications. To date, no disadvantages of ABS tips have been reported. We report a unique case of an intraoperative break of an ABS phaco tip during routine cataract surgery.

  1. Fibre-optical microendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Gu, M; Bao, H; Kang, H

    2014-04-01

    Microendoscopy has been an essential tool in exploring micro/nano mechanisms in vivo due to high-quality imaging performance, compact size and flexible movement. The investigations into optical fibres, micro-scanners and miniature lens have boosted efficiencies of remote light delivery to sample site and signal collection. Given the light interaction with materials in the fluorescence imaging regime, this paper reviews two classes of compact microendoscopy based on a single fibre: linear optical microendoscopy and nonlinear optical microendoscopy. Due to the fact that fluorescence occurs only in the focal volume, nonlinear optical microendoscopy can provide stronger optical sectioning ability than linear optical microendoscopy, and is a good candidate for deep tissue imaging. Moreover, one-photon excited fluorescence microendoscopy as the linear optical microendoscopy suffers from severe photobleaching owing to the linear dependence of photobleaching rate on excitation laser power. On the contrary, nonlinear optical microendoscopy, including two-photon excited fluorescence microendoscopy and second harmonic generation microendoscopy, has the capability to minimize or avoid the photobleaching effect at a high excitation power and generate high image contrast. The combination of various nonlinear signals gained by the nonlinear optical microendoscopy provides a comprehensive insight into biophenomena in internal organs. Fibre-optical microendoscopy overcomes physical limitations of traditional microscopy and opens up a new path to achieve early cancer diagnosis and microsurgery in a minimally invasive and localized manner.

  2. Mould design and manufacturing considerations of honeycomb biocomposites with transverse fibre direction for aerospace application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manan, N. H.; Majid, D. L.; Romli, F. I.

    2016-10-01

    Sandwich structures with honeycomb core are known to significantly improve stiffness at lower weight and possess high flexural rigidity. They have found wide applications in aerospace as part of the primary structures, as well as the interior paneling and floors. High performance aluminum and aramid are the typical materials used for the purpose of honeycomb core whereas in other industries, materials such as fibre glass, carbon fibre, Nomex and also Kevlar reinforced with polymer are used. Recently, growing interest in developing composite structures with natural fibre reinforcement has also spurred research in natural fibre honeycomb material. The majority of the researches done, however, have generally emphasized on the usage of random chopped fibre and only a few are reported on development of honeycomb structure using unidirectional fibre as the reinforcement. This is mainly due to its processing difficulties, which often involve several stages to account for the arrangement of fibres and curing. Since the use of unidirectional fibre supports greater strength compared to random chopped fibre, a single-stage process in conjunction with vacuum infusion is suggested with a mould design that supports fibre arrangement in the direction of honeycomb loading.

  3. A new solid phase microextraction method using organic ligand in micropipette tip syringe system packed with modified carbon cloth for preconcentration of cadmium in drinking water and blood samples of kidney failure patients.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Salma Aslam; Naeemullah; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi

    2015-03-05

    A simple and efficient miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPμE) in a syringe system was developed for preconcentration of cadmium (Cd) in environmental and biological samples, followed by flame atomic absorption technique. The syringe system contains the micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth, coated with modified magnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide Triton X114 (ACC-NPs). Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy used for characterization of the size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC-NPs. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent 8-hydroxyqunilone (8-HQ), and drawn into the syringe, filled with ACC-MNPs and dispensed manually for 2-10 drawing/discharging cycles. The analyte retained on ACC-NPs in micropipette tip-syringe system were then eluted with different volume of 1.5molL(-1) HCl by 1-5 drawing/discharging cycles. The syringe system directly couple with FAAS for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency of Cd, including adsorbent dosage, pH, sample volume, eluent volume and drawing/discharging cycles of syringe system were optimized. At optimized extraction conditions, the method showed good linearity in the range of 5-250μgL(-1), with a limit of detection 0.15μgL(-1). Repeatability of the extraction (%RSD) was <5%, n=5. The validity and accuracy of the method was checked by the certified reference materials. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of Cd in different drinking water and biological samples of kidney failure patients and healthy controls.

  4. A new solid phase microextraction method using organic ligand in micropipette tip syringe system packed with modified carbon cloth for preconcentration of cadmium in drinking water and blood samples of kidney failure patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Salma Aslam; Naeemullah; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi

    2015-03-01

    A simple and efficient miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPμE) in a syringe system was developed for preconcentration of cadmium (Cd) in environmental and biological samples, followed by flame atomic absorption technique. The syringe system contains the micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth, coated with modified magnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide Triton X114 (ACC-NPs). Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy used for characterization of the size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC-NPs. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent 8-hydroxyqunilone (8-HQ), and drawn into the syringe, filled with ACC-MNPs and dispensed manually for 2-10 drawing/discharging cycles. The analyte retained on ACC-NPs in micropipette tip-syringe system were then eluted with different volume of 1.5 mol L-1 HCl by 1-5 drawing/discharging cycles. The syringe system directly couple with FAAS for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency of Cd, including adsorbent dosage, pH, sample volume, eluent volume and drawing/discharging cycles of syringe system were optimized. At optimized extraction conditions, the method showed good linearity in the range of 5-250 μg L-1, with a limit of detection 0.15 μg L-1. Repeatability of the extraction (%RSD) was <5%, n = 5. The validity and accuracy of the method was checked by the certified reference materials. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of Cd in different drinking water and biological samples of kidney failure patients and healthy controls.

  5. Evolving Indications for Tips.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mitchell; Durham, Janette

    2016-03-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation is a well-established therapy for refractory variceal bleeding and refractory ascites in patients who do not tolerate repeated large volume paracentesis. Experience and technical improvements including covered stents have led to improved TIPS outcomes that have encouraged an expanded application. Evidence for other less frequent indications continues to accumulate, including the indications of primary prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute variceal bleeding, gastric and ectopic variceal bleeding, primary treatment of medically refractory ascites, recurrent refractory ascites following liver transplantation, hepatic hydrothorax, hepatorenal syndrome, Budd-Chiari syndrome, and portal vein thrombosis. Treatment of patients with high-risk acute variceal bleeding with early TIPS and using transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts as a primary therapy rather than large volume paracentesis for refractory ascites would likely be the 2 circumstances that permit expansion in the frequency of TIPS procedures. The remaining populations discussed above are relatively rare.

  6. Magnet pole tips

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  7. Magnet pole tips

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-11-19

    An improved magnet more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  8. Fibre constituents of some foods.

    PubMed

    Rani, B; Kawatra, A

    1994-06-01

    Some plant foods viz. bottlegourd, carrot, cauliflower, cabbage, green bengalgram, pea, apple, plum, guava, karonda, blackgram husk and lentil husk were analysed for their dietary fibre components. The total dietary fibre contents of these foods varied from 14.68 to 78.21 percent on dry matter basis. As compared to fruits and vegetables, the husks had higher amount of total dietary fibre. Cellulose represented as the major fibre constituent in most of the foods whereas, husks were observed to be good sources of hemicellulose. All foods were low in pectin and lignin contents except guava.

  9. Palladium coated ball lens for optical fibre refractometry based hydrogen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Sahar A.; Correia, Ricardo; Francis, Daniel; Brooks, Simon J.; Jones, Ben J. S.; Thompson, Alexander W. J.; Hodgkinson, Jane; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2014-05-01

    An optical fibre refractometer using a ball lens as a sensor head has been developed and characterised. Light from a superluminescent diode is directed to an optical fibre sensor head and the intensity of the returned beam gives a measure of the refractive index of the medium at the ball lens fibre tip. A second beam is used to reference the intensity measurements. The system is capable of detecting changes in refractive index with a resolution of 0.003 RIU. The ball lenses have been coated with an 80nm thick layer of palladium and the potential use of this system as a micromirror hydrogen sensor is demonstrated. This technique offers a simple sensor head arrangement, with a large signal sampling area compared with that of a bare fibre.

  10. Simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements in a mechanical ventilator using an optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F. U.; Correia, R.; Morgan, S. P.; Hayes-Gill, B.; Evans, D.; Sinha, R.; Norris, A.; Harvey, D.; Hardman, J. G.; Korposh, S.

    2016-05-01

    An optical fibre sensor for simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements consisting of one fibre Bragg grating (FBG) to measure temperature and a mesoporous film of bilayers of Poly(allylamine hydrochloride)(PAH) and silica (SiO2) nanoparticles deposited onto the tip of the same fibre to measure humidity is reported. The hygroscopic film was created using the layer-by-layer (LbL) method and the optical reflection spectra were measured up to a maximum of 23 bilayers. The temperature sensitivity of the FBG was 10 pm/°C while the sensitivity to humidity was (-1.4x10-12 W / %RH) using 23 bilayers. The developed sensor was tested in the mechanical ventilator and temperature and humidity of the delivered artificial air was simultaneously measured. Once calibrated, the optical fibre sensor has the potential to control the absolute humidity as an essential part of critical respiratory care.

  11. Fibers comprised of epitaxially grown single-wall carbon nanotubes, and a method for added catalyst and continuous growth at the tip

    DOEpatents

    Kittrell, W. Carter; Wang, Yuhuang; Kim, Myung Jong; Hauge, Robert H.; Smalley, Richard E.; Marek leg, Irene Morin

    2010-06-01

    The present invention is directed to fibers of epitaxially grown single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and methods of making same. Such methods generally comprise the steps of: (a) providing a spun SWNT fiber; (b) cutting the fiber substantially perpendicular to the fiber axis to yield a cut fiber; (c) etching the cut fiber at its end with a plasma to yield an etched cut fiber; (d) depositing metal catalyst on the etched cut fiber end to form a continuous SWNT fiber precursor; and (e) introducing feedstock gases under SWNT growth conditions to grow the continuous SWNT fiber precursor into a continuous SWNT fiber.

  12. Multifunctional non-woven fabrics of interfused graphene fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Yingjun; Wang, Ran; Gao, Chao

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-based fibres hold promise for preparing multifunctional fabrics with electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, permeability, flexibility and lightweight. However, these fabrics are of limited performance mainly because of the weak interaction between fibres. Here we report non-woven graphene fibre fabrics composed of randomly oriented and interfused graphene fibres with strong interfibre bonding. The all-graphene fabrics obtained through a wet-fusing assembly approach are porous and lightweight, showing high in-plane electrical conductivity up to ~2.8 × 104 S m-1 and prominent thermal conductivity of ~301.5 W m-1 K-1. Given the low density (0.22 g cm-3), their specific electrical and thermal conductivities set new records for carbon-based papers/fabrics and even surpass those of individual graphene fibres. The as-prepared fabrics are further used as ultrafast responding electrothermal heaters and durable oil-adsorbing felts, demonstrating their great potential as high-performance and multifunctional fabrics in real-world applications.

  13. Multifunctional non-woven fabrics of interfused graphene fibres

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Yingjun; Wang, Ran; Gao, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based fibres hold promise for preparing multifunctional fabrics with electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, permeability, flexibility and lightweight. However, these fabrics are of limited performance mainly because of the weak interaction between fibres. Here we report non-woven graphene fibre fabrics composed of randomly oriented and interfused graphene fibres with strong interfibre bonding. The all-graphene fabrics obtained through a wet-fusing assembly approach are porous and lightweight, showing high in-plane electrical conductivity up to ∼2.8 × 104 S m−1 and prominent thermal conductivity of ∼301.5 W m−1 K−1. Given the low density (0.22 g cm−3), their specific electrical and thermal conductivities set new records for carbon-based papers/fabrics and even surpass those of individual graphene fibres. The as-prepared fabrics are further used as ultrafast responding electrothermal heaters and durable oil-adsorbing felts, demonstrating their great potential as high-performance and multifunctional fabrics in real-world applications. PMID:27901022

  14. Multifunctional non-woven fabrics of interfused graphene fibres.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Yingjun; Wang, Ran; Gao, Chao

    2016-11-30

    Carbon-based fibres hold promise for preparing multifunctional fabrics with electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, permeability, flexibility and lightweight. However, these fabrics are of limited performance mainly because of the weak interaction between fibres. Here we report non-woven graphene fibre fabrics composed of randomly oriented and interfused graphene fibres with strong interfibre bonding. The all-graphene fabrics obtained through a wet-fusing assembly approach are porous and lightweight, showing high in-plane electrical conductivity up to ∼2.8 × 10(4 )S m(-1) and prominent thermal conductivity of ∼301.5 W m(-1 )K(-1). Given the low density (0.22 g cm(-3)), their specific electrical and thermal conductivities set new records for carbon-based papers/fabrics and even surpass those of individual graphene fibres. The as-prepared fabrics are further used as ultrafast responding electrothermal heaters and durable oil-adsorbing felts, demonstrating their great potential as high-performance and multifunctional fabrics in real-world applications.

  15. EcoTipping Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marten, Gerald G.; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2009-01-01

    Contrary to what we often hear and teach, there is good news to be found on the environmental front. Environmental success stories show us not only that sustainability is possible, but also how people have made it happen. We can make these stories and their lessons accessible to students with help from the EcoTipping Points Project, which has…

  16. Tips from the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedetti, Teresa; De Gaetano, Yvonne; Weinstein-McShane, Ruth; Paez, Doris; McCarty, Laurie; Ehlers-Zavala, Fabiola; Bakken, Jeffrey P.

    1997-01-01

    This group of classroom tips discusses the benefits of peer coaching, peer group conversation about teachers' classroom experiences, using visual displays for collegial sharing, using cultural brokers in educational settings, and the role of picture books in developing literacy skills in diverse students with disabilities. (Author/CK)

  17. Tips for Energy Savers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    According to 1986 U.S. Department of Energy data, 48% of our residential energy is used to heat and cool our homes, 16% goes for heating water, 12% is used to refrigerators and freezers, and the remaining 24% goes into lighting, cooking, and running appliances. This booklet contains tips for saving energy, including sections on: (1) draft-proof…

  18. Newsletter Design Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Sally

    This paper presents detailed tips on newsletter design. Following an overview, it discusses effective design, anatomy of a page, type, designing tools (organizational tools, text organizers, emphasizing tools, and graphics, presented with some do's and don'ts), and a list of other items to consider. Three appendixes contain a brief glossary of…

  19. The Bacterial Community Structure and Dynamics of Carbon and Nitrogen when Maize (Zea mays L.) and Its Neutral Detergent Fibre Were Added to Soil from Zimbabwe with Contrasting Management Practices.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz-Barrón, Magali; Cruz-Mendoza, Alejandra; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Ruiz-Valdiviezo, Victor M; Ortíz-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Ramírez-Villanueva, Daniel A; Luna-Guido, Marco; Thierfelder, Cristian; Wall, Patrick C; Verhulst, Nele; Govaerts, Bram; Dendooven, Luc

    2017-01-01

    Water infiltration, soil carbon content, aggregate stability and yields increased in conservation agriculture practices compared to conventionally ploughed control treatments at the Henderson research station near Mazowe (Zimbabwe). How these changes in soil characteristics affect the bacterial community structure and the bacteria involved in the degradation of applied organic material remains unanswered. Soil was sampled from three agricultural systems at Henderson, i.e. (1) conventional mouldboard ploughing with continuous maize (conventional tillage), (2) direct seeding with a Fitarelli jab planter and continuous maize (direct seeding with continuous maize) and (3) direct seeding with a Fitarelli jab planter with rotation of maize sunn hemp (direct seeding with crop rotation). Soil was amended with young maize plants or their neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and incubated aerobically for 56 days, while C and N mineralization and the bacterial community structure were monitored. Bacillus (Bacillales), Micrococcaceae (Actinomycetales) and phylotypes belonging to the Pseudomonadales were first degraders of the applied maize plants. At day 3, Streptomyces (Actinomycetales), Chitinophagaceae ([Saprospirales]) and Dyella (Xanthomonadales) participated in the degradation of the applied maize and at day 7 Oxalobacteraceae (Burkholderiales). Phylotypes belonging to Halomonas (Oceanospirillales) were the first degraders of NDF and were replaced by Phenylobacterium (Caulobacterales) and phylotypes belonging to Pseudomonadales at day 3. Afterwards, similar bacterial groups were favoured by application of NDF as they were by the application of maize plants, but there were also clear differences. Phylotypes belonging to the Micrococcaceae and Bacillus did not participate in the degradation of NDF or its metabolic products, while phylotypes belonging to the Acidobacteriaceae participated in the degradation of NDF but not in that of maize plants. It was found that agricultural

  20. Tipping off endothelial tubes: nitric oxide drives tip cells.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mani Krishna; Sahu, Giriraj; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Goldy, Naga; Sundaresan, Abaya Meenakshi; Jadhav, Vivek; Barathkumar, T R; Saran, Uttara; Jaffar Ali, B M; Roberts, David D; Bera, Amal Kanti; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2015-04-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is a complex process that warrants cell migration, proliferation, tip cell formation, ring formation, and finally tube formation. Angiogenesis is initiated by a single leader endothelial cell called "tip cell," followed by vessel elongation by "stalk cells." Tip cells are characterized by their long filopodial extensions and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and endocan. Although nitric oxide (NO) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, its role in angiogenic sprouting and specifically in tip cell formation is poorly understood. The present study tested the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/NO/cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling in tip cell formation. In primary endothelial cell culture, about 40% of the tip cells showed characteristic sub-cellular localization of eNOS toward the anterior progressive end of the tip cells, and eNOS became phosphorylated at serine 1177. Loss of eNOS suppressed tip cell formation. Live cell NO imaging demonstrated approximately 35% more NO in tip cells compared with stalk cells. Tip cells showed increased level of cGMP relative to stalk cells. Further, the dissection of NO downstream signaling using pharmacological inhibitors and inducers indicates that NO uses the sGC/cGMP pathway in tip cells to lead angiogenesis. Taken together, the present study confirms that eNOS/NO/cGMP signaling defines the direction of tip cell migration and thereby initiates new blood vessel formation.

  1. 14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP TOP HOUSE. ID-31-C-12 WOODEN STRUCTURE IS VISIBLE IN TOP LEFT. CABLES VISIBLE LEFT AND CENTER OF TAILINGS. HOUSE IS JUST OVER APEX OF TAILINGS. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  2. Fluoride Glass Fibres For Telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maze, Gwenael; Cardin, Vincent; Poulain, Marcel

    1983-09-01

    Zirconium fluoride glasses are the best known and the most stable beryllium-free glasses. They offer numerous potential uses for I.R.-transmitting fibres and ultra-long repeaterless optical wave-guides. Various problems arise in the manufacturing of fluoride glass fibres, essentially because of the steep viscosity profile and the devitrification phenomena. This paper discusses the processes for manufacturing step-index preforms and for drawing fibres. Optical quality preforms have been obtained and fibres have been drawn over more than 1 km. A spectral loss measurement system has been constructed using fluoride glass optical components. Several curves showing the optical attenuation versus wavelength are presented and discussed. These fibres are now available for optical transmission in infra-red systems.

  3. Safety Tips: Baseball (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by U.S.A. Little League and the American Sports Medicine Institute: 7-8 years old: 50 pitches a ... ON THIS TOPIC Signing Kids Up for Sports Sports Medicine Center Safety Tips: Hockey Safety Tips: Basketball Competitive ...

  4. Reticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrevy, Christel

    Pour faire face à la crise économique la conception de papier à valeur ajoutée est développée par les industries papetières. Le but de se projet est l'amélioration des techniques actuelles de réticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques de la pâte à papier visant à produire un papier plus résistant. En effet, lors des réactions de réticulation traditionnelles, de nombreuses liaisons intra-fibres se forment ce qui affecte négativement l'amélioration anticipée des propriétés physiques du papier ou du matériau produit. Pour éviter la formation de ces liaisons intra-fibres, un greffage sur les fibres de groupements ne pouvant pas réagir entre eux est nécessaire. La réticulation des fibres par une réaction de « click chemistry » appelée cycloaddition de Huisgen entre un azide et un alcyne vrai, catalysée par du cuivre (CuAAC) a été l'une des solutions trouvée pour remédier à ce problème. De plus, une adaptation de cette réaction en milieux aqueux pourrait favoriser son utilisation en milieu industriel. L'étude que nous désirons entreprendre lors de ce projet vise à optimiser la réaction de CuAAC et les réactions intermédiaires (propargylation, tosylation et azidation) sur la pâte kraft, en milieu aqueux. Pour cela, les réactions ont été adaptées en milieu aqueux sur la cellulose microcristalline afin de vérifier sa faisabilité, puis transférée à la pâte kraft et l'influence de différents paramètres comme le temps de réaction ou la quantité de réactifs utilisée a été étudiée. Dans un second temps, une étude des différentes propriétés conférées au papier par les réactions a été réalisée à partir d'une série de tests papetiers optiques et physiques. Mots Clés Click chemistry, Huisgen, CuAAC, propargylation, tosylation, azidation, cellulose, pâte kraft, milieu aqueux, papier.

  5. A facile approach to spinning multifunctional conductive elastomer fibres with nanocarbon fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedin, Shayan; Razal, Joselito M.; Innis, Peter C.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2016-03-01

    Electrically conductive elastomeric fibres prepared using a wet-spinning process are promising materials for intelligent textiles, in particular as a strain sensing component of the fabric. However, these fibres, when reinforced with conducting fillers, typically result in a compromise between mechanical and electrical properties and, ultimately, in the strain sensing functionality. Here we investigate the wet-spinning of polyurethane (PU) fibres with a range of conducting fillers such as carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and chemically converted graphene. We show that the electrical and mechanical properties of the composite fibres were strongly dependent on the aspect ratio of the filler and the interaction between the filler and the elastomer. The high aspect ratio SWCNT filler resulted in fibres with the highest electrical properties and reinforcement, while the fibres produced from the low aspect ratio CB had the highest stretchability. Furthermore, PU/SWCNT fibres presented the largest sensing range (up to 60% applied strain) and the most consistent and stable cyclic sensing behaviour. This work provides an understanding of the important factors that influence the production of conductive elastomer fibres by wet-spinning, which can be woven or knitted into textiles for the development of wearable strain sensors.

  6. Characteristics of optimized fibre-optic ultrasound receivers for minimally invasive photoacoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.

    2015-03-01

    A range of miniature (125μm o.d.) fibre optic ultrasound sensors based on the use of interferometric polymer optical cavities has been developed for minimally invasive photoacoustic imaging and sensing applications. It was observed that by careful selection of both the fibre tip and cavity geometry it is possible to achieve exceptional acoustic performance. Specifically, rounding the tip of the fibre to remove the presence of sharp diffractive boundaries enables a well behaved frequency response along with a near omnidirectional response at frequencies in the tens of MHz range to be achieved. The use of a plano-convex rather than a planar cavity provides high finesse and therefore detection sensitivity. Thus, by using a plano-convex cavity formed at the tip of radiused single mode fibre it was possible to realise a miniature ultrasound detector with a bandwidth of 80MHz, a noise-equivalent pressure of 40Pa (over a 20MHz measurement bandwidth) and a near omnidirectional response at frequencies as high as 30MHz. These characteristics suggest this type of sensor could find applications in interventional medicine for guiding needles or catheters, as mechanically scanned photoacoustic imaging probes or in laser scanning OR-PAM.

  7. [Carbonization in endovasal laser obliteration by radial light guide with wavelength of 1470 and 970 nm].

    PubMed

    Shaidakov, E V; Ilyukhin, E A; Grigoryan, A G; Bulatov, V L; Rosukhovsky, D A; Shonov, O A

    2015-01-01

    The authors assessed the effect of carbonization and its influence on the parameters of endovasal laser obliteration (EVLO) depending on wavelength of laser radiation (970 and 1470 nm) using a light guide with radial emission. They also analysed the value of drop of radiation power of the light guide after performing EVLO and visually assessed the degree of damage of the glass tip of the radial fibre by means of ultra-close-up photography. The study comprised a total of 20 patients with varicose disease. A total of ten procedures of EVLO were performed in two modes: mode one - W-laser 1470 nm, mode two - H-laser 970 nm, using fibre with radial emission, an automatic retractor of the light guide. It was determined that the median of power loss after EVLO with W-laser amounted to 0.6 W, and that for H-laser - 3.15 W (p=0.002). Ultra-close-up photography showed pronounced damage of the glass tip of the radial light guide while using H-laser and no damages while using the W-laser. It was proved that using laser radiation with wavelength of 970 nm using the light guide with radial emission leads to pronounced carbonization on the surface of the glass tip of the light guide, its damage, a decrease in radiation power and risk of mechanical destruction of the flask. Using the laser with wavelength of 1470 nm with the use of radial light guide did not result in the development of such negative effects, which increases the service life of laser fibre and makes it possible to use it for obliteration of several segments in one patient.

  8. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Babin, Sergey A.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim; Podivilov, Evgenii V.

    2014-09-01

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors-random distributed feedback fibre laser-was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (˜0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the generation

  9. Tips to Prevent Poisonings

    MedlinePlus

    ... back programs in your community . Household Chemicals and Carbon Monoxide Always read the label before using a ... American Association of Poison Control Centers, Inc. CDC: Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Prevention Guidelines U.S. Food and Drug ...

  10. Fibre laser based on tellurium-doped active fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Alyshev, S V; Ryumkin, K E; Shubin, A V; Medvedkov, O I; Dianov, E M; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, A N

    2014-02-28

    We have studied the lasing properties of tellurium-doped germanosilicate fibre, identified its gain and excited-state absorption bands, and assessed the effect of cooling to low temperature (77 K) on the bands. The excitation spectrum of the near-IR luminescence in the fibre has been measured. Lasing at 1.55 mm has been demonstrated for the first time in this gain medium at liquidnitrogen temperature and pump wavelengths of 1.064 and 1.085 mm. The measured Raman spectrum of the fibre provides some insight into the structure of the near-IR luminescence centre. (letters)

  11. Dichroism measurements in forensic fibre examination: part 5-pigmented fibres.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L

    2012-09-01

    A number of pigmented fibre samples were examined with plane polarized light on their dichroic behaviour by optical light microscopy (OLM) and microspectrophotometry with plane polarized light (MSP-PPL). It was found that about half of the samples show a strong dichroic effect and another 20% have a weak dichroism. Both regular (80%) and inversed dichroic effects (20%) occur. The dichroic characteristics of pigmented fibres can be compared to these of sheet polarizers. It is suggested that the dichroic behaviour of pigmented fibres depends strongly on the crystal structure (shape of the pigment grains) and the draw ratio (orientation of the polymer chains).

  12. Effect of the doped fibre length on soliton pulses of a bidirectional mode-locked fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, H; Alwi Kutty, N A; Zulkifli, M Z; Harun, S W

    2015-08-31

    A passively bidirectional mode-locked fibre laser is demonstrated using a highly concentrated erbium-doped fibre (EDF) as a gain medium. To accomplish mode-locked operation in a short cavity, use is made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a saturable absorber. Soliton pulses are obtained at a wavelength of 1560 nm with a repetition rate ranging from 43.92 MHz to 46.97 MHz and pulse width stretching from 0.56 ps to 0.41 ps as the EDF length is reduced from 60 cm to 30 cm. (lasers)

  13. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    PubMed

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  14. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    PubMed Central

    Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic ‘space’, cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of ‘numerical experiments’ based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069771

  15. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  16. Tapered optical fibres for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martan, Tomas; Kanka, Jiri; Kasik, Ivan; Matejec, Vlastimil

    2008-11-01

    Recently, optical fibre tapers have intensively been investigated for many applications e.g. in telecommunications, medicine and (bio-) chemical sensing. The paper deals with enhancement of evanescent-field sensitivity of the solid-core microstructured fibre with steering-wheel air-cladding. Enhancement of a performance of the microstructured fibre is based on reduction of fibre core diameter down to narrow filament by tapering thereby defined part of light power is guided by an evanescent wave traveling in axial cladding air holes. The original fibre structure with outer diameter of 125 µm was reduced 2×, 2.5×, 3.33×, and 4× for increasing relatively small intensity overlap of guided core mode at wavelength of 1.55 μm with axial air holes. The inner structures of tapered microstructured fibre with steering-wheel aircladding were numerically analyzed and mode intensity distributions were calculated using the FDTD technique. Analyzed fiber tapers were prepared by constructed fibre puller employing 'flame brush technique'.

  17. Microbubble generation using fiber optic tips coated with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pimentel-Domínguez, Reinher; Hernández-Cordero, Juan; Zenit, Roberto

    2012-04-09

    We show that fiber optic tips can be used as microbubble generators in liquid media. Using standard single-mode silica fibers incorporating nanoparticles (carbon nanoparticles and metallic powders), bubbles can be generated with low optical powers owing to the enhanced photothermal effects of the coating materials. We provide details about the hydrodynamic effects generated in the vicinity of the fiber tip during the coating process, bubble generation and growth. Flow visualization techniques show that thermal effects lead to bubble formation on the tip of the fibers, and coating optimization is crucial for optimal performance of the probes.

  18. Whispering-gallery waves in optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Sychugov, V A; Torchigin, V P; Tsvetkov, M Yu

    2002-08-31

    The process of excitation of whispering-gallery waves (WGWs) in optical fibres (microcavities) with the help of a bitapered fibre is analysed. It is shown that useful information on the WGW modes can be obtained from the spectrograms recorded by scanning the exciting-radiation frequency. Based on the geometrical-optic approximation, the longitudinal sizes of the WGW modes are estimated and it is shown that the ultimate diameter of the fibre exists for optical fibres (microcavities) where a mode can be still excited with the help of a bitapered fibre. (fibre optics. optical fibres)

  19. Optical fibre gas detections systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Brian

    2016-05-01

    This tutorial review covers the principles of and prospects for fibre optic sensor technology in gas detection. Many of the potential benefits common to fibre sensor technology also apply in the context of gas sensing - notably long distance - many km - access to multiple remote measurement points; invariably intrinsic safety; access to numerous important gas species and often uniquely high levels of selectivity and/or sensitivity. Furthermore, the range of fibre sensor network architectures - single point, multiple point and distributed - enable unprecedented flexibility in system implementation. Additionally, competitive technologies and regulatory issues contribute to final application potential.

  20. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    PubMed

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-04-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres in mammalian muscle spindles.

  1. Phosphate glass fibre scaffolds: Tailoring of the properties and enhancement of the bioactivity through mesoporous glass particles.

    PubMed

    Novajra, G; Boetti, N G; Lousteau, J; Fiorilli, S; Milanese, D; Vitale-Brovarone, C

    2016-10-01

    Novel bone glass fibre scaffolds were developed by thermally bonding phosphate glass fibres belonging to the P2O5-CaO-Na2O-SiO2-MgO-K2O-TiO2 system (TiPS2.5 glass). Scaffolds with fibres of 85 or 110μm diameter were fabricated, showing compressive strength in the range of 2-3.5MPa, comparable to that of the trabecular bone. The effect of different thermal treatments and fibre diameters and length on the final scaffold structure was investigated by means of micro-CT analysis. The change of the sintering time from 30 to 60min led to a decrease in the scaffold overall porosity from 58 to 21vol.% for the 85μm fibre scaffold and from 50 to 40vol.% when increasing the sintering temperature from 490 to 500°C for the 110μm fibre scaffold. The 85μm fibres resulted in an increase of the scaffold overall porosity, increased pore size and lower trabecular thickness; the use of different fibre diameters allowed the fabrication of a scaffold showing a porosity gradient. In order to impart bioactive properties to the scaffold, for the first time in the literature the introduction in these fibre scaffolds of a bioactive phase, a melt-derived bioactive glass (CEL2) powder or spray-dried mesoporous bioactive glass particles (SD-MBG) was investigated. The scaffold bioactivity was assessed through soaking in simulated body fluid. CEL2/glass fibre scaffold did not show promising results due to particle detachment from the fibres during soaking in simulated body fluid. Instead the use of mesoporous bioactive powders showed to be an effective way to impart bioactivity to the scaffold and could be further exploited in the future through the ability of mesoporous particles to act as systems for the controlled release of drugs.

  2. Effects of fibre-surface morphology on the mechanical properties of Porifera-inspired rubber-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Stillfried, Daniela Graf; Celli, Jessika; Toivakka, Martti

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, mineralised organic fibre morphologies, inspired by the structures of Porifera (sponges) are correlated to the mechanical performance of fibre reinforced rubbers. The mineralised structures are rich in calcium carbonate and silica. These compounds nucleate and precipitate on the fibre surfaces yielding different morphologies as a function of mineral ion concentrations. Smaller mineralised precipitates manifestly improve the mechanical performance of composites while thicker precipitates enveloping the fibres give rise to inferior properties. Mechanisms and evidenced reasoning for these differences are reported herein.

  3. Gas only nozzle fuel tip

    DOEpatents

    Bechtel, William Theodore; Fitts, David Orus; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne

    2002-01-01

    A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozzle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

  4. Optofluidic realization and retaining of cell-cell contact using an abrupt tapered optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hongbao; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Yayi; Zhang, Huixian; Li, Baojun

    2013-06-01

    Studies reveal that there exists much interaction and communication between bacterial cells, with parts of these social behaviors depending on cell-cell contacts. The cell-cell contact has proved to be crucial for determining various biochemical processes. However, for cell culture with relatively low cell concentration, it is difficult to precisely control and retain the contact of a small group of cells. Particularly, the retaining of cell-cell contact is difficult when flows occur in the medium. Here, we report an optofluidic method for realization and retaining of Escherichia coli cell-cell contact in a microfluidic channel using an abrupt tapered optical fibre. The contact process is based on launching a 980-nm wavelength laser into the fibre, E. coli cells were trapped onto the fibre tip one after another, retaining cell-cell contact and forming a highly organized cell chain. The formed chains further show the ability as bio-optical waveguides.

  5. A Micro-Computed Tomography Technique to Study the Quality of Fibre Optics Embedded in Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Chiesura, Gabriele; Luyckx, Geert; Voet, Eli; Lammens, Nicolas; Van Paepegem, Wim; Degrieck, Joris; Dierick, Manuel; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Vanderniepen, Pieter; Sulejmani, Sanne; Sonnenfeld, Camille; Geernaert, Thomas; Berghmans, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Quality of embedment of optical fibre sensors in carbon fibre-reinforced polymers plays an important role in the resultant properties of the composite, as well as for the correct monitoring of the structure. Therefore, availability of a tool able to check the optical fibre sensor-composite interaction becomes essential. High-resolution 3D X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography, or Micro-CT, is a relatively new non-destructive inspection technique which enables investigations of the internal structure of a sample without actually compromising its integrity. In this work the feasibility of inspecting the position, the orientation and, more generally, the quality of the embedment of an optical fibre sensor in a carbon fibre reinforced laminate at unit cell level have been proven. PMID:25961383

  6. Fibre reinforced composites in aircraft construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soutis, C.

    2005-02-01

    Fibrous composites have found applications in aircraft from the first flight of the Wright Brothers’ Flyer 1, in North Carolina on December 17, 1903, to the plethora of uses now enjoyed by them on both military and civil aircrafts, in addition to more exotic applications on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), space launchers and satellites. Their growing use has risen from their high specific strength and stiffness, when compared to the more conventional materials, and the ability to shape and tailor their structure to produce more aerodynamically efficient structural configurations. In this paper, a review of recent advances using composites in modern aircraft construction is presented and it is argued that fibre reinforced polymers, especially carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) can and will in the future contribute more than 50% of the structural mass of an aircraft. However, affordability is the key to survival in aerospace manufacturing, whether civil or military, and therefore effort should be devoted to analysis and computational simulation of the manufacturing and assembly process as well as the simulation of the performance of the structure, since they are intimately connected.

  7. Fibre prestressed composites: A study of the influences of fibre prestressing on the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motahhari, Siamak

    1998-12-01

    Fibre prestressing during the curing of the polymeric resin is applied in some fabrication processes of composite materials such as filament winding and pultrusion processes. The influences of fibre prestressing on certain mechanical properties have been investigated and justified in the present thesis. Epoxy resin with E-glass fibre and carbon fibre were used to manufacture the samples. The samples were made by applying and holding the tension on the fibres on a horizontal tensiometer machine while the resin was being cured. For glass-epoxy and carbon-epoxy samples different prestressing levels from 10 to 100 MPa and 20 to 140 MPa were applied respectively during the curing of the resin. The samples were made at three different curing temperatures. Flexural strength, flexural modulus, and impact strength of the composites were chosen and measured as representative of the mechanical properties. It was shown that in all cases the studied mechanical properties significantly increased when fibre prestressing increased. The increase of the mechanical properties continued up to a certain fibre prestressing level. Beyond that level, however, the mechanical properties declined. The best fibre prestressing level at which the highest mechanical properties were obtained, was shown to be a function of the curing temperature and the constituent materials of the composites. In the second part of this thesis, the effort has been taken to explain the changes of the mechanical properties caused by fibre prestressing. The residual stresses resulting from the fibre prestressing and resin shrinkage were responsible for the changes of the mechanical properties. A new method was developed to measure the residual stresses which were formed in the composite during the curing process. This method was based of the evaluation of the residual strain in the fibres right after the curing process and removal of applied prestress. Using this method, it was indicated that the residual stresses in

  8. Stochastic integrated assessment of climate tipping points indicates the need for strict climate policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lontzek, Thomas S.; Cai, Yongyang; Judd, Kenneth L.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2015-05-01

    Perhaps the most `dangerous’ aspect of future climate change is the possibility that human activities will push parts of the climate system past tipping points, leading to irreversible impacts. The likelihood of such large-scale singular events is expected to increase with global warming, but is fundamentally uncertain. A key question is how should the uncertainty surrounding tipping events affect climate policy? We address this using a stochastic integrated assessment model, based on the widely used deterministic DICE model. The temperature-dependent likelihood of tipping is calibrated using expert opinions, which we find to be internally consistent. The irreversible impacts of tipping events are assumed to accumulate steadily over time (rather than instantaneously), consistent with scientific understanding. Even with conservative assumptions about the rate and impacts of a stochastic tipping event, today’s optimal carbon tax is increased by ~50%. For a plausibly rapid, high-impact tipping event, today’s optimal carbon tax is increased by >200%. The additional carbon tax to delay climate tipping grows at only about half the rate of the baseline carbon tax. This implies that the effective discount rate for the costs of stochastic climate tipping is much lower than the discount rate for deterministic climate damages. Our results support recent suggestions that the costs of carbon emission used to inform policy are being underestimated, and that uncertain future climate damages should be discounted at a low rate.

  9. The Macro - TIPS Course Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (Scotland). Esmee Fairbairn Economics Research Centre.

    The TIPS (Teaching Information Processing System) Course Package was designed to be used with the Macro-Games Course Package (SO 011 930) in order to train college students to apply the tools of economic analysis to current problems. TIPS is used to provide feedback and individualized assignments to students, as well as information about the…

  10. Tips for Mental Health Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitsett, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers tips for working with interpreters in mental health settings. These tips include: (1) Using trained interpreters, not bilingual staff or community members; (2) Explaining "interpreting procedures" to the providers and clients; (3) Addressing the stigma associated with mental health that may influence interpreters; (4) Defining…

  11. Moderate-power cw fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2004-10-31

    A review of the development and investigation of moderate-power (10{sup -1}-10{sup 2} W) cw fibre lasers is presented. The properties of optical fibres doped with rare-earth ions and methods for fabricating double-clad fibres are considered. The methods for fabrication of fibre Bragg gratings used as selective reflectors are discussed and the grating properties are analysed. The main pump schemes for double-clad fibre lasers are described. The properties of fibre lasers doped with neodymium, ytterbium, erbium, thulium, and holmium ions are also considered. The principles of fabrication of Raman converters of laser radiation based on optical fibres of different compositions are discussed and the main results of their studies are presented. It is concluded that fibre lasers described in the review can produce moderate-power radiation at any wavelength in the spectral range from 0.9 to 2 {mu}m. (review)

  12. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  13. Dietary fibre and colonic neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, H J

    1979-01-01

    Dietary plant fibre, or plantix, is thought to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of colon cancer in humans. It is a complex polymeric substance that has several distinct components resistant to hydrolysis by the digestive enzymes of humans. These components include cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, lignin, gums, mucilages and, in certain instances, algal polysaccharides. These polymers have different physicochemical properties, and recent evidence from experimental studies in animals treated with carcinogens suggests that some may exert protective effects in the intestine and others may enhance colon carcinogenesis. This review synthesizes information on the chemical composition, methods of analysis and physicochemical properties of dietary plant fibre and reviews available studies examining the role of fibre in colonic neoplasia in animals and humans. PMID:466603

  14. Preliminary study: fibre content in pet rabbit diets, crude fibre versus total dietary fibre.

    PubMed

    Molina, J; Martorell, J; Hervera, M; Pérez-Accino, J; Fragua, V; Villaverde, C

    2015-04-01

    Fibre is an important nutrient for rabbit health, and, on commercial pet rabbit packaging, it is labelled as crude fibre (CF). In several species, it is considered that CF is not an accurate representation of the fibre content in feedstuffs. The objective of this study was to compare the CF stated on the label (CFL) with laboratory analysis of CF (CFA) and the analysed content of total dietary fibre (TDF) in different commercial pet rabbit feeds. We selected 15 commercial diets and analysed CF and TDF. A mixed model was used to evaluate differences between CFL, CFA and TDF, and linear regression was performed to study the correlation between CFL and CFA with TDF. CFA and CFL were not significantly different (p = 0.836) in the feeds studied, and both were lower than TDF (p < 0.001). The correlations between TDF and both CFA and CFL were significant (p < 0.001 and p = 0.02, respectively), but the correlation was better with CFA (R = 0.86) than with CFL (R = 0.53). As expected, TDF content was higher than CF content, an average of two times. These results suggest that the CF content in rabbit diets reported on the label is not an appropriate indicator of their total fibre content, although further work with a larger sample size is required to confirm these results.

  15. Portable smartphone optical fibre spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-09-01

    A low cost, optical fibre based spectrometer has been developed on a smartphone platform for field-portable spectral analysis. Light of visible wavelength is collected using a multimode optical fibre and diffracted by a low cost nanoimprinted diffraction grating. A measurement range over 300 nm span (λ = 400 to 700 nm) is obtained using the smartphone CMOS chip. The spectral resolution is Δλ ~ 0.42 nm/screen pixel. A customized Android application processed the spectra on the same platform and shares with other devices. The results compare well with commercially available spectrometer.

  16. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s-1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%-50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  17. Skeletal muscle fibre types in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, R; Gil, F; Vázquez, J M; Moreno, F; Mascarello, F; Ramirez, G

    1993-01-01

    Using a variety of histochemical methods we have investigated the mATPase reaction of skeletal muscle fibres in the dog. Types I, IIA, IIDog (peculiar to the dog) and IIC fibres were identified. The results reveal that the interpretation of the fibre type composition depends on the methods used. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8226288

  18. Respiratory muscle fibres: specialisation and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Polla, B; D'Antona, G; Bottinelli, R; Reggiani, C

    2004-01-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of fibres of different types, each type being identified by the isoform of myosin heavy chain which is expressed as slow 1, fast 2A, fast 2X, and fast 2B. Slow fibres are resistant to fatigue due to their highly oxidative metabolism whereas 2X and 2B fibres are easily fatiguable and fast 2A fibres exhibit intermediate fatigue resistance. Slow fibres and fast fibres are present in equal proportions in the adult human diaphragm while intercostal muscles contain a higher proportion of fast fibres. A small fibre size, abundance of capillaries, and a high aerobic oxidative enzyme activity are typical features of diaphragm fibres and give them the resistance to fatigue required by their continuous activity. Because of their fibre composition, intercostal muscles are less resistant to fatigue. The structural and functional characteristics of respiratory muscle fibres are not fixed, however, and can be modified in response to several physiological and pathological conditions such as training (adaptation to changes in respiratory load), adaptation to hypoxia, age related changes, and changes associated with respiratory diseases. The properties of respiratory muscle fibres can also be modified by pharmacological agents such as ß2 agonists and corticosteroids used for the treatment of respiratory diseases. PMID:15333861

  19. Wideband-tuneable, nanotube mode-locked, fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Rozhin, A. G.; Scardaci, V.; Sun, Z.; Hennrich, F.; White, I. H.; Milne, W. I.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2008-12-01

    Ultrashort-pulse lasers with spectral tuning capability have widespread applications in fields such as spectroscopy, biomedical research and telecommunications. Mode-locked fibre lasers are convenient and powerful sources of ultrashort pulses, and the inclusion of a broadband saturable absorber as a passive optical switch inside the laser cavity may offer tuneability over a range of wavelengths. Semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors are widely used in fibre lasers, but their operating range is typically limited to a few tens of nanometres, and their fabrication can be challenging in the 1.3-1.5 µm wavelength region used for optical communications. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are excellent saturable absorbers because of their subpicosecond recovery time, low saturation intensity, polarization insensitivity, and mechanical and environmental robustness. Here, we engineer a nanotube-polycarbonate film with a wide bandwidth (>300 nm) around 1.55 µm, and then use it to demonstrate a 2.4 ps Er3+-doped fibre laser that is tuneable from 1,518 to 1,558 nm. In principle, different diameters and chiralities of nanotubes could be combined to enable compact, mode-locked fibre lasers that are tuneable over a much broader range of wavelengths than other systems.

  20. Occupational ceramic fibres dermatitis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, M; Wojtczak, J

    2000-07-01

    Recently, the use of asbestos has been considerably limited in Poland, with the simultaneous increase in the manufacture, processing and application of man-made mineral fibres, which includes ceramic fibres. The aims of this study were (1) to assess the type and frequency of dermal changes caused by the irritant activity of ceramic fibres among workers at the plants that manufacture packing and insulation products; and (2) to compare the irritant activity of Polish-made L-2 and L-3 ceramic fibres with that of the Thermowool ceramic fibres made in England. Workers (n = 226) who were exposed to ceramic fibres underwent dermatological examination. Patch tests with the standard allergen set, together with samples of the fibres L-2, L-3, and Thermowool fibres, were applied to all the workers. It has been shown that the Polish-made L-2 and L-3 fibres differed from Thermowool fibres in that the L-2 and L-3 fibres contained zirconium and were coarser. The proportion of filaments with diameters above 3 microns was 11.1% in the L-3 fibre and 6.3% in the L-2 fibre samples. The Thermowool fibre did not contain filaments thicker than 3 microns. Evident dermal changes, resulting from strong irritant activity of the fibres, were detected in 109 (48.2%) of the workers examined. Irritant contact dermatitis acuta (maculae, sometimes papulae and small crusts on the upper extremities, trunk, and lower extremities), disappearing after 2-3 days, was found in 50 (22.1%) workers. Irritant contact dermatitis chronica (diffuse permanent erythema with numerous telangiectasiae on the lateral portions of the face and neck, on the trunk, behind the auricles) was detected in 40 (17.7%) workers. The remaining 19 (8.4%) workers had both types of dermal change. All examined workers complained of very strong itching. The results of the patch tests confirmed the irritant activity of the ceramic fibres. Erythema without oedema, persisting for up to 96 h, appeared at the places where the fibres had

  1. Tipping the scales.

    PubMed

    1998-12-01

    In the US, the October 1998 murder of a physician who performed abortions was an outward manifestation of the insidious battle against legal abortion being waged by radical Christian social conservatives seeking to transform the US democracy into a theocracy. This movement has been documented in a publication entitled, "Tipping the Scales: The Christian Right's Legal Crusade Against Choice" produced as a result of a 4-year investigation conducted by The Center for Reproductive Law and Policy. This publication describes how these fundamentalists have used sophisticated legal, lobbying, and communication strategies to further their goals of challenging the separation of church and state, opposing family planning and sexuality education that is not based solely on abstinence, promoting school prayer, and restricting homosexual rights. The movement has resulted in the introduction of more than 300 anti-abortion bills in states, 50 of which have passed in 23 states. Most Christian fundamentalist groups provide free legal representation to abortion clinic terrorists, and some groups solicit women to bring specious malpractice claims against providers. Sophisticated legal tactics are used by these groups to remove the taint of extremism and mask the danger posed to US constitutional principles being posed by "a well-financed and zealous brand of radical lawyers and their supporters."

  2. The development of advanced cellulosic fibres.

    PubMed

    Woodings, C R

    1995-12-01

    For the majority of the last century, commercial routes to regenerated cellulose fibres have coped with the difficulties of making a good cellulose solution by using an easy to dissolve derivative (e.g. xanthate in the case of viscose rayon) or complex (e.g. cuprammonium rayon). For the purposes of this paper, advanced cellulosic fibres are defined as those made from a process involving direct dissolution of cellulose. The first examples of such fibres have now been generically designated as lyocell fibres to distinguish them from rayons, and the first commercial lyocell fibre is Courtaulds' Tencel.

  3. Threshold temperature optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiewicz, K. A.; Musial, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to manufacture a threshold temperature sensor based on a biconical optical fibre taper. The presented sensor employs the influence of variable state of concentration of some isotropic materials like wax or paraffin. Application of the above- mentioned materials is an attempt to prove that there is a possibility to obtain a low-cost, repeatable and smart sensor working as an in-line element. Optical fibre taper was obtained from a standard single mode fibre (SMF28®) by using a low pressure gas burner technique. The diameter of the manufactured tapers was 6.0 ± 0.5 μm with the length of elongation equal to 30.50 ± 0.16 mm. The applied technology allowed to produce tapers with the losses of 0.183 ± 0.015 dB. Application of materials with different temperature transition points made it possible to obtain the threshold work at the temperatures connected directly with their conversion temperature. External materials at the temperatures above their melting points do not influence the propagation losses. For each of them two types of the protection area and position of the optical fibre taper were applied.

  4. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  5. Rearrangement of 1D Conducting Nanomaterials towards Highly Electrically Conducting Nanocomposite Fibres for Electronic Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Joong Tark; Choi, Sua; Jang, Jeong In; Seol, Seung Kwon; Woo, Jong Seok; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-03-01

    Nanocarbon-based conducting fibres have been produced using solution- or dry-spinning techniques. Highly conductive polymer-composite fibres containing large amounts of conducting nanomaterials have not been produced without dispersants, however, because of the severe aggregation of conducting materials in high-concentration colloidal solutions. Here we show that highly conductive (electrical conductivity ~1.5 × 105 S m-1) polymer-composite fibres containing carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires can be fabricated via a conventional solution-spinning process without any other treatment. Spinning dopes were fabricated by a simple mixing of a polyvinyl alcohol solution in dimethylsulfoxide with a paste of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic solvents, assisted by quadruple hydrogen-bonding networks and an aqueous silver nanowire dispersion. The high electrical conductivity of the fibre was achieved by rearrangement of silver nanowires towards the fibre skin during coagulation because of the selective favourable interaction between the silver nanowires and coagulation solvents. The prepared conducting fibres provide applications in electronic textiles such as a textile interconnector of light emitting diodes, flexible textile heaters, and touch gloves for capacitive touch sensors.

  6. Rearrangement of 1D conducting nanomaterials towards highly electrically conducting nanocomposite fibres for electronic textiles.

    PubMed

    Han, Joong Tark; Choi, Sua; Jang, Jeong In; Seol, Seung Kwon; Woo, Jong Seok; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-03-20

    Nanocarbon-based conducting fibres have been produced using solution- or dry-spinning techniques. Highly conductive polymer-composite fibres containing large amounts of conducting nanomaterials have not been produced without dispersants, however, because of the severe aggregation of conducting materials in high-concentration colloidal solutions. Here we show that highly conductive (electrical conductivity ~1.5 × 10(5) S m(-1)) polymer-composite fibres containing carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires can be fabricated via a conventional solution-spinning process without any other treatment. Spinning dopes were fabricated by a simple mixing of a polyvinyl alcohol solution in dimethylsulfoxide with a paste of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic solvents, assisted by quadruple hydrogen-bonding networks and an aqueous silver nanowire dispersion. The high electrical conductivity of the fibre was achieved by rearrangement of silver nanowires towards the fibre skin during coagulation because of the selective favourable interaction between the silver nanowires and coagulation solvents. The prepared conducting fibres provide applications in electronic textiles such as a textile interconnector of light emitting diodes, flexible textile heaters, and touch gloves for capacitive touch sensors.

  7. Rearrangement of 1D Conducting Nanomaterials towards Highly Electrically Conducting Nanocomposite Fibres for Electronic Textiles

    PubMed Central

    Han, Joong Tark; Choi, Sua; Jang, Jeong In; Seol, Seung Kwon; Woo, Jong Seok; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Nanocarbon-based conducting fibres have been produced using solution- or dry-spinning techniques. Highly conductive polymer-composite fibres containing large amounts of conducting nanomaterials have not been produced without dispersants, however, because of the severe aggregation of conducting materials in high-concentration colloidal solutions. Here we show that highly conductive (electrical conductivity ~1.5 × 105 S m−1) polymer-composite fibres containing carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires can be fabricated via a conventional solution-spinning process without any other treatment. Spinning dopes were fabricated by a simple mixing of a polyvinyl alcohol solution in dimethylsulfoxide with a paste of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic solvents, assisted by quadruple hydrogen-bonding networks and an aqueous silver nanowire dispersion. The high electrical conductivity of the fibre was achieved by rearrangement of silver nanowires towards the fibre skin during coagulation because of the selective favourable interaction between the silver nanowires and coagulation solvents. The prepared conducting fibres provide applications in electronic textiles such as a textile interconnector of light emitting diodes, flexible textile heaters, and touch gloves for capacitive touch sensors. PMID:25792333

  8. Comparison of direct and indirect methods of measuring airborne chrysotile fibre concentration.

    PubMed

    Eypert-Blaison, Celine; Veissiere, Sylvie; Rastoix, Olivier; Kauffer, Edmond

    2010-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy observations most frequently form a basis for estimating asbestos fibre concentration in the environment and in buildings with asbestos-containing materials. Sampled fibres can be transferred to microscope grids by applying either a direct [ISO (1995) Draft International ISO/DIS 10312. Ambient air. Determination of asbestos fibres. Direct transfer transmission electron microscopy procedure. Geneva, Switzerland: International Standardization Organization] or an indirect [AFNOR (1996) Détermination de la concentration en fibres d'amiante par microscopie électronique à transmission-Méthode indirecte. Cedex, France: AFNOR, p. 42; ISO (1997) Draft International ISO/DIS 13794. Ambient air. Determination of asbestos fibres. Indirect-transfer transmission electron microscopy procedure. Geneva, Switzerland: International Standardization Organization] method. In the latter case, ISO Standard 13794 recommends filtering calcination residues either on a polycarbonate (PC) filter (PC indirect method) or on a cellulose ester (CE) membrane (CE indirect method). The PC indirect method requires that fibres deposited on a PC filter be covered by a carbon layer, whereas in the CE indirect method, the CE membrane has to be directly processed using a method described in ISO Standard 10312. The purpose of this study was to compare results obtained using, on the one hand, direct preparation methods and, on the other hand, PC indirect or CE indirect methods, for counting asbestos fibres deposited on filters as a result of liquid filtration or air sampling. In direct method-based preparation, we observed that an etching time of 6-14 min does not affect the measured densities, except for fibres <1 microm deposited by liquid filtration. Moreover, in all cases, the direct method gives higher densities than the PC indirect method because of possible fibre disappearance when using the carbon evaporator implemented in the PC indirect method. The CE membrane

  9. Optical fibres for high radiation dose environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, H.; Kohn, O.; Schmidt, H. U.; Bawirzanski, E.; Landers, A.

    1994-06-01

    A variety of modern single mode (SM) and graded index (GI) fibres as well as a new pure silica multimode step index (MMSI) fibre with high OH content were irradiated at a Co-60 gamma ray source with a dose rate of approximately = 1.5Gy/s up to a total dose of 10(exp 6)Gy. The radiation-induced loss of all fibres was measured continuously during and after irradiation at discrete wavelengths (approximately = 850, approximately = 1070, approximately = 1300, approximately = 1550nm). With one SM fibre type also the 'breaking stress' before and after irradiation was determined. Radiation-induced losses of approximately less than 5dB/50m (at approximately = 1300nm) were found with some of the SM fibres, whereas the MMSI fibre showed a final induced loss of only 0.5dB/50m at 1070nm wavelength. The breaking stress of the SM fibre increased by about 10%.

  10. A colour-tunable, weavable fibre-shaped polymer light-emitting electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhitao; Guo, Kunping; Li, Yiming; Li, Xueyi; Guan, Guozhen; Li, Houpu; Luo, Yongfeng; Zhao, Fangyuan; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Bin; Pei, Qibing; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of wearable electronics and optoelectronics requires the development of devices that are not only highly flexible but can also be woven into textiles to offer a truly integrated solution. Here, we report a colour-tunable, weavable fibre-shaped polymer light-emitting electrochemical cell (PLEC). The fibre-shaped PLEC is fabricated using all-solution-based processes that can be scaled up for practical applications. The design has a coaxial structure comprising a modified metal wire cathode and a conducting aligned carbon nanotube sheet anode, with an electroluminescent polymer layer sandwiched between them. The fibre shape offers unique and promising advantages. For example, the luminance is independent of viewing angle, the fibre-shaped PLEC can provide a variety of different and tunable colours, it is lightweight, flexible and wearable, and it can potentially be woven into light-emitting clothes for the creation of smart fabrics.

  11. Tips to Prevent Tick Bites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Using the right insect repellent and other preventive actions can discourage ticks, mosquitoes, and other biting insects from landing on you. Tips include avoiding tick habitats and minimizing exposed skin.

  12. Tips to Prevent Mosquito Bites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Using the right insect repellent and other preventive actions can discourage mosquitoes from landing on you. Tips include removing mosquito habitats such as standing water, minimizing exposed skin, and staying indoors while mosquitoes are most active.

  13. Gardening Health and Safety Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hot Weather Tips for persons with disabilities and physical activity. Talk to your health care provider if you ... for Everyone (Arthritis Foundation) Enjoy the benefits of physical activity. Gardening is an excellent way to get physical ...

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray or ultrasound equipment, a stent, and a balloon-tipped catheter are used. The equipment typically used ... the stent is in the correct position, the balloon is inflated, expanding the stent into place. The ...

  15. Try These Time Management Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bimrose, Jack J.

    1987-01-01

    Offers 12 time management tips for harried school administrators, including using a personal calendar, calling five-minute meetings with secretaries, mail-sorting, delegating or declining certain tasks, controlling visitors, screening phone calls, streamlining meetings, and other ideas. (MLH)

  16. Tips on Writing News Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Shannon

    1975-01-01

    The author offers journalism tips to vocational agriculture teachers involved in public relations coverage through newspaper articles. Specific suggestions cover headlines, leading paragraphs, localization of the story, organization, and format of a news release. (EA)

  17. Flu Prevention and Treatment Tips

    MedlinePlus

    Flu Prevention and Treatment Tips Expert Information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care of Older Adults Influenza, or the “flu,” is a contagious respiratory illness. It can cause ...

  18. Health Tips for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... held weights, like soup cans, to improve your strength. The Go4Life campaign, sponsored by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), offers easy-to-use materials on health and aging. Try their tips on ...

  19. Search Tips: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Search Tips URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/searchtips.html ... site by adding 'site:' and the domain or URL to your search words. For example, if you ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee and elbow pads, wrist braces, and gloves. Swimming/diving prevention tips • Do not dive in water ... all rules and warning signs at water parks, swimming pools, and public beaches. • The first time you ...

  1. Adhesion force mapping on wood by atomic force microscopy: influence of surface roughness and tip geometry.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Kasal, B

    2016-10-01

    This study attempts to address the interpretation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) adhesion force measurements conducted on the heterogeneous rough surface of wood and natural fibre materials. The influences of wood surface roughness, tip geometry and wear on the adhesion force distribution are examined by cyclic measurements conducted on wood surface under dry inert conditions. It was found that both the variation of tip and surface roughness of wood can widen the distribution of adhesion forces, which are essential for data interpretation. When a common Si AFM tip with nanometre size is used, the influence of tip wear can be significant. Therefore, control experiments should take the sequence of measurements into consideration, e.g. repeated experiments with used tip. In comparison, colloidal tips provide highly reproducible results. Similar average values but different distributions are shown for the adhesion measured on two major components of wood surface (cell wall and lumen). Evidence supports the hypothesis that the difference of the adhesion force distribution on these two locations was mainly induced by their surface roughness.

  2. Adhesion force mapping on wood by atomic force microscopy: influence of surface roughness and tip geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X.; Kasal, B.

    2016-10-01

    This study attempts to address the interpretation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) adhesion force measurements conducted on the heterogeneous rough surface of wood and natural fibre materials. The influences of wood surface roughness, tip geometry and wear on the adhesion force distribution are examined by cyclic measurements conducted on wood surface under dry inert conditions. It was found that both the variation of tip and surface roughness of wood can widen the distribution of adhesion forces, which are essential for data interpretation. When a common Si AFM tip with nanometre size is used, the influence of tip wear can be significant. Therefore, control experiments should take the sequence of measurements into consideration, e.g. repeated experiments with used tip. In comparison, colloidal tips provide highly reproducible results. Similar average values but different distributions are shown for the adhesion measured on two major components of wood surface (cell wall and lumen). Evidence supports the hypothesis that the difference of the adhesion force distribution on these two locations was mainly induced by their surface roughness.

  3. Adhesion force mapping on wood by atomic force microscopy: influence of surface roughness and tip geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kasal, B.

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to address the interpretation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) adhesion force measurements conducted on the heterogeneous rough surface of wood and natural fibre materials. The influences of wood surface roughness, tip geometry and wear on the adhesion force distribution are examined by cyclic measurements conducted on wood surface under dry inert conditions. It was found that both the variation of tip and surface roughness of wood can widen the distribution of adhesion forces, which are essential for data interpretation. When a common Si AFM tip with nanometre size is used, the influence of tip wear can be significant. Therefore, control experiments should take the sequence of measurements into consideration, e.g. repeated experiments with used tip. In comparison, colloidal tips provide highly reproducible results. Similar average values but different distributions are shown for the adhesion measured on two major components of wood surface (cell wall and lumen). Evidence supports the hypothesis that the difference of the adhesion force distribution on these two locations was mainly induced by their surface roughness. PMID:27853541

  4. Laser fabrication of gold nanoparticle clustered tips for use in apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Park, Jung Su; Park, Jin-Ho; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Lee, Young Hee; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2014-08-01

    A laser fabrication method was developed to make gold nanoparticle clustered (GNC) tips for apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopes (ANSOMs) and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The near-field Rayleigh and Raman scattering of samples are highly enhanced when a gold nanoparticle cluster is synthesized on the end of the tip. This is due to the lightning rod effect in the sharp tips. The localized electromagnetic field enhancement and the spatial resolution (~30 nm) of the fabricated GNC tip were verified by TERS and ANSOM measurements of carbon nanotubes.

  5. Roughness and fibre reinforcement effect onto wettability of composite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénard, Quentin; Fois, Magali; Grisel, Michel

    2007-03-01

    Wettability of glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy composites materials has been determined via sessile drop technique. Good-Van Oss approach has been used to evaluate surface free energy parameters of smooth and rough surfaces. Results obtained point out the influence of fibre reinforcement on surface free energy of composite materials. In addition, the interest of surface treatment to increase surface roughness has been discussed in terms of wettability. To sum up, results obtained clearly demonstrate the necessity of considering properties of a given composite surface not only as a polymer but a fibre/polymer couple. The drawn conclusions are of great interest as it may have numerous consequences in applications such as adhesion.

  6. Structural investigation of Mimosa pudica Linn fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S. R.; Pattojoshi, P.; Tiwari, T. N.; Mallick, B.

    2016-12-01

    Sensitive plant (Mimosa pudica Linn.) fibre is a natural fibre with electrically conductive property. Because of its electro-active sensing nature, it has been found very interesting among physicists, chemists, biologists, material scientists and technologists. So far as our knowledge is concerned; there is no report on the X-ray structure of M. pudica fibre using diffraction technique. In the present report, the M. pudica fibre has been extracted from the stem of the herb by sinking the stem in 10% NaOH solution for one week. The diffraction pattern of the fibre is found out to be cellulose-I. The effect of the fibre structure and its orientation due to different mounting have been investigated using X-ray diffraction technique. The I max of cellulose-I has been observed along (002) and (10overline{1)} for the perpendicular and parallel mounting of the native-fibre, respectively. Full width at half maxima of the diffraction profile turns out to be decreased with fibre orientation. Dimension of crystallite size D hkl estimated in the perpendicular mounting D_{hkl}^{ bot } is more as compared to that of the parallel mounting D_{hkl}^{{^{allel } }} . The smallest crystallite sizes observed in both parallel and perpendicular mounting are 18.78 and 30.78 Å respectively. It is expected that the present study may help to analyse the X-ray diffraction of fibre materials in general and natural fibres in particular.

  7. Structural investigation of Mimosa pudica Linn fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S. R.; Pattojoshi, P.; Tiwari, T. N.; Mallick, B.

    2017-04-01

    Sensitive plant ( Mimosa pudica Linn.) fibre is a natural fibre with electrically conductive property. Because of its electro-active sensing nature, it has been found very interesting among physicists, chemists, biologists, material scientists and technologists. So far as our knowledge is concerned; there is no report on the X-ray structure of M. pudica fibre using diffraction technique. In the present report, the M. pudica fibre has been extracted from the stem of the herb by sinking the stem in 10% NaOH solution for one week. The diffraction pattern of the fibre is found out to be cellulose-I. The effect of the fibre structure and its orientation due to different mounting have been investigated using X-ray diffraction technique. The I max of cellulose-I has been observed along (002) and (10\\overline{1)} for the perpendicular and parallel mounting of the native-fibre, respectively. Full width at half maxima of the diffraction profile turns out to be decreased with fibre orientation. Dimension of crystallite size D hkl estimated in the perpendicular mounting D_{hkl}^{ \\bot } is more as compared to that of the parallel mounting D_{hkl}^{{^{allel } }}. The smallest crystallite sizes observed in both parallel and perpendicular mounting are 18.78 and 30.78 Å respectively. It is expected that the present study may help to analyse the X-ray diffraction of fibre materials in general and natural fibres in particular.

  8. Electrospinning and evaluation of PHBV-based tissue engineering scaffolds with different fibre diameters, surface topography and compositions.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ho-Wang; Wang, Min; Lu, William W

    2012-01-01

    While electrospinning is an effective technology for producing poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) micrometre-scale fibrous scaffolds for tissue regeneration, electrospinning of PHBV fibrous scaffolds composed of sub-micrometre fibres, surface-porous fibres or nanocomposite fibres is rarely explored. In this study, the average PHBV fibre diameter was successfully reduced to the sub-micrometre scale by dissolving a conductivity-enhancing salt in the polymer solution for electrospinning. Surface-porous fibres were made using a mixture of solvents, and carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanoparticles were incorporated into the fibres with the aid of an ultrasonic power source. Water contact angle measurements demonstrated that both fibre diameter reduction and CHA incorporation enhanced the wettability of the fibrous scaffolds. Tensile properties of the scaffolds were not undermined by the reduction of fibre diameter and the presence of surface pores. In vitro biological evaluation using a human osteoblast-like cell line (SaOS-2) demonstrated that all types of fibrous scaffolds supported cell attachment, spreading and proliferation. Analysis of cell morphology revealed similar projected cell areas on all types of scaffolds. However, cells on sub-micrometre fibres possessed a lower cell aspect ratio than cells on microfibres. The reduction of fibre diameter to the sub-micrometre scale enhanced cell proliferation after 14 days cell culture, while the incorporation of CHA nanoparticles in microfibres significantly enhanced the alkaline phosphatase activity of SaOS-2 cells. The control of fibre diameter, surface topography and composition is important in developing electrospun PHBV-based scaffolds for specific tissue-engineering applications.

  9. Turbine blade with contoured chamfered squealer tip

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-12-30

    A squealer tip formed from a pressure side tip wall and a suction side tip wall extending radially outward from a tip of the turbine blade is disclosed. The pressure and suction side tip walls may be positioned along the pressure sidewall and the suction sidewall of the turbine blade, respectively. The pressure side tip wall may include a chamfered leading edge with film cooling holes having exhaust outlets positioned therein. An axially extending tip wall may be formed from at least two outer linear surfaces joined together at an intersection forming a concave axially extending tip wall. The axially extending tip wall may include a convex inner surface forming a radially outer end to an inner cavity forming a cooling system. The cooling system may include one or more film cooling holes in the axially extending tip wall proximate to the suction sidewall, which promotes increased cooling at the pressure and suction sidewalls.

  10. On the feasibility of optical fibre sensors for strain monitoring in thermoplastic composites under fatigue loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Baere, I.; Luyckx, G.; Voet, E.; Van Paepegem, W.; Degrieck, J.

    2009-03-01

    This study investigates the possibility of using optical fibres with Bragg gratings for measurements in thermoplastic composites under fatigue loading conditions. Two setups are considered: (i) the fibre is embedded in the composite and (ii) the grating is bonded externally. Detailed information is given on the principle of optical fibre measurements and the data acquisition for both setups. To verify the strain derived from the optical fibre, the strain is compared with extensometer measurements. A special design of the blades of the extensometer is presented, since the standard blades suffer from a loss of grip on the surface of the specimen. The material used for this study was a carbon fibre-reinforced polyphenylene sulphide. It can be concluded for both setups that the optical fibre survives over half a million loading cycles, without de-bonding of the fibre. The advantage of the external fibre over the embedded one is that it can be mounted after manufacturing of the plate, but it has a higher risk of being damaged during working conditions of the component.

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphism for animal fibre identification.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Selvi; Karthik, T; Vijayaraaghavan, N N

    2005-03-16

    Animal fibres are highly valuable industrial products often adulterated during marketing. Currently, there is no precise method available to identify and differentiate the fibres. In this study, a PCR-RFLP technique was exploited to differentiate cashmere and wool fibres derived from goat and sheep, respectively. The presence of DNA in animal hair shafts has enabled the isolation of DNA from scoured cashmere and wool fibres. The mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences of both species were amplified by PCR using primers designed from conserved regions. The polymorphism observed between the two species was detected by restricting the amplified product by endonucleases viz., BamH1 and Ssp1. The RFLP profile clearly distinguishes the cashmere and wool fibres and this technique can also be exploited to test adulteration in animal fibres qualitatively.

  12. Control of interfaces in Al-C fibre composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warrier, S. G.; Blue, C. A.; Lin, R. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The interface of Al-C fiber composite was modified by coating a silver layer on the surface of carbon fibres prior to making composites, in an attempt to improve the wettability between molten aluminum and carbon fibers during infiltration. An electroless plating technique was adopted and perfected to provide a homogeneous silver coating on the carbon fiber surface. Al-C fiber composites were prepared using a liquid infiltration technique in a vacuum. It was found that silver coating promoted the wetting between aluminum and carbon fibers, particularly with polyacrylonitrile-base carbon fibers. However, due to rapid dissolution of silver in molten aluminum, it was believed that the improved infiltration was not due to the wetting behavior between molten aluminum and silver. The cleaning of the fiber surface and the preservation of the cleaned carbon surface with silver coating was considered to be the prime reason for the improved wettability. Interfacial reactions between aluminum and carbon fibers were observed. Amorphous carbon was found to react more with aluminum than graphitic carbon. This is believed to be because of the inertness of the graphitic basal planes.

  13. Characterisation of a fibre optic Raman probe within a hypodermic needle.

    PubMed

    Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Day, John C C; Fullwood, Leanne M; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nick

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the first use of a multifibre Raman probe that fits inside the bore of a hypodermic needle. A Raman probe containing multiple collection fibres provides improved signal collection efficiency in biological samples compared with a previous two-fibre design. Furthermore, probe performance (signal-to-noise ratios) compared favourably with the performance achieved in previous Raman microscope experiments able to distinguish between benign lymph nodes, primary malignancies in lymph nodes and secondary malignancies in lymph nodes. The experimental measurements presented here give an indication of the sampling volume of the Raman needle probe in lymphoid tissues. Liquid tissue phantoms were used that contained scattering medium encompassing a range of scattering properties similar to those of a variety of tissue types, including lymph node tissues. To validate the appropriateness of the phantoms, the sampling depth of the probe was also measured in excised lymph node tissue. More than 50 % of Raman photons collected were found to originate from between the tip of the needle and a depth of 500 μm into the tissue. The needle probe presented here achieves spectral quality comparable to that in numerous studies previously demonstrating Raman disease discrimination. It is expected that this approach could achieve targeted subcutaneous tissue measurements and be viable for use for the in vivo Raman diagnostics of solid organs located within a few centimetres below the skin's surface. Graphical Abstract Schematic of multi-fibre Raman needle probe with disposible tips and proximal optical filtration.

  14. Why intra-epidermal electrical stimulation achieves stimulation of small fibres selectively: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, Jun; Sugiyama, Yukiya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Inui, Koji; Tamura, Manabu; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    The in situ electric field in the peripheral nerve of the skin is investigated to discuss the selective stimulation of nerve fibres. Coaxial planar electrodes with and without intra-epidermal needle tip were considered as electrodes of a stimulator. From electromagnetic analysis, the tip depth of the intra-epidermal electrode should be larger than the thickness of the stratum corneum, the electrical conductivity of which is much lower than the remaining tissue. The effect of different radii of the outer ring electrode on the in situ electric field is marginal. The minimum threshold in situ electric field (rheobase) for free nerve endings is estimated to be 6.3 kV m-1. The possible volume for electrostimulation, which can be obtained from the in situ electric field distribution, becomes deeper and narrower with increasing needle depth, suggesting that possible stimulation sites may be controlled by changing the needle depth. The injection current amplitude should be adjusted when changing the needle depth because the peak field strength also changes. This study shows that intra-epidermal electrical stimulation can achieve stimulation of small fibres selectively, because Aβ-, Aδ-, and C-fibre terminals are located at different depths in the skin.

  15. Loss of power output and laser fibre degradation during 120 watt lithium-triborate HPS laser vaporisation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Thomas; Sulser, Tullio; Hefermehl, Lukas J.; Strebel, Daniel; Michel, Maurice-Stephan; Müntener, Michael; Meier, Alexander H.; Seifert, Hans-Helge

    2009-02-01

    It has recently been shown that laser fibre deterioration leads to a significant decrease of power output during 80 W potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser vaporisation (LV) of the prostate. This decrease results in inefficient vaporisation especially towards the end of the procedure. For the new 120 W lithium-triborate (LBO) High Performance System (HPS) laser not only higher power but also changes in beam characteristics and improved fibre quality have been advertised. However, high laser power has been identified as a risk factor for laser fibre degradation. Between July and September 2008 25 laser fibres were investigated during routine 120 W LBO-LV in 20 consecutive patients. Laser beam power was measured at baseline and after the application of every 25 kJ during the LV procedure. Postoperatively, the surgeon subjectively rated the performance of the respective fibre on a scale from 1 to 4 (1 indicating perfect and 4 insufficient performance). Additionally, microscopic examination of the fibre tip was performed. Median energy applied was 212 kJ. Changes of power output were similar for all fibres. Typically, a steep decrease of power output within the first 50 kJ was followed by a continuous mild decrease until the end of the procedure. After the application of 50 kJ the median power output was 63% (58-73% interquartile range) of the baseline value. The median power output at the end of the 275 kJ-lifespan of the fibres was 42% (40-47%). The median surgeons' rating of the overall performance of the laser fibres was 2 and the median estimated final decrease of power output 60%. Some degree of degradation at the emission window was microscopically detectable in all cases after the procedure. However, even after the application of 275 kJ, these structural changes were only moderate. Minor degradation of the laser fibre was associated with a significant decrease of power output during 120 W LBO-LV. However, following an early, steep decrease, power output

  16. Tipping Points in Texas Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Anticipating geomorphic tipping points requires that we learn from the past. Major geomorphic changes in coastal plain rivers of Texas resulting in river metamorphosis or regime shifts were identified, and the major driving factors determined. Nine fluvial tipping points were identified from contemporary observations, historical records, and Quaternary reconstructions. Two of the tipping points (between general aggrading and degrading valley states) are associated with reversals in a fundamental system control (sea-level). One (stable or aggrading vs. degrading channels) is associated with an abrupt change in sediment supply due to dam construction, and two others (changes from meandering to anastomosing channel patterns, and different anastomosis styles) are similarly related to changes in sediment supply and/or transport capacity, but with additional elements of historical contingency. Three tipping points are related to avulsions. One, from a regime dominated to reoccupation of former channels to one dominated by progradation into flood basins, is driven by progressive long term filling of incised valleys. Another, nodal avulsions, are driven by disturbances associated with tectonics or listric faults. The third, avulsions and related valley metamorphosis in unfilled incised valleys, is due to fundamental dynamical instabilities within the fluvial system. This synthesis and analysis suggests that geomorphic tipping points are sometimes associated with general extrinsic or intrinsic (to the fluvial system) environmental change, independent of any disturbances or instabilities. Others are associated with natural (e.g., tectonic) or human (dams) disturbances, and still others with intrinsic geomorphic instabilities. This suggests that future tipping points will be equally diverse with respect to their drivers.

  17. Investigating the ablation efficiency of a 1940-nm thulium fibre laser for intraoral surgery.

    PubMed

    Guney, M; Tunc, B; Gulsoy, M

    2014-08-01

    The use of a laser in surgical procedures involving the soft tissues is advantageous due to its sterile and hemostatic nature. Several different lasers are in use for intraoral soft tissue surgery; however, small, efficient, and fibre-coupled lasers are favoured due to the tightly confined nature of the intraoral environment. This study proposes the use of a 1940-nm thulium fibre laser (Tm:fibre laser) for intraoral soft tissue procedures. Its thermal effects when used to make incisions were investigated. This laser was chosen due to its output wavelength, which is absorbed well by water in biological tissues. Lamb tongues were used in the experiments. The laser was coupled to a 600-μm silica fibre and incisions were made in contact mode with a continuous wave. The extent of ablation and coagulation produced were measured at three different speeds, powers, and numbers of passes. The thermal effects of laser power, movement speed, and number of passes on incision depth and ablation efficiency were determined. The Tm:fibre laser is a promising tool for intraoral surgery, with excellent absorption by tissue, good coagulative qualities, and easy to manipulate fibre output. Its use as an incisional tool with very little to no carbonization is shown in this study.

  18. Shape memory polymeric composites sensing by optic fibre Bragg gratings: A very first approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrini, Fabrizio; Santo, Loredana; Ciminello, Monica; Concilio, Antonio; Volponi, Ruggero; Spena, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) have the potential for many applications in aerospace, spanning from self-repairing of structures to self-deploying of antennas, solar sails, or functional devices (e.g. for grabbing small space debris). In all these cases, it may be essential to have information about their configuration at different stages of shape recovery. In this study, the strain history of a prepreg carbon fibre system, cured with a shape memory polymer (SMP) interlayer, is monitored through a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG), a fibre optic sensor device. SMPC has been manufactured by using traditional technologies for aerospace. After manufacturing cylindrical shape samples, an external fibre optic system is added to the composite structure; this system is especially suited for high temperatures which are necessary for SMP recovery and composite softening. Sensor functionality is checked before and after each strain history path. Optic fibre arrangement is optimized to avoid unwanted breakings whereas strains are limited by fibre collapsing, i.e. within nominal 2% of deformation. Dynamic information about shape recovery gives fundamental insights about strain evolution during time as well as its spatial distribution.

  19. Structural and functional assessment of skin nerve fibres in small-fibre pathology.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, P; Nyengaard, J R; Polydefkis, M; Jensen, T S

    2015-09-01

    Damage to nociceptor nerve fibres may give rise to peripheral neuropathies, some of which are pain free and some are painful. A hallmark of many peripheral neuropathies is the loss of small nerve fibres in the epidermis, a condition called small-fibre neuropathy (SFN) when it is predominantly the small nerve fibres that are damaged. Historically, SFN has been very difficult to diagnose as clinical examination and nerve conduction studies mainly detect large nerve fibres, and quantitative sensory testing is not sensitive enough to detect small changes in small nerve fibres. However, taking a 3-mm punch skin biopsy from the distal leg and quantification of the nerve fibre density has proven to be a useful method to diagnose SFN. However, the correlation between the nerve fibre loss and other test results varies greatly. Recent studies have shown that it is possible not only to extract information about the nerve fibre density from the biopsies but also to get an estimation of the nerve fibre length density using stereology, quantify sweat gland innervation and detect morphological changes such as axonal swelling, all of which may be additional parameters indicating diseased small fibres relating to symptoms reported by the patients. In this review, we focus on available tests to assess structure and function of the small nerve fibres, and summarize recent advances that have provided new possibilities to more specifically relate structural findings with symptoms and function in patients with SFN.

  20. Towards the Knittability of Graphene Oxide Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedin, Shayan; Romano, Mark S.; Minett, Andrew I.; Razal, Joselito M.

    2015-10-01

    Recent developments in graphene oxide fibre (GO) processing include exciting demonstrations of hand woven textile structures. However, it is uncertain whether the fibres produced can meet the processing requirements of conventional textile manufacturing. This work reports for the first time the production of highly flexible and tough GO fibres that can be knitted using textile machinery. The GO fibres are made by using a dry-jet wet-spinning method, which allows drawing of the spinning solution (the GO dispersion) in several stages of the fibre spinning process. The coagulation composition and spinning conditions are evaluated in detail, which led to the production of densely packed fibres with near-circular cross-sections and highly ordered GO domains. The results are knittable GO fibres with Young’s modulus of ~7.9 GPa, tensile strength of ~135.8 MPa, breaking strain of ~5.9%, and toughness of ~5.7 MJ m-3. The combination of suitable spinning method, coagulation composition, and spinning conditions led to GO fibres with remarkable toughness; the key factor in their successful knitting. This work highlights important progress in realising the full potential of GO fibres as a new class of textile.

  1. Towards the Knittability of Graphene Oxide Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Shayan; Romano, Mark S.; Minett, Andrew I.; Razal, Joselito M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in graphene oxide fibre (GO) processing include exciting demonstrations of hand woven textile structures. However, it is uncertain whether the fibres produced can meet the processing requirements of conventional textile manufacturing. This work reports for the first time the production of highly flexible and tough GO fibres that can be knitted using textile machinery. The GO fibres are made by using a dry-jet wet-spinning method, which allows drawing of the spinning solution (the GO dispersion) in several stages of the fibre spinning process. The coagulation composition and spinning conditions are evaluated in detail, which led to the production of densely packed fibres with near-circular cross-sections and highly ordered GO domains. The results are knittable GO fibres with Young’s modulus of ~7.9 GPa, tensile strength of ~135.8 MPa, breaking strain of ~5.9%, and toughness of ~5.7 MJ m−3. The combination of suitable spinning method, coagulation composition, and spinning conditions led to GO fibres with remarkable toughness; the key factor in their successful knitting. This work highlights important progress in realising the full potential of GO fibres as a new class of textile. PMID:26459866

  2. A compact polymer optical fibre ultrasound detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Pospori, Andreas; Zubel, Michal; Webb, David J.; Sugden, Kate; Carpintero, Guillermo; Lamela, Horacio

    2016-03-01

    Polymer optical fibre (POF) is a relatively new and novel technology that presents an innovative approach for ultrasonic endoscopic applications. Currently, piezo electric transducers are the typical detectors of choice, albeit possessing a limited bandwidth due to their resonant nature and a sensitivity that decreases proportionally to their size. Optical fibres provide immunity from electromagnetic interference and POF in particular boasts more suitable physical characteristics than silica optical fibre. The most important of these are lower acoustic impedance, a reduced Young's Modulus and a higher acoustic sensitivity than single-mode silica fibre at both 1 MHz and 10 MHz. POF therefore offers an interesting alternative to existing technology. Intrinsic fibre structures such as Bragg gratings and Fabry-Perot cavities may be inscribed into the fibre core using UV lasers. These gratings are a modulation of the refractive index of the fibre core and provide the advantages of high reflectivity, customisable bandwidth and point detection. We present a compact in fibre ultrasonic point detector based upon a POF Bragg grating (POFBG) sensor. We demonstrate that the detector is capable of leaving a laboratory environment by using connectorised fibre sensors and make a case for endoscopic ultrasonic detection through use of a mounting structure that better mimics the environment of an endoscopic probe. We measure the effects of water immersion upon POFBGs and analyse the ultrasonic response for 1, 5 and 10 MHz.

  3. Towards the Knittability of Graphene Oxide Fibres.

    PubMed

    Seyedin, Shayan; Romano, Mark S; Minett, Andrew I; Razal, Joselito M

    2015-10-13

    Recent developments in graphene oxide fibre (GO) processing include exciting demonstrations of hand woven textile structures. However, it is uncertain whether the fibres produced can meet the processing requirements of conventional textile manufacturing. This work reports for the first time the production of highly flexible and tough GO fibres that can be knitted using textile machinery. The GO fibres are made by using a dry-jet wet-spinning method, which allows drawing of the spinning solution (the GO dispersion) in several stages of the fibre spinning process. The coagulation composition and spinning conditions are evaluated in detail, which led to the production of densely packed fibres with near-circular cross-sections and highly ordered GO domains. The results are knittable GO fibres with Young's modulus of ~7.9 GPa, tensile strength of ~135.8 MPa, breaking strain of ~5.9%, and toughness of ~5.7 MJ m(-3). The combination of suitable spinning method, coagulation composition, and spinning conditions led to GO fibres with remarkable toughness; the key factor in their successful knitting. This work highlights important progress in realising the full potential of GO fibres as a new class of textile.

  4. Polymer photonic crystal fibre for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David J.

    2010-04-01

    Polymer photonic crystal fibres combine two relatively recent developments in fibre technology. On the one hand, polymer optical fibre has very different physical and chemical properties to silica. In particular, polymer fibre has a much smaller Young's modulus than silica, can survive higher strains, is amenable to organic chemical processing and, depending on the constituent polymer, may absorb water. All of these features can be utilised to extend the range of applications of optical fibre sensors. On the other hand, the photonic crystal - or microstructured - geometry also offers advantages: flexibility in the fibre design including control of the dispersion properties of core and cladding modes, the possibility of introducing minute quantities of analyte directly into the electric field of the guided light and enhanced pressure sensitivity. When brought together these two technologies provide interesting possibilities for fibre sensors, particularly when combined with fibre Bragg or long period gratings. This paper discusses the features of polymer photonic crystal fibre relevant to sensing and provides examples of the applications demonstrated to date.

  5. Research With Scanning Tip Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-31

    08ro P noiwe bae?041Le Research With Scanning Tip Microscopy AFOSR-89-0498 V AUTHOS)i Professor Dror Sarid 7. PFOUImNG 00ANIZATION NAMEIS) AND...forces and (b) surfaces. UNCLASS UNCLASS UNCLASS UL FINAL REPORT TO THE AFOSR ൱-, to J4ti. r Aat io Research in Scanning Tip Microscopy Dror Sarid Dtst...microscopy have been used to investigate (a) forces and (b) surfaces. a. Forces 1. Dror Sarid , Douglas lams, Volker Weissenberger, and L. Stephen Bell

  6. A validation of the fibre orientation and fibre length attrition prediction for long fibre-reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Haag, J. van; Schöngart, M.

    2015-05-22

    To improve the mechanical performance of polymeric parts, fibre reinforcement has established in industrial applications during the last decades. Next to the widely used Short Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (SFT) the use of Long Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) is increasingly growing. Especially for non-polar polymeric matrices like polypropylene (PP), longer fibres can significantly improve the mechanical performance. As with every kind of discontinuous fibre reinforcement the fibre orientations (FO) show a high impact on the mechanical properties. On the contrary to SFT where the local fibre length distribution (FLD) can be often neglected, for LFT the FLD show a high impact on the material’s properties and has to be taken into account in equal measure to the FOD. Recently numerical models are available in commercial filling simulation software and allow predicting both the local FOD and FLD in LFT parts. The aim of this paper is to compare i.) the FOD results and ii) the FLD results from available orientation- and fibre length attrition-models to those obtained from experimental data. The investigations are conducted by the use of different injection moulded specimens made from long glass fibre reinforced PP. In order to determine the FOD, selected part sections are examined by means of Computed Tomographic (CT) analyses. The fully three dimensional measurement of the FOD is then performed by digital image processing using grey scale correlation. The FLD results are also obtained by using digital image processing after a thermal pyrolytic separation of the polymeric matrix from the fibres. Further the FOD and the FLD are predicted by using a reduced strain closure (RSC) as well as an anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure model (ARD-RSC) and Phelps-Tucker fibre length attrition model implemented in the commercial filling software Moldflow, Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA.

  7. A validation of the fibre orientation and fibre length attrition prediction for long fibre-reinforced thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; van Haag, J.; Schöngart, M.

    2015-05-01

    To improve the mechanical performance of polymeric parts, fibre reinforcement has established in industrial applications during the last decades. Next to the widely used Short Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (SFT) the use of Long Fibre-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) is increasingly growing. Especially for non-polar polymeric matrices like polypropylene (PP), longer fibres can significantly improve the mechanical performance. As with every kind of discontinuous fibre reinforcement the fibre orientations (FO) show a high impact on the mechanical properties. On the contrary to SFT where the local fibre length distribution (FLD) can be often neglected, for LFT the FLD show a high impact on the material's properties and has to be taken into account in equal measure to the FOD. Recently numerical models are available in commercial filling simulation software and allow predicting both the local FOD and FLD in LFT parts. The aim of this paper is to compare i.) the FOD results and ii) the FLD results from available orientation- and fibre length attrition-models to those obtained from experimental data. The investigations are conducted by the use of different injection moulded specimens made from long glass fibre reinforced PP. In order to determine the FOD, selected part sections are examined by means of Computed Tomographic (CT) analyses. The fully three dimensional measurement of the FOD is then performed by digital image processing using grey scale correlation. The FLD results are also obtained by using digital image processing after a thermal pyrolytic separation of the polymeric matrix from the fibres. Further the FOD and the FLD are predicted by using a reduced strain closure (RSC) as well as an anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure model (ARD-RSC) and Phelps-Tucker fibre length attrition model implemented in the commercial filling software Moldflow, Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA.

  8. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    López-Buendía, Angel M.; Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores; Climent, Verónica

    2013-12-15

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  9. Investigations on modern carbon materials in the Boris Kidrič Institute, Vinča

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinković, Slobodan

    1980-03-01

    Modern carbon materials which have been objects of research at the Boris Kidrič Institute, Vinča involve high-performance carbon fibres from PAN precursor, carbon-fibre-reinforced phenolic and epoxy resins, carbon-carbon composites, pyrolytic carbons deposited at 1500-2450 K both pure and containing small amounts of B, Si, P or U, and carbon felt from viscose rayon precursor. Investigations relevant to carbon fibres comprise a study of processes during air oxidation of PAN fibres and an extensive research of low-temperature SO 2-treatment of PAN fibres, which has resulted in a model of the structure stabilization and shows that this stabilization can be successfully applied for the preparation of high-performance carbon fibres. Extensive investigations of codeposition of carbon and small amounts of B, Si, P and U suggest that B, Si and P enter the pyrocarbon lattice substitutionally and produce important changes in properties of the product. B, Si and U act as graphitizing catalysts, the effect being most pronounced for Si. The fabrication technology of the carbon fibres, carbon-fibre-reinforced-plastics and of pyrolytic carbon has been developed on a laboratory scale.

  10. Scanning tip microwave near field microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Schultz, Peter G.; Wei, Tao

    1998-01-01

    A microwave near field microscope has a novel microwave probe structure wherein the probing field of evanescent radiation is emitted from a sharpened metal tip instead of an aperture or gap. This sharpened tip, which is electrically and mechanically connected to a central electrode, extends through and beyond an aperture in an endwall of a microwave resonating device such as a microwave cavity resonator or a microwave stripline resonator. Since the field intensity at the tip increases as the tip sharpens, the total energy which is radiated from the tip and absorbed by the sample increases as the tip sharpens. The result is improved spatial resolution without sacrificing sensitivity.

  11. Scanning tip microwave near field microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, X.D.; Schultz, P.G.; Wei, T.

    1998-10-13

    A microwave near field microscope has a novel microwave probe structure wherein the probing field of evanescent radiation is emitted from a sharpened metal tip instead of an aperture or gap. This sharpened tip, which is electrically and mechanically connected to a central electrode, extends through and beyond an aperture in an end wall of a microwave resonating device such as a microwave cavity resonator or a microwave stripline resonator. Since the field intensity at the tip increases as the tip sharpens, the total energy which is radiated from the tip and absorbed by the sample increases as the tip sharpens. The result is improved spatial resolution without sacrificing sensitivity. 17 figs.

  12. Simulation of complex phenomena in optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allington-Smith, Jeremy; Murray, Graham; Lemke, Ulrike

    2012-12-01

    Optical fibres are essential for many types of highly multiplexed and precision spectroscopy. The success of the new generation of multifibre instruments under construction to investigate fundamental problems in cosmology, such as the nature of dark energy, requires accurate modellization of the fibre system to achieve their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) goals. Despite their simple construction, fibres exhibit unexpected behaviour including non-conservation of etendue (focal ratio degradation, FRD) and modal noise. Furthermore, new fibre geometries (non-circular or tapered) have become available to improve the scrambling properties that, together with modal noise, limit the achievable SNR in precision spectroscopy. These issues have often been addressed by extensive tests on candidate fibres and their terminations, but these are difficult and time-consuming. Modelling by ray tracing and wave analysis is possible with commercial software packages, but these do not address the more complex features, in particular FRD. We use a phase-tracking ray-tracing method to provide a practical description of FRD derived from our previous experimental work on circular fibres and apply it to non-standard fibres. This allows the relationship between scrambling and FRD to be quantified for the first time. We find that scrambling primarily affects the shape of the near-field pattern but has negligible effect on the barycentre. FRD helps to homogenize the near-field pattern but does not make it completely uniform. Fibres with polygonal cross-section improve scrambling without amplifying the FRD. Elliptical fibres, in conjunction with tapering, may offer an efficient means of image slicing to improve the product of resolving power and throughput, but the result is sensitive to the details of illumination. We also investigated the performance of fibres close to the limiting numerical aperture since this may affect the uniformity of the SNR for some prime focus fibre instrumentation.

  13. Teaching Tips: Improving College Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlynn, Angela Provitera

    Designed to help teachers improve instruction, this handbook provides tips gathered from focus groups of teachers and students at New Jersey's Mercer County Community College, as well as from other teaching resources. The first part focuses on the contribution of faculty-student interaction to student success, listing 21 suggestions for building…

  14. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  15. Library Management Tips that Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallwood, Carol, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There's no shortage of library management books out there--but how many of them actually tackle the little details of day-to-day management, the hard-to-categorize things that slip through the cracks of a larger handbook? "Library Management Tips that Work" does exactly that, addressing dozens of such issues facing library managers, including: (1)…

  16. 99 Tips for Safe Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufer, Steve

    This pamphlet highlights 99 tips for maintaining safe schools. Areas of interest include: alarm systems and control of access, vandalism, parent education, transportation, school design, personnel training, and graffiti. The majority of the pointers deal with maintaining and implementing various forms of electronic surveillance and strategies for…

  17. Assigning Effective Homework. Classroom Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each new school year brings high hopes, great expectations and challenges for both new and seasoned educators. The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has developed a series called "Classroom Tips" to help educators start the year right and anticipate the year ahead. Over the past 40 years, most research studies on homework have found that…

  18. Turbine blade tip flow discouragers

    DOEpatents

    Bunker, Ronald Scott

    2000-01-01

    A turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationery shroud. The rotating blade portions comprise a root section, a tip portion and an airfoil. The tip portion has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall. A number of flow discouragers are disposed on the blade tip portion. In one embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. In an alternative embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned at an angle in the range between about 0.degree. to about 60.degree. with respect to a reference axis aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. The flow discouragers increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  19. Blade tip timing (BTT) uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russhard, Pete

    2016-06-01

    Blade Tip Timing (BTT) is an alternative technique for characterising blade vibration in which non-contact timing probes (e.g. capacitance or optical probes), typically mounted on the engine casing (figure 1), and are used to measure the time at which a blade passes each probe. This time is compared with the time at which the blade would have passed the probe if it had been undergoing no vibration. For a number of years the aerospace industry has been sponsoring research into Blade Tip Timing technologies that have been developed as tools to obtain rotor blade tip deflections. These have been successful in demonstrating the potential of the technology, but rarely produced quantitative data, along with a demonstration of a traceable value for measurement uncertainty. BTT technologies have been developed under a cloak of secrecy by the gas turbine OEM's due to the competitive advantages it offered if it could be shown to work. BTT measurements are sensitive to many variables and there is a need to quantify the measurement uncertainty of the complete technology and to define a set of guidelines as to how BTT should be applied to different vehicles. The data shown in figure 2 was developed from US government sponsored program that bought together four different tip timing system and a gas turbine engine test. Comparisons showed that they were just capable of obtaining measurement within a +/-25% uncertainty band when compared to strain gauges even when using the same input data sets.

  20. [Management of patients with TIPS].

    PubMed

    Dailleau, Édith; Dos Santos, Sophie; Garçon, Adrien; Russeil, Cécile; Brajon, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    The Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) procedure is now performed in almost twenty hospitals in France, including Tours university hospital. The aim is to reduce portal hypertension (PHT) by diverting the portal system to the caval system within the liver. The main cause of PHT is cirrhosis, which may be of alcoholic, viral, dysmetabolic or autoimmune origin.

  1. Experimental study of the mutual influence of fibre Faraday elements in a spun-fibre interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gubin, V P; Morshnev, S K; Przhiyalkovsky, Ya V; Starostin, N I; Sazonov, A I

    2015-08-31

    An all-spun-fibre linear reflective interferometer with two linked Faraday fibre coils is studied. It is found experimentally that there is mutual influence of Faraday fibre coils in this interferometer. It manifests itself as an additional phase shift of the interferometer response, which depends on the circular birefringence induced by the Faraday effect in both coils. In addition, the interferometer contrast and magneto-optical sensitivity of one of the coils change. A probable physical mechanism of the discovered effect is the distributed coupling of orthogonal polarised waves in the fibre medium, which is caused by fibre bend in the coil. (interferometry)

  2. Predicting casualties implied by TIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafiloski, G.; Wyss, M.; Wyss, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    When an earthquake is predicted, forecast, or expected with a higher than normal probability, losses are implied. We estimated the casualties (fatalities plus injured) that should be expected if earthquakes in TIPs (locations of Temporarily Increased Probability of earthquakes) defined by Kossobokov et al. (2009) should occur. We classified the predictions of losses into the categories red (more than 400 fatalities or more than 1,000 injured), yellow (between 100 and 400 fatalities), green (fewer than 100 fatalities), and gray (undetermined). TIPs in Central Chile, the Philippines, Papua, and Taiwan are in the red class, TIPs in Southern Sumatra, Nicaragua, Vanatu, and Honshu in the yellow class, and TIPs in Tonga, Loyalty Islands, Vanatu, S. Sandwich Islands, Banda Sea, and the Kuriles, are classified as green. TIPs where the losses depend moderately on the assumed point of major energy release were classified as yellow; TIPs such as in the Talaud Islands and in Tonga, where the losses depend very strongly on the location of the epicenter, were classified as gray. The accuracy of loss estimates after earthquakes with known hypocenter and magnitude are affected by uncertainties in transmission and soil properties, the composition of the building stock, the population present, and the method by which the numbers of casualties are calculated. In the case of TIPs, uncertainties in magnitude and location are added, thus we calculate losses for a range of these two parameters. Therefore, our calculations can only be considered order of magnitude estimates. Nevertheless, our predictions can come to within a factor of two of the observed numbers, as in the case of the M7.6 earthquake of October 2005 in Pakistan that resulted in 85,000 fatalities (Wyss, 2005). In subduction zones, the geometrical relationship between the earthquake source capable of a great earthquake and the population is clear because there is only one major fault plane available, thus the epicentral

  3. Plastic optical fibre sensor for spine bending monitoring with power fluctuation compensation.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, Mohd Anwar; O'Keeffe, Sinead; Lewis, Elfed

    2013-10-25

    This paper presents the implementation of power fluctuation compensation for an intensity-based optical fibre bending sensor aimed at monitoring human spine bending in a clinical environment. To compensate for the light intensity changes from the sensor light source, a reference signal was provided via the light reflection from an aluminum foil surface fixed at a certain distance from the source fibre end tips. From the results, it was found that the investigated sensor compensation technique was capable of achieving a 2° resolution for a bending angle working range between 0° and 20°. The study also suggested that the output voltage ratio has a 0.55% diversion due to input voltage variation between 2.9 V and 3.4 V and a 0.25% output drift for a 2 h measurement. With the achieved sensor properties, human spine monitoring in a clinical environment can potentially be implemented using this approach with power fluctuation compensation.

  4. Modelling the nonlinear response of fibre-reinforced bending fluidic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacucciolo, Vito; Renda, Federico; Poccia, Ernesto; Laschi, Cecilia; Cianchetti, Matteo

    2016-10-01

    Soft actuators are receiving increasing attention from the engineering community, not only in research but even for industrial applications. Among soft actuators, fibre-reinforced bending fluidic actuators (BFAs) became very popular thanks to features such as robustness and easy design and fabrication. However, an accurate modelling of these smart structures, taking into account all the nonlinearities involved, is a challenging task. In this effort, we propose an analytical mechanical model to capture the quasi-static response of fibre-reinforced BFAs. The model is fully 3D and for the first time includes the effect of the pressure on the lateral surface of the chamber as well as the non-constant torque produced by the pressure at the tip. The presented model can be used for design and control, while providing information about the mechanics of these complex actuators.

  5. Optical cavity fibre sensor for detection of microcystin-LR in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, Raquel B.; Silva, S. O.; Sales, M. G. F.; Noronha, J. P.; Frazão, O.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Aguilar, G. G.

    2010-09-01

    The deterioration of water quality by Cyanobacteria causes outbreaks and epidemics associated with harmful diseases in Humans and animals because of the released toxins. Microcystin-LR (mcyst) is one of the most widely studied hepatotoxin and World Health Organization recommends a maximum value of 1 μg L-1 of mcyst in drinking-water. Therefore, there is a great demand for remote, real-time sensing techniques to detect and quantify the presence of mcyst. In this work a Fabry-Perot sensing probe based on a fibre tip coated with a mcyst sensitive thin film is presented. Highly specific recognition membranes, using sol-gel based Molecular Imprinted Polymers (MIPs), were developed to quantify microcystins in water, showing great potential in the analysis of this kind of samples. The fibre Fabry-Perot MIP sensor shows a linear response to mcyst concentration with a sensitivity of -13.2 +/-} 0.4 nm L μg-1.

  6. Cotton fibre cross-section properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From a structural perspective the cotton fibre is a singularly discrete, elongated plant cell with no junctions or inter-cellular boundaries. Its form in nature is essentially unadulterated from the field to the spinning mill where its cross-section properties, as for any textile fibre, are central ...

  7. Amphibole fibres in Chinese chrysotile asbestos.

    PubMed

    Tossavainen, A; Kotilainen, M; Takahashi, K; Pan, G; Vanhala, E

    2001-03-01

    Ten chrysotile bulk samples originating from six Chinese chrysotile mines were studied for amphibole fibres. Five of the mines operate on ultramafic rocks whereas one exploits a dolomite-hosted deposit. The asbestos fibre content in lung tissue was examined from seven deceased workers of the Shenyang asbestos plant using these raw materials. The bulk samples were pretreated with acid/alkali-digestion, and thereafter, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, selected area electron diffraction and X-ray powder diffractometry were used to identify the minerals. Sample preparation of lung tissue involved drying and low-temperature ashing. All of the bulk samples contained amphibole fibres as an impurity. The amphibole asbestos contents were between 0.002 and 0.310 w-%. Tremolite fibres were detected in every sample but anthophyllite fibres were present only in the sample originating from the dolomite-hosted deposit. In comparison, anthophyllite (71%), tremolite (9%) and chrysotile (10%) were the main fibre types in the lung tissue samples indicating faster pulmonary clearance of chrysotile fibres. The total levels ranged from 2.4 to 148.3 million fibres (over 1 microm in length) per gram of dry tissue, and they were consistent with heavy occupational exposure to asbestos.

  8. Metal-coated Bragg grating reflecting fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorovskiy, Yu. K.; Butov, O. V.; Kolosovskiy, A. O.; Popov, S. M.; Voloshin, V. V.; Vorob'ev, I. L.; Vyatkin, M. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    High-temperature optical fibres (OF) with fibre Bragg gratings (FBG) arrays written over a long length and in-line metal coating have been made for the first time. The optical parameters of the FBG arrays were tested by the optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) method in a wide temperature range, demonstrating no degradation in reflection at heating up to 600 °C for a fibre with Al coating. The mechanical strength of the developed fibre was practically the same as "ordinary" OF with similar coating, showing the absence of the influence of FBG writing process on fibre strength. Further experiments are necessary to evaluate the possibility of further increases in the operational temperature range.

  9. Erbium-doped aluminophosphosilicate optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Likhachev, M E; Bubnov, M M; Zotov, K V; Medvedkov, O I; Lipatov, D S; Yashkov, M V; Gur'yanov, Aleksei N

    2010-09-10

    We have studied the active properties of erbium-doped aluminophosphosilicate (APS) core fibres in wide ranges of erbia, alumina and phosphorus pentoxide concentrations. The absorption and luminescence spectra of the P{sub 2}O{sub 5}- or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-enriched erbium-doped APS fibres are shown to be similar to those of the erbium-doped fibres singly doped with phosphorus pentoxide or alumina, respectively. The formation of AlPO{sub 4} in APS fibres leads not only to a reduction in the refractive index of the glass but also to a marked increase in Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} solubility in silica. (optical fibres)

  10. Supercontinuum generation in thulium-doped fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Kamynin, V A; Tsvetkov, V B; Sadovnikova, Ya E; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2012-09-30

    Supercontinuum generation in thulium-doped fibres under pumping at 1.59 {mu}m is investigated. Amplification of supercontinuum in the range of 1.8--2.0 {mu}m is found for a fibre doped to a level of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. For a fibre with an activator concentration of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} amplification is also observed in the (2.1 - 2.45)-{mu}m band, which suggests the occurrence of the {sup 3}H{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 5} optical transition in the fibre. The occupation of the {sup 3}H{sub 4} level can be explained by cooperative effects. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  11. Mode conversion in magneto photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    otmani, Hamza; Bouchemat, Mohamed; Hocini, Abdesselam; Boumaza, Touraya; benmerkhi, ahlem

    2017-01-01

    The first concept of an integrated isolator was based on nonreciprocal TE-TM mode conversion, the nonreciprocal coupling between these modes is caused by the Faraday rotation if the magnetization is aligned along the z-axis, parallel to mode propagation. We propose to study this magneto-optical phenomenon, by the simulation of magneto photonic crystal fibre (MPCF), it consists of a periodic triangular lattice of air-holes filled with magnetic fluid which consists of magnetic nanoparticles into a BIG (Bismuth Iron Garnet) fibre. We simulated the influence of gyrotropy and the wavelength, and calculated Faraday rotation and modal birefringence. In this fibre the light is guided by internal total reflection, like classical fibres. However it was shown that they could function on a mode conversion much stronger than conventional fibres.

  12. Tips for Reducing Pesticide Impacts on Wildlife

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Web page provides tips for pesticide users in residential and agricultural settings, as well as tips for certified pesticide applicators for ways to protect wildlife from potentially harmful effects of pesticides.

  13. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  14. Highly efficient Raman distributed feedback fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jindan; Alam, Shaif-ul; Ibsen, Morten

    2012-02-27

    We demonstrate highly efficient Raman distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers for the first time with up to 1.6 W of continuous wave (CW) output power. The DFB Bragg gratings are written directly into two types of commercially available passive germano-silica fibres. Two lasers of 30 cm length are pumped with up to 15 W of CW power at 1068 nm. The threshold power is ~2 W for a Raman-DFB (R-DFB) laser written in standard low-NA fibre, and only ~1 W for a laser written in a high-NA fibre, both of which oscillate in a narrow linewidth of <0.01 nm at ~1117 nm and ~1109 nm, respectively. The slope efficiencies are ~74% and ~93% with respect to absorbed pump power in the low-NA fibre and high-NA fibre respectively. Such high conversion efficiency suggests that very little energy is lost in the form of heat through inefficient energy transfer. Our results are supported by numerical simulations, and furthermore open up for the possibility of having narrow linewidth all-fibre laser sources in wavelength bands not traditionally covered by rare-earth doped silica fibres. Simulations also imply that this technology has the potential to produce even shorter R-DFB laser devices at the centimetre-level and with mW-level thresholds, if Bragg gratings formed in fibre materials with higher intrinsic Raman gain coefficient than silica are used. These materials include for example tellurite or chalcogenide glasses. Using glasses like these would also open up the possibility of having narrow linewidth fibre sources with DFB laser oscillating much further into the IR than what currently is possible with rare-earth doped silica glasses.

  15. Fibre-Matrix Interaction in Soft Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zaoyang

    2010-05-21

    Although the mechanical behaviour of soft tissue has been extensively studied, the interaction between the collagen fibres and the ground matrix has not been well understood and is therefore ignored by most constitutive models of soft tissue. In this paper, the human annulus fibrosus is used as an example and the potential fibre-matrix interaction is identified by careful investigation of the experimental results of biaxial and uniaxial testing of the human annulus fibrosus. First, the uniaxial testing result of the HAF along the axial direction is analysed and it is shown that the mechanical behaviour of the ground matrix can be well simulated by the incompressible neo-Hookean model when the collagen fibres are all under contraction. If the collagen fibres are stretched, the response of the ground matrix can still be described by the incompressible neo-Hookean model, but the effective stiffness of the matrix depends on the fibre stretch ratio. This stiffness can be more than 10 times larger than the one obtained with collagen fibres under contraction. This phenomenon can only be explained by the fibre-matrix interaction. Furthermore, we find that the physical interpretation of this interaction includes the inhomogeneity of the soft tissue and the fibre orientation dispersion. The dependence of the tangent stiffness of the matrix on the first invariant of the deformation tensor can also be explained by the fibre orientation dispersion. The significant effect of the fibre-matrix interaction strain energy on mechanical behaviour of the soft tissue is also illustrated by comparing some simulation results.

  16. Tip cap for a rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofel, W. K.; Tuley, E. N.; Gay, C. H., Jr.; Troeger, R. E.; Sterman, A. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A replaceable tip cap for attachment to the end of a rotor blade is described. The tip cap includes a plurality of walls defining a compartment which, if desired, can be divided into a plurality of subcompartments. The tip cap can include inlet and outlet holes in walls thereof to permit fluid communication of a cooling fluid there through. Abrasive material can be attached with the radially outer wall of the tip cap.

  17. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  18. Non-destructive testing on aramid fibres for the long-term assessment of interventions on heritage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceravolo, R.; De Marchi, A.; Pinotti, E.; Surace, C.; Zanotti Fragonara, L.

    2015-07-01

    High strength fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) are composite materials made of fibres such as carbon, aramid and/or glass, and a resin matrix. FRPs are commonly used for structural repair and strengthening interventions and exhibit high potential for applications to existing constructions, including heritage buildings. In regard to aramid fibres, uncertainties about the long-term behaviour of these materials have often made the designers reluctant to use them in structural engineering. The present study describes simple and non-destructive nonlinearity tests for assessing damage or degradation of structural properties in Kevlar fibres. This was obtained by using high precision measurements to detect small deviations in the dynamic response measured on fibres and ropes. The change in dynamic properties was then related to a damage produced by exposure of the sample to UV rays for a defined time period, which simulated long-term sun exposure. In order to investigate the sensitivity of such an approach to damage detection, non-linearity characterisation tests were conducted on aramid fibres in both damaged and undamaged states. With the purpose of carrying out dynamic tests on small fibre specimens, a dedicated instrumentation was designed and built in cooperation with the Metrology Laboratory of the Department of Electronics at the Politecnico di Torino.

  19. Measurement of Surface Strains from a Composite Hydrofoil using Fibre Bragg Grating Sensing Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    a profiled aluminium capture block. Load was applied near the tip of the foil by a profiled aluminium form board connected to a 280 kN capacity...manufactured using a closed mould resin transfer moulding (RTM) process in a custom-built Aluminium mould. The matrix material was the low viscosity Kinetix...use of a heat-activated film adhesive (Redux 312) [8,9]. The optical fibres were laid into channels formed on the part surface using tape and then

  20. Europium complex-based thermochromic sensor for integration in plastic optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Inma Suarez; Luisa Mendonça, A.; Fernandes, Mariana; Bermudez, Verónica de Zea; Morgado, Jorge; Del Pozo, G.; Romero, B.; Cabanillas-Gonzalez, Juan

    2012-06-01

    We report on a new thermochromic material containing a europium complex for thermal sensing through its fluorescence response to temperature. The ratio between the strong luminescence peak of europium (III) and a side band emission is employed as a new probe for optical sensing of temperature. The ratio is observed to follow an Arrhenius-type dependence with temperature. Based on these results we developed a thermal probe based on a segment of luminescent thermometer optically cemented to the tip of a PMMA fibre.

  1. Design and development of an optical-fibre-based Integral Field Unit (IFU) on the IUCAA 2-m telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Mudit K.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Das, Hillol K.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Chordia, Pravin A.; Kohok, Abhay A.; Rajarshi, Chaitanya V.

    2011-12-01

    An optical-fibre-based Integral Field Unit (IFU) has been developed for the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) Faint Object Spectrometer and Camera (IFOSC), the main back-end instrument on the IUCAA 2-m telescope at Girawali, Pune, India. This IFU enables IFOSC to perform two-dimensional spectroscopy of extended astronomical objects and is being used as one of the modes of IFOSC. Based on the concept of coupling the telescope focal plane with the spectrograph slit using a fibre bundle, the IFU (named the Fibre-based Integral Field Unit for IFOSC, hereafter FIFUI) uses 100 optical fibres, each associated with a tiny lenslet on its tip, to sample the incoming field of view spatially. In addition, FIFUI uses some coupling optics to realize this two-dimensional interface. FIFUI offers three different spatial sampling scales of 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 arcsec fibre-1. It is optimized for the visible spectrum and for a field of view of ˜13 × 6 arcsec2 on the sky for the nominal 1-arcsec sampling mode. FIFUI was commissioned on the IUCAA 2-m telescope during 2010 February-March after a series of sky tests and science-verification observations and a data-analysis pipeline was developed to extract the spectra and reconstruct the sky maps. Here we report on the development of FIFUI, including its opto-mechanical design and commissioning observations.

  2. Effects of Extrusion on Fibre Length in Sisal Fibre-Reinforced Polypropylene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathi, Sridhar; Jayaraman, Krishnan

    Natural fibre reinforced thermoplastic composites find a wide array of applications in the automobile, building and construction industries. These composites are mostly produced by injection moulding or extrusion through properly designed dies. During these production processes, the shear forces exerted by the screw or ram leads to the degradation of the natural fibres. A screwless extruder that minimises fibre degradation and employs a reliable and low technology process has already been developed. However, the fibre degradation caused by the screwless extruder has not been compared with that of the conventional extruders. So, this study is focused on the influence of extrusion processes on the degradation of natural fibres in thermoplastic composites. Sisal fibres of 10 mm length were extruded with polypropylene, to furnish extrudates with a fibre mass fraction of 25%, using conventional single screw and screwless extruders. Polypropylene in the extrudates was dissolved in Xylene in a Sohxlet process; the fibres that were extracted were analysed for length variations. While fibre degradation in the form of fibre length variation is similar in both cases, this can be minimised in screwless extrusion by extending the gap between the front face of the cone and the orifice plate.

  3. Coated fiber tips for optical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, John B.; Chanda, Sheetal; Locknar, Sarah A.; Carver, Gary E.

    2016-03-01

    Compact optical systems can be fabricated by integrating coatings on fiber tips. Examples include fiber lasers, fiber interferometers, fiber Raman probes, fiber based spectrometers, and anti-reflected endoscopes. These interference filters are applied to exposed tips - either connectorized or cleaved. Coatings can also be immersed within glass by depositing on one tip and connecting to another uncoated tip. This paper addresses a fiber spectrometer for multispectral imaging - useful in several fields including biomedical scanning, flow cytometry, and remote sensing. Our spectrometer integrates serial arrays of reflecting fiber tips, delay lines between these elements, and a single element detector.

  4. The Effect on the Flexural Strength, Flexural Modulus and Compressive Strength of Fibre Reinforced Acrylic with That of Plain Unfilled Acrylic Resin – An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Tony C; K, Aswini Kumar; Krishnan, Vinod; Mathew, Anil; V, Manju

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the flexural strength, the flexural modulus and compressive strength of the acrylic polymer reinforced with glass, carbon, polyethylene and Kevlar fibres with that of plain unfilled resin. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 specimens were prepared and divided into 10 specimens each under 5 groups namely group 1- control group without any fibres, group 2 – carbon fibres, group 3- glass fibres, group 4 – polyethylene, group 5- Kevlar. Universal testing machine (Tinius olsen, USA) was used for the testing of these specimens. Out of each group, 5 specimens were randomly selected and testing was done for flexural strength using a three point deflection test and three point bending test for compressive strength and the modulus was plotted using a graphical method. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software. Results: The respective mean values for samples in regard to their flexural strength for PMMA plain, PMMA+ glass fibre, PMMA+ carbon, PMMA+ polyethylene and PMMA+ Kevlar were 90.64, 100.79, 102.58, 94.13 and 96.43 respectively. Scheffes post hoc test clearly indicated that only mean flexural strength values of PMMA + Carbon, has the highest mean value. One-way ANOVA revealed a non-significant difference among the groups in regard to their compressive strength. Conclusion: The study concludes that carbon fibre reinforced samples has the greatest flexural strength and greatest flexural modulus, however the compressive strength remains unchanged. PMID:25954696

  5. Adhesion, friction and wear on the nanoscale of MWNT tips and SWNT and MWNT arrays.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Galasso, Barbara; Bignardi, Cristina; Nguyen, Cattien V; Dai, Liming; Qu, Liangti

    2008-03-26

    The nanotribological characterization of carbon nanotubes is fundamental for the exploration of new sliding applications. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of adhesion, friction and wear of a multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) tip, and SWNT (single-walled nanotube) and MWNT arrays has been carried out. A nonlinear response of the MWNT tip is observed when the tip is brought into and out of contact with various surfaces. A nonlinear response occurs due to the buckling of the nanotube and its subsequent sliding on the surface. In addition to the role of surface chemistry, it can also explain the relatively high value of the coefficient of friction obtained on different surfaces, as compared to that of Si and Si(3)N(4) tips. The adhesion and friction studies carried out on SWNT and MWNT arrays using Si tips show that SWNT arrays, compared to MWNT arrays, exhibit lower values, possibly due to lower van der Waals forces as a result of lower packing density and higher flexibility. The wear tests conducted with the MWNT tip and a Si tip on a gold film, at two normal loads, show less damage of the surface when the MWNT tip is used because of the MWNT acting as a compliant spring, absorbing part of the load. Wear tests conducted with a Si tip on SWNT and MWNT arrays show that the arrays do not wear. The tip wear and the friction force in the SWNT array are lower, because of lower adhesion and higher flexibility of the SWNTs, which causes less opposition to the motion of the tip.

  6. Multifunctional and dimensionally stable flexible fibre composites for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datashvili, Leri

    2010-04-01

    Large deployable reflectors typically use knitted metal mesh reflecting surfaces. Knitted metal meshes are characterized by excellent stowability properties. For the operation, meshes have to be tensioned, which leads to much lower accuracy. In order to keep the stowability advantages of knitted meshes but enhancing shape accuracy, a flexible reflecting surface material composed of carbon fibre reinforced silicone (CFRS) has been developed and investigated. Due to its low bending stiffness determined by the silicone matrix, the composite material can be manufactured easily with double curvature and nearly ideal parabolic shape. Compared to the conventional stiff matrix composites, which give high accurate double curved reflecting surfaces, an additional functionality is acquired by using a flexible silicone matrix. The use of this material allows for easy stowing and deployment. Because of the carbon fibres, the CFRS is characterized with a very low thermal expansion coefficient (measured and calculated about -0.36e-6/°C) with no moisture absorption or micro-cracking effects even under strong environmental cycles. These points indicate a high dimensional stability of the material. Results obtained from different thermo-mechanical and radio-frequency (RF) characterization tests for such CFRS surfaces confirm the expected behaviour. The measured RF properties, such as insertion loss, cross-polarization, reflectivity, and passive inter-modulation (PIM), show that the created material can be used even up to 15 GHz of RF. Higher frequencies can be achieved in different cases. Several application examples are addressed further in the paper.

  7. Advanced turbine blade tip seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelahy, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    An advanced blade/shroud system designed to maintain close clearance between blade tips and turbine shrouds and at the same time, be resistant to environmental effects including high temperature oxidation, hot corrosion, and thermal cycling is described. Increased efficiency and increased blade life are attained by using the advanced blade tip seal system. Features of the system include improved clearance control when blade tips preferentially wear the shrouds and a superior single crystal superalloy tip. The tip design, joint location, characterization of the single crystal tip alloy, the abrasive tip treatment, and the component and engine test are among the factors addressed. Results of wear testing, quality control plans, and the total manufacturing cycle required to fully process the blades are also discussed.

  8. Parametric tip effects for conformable rotor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantay, W. R.; Yeager, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A research study was initiated to systematically determine the impact of selected blade tip geometric parameters on aeroelasticity conformable rotor performance and loads characteristics. The model articulated rotors included baseline and torsionally soft blades with interchangeable tips. Seven blade tip designs were evaluated on the baseline rotor and three tip designs were tested on the torsionally soft blades. The designs incorporated a systematic variation in three geometric parameters: sweep, taper, and anhedral. The rotors were evaluated in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at several advance ratios, lift and propulsive force values, and tip Mach numbers. Based on the test results, tip parameter variations generated significant rotor performance and loads difference for both baseline and torsionally soft blades. Azimuthal variation of elastic twist generated by the tip parameters strongly correlated with rotor performance and loads, but the magnitude of advancing blade elastic twist did not correlate.

  9. Ultraviolet microbeam irradiations of epithelial and spermatocyte spindles suggest that forces act on the kinetochore fibre and are not generated by its disassembly.

    PubMed

    Spurck, T; Forer, A; Pickett-Heaps, J

    1997-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) microbeam irradiations of crane-fly spermatocyte and newt epithelial spindles severed kinetochore fibres (KT-fibres), creating areas of reduced birefringence (ARBs): the remnant KT-fibre consists of two "stubs," a pole-stub attached to the pole and a KT-stub attached to the kinetochore. KT-stubs remained visible but pole-stubs soon became undetectable [Forer et al., 1996]. At metaphase, in both cell types the KT-stub often changed orientation immediately after irradiation and its tip steadily moved poleward. In spermatocytes, the chromosome attached to the KT-stub remained at the equator as the KT-stub elongated. In epithelial cells, the KT-stub sometimes elongated as the associated chromosome remained at the equator; other times the associated chromosome moved poleward together with the KT-stub, albeit only a short distance toward the pole. When an ARB was generated at anaphase, chromosome(s) with a KT-stub often continued to move poleward. In spermatocytes, this movement was accompanied by steady elongation of the KT-stub. In epithelial cells, chromosomes accelerated polewards after irradiation until the KT-stubs reached the pole, after which chromosome movement returned to normal speeds. In some epithelial cells fine birefringent fibres by chance were present along one edge of ARBs; these remnant fibres buckled and broke as the KT-stub and chromosome moved polewards. Similarly, KT-stubs that moved into pole stubs (or astral fibres) caused the pole stubs (or astral fibres) to bend sharply from the point of impact. Our results contradict models of chromosome movement that postulate that force is generated by the kinetochore disassembling the KT-fibre. Instead, these results suggest that poleward directed forces act on the KT-fibre and the KT-stub and suggest that continuity of microtubules between kinetochore and pole is not obligatory for achieving anaphase motion to the pole.

  10. Twin-hollow-core optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyros, Alexander; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; van Eijkelenborg, Martijn A.

    2009-05-01

    Twin-hollow-core microstructured optical fibres have been fabricated and characterised for the first time. The fibre cladding structure results in guidance by the inhibited coupling mechanism, in which there is a low overlap between the core modes and surrounding structure. This results in minimal interaction between the modes of each core in the transmission bands of the fibre and hence minimal coupling between the cores. It is shown that light is able to couple between the cores via coupling to cladding struts in the high loss wavelength bands.

  11. Comparison of Various Supersonic Turbine Tip Designs to Minimize Aerodynamic Loss and Tip Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The rotor tips of axial turbines experience high heat flux and are the cause of aerodynamic losses due to tip clearance flows, and in the case of supersonic tips, shocks. As stage loadings increase, the flow in the tip gap approaches and exceeds sonic conditions. This introduces effects such as shock-boundary layer interactions and choked flow that are not observed for subsonic tip flows that have been studied extensively in literature. This work simulates the tip clearance flow for a flat tip, a diverging tip gap and several contoured tips to assess the possibility of minimizing tip heat flux while maintaining a constant massflow from the pressure side to the suction side of the rotor, through the tip clearance. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code GlennHT was used for the simulations. Due to the strong favorable pressure gradients the simulations assumed laminar conditions in the tip gap. The nominal tip gap width to height ratio for this study is 6.0. The Reynolds number of the flow is 2.4 x 10(exp 5) based on nominal tip width and exit velocity. A wavy wall design was found to reduce heat flux by 5 percent but suffered from an additional 6 percent in aerodynamic loss coefficient. Conventional tip recesses are found to perform far worse than a flat tip due to severe shock heating. Overall, the baseline flat tip was the second best performer. A diverging converging tip gap with a hole was found to be the best choice. Average tip heat flux was reduced by 37 percent and aerodynamic losses were cut by over 6 percent.

  12. Polarisation effects in twin-core fibre: Application for mode locking in a fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, I. A.; Kablukov, S. I.; Podivilov, Evgenii V.; Babin, Sergei A.; Apolonski, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    We report the first measurements of the longitudinal power distribution in a twin-core optical fibre at different input light polarisations. Experimental evidence is presented that, because of the difference in birefringence between the cores, the power in them depends on which core the beam is launched into. Experimental data are interpreted in terms of a modified polarisation model for mode coupling in twin-core fibres which takes into account the birefringence of the cores. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time the use of the polarisation properties of a twincore fibre for mode locking in a fibre laser.

  13. Force field analysis suggests a lowering of diffusion barriers in atomic manipulation due to presence of STM tip.

    PubMed

    Emmrich, Matthias; Schneiderbauer, Maximilian; Huber, Ferdinand; Weymouth, Alfred J; Okabayashi, Norio; Giessibl, Franz J

    2015-04-10

    We study the physics of atomic manipulation of CO on a Cu(111) surface by combined scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy at liquid helium temperatures. In atomic manipulation, an adsorbed atom or molecule is arranged on the surface using the interaction of the adsorbate with substrate and tip. While previous experiments are consistent with a linear superposition model of tip and substrate forces, we find that the force threshold depends on the force field of the tip. Here, we use carbon monoxide front atom identification (COFI) to characterize the tip's force field. Tips that show COFI profiles with an attractive center can manipulate CO in any direction while tips with a repulsive center can only manipulate in certain directions. The force thresholds are independent of bias voltage in a range from 1 to 10 mV and independent of temperature in a range of 4.5 to 7.5 K.

  14. Extraneous fibre traces brought by river water - A case study.

    PubMed

    Lepot, L; Vanden Driessche, T; Lunstroot, K; Barret, A; Gason, F; De Wael, K

    2017-01-01

    The fibre traces on a young victim found underwater were mostly single fibre traces besides small amounts of fibre collectives indistinguishable from his parents clothes (mainly wool). Most of those single fibre traces were blue-grey polyester fibres showing tiny differences among each other. They were unexpected according to known population fibre studies. One year after the victim's discovery experiments were conducted to evaluate the possible contamination with fibres from river water. A small amount of extraneous fibres were collected among which blue and grey-black cotton and man-made (mainly polyester) fibres. All man-made fibres were single fibre traces and small fibre collectives were only observed for cotton. These results confirmed the frequent occurrence of blue and grey-black cotton fibres as background, but also highlighted the possible contamination with single blue and grey-black man-made fibres from river water. No wool was found, strengthening the significance of the wool fibre collectives present on the victim.

  15. SpaceFibre Demonstrator (Demonstration and Testing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfers, T.; Rastetter, P.; Papadas, C.; Parkes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Currently Astrium GmbH and ISD S.A. are planning the development of a demonstrator for SpaceFibre. The SpaceFibre demonstrator will be used to execute functional performance tests and EMC (Electro Magnetic Compatibility) tests. University of Dundee is program prime contractor and provides Astrium with the SpaceFibre IP core. The work si shared between the two partners in the following way: • Astrium: Prime Contractor and Technical Coordination; FPGA Design; EMC Testing• ISD: Development of Demonstrator Board including housing, development of test bed and functional performance testingThe driving requirements for this development are:• SpaceFibre performance, while implementing it into space equivalent components• Design and MAIT of the demonstrator in such a way that representative EMC testing is possible.

  16. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Poeggel, Sven; Tosi, Daniele; Duraibabu, DineshBabu; Leen, Gabriel; McGrath, Deirdre; Lewis, Elfed

    2015-01-01

    This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas. PMID:26184228

  17. Endoscopic septoplasty: Tips and pearls.

    PubMed

    Pons, Y; Champagne, C; Genestier, L; Ballivet de Régloix, S

    2015-12-01

    This article is designed to provide a step-by-step description of our endoscopic septoplasty technique and discuss its difficulties and technical tips. Endoscopic septoplasty comprises 10 steps: diagnostic endoscopy, subperichondral infiltration, left mucosal incision, dissection of the left subperichondral flap, cartilage incision (0.5 centimetre posterior to the mucosal incision), dissection of the right subperichondral flap, anterior cartilage resection, perpendicular plate dissection, dissection and resection of the maxillary crest, endoscopic revision, mucosal suture and Silastic stents. A satisfactory postoperative result was observed at 3 months in 97% of cases in this series. The main contraindication to endoscopic septoplasty is anterior columellar deviation of the nasal septum requiring a conventional procedure.

  18. Effectiveness of cigarette filter tips for reducing cadmium in relation to other mainstream smoke constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, C.A.; Lisk, D.J.; Shane, B.S.; Hoffmann, D.; Adams, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of filter tips for reducing cadmium, tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in cigarettes was studied. The cigarettes were made from tobacco grown on municipal sewage sludge-amended soil and were therefore high in cadmium. When machine-smoked, filter tips did not result in a significant reduction of cadmium deposited on Cambridge filters. This may indicate that a considerable fraction of cadmium is present in the vapor phase of the smoke and therefore not reduced to the same extent as the tar by certain filters. Nicotine and carbon monoxide were reduced to a lesser extent than tar. This indicates that the filter tip has influenced the combustion of the tobacco column during smoking.

  19. GaN nanowire tip for high aspect ratio nano-scale AFM metrology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadirad, Mahmoud; Dawson, Noel; Nami, Mohsen; Rishinaramangalam, Ashwin K.; Feezell, Daniel F.; Busani, Tito L.

    2016-09-01

    In this study we introduce Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanowire (NW) as high aspect ratio tip with excellent durability for nano-scale metrology. GaN NWs have superior mechanical property and young modulus compare to commercial Si and Carbon tips which results in having less bending issue during measurement. The GaN NWs are prepared via two different methods: i) Catalyst-free selected area growth, using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD), ii) top-down approach by employing Au nanoparticles as the mask material in dry-etch process. To achieve small diameter tips, the semipolar planes of the NWs grown by MOCVD are etched using AZ400k. The diameter of the NWs fabricated using the top down process is controlled by using different size of nanoparticles and by Inductively Coupled Plasma etching. NWs with various diameters were manipulated on Si cantilevers using Focus Ion Beam (FIB) to make tips for AFM measurement. A Si (110) substrate containing nano-scale grooves with vertical 900 walls were used as a sample for inspection. AFM measurements were carried out in tapping modes for both types of nanowires (top-down and bottom-up grown nanowires) and results are compared with conventional Si and carbon nanotube tips. It is shown our fabricated tips are robust and have improved edge resolution over conventional Si tips. GaN tips made with NW's fabricated using our top down method are also shown to retain the gold nanoparticle at tip, which showed enhanced field effects in Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Angiogenic effect induced by mineral fibres.

    PubMed

    Carbonari, Damiano; Campopiano, Antonella; Ramires, Deborah; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Tomasetti, Marco; Curini, Roberta; Valentino, Matteo; Santarelli, Lory; Amati, Monica

    2011-10-09

    Due to the toxic effect of asbestos, other materials with similar chemical-physical characteristics have been introduced to substitute it. We evaluate the angiogenic effect of certain asbestos substitute fibres such as glass fibres (GFs), ceramic fibres (CFs) and wollastonite fibres (WFs) and then compare angiogenic responses to those induced by crocidolite asbestos fibres (AFs). An in vitro model using human endothelial cells in small islands within a culture matrix of fibroblasts (Angio-Kit) was used to evaluate vessel formation. The release of IL-6, sIL-R6, IL-8, VEGF-A and their soluble receptors, sVEGFR-1, sVEGFR-2, was determined in the conditioning medium of Angio-Kit system after fibre treatment. ROS formation and cell viability were evaluated in cultured endothelial cells (HUVEC). To evaluate the involvement of intracellular mechanisms, EGFR signalling, ROS formation and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) pathway were then inhibited by incubating HUVEC cells with AG1478, NAC and PDTC respectively, and the cytokine and growth factor release was analyzed in the culture medium after 7 days of fibre incubation. Among the mineral fibres tested, WFs markedly induced blood vessel formation which was associated with release of IL-6 and IL-8, VEGF-A and their soluble receptors. ROS production was observed in HUVEC after WFs treatment which was associated with cell cytotoxicity. The EGFR-induced ERK phosphorylation and ROS-mediated NFκB activation were involved in the cytokine and angiogenic factor release. However, only the EGFR activation was able to induce angiogenesis. The WFs are potential angiogenic agents that can induce regenerative cytokine and angiogenic factor production resulting in the formation of new blood vessels.

  1. Simulating Fibre Suspensions: Lagrangian versus Statistical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. H.; Andersson, H. I.; Gillissen, J. J. J.; Boersma, B. J.

    Fibre suspensions exhibit complex dynamical flow phenomena and are at the same time of immense practical importance, notably in the pulp and paper industries. NTNU and TU Delft have in a collaborative research project adopted two alternative strategies in the simulation of dilute fibre suspensions, namely a statistical approach [2] and a Lagrangian particle treatment [4]. The two approaches have their own advantages and disadvantages. In this paper we aim for the first time to compare the performance of the two.

  2. Fibre-optic sensors in health care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazia Mignani, Anna; Baldini, Francesco

    1997-05-01

    Biomedical fibre-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of physical, chemical and biochemical parameters and for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fibre-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention paid to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different application fields such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology and dentistry.

  3. Sub-10-micrometer toughening and crack tip toughness of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ang, Siang Fung; Schulz, Anja; Pacher Fernandes, Rodrigo; Schneider, Gerold A

    2011-04-01

    In previous studies, enamel showed indications to occlude small cracks in-vivo and exhibited R-curve behaviors for bigger cracks ex-vivo. This study quantifies the crack tip's toughness (K(I0),K(III0)), the crack's closure stress and the cohesive zone size at the crack tip of enamel and investigates the toughening mechanisms near the crack tip down to the length scale of a single enamel crystallite. The crack-opening-displacement (COD) profile of cracks induced by Vickers indents on mature bovine enamel was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mode I crack tip toughness K(I0) of cracks along enamel rod boundaries and across enamel rods exhibit a similar range of values: K(I0,Ir)=0.5-1.6MPa m(0.5) (based on Irwin's 'near-field' solution) and K(I0,cz)=0.8-1.5MPa m(0.5) (based on the cohesive zone solution of the Dugdale-Muskhelishvili (DM) crack model). The mode III crack tip toughness K(III0,Ir) was computed as 0.02-0.15MPa m(0.5). The crack-closure stress at the crack tip was computed as 163-770 MPa with a cohesive zone length and width 1.6-10.1μm and 24-44 nm utilizing the cohesive zone solution. Toughening elements were observed under AFM and SEM: crack bridging due to protein ligament and hydroxyapatite fibres (micro- and nanometer scale) as well as microcracks were identified.

  4. Fibre-optic bacterial biosensors and their application for the analysis of bioavailable Hg and As in soils and sediments from Aznalcollar mining area in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ivask, Angela; Green, Tal; Polyak, Boris; Mor, Amit; Kahru, Anne; Virta, Marko; Marks, Robert

    2007-02-15

    Fibre-optic biosensors for Hg and As were developed by attaching alginate-immobilised recombinant luminescent Hg- and As-sensor bacteria onto optical fibres. The optimised biosensors (consisting of seven layers of fibre-attached bacteria pre-grown till mid-logarithmic growth phase) enabled quantification of environmentally relevant concentrations of the target analytes: 2.6 microg l-1 of Hg(II) and 141 microg l-1 of As(V) or 18 microg l-1 of As(III). The highest viability and sensitivity for target analyte was obtained when fibre tips were stored in CaCl2 solution at -80 degrees C. Applicability of the fibre-optic biosensors in parallel to the respective non-immobilised sensors was assessed on 10 natural soil and sediment samples from Aznalcollar mining area (Spain). On the average 0.2% of the total Hg and 0.87% of the total As proved bioavailable to fibre-attached bacteria. Interestingly, about 20-fold more Hg and 4-fold more As was available to non-immobilised sensor bacteria indicating the importance of direct cell contact (possible only for non-immobilised cells) for enhanced bioavailability of these metals in solid samples.

  5. Dewatering of fibre suspensions by pressure filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Duncan R.; Paterson, Daniel T.; Balmforth, Neil J.; Martinez, D. Mark

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of dewatering of fibre suspensions by uniaxial compression is presented. Solutions of a one-dimensional model are discussed and asymptotic limits of fast and slow compression are explored. Particular focus is given to relatively rapid compression and to the corresponding development of spatial variations in the solidity and velocity profiles of the suspension. The results of complementary laboratory experiments are presented for nylon or cellulose fibres suspended in viscous fluid. The constitutive relationships for each suspension were measured independently. Measurements of the load for different fixed compression speeds, together with some direct measurements of the velocity profiles using particle tracking velocimetry, are compared with model predictions. The comparison is reasonable for nylon, but poor for cellulose fibres. An extension to the model, which allows for a strain-rate-dependent component in the network stress, is proposed, and is found to give a dramatic improvement in the model predictions for cellulose fibre suspensions. The reason for this improvement is attributed to the microstructure of cellulose fibres, which, unlike nylon fibres, are themselves porous.

  6. Fibre positioning algorithms for the WEAVE spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrett, David L.; Lewis, Ian J.; Dalton, Gavin; Abrams, Don Carlos; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Middleton, Kevin; Trager, Scott C.

    2014-07-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick and place" fibre fed spectrograph with more than one thousand fibres, similar in concept to the Australian Astronomical Observatory's 2dF1 instrument with two observing plates, one of which is observing the sky while other is being reconfigured by a robotic fibre positioner. It will be capable of acquiring more than 10000 star or galaxy spectra a night. The WEAVE positioner concept uses two robots working in tandem in order to reconfigure a fully populated field within the expected 1 hour dwell-time for the instrument (a good match between the required exposure times and the limit of validity for a given configuration due to the effects of differential refraction). This presents additional constraints and complications for the software that determines the optimal path from one configuration to the next, particularly given the large number of fibre crossings implied by the 1000 fibre multiplex. This paper describes the algorithms and programming techniques used in the prototype implementations of the field configuration tool and the fibre positioner robot controller developed to support the detailed design of WEAVE.

  7. Blade Tip Rubbing Stress Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gary A.; Clough, Ray C.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical model was constructed to predict the magnitude of stresses produced by rubbing a turbine blade against its tip seal. This model used a linearized approach to the problem, after a parametric study, found that the nonlinear effects were of insignificant magnitude. The important input parameters to the model were: the arc through which rubbing occurs, the turbine rotor speed, normal force exerted on the blade, and the rubbing coefficient of friction. Since it is not possible to exactly specify some of these parameters, values were entered into the model which bracket likely values. The form of the forcing function was another variable which was impossible to specify precisely, but the assumption of a half-sine wave with a period equal to the duration of the rub was taken as a realistic assumption. The analytical model predicted resonances between harmonics of the forcing function decomposition and known harmonics of the blade. Thus, it seemed probable that blade tip rubbing could be at least a contributor to the blade-cracking phenomenon. A full-scale, full-speed test conducted on the space shuttle main engine high pressure fuel turbopump Whirligig tester was conducted at speeds between 33,000 and 28,000 RPM to confirm analytical predictions.

  8. Tipping elements in the Earth's climate system

    SciTech Connect

    Lenton, T.M.; Held, H.; Lucht, W.; Rahmstorf, S.; Kriegler, E. |; Hall, J.W.; Schellnhuber, H.J. |

    2008-02-12

    The term 'tipping point' commonly refers to a critical threshold at which a tiny perturbation can qualitatively alter the state or development of a system. Here the authors introduce the term 'tipping element' to describe large-scale components of the Earth system that may pass a tipping point. They critically evaluate potential policy-relevant tipping elements in the climate system under anthropogenic forcing, drawing on the pertinent literature and a recent international workshop to compile a short list, and they assess where their tipping points lie. An expert elicitation is used to help rank their sensitivity to global warming and the uncertainty about the underlying physical mechanisms. Then the authors explain how, in principle, early warning systems could be established to detect the proximity of some tipping points.

  9. Airborne polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and cellulose fibre levels in fibre-cement factories in seven European countries.

    PubMed

    De Raeve, H; Van Cleemput, J; Nemery, B

    2001-11-01

    Because of their relatively high diameter, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibres, as used in fibre-cement, are not fibres as defined by WHO (or other) regulations. Nevertheless, as with all particulate raw materials, it can be questioned if and to what extent particles with critical fibrous dimensions might be generated by the handling or machining of this material. In order to investigate any tendency of PVA fibres to release airborne particles with critical fibrous dimensions (WHO fibres), static and/or personal samples were taken in eight fibre-cement factories at locations where potential exposures to PVA fibres were expected to be the highest. The following locations were surveyed: the PVA fibre weighing station, where PVA bales are opened mechanically and the PVA fibres are dispersed and weighed in a dry state; the fibre-cement slate punching machine; the slate 'riven edge' cutting machine or sheet sawing machine, whichever was present in the respective factories. Since cellulose fibres are an important constituent of fibre-cement, the organic fibre concentrations observed at the machining operations include cellulose. At each factory a control sample was taken in open air. Sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed according to standard German procedures. Only very low number concentrations of organic WHO fibres, ranging from below detection limit to 0.006 f/ml, were found. These levels are lower than the typical levels of organic fibres commonly found in the normal personal environment (0.009-0.02 f/ml), stemming from the release of particles by a person's activities and from clothing and other textiles (bed sheets, blankets, pillow,.). We conclude that the handling of PVA fibres as well as the machining of PVA and cellulose fibre containing cement products in the fibre-cement factories surveyed have a low potential to release fibres with critical fibrous (WHO) dimensions.

  10. The effect of fibre content, fibre size and alkali treatment to Charpy impact resistance of Oil Palm fibre reinforced composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitri, Muhamad; Mahzan, Shahruddin

    2016-11-01

    In this research, the effect of fibre content, fibre size and alkali treatment to the impact resistance of the composite material have been investigated, The composite material employs oil palm fibre as the reinforcement material whereas the matrix used for the composite materials are polypropylene. The Oil Palm fibres are prepared for two conditions: alkali treated fibres and untreated fibres. The fibre sizes are varied in three sizes: 5mm, 7mm and 10mm. During the composite material preparation, the fibre contents also have been varied into 3 different percentages: 5%, 7% and 10%. The statistical approach is used to optimise the variation of specimen determined by using Taguchi method. The results were analyzed also by the Taguchi method and shows that the Oil Palm fibre content is significantly affect the impact resistance of the polymer matrix composite. However, the fibre size is moderately affecting the impact resistance, whereas the fibre treatment is insignificant to the impact resistance of the oil palm fibre reinforced polymer matrix composite.

  11. Effect of different lay-ups on the microstructure, mechanical properties and neutron transmission of neutron shielding fibre metal laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xuelong; Tang, Xiaobin; Hu, Yubing; Li, Huaguan; Tao, Jie

    2016-07-01

    A novel neutron shielding fibre metal laminates (NSFMLs) with different lay-ups, composed of stacking layers of AA6061 plates, neutron shielding composite and carbon fibre reinforced polyimide (CFRP), were fabricated using hot molding process in atmospheric environments. The microstructure, mechanical properties and neutron transmission of the NSFMLs were evaluated, respectively. The results indicated that the NSFMLs possessed good mechanical properties owing to the good interfacial adhesion of the components. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of the NSFMLs increased with the numbers of lay-ups, while the elongation to fracture exhibited obvious declining tendency. Flexural strength and modulus of the NSFMLs were improved obviously with the increasing of stacking layers. Neutron transmission of the NSFMLs decreased obviously with increasing the number of lay-ups, owing to the increase of 10B areal density. Besides, the effect of carbon fibres on the neutron shielding performance of the NSFMLs was also taken into consideration.

  12. A comparison of efficiency of manual and automatic fibres search with the Maxcan fibre finder.

    PubMed

    Monard Sermier, F; Massonnet, G; Buzzini, P; Fortini, A; Gason, F; De Wael, K; Rovas, P

    2006-07-13

    The aim of this work was to study the efficiency of automatic fibre searching with the Maxcan fibre finder (Cox Analytical Systems, Sweden) in comparison to manual searching. The influence of some parameters (color, thickness, background noise) on the results of a fibre search was considered. Eighteen experimental tapes with different target fibres and different background noises were prepared in the laboratory. Searching of fibres was performed manually and with the Maxcan fibre finder by different operators from four European laboratories. Two laboratories have the Maxcan fibre finder system and the two instruments were used and compared in this study. The results show that searching with the Maxcan is generally as efficient as manual searching, except for very pale or very dark fibres. Note that the tapes used for these experiments were prepared in laboratory, and are not completely representative of the tape that could be obtained in real cases. To generalize the results obtained, further research on real case samples would be necessary.

  13. Magnesium Coated Bioresorbable Phosphate Glass Fibres: Investigation of the Interface between Fibre and Polyester Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoling; Grant, David M.; Parsons, Andrew J.; Harper, Lee T.; Rudd, Chris D.; Ahmed, Ifty

    2013-01-01

    Bioresorbable phosphate glass fibre reinforced polyester composites have been investigated as replacement for some traditional metallic orthopaedic implants, such as bone fracture fixation plates. However, composites tested revealed loss of the interfacial integrity after immersion within aqueous media which resulted in rapid loss of mechanical properties. Physical modification of fibres to change fibre surface morphology has been shown to be an effective method to improve fibre and matrix adhesion in composites. In this study, biodegradable magnesium which would gradually degrade to Mg2+ in the human body was deposited via magnetron sputtering onto bioresorbable phosphate glass fibres to obtain roughened fibre surfaces. Fibre surface morphology after coating was observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The roughness profile and crystalline texture of the coatings were determined via atomic force microscope (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, respectively. The roughness of the coatings was seen to increase from 40 ± 1 nm to 80 ± 1 nm. The mechanical properties (tensile strength and modulus) of fibre with coatings decreased with increased magnesium coating thickness. PMID:24066297

  14. Turbine blade tip with offset squealer

    DOEpatents

    Bunker, Ronald Scott

    2001-01-01

    An industrial turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationary shroud. The rotating blade includes a root section, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall defining an outer periphery and a tip portion having a tip cap. An offset squealer is disposed on the tip cap. The offset squealer is positioned inward from the outer periphery of the rotating blade. The offset squealer increases the flow resistance and reduces the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  15. Advanced optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, M. J.; Honeycutt, R. E.; Nordlund, R. E.; Robinson, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced electro-optical system was developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in an operating gas turbine engine. This system is applicable to fan, compressor, and turbine blade tip clearance measurement requirements, and the system probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. A study of optical properties of blade tips was conducted to establish measurement system application limitations. A series of laboratory tests was conducted to determine the measurement system's operational performance characteristics and to demonstrate system capability under simulated operating gas turbine environmental conditions. Operational and environmental performance test data are presented.

  16. Tip-enhanced THz Raman spectroscopy for local temperature determination at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Balois, Maria Vanessa; Hayazawa, Norihiko; Catalan, Francesca Celine; Kawata, Satoshi; Yano, Taka-Aki; Hayashi, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    Local temperature of a nanoscale volume is precisely determined by tip-enhanced terahertz Raman spectroscopy in the low temperature range of several tens of degrees. Heat generated by the tip-enhanced electric field is directly transferred to single-walled carbon nanotubes by heat conduction and radiation at the nanoscale. This heating modulates the intensity ratio of anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering of the radial breathing mode of the carbon nanotube based on the Boltzmann distribution at elevated temperatures. Owing to the low-energy feature of the radial breathing mode, the local temperature of the probing volume has been successfully extracted with high sensitivity. The dependence of the temperature rise underneath the tip apex on the incident power coincides with the analytical results calculated by finite element method based on the tip enhancement effect and the consequent steady-state temperature via Joule heat generation. The results show that the local temperature at the nanoscale can be controlled in the low temperature range simply by the incident laser power while exhibiting a sufficiently high tip enhancement effect as an analytical tool for thermally sensitive materials (e.g., proteins, DNA). Graphical Abstract Tip-enhanced THz Raman spectroscopy detects the low frequency Raman mode both in Stokes and anti-Stokes shifts, which precisely reflects the local temperature of the sample volume.

  17. Polarisation maintaining fibre with pure silica core and two depressed claddings for fibre optic gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, A. M.; Kurbatov, R. A.; Voloshin, V. V.; Vorob'ev, I. L.; Kolosovsky, A. O.

    2016-12-01

    Polarisation maintaining (PM) fibre is described with pure silica core and two depressed claddings for fibre optic gyro (FOG) sensing coil. Detailed mathematical simulation is presented by supermodes method, which is extremely necessary for such fibre. Simulation is fulfilled by frequency domain finite difference method (FDFDM), taking into account all details of realistic index profile with stress applying parts, while the leakage/bend loss occur in the region with complex index, surrounding the fibre. Cutoff and small bend loss are theoretically predicted and experimentally measured with excellent agreement between theory and experiment. Polarisation maintaining ability is measured in the form of conventional h-parameter (7.1·10-6 1/m) for 90-μm diameter fibre with birefringence value only 3.9·10-4.

  18. Influence of fibre design and curvature on crosstalk in multi-core fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Egorova, O N; Astapovich, M S; Semjonov, S L; Dianov, E M; Melnikov, L A; Salganskii, M Yu; Mishkin, S N; Nishchev, K N

    2016-03-31

    We have studied the influence of cross-sectional structure and bends on optical cross-talk in a multicore fibre. A reduced refractive index layer produced between the cores of such fibre with a small centre-to-centre spacing between neighbouring cores (27 μm) reduces optical cross-talk by 20 dB. The cross-talk level achieved, 30 dB per kilometre of the length of the multicore fibre, is acceptable for a number of applications where relatively small lengths of fibre are needed. Moreover, a significant decrease in optical cross-talk has been ensured by reducing the winding diameter of multicore fibres with identical cores. (fiber optics)

  19. Fibre Body’: The Concept of Fibre in Eighteenth-century Medicine, c.1700–401

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts a comprehensive account of ‘fibre medicine’ elaborated by iatromechanists from c. 1700 to c. 1740. Fibre medicine, a medical theory informed by the notion of the fibre, has been neglected by medical historians despite the pivotal role played by the fibre in animal economy. Referring to a wide range of medical fields such as anatomy, physiology, pathology, therapeutics and life sciences, this paper elucidates the ways that the fibre serves as an indispensable concept for iatromechanists to establish their medical theories. This paper also highlights the metaphorical dimension of the fibre as an integral part of fibre medicine. In re-evaluating the concept of the fibre, this paper seeks to redress the neuro-centric view of eighteenth-century medicine, and attempts to locate the fibre body amidst the fundamental shift from humoralism to solidism. PMID:23112385

  20. Preliminary research on monitoring the durability of concrete subjected to sulfate attack with optical fibre Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yanfei; Bai, Yun; Basheer, P. A. Muhammed; Boland, John J.; Wang, Jing Jing

    2013-04-01

    Formation of ettringite and gypsum from sulfate attack together with carbonation and chloride ingress have been considered as the most serious deterioration mechanisms of concrete structures. Although Electrical Resistance Sensors and Fibre Optic Chemical Sensors could be used to monitoring the latter two mechanisms in situ, currently there is no system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of sulfate attack and hence still needs to be developed. In this paper, a preliminary study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of monitoring the sulfate attack with optical fibre Raman spectroscopy through characterizing the ettringite and gypsum formed in deteriorated cementitious materials under an `optical fibre excitation + spectroscopy objective collection' configuration. Bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy analysis was also used to validate the spectrum obtained from the fibre-objective configuration. The results showed that the expected Raman bands of ettringite and gypsum in the sulfate attacked cement paste have been clearly identified by the optical fibre Raman spectroscopy and are in good agreement with those identified from bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy. Therefore, based on these preliminary results, there is a good potential of developing an optical fibre Raman spectroscopy-based system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of concrete subjected to the sulfate attack in the future.

  1. The role of dietary fibre in the human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, J H; Stephen, A M

    1980-01-01

    Several effects of dietary fibre on colonic function have been documented by experiment or deduced from epidemiologic observation. The magnitude of these changes depends on the source and the physical and chemical composition of the fibre used, and on the individual response of the subjects. Three theories of the mode of action of fibre are discussed; they relate to the water-holding capacity of fibre, the production of short-chain fatty acids from fibre in the colon and the alteration by fibre of the colonic microflora. PMID:6257366

  2. A fabry-perot fibre-optic hydrophone for the characterisation of ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Paul

    This thesis documents the development of a novel fibre optic hydrophone, for the characterisation of medical ultrasound transducers and the measurement of ultrasound induced temperature rises. The transduction mechanism of the hydrophone is based on the detection of acoustically and thermally induced changes in the optical thickness of a Fabry-Perot interferometer deposited at the tip of a single mode optical fibre. The interferometer comprises a layer of Parylene-C sandwiched between two thin gold mirrors. The design of the sensor was optimised using a numerical model of the interferometer transfer function. Through the use of vacuum deposition techniques, a fabrication procedure has been developed which enables batch production of the sensors. A self contained sensor interrogation system has also been developed. The system uses a rapidly tuneable laser developed originally for the telecoms industry to interrogate the sensor and make acoustic and thermal measurements. Control of the system is achieved via a PC using software written in Labview 8.0. The acoustic performance of the sensors was characterised using a substitution calibration. The frequency response, directivity and sensitivity of the sensor were all investigated. It was found that whilst the sensor offers a wide bandwidth (>50 MHz), the frequency response is significantly non uniform. Using a finite difference model (AFiDS), it was found that diffraction at the sensor tip is the main cause of resonances in the response. The thermal measurement performance of the sensor was investigated in the presence of an ultra sound field. By comparing the temperature measurements from the hydrophone with those obtained from a thin-film thermocouple, it was found that the fibre-optic hydrophone is immune to viscoelastic heating artefacts. Finally, a novel tracking algorithm was developed, allowing the hydrophone to be used to make simultaneous measurements of both acoustic pressures and ultrasound induced

  3. Voronoi cells, fractal dimensions and fibre composites.

    PubMed

    Summerscales, J.; Guild, F. J.; Pearce, N. R. L.; Russell, P. M.

    2001-02-01

    The use of fibre-reinforced polymer matrix composite materials is growing at a faster rate than the gross domestic product (GDP) in many countries. An improved understanding of their processing and mechanical behaviour would extend the potential applications of these materials. For unidirectional composites, it is predicted that localized absence of fibres is related to longitudinal compression failure. The use of woven reinforcements permits more effective manufacture than for unidirectional fibres. It has been demonstrated experimentally that compression strengths of woven composites are reduced when fibres are clustered. Summerscales predicted that clustering of fibres would increase the permeability of the reinforcement and hence expedite the processing of these materials. Commercial fabrics are available which employ this concept using flow-enhancing bound tows. The net effect of clustering fibres is to enhance processability whilst reducing the mechanical properties. The effects reported above were qualitative correlations. To improve the design tools for reinforcement fabrics we have sought to quantify the changes in the micro/meso-structure of woven reinforcement fabrics. Gross differences in the appearance of laminate sections are apparent for different weave styles. The use of automated image analysis is essential for the quantification of subtle changes in fabric architecture. This paper considers Voronoi tessellation and fractal dimensions for the quantification of the microstructures of woven fibre-reinforced composites. It reviews our studies in the last decade of the process-property-structure relationships for commercial and experimental fabric reinforcements in an attempt to resolve the processing vs. properties dilemma. A new flow-enhancement concept has been developed which has a reduced impact on laminate mechanical properties.

  4. CSC Tip Sheets: Action Checklists

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Action checklists motivate behavior change by providing a clear and concise list of activities that community members and organizations can use to reduce their carbon footprint and achieve other sustainability goals.

  5. A fibre-optic oxygen sensor for monitoring human breathing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongsheng; Formenti, Federico; Obeid, Andy; Hahn, Clive E W; Farmery, Andrew D

    2013-09-01

    The development and construction of a tapered-tip fibre-optic fluorescence based oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is suitable for fast and real-time monitoring of human breathing. The sensitivity and response time of the oxygen sensor were evaluated in vitro with a gas pressure chamber system, where oxygen partial pressure was rapidly changed between 5 and 15 kPa, and then in vivo in five healthy adult participants who synchronized their breathing to a metronome set at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 breaths min(-1). A Datex Ultima medical gas analyser was used to monitor breathing rate as a comparator. The sensor's response time in vitro was less than 150 ms, which allows accurate continuous measurement of inspired and expired oxygen pressure. Measurements of breathing rate by means of our oxygen sensor and of the Datex Ultima were in strong agreement. The results demonstrate that the device can reliably resolve breathing rates up to 60 breaths min(-1), and that it is a suitable cost-effective alternative for monitoring breathing rates and end-tidal oxygen partial pressure in the clinical setting. The rapid response time of the sensor may allow its use for monitoring rapid breathing rates as occur in children and the newborn.

  6. Interaction between impact damage and fatigue in fibre reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshty, M. H.

    This study has been designed to investigate the interaction between impact damage and fatigue, which is necessarily a complex one and of current interest to the aerospace industry, and to predict the fatigue response for virgin and impact-damaged materials by using a constant-life model. In order to achieve these goals, measurements have been made of the residual tensile and compressive strengths after low-velocity impacts of 1, 2, 3 and 5 Joules of two modem carbon-fibre composites, viz., HTA/982A and HTA/913, and a glass-fibre laminate, E-Glass/913, all having the common lay-up [(45,02)2]s. The impact damage was assessed by transient thermography, ultrasonic C-scan and optical microscopy. The modes of failure under low-velocity impacts of 1-3J were found to be matrix cracking and mainly delamination. Only a 5J impact energy event caused some fibre fractures in CFRP laminates. Measurement of post-impact mechanical properties has shown that impact damage in the range 1-5J had little effect on the residual tensile strength although the compressive strength was markedly reduced. Replicate stress/life fatigue data were obtained at different stress ratios, R, for sound and impact-damaged materials. Results show that impact energies in the range 1-3J had no effect on the tensile fatigue behaviour at R = +0.l. At R = -1.5 and +10, on the other hand, the stress/life curves are markedly affected. And as the compression component of stress increases the slope of the S/N curve decreases, which indicates less sensitivity to fatigue. The fatigue tests results have been analysed by using a constant-life model previously developed at Bath. A new relationship between constant-life model parameters and material properties has been found. The model has been modified to predict the fatigue response of fibre composite materials in the virgin condition and after damage by low-velocity impact by using only the tensile and compressive strengths of composite in question. Results show

  7. Lateral Tip Control Effects in CD-AFM Metrology: The Large Tip Limit.

    PubMed

    Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Goldband, Ryan S

    2016-01-25

    Sidewall sensing in critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs) usually involves continuous lateral dithering of the tip or the use of a control algorithm and fast response piezo actuator to position the tip in a manner that resembles touch-triggering of coordinate measuring machine (CMM) probes. All methods of tip position control, however, induce an effective tip width that may deviate from the actual geometrical tip width. Understanding the influence and dependence of the effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip can improve the measurement accuracy and uncertainty estimation for CD-AFM measurements. Since CD-AFM typically uses tips that range from 15 nm to 850 nm in geometrical width, the behavior of effective tip width throughout this range should be understood. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been investigating the dependence of effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip, as well as the possibility of material effects due to sample composition. For tip widths of 130 nm and lower, which also have lower lateral stiffness, the response of the effective tip width to lateral dither is greater than for larger tips. However, we have concluded that these effects will not generally result in a residual bias, provided that the tip calibration and sample measurement are performed under the same conditions. To validate that our prior conclusions about the dependence of effective tip width on lateral stiffness are valid for large CD-tips, we recently performed experiments using a very large non-CD tip with an etched plateau of approximately 2 μm width. The effective lateral stiffness of these tips is at least 20 times greater than typical CD-AFM tips, and these results supported our prior conclusions about the expected behavior for larger tips. The bottom-line importance of these latest observations is that we can now reasonably conclude that a dither slope of 3 nm

  8. On singular fibres in F-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas P.; Watari, Taizan

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a connection between the field theory local model (Katz-Vafa field theory) and the type of singular fibre in flat crepant resolutions of elliptic Calabi-Yau fourfolds, a class of fourfolds considered by Esole and Yau. We review the analysis of degenerate fibres for models with gauge groups SU(5) and SO(10) in detail, and observe that the naively expected fibre type is realized if and only if the Higgs vev in the field theory local model is unramified. To test this idea, we implement a linear (unramified) Higgs vev for the " E 6" Yukawa point in a model with gauge group SU(5) and verify that this indeed leads to a fibre of Kodaira type IV*. Based on this observation, we argue i) that the singular fibre types appearing in the fourfolds studied by Esole-Yau are not puzzling at all, (so that this class of fourfolds does not have to be excluded from the candidate of input data of some yet-unknown formulation of F-theory) and ii) that such fourfold geometries also contain more information than just the eigenvalues of the Higgs field vev configuration in the field theory local models.

  9. A large Scintillating Fibre Tracker for LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greim, R.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during LHC Long Shutdown 2 to be able to record data at a higher instantaneous luminosity. The readout rate is currently limited to 1 MHz by the Level 1 trigger. In order to achieve the target integrated luminosity of 50 fb‑1 during LHC Run 3, all subdetectors have to be read out by a 40 MHz trigger-less readout system. Especially, the current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet suffer from large detector dead times and a small granularity in the Outer Tracker, which consists of proportional straw tubes. Therefore, the Downstream Tracker will be replaced by a Scintillating Fibre Tracker with Silicon Photomultiplier readout. The total sensitive area of 340 m2 is made up of 2.5 m long fibre mats consisting of six staggered layers of 250 μm thin scintillating fibres. The scintillation light created by the charged particles traversing the fibre mats is transported to the fibre ends via total internal reflection and detected by state-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays. This paper presents the detector concept, design, challenges, custom-made readout chips, as well as laboratory and beam test results.

  10. Monitoring of harmful gaseous emissions from land transport vehicles using a mid-infrared optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulrooney, Jim; Clifford, John; Fitzpatrick, Colin; Lewis, Elfed

    2006-04-01

    This paper discusses the development of an optical fibre sensor suitable for the detection of gas emissions from motor vehicles based on mid-infrared spectroscopy. Initial measurements are presented for carbon dioxide emissions from a petrol engine using low-cost mid-infrared components, and a practical detection system, which could be fitted to a vehicle, is outlined.

  11. British Columbia Transfer TIPS. Second Edition Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Finola, Ed.; Karlinski, Jean, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    BCTransfer TIPS is a user friendly document outlining how transfer between British Columbia (BC) post-secondary institutions works. It includes tips, student quotes, scenarios, a personal plan and checklist. Information in this document can only be reproduced with permission from the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT.)

  12. News: Tripping over tipping points/elements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term “tipping point” has been used to identify a critical threshold susceptible to a tiny perturbation that can qualitatively alter the state or development of a system. “Tipping element” has been introduced to describe large-scale components of the Earth system that may pass...

  13. Cryopreservation of in vitro grown shoot tips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter in Plant Cell Culture, Development and Biotechnology describes student laboratory exercises for cryopreservation of the growing shoot tips of plants in liquid nitrogen. It includes two exercises involving step by step protocols for use with shoot tips. Vitrification (fast freezing) an...

  14. Schools That Quit "Tipping" in Mississippi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munford, Luther

    As described by some observers, white flight rapidly and irreversibly leads to black or nearly all black schools, once the ratio of blacks to whites in a school reaches a tipping point. Research in Mississippi, however, has uncovered school districts where tipping has not only stopped, in some cases it has even reversed. Events there call into…

  15. Ten Tips for Better Washroom Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigger, Alan S.; Bigger, Linda B.

    1998-01-01

    Offers 10 tips for renovating or building school washrooms that enhance user satisfaction while making them easier to maintain. Tips cover all aspects of school washroom design and highlights the following elements of effective washroom design development: user input; ease of maintenance; accessibility; and functionality. (GR)

  16. 'Oxide-free' tip for scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, R. J.; Baker, S. M.; Baldeschwieler, J. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A new tip for scanning tunneling microscopy and a tip repair procedure that allows one to reproducibly obtain atomic images of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with previously inoperable tips are reported. The tips are shown to be relatively oxide-free and highly resistant to oxidation. The tips are fabricated with graphite by two distinct methods.

  17. Helicopter Rotor Blade With Free Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroub, Robert H.; Young, Larry; Cawthorne, Matthew; Keys, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Free-tip rotor blades improve fuel efficiency and performance characteristics of helicopters. Outermost portion of blade pivots independently with respect to inboard portion about pitch axis parallel to blade axis, located forward of aerodynamic center. Centrifugal force acts on tension/torsion strap and biases tip nose-up. Airstream turns tip nose-down, other torques cause tip to "weathervane" to intermediate angular position resulting in net lift. Reduces fluctuations in lift, with two effects: flapwise vibratory loads on blade and vibratory loads on pitch-control mechanism reduced; negative lift produced by advancing fixed tip eliminated, reducing power required to achieve same overall lift. Applies to tilt rotors and tail rotors as well.

  18. Molecular Mechanics of Tip-Link Cadherins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P.

    2011-11-01

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is likely composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their complete molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects remain largely unknown. We present crystal structures of extracellular (EC) tip-link cadherin repeats involved in hereditary deafness and tip link formation. In addition, we show that the deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats EC1 and EC2 of cadherin-23, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca2+ affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tip-link cadherin repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca2+ or mutating Ca2+-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures and simulations also suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  19. Novel methods for preparing EC STM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinczi, R.; Szõcs, E.; Kálmán, E.; Nagy, P.

    We present a dynamic electrochemical etching technique for preparing scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tips. Current vs. potential measurements have led to the development of a dynamic technique which provides atomic resolution and which is faster and more reliable, reproducible and productive than conventional static methods. Tungsten tips are prepared in a 2M NaOH film while the electrolyte is flowing through the film, keeping concentrations and etching rate constant. In order to apply the STM in liquids, an appropriate tip insulating technique is developed so as to prevent Faradaic current. A molten thermoplastic wax film is used for reproducible insulation. The STM tips and insulated tips were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, STM, and electrochemical STM. Imaging with atomic resolution was demonstrated on HOPG.

  20. Tip cap for a turbine rotor blade

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2014-03-25

    A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, and a tip cap that includes a row of lugs extending from a bottom side that form dovetail grooves that engage with similar shaped lugs and grooves on a tip end of the spar to secure the tip cap to the spar against radial displacement. The lug on the trailing edge end of the tip cap is aligned perpendicular to a chordwise line of the blade in the trailing edge region in order to minimize stress due to the lugs wanting to bend under high centrifugal loads. A two piece tip cap with lugs at different angles will reduce the bending stress even more.

  1. Cutaneous receptive fields and topography of mossy fibres and climbing fibres projecting to cat cerebellar C3 zone

    PubMed Central

    Garwicz, Martin; Jörntell, Henrik; Ekerot, Carl-Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    The topographical organization of mossy fibre input to the forelimb area of the paravermal C3 zone in cerebellar lobules IV and V was investigated in barbiturate-anaesthetized cats and compared with the previously described microzonal organization of climbing fibre input to the same part of the cortex. Recordings were made in the Purkinje cell and granule cell layers from single climbing fibre and mossy fibre units, respectively, and the organization of cutaneous receptive fields was assessed for both types of afferents.Based on spatial characteristics, receptive fields of single mossy fibres could be systematized into ten classes and a total of thirty-two subclasses, mainly in accordance with a scheme previously used for classification of climbing fibres. Different mossy fibres displayed a substantial range of sensitivity to natural peripheral stimulation, responded preferentially to phasic or tonic stimuli and were activated by brushing of hairs or light tapping of the skin.Overall, mossy fibres to any given microzone had receptive fields resembling the climbing fibre receptive field defining that microzone. However, compared with the climbing fibre input, the mossy fibre input had a more intricate topographical organization. Mossy fibres with very similar receptive fields projected to circumscribed cortical regions, with a specific termination not only in the mediolateral, but also in some cases in the rostrocaudal and dorsoventral, dimensions of the zone. On the other hand, mossy fibre units with non-identical, albeit usually similar, receptive fields were frequently found in the same microelectrode track. PMID:9729638

  2. Short-fibre reinforcement of calcium phosphate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, F; Gallagher, L; Jack, V; Dunne, N

    2007-02-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) sets to form hydroxyapatite, a major component of mineral bone, and is gaining increasing interest in bone repair applications. However, concerns regarding its brittleness and tendency to fragment have limited its widespread use. In the present study, short-fibre reinforcement of an apatitic calcium phosphate has been investigated to improve the fracture behaviour. The fibres used were polypropylene (PP) fibres, 50 microm in diameter and reduced in length by cryogenic grinding. The compressive strength and fracture behaviour were examined. Fibre addition of up to 10 wt % had a significant effect on composite properties, with the energy absorbed during failure being significantly increased, although this tended to be accompanied with a slight drop in compressive strength. The fibre reinforcement mechanisms appeared to be crack bridging and fibre pull-out. The setting time of the CPC with fibre reinforcement was also investigated and was found to increase with fibre volume fraction.

  3. The in vivo biological activity of ceramic fibres.

    PubMed

    Brown, R C; Hoskins, J A; Glass, L R

    1995-10-01

    The well-known health effects following exposure to amphibole asbestos have led to some concern about the potential for other fibrous materials to cause similar diseases. This paper presents a summary of some of the inhalation experiments conducted with ceramic fibres in both rats and hamsters at the Research and Consulting Company, Geneva. One ceramic fibre (designated RCF1) was tested in rats at four exposure levels, this fibre was also tested in hamsters. Three other fibres were only tested in rats at the highest level--30 mg m-3. The increased incidence of tumours in these experiments has been contrasted with the negative results obtained with glass or mineral wools. However, there is evidence that the ceramic fibres were longer than the glass fibres and that long ceramic fibres were retained in lung tissue to a greater extent. This is sufficient to explain the results without recourse to explanations based on chemical differences between fibres.

  4. EDITORIAL: Optical Fibre Sensors 18 (OFS-18)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Julian D. C.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2007-10-01

    The International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors (OFS-18) was held in October 2006 in Cancún, Mexico, under the general chairmanship of Dr Alexis Mendez (MCH Engineering LLC, USA) and Dr Fernando Mendoza (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico). 'OFS', as it has become known, is firmly established as the leading international conference for the optical fibre sensor community. Since its inception, in London in 1983, and under the leadership of an international steering committee independent of any learned society or professional institution, it has been held approximately every eighteen months. The venue nominally rotates from Europe, to the Americas, and thence to Asia and the Pacific. OFS-18 demonstrated the continuing vigour of the community, with some 250 papers presented, plus two workshops, with attendance as international as ever. In recent years, it has become a tradition to publish a post-conference special issue in the journal Measurement Science and Technology, and these special issues offer a representative sample of the current status of the field. In the nearly 25 years since OFS began, many of the early ideas and laboratory-based proof-of-principle experiments have led to highly developed instrumentation systems, and to successful commercial products. Perhaps the most mature of all of these technologies is the optical fibre gyroscope, with the fibre hydrophone a close second—originally developed for defence applications for which it is now established, but with increasing relevance to the oil and gas industry; electromagnetic sensors based on the Faraday and electro-optic effects are of growing significance in the power generation and distribution industry; whilst in-fibre grating-based sensors occupy an expanding niche in structural monitoring, especially in civil engineering. It is therefore appropriate that the first day of OFS was devoted to workshops on structural health monitoring, and to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the

  5. Nonlinear optics of fibre event horizons.

    PubMed

    Webb, Karen E; Erkintalo, Miro; Xu, Yiqing; Broderick, Neil G R; Dudley, John M; Genty, Goëry; Murdoch, Stuart G

    2014-09-17

    The nonlinear interaction of light in an optical fibre can mimic the physics at an event horizon. This analogue arises when a weak probe wave is unable to pass through an intense soliton, despite propagating at a different velocity. To date, these dynamics have been described in the time domain in terms of a soliton-induced refractive index barrier that modifies the velocity of the probe. Here we complete the physical description of fibre-optic event horizons by presenting a full frequency-domain description in terms of cascaded four-wave mixing between discrete single-frequency fields, and experimentally demonstrate signature frequency shifts using continuous wave lasers. Our description is confirmed by the remarkable agreement with experiments performed in the continuum limit, reached using ultrafast lasers. We anticipate that clarifying the description of fibre event horizons will significantly impact on the description of horizon dynamics and soliton interactions in photonics and other systems.

  6. Capillary droplet propulsion on a fibre.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Sabrina; Bäumchen, Oliver; Jacobs, Karin

    2015-09-21

    A viscous liquid film coating a fibre becomes unstable and decays into droplets due to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability (RPI). Here, we report on the generation of uniform droplets on a hydrophobized fibre by taking advantage of this effect. In the late stages of liquid column breakup, a three-phase contact line can be formed at one side of the droplet by spontaneous rupture of the thinning film. The resulting capillary imbalance leads to droplet propulsion along the fibre. We study the dynamics and the dewetting speed of the droplet as a function of molecular weight as well as temperature and compare to a force balance model based on purely viscous dissipation.

  7. Speckle interferometric damage investigation of fibre-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertwig, Manfred; Flemming, Torsten; Floureux, Thierry; Aebischer, Hubert A.

    1996-06-01

    With the aid of the recently reported technique of adding up phase images modulo 2π that correspond to stepwise applied load increments, the fringe density that can be achieved in electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) has been substantially improved. This technique also allows the measurement of much larger deformations than were hitherto possible with ESPI. The analytical power of the method is demonstrated in the measurement of high local displacement gradients in carbon fibre-reinforced plastics (CFRPs). In-plane and out-of-plane displacement field measurements, performed with one single optical instrument, are compared with finite-element models. This paper reports how the technique is used to detect and quantify damage in fatigued CFRP laminates via its effect on the surface displacement field. Moreover, the measured displacement fields are used to validate a finite-element damage model. The correctness of the delamination measurement is verified with the aid of ultrasonic C-scan reference results.

  8. Classification of Wood Pulp Fibre Cross-Sectional Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Asuka; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary

    This work presents a comparison of two statistical approaches for automatic classification of fibre shapes, i.e. Canonical Discriminant Analysis (CDA) and Mahalanobis Discriminant Analysis (MLDA). The discriminant analyses were applied to identify and classify several fibre cross-sectional shapes, including e.g. intact, collapsed, touching and fibrillated fibres. The discriminant analyses perform differently, giving clear indications of their suitability for classifying a given group of fibre elements. Compared to CDA, MLDA was more reliable and relatively stable.

  9. Dielectrophoretic positioning of single nanoparticles on atomic force microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Christian; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Singh, Prabha; Wirth, Janina; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, a combination of Raman spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy, is a powerful technique to detect the vibrational fingerprint of molecules at the nanometer scale. A metal nanoparticle at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip leads to a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field when illuminated with an appropriate wavelength, resulting in an increased Raman signal. A controlled positioning of individual nanoparticles at the tip would improve the reproducibility of the probes and is quite demanding due to usually serial and labor-intensive approaches. In contrast to commonly used submicron manipulation techniques, dielectrophoresis allows a parallel and scalable production, and provides a novel approach toward reproducible and at the same time affordable tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tips. We demonstrate the successful positioning of an individual plasmonic nanoparticle on a commercial atomic force microscope tip by dielectrophoresis followed by experimental proof of the Raman signal enhancing capabilities of such tips.

  10. Trace elements in hazardous mineral fibres.

    PubMed

    Bloise, Andrea; Barca, Donatella; Gualtieri, Alessandro Francesco; Pollastri, Simone; Belluso, Elena

    2016-09-01

    Both occupational and environmental exposure to asbestos-mineral fibres can be associated with lung diseases. The pathogenic effects are related to the dimension, biopersistence and chemical composition of the fibres. In addition to the major mineral elements, mineral fibres contain trace elements and their content may play a role in fibre toxicity. To shed light on the role of trace elements in asbestos carcinogenesis, knowledge on their concentration in asbestos-mineral fibres is mandatory. It is possible that trace elements play a synergetic factor in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by the inhalation of mineral fibres. In this paper, the concentration levels of trace elements from three chrysotile samples, four amphibole asbestos samples (UICC amosite, UICC anthophyllite, UICC crocidolite and tremolite) and fibrous erionite from Jersey, Nevada (USA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For all samples, the following trace elements were measured: Li, Be, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Y, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Pb, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Th, U. Their distribution in the various mineral species is thoroughly discussed. The obtained results indicate that the amount of trace metals such as Mn, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn is higher in anthophyllite and chrysotile samples, whereas the amount of rare earth elements (REE) is higher in erionite and tremolite samples. The results of this work can be useful to the pathologists and biochemists who use asbestos minerals and fibrous erionite in-vitro studies as positive cyto- and geno-toxic standard references.

  11. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  12. Inscription of fibre Bragg gratings in non-sensitised fibres using VUV F2 laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Dyer, P E; Johnson, A M; Walton, C D

    2008-11-10

    We report the inscription of fibre Bragg gratings in non-sensitised SMF 28 and HI 980 fibre by exposure to VUV F2 laser radiation at 157 nm. The modulated effective refractive index change Deltan(eff) deduced from the shift in the grating reflection peaks was Deltan(eff) = 2.8x10(-4) and 1.7x10(-4) in SMF 28 and HI 980 fibre respectively. The possible influence of non-uniformity of core exposure and VUV cladding absorption loss on these results is discussed.

  13. OPTICAL FIBRES Experimental and theoretical study of optical losses in straight and bent Bragg fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshkina, S. S.; Likhachev, M. E.; Uspenskii, Yurii A.; Bubnov, M. M.

    2010-12-01

    The leakage loss in straight and bent Bragg fibres has been studied experimentally and theoretically using five fibres differing in the core diameter, the number of layers in the Bragg mirror and their refractive indices. Simple analytical formulas have been derived within ray-optics theory which describe leakage and bending losses. The optical loss calculated using these formulas agrees well with our experimental data. Analysis of the theoretical and experimental results enables us to assess the effect of parameters of the waveguiding system on the optical loss in straight and bent fibres.

  14. Dichroism measurements in forensic fibre examination. Part 2 - dyed polyamide, wool and silk fibres.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Vanden Driessche, T

    2011-12-01

    A number of dyed polyamide, wool and silk samples were examined with plane polarized light on their dichroic behavior by optical light microscopy (OLM) and microspectrophotometry with plane polarized light (MSP-PPL). It was found that most of these acid dyed peptidic fibres possess dichroism, but these are weaker than the effects previously described for polyester fibres. The small effects may be not observed, especially for wool, but these can be measured using MSP-PPL. In the three peptidic fibre classes, for the first time, a so called "inverse dichroism" is observed which appears in the absorption spectra as a hyperchromic effect.

  15. Improved protein refolding using hollow-fibre membrane dialysis.

    PubMed

    West, S M; Chaudhuri, J B; Howell, J A

    1998-03-05

    We have used a cellulose acetate, hollow-fibre (HF) ultrafiltration membrane to refold bovine carbonic anhydrase, loaded into the lumen space, by removing the denaturant through controlled dialysis via the shell side space. When challenged with GdnHCl-denatured carbonic anhydrase, 70% of the loaded protein reptated through the membrane into the circulating dialysis buffer. Reptation occurred because the protein, in its fully unfolded configuration, was able to pass through the pores. The loss of carbonic anhydrase through the membrane was controlled by the dialysis conditions. Dialysis against 0.05 M Tris-HCl for 30 min reduced the denaturant around the protein to a concentration that allowed the return of secondary structure, increasing the hydrodynamic radius, thus preventing protein transmission. Under these conditions a maximum of 42% of carbonic anhydrase was recovered (from a starting concentration of 5 mg/mL) with 94% activity. This is an improvement over refolding carbonic anhydrase by simple batch dilution, which gave a maximum reactivation of 85% with 35% soluble protein yield. The batch refolding of carbonic anhydrase is very sensitive to temperature; however, during HF refolding between 0 and 25 degrees C the temperature sensitivity was considerably reduced. In order to reduce the convection forces that give rise to aggregation and promote refolding the dialyzate was slowly heated from 4 to 25 degrees C. This slow, temperature-controlled refolding gave an improved soluble protein recovery of 55% with a reactivation yield of 90%. The effect of a number of additives on the refolding system performance were tested: the presence of PEG improved both the protein recovery and the recovered activity from the membrane, while the detergents Tween 20 and IGEPAL CA-630 increased only the refolding yield.

  16. Spinothalamic fibres, pain conduction and cordotomy.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D

    1975-01-01

    Description of four cases of cordotomy for intractable pain in which autopsy could be performed. In two of the cases the lesion had been placed (unintentionally) in the posterior quadrant of the spinal cord with good results as to the abolishing of pain. It is concluded that the conduction of pain and temperature stimuli is not restricted to the anterolateral part of the spinal cord but that this conduction may also take place along fibres in the posterolateral quadrant. A further conclusion is that the results of cordotomy are related to the number of cut fibres.

  17. Molybdenum blue: binding to collagen fibres and microcrystal formation.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin; Reiber, Andreas; Therese, Helen Annal; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Collagen fibres have been shown by transmission electron microscopy to progressively bind the polyoxomolybdate ring-complex, termed molybdenum blue. Nucleation of cuboidal molybdenum blue microcrystals occurs on the surface of the collagen fibres, leading eventually to extensive coating of the fibres with microcrystals.

  18. Modelling fibre laydown and web uniformity in nonwoven fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, F.; Sutcliffe, M. P. F.

    2017-04-01

    The mechanical and functional performance of nonwoven fabric critically depends on the fibre architecture. The fibre laydown process plays a key role in controlling this architecture. The fibre dynamic behaviour during laydown is studied through a finite element model which describes the role of the parameters in defining the area covered by a single fibre when deposited on the conveyor belt. The path taken by a fibre is described in terms of the radius of gyration, which characterises the area covered by the fibre in the textile, and the spectrum of curvature, which describes the degree of fibre looping as a function of the arc length. Starting from deterministic and idealised fibre curvature spectra, stochastic Monte Carlo simulations are undertaken to generate full nonwoven web samples and reproduce the uniformity of fibre density. A novel image analysis technique that allows measurement of the uniformity of real spunbonded nonwoven samples from images of textiles is used to confirm the validity of the model. It is shown that the main parameter that governs the fibre density uniformity is the ratio of the fibre spinning velocity to the velocity of conveyor belt, while fibre oscillations prior to deposition play a secondary role.

  19. [INVITED] Developments in optical fibre sensors for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwis, L.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2016-04-01

    It can be seen that optical fibre sensing technology has huge potential to address industrial applications. They offer various advantages over the conventional electrical systems and are increasingly becoming cost effective. Different types of fibre structure and configurations can be utilised to tailor specific applications. The paper aims to highlight the developments in optical fibre sensors for industrial applications.

  20. Macroscopic CNT fibres inducing non-epitaxial nucleation and orientation of semicrystalline polymers

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Hangbo; Monreal-Bernal, Alfonso; Fernández-Blázquez, Juan P.; Llorca, Javier; Vilatela, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of macroscopic fibres of carbon nanotubes (CNT), various semicrystalline polymers are shown to present accelerated crystallisation through the formation of a transcrystalline (TC) layer perpendicular to the fibre axis. From differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction we establish this to be due to much faster nucleation rates at the fibre surface. The formation of a TC layers is demonstrated for polyvinyldene fluoride, isotactic polypropylene and poly(lactic acid) in spite of the large differences in their chemistry and structure unit cells, suggesting that epitaxy in terms of lattice type or size matching is not a prerequisite. For the three polymers as well as poly(ether ether ketone), the TC layer is identically oriented with the chain axis in the lamella parallel to the CNTs, as observed by wide and small angle X-ray scattering. These results point to polymer chain orientation at the point of adsorption and the formation of a mesomorphic layer as possible steps in the fast nucleation of oriented lamella, with wetting of the CNT fibre surface by the molten semi-crystalline polymer a key condition for heterogeneous nucleation to take place. PMID:26578104

  1. Macroscopic CNT fibres inducing non-epitaxial nucleation and orientation of semicrystalline polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Hangbo; Monreal-Bernal, Alfonso; Fernández-Blázquez, Juan P.; Llorca, Javier; Vilatela, Juan J.

    2015-11-01

    In the presence of macroscopic fibres of carbon nanotubes (CNT), various semicrystalline polymers are shown to present accelerated crystallisation through the formation of a transcrystalline (TC) layer perpendicular to the fibre axis. From differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction we establish this to be due to much faster nucleation rates at the fibre surface. The formation of a TC layers is demonstrated for polyvinyldene fluoride, isotactic polypropylene and poly(lactic acid) in spite of the large differences in their chemistry and structure unit cells, suggesting that epitaxy in terms of lattice type or size matching is not a prerequisite. For the three polymers as well as poly(ether ether ketone), the TC layer is identically oriented with the chain axis in the lamella parallel to the CNTs, as observed by wide and small angle X-ray scattering. These results point to polymer chain orientation at the point of adsorption and the formation of a mesomorphic layer as possible steps in the fast nucleation of oriented lamella, with wetting of the CNT fibre surface by the molten semi-crystalline polymer a key condition for heterogeneous nucleation to take place.

  2. Photoacoustic endoscopy probe using a coherent fibre-optic bundle and Fabry-Pérot ultrasound sensor (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rehman; Beard, Paul C.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) probes for the clinical assessment of pathologies in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, guiding minimally invasive laparoscopic surgeries and applications in foetal medicine. However, most previous PAE probes integrate mechanical scanners and piezoelectric transducers at the distal end which can be technically complex, expensive and pose challenges in achieving the necessary level of miniaturisation. We present two novel all-optical forward-viewing endoscopic probes operating in widefield tomography mode that have the potential to overcome these limitations. In one configuration, the probe comprises a transparent 40 MHz Fabry-Pérot ultrasound sensor deposited at the tip of a rigid, 3 mm diameter coherent fibre-optic bundle. In this way, the distal end of coherent fibre bundle acts as a 2D array of wideband ultrasound detectors. In another configuration, an optical relay is used between the distal end face of flexible fibre bundle and the Fabry-Pérot sensor to enlarge the lateral field of view to 6 mm x 6 mm. In both configurations, the pulsed excitation laser beam is full-field coupled into the fibre bundle at the proximal end for uniform backward-mode illumination of the tissue at the probe tip. In order to record the photoacoustic waves arriving at the probe tip, the proximal end of the fibre bundle is optically scanned in 2D with a CW wavelength-tunable interrogation laser beam thereby interrogating different spatial points on the sensor. A time-reversal image reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct a 3D image from the detected signals. The 3D field of view of the flexible PAE probe is 6 mm x 6 mm x 6 mm and the axial and lateral spatial resolution is 30 µm and 90 µm, respectively. 3D imaging capability is demonstrated using tissue phantoms, ex vivo tissues and in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first forward-viewing implementation of a photoacoustic

  3. Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Imaging: an Apical Illumination Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Levin, Ira W.

    2009-01-01

    Results are presented illustrating the use of tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy and imaging in a top-illumination geometry. A radially polarized beam is used to generate an electric field component in the direction of beam propagation, normal to the surface, resulting in a 5× increased enhancement compared to a linearly polarized beam. This multiplicative enhancement facilitates a discrimination of the near field signal from the far field Raman background. The top illumination configuration facilitates the application of TERS for investigating molecules on a variety of surfaces, such as Au, glass, and Si. The near field Raman spectrum is presented of Si(100), rhodamine B, brilliant cresyl blue, and single wall carbon nanotubes. Sufficient enhancement is obtained to permit a sub-diffraction limited resolution Raman imaging of the surface distribution of large bundles of carbon nanotubes of various diameters. PMID:19007457

  4. Composite second-order performance improvement in optical fibre CATV transmission system using chirped fibre grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qing; Liu, Feng; Cai, Hai-Wen; Qu, Rong-Hui; Fang, Zu-Jie

    2005-05-01

    Theoretically, we analyse the dispersion compensation characteristics of the chirped fibre grating (CFG) in an optical fibre cable television (CATV) system and obtain the analytic expression of the composite second-order (CSO) distortion using the time-domain form of the field envelope wave equation. The obtained result is in good agreement with the numerical simulation result. Experimentally, we verify the result by making use of the tunable characteristics of CFG to change the dispersion compensation amount and obtain an optimal CSO performance in a 125km fibre transmission link. Both the theoretical and experimental results show that the CSO performance can be improved by properly choosing the dispersion compensation amount for a certain fibre transmission link.

  5. Sensitivity of a fibre scattered-light interferometer to external phase perturbations in an optical fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A E; Potapov, V T; Gorshkov, B G

    2015-10-31

    Sensitivity of a fibre scattered-light interferometer to external phase perturbations is studied for the first time. An expression is derived for an average power of a useful signal at the interferometer output under external harmonic perturbations in a signal fibre of the interferometer. It is shown that the maximum sensitivity of the scattered-light interferometer depends on the dispersion of the interferogram intensity. An average signal-to-noise ratio is determined theoretically and experimentally at the output of the interferometer at different amplitudes of external perturbations. Using the measured dependences of the signal-to-noise ratio, the threshold sensitivity of the fibre scattered-light interferometer to external phase perturbations is found. The results obtained can be used to optimise characteristics of optical time-domain reflectometers and to design individual phase-sensitive fibre-optic sensors. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Oxygen-Free Welding Contact Tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, James F.

    1993-01-01

    Contact tips for gas/metal arc welding (GMAW) fabricated from oxygen-free copper. Prototype tips tested in robotic welding, for which application intended. Reduces electrical erosion, increases electrical conductivity, and reduces mechanical wear. Productivity of robotic welding increases while time during welding interrupted for removal and replacement of contact tips minimal. Improves alignment of joints and filler metal, reducing rate of rejection and repair of unacceptable weldments. Utility extends beyond aerospace industry to mass production of various types of hardware, including heavy off-highway construction equipment.

  7. The ducted tip -- A hydrofoil tip geometry with superior cavitation performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, S.I.; Duan, S.Z.

    1995-12-01

    A novel hydrofoil design, consisting of a small diameter flow-through duct affixed to the tip, has been studied. The tip vortex cavitation inception index, {sigma}{sub i}, of this hydrofoil geometry is about a factor of 2 lower than that of a conventional rounded hydrofoil tip. This inception improvement comes with little associated performance penalty. For angles of attack greater than 8 deg the noncavitating lift-drag ratio is actually superior to that of an unducted hydrofoil of equal span, although with lower wing loadings the hydrofoil performance is diminished by application of the ducted tip. The ducted tip is effective at reducing the tip vortex inception index because, in contrast with the rounded tip, for which vorticity in the Trefftz plane is confined to a line, the ducted tip shed vorticity at the trailing edge is distributed over a line and circle. Distributing the vorticity in this fashion causes the trailing vortex to roll up less tightly, and hence have a higher core pressure and lower {sigma}{sub i}, than a conventional hydrofoil tip. It is also suspected that the interaction at the microscale level between the flow through the duct, and the flow around it, makes the vortex core size larger, and therefore {sigma}{sub i} smaller. The ducted tip design has many potential marine applications, including to ship and submarine propellers, submarine control fins, and ship rudders.

  8. Controlled tip wear on high roughness surfaces yields gradual broadening and rounding of cantilever tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorselen, Daan; Kooreman, Ernst S.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.

    2016-11-01

    Tip size in atomic force microscopy (AFM) has a major impact on the resolution of images and on the results of nanoindentation experiments. Tip wear is therefore a key limitation in the application of AFM. Here we show, however, how wear can be turned into an advantage as it allows for directed tip shaping. We studied tip wear on high roughness polycrystalline titanium and diamond surfaces and show that tip wear on these surfaces leads to an increased tip size with a rounded shape of the apex. Next, we fitted single peaks from AFM images in order to track the changes in tip radius over time. This method is in excellent agreement with the conventional blind tip reconstruction method with the additional advantage that we could use it to demonstrate that the increase in tip size is gradual. Moreover, with our approach we can shape and control the tip size, while retaining identical chemical and cantilever properties. This significantly expands the reproducibility of AFM force spectroscopy data and is therefore expected to find a wide applicability.

  9. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached eddy simulations (DES) are made for cavitating flows on three tip- modified propellers, of which one is a reference propeller having an experimental result from a cavitation tunnel test with a hull model, and the other two are modified from the reference propeller by altering the blade tip loading. DES results have been validated against the experiment in terms of sheet and cloud cavitation. In DES, non-uniform hull wake is modelled by using the inlet flow and momentum sources instead of including a hull model. A 4-bladed Kappel propeller with a smooth tip bending towards the suction side is used as the reference propeller. For the reference propeller, sheet cavitation extends over a whole chord length in the hull wake peak. As the blade gets out of the wake peak, the rear part of sheet cavity is detached in a form of cloud cavitation. For the reference propeller, the tip pitch reduction from the maximum is about 35%. When decreasing the tip pitch reduction to 10%, tip vortex cavitation is formed and cloud cavitation is significantly weakened. When increasing the tip pitch reduction to 60%, sheet cavitation slightly moves to inner radii and cloud cavitation grows larger.

  10. Controlled tip wear on high roughness surfaces yields gradual broadening and rounding of cantilever tips

    PubMed Central

    Vorselen, Daan; Kooreman, Ernst S.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.

    2016-01-01

    Tip size in atomic force microscopy (AFM) has a major impact on the resolution of images and on the results of nanoindentation experiments. Tip wear is therefore a key limitation in the application of AFM. Here we show, however, how wear can be turned into an advantage as it allows for directed tip shaping. We studied tip wear on high roughness polycrystalline titanium and diamond surfaces and show that tip wear on these surfaces leads to an increased tip size with a rounded shape of the apex. Next, we fitted single peaks from AFM images in order to track the changes in tip radius over time. This method is in excellent agreement with the conventional blind tip reconstruction method with the additional advantage that we could use it to demonstrate that the increase in tip size is gradual. Moreover, with our approach we can shape and control the tip size, while retaining identical chemical and cantilever properties. This significantly expands the reproducibility of AFM force spectroscopy data and is therefore expected to find a wide applicability. PMID:27833143

  11. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations. PMID:24022336

  12. A graduated method of tip graft fixation in rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Papel, I D

    1995-06-01

    Projection of the nasal tip has gained increased recognition as a measurable and visual characteristic that has an impact on the results of aesthetic rhinoplasty. Autologous cartilage tip grafts have been used in many techniques to increase tip projection and contour the tip during rhinoplasty. This article introduces a graduated method of tip graft fixation correlated with specific clinical measurements related to tip projection. After careful analysis of tip projection and contour, a predictable graft fixation technique can be selected to obtain the desired degree of nasal tip projection and sculpting.

  13. Fibre Optic Laser Doppler Anemometry, The Potential For Measurements In Man.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, Walker D.

    1984-10-01

    Fibre optic laser Doppler anemometry (FOLDA) is a useful technique for in vitro studies but has yet to be used successfully for the measurement of intravascular velocity in man. Some reasons for this are: 1. The difficulty of locating the position of the fibre within the vessel. 2. Lack of knowledge of the precise velocity profile across the vessel. 3. The effects of flow perturbation at the tip of the probe. These problems have been assessed using a FOLDA system developed in our laboratory. Three dimensional velocity profiles of blood flowing in arteries with and without stenoses have been plotted at different rates of flow. The results show that the parabolic profile of fully developed laminar flow is flattened in an arterial stenosis and the degree of flattening increases as flow increases. This means the relationship of the flow and velocity is nonlinear. Any use of FOLDA to assess vessel dimension must take this into account. The position of the fibre in the vessel can only be adequately controlled in in-vitro studies. The region of measurement is only 50 μm diameter and must be at the position of the peak velocity to enable quantitative measurement. Thus the technique is useful in humans only when there is a flat velocity profile such as in the coronary sinus. The relationship between coronary sinus flow and FOLDA velocity is linear in experimental animals. The current FOLDA system has a limited range of projection into the blood stream. The velocity is not linearly related to blood flow when the direction of flow is the same as the projected light, probably due to flow perturbation at the fibre tip. This means that a probe introduced into a coronary artey would not measure linear flow however a probe introduced against the flow could be used to assess the severity of peripheral arterial stenoses. To measure flow across a stenoses before and after angioplasty is possible but requires a method of obtaining an average spatial velocity before it is practicable.

  14. Post-microbuckling of fibre bridging kink bands under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueguang, Wei; Wei, Yang

    1993-02-01

    Surface originated kink bands consist of an important failure mode for fibre-reinforced composites under compression. The mechanical behavior of the fibre bridging kink bands is explored herein in the context of the post-microbuckling theory. Expressions of bridging force are obtained for the entire postbuckling process of the fibres exhibiting weak or strong hardening. The postbuckling formulation of the fibres is applied to yield the toughness increment due to the advancing kink bands, and consequently leads to a quantitative prediction on the overall compressive stress strain curves of the fibre-reinforced composites.

  15. The tensile properties of single sugar palm (Arenga pinnata) fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachtiar, D.; Sapuan, S. M.; Zainudin, E. S.; Khalina, A.; Dahlan, K. Z. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a brief description and characterization of the sugar palm fibres, still rare in the scientific community, compared to other natural fibres employed in polymeric composites. Sugar palm fibres are cellulose-based fibres extracted from the Arenga pinnata plant. The characterization consists of tensile test and the morphological examination. The average tensile properties results of fibres such as Young's modulus is equal to 3.69 GPa, tensile strength is equal to 190.29 MPa, and strain at failure is equal to 19.6%.

  16. Force measurements in skinned muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Hellam, D. C.; Podolsky, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    1. Isometric force was measured in skinned segments of frog semitendinosus muscle fibres exposed to solutions in which the calcium ion concentration was controlled with EGTA. 2. The threshold for force development, calculated from an apparent stability constant for the CaEGTA complex of 106.69 M-1 at pH 7·0, was generally close to pCa 7·5. Maximum force was reached at about pCa 6·0. 3. Maximum force is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the fibres. 4. The rate of force development was slower than that expected from simple diffusion of a substance from the bathing solution into the fibre. The delay appears to be due to slow equilibration of the EGTA buffer system during calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 5. Addition of deoxycholate (DOC) to the bathing solution produced a reversible increase in the rate of force development. The steady force was also increased for values of pCa that gave less than maximum force, which shifted the force—pCa relation toward lower calcium concentrations by about 0·5 pCa unit. 6. The length—force relation in partially activated preparations is similar to that reported for electrically activated intact fibres. This result suggests that in the region of myofilament overlap the affinity of the binding sites for calcium is uniform along the length of the calciumbinding myofilament. PMID:5765859

  17. Fabrication of Polymer Optical Fibre (POF) Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanhua; Yan, Binbin; Zhang, Qijin; Peng, Gang-Ding; Wen, Jianxiang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2017-01-01

    Gratings inscribed in polymer optical fibre (POF) have attracted remarkable interest for many potential applications due to their distinctive properties. This paper overviews the current state of fabrication of POF gratings since their first demonstration in 1999. In particular we summarize and discuss POF materials, POF photosensitivity, techniques and issues of fabricating POF gratings, as well as various types of POF gratings. PMID:28273844

  18. Compressive Behaviour of PBZ Fibres in Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    fibre wihincreasing load. Helical compresive %:!nlbands in zy"indricaiiy orthotro-pic materials such asIK wood and P’PTA have been studied by DeTeresa 2... radial sheets. He b concluded that the formation of kinkbands in orthotropic materials I result from shearing between the planes of easy shear slip. This

  19. The structure of boron in boron fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, J.; Krawitz, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of noncrystalline, chemically vapour-deposited boron fibres was investigated by computer modelling the experimentally obtained X-ray diffraction patterns. The diffraction patterns from the models were computed using the Debye scattering equation. The modelling was done utilizing the minimum nearest-neighbour distance, the density of the model, and the broadening and relative intensity of the various peaks as boundary conditions. The results suggest that the fibres consist of a continuous network of randomly oriented regions of local atomic order, about 2 nm in diameter, containing boron atoms arranged in icosahedra. Approximately half of these regions have a tetragonal structure and the remaining half a distorted rhombohedral structure. The model also indicates the presence of many partial icosahedra and loose atoms not associated with any icosahedra. The partial icosahedra and loose atoms indicated in the present model are in agreement with the relaxing sub-units which have been suggested to explain the anelastic behavior of fibre boron and the loosely bound boron atoms which have been postulated to explain the strengthening mechanism in boron fibres during thermal treatment.

  20. A novel technique for active fibre production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner-Erny, Ruth; Di Labio, Loredana; Lüthy, Willy

    2007-04-01

    Active fibre devices are conventionally manufactured using MCVD technique. Recently it has been shown that nearly equivalent results can also be obtained with sol-gel technology. Now we present a novel technique allowing simplification of the manufacturing process even more. The required constituents are mixed in the form of dry micro- and nano-sized particles. A silica glass tube forming the future core region of a fibre preform is filled with a powder mix of SiO 2, 1% Nd (as Nd 2O 3) and 10% Al (as Al 2O 3). This tube is mounted in the centre of a larger tube forming the future cladding. The empty space between the two tubes is filled with SiO 2 powder. After preheating, the evacuated preform is drawn to a fibre. A length of 45 cm, cladding-pumped with a diode laser at 808 nm as well as a core-pumped fibre of 5.1 cm length showed laser action between 1.05 and 1.1 μm.