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Sample records for carbon ion-implanted diamond

  1. Friction and Wear Properties of As-Deposited and Carbon Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited and carbon ion-implanted diamond films was reviewed. Diamond films were produced by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes and surface roughnesses were implanted with carbon ions at 60 keV ion energy, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions per cm(exp 2). Various analytical techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, proton recoil analysis, Rutherford backscattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with a polished natural diamond pin in contact with diamond films in the three environments: humid air (40% relative humidity), dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent relative humidity), and ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa). The CVD diamond films indeed have friction and wear properties similar to those of natural diamond in the three environments. The as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films can be effectively used as self-lubricating, wear-resistant coatings that have low coefficients of friction (0.02 to 0.04) and low wear rates (10(exp -7) to lO(exp -8) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in both humid air and dry nitrogen. However, they have high coefficients of friction (1.5 to 1.7) and a high wear rate (10(exp -4) mm(exp 7) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in ultrahigh vacuum. The carbon ion implantation produced a thin surficial layer (less than 0.1 micron thick) of amorphous, non-diamond carbon on the diamond films. In humid air and dry nitrogen, the ion-implanted, fine and coarse-grain diamond films have a low coefficient of friction (around 0.1) and a low wear rate (10(exp -7) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp-1)). Even in ultrahigh vacuum, the presence of the non-diamond carbon layer reduced the coefficient of friction of fine-grain diamond films to 0.1 or lower and the wear rate to 10(exp -6

  2. Friction and Wear Properties of As-deposited and Carbon Ion-implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1994-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited and carbon ion-implanted diamond films was reviewed. Diamond films were produced by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes and surface roughnesses were implanted with carbon ions at 60 ke V ion energy, resulting in a dose of 1.2310(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). Various analytical techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, proton recoil analysis, Rutherford backscattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with a polished natural diamond pin in contact with diamond films in the three environments: humid air (40 percent relative humidity), dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent relative humidity), and ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa). The CVD diamond films indeed have friction and were properties similar to those of natural diamond in the three environments. The as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films can be effectively used as self-lubricating, wear-resistant coatings that have low coefficients of friction (0.02 to 0.04) and low wear rates (10(exp -7) to 10(exp -8)mm(exp 3)/N-m) in both humid air and dry nitrogen. However, they have high coefficients of friction (1.5 to 1.7) and a high wear rate (10(exp -4)mm(exp 3/N-m) in ultrahigh vacuum. The carbon ion implanation produced a thin surficial layer (less than 0.1 micron thick) of amorphous, nondiamond carbon on the diamond films. In humid air and dry nitrogen, the ion-implanted, fine- and coarse-grain diamond films have a low coefficient of friction (around 0.1) and a low wear rate (10(exp -7)mm(exp 3/N-m). Even in ultrahigh vacuum, the presence of the nondiamond carbon layer reduced the coefficient of friction of fine-grain diamond films to 0.1 or lower and the wear rate to 10(exp -6)mm(exp 3)/N-m. Thus, the carbon ion-implanted, fine

  3. Adherent diamond like carbon coatings on metals via plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.P.

    1996-12-01

    Various techniques are currently used to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on various materials. Many of these techniques use metallic interlayers, such as Ti or Si, to improve the adhesion of a DLC coating to a ferrous substrate. An alternative processing route would be to use plasma source ion implantation (PSII) to create a carbon composition gradient in the surface of the ferrous material to serve as the interface for a DLC coating. The need for interlayer deposition is eliminated by using a such a graded interfaces PSII approach has been used to form adherent DLC coatings on magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, brass, nickel, and tungsten. A PSII process tailored to create a graded interface allows deposition of adherent DLC coatings even on metals that exhibit a positive heat of formation with carbon, such as magnesium, iron, brass and nickel.

  4. Physical and Tribological Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.; Jayne, D. T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P. J.; Wu, R. L. C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  5. Modification of diamond-like carbon films by nitrogen incorporation via plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flege, S.; Hatada, R.; Hoefling, M.; Hanauer, A.; Abel, A.; Baba, K.; Ensinger, W.

    2015-12-01

    The addition of nitrogen to diamond-like carbon films affects properties such as the inner stress of the film, the conductivity, biocompatibility and wettability. The nitrogen content is limited, though, and the maximum concentration depends on the preparation method. Here, plasma immersion ion implantation was used for the deposition of the films, without the use of a separate plasma source, i.e. the plasma was generated by a high voltage applied to the samples. The plasma gas consisted of a mixture of C2H4 and N2, the substrates were silicon and glass. By changing the experimental parameters (high voltage, pulse length and repetition rate and gas flow ratio) layers with different N content were prepared. Additionally, some samples were prepared using a DC voltage. The nitrogen content and bonding was investigated with SIMS, AES, XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Their influence on the electrical resistivity of the films was investigated. Depending on the preparation conditions different nitrogen contents were realized with maximum contents around 11 at.%. Those values were compared with the nitrogen concentration that can be achieved by implantation of nitrogen into a DLC film.

  6. Diamond-like carbon produced by plasma source ion implantation as a corrosion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Taylor, T.N.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-03-01

    There currently exists a broad range of applications for which the ability to produce an adherent, hard, wear and, corrosion-resistant coating plays a vital role. These applications include engine components, orthopedic devices, textile manufacturing components, hard disk media, optical coatings, and cutting and machining tools (e.g., punches, taps, scoring dies, and extrusion dies). Ion beam processing can play an important role in all of these technologies. Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is an emerging technology which has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional ion implantation by: (1) reducing the time and expense for implanting onto complex shapes and large areas and (2) extending the thickness of the modification zone through ion beam enhanced plasma growth of surface coatings. In PSII, targets are placed directly in a plasma source and then pulse biased to produce a non-line-of-sight process for complex-shaped targets without complex fixturing. If the pulse bias is a relatively high negative potential (20 to 100 kV) ion implantation will result. If however, a low voltage (50--1,200 eV) high duty cycle pulse bias is applied, film deposition from the chamber gas will result, thereby increasing the extent of the surface modification into the 1--10 micron regime. To evaluate the potential for DLC to be used as a corrosion barrier, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and traditional electrochemistry techniques were used to investigate the breakdown mechanism in chloride and nonchloride containing environments. The effect of surface preparation on coating breakdown was also evaluated.

  7. Gold nanoparticle formation in diamond-like carbon using two different methods: Gold ion implantation and co-deposition of gold and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Araujo, W. W. R.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Spirin, R. E.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-10-01

    We describe work in which gold nanoparticles were formed in diamond-like carbon (DLC), thereby generating a Au-DLC nanocomposite. A high-quality, hydrogen-free DLC thin film was formed by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition, into which gold nanoparticles were introduced using two different methods. The first method was gold ion implantation into the DLC film at a number of decreasing ion energies, distributing the gold over a controllable depth range within the DLC. The second method was co-deposition of gold and carbon, using two separate vacuum arc plasma guns with suitably interleaved repetitive pulsing. Transmission electron microscope images show that the size of the gold nanoparticles obtained by ion implantation is 3-5 nm. For the Au-DLC composite obtained by co-deposition, there were two different nanoparticle sizes, most about 2 nm with some 6-7 nm. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the implanted sample contains a smaller fraction of sp{sup 3} bonding for the DLC, demonstrating that some sp{sup 3} bonds are destroyed by the gold implantation.

  8. Characteristics of diamond-like carbon film synthesized on AISI 304 austenite stainless steel using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J. H.; Chen, M. H.; Tsai, W. F.; Lee, S. C.; Ai, C. F.

    2007-04-01

    This study examines the characteristics of diamond-like carbon (DLC) film synthesized on AISI 304 austenite stainless steel by means of a hybrid process of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) maintained at 60 °C. The former and latter processes under investigation were carried out using methane (0-20 kV) and acetylene (1-2 kV, 0.13-0.40 Pa) plasmas, respectively. Glow discharge spectrometry (GDS), Raman scattering spectroscopy (RSS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), a nano-indentation probe (NIP) and a Rockwell-C hardness tester were employed to characterize, respectively, elemental depth profiles, sp3-to-sp2 ratio, surface morphology, hardness and adhesion strength of the DLC specimen. The results revealed that the mixing layer at the interface generated by plasma immersion ion implantation of methane at a higher voltage could enhance adhesive strength of the DLC film to the substrate. Furthermore, a higher sp3-to-sp2 ratio, a smoother surface, greater hardness, but weaker adhesion strength were obtained for the DLC film synthesized using plasma immersion ion deposition of acetylene at a lower bias voltage or higher gas pressure.

  9. Nano-Crystals of c-Diamond, n-Diamond and i-Carbon Grown in Carbon-Ion Implanted Fused Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, J. L.; Orwa, J. O.; Jiang, B.; Prawer, S.; Bursill, L. A.

    Combined high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy are used to characterise carbon nano-phases found embedded in fused quartz. These appear after implantation of 1 MeV carbon ions, followed by annealing in argon, oxygen and forming gas for 1 hour at 1100°C. For Ar, virtually all of the carbon diffuses out of the substrate with no observable carbon clusters for all doses studied. After annealing in oxygen, a crystalline COx phase is identified at the end of range, following a dose of 5×1017 C/cm2. Three nano-crystalline carbon phases, including diamond, appear after annealing in forming gas: these form a layer 170 nm beneath the fused quartz surface for all ion doses. The average size of these clusters and the corresponding phases depend on the ion dose; the smallest size of 5-7 nm diameter crystallise as fcc Fd¯ {3}m diamond following a dose of 0.5× 1017 C/cm2, whereas clusters of 8-13 nm diameter, for a higher dose of 2× 1017 C/cm2, have a Fm¯ {3}m modified phase of diamond known as n-diamond. The largest clusters, diameter 15-40 nm, for a dose of 5× 1017 C/cm2, have the cubic P213 (or P4232) structure known as i-carbon. These buried layered diamond and diamond-related materials may have applications for field emission and optical waveguide type devices.

  10. Mechanical stresses and amorphization of ion-implanted diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelnitsky, R. A.; Dravin, V. A.; Tal, A. A.; Latushko, M. I.; Khomich, A. A.; Khomich, A. V.; Trushin, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Terentiev, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Scanning white light interferometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the mechanical stresses and structural changes in ion-implanted natural diamonds with different impurity content. The uniform distribution of radiation defects in implanted area was obtained by the regime of multiple-energy implantation of keV He+ ions. A modification of Bosia's et al. (Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 268 (2010) 2991) method for determining the internal stresses and the density variation in an ion-implanted diamond layer was proposed that suggests measuring, in addition to the surface swelling of a diamond plate, the radius of curvature of the plate. It is shown that, under multiple-energy implantation of He+, mechanical stresses in the implanted layer may be as high as 12 GPa. It is shown that radiation damage reaches saturation for the implantation fluence characteristic of amorphization of diamond but is appreciably lower than the graphitization threshold.

  11. Hemocompatibility of nitrogen-doped, hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon prepared by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Sunny C H; Yang, Ping; Wang, Jin; Liu, Xuanyong; Chu, Paul K

    2004-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) has been shown to be a potential material in biomedical devices such as artificial heart valves, bone implants, and so on because of its chemical inertness, low coefficient of friction, high wear resistance, and good biocompatibility. However, the biomedical characteristics such as blood compatibility of doped hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) have not been investigated in details. We recently began to investigate the potential use of nitrogen-doped, hydrogen-free DLC in artificial heart valves. In our experiments, a series of hydrogen-free DLC films doped with nitrogen were synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition (PIII-D) utilizing a pulsed vacuum arc plasma source and different N to Ar (FN/FAr) gas mixtures in the plasma chamber. The structures and properties of the film were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). To assess the blood compatibility of the films and the impact on the blood compatibility by the presence of nitrogen, platelet adhesion tests were conducted. Our results indicate that the blood compatibility of both hydrogen-free carbon films (a-C) and amorphous carbon nitride films are better than that of low-temperature isotropic pyrolytic carbon (LTIC). The experimental results are consistent with the relative theory of interfacial energy and surface tension including both dispersion and polar components. Our results also indicate that an optimal fraction of sp2 bonding is desirable, but an excessively high nitrogen concentration degrades the properties to an extent that the biocompatibility can be worse than that of LTIC.

  12. Effects of electrical conductivity of substrate materials on microstructure of diamond-like carbon films prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Sonoda, T.

    2013-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared by a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation, and the structural differences between DLC films deposited on different electrical conductive substrates, i.e., conductive Si wafers and insulating glass plates are examined by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo emission spectroscopy (XPS). In the Raman measurements, graphite (G) and disorder (D) peaks are observed for both samples. However, the additional photo luminescence is overlapped on the spectra in the case of on-glass sample. To elucidate the structural difference, the intensity ratio of D to G peak (I(D)/I(G)), G peak position and full width at half maximum (FWHM) are obtained by curve fitting using Gaussian function and linear baseline. It is found that the I(D)/I(G) is lower, G peak position is higher and FWHM of G peak is narrower for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. According to Robertson [1], lower I(D)/I(G) seems more sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. In contrast, higher G peak position and narrower FWHM of G peak suggest less sp3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. The results of XPS analysis with C1s spectra reveal that sp3 ratio, i.e., the intensity ratio of sp3/(sp3+sp2) is smaller for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. The inconsistency of the trend between I(D)/I(G) and other parameters (G peak position and FWHM of G peak) might be caused by the overlap of photo luminescence signal on Raman spectrum as to on-glass sample. From these results, it is considered that sp3 C-C bonding is reduced in amount when using insulating substrate in comparison with conductive substrate.

  13. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Naydenov, B.; Kolesov, R.; Batalov, A.; Meijer, J.; Pezzagna, S.; Rogalla, D.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2009-01-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center. PMID:19956415

  14. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, B; Kolesov, R; Batalov, A; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S; Rogalla, D; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J

    2009-11-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center. PMID:19956415

  15. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenov, B.; Kolesov, R.; Batalov, A.; Meijer, J.; Pezzagna, S.; Rogalla, D.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2009-11-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center.

  16. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, B; Kolesov, R; Batalov, A; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S; Rogalla, D; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J

    2009-11-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center.

  17. Surface damage on diamond membranes fabricated by ion implantation and lift-off

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, V. S.; Alves, A. D. C.; Fairchild, B. A.; Ganesan, K.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Kalish, R.; Feldman, L. C.

    2011-06-06

    Thin membranes with excellent optical properties are essential elements in diamond based photonic systems. Due to the chemical inertness of diamond, ion beam processing must be employed to carve photonic structures. One method to realize such membranes is ion-implantation graphitization followed by chemical removal of the sacrificial graphite. The interface revealed when the sacrificial layer is removed has interesting properties. To investigate this interface, we employed the surface sensitive technique of grazing angle channeled Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Even after high temperature annealing and chemical etching a thin layer of damaged diamond remains, however, it is removed by hydrogen plasma exposure.

  18. Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei

    2012-11-06

    Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

  19. On carbon nitride synthesis at high-dose ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, E. A.; Bespalova, O. V.; Borisov, A. M.; Goryaga, N. G.; Kulikauskas, V. S.; Sukharev, V. G.; Zatekin, V. V.

    1998-04-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was used for the study of high dose 35 keV nitrogen ions implantation into graphites and glassy carbon. Quantitative data on depth profiles and its dependencies on irradiation fluence and ion beam density were obtained. The stationary dome-shaped depth profile with maximum nitrogen concentration 22-27 at.% and half-width more than twice exceeding projected range of ions is reached at fluence Φ ˜10 18 cm -2. The dependence of the maximum concentration in the profile on ion current density was studied. The largest concentration was obtained at reduced ion current density.

  20. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo; Li, Zhuguo; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  1. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ion implantation of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Emlin, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ion implantation experiments of C, N, and O into stainless steel have been performed, with beam-line and plasma source ion implantation methods. Acceleration voltages were varied between 27 and 50 kV, with pulsed ion current densities between 1 and 10 mA/cm{sup 2}. Implanted doses ranged from 0.5 to 3 {times} 10{sup 18}cm{sup -2}, while workpiece temperatures were maintained between 25 and 800 C. Implant concentration profiles, microstructure, and surface mechanical properties of the implanted materials are reported.

  2. Direct observation and mechanism for enhanced field emission sites in platinum ion implanted/post-annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Kalpataru E-mail: phy.kalpa@gmail.com; Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Tai, Nyan Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2014-10-20

    Enhanced electron field emission (EFE) properties for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films upon platinum (Pt) ion implantation and subsequent post-annealing processes is reported, viz., low turn-on field of 4.17 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.08 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 7.0 V/μm. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) mode in scanning tunneling spectroscopy directly revealed the increased electron emission sites density for Pt ion implanted/post-annealed UNCD films than the pristine one. The high resolution CITS mapping and local current–voltage characteristic curves demonstrated that the electrons are dominantly emitted from the diamond grain boundaries and Pt nanoparticles.

  3. The Influence of Ion Implantation on cell Attachment to Glassy Polymeric Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.; Ila, D.; Gurhan, I.; Ozdal-Kurt, F.; Sen, B. H.; Rodrigues, M.

    2006-11-13

    In vitro biocompatibility tests have been carried out with model cell lines to demonstrate that near surface implantation of silver in Glassy Polymeric Carbon (GPC) can completely inhibit cell attachment on implanted areas while leaving adjacent areas unaffected. Patterned ion implantation permits precise control of tissue growth on medical applications of GPC. We have shown that silver ion implantation or argon ion assisted surface deposition of silver inhibits cell growth on GPC, a desirable improvement of current cardiac implants.

  4. Microstructure evolution in carbon-ion implanted sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Orwa, J. O.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Peng, J. L.; Rubanov, S.

    2010-01-15

    Carbon ions of MeV energy were implanted into sapphire to fluences of 1x10{sup 17} or 2x10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} and thermally annealed in forming gas (4% H in Ar) for 1 h. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results obtained from the lower dose implant showed retention of implanted carbon and accumulation of H near the end of range in the C implanted and annealed sample. Three distinct regions were identified by transmission electron microscopy of the implanted region in the higher dose implant. First, in the near surface region, was a low damage region (L{sub 1}) composed of crystalline sapphire and a high density of plateletlike defects. Underneath this was a thin, highly damaged and amorphized region (L{sub 2}) near the end of range in which a mixture of i-carbon and nanodiamond phases are present. Finally, there was a pristine, undamaged sapphire region (L{sub 3}) beyond the end of range. In the annealed sample some evidence of the presence of diamond nanoclusters was found deep within the implanted layer near the projected range of the C ions. These results are compared with our previous work on carbon implanted quartz in which nanodiamond phases were formed only a few tens of nanometers from the surface, a considerable distance from the projected range of the ions, suggesting that significant out diffusion of the implanted carbon had occurred.

  5. Improvement on electrical conductivity and electron field emission properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond films by using Au-Si eutectic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, K. J.; Sundaravel, B.; Tai, N. H. E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw; Lin, I. N. E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw

    2015-08-28

    In the present work, Au-Si eutectic layer was used to enhance the electrical conductivity/electron field emission (EFE) properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond (Au-UNCD) films grown on Si substrates. The electrical conductivity was improved to a value of 230 (Ω cm){sup −1}, and the EFE properties was enhanced reporting a low turn-on field of 2.1 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.3 mA/cm{sup 2} (at an applied field of 4.9 V/μm) for the Au-UNCD films. The formation of SiC phase circumvents the formation of amorphous carbon prior to the nucleation of diamond on Si substrates. Consequently, the electron transport efficiency of the UNCD-to-Si interface increases, thereby improving the conductivity as well as the EFE properties. Moreover, the salient feature of these processes is that the sputtering deposition of Au-coating for preparing the Au-Si interlayer, the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process for growing the UNCD films, and the Au-ion implantation process for inducing the nanographitic phases are standard thin film preparation techniques, which are simple, robust, and easily scalable. The availability of these highly conducting UNCD films with superior EFE characteristics may open up a pathway for the development of high-definition flat panel displays and plasma devices.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotube growth from ion implanted Fe catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongho; Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer; Ural, Ant

    2006-10-09

    The authors present experimental evidence that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be grown by chemical vapor deposition from ion implanted iron catalyst. They systematically characterize the effect of ion implantation dose and energy on the catalyst nanoparticles and nanotubes formed at 900 deg. C. They also fabricate a micromachined silicon grid for direct transmission electron microscopy characterization of the as-grown nanotubes. This work opens up the possibility of controlling the origin of single-walled nanotubes at the nanometer scale and of integrating them into nonplanar three-dimensional device structures with precise dose control.

  7. Haemocompatibility of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Kwok, S. C. H.; Chu, P. K.; Leng, Y. X.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, J.; Huang, N.

    2003-05-01

    Diamond-like-carbon has attracted much attention recently as a potential biomaterial in blood contacting biomedical devices. However, previous reports in this area have not adequately addressed the biocompatibility and acceptability of the materials in blood contacting applications. In this study, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were fabricated on silicon wafers (1 0 0) using plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition. A series of a-C:H films with different structures and chemical bonds were fabricated under different substrate voltages. The results indicate that film graphitization is promoted at higher substrate bias. The film deposited at a lower substrate bias of -75 V possesses better blood compatibility than the films at higher bias and stainless steel. Our results suggest two possible paths to improve the blood compatibility, suppression of the endogenic clotting system and reduction of platelet activation.

  8. Surface treatment of silicone rubber by carbon negative-ion implantation for nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Izukawa, Masayoshi; Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2004-07-01

    Surface treatment of silicone rubber by carbon negative ion-implantation was investigated for nerve regeneration by "tubulation". Silicone rubber had its surface property altered to be more hydrophilic by carbon negative-ion implantation. The extracellular matrices of proteins in culture medium adsorbed on the implanted surface rather than unimplanted ones. These improvements in wettability and adsorption properties of proteins were respected to contribute to the regeneration of a nerve-lacking system. An in vivo regeneration test of rat sciatic nerves with silicone-rubber tubes was performed. Using a tube in which the inner surface was implanted with carbon negative ions, the sciatic nerve was regenerated through the inter-stump gap of 15 mm between the proximal and distal nerve stumps and electrical stimulation was transported through the regenerated nerve. Thus, the nerve system was recovered. However, with the unimplanted tube, the nerve was not regenerated at all.

  9. The microstructural evolution of ultrananocrystalline diamond films due to P ion implantation process—the annealing effect

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Sheng-Chang; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Kurian, Joji; Lin, I.-Nan; Dong, Chung-Li; Niu, Huan

    2014-11-14

    The microstructural evolution of UNCD films which are P-ion implanted and annealed at 600 °C (or 800 °C) is systematically investigated. The difference of interaction that the UNCD content undergoes along the trajectory of the incident P-ions is reflected in the alteration of the granular structure. In regions where the P-ions reside, the “interacting zone,” which is found at about 300 nm beneath the surface of the films, coalescence of diamond grains occurs inducing nano-graphitic clusters. The annealing at 600 °C (or 800 °C) heals the defects and, in some cases, forms interconnected graphitic filaments that result in the decrease in surface resistance. However, the annealing at 600 °C (800 °C) induces marked UNCD-to-Si layers interaction. This interaction due to the annealing processes hinders the electron transport across the interface and degrades the electron field emission properties of the UNCD films. These microstructural evolution processes very well account for the phenomenon elaborating that, in spite of enhanced conductivity of the UNCD films along the film's surface due to the P-ion implantation and annealing processes, the electron field emission properties for these UNCD films do not improve.

  10. Wafer-scale synthesis of multi-layer graphene by high-temperature carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Janghyuk; Lee, Geonyeop; Kim, Jihyun

    2015-07-20

    We report on the synthesis of wafer-scale (4 in. in diameter) high-quality multi-layer graphene using high-temperature carbon ion implantation on thin Ni films on a substrate of SiO{sub 2}/Si. Carbon ions were bombarded at 20 keV and a dose of 1 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} onto the surface of the Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate at a temperature of 500 °C. This was followed by high-temperature activation annealing (600–900 °C) to form a sp{sup 2}-bonded honeycomb structure. The effects of post-implantation activation annealing conditions were systematically investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Carbon ion implantation at elevated temperatures allowed a lower activation annealing temperature for fabricating large-area graphene. Our results indicate that carbon-ion implantation provides a facile and direct route for integrating graphene with Si microelectronics.

  11. High temperature annealing studies of strontium ion implanted glassy carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odutemowo, O. S.; Malherbe, J. B.; Prinsloo, L.; Langa, D. F.; Wendler, E.

    2016-03-01

    Glassy carbon samples were implanted with 200 keV strontium ions to a fluence of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Analysis with Raman spectroscopy showed that ion bombardment amorphises the glassy carbon structure. Partial recovery of the glassy carbon structure was achieved after the implanted sample was vacuum annealed at 900 °C for 1 h. Annealing the strontium ion bombarded sample at 2000 °C for 5 h resulted in recovery of the glassy carbon substrate with the intensity of the D peak becoming lower than that of the pristine glassy carbon. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) showed that the implanted strontium diffused towards the surface of the glassy carbon after annealing the sample at 900 °C. This diffusion was also accompanied by loss of the implanted strontium. Comparison between the as-implanted and 900 °C depth profiles showed that less than 30% of the strontium was retained in the glassy carbon after heat treatment at 900 °C. The RBS profile after annealing at 2000 °C indicated that no strontium ions were retained after heat treatment at this temperature.

  12. Voltage dependence of cluster size in carbon films using plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. R.; Tarrant, R. N.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Pearce, G.; Marks, N. A.; McCulloch, D. G.; Lim, S. H. N.

    2003-05-01

    Carbon films were prepared using a cathodic arc with plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). Using Raman spectroscopy to determine cluster size, a comparison is made between cluster sizes at high voltage and a low duty cycle of pulses with the cluster sizes produced at low voltage and a higher duty cycle. We find that for ion implantation in the range 2-20 kV, the cluster size depends more on implantation energy ( E) than implantation frequency ( f), unlike stress relief, which we have previously shown [M.M.M. Bilek, et al., IEEE Trans. in Plasma Sci., Proceedings 20th ISDEIV 1-5 July 2002, Tours, France, Cat. No. 02CH37331, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, p. 95] to be dependent on the product Ef. These differences are interpreted in terms of a model in which the ion impacts create thermal spikes.

  13. Thermal stability of diamondlike carbon buried layer fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition in silicon on insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Di Zengfeng; Huang Anping; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Shao Lin; Hoechbauer, T.; Nastasi, M.; Zhang Miao; Liu Weili; Shen Qinwo; Luo Suhua; Song Zhitang; Lin Chenglu

    2005-09-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) as a potential low-cost substitute for diamond has been extended to microelectronics and we have demonstrated the fabrication of silicon on diamond (SOD) as a silicon-on-insulator structure using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition in conjunction with layer transfer and wafer bonding. The thermal stability of our SOD structure was found to be better than that expected for conventional DLC films. In the work reported here, we investigate the mechanism of the enhanced thermal stability. We compare the thermal stability of exposed and buried DLC films using Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Our Raman analysis indicates that the obvious separation of the D and G peaks indicative of nanocrystalline graphite emerges at 500 deg. C in the exposed DLC film. In contrast, the separation appears in the buried DLC film only at annealing temperatures above 800 deg. C. Analysis of the XPS C{sub 1s} core-level spectra shows that the (sp{sup 3}+C-H) carbon content of the unprotected DLC film decreases rapidly between 300-700 deg. C indicating the rapid transformation of sp{sup 3}-bonded carbon to sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon combined with hydrogen evolution. In comparison, the decrease in the (sp{sup 3}+C-H) carbon content of the buried DLC film is slower below 800 deg. C. Elastic recoil detection results show that this superior thermal stability is due to the slower hydrogen out diffusion from the buried DLC film thereby impeding the graphitization process. We propose that the SiO{sub 2} overlayer retards the graphitization process during annealing by shifting the chemical equilibrium.

  14. Mossbauer effect in the ion-implanted iron-carbon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1976-01-01

    The concentration dependence of Mossbauer effect in four carbon ion-implanted iron absorbers, which contain carbon as the solute atoms, has been investigated over the range of concentration 0.05 through 1 atomic percent. The specimens were prepared by implanting carbon atoms on each reference iron foil with four different bombarding energies of 250 keV, 160 keV, 140 keV and 80 keV, respectively. Thus, the specimen contains a uniform dosage of carbon atoms which penetrated up to 3,000 A depth of the reference iron. In the measurement of Mossbauer spectra, the backscattering conversion electron counting geometry was used. Typical results of Mossbauer parameters of iron-carbon alloys show that the isomer shift, quadrupole shift, the effective hyperfine splitting of Fe-57, and the intensity ratio exhibit a large variation with the increase of carbon concentration in the environment of iron atoms.

  15. Mechanical properties of nickel ion-implanted with titanium and carbon and their relation to microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Dugger, M.T.

    1998-02-01

    Dual ion implantation of titanium and carbon into nickel was shown to produce an amorphous layer with exceptionally high strength and hardness and substantially improved tribological properties. Indentation testing at submicrometer penetrations combined with finite-element modeling permitted quantification of the intrinsic elastic and plastic properties of the amorphous layer, which was found to have a yield strength near 5 GPa. During unlubricated sliding contact with a steel pin, the implantation treatment reduced friction, suppressed adhesion-and-fracture wear, and reduced wear depth. These tribological effects may enhance the performance and lifetime of microelectromechanical systems constructed from nickel.

  16. Multienergy gold ion implantation for enhancing the field electron emission characteristics of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Manoharan, D.; Sundaravel, B.; Lin, I. N.

    2016-09-01

    Multienergy Au-ion implantation enhanced the electrical conductivity of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates to a high level of 5076.0 (Ω cm)-1 and improved the field electron emission (FEE) characteristics of the films to low turn-on field of 1.6 V/μm, high current density of 5.4 mA/cm2 (@ 2.65 V/μm), and high lifetime stability of 1825 min. The catalytic induction of nanographitic phases in the films due to Au-ion implantation and the formation of diamond-to-Si eutectic interface layer due to Au-coating on Si together encouraged the efficient conducting channels for electron transport, thereby improved the FEE characteristics of the films.

  17. Estimation of Protein Absorption on Polymer Material by Carbon-Negative Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Hattori, Mitsutaka; Sommani, Piyanuch; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    Selective cell attachment on carbon-negative-ion implanted region of polystyrene was already reported by the authors. However, the selectivity and adhesion strength in the cell pattering were partially insufficient. The adhesive proteins called extracellular matrix (ECM), in general, intervene between cell and substrate surface in the cell attachment on the solid surface. Therefore, we considered to obtain clearer selective cell attachment with tighter binding strength on the implanted region of polystyrene when these adhesive proteins precedently adsorbed on the implanted region of polystyrene. In this paper, we have investigated adsorption properties of three kinds of adhesive proteins (gelatin, fibronectin, laminin) and cell attachment properties on precedent protein adsorbed surface of polystyrene modified by carbon negative-ion implantation. Carbon negative ions were implanted into polystyrene at energy of 10 keV with dose in a range of 1×1014~1×1016 ions/cm2. After implantation, the samples were dipped in the protein solutions for 2 hours. Then, the protein adsorption ratio between implanted and unimplanted regions was evaluated by detecting amount of nitrogen atoms on the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). As a result, the protein-precedently-absorbed sample implanted at dose more than 3×1015 ions/cm2 showed the large gelatin adsorption ratio of more than 2, where the much densely populated cell-attachment was observed more than that on the implanted region of polystyrene without precedent adsorption of protein after cell culture.

  18. Ozone and carbon trioxide synthesis by low energy ion implantation onto solid carbon dioxide and implications to astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Raja Sekhar, B. N.; Fulvio, Daniele; Hunniford, Adam; McCullough, Bob; Palumbo, Maria Elisabetta; Mason, Nigel

    2013-08-01

    Ion implantation experiments were carried out on amorphous (30 K) and crystalline (80 K) solid CO2 using both reactive (D+, H+) and non-reactive (He+) ions, simulating different irradiation environments on satellite and dust grain surfaces. Such ion irradiation synthesized several new species in the ice including ozone (O3), carbon trioxide (CO3), and carbon monoxide (CO) the main dissociation product of carbon dioxide. The yield of these products was found to be strongly dependent upon the ion used for irradiation and the sample temperature. Ion implantation changes the chemical composition of the ice with recorded infrared spectra clearly showing the coexistence of D3h and C2v isomers of CO3, for the first time, in ion irradiated CO2 ice.

  19. Optical properties of K9 glass waveguides fabricated by using carbon-ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Wei, Wei; Fu, Li-Li; Zhu, Xu-Feng; Guo, Hai-Tao; Li, Wei-Nan; Lin, She-Bao

    2016-07-01

    K9 glass is a material with promising properties that make it attractive for optical devices. Ion implantation is a powerful technique to form waveguides with controllable depth and refractive index profile. In this work, optical planar waveguide structures were fabricated in K9 glasses by using 6.0-MeV C3+-ion implantation with a fluence of 1.0 × 1015 ions/cm2. The effective refractive indices of the guided modes were measured by using a prism-coupling system. The refractive index change in the ion-irradiated region was simulated by using the intensity calculation method. The modal intensity profile of the waveguide was calculated and measured by using the finite difference beam propagation method and the end-face coupling technique, respectively. The transmission spectra before and after the implantation showed that the main absorption band was not influenced by the low fluence dopants. The optical properties of the carbon-implanted K9 glass waveguides show promise for use as integrated photonic devices.

  20. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosobrodova, E.; Kondyurin, A.; Chrzanowski, W.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2014-06-01

    At ion fluences higher than 5 · 1015 ions/cm2, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 1016 ions/cm2, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of Cdbnd O bonds and much lower concentration of O-H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2. At this and higher fluence, areas of an ordered island-like structure were observed.

  1. Formation of titanium carbide by high-fluence carbon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, A.; Hammerl, C.; Königer, A.; Rauschenbach, B.

    1997-08-01

    Titanium carbide has been prepared by high fluence carbon ion implantation in titanium at temperatures between -70°C and 450°C. The carbon ion dose has been varied between 1.2 and 36 × 10 17 C +-ions/cm 2 and the ion energy between 30 and 180 keV. The carbon concentration distribution, the structure, the morphology and the microhardness have been examined with Rutherford backscattering, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation, respectively. The concentration distribution of carbon is characterized by a symmetric Gaussian profile for doses up to 12×10 17C +-ions/cm 2 and a more and more asymmetrical profile for higher fluences. The evolution of the concentration distribution is discussed on basis of swelling and sputtering. Precipitates of the titanium carbide phase can be observed after implantation at -70°C with doses ⩾3×10 17C +-ions/cm 2. The average diameter of the TiC precipitates is a function of ion dose, temperature and duration of annealing. A significant increase of the hardness in the near surface region of implanted samples can be detected. The measured hardness values depend strongly on ion dose, annealing conditions and the hardness of the unimplanted titanium.

  2. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  3. Improvement on corrosion resistance of NiTi orthopedic materials by carbon plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ray W. Y.; Ho, Joan P. Y.; Luk, Camille M. Y.; Liu, Xuanyong; Chung, Jonathan C. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2006-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) have potential applications as orthopedic implants because of their unique super-elastic properties and shape memory effects. However, the problem of out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the alloys during prolonged use inside a human body must be overcome before they can be widely used in orthopedic implants. In this work, we enhance the corrosion resistance of NiTi using carbon plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D). Our corrosion and simulated body fluid tests indicate that either an ion-mixed amorphous carbon coating fabricated by PIII&D or direct carbon PIII can drastically improve the corrosion resistance and block the out-diffusion of Ni from the materials. Results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that both C2H2-PIII&D and C2H2-PIII do not roughen the original flat surface to an extent that can lead to degradation in corrosion resistance.

  4. Immobilization of extracellular matrix on polymeric materials by carbon-negative-ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sommani, Piyanuch; Muto, Takashi; Utagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakai, Shun; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2005-08-01

    Effects of ion implantation into polystyrene (PS), silicone rubber (SR) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) have been investigated for immobilization of extracellular matrix. Carbon negative ions were implanted into PS and SR sheets at various energies between 5-30 keV and various doses between 1.0 × 1014-1.0 × 1016 ions/cm2. Contact angles of pure water on C-implanted surfaces of PS and SR were decreased as increase in ion energy and in dose due to formation of functional groups such as OH and C-O. Selective attachment of nerve cells was observed on C-implanted them at 10 keV and 3 × 1015 ions/cm2 after in vitro cell culture of nerve cells of PC-12 h. Neurite outgrowth also extended over the implanted area. After dipping in a serum medium and in a fibronectin solution for 2 h, the detection of N 1s electrons by X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) revealed a significant distinction of protein adhesion on the implanted area. Thus, immobilization of proteins on surface is used for considering the selective cell-attachment. For PLA, the selective attachment of cells and protein depended on the implantation conditions.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of a co-planar detector in diamond for low energy single ion implantation

    DOE PAGES

    Abraham, John Bishoy Sam; Pacheco, Jose L.; Aguirre, Brandon Adrian; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Bielejec, Edward S.

    2016-08-09

    We demonstrate low energy single ion detection using a co-planar detector fabricated on a diamond substrate and characterized by ion beam induced charge collection. Histograms are taken with low fluence ion pulses illustrating quantized ion detection down to a single ion with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10. We anticipate that this detection technique can serve as a basis to optimize the yield of single color centers in diamond. In conclusion, the ability to count ions into a diamond substrate is expected to reduce the uncertainty in the yield of color center formation by removing Poisson statistics from the implantationmore » process.« less

  6. Fabrication and characterization of a co-planar detector in diamond for low energy single ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. B. S.; Aguirre, B. A.; Pacheco, J. L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Bielejec, E.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate low energy single ion detection using a co-planar detector fabricated on a diamond substrate and characterized by ion beam induced charge collection. Histograms are taken with low fluence ion pulses illustrating quantized ion detection down to a single ion with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10. We anticipate that this detection technique can serve as a basis to optimize the yield of single color centers in diamond. The ability to count ions into a diamond substrate is expected to reduce the uncertainty in the yield of color center formation by removing Poisson statistics from the implantation process.

  7. Optical planar waveguide in sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals by carbon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Gang; Wang, Hui-Lin; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2013-07-01

    There is great interest in niobate crystals which belong to the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) families owing to their intriguing properties. As one representative of such crystals, CBN (calcium barium niobate) has attracted rapidly growing attention. Because it has a higher Curie temperature than SBN (strontium barium niobate), possesses outstanding ferroelectric and it possesses optical properties. In addition, doped with sodium, CBN will show a higher Curie temperature than pure CBN. We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical planar waveguide in x-cut sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystal by using C ion implantation. The guided-mode properties at the wavelength of 633 and 1539 nm are investigated through prism-coupling measurements, respectively. By applying direct end-face coupling arrangement, the near-field optical intensity distribution of waveguide modes is measured at 633 nm. For comparison, the modal profile of the same guided mode is also numerically calculated by the finite difference beam-propagation method via computer software BeamPROP. The transmission spectra of the waveguide before and after ion implantation treatments were investigated also. Our experiment results reveal that the waveguide could propagate light with transverse magnetic polarized direction only and it is assumed that the polarization selectivity of CBN crystal may responsible for this phenomenon.

  8. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  9. In-situ observation of sputtered particles for carbon implanted tungsten during energetic isotope ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Oya, Y.; Sato, M.; Uchimura, H.; Okuno, K.; Ashikawa, N.; Sagara, A.; Yoshida, N.; Hatano, Y.

    2015-03-15

    Tungsten is a candidate for plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors. During DT plasma operations, carbon as an impurity will bombard tungsten, leading to the formation of tungsten-carbon (WC) layer and affecting tritium recycling behavior. The effect of carbon implantation for the dynamic recycling of deuterium, which demonstrates tritium recycling, including retention and sputtering, has been investigated using in-situ sputtered particle measurements. The C{sup +} implanted W, WC and HOPG were prepared and dynamic sputtered particles were measured during H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation. It has been found that the major hydrocarbon species for C{sup +} implanted tungsten is CH{sub 3}, while for WC and HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) it is CH{sub 4}. The chemical state of hydrocarbon is controlled by the H concentration in a W-C mixed layer. The amount of C-H bond and the retention of H trapped by carbon atom should control the chemical form of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation and the desorption of CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2} are due to chemical sputtering, although that for CH is physical sputtering. The activation energy for CH{sub 3} desorption has been estimated to be 0.4 eV, corresponding to the trapping process of hydrogen by carbon through the diffusion in W. It is concluded that the chemical states of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation for W is determined by the amount of C-H bond on the W surface. (authors)

  10. Surface modification of poly(propylene carbonate) by oxygen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jizhong; Kang, Jiachen; Hu, Ping; Meng, Qingli

    2007-04-01

    Poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) was implanted by oxygen ion with energy of 40 keV. The influence of experimental parameters was investigated by varying ion fluence from 1 × 10 12 to 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. XPS, SEM, surface roughness, wettability, hardness, and modulus were employed to investigate structure and properties of the as-implanted PPC samples. Eight chemical groups, i.e., carbon, C sbnd H, C sbnd O sbnd C, C sbnd O, O sbnd C sbnd O, C dbnd O, ?, and ? groups were observed on surfaces of the as-implanted samples. The species and relative intensities of the chemical groups changed with increasing ion fluence. SEM images displayed that irradiation damage was related strongly with ion fluence. Both surface-recovering and shrunken behavior were observed on surface of the PPC sample implanted with fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. As increasing ion fluence, the surface roughness of the as-implanted PPC samples increased firstly, reached the maximum value of 159 nm, and finally decreased down the minimum value. The water droplet contact angle of the as-implanted PPC samples changed gradually with fluence, and reached the minimum value of 70° with fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The hardness and modulus of the as-implanted PPC samples increased with increasing ion fluence, and reached their corresponding maximum values with fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The experimental results revealed that oxygen ion fluence closely affected surface chemical group, morphology, surface roughness, wettability, and mechanical properties of the as-implanted PPC samples.

  11. Transport Anomalies and Possible High Tc Superconductivity in interconnected multiwall carbon nanotube sheets doped by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, Anvar; Howard, Austin; Cornell, Nicholas; Goskun, Ulas; Salamon, Myron; Baughman, Ray; Bykova, Julia; Mayo, Nathanael; Wang, Xuemei; Galstyan, Eduard; Freyhardt, Herbert; Kan Chu, Wei

    2012-02-01

    Ion implantation offers an alternative doping method. In searching for superconductivity,we describe here the ion-implantation doping of MWCNT interconnected networks by boron and other dopants (phosphorous, sulfur, arsenic) and report transport anomalies in oriented networks of ion implanted MWCNT sheets as compared to cross coated (non-oriented multilayer MWCNT sheets). The strong drop of resistance R(T) with temperature decrease starting at Tc1= 50-60 K and even at higher T is reminiscent of inhomogeneous superconducting islands appearing in the non-SC matrix. An unusual anomaly of the 4-terminal resistance is observed in many samples, R(T) becoming negative at lower T< Tc2 ˜ 10-20 K, This negative resistance is found to be associated with unusual I-V curves with s-shape at low T < Tc2 and R(T) shows nonlinear dependence on excitation current and other features that are studied carefully in MWCNTs with different lengths and densities. This negative-resistance behavior gives a hint for the possible incorporation of superconducting areas and can be explained in terms of an imbalanced resistance bridge.

  12. Carbon transport in diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Prakapenka, V.B.; Shen, G.; Dubrovinsky, L.S.

    2010-11-10

    High-pressure-induced carbon transport from diamond anvils into the pressure chamber of diamond anvil cells (DACs) was studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Depending on experimental conditions (temperature and pressure), various carbon phases (amorphous carbon, diamond, microcrystalline or nanocrystalline graphite) were detected in the originally carbon-free samples. Temperature-induced growth of a graphite phase at the sample/diamond interface was observed in situ at high pressure in an externally heated DAC. In laser-heated samples inside the pressure-transmitting medium, at pressures above 6 GPa there was transport of carbon from the diamond culet surface into the heated part of the sample. These observations suggest that account should be taken of possible carbon diffusion in high-pressure research with DACs, such as high-pressure melting, element partitioning, phase transformations, chemical reactions, and electrical resistivity.

  13. Ion implantation in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintersgill, M. C.

    1984-02-01

    An introductory overview will be given of the effects of ion implantation on polymers, and certain areas will be examined in more detail. Radiation effects in general and ion implantation in particular, in the field of polymers, present a number of contrasts with those in ionic crystals, the most obvious difference being that the chemical effects of both the implanted species and the energy transfer to the host may profoundly change the nature of the target material. Common effects include crosslinking and scission of polymer chains, gas evolution, double bond formation and the formation of additional free radicals. Research has spanned the chemical processes involved, including polymerization reactions achievable only with the use of radiation, to applied research dealing both with the effects of radiation on polymers already in commercial use and the tailoring of new materials to specific applications. Polymers are commonly divided into two groups, in describing their behavior under irradiation. Group I includes materials which form crosslinks between molecules, whereas Group II materials tend to degrade. In basic research, interest has centered on Group I materials and of these polyethylene has been studied most intensively. Applied materials research has investigated a variety of polymers, particularly those used in cable insulation, and those utilized in ion beam lithography of etch masks. Currently there is also great interest in enhancing the conducting properties of polymers, and these uses would tend to involve the doping capabilities of ion implantation, rather than the energy deposition.

  14. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Hallén, A.; Svensson, B. G.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon vacancy (VC) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the VC-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (Ci's) and annihilation of VC's in the epi-layer "bulk". Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the VC annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating VC's. Concentrations of VC below ˜2 × 1011 cm-3 can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the VC-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote Ci-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These Ci-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced Ci injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the VC-concentration, which limit the net effect of the Ci injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  15. Single Ion Implantation and Deterministic Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas

    2010-06-11

    The presence of single atoms, e.g. dopant atoms, in sub-100 nm scale electronic devices can affect the device characteristics, such as the threshold voltage of transistors, or the sub-threshold currents. Fluctuations of the number of dopant atoms thus poses a complication for transistor scaling. In a complementary view, new opportunities emerge when novel functionality can be implemented in devices deterministically doped with single atoms. The grand price of the latter might be a large scale quantum computer, where quantum bits (qubits) are encoded e.g. in the spin states of electrons and nuclei of single dopant atoms in silicon, or in color centers in diamond. Both the possible detrimental effects of dopant fluctuations and single atom device ideas motivate the development of reliable single atom doping techniques which are the subject of this chapter. Single atom doping can be approached with top down and bottom up techniques. Top down refers to the placement of dopant atoms into a more or less structured matrix environment, like a transistor in silicon. Bottom up refers to approaches to introduce single dopant atoms during the growth of the host matrix e.g. by directed self-assembly and scanning probe assisted lithography. Bottom up approaches are discussed in Chapter XYZ. Since the late 1960's, ion implantation has been a widely used technique to introduce dopant atoms into silicon and other materials in order to modify their electronic properties. It works particularly well in silicon since the damage to the crystal lattice that is induced by ion implantation can be repaired by thermal annealing. In addition, the introduced dopant atoms can be incorporated with high efficiency into lattice position in the silicon host crystal which makes them electrically active. This is not the case for e.g. diamond, which makes ion implantation doping to engineer the electrical properties of diamond, especially for n-type doping much harder then for silicon. Ion

  16. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  17. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  18. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  19. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G.

    2015-11-07

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the V{sub C}-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (C{sub i}'s) and annihilation of V{sub C}'s in the epi-layer “bulk”. Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the V{sub C} annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating V{sub C}'s. Concentrations of V{sub C} below ∼2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the V{sub C}-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote C{sub i}-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These C{sub i}-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced C{sub i} injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the V{sub C}-concentration, which limit the net effect of the C{sub i} injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  20. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  1. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  2. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  3. Carbon stardust: From soot to diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1990-01-01

    The formation of carbon dust in the outflow from stars and the subsequent evolution of this so called stardust in the interstellar medium is reviewed. The chemical and physical processes that play a role in carbon stardust formation are very similar to those occurring in sooting flames. Based upon extensive laboratory studies of the latter, the structure and physical and chemical properties of carbon soot are reviewed and possible chemical pathways towards carbon stardust are discussed. Grain-grain collisions behind strong interstellar shocks provide the high pressures required to transform graphite and amorphous carbon grains into diamond. This process is examined and the properties of shock-synthesized diamonds are reviewed. Finally, the interrelationship between carbon stardust and carbonaceous meteorites is briefly discussed.

  4. Optical and electrical properties of heavily carbon-doped GaAs fabricated by high-energy ion-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Takayuki |; Makita, Yunosuke; Kimura, Shinji

    1996-12-31

    High-energy (400 keV) implantation of carbon (C) ions was made into LEC-GaAs substrates with C concentration ([C]) of 10{sup 19}--10{sup 22} cm{sup {minus}3}. 2 K photoluminescence (PL) and Hall effect measurements indicated that activation rate of C in LEC GaAs is both optically and electrically extremely low even after furnace-annealing at 850 C for 20 min. For [C] = 1 {times} 10{sup 22} cm{sup {minus}3}, two novel strong emissions were obtained and PL measurements as a function of excitation power and sample temperature suggested that the two emissions one at 1.485 eV and the other at 1.305 eV should reflect the formation of a new alloy between GaAs and C. Dual implantation of C{sup +} and Ga{sup +} ions was carried out to improve the activation or substitution rate. The authors found that nearly 90% activation rate can be achieved for C dose of 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}2}.

  5. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  6. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  7. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Watanabe, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Sadao; Miyake, Shojiro; Wu, Richard L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) cubic MM /(N*m), respectively. Carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond and diamondlike carbon (DLC) ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the criteria regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  8. Stiff diamond/buckypaper carbon hybrids.

    PubMed

    Holz, T; Mata, D; Santos, N F; Bdikin, I; Fernandes, A J S; Costa, F M

    2014-12-24

    Given the specific properties of each carbon allotrope such as high electrical/thermal conductivity of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and extreme hardness and high inertness of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), the integration of both carbon phases is highly desirable. Therefore, in the present work, buckypapers were produced from MWCNT suspensions and were used as free-standing substrates to be coated with NCD by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The integration of both allotropes was successfully achieved, the CNTs being preserved after diamond growth as confirmed by μ-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additionally, a good linkage was observed, the CNTs remaining embedded within the NCD matrix, thus reinforcing the interface of the resulting hybrid structure. This was corroborated by bending tests in a modified nanohardness tester. The increase of the Young's modulus from 0.3 to 300 GPa after NCD growth enables the use of this material in a wide range of applications including microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Additionally, a highly anisotropic electrical resistivity behavior was confirmed: low in-plane values were found for the CNT layer (1.39 × 10(-2) Ω.cm), while high transverse ones were measured for both the NCD coated and uncoated CNT buckypapers (8.13 × 10(5) and 6.18 × 10(2) Ω.cm, respectively). PMID:25412196

  9. Report on the workshop on Ion Implantation and Ion Beam Assisted Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1992-03-01

    This workshop was organized by the Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD), the major helicopter repair base within AVSCOM. Previous meetings had revealed a strong interest throughout DoD in ion beam technology as a means of extending the service life of military systems by reducing wear, corrosion, fatigue, etc. The workshop opened with an account by Dr. Bruce Sartwell of the successful application of ion implantation to bearings and gears at NRL, and the checkered history of the MANTECH Project at Spire Corporation. Dr. James Hirvonen (AMTL) continued with a summary of successful applications to reduce wear in biomedical components, and he also described the processes of ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) for a variety of protective coatings, including diamond-like carbon (DLC).

  10. Buckled diamond-like carbon nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomi, Matti; Isacsson, Andreas; Oksanen, Mika; Lyashenko, Dmitry; Kaikkonen, Jukka-Pekka; Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed capacitively-transduced nanomechanical resonators using sp2-rich diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films as conducting membranes. The electrically conducting DLC films were grown by physical vapor deposition at a temperature of 500 °C. Characterizing the resonant response, we find a larger than expected frequency tuning that we attribute to the membrane being buckled upwards, away from the bottom electrode. The possibility of using buckled resonators to increase frequency tuning can be of advantage in rf applications such as tunable GHz filters and voltage-controlled oscillators.We have developed capacitively-transduced nanomechanical resonators using sp2-rich diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films as conducting membranes. The electrically conducting DLC films were grown by physical vapor deposition at a temperature of 500 °C. Characterizing the resonant response, we find a larger than expected frequency tuning that we attribute to the membrane being buckled upwards, away from the bottom electrode. The possibility of using buckled resonators to increase frequency tuning can be of advantage in rf applications such as tunable GHz filters and voltage-controlled oscillators. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed transmission measurements, discussion about mechanical contacts and surface roughness, derivation of the equations describing the eigenspectrum of a buckled beam under electrostatic load. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02820e

  11. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material.

  12. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs

  13. Carbon Onions as Nanoscopic Pressure Cells for Diamond Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banhart, Florian

    1997-03-01

    Concentric-shell carbon onions form under electron irradiation of different carbon precursors in an electron microscope. Carbon onions under irradiation at high temperature are in a state of high compression with a considerable decrease of the c-plane spacing towards the centre. Under prolonged irradiation at temperatures around 900 K the cores of the graphitic onions transform into diamond crystals (F. Banhart and P.M. Ajayan, Nature 382), 433 (1996). Hence, carbon onions can be thought of as nanoscopic pressure cells for the directly observable nucleation and growth of diamond from graphitic material. The diamond crystals grow under further irradiation until the whole graphitic particles have transformed to diamond. Apparently the conversion of the graphitic structure to diamond starts at high pressure and proceeds at decreasing, possibly even at zero pressure. The experiment is carried out in a transmission electron microscope which enables us to monitor this phase transformation in-situ on an atomic scale.

  14. Contamination Control in Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, R.; Doi, D.; Santos, I.; Wriggins, W.

    2011-01-07

    The investigation and elimination or control of metallic contamination in ion implanters has been a leading, continuous effort at implanter OEMs and in fabs/IDMs alike. Much of the efforts have been in the area of control of sputtering through material and geometry changes in apertures, beamline and target chamber components. In this paper, we will focus on an area that has not, heretofore, been fully investigated or controlled. This is the area of lubricants and internal and external support material such as selected cleaning media. Some of these materials are designated for internal use (beamline/vacuum) only while others are for internal and/or external use. Many applications for selected greases, for example, are designated for or are used for platens, implant disks/wheels and for wafer handling components. We will present data from popular lubricants (to be unnamed) used worldwide in ion implanters. This paper will review elements of concern in many lubricants that should be tracked and monitored by all fabs.Proper understanding of the characteristics, risks and the control of these potential contaminants can provide for rapid return to full process capability following major PMs or parts changes. Using VPD-ICPMS, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography (IC) data, we will review the typical cleaning results and correlation to ''on wafer'' contamination by elements of concern--and by some elements that are otherwise barred from the fab.

  15. Advances in PSII Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings for Use as a Barrier to Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Baker, N.P.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-10-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a non line of sight process for implanting complex shaped targets without the need for complex fixturing. The breakdown initiation of materials coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) produced by PSII occurs at defects in the DLC which expose the underlying material. To summarize these findings, a galvanic couple is established between the coating and exposed material at the base of the defect. Pitting and oxidation of the base and metal leads to the development of mechanical stress in the coating and eventually spallation of the coating. This paper presents our current progress in attempting to mitigate the breakdown of these coatings by implanting the parent material prior to coating with DLC. Ideally one would like to implant the parent material with chromium or molybdenum which are known to improve corrosion resistance, however, the necessary organometallics needed to implant these materials with PSII are not yet available. Here we report on the effects of carbon, nitrogen, and boron implantation on the susceptibility of PSII-DLC coated mild steel to breakdown.

  16. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    When the main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m, respectively, carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond and DLC ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the requirements regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  17. The carbon isotopic composition of Novo Urei diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjenova, L. F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diamond grains isolated from the Novo Urei meteorite are discussed. A diamond separate was obtained from 2g of whole rock using the chemical treatments described aimed at obtaining very pure diamond. X ray diffraction of the residue, which represented 5000 ppm of the parent mass, indicated only the presence of the desired mineral. The diamond crystals were 1-30 microns in diameter, and some grains had a yellow color. The chemical treatments were followed by a size separation to give a 1-10 microns and a 5-30 microns fraction, which were named DNU-1 and DNU-2, respectively.

  18. Ion implantation and laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Three ion implantation and laser annealing projects have been performed by ORNL through the DOE sponsored Seed Money Program. The research has contributed toward improving the characteristics of wear, hardness, and corrosion resistance of some metals and ceramics, as well as the electrical properties of semiconductors. The work has helped to spawn related research, at ORNL and elsewhere, concerning the relationships between microstructure and materials properties. ORNL research has resulted in major advances in extended life and non-corrosive artificial joints (hip and knee), high performance semiconductors, failure resistant ceramics (with potential energy applications), and solar cells. The success of the seed money projects was instrumental in the formation of ORNL's Surface Modification and Characterization Facility (SMAC). More than 60 universities and companies have participated in SMAC programs.

  19. Novel phase of carbon, ferromagnetism, and conversion into diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Jagdish Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-12-07

    We report the discovery of a new phase of carbon (referred to as Q-carbon) and address fundamental issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon is formed as result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram (P vs. T) of carbon and show that by rapid quenching kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of diamond-like amorphous carbon on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt carbon in a super undercooled state. By quenching the carbon from the super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) from which nanodiamond, microdiamond, microneedles, and single-crystal thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed for diamond formation. The Q-carbon quenched from liquid is a new state of solid carbon with a higher mass density than amorphous carbon and a mixture of mostly fourfold sp{sup 3} (75%–85%) with the rest being threefold sp{sup 2} bonded carbon (with distinct entropy). It is expected to have new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, chemical, and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) and enhanced field emission. Here we present interesting results on RTFM, enhanced electrical conductivity and surface potential of Q-carbon to emphasize its unique properties. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g{sup −1}. From the Q-carbon, diamond phase is nucleated and a variety of micro- and nanostructures and large-area single-crystal diamond sheets are grown by allowing

  20. Novel phase of carbon, ferromagnetism, and conversion into diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new phase of carbon (referred to as Q-carbon) and address fundamental issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon is formed as result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram (P vs. T) of carbon and show that by rapid quenching kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of diamond-like amorphous carbon on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt carbon in a super undercooled state. By quenching the carbon from the super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) from which nanodiamond, microdiamond, microneedles, and single-crystal thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed for diamond formation. The Q-carbon quenched from liquid is a new state of solid carbon with a higher mass density than amorphous carbon and a mixture of mostly fourfold sp3 (75%-85%) with the rest being threefold sp2 bonded carbon (with distinct entropy). It is expected to have new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, chemical, and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) and enhanced field emission. Here we present interesting results on RTFM, enhanced electrical conductivity and surface potential of Q-carbon to emphasize its unique properties. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g-1. From the Q-carbon, diamond phase is nucleated and a variety of micro- and nanostructures and large-area single-crystal diamond sheets are grown by allowing growth times as needed

  1. Morphological analysis and cell viability on diamond-like carbon films containing nanocrystalline diamond particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, C. N.; Ramos, B. C.; Da-Silva, N. S.; Pacheco-Soares, C.; Trava-Airoldi, V. J.; Lobo, A. O.; Marciano, F. R.

    2013-06-01

    The coating of orthopedic prostheses with diamond like-carbon (DLC) has been actively studied in the past years, in order to improve mechanical, tribological properties and promote the material's biocompatibility. Recently, the incorporation of crystalline diamond nanoparticles into the DLC film has shown effective in combating electrochemical corrosion in acidic medias. This study examines the material's biocompatibility through testing by LDH release and MTT, on in vitro fibroblasts; using different concentrations of diamond nanoparticles incorporated into the DLC film. Propounding its potential use in orthopedics in order to increase the corrosion resistance of prostheses and improve their relationship with the biological environment.

  2. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Liu, Shengzhong; Pan, Xianzheng; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  3. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-03-09

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ∼25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  4. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-03-01

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ˜25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  5. Carbon onions as nanoscopic pressure cells for diamond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banhart, F.; Ajayan, P. M.

    1996-08-01

    SPHERICAL particles of carbon consisting of concentric graphite-like shells ('carbon onions') can be formed by electron irradiation of graphitic carbon materials1,2. Here we report that, when such particles are heated to ~700 °C and irradiated with electrons, their cores can be transformed to diamond. Under these conditions the spacing between layers in the carbon onions decreases from 0.31 in the outer shells (slightly less than the 0.34-nm layer spacing of graphite) to about 0.22 nm in the core, indicating considerable compression towards the particle centres. We find that this compression allows diamond to nucleate-in effect the carbon onions act as nanoscopic pressure cells for diamond formation.

  6. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricant Diamond Films and Coatings. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films and coatings toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. Friction mechanisms and solid lubrication mechanisms of CVD diamond are stated. Effects of an amorphous hydrogenated carbon on CVD diamond, an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by carbon and nitrogen ion implantation, and a materials combination of cubic boron nitride and CVD diamond on the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of CVD diamond in ultrahigh vacuum are described. How surface modification and the selected materials couple improved the tribological functionality of coatings, giving low coefficient of friction and good wear resistance, is explained.

  7. Thermal Behaviour of W+C Ion Implanted Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Urkac, E. Sokullu; Oztarhan, A.; Tihminlioglu, F.; Ila, D.; Chhay, B.; Muntele, C.; Budak, S.; Oks, E.; Nikolaev, A.

    2009-03-10

    The aim of this work was to examine thermal behavior of the surface modified Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly Ethylene (UHMWPE ) in order to understand the effect of ion implantation on the properties of this polymer which is widely used especially for biomedical applications. UHMWPE samples were Tungsten and Carbon (W+C) hybrid ion implanted by using Metal Vapour Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implantation technique with a fluence of 10 17 ions/cm2 and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Untreated and surface-treated samples were investigated by Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) Analysis, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectrometry, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). This study has shown that ion implantation represents a powerful tool on modifying thermal properties of UHMWPE surfaces. This combination of properties can make implanted UHMWPE a preferred material for biomedical applications.

  8. Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

    2004-07-15

    To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

  9. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

    1998-12-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

  10. Carbonate Mineral Assemblages as Inclusions in Yakutian Diamonds: TEM Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A. M.; Wirth, R.; Sobolev, N. V.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate mineral inclusions are quite rare in diamonds from the upper mantle, but are evidence for a carbonate abundance in the mantle. It is believed that such carbonatitic inclusions originated from high-density fluids (HDFs) that were enclosed in diamond during its growth. Using TEM and EPMA, several kinds of carbonate inclusions have been identified in Yakutian diamonds : aragonite, dolomite, magnesite, Ba-, Sr-, and Fe-rich carbonates. Most of them are represented by multi-phase inclusions of various chemically distinct carbonates, rich in Ca, Mg, and K and associated with minor amounts of silicate, oxide, saline, and volatile phases. Volatiles, leaving some porosity, played a significant role in the diamond growth. A single crystal of aragonite (60μm) is herein reported for the first time. This inclusion is located in the center of a diamond from the Komsomolskaya pipe. Careful CL imaging reveals the total absence of cracks around the aragonite inclusion - i.e., closed system. This inclusion has been identified by X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. At temperatures above 1000 0C, aragonite is only stable at high pressures of 5-6 GPa. Inside this aragonite, we observed nanocrystalline inclusions of titanite, Ni-rich sulfide, magnetite, water-bearing Mg-silicate, and fluid bubbles. Dolomite is common in carbonate multi-phase inclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya, Yubileinaya, and Udachnaya kimberlite pipes. Alluvial diamonds of the northeastern Siberian Platform are divided into two groups based on the composition of HDFs: 1) Mg-rich multi-phase inclusions (60% magnesite + dolomite + Fe-spinel + Ti-silicate + fluid bubbles); and 2) Ca-rich multi-phase inclusions (Ca,Ba-, Ca,Sr-, Ca,Fe-carbonates + Ti-silicate + Ba-apatite + fluid bubbles). High-density fluids also contain K. Volatiles in the fluid bubbles are represented by water, Cl, F, S, CO2, CH4, and heavy hydrocarbons. Origin of the second group of HDFs may be related to the non

  11. Vibrational Raman characterization of hard carbon and diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Ager, J.W. III; Veirs, D.K.; Cho, Namhee; Rosenblatt, G.M. ); Marchon, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous hard carbon'' and microcrystalline diamond films are being investigated and characterized using high-sensitivity and spatial-profiling Raman spectroscopy. The hard carbon'' films have broad Raman spectra with no diamond line while higher quality diamond films show only a single sharp diamond line. Features in the Raman spectra of the amorphous hard carbon'' films correlate with the rates of specific types of wear. Changes in the relative intensity of the Raman band near 1570 cm{sup {minus}1} (G-band) compared to the band near 1360 cm{sup {minus}1} (D-band) are related to the rate of abrasive wear. Shifts in the frequency of the G-band are related to the rate of tribochemical wear. The results are consistent with a structural model of amorphous carbon films in which small (<20{Angstrom}) graphitic microcrystals comprised of sp{sup 2} bonded domains are cross-linked by sp{sup 3} carbon atoms. Profiles of Raman frequency and linewidth obtained from spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy across CVD-grown diamond thin films show that the Raman frequency and position are correlated in these films and that both change in regions of poorer film quality. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Aluminum ion implantation under backfilling oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausner, R. M.; Baumann, H.; Bethge, K.

    1996-06-01

    High dose ion implantation ( F ≥ 2 × 10 18 ions/cm 2) of 40 keV Al ions into stainless steel (AISI 321) under increased partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen compounds ( P ≥ 1 × 10 -8 hPa O 2, CO 2, N 2O) leads to the formation of a homogenous Al film on the sample surface due to a reduced self-sputtering yield of Al. The depth distribution of the implanted aluminum and the thickness of the Al film grown up on the sample were measured using the resonant nuclear reaction 27Al(p, γ) 28Si at 992 keV and by the (α, α) elastic backscattering at 3.05 MeV. The concentrations of the low- Z impurity oxygen and carbon were determined with the extremely strong resonances of the (α, α) elastic scattering under backward angles at 7.6 MeV for 16O and at 5.75 MeV for 12C. Furthermore the properties of the formed Al film were investigated by SEM, surface profile and microhardness measurements. The self-sputtering yield of Al was measured under normal vacuum conditions and under increased O 2 partial pressure, and the results were compared with the data obtained from calculations using the computer code T-DYN.

  13. Improving Sustainability of Ion Implant Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor fabs have long been pressured to manage capital costs, reduce energy consumption and increasingly improve efforts to recycle and recover resources. Ion implant tools have been high-profile offenders on all three fronts. They draw such large volumes of air for heat dissipation and risk reduction that historically, they are the largest consumer of cleanroom air of any process tool—and develop energy usage and resource profiles to match. This paper presents a documented approach to reduce their energy consumption and dramatically downsize on-site facilities support for cleanroom air manufacture and abatement. The combination produces significant capital expenditure savings. The case entails applying SAGS Type 1 (sub-atmospheric gas systems) toxic gas packaging to enable engineering adaptations that deliver the energy savings and cost benefits without any reduction in environmental health and safety. The paper also summarizes benefits as they relate to reducing a fabs carbon emission footprint (and longer range advantages relative to potential cap and trade programs) with existing technology.

  14. Diamond and diamond-like carbon films for advanced electronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, M.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Sullivan, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    Aim of this laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project was to develop diamond and/or diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for electronic applications. Quality of diamond and DLC films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is not adequate for electronic applications. Nucleation of diamond grains during growth typically results in coarse films that must be very thick in order to be physically continuous. DLC films grown by CVD are heavily hydrogenated and are stable to temperatures {le} 400{degrees}C. However, diamond and DLC`s exceptional electronic properties make them candidates for integration into a variety of microelectronic structures. This work studied new techniques for the growth of both materials. Template layers have been developed for the growth of CVD diamond films resulting in a significantly higher nucleation density on unscratched or unprepared Si surfaces. Hydrogen-free DLC with temperature stability {le} 800{degrees}C has been developed using energetic growth methods such as high-energy pulsed-laser deposition. Applications with the largest system impact include electron-emitting materials for flat-panel displays, dielectrics for interconnects, diffusion barriers, encapsulants, and nonvolatile memories, and tribological coatings that reduce wear and friction in integrated micro-electro-mechanical devices.

  15. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  16. Capacitively coupled RF diamond-like-carbon reactor

    DOEpatents

    Devlin, David James; Coates, Don Mayo; Archuleta, Thomas Arthur; Barbero, Robert Steven

    2000-01-01

    A process of coating a non-conductive fiber with diamond-like carbon, including passing a non-conductive fiber between a pair of parallel metal grids within a reaction chamber, introducing a hydrocarbon gas into the reaction chamber, forming a plasma within the reaction chamber for a sufficient period of time whereby diamond-like carbon is formed upon the non-conductive fiber, is provided together with a reactor chamber for deposition of diamond-like carbon upon a non-conductive fiber, including a vacuum chamber, a cathode assembly including a pair of electrically isolated opposingly parallel metal grids spaced apart at a distance of less than about 1 centimeter, an anode, a means of introducing a hydrocarbon gas into said vacuum chamber, and a means of generating a plasma within said vacuum chamber.

  17. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  18. A new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to new-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Li, J L; Liu, P; Yang, G W

    2014-12-21

    The investigation of carbon allotropes such as graphite, diamond, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon onions and mechanisms that underlie their mutual phase transformation is a long-standing problem of great fundamental importance. New diamond (n-diamond) is a novel metastable phase of carbon with a face-centered cubic structure; it is called "new diamond" because many reflections in its electron diffraction pattern are similar to those of diamond. However, producing n-diamond from raw carbon materials has so far been challenging due to n-diamond's higher formation energy than that of diamond. Here, we, for the first time, demonstrate a new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to n-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion in the unique process of laser ablation in water, and establish that water plays a crucial role in the formation of n-diamond. When a laser irradiates colloidal suspensions of nanodiamonds at ambient pressure and room temperature, nanodiamonds are first transformed into carbon onions serving as an intermediate phase, and sequentially carbon onions are transformed into n-diamonds driven by the laser-induced high temperature and high pressure from the carbon onion as a nanoscaled temperature and pressure cell upon the process of laser irradiation in a liquid. This phase transformation not only provides new insight into the physical mechanism involved, but also offers one suitable opportunity for breaking controllable pathways between n-diamond and carbon allotropes such as diamond and carbon onions.

  19. Panel 2 - properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Clausing, R.E.; Ajayi, O.O.; Liu, Y.Y.; Purohit, A.; Bartelt, P.F.; Baughman, R.H.; Bhushan, B.; Cooper, C.V.; Dugger, M.T.; Freedman, A.; Larsen-Basse, J.; McGuire, N.R.; Messier, R.F.; Noble, G.L.; Ostrowki, M.H.; Sartwell, B.D.; Wei, R.

    1993-01-01

    This panel attempted to identify and prioritize research and development needs in determining the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films (D/DLCF). Three specific goals were established. They were: (1) To identify problem areas which produce concern and require a better knowledge of D/DLCF properties. (2) To identify and prioritize key properties of D/DLCF to promote transportation applications. (3) To identify needs for improvement in properties-measurement methods. Each of these goals is addressed subsequently.

  20. Diamond-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Field Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Stevan; Withers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Field-emission cathodes containing arrays of carbon nanotubes coated with diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) are undergoing development. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been shown to perform well as electron field emitters. The idea underlying the present development is that by coating carbon nanotubes with wideband- gap materials like diamond or DLC, one could reduce effective work functions, thereby reducing threshold electric-field levels for field emission of electrons and, hence, improving cathode performance. To demonstrate feasibility, experimental cathodes were fabricated by (1) covering metal bases with carbon nanotubes bound to the bases by an electrically conductive binder and (2) coating the nanotubes, variously, with diamond or DLC by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In tests, the threshold electric-field levels for emission of electrons were reduced by as much as 40 percent, relative to those of uncoated- nanotube cathodes. Coating with diamond or DLC could also make field emission-cathodes operate more stably by helping to prevent evaporation of carbon from nanotubes in the event of overheating of the cathodes. Cathodes of this type are expected to be useful principally as electron sources for cathode-ray tubes and flat-panel displays.

  1. Mechanism for diamond nucleation and growth on single crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, T. P.; Xiong, Fulin; Chang, R. P. H.; White, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond crystals on single-crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon ions is studied. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used for diamond growth. The single-crystal copper substrates were implanted either at room or elevated temperature with carbon ions prior to diamond nucleation. This procedure leads to the formation of a graphite film on the copper surface which greatly enhances diamond crystallite nucleation. A simple lattice model is constructed for diamond growth on graphite as 111 line (diamond) parallel to 0001 line (graphite) and 110 line (diamond) parallel to 1 1 -2 0 (graphite).

  2. Application of ion implantation to electrochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vallet, C.E.; White, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The application of ion implantation to electrochemical studies is illustrated with a study of electrocatalysis of the chlorine evolution reaction at RuO{sub 2}, IrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide anodes in chloride solutions. Electrode/solution interfaces of well defined catalyst composition are generated in a reproducible manner by implantation of Ru (or Ir) into Ti followed by in situ oxidation of the near surface titanium alloys. Ion implantation enables the tailoring on an atomic scale of an electrochemical interface. Analysis by Rutherford backscattering adds the ability of quantitative mechanistic study in terms of actual ion concentration at the interface. In addition, ion implantation, as a processing technique, creates new materials with improved properties which may have future practical use in catalytic materials.

  3. HRTEM study of Popigai impact diamond: heterogeneous diamond nanostructures in native amorphous carbon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Viktoria K.; Shumilova, Tatyana; Masaitis, Victor

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied for the detailed nanostructural investigation of Popigai impact diamonds with the aim of revealing the nature of the amorphous carbon of the matrix. The successful application of two complementary specimen preparation methods, focused ion beam (FIB) milling and mechanical cleavage, allowed direct imaging of nanotwinned nanodiamond crystals embedded in a native amorphous carbon matrix for the first time. Based on its stability under the electron beam, native amorphous carbon can be easily distinguished from the amorphous carbon layer produced by FIB milling during specimen preparation. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the native amorphous carbon revealed the dominance of sp 2-bonded carbon and the presence of a small amount of oxygen. The heterogeneous size distribution and twin density of the nanodiamond crystals and the structural properties of the native amorphous carbon are presumably related to non-graphitic (organic) carbon precursor material.

  4. HRTEM study of Popigai impact diamond: heterogeneous diamond nanostructures in native amorphous carbon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Viktoria K.; Shumilova, Tatyana; Masaitis, Victor

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied for the detailed nanostructural investigation of Popigai impact diamonds with the aim of revealing the nature of the amorphous carbon of the matrix. The successful application of two complementary specimen preparation methods, focused ion beam (FIB) milling and mechanical cleavage, allowed direct imaging of nanotwinned nanodiamond crystals embedded in a native amorphous carbon matrix for the first time. Based on its stability under the electron beam, native amorphous carbon can be easily distinguished from the amorphous carbon layer produced by FIB milling during specimen preparation. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the native amorphous carbon revealed the dominance of sp 2-bonded carbon and the presence of a small amount of oxygen. The heterogeneous size distribution and twin density of the nanodiamond crystals and the structural properties of the native amorphous carbon are presumably related to non-graphitic (organic) carbon precursor material.

  5. Classroom Demonstration: Combustion of Diamond to Carbon Dioxide Followed by Reduction to Graphite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyauchi, Takuya; Kamata, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    An educational demonstration shows the combustion of carbon to carbon dioxide and then the reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon. A melee diamond is the source of the carbon and the reaction is carried out in a closed flask. The demonstration helps students to realize that diamonds are made of carbon and that atoms do not change or vanish in…

  6. Adherent diamond film deposited on Cu substrate by carbon transport from nanodiamond buried under Pt interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuezhang; Wei, Qiuping; Yu, Zhiming; Yang, Taiming; Zhai, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Diamond film deposited on Cu suffered from poor adhesion mainly due to the large mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients and the lack of affinity between carbon and Cu. Enhancing diamond nucleation by carbon transport from buried nanodiamond through a Pt ultrathin interlayer, adherent diamond film was then deposited on Cu substrate without distinctly metallic interlayer. This novel nucleation mechanism increased diamond nucleation density to 1011 cm-2, and developed diamond film with a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Diamond film was characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscope, respectively. The composition of diamond film/Cu substrate interface was examined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The adhesion of diamond film was evaluated by indentation test. Those results show that a Pt ultrathin interlayer provides stronger chemically bonded interfaces and improve film adhesion.

  7. Apparatus for producing diamond-like carbon flakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A vacuum arc from a spot at the face of a graphite cathode to a graphite anode produces a beam of carbon ions and atoms. A carbon coating from this beam is deposited on an ion beam sputtered target to produce diamond-like carbon flakes. A graphite tube encloses the cathode, and electrical isolation is provided by an insulating sleeve. The tube forces the vacuum arc spot to be confined to the surface on the outermost end of the cathode. Without the tube the arc spot will wander to the side of the cathode. This spot movement results in low rates of carbon deposition, and the properties of the deposited flakes are more graphite-like than diamond-like.

  8. Optimization of the ion implantation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maczka, D.; Latuszynski, A.; Kuduk, R.; Partyka, J.

    This work is devoted to the optimization of the ion implantation process in the implanter Unimas of the Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin. The results obtained during several years of operation allow us to determine the optimal work parameters of the device [1-3].

  9. Onion-like carbon from ultra-disperse diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir L.; Chuvilin, Andrey L.; Butenko, Yuri V.; Mal'kov, Igor Yu.; Titov, Vladimir M.

    1994-05-01

    A new material containing macroscopic quantities of onion-like carbon (OLC) particles is produced by heat treatment of ultra-disperse diamond (UDD) powder (2-6 nm). Annealing products (characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy) are presented by; (a) quasi-spherical particles with closed concentric graphite shells, (b) polyhedron particles with closed shells, (c) elongated particles with linked external graphite-like layers and closed quasi-spherical internal shells. The intermediates of UDD transformation have been registered. The structural transformation of UDD begins from the surface of the diamond particles towards a crystal bulk. The transformation rate of (111) diamond planes to graphite-like sheets is higher than that of other planes.

  10. Amorphous diamond: A high-pressure superhard carbon allotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu; Zhang, Li; Mao, Ho Kwang; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Baldini, Maria; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Wendy L.

    2011-01-01

    Compressing glassy carbon above 40 GPa, we have observed a new carbon allotrope with a fully sp³-bonded amorphous structure and diamondlike strength. Synchrotron x-ray Raman spectroscopy revealed a continuous pressure-induced sp²-to-sp³ bonding change, while x-ray diffraction confirmed the perseverance of noncrystallinity. The transition was reversible upon releasing pressure. Used as an indenter, the glassy carbon ball demonstrated exceptional strength by reaching 130 GPa with a confining pressure of 60 GPa. Such an extremely large stress difference of >70 GPa has never been observed in any material besides diamond, indicating the high hardness of this high-pressure carbon allotrope.

  11. Local Adhesion of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Coated on Substrates in a Trench-shaped Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Masami; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Osawa, Hodaka; Minaki, Kazushi; Kitajima, Koichi; Yokota, Katsuhiro

    A negative potential is applied to an object in plasma consisting of methane or acetylene in order to coat a thin solid film, such as DLC (Diamond-like Carbon), on a material surface. The method is called Plasma-based Ion Implantation (PBII). Since mechanical objects commonly possess complex shapes, it may be difficult to coat DLC on them in a uniform manner. This non-uniformity in thickness has been studied in many papers, and it has been reported that it is improved by applying a pulse potential repeatedly to the coated material. A scratch test defined the local adhesion of DLC coated by PBII attached at several places to SUS304 thin plates in a trench-shaped cathode. It has been found that the adhesion increases in strength in the following order: the sides of the plates, the bottom of the groove in a trench, and the top of a trench. In order to interpret these results, the hardness of films is measured by a nano-indenter, and the Raman spectra are examined.

  12. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently. PMID:26955791

  13. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently.

  14. Comparative surface and nano-tribological characteristics of nanocomposite diamond-like carbon thin films doped by silver

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han-Shen; Endrino, Jose L.; Anders, Andre

    2008-07-10

    In this study we have deposited silver-containing hydrogenated and hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) nanocomposite thin films by plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition methods. The surface and nano-tribological characteristics were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano-scratching experiments. The silver doping was found to have no measurable effect on sp2-sp3 hybridization of the hydrogenated DLC matrix and only a slight effect on the hydrogen-free DLC matrix. The surface topography was analyzed by surface imaging. High- and low-order roughness determined by AFM characterization was correlated to the DLC growth mechanism and revealed the smoothing effect of silver. The nano-tribological characteristics were explained in terms of friction mechanisms and mechanical properties in correlation to the surface characteristics. It was discovered that the adhesion friction was the dominant friction mechanism; the adhesion force between the scratching tip and DLC surface was decreased by hydrogenation and increased by silver doping.

  15. Surface microanalytical studies of nitrogen ion-implanted steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Charles G.; Meeker, G. P.; Baumann, Scott M.; Norberg, James C.; Legg, Keith O.

    1985-03-01

    Five types of industrial steels, 1018, 52100, M-2, 440C, and 304 were ion implanted with nitrogen and subjected to surface microanalysis by three independent surface techniques: AES, RBS, and SIMS. The results provided understanding for earlier observations of the properties of various types of steel after nitrogen implantation. The steels that retained the most nitrogen and that have been reported to benefit the most in improved tribological properties from ion implantation were ferritic carbon and austenitic stainless steels, such as soft 1018 and 304, respectively. Heat-treated martensitic carbon steels such as 52100 and M-2 tool steel were found to retain the least nitrogen, and they have been reported to benefit less from nitrogen implantation; however, the interaction of transition metal carbides in M-2 with nitrogen has not been clarified. The data showed that 440C steel retained as much nitrogen as 1018 and 304, but treatment benefits may be limited to improvements in properties related to toughness and impact resistance.

  16. Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shigeki Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki

    2014-02-15

    Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

  17. Stretchable diamond-like carbon microstructures for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Ryan; Narayan, Roger J.; Aggarwal, Ravi; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2009-09-01

    Designing, fabricating, and evaluating stretchable electronics is a growing area of materials research. Electronic devices have traditionally been fabricated using rigid, inorganic substrates (e.g., silicon) with metallic components and interconnections. Conventional electronic devices may face limitations when placed in environments that are dominated by stretchable or three-dimensional structures, including those within the human body. This paper describes the use of pulsed laser deposition to create diamond-like carbon microstructures on polydimethylsiloxane. The viability of human epidermal keratinocyte cells on polydimethylsiloxane surfaces coated with arrays of diamond-like carbon islands was similar to that on unmodified polydimethylsiloxane surfaces, which are commonly used in medical devices. It is anticipated that stretchable electronic devices may be incorporated within novel medical devices and prostheses that interface with stretchable or three-dimensional structures in the human body.

  18. Method for producing fluorinated diamond-like carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Hakovirta, Marko J.; Nastasi, Michael A.; Lee, Deok-Hyung; He, Xiao-Ming

    2003-06-03

    Fluorinated, diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) films are produced by a pulsed, glow-discharge plasma immersion ion processing procedure. The pulsed, glow-discharge plasma was generated at a pressure of 1 Pa from an acetylene (C.sub.2 H.sub.2) and hexafluoroethane (C.sub.2 F.sub.6) gas mixture, and the fluorinated, diamond-like carbon films were deposited on silicon <100>substrates. The film hardness and wear resistance were found to be strongly dependent on the fluorine content incorporated into the coatings. The hardness of the F-DLC films was found to decrease considerably when the fluorine content in the coatings reached about 20%. The contact angle of water on the F-DLC coatings was found to increase with increasing film fluorine content and to saturate at a level characteristic of polytetrafluoroethylene.

  19. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-09-24

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

  20. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., George W.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  1. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

  2. Characteristics of deuterated diamond-like carbon as neutron mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Y.; Hino, M.; Horie, T.; Tasaki, S.; Yoshida, K.; Kanno, I.; Nakayama, M.

    2004-08-01

    The characteristics of deuterated diamond-like carbon (D-DLC) as a neutron mirror was evaluated by ERDA, RBS and neutron reflectivity measurements. The number density of hydrogen in unit area is 1.4-3.2×10 16 H/cm 2 in D-DLC. This is same with the typical numbers of normal neutron mirrors. It has a good neutron reflectivity with high quality mirror surface and high optical potential.

  3. Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricating Surfaces of Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    In humid air and dry nitrogen, as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films and polished, coarse-grain diamond films have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m). In an ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa), however, they have high steady-state coefficients of friction (greater than 0.6) and high wear rates (greater than or equal to 10(exp -4) mm(exp 3)/N-m). Therefore, the use of as-deposited, fine-grain and polished, coarse-grain diamond films as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings must be limited to normal air or gaseous environments such as dry nitrogen. On the other hand, carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films and nitrogen-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m) in all three environments. These films can be effectively used as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in an ultrahigh vacuum as well as in normal air and dry nitrogen.

  4. A new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to new-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, J.; Li, J. L.; Liu, P.; Yang, G. W.

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of carbon allotropes such as graphite, diamond, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon onions and mechanisms that underlie their mutual phase transformation is a long-standing problem of great fundamental importance. New diamond (n-diamond) is a novel metastable phase of carbon with a face-centered cubic structure; it is called ``new diamond'' because many reflections in its electron diffraction pattern are similar to those of diamond. However, producing n-diamond from raw carbon materials has so far been challenging due to n-diamond's higher formation energy than that of diamond. Here, we, for the first time, demonstrate a new phase transformation path from nanodiamond to n-diamond via an intermediate carbon onion in the unique process of laser ablation in water, and establish that water plays a crucial role in the formation of n-diamond. When a laser irradiates colloidal suspensions of nanodiamonds at ambient pressure and room temperature, nanodiamonds are first transformed into carbon onions serving as an intermediate phase, and sequentially carbon onions are transformed into n-diamonds driven by the laser-induced high temperature and high pressure from the carbon onion as a nanoscaled temperature and pressure cell upon the process of laser irradiation in a liquid. This phase transformation not only provides new insight into the physical mechanism involved, but also offers one suitable opportunity for breaking controllable pathways between n-diamond and carbon allotropes such as diamond and carbon onions.The investigation of carbon allotropes such as graphite, diamond, fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon onions and mechanisms that underlie their mutual phase transformation is a long-standing problem of great fundamental importance. New diamond (n-diamond) is a novel metastable phase of carbon with a face-centered cubic structure; it is called ``new diamond'' because many reflections in its electron diffraction pattern are similar to those of diamond

  5. Diamond-like carbon protective coatings for optical windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1989-09-01

    Two of the materials most often used as optical windows due to their high transmittance at infrared wavelengths are zinc selenide (ZnSe) and zinc sulfide (ZnS). However, these materials are soft and often degrade when subjected to a particle-impacting environment. Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films have the potential to protect optical windows, such as ZnSe and ZnS, from rain and particle erosion as well as chemical attack. Diamondlike carbon films were deposited on ZnSe and ZnS, and have been evaluated as protective coatings for the optical windows exposed to particle and rain erosion. The DLC films were deposited on the windows using three different ion beam methods. One method was sputter deposition, while the other two methods used a 30 cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon/argon gas to directly deposit the DLC films. In an attempt to improve the adherence of the DLC films on ZnSe and ZnS, techniques such as ion beam cleaning, ion implantation using helium and neon ions, and thin ion beam sputter deposited intermediate coatings were employed prior to deposition of the film and were also evaluated. The protection the DLC films afforded the windows was quantitatively determined by exposing the surfaces to 27-μm-diam A1203 particles in a microsandblaster. A Perkin-Elmer IR spectrophotometer was then utilized to indicated the change in specular transmittance between 2.5 and 50 μm as a result of the erosion. The DLC coated windows were also subjected to water droplets at 400 mph for exposure times up to 15 minutes. These samples were qualitatively evaluated by optically viewing the surfaces. The DLC films were also evaluated for adherence, intrinsic stress, and infrared transmittance.

  6. Carbon isotope fractionation during experimental crystallisation of diamond from carbonate fluid at mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutsky, Vadim; Borzdov, Yuri; Palyanov, Yuri; Sokol, Alexander; Izokh, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We report first results of a systematic study of carbon isotope fractionation in a carbonate fluid system under mantle PT conditions. The system models a diamond-forming alkaline carbonate fluid using pure sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4) as the starting material, which decomposes to carbonate, CO2 and elementary carbon (graphite and diamond) involving a single source of carbon following the reaction 2Na2C2O4 → 2Na2CO3 + CO2 + C. Near-liquidus behaviour of carbonate was observed at 1300 °C and 6.3 GPa. The experimentally determined isotope fractionation between the components of the system in the temperature range from 1300 to 1700 °C at 6.3 and 7.5 GPa fit the theoretical expectations well. Carbon isotope fractionation associated with diamond crystallisation from the carbonate fluid at 7.5 GPa decreases with an increase in temperature from 2.7 to 1.6 ‰. This trend corresponds to the function ΔCarbonate fluid-Diamond = 7.38 × 106 T-2.

  7. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Seleznev, D. N.; Bugaev, A. S.; Dugin, S.; Oks, E. M.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Alexeyenko, O.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  8. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  9. Environmental effects on friction and wear of diamond and diamondlike carbon coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural diamond flat, diamond film, and low and high density diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in contact with pin specimens of natural diamond and silicon nitride (Si3N4) both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. The results indicated that for natural diamond pin contacts the diamond films and the natural diamond flat were not susceptible to moisture but that moisture could increase both the coefficient of friction and the wear factors of the DLC films. The coefficients of friction and wear factors of the diamond films were generally similar to those of the natural diamond flat both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. In dry nitrogen the coefficients of friction of the high density DLC films in contact with pin specimens of both diamond and Si3N4 were generally low (about 0.02) and similar to those of the natural diamond flat and the diamond films. The wear factors of the materials in contact with both natural diamond and Si3N4 were generally in the ascending order of natural diamond flat, diamond film, high density DLC film, and low density DLC film. The moisture in the environment increased the coefficients of friction for Si3N4 pins in contact with all the materials. This increase in friction is due to the silicon oxide film produced on the surface of Si3N4 pins in humid air.

  10. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  11. Ion implanted GaAs microwave FET's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, S. S.; Blockley, E. G.; Dawsey, J. R.; Foreman, B. J.; Woodward, J.; Ball, G.; Beard, S. J.; Gaskell, J. M.; Allenson, M. B.

    1988-06-01

    The combination of ion implantation and photolithographic patterning techniques was applied to the fabrication of GaAs microwave FETs to provide a large number of devices having consistently predictable dc and high frequency characteristics. To validate the accuracy and repeatability of the high frequency device parameters, an X-band microwave circuit was designed and realized. The performance of this circuit, a buffered amplifier, is very close to the design specification. The availability of a large number of reproducible, well-characterized transistors enabled work to commence on the development of a large signal model for FETs. Work in this area is also described.

  12. Ion sources for use in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Nicholas R.

    1989-02-01

    This paper reviews high current ion sources suitable for commercial use. Although the production of high currents of a variety of ions is a vital consideration, this paper focuses on other aspects of ion source performance. The modern ion implanter is a major item of expensive capital equipment, with the ion source being its least reliable component. So, the most critical issues today are reliability and lifetime, as well as safety, flexibility, and ease of service. The Freeman ion source has clearly dominated the field, yet a number of alternative sources have found commercial acceptance, including microwave sources. Factors affecting the ultimate usefulness of various sources in different implantation applications are discussed.

  13. Carbonate-silicate composition of diamond-forming media of fibrous diamonds from the Snap Lake area (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Pokhilenko, N. P.; Griffin, W. L.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents new data on the compositions of microinclusions in fibrous diamonds from the Snap Lake area in the eastern part of the Slave Craton (Canada). The compositional trends of diamond microinclusions are consistent with those of diamond-forming media ranging continuously between a highly carbonatitic endmember and a highly silicic endmember. The microinclusions exhibit general enrichment of most incompatible elements, which is probably indicative of their crystallization during partial melting of mantle peridotites and eclogites. Our results also suggest that the diamond analyzed in this study may have formed as a result of interaction between carbonate-silicate melts and peridotitic wall-rocks at the base of a thick lithospheric mantle at depths below 300 km. The trace element distributions in the studied diamond microinclusions show a general similarity to those previously found in the parental kimberlites and carbonatites. These data suggest that diamonds may have crystallized either directly from a kimberlitic/carbonatitic melt or from a proto-kimberlitic fluid/melt, which was derived from a source also common to kimberlites. This is supported by differences in the major element compositions of diamond-forming fluids/melts and kimberlites.

  14. Method and apparatus for making diamond-like carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pern, Fu-Jann; Touryan, Kenell J.; Panosyan, Zhozef Retevos; Gippius, Aleksey Alekseyevich

    2008-12-02

    Ion-assisted plasma enhanced deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on the surface of photovoltaic solar cells is accomplished with a method and apparatus for controlling ion energy. The quality of DLC layers is fine-tuned by a properly biased system of special electrodes and by exact control of the feed gas mixture compositions. Uniform (with degree of non-uniformity of optical parameters less than 5%) large area (more than 110 cm.sup.2) DLC films with optical parameters varied within the given range and with stability against harmful effects of the environment are achieved.

  15. Ion implantations of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojak, S.; Simeg Veternikova, J.; Slugen, V.; Petriska, M.; Stacho, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is focused on a study of radiation damage and thermal stability of high chromium oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA 956 (20% Cr), which belongs to the most perspective structural materials for the newest generation of nuclear reactors - Generation IV. The radiation damage was simulated by the implantation of hydrogen ions up to the depth of about 5 μm, which was performed at a linear accelerator owned by Slovak University of Technology. The ODS steel MA 956 was available for study in as-received state after different thermal treatments as well as in ions implanted state. Energy of the hydrogen ions chosen for the implantation was 800 keV and the implantation fluence of 6.24 × 1017 ions/cm2. The investigated specimens were measured by non-destructive technique Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy in order to study the defect behavior after different thermal treatments in the as-received state and after the hydrogen ions implantation. Although, different resistance to defect production was observed in individual specimens of MA 956 during the irradiation, all implanted specimens contain larger defects than the ones in as-received state.

  16. PLEPS study of ions implanted RAFM steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojak, S.; Slugeň, V.; Egger, W.; Ravelli, L.; Petriska, M.; Veterníková, J.; Stacho, M.; Sabelová, V.

    2014-04-01

    Current nuclear power plants (NPP) require radiation, heat and mechanical resistance of their structural materials with the ability to stay operational during NPP planned lifetime. Radiation damage much higher, than in the current NPP, is expected in new generations of nuclear power plants, such as Generation IV and fusion reactors. Investigation of perspective structural materials for new generations of nuclear power plants is among others focused on study of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. These steels have good characteristics as reduced activation, good resistance to volume swelling, good radiation, and heat resistance. Our experiments were focused on the study of microstructural changes of binary Fe-Cr alloys with different chromium content after irradiation, experimentally simulated by ion implantations. Fe-Cr alloys were examined, by Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) at FRM II reactor in Garching (Munich), after helium ion implantations at the dose of 0.1 C/cm2. The investigation was focused on the chromium effect and the radiation defects resistivity. In particular, the vacancy type defects (monovacancies, vacancy clusters) have been studied. Based on our previous results achieved by conventional lifetime technique, the decrease of the defects size with increasing content of chromium is expected also for PLEPS measurements.

  17. Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Yonhua; Yeh, Shoupu; Fang, Wei Cheng; Chu, Yuehchieh

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) on oxidized silicon which is pre-seeded with diamond nanoparticles. MPECVD of N-UNCD on nanodiamond seeds produces a base layer, from which carbon structures nucleate and grow perpendicularly to form standing carbon platelets. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering measurements reveal that these carbon platelets are comprised of ultrananocrystalline diamond embedded in multilayer-graphene-like carbon structures. The hybrid carbon films are of low electrical resistivity. UNCD grains in the N-UNCD base layer and the hybrid carbon platelets serve as high-density diamond nuclei for the deposition of an electrically insulating UNCD film on it. Biocompatible carbon-based heaters made of low-resistivity hybrid carbon heaters encapsulated by insulating UNCD for possible electrosurgical applications have been demonstrated. PMID:24681781

  18. Diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications: Tribological behaviors of vacuum arc diamond-like carbon-coated titanium alloy against medical-grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianzong

    An extensive and detailed investigation of tribological behaviors of vacuum arc carbon coated Ti6Al4V against medical grade ultra high molecular weight polyethylene were conducted in this work in order to investigate the potential use of diamond-like carbon coatings for orthopedic applications. Further, the gas plasma sterilization and surface modification technique were evaluated as an alternative to the currently used gamma-radiation technique which has previously shown degradation effects on the mechanical properties of the UHMWPE. In addition, an emerging polymer surface modification technique using high-energy ion-implantation is explored to modify the surface of the UHMWPE for improved wear performance. The experiments were performed using a standard pin-on-disk wear tester under both dry and distilled water lubricated condition. The evolution of friction and wear processes are interpreted in the context of in situ recorded coefficient of friction and microscopic images of worn surfaces. Sliding wear tests demonstrated the existence of two distinct friction and wear regimes which comprise physically different dominant mechanisms: an adhesive and abrasive mechanism activated early in the run-in stage, followed by fatigue processes which developed later microscopically in the (quasi) steady-state sliding stage. The effects of surface roughness, distilled water lubricant, coating structure, polymer sterilization and surface modification on the tribological behaviors are presented and discussed in light of these results. Explanations based on theories of sliding contact stress fields, temperature profiles, as well as lubrication and coating fracture mechanics are presented to discuss and support the experimental results. It is revealed that, largely depending on material structures and surface roughness of both articulating components, significantly improved friction and wear performance can be achieved by optimal design of their process

  19. Investigating the functionality of diamond-like carbon films on an artificial heart diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Ohgoe, Yasuharu; Takada, Satoshi; Hirakuri, Kenji K; Tsuchimoto, Katsuya; Homma, Akihiko; Miyamatsu, Toshinobu; Saitou, Tomoyuki; Friedbacher, Gernot; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the authors used diamond-like carbon film to coat the ellipsoidal diaphragm (polyurethane elastomer) of artificial hearts. The purpose of such coatings is to prevent the penetration of hydraulic silicone oil and blood through the diaphragm. To attach diamond-like carbon film uniformly on the diaphragm, the authors developed a special electrode. In estimating the uniformity of the diamond-like carbon film, the thickness was measured using a scanning electron microscope, and the characteristics of the diamond-like carbon film was investigated using infrared spectroscopy, Ar-laser Raman spectrophotometer, and x-ray photoelectron spectrometer. Also, to estimate the penetration of silicone oil through the diaphragm, in vitro testing was operated by alternating the pressure of silicone oil for 20 days. The authors were able to successfully attach uniform deposition of diamond-like carbon film on the ellipsoidal diaphragm. In this in vitro test, diamond-like carbon film was proven to have good stability. The amount of silicone oil penetration was improved by one-third using the diamond-like carbon film coating compared with an uncoated diaphragm. It is expected that through the use of the diamond-like carbon film, the dynamic compatibility of an artificial heart diaphragm will increase.

  20. Characterization of single-crystal diamond grown from the vapor phase on substrates of natural diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Altukhov, A. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Dukhnovsky, M. P.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Ziablyuk, K. N.; Mitenkin, A. V.; Muchnikov, A. B. Radishev, D. B.; Ratnikova, A. K.; Fedorov, Yu. Yu.

    2011-03-15

    The results of studies of single-crystal diamond layers with orientation (100) grown on substrates of IIa-type natural diamond by chemical-vapor deposition and of semiconductor diamond obtained subsequently by doping by implantation of boron ions are reported. Optimal conditions of postimplantation annealing of diamond that provide the hole mobility of 1150 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} (the highest mobility obtained so far for semiconductor diamond after ion implantation) are given.

  1. Low Energy Sputter Yields for Diamond, Carbon-Carbon Composite, and Molybdenum Subject to Xenon Ion Nombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandino, J.; Goodwin, D.; Garner, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter yields have been measured for polycrystalline diamond, single crystal diamond, a carbon-carbon composite, and molybdenum subject to bombardment with xenon. The tests were performed using a 3 cm Kaufman ion source to produce incident ions with energy in the range of 150 - 750 eV and profilometry based technique to measure the amount of sputtered material.

  2. Diamond and other forms of elemental carbon in Saturn’s deep atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Baines, K. H.

    2013-10-01

    The energetic lightning storms in the Saturn atmosphere will dissociate molecules into atoms, ions and plasma. Specifically, methane will be dissociated into elemental carbon, most probably in an amorphous form, such as fluffy turbostratic carbon or irregular soot particles. Once formed, this non-crystalline carbon sinks down through the atmosphere reaching an altitude of similar density. Amorphous carbon is converted to graphite under pressure. Graphite has a density of ~2.2 g/cc at room temperature. The density of diamond is ~3.3 g/cc at STP. However, at much higher pressures, the density of diamond increases dramatically, up to 9 grams/cm3 at P=1500 GPa (15 Mbar). As carbon descends through the atmosphere, amorphous carbon becomes graphite which then is converted into diamond, creating various strata of carbon allotropes according to their densities. Densities of the planets increase with depth. Eventually, at great depths, diamond will melt, forming liquid diamond. The melting point of diamond varies with pressure, reaching a high of ~ 8000 K at 500 GPa (5 Mbar). Using updated adiabats and equation-of-state data from Nettelmann et al. (2011), we determined the altitude at which diamond reaches its melting point on each planet. Combining these adiabats with new data for the carbon phase diagram from high-pressure shockwave experiments indicates that diamond may be a stable layer in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Previously, only Uranus and Neptune were thought to have conditions in their interiors that would allow the formation of diamond at their cores. It appears that the interior of Jupiter gets hot enough to reach the liquid diamond region of the carbon phase diagram, whereas the interior of Saturn includes regions of temperature and pressure where carbon could exist as solid diamond. At the boundaries (locations of sharp increases in density) on Jupiter and Saturn, there may be diamond rain or diamond oceans sitting as a layer. However, in Uranus

  3. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials’ surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of

  4. Carbon and nitrogen in Type 2 supernova diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Eleid, Mounib; Brown, Lawrence E.

    1993-01-01

    Abundant diamonds found in meteorites seem either to have condensed within supernova interiors during their expansions and coolings or to have been present around those explosions. Either alternative allows implantation of Xe-HL prior to interstellar mixing. A puzzling feature is the near normalcy of the carbon isotopes, considering that the only C-rich matter, the He-burning shell, is pure C-12 in that region. That last fact has caused many to associate supernova carbon with C-12 carbon, so that its SUNOCONS have been anticipated as very C-12-rich. We show that this expectation is misleading because the C-13-rich regions of Type 2's have been largely overlooked in this thinking. We here follow the idea that the diamonds nucleated in the C-12-rich He shell, the only C-rich site for nucleation, but then attached C-13-rich carbon during turbulent encounters with overlying C-13-rich matter. That is, the initial diamonds continued to grow during the same collisional encounters that cause the Xe-HL implantation. Instead of interacting with the small carbon mass having 13/12 = 0.2 in the upper He zone, however, we have calculated the remnants of the initial H-burning core, which left behind C-13-rich matter as it receded during core hydrogen burning. Howard et al. described why the velocity mixing would be essential to understanding the implantation of both the Xe-H and Xe-L components. Velocity mixing is now known to occur from the X-ray and gamma-ray light curves of supernova 1987A. Using the stellar evolution code developed at Goettingen, we calculated at Clemson the evolution of a grid of massive stars up to the beginning of core He burning. We paid attention to all H-burning reactions throughout the star, to the treatment of both convection and semiconvection, and to the recession of the outer boundary of the convective H-burning core as the star expands toward a larger redder state. This program was to generate a careful map of the CNO isotope distribution as He

  5. Enhanced patterning by tilted ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Wan; Zheng, Peng; Kato, Kimihiko; Rubin, Leonard; Liu, Tsu-Jae King

    2016-03-01

    Tilted ion implantation (TII) is proposed as a lower-cost alternative to self-aligned double patterning (SADP) for pitch halving. This new approach is based on an enhancement in etch rate of a hard-mask layer by implant-induced damage. Ar+ implantation into a thin layer of silicon dioxide (SiO2) is shown to enhance its etch rate in dilute hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution, by up to 9× for an implant dose of 3×1014 cm-2. The formation of sub-lithographic features defined by masked tilted Ar+ implantation into a SiO2 hard-mask layer is experimentally demonstrated. Features with sizes as small as ~21 nm, self-aligned to the lithographically patterned mask, are achieved. As compared with SADP, enhanced patterning by TII requires far fewer and lower-cost process steps and hence is expected to be much more cost-effective.

  6. A commercial plasma source ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuer, J.T.; Adler, R.A.; Horne, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Empire Hard Chrome has recently installed commercial plasma source ion implantation (PSU) equipment built by North Star Research Corporation. Los Alamos National Laboratory has assisted in this commercialization effort via two Cooperative Research and Development Agreements to develop the plasma source for the equipment and to identify low-risk commercial PSII applications. The PSII system consists of a 1 m x 1 m cylindrical vacuum chamber with a rf plasma source. The pulse modulator is capable of delivering pulses kV and peak currents of 300 A at maximum repetition rate of 400 Hz. thyratron tube to switch a pulse forming network which is tailored to match the dynamic PSII load. In this paper we discuss the PSII system, process facility, and early commercial applications to production tooling.

  7. Key issues in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Faehl, R.J.; Matossian, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a scaleable, non-line-of-sight method for the surface modification of materials. In this paper, we consider three important issues that should be addressed before wide-scale commercialization of PSII: (1) implant conformality; (2) ion sources; and (3) secondary electron emission. To insure uniform implanted dose over complex shapes, the ion sheath thickness must be kept sufficiently small. This criterion places demands on ion sources and pulsed-power supplies. Another limitation to date is the availability of additional ion species beyond B, C, N, and 0. Possible solutions are the use of metal arc vaporization sources and plasma discharges in high-vapor-pressure organometallic precursors. Finally, secondary electron emission presents a potential efficiency and x-ray hazard issue since for many metallurgic applications, the emission coefficient can be as large as 20. Techniques to suppress secondary electron emission are discussed.

  8. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Yu, K. M.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-06-15

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  9. Ion implantation of boron in germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.S.

    1985-05-01

    Ion implantation of /sup 11/B/sup +/ into room temperature Ge samples leads to a p-type layer prior to any post implant annealing steps. Variable temperature Hall measurements and deep level transient spectroscopy experiments indicate that room temperature implantation of /sup 11/B/sup +/ into Ge results in 100% of the boron ions being electrically active as shallow acceptor, over the entire dose range (5 x 10/sup 11//cm/sup 2/ to 1 x 10/sup 14//cm/sup 2/) and energy range (25 keV to 100 keV) investigated, without any post implant annealing. The concentration of damage related acceptor centers is only 10% of the boron related, shallow acceptor center concentration for low energy implants (25 keV), but becomes dominant at high energies (100 keV) and low doses (<1 x 10/sup 12//cm/sup 2/). Three damage related hole traps are produced by ion implantation of /sup 11/B/sup +/. Two of these hole traps have also been observed in ..gamma..-irradiated Ge and may be oxygen-vacancy related defects, while the third trap may be divacancy related. All three traps anneal out at low temperatures (<300/sup 0/C). Boron, from room temperature implantation of BF/sub 2//sup +/ into Ge, is not substitutionally active prior to a post implant annealing step of 250/sup 0/C for 30 minutes. After annealing additional shallow acceptors are observed in BF/sub 2//sup +/ implanted samples which may be due to fluorine or flourine related complexes which are electrically active.

  10. Research Update: Direct conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond at ambient pressures and temperatures in air

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Jagdish Bhaumik, Anagh

    2015-10-01

    We report on fundamental discovery of conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond by irradiating amorphous carbon films with nanosecond lasers at room-temperature in air at atmospheric pressure. We can create diamond in the form of nanodiamond (size range <100 nm) and microdiamond (>100 nm). Nanosecond laser pulses are used to melt amorphous diamondlike carbon and create a highly undercooled state, from which various forms of diamond can be formed upon cooling. The quenching from the super undercooled state results in nucleation of nanodiamond. It is found that microdiamonds grow out of highly undercooled state of carbon, with nanodiamond acting as seed crystals.

  11. Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Seals, R.D.

    1995-09-26

    A process is disclosed for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550 C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture. 2 figs.

  12. Low substrate temperature deposition of diamond coatings derived from glassy carbon

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Seals, Roland D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for depositing a diamond coating on a substrate at temperatures less than about 550.degree. C. A powder mixture of glassy carbon and diamond particles is passed through a high velocity oxy-flame apparatus whereupon the powders are heated prior to impingement at high velocity against the substrate. The powder mixture contains between 5 and 50 powder volume percent of the diamond particles, and preferably between 5 and 15 powder volume percent. The particles have a size from about 5 to about 100 micrometers, with the diamond particles being about 5 to about 30 micrometers. The flame of the apparatus provides a velocity of about 350 to about 1000 meters per second, with the result that upon impingement upon the substrate, the glassy carbon is phase transformed to diamond as coaxed by the diamond content of the powder mixture.

  13. Diamond dissolution and the production of methane and other carbon-bearing species in hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Anderson, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Raman analysis of the vapor phase formed after heating pure water to near critical (355-374 ??C) temperatures in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) reveals the synthesis of abiogenic methane. This unexpected result demonstrates the chemical reactivity of diamond at relatively low temperatures. The rate of methane production from the reaction between water and diamond increases with increasing temperature and is enhanced by the presence of a metal gasket (Re, Ir, or Inconel) which is compressed between the diamond anvils to seal the aqueous sample. The minimum detection limit for methane using Raman spectroscopy was determined to be ca. 0.047 MPa, indicating that more than 1.4 nanograms (or 8.6 ?? 10-11 mol) of methane were produced in the HDAC at 355 ??C and 30 MPa over a period of ten minutes. At temperatures of 650 ??C and greater, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were detected in addition to methane. The production of abiogenic methane, observed in all HDAC experiments where a gasket was used, necessitates a reexamination of the assumed chemical systems and intensive parameters reported in previous hydrothermal investigations employing diamonds. The results also demonstrate the need to minimize or eliminate the production of methane and other carbonic species in experiments by containing the sample within a HDAC without using a metal gasket.

  14. Silicate and carbonate melt inclusions associated with diamonds in deeply subducted carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsakov, Andrey V.; Hermann, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Deeply subducted carbonate rocks from the Kokchetav massif (Northern Kazakhstan) recrystallised within the diamond stability field (P = 4.5-6.0 GPa; T ≈ 1000 °C) and preserve evidence for ultra high-pressure carbonate and silicate melts. The carbonate rocks consist of garnet and K-bearing clinopyroxene embedded in a dolomite or magnesian calcite matrix. Polycrystalline magnesian calcite and polyphase carbonate-silicate inclusions occurring in garnet and clinopyroxene show textural features of former melt inclusions. The trace element composition of such carbonate inclusions is enriched in Ba and light rare earth elements and depleted in heavy rare earth elements with respect to the matrix carbonates providing further evidence that the inclusions represent trapped carbonate melt. Polyphase inclusions in garnet and clinopyroxene within a magnesian calcite marble, consisting mainly of a tight intergrowth of biotite + K-feldspar and biotite + zoisite + titanite, are interpreted to represent two different types of K-rich silicate melts. Both melt types show high contents of large ion lithophile elements but contrasting contents of rare earth elements. The Ca-rich inclusions display high REE contents similar to the carbonate inclusions and show a general trace element characteristic compatible with a hydrous granitic origin. Low SiO2 content in the silicate melts indicates that they represent residual melts after extensive interaction with carbonates. These observations suggest that hydrous granitic melts derived from the adjacent metapelites reacted with dolomite at ultra high-pressure conditions to form garnet, clinopyroxene - a hydrous carbonate melt - and residual silicate melts. Silicate and carbonate melt inclusions contain diamond, providing evidence that such an interaction promotes diamond growth. The finding of carbonate melts in deeply subducted crust might have important consequences for recycling of trace elements and especially C from the slab to the

  15. Photochemically modified diamond-like carbon surfaces for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hopper, A P; Dugan, J M; Gill, A A; Regan, E M; Haycock, J W; Kelly, S; May, P W; Claeyssens, F

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) was modified using a UV functionalization method to introduce surface-bound amine and aldehyde groups. The functionalization process rendered the DLC more hydrophilic and significantly increased the viability of neurons seeded to the surface. The amine functionalized DLC promoted adhesion of neurons and fostered neurite outgrowth to a degree indistinguishable from positive control substrates (glass coated with poly-L-lysine). The aldehyde-functionalized surfaces performed comparably to the amine functionalized surfaces and both additionally supported the adhesion and growth of primary rat Schwann cells. DLC has many properties that are desirable in biomaterials. With the UV functionalization method demonstrated here it may be possible to harness these properties for the development of implantable devices to interface with the nervous system.

  16. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOEpatents

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  17. Photochemically modified diamond-like carbon surfaces for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hopper, A P; Dugan, J M; Gill, A A; Regan, E M; Haycock, J W; Kelly, S; May, P W; Claeyssens, F

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) was modified using a UV functionalization method to introduce surface-bound amine and aldehyde groups. The functionalization process rendered the DLC more hydrophilic and significantly increased the viability of neurons seeded to the surface. The amine functionalized DLC promoted adhesion of neurons and fostered neurite outgrowth to a degree indistinguishable from positive control substrates (glass coated with poly-L-lysine). The aldehyde-functionalized surfaces performed comparably to the amine functionalized surfaces and both additionally supported the adhesion and growth of primary rat Schwann cells. DLC has many properties that are desirable in biomaterials. With the UV functionalization method demonstrated here it may be possible to harness these properties for the development of implantable devices to interface with the nervous system. PMID:26478422

  18. Durability of diamond-like carbon coated polycarbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, A.J.; Pergantis, C.G.

    1993-12-31

    Chemical exposure, accelerated weathering and mechanical tests have been carried out on diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated polycarbonates. DLC coatings are deposited at near room temperature via an ion beam system. Results show that DLC coatings have provided polycarbonate with significant improvement in the resistance to abrasion and attack of many organic liquids. The effects of simulated weathering exposure, including solar radiation, heat and humidity on DLC coated polycarbonates, are evaluated following the military standard MIL-STD-810E conditions. Preliminary results showed that both uncoated and coated polycarbonates yellowed; however, all the coated polycarbonates still remained optically clear. For the specimens coated with 0.5{mu} DLC, the originally brownish looking films seemed faded and became water clear. Comparison of the test results with other coatings, including a polysiloxane and and SiO{sub 2}, will be presented and discussed.

  19. Laser Patterning of Diamond. Part II. Surface Nondiamond Carbon Formation and its Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, J.; Jaye, C; Bohon, J; Rao, T; Fischer, D

    2009-01-01

    As diamond becomes more prevalent for electronic and research applications, methods of patterning diamond will be required. One such method, laser ablation, has been investigated in a related work. We report on the formation of surface nondiamond carbon during laser ablation of both polycrystalline and single-crystal synthetic diamonds. Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used to confirm that the nondiamond carbon layer formed during the ablation was amorphous, and Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to estimate the thickness of this layer to be {approx} 60 nm. Ozone cleaning was used to remove the nondiamond carbon layer.

  20. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOEpatents

    Hampikian, Janet M; Hunt, Eden M

    2001-01-01

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  1. Ion-implanted planar-buried-heterostructure diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, Burrell E.; Myers, David R.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    A Planar-Buried-Heterostructure, Graded-Index, Separate-Confinement-Heterostructure semiconductor diode laser 10 includes a single quantum well or multi-quantum well active stripe 12 disposed between a p-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 14 and an n-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 16. The laser 10 includes an ion implanted n-type region 28 within the p-type cladding layer 14 and further includes an ion implanted p-type region 26 within the n-type cladding layer 16. The ion implanted regions are disposed for defining a lateral extent of the active stripe.

  2. Noble gas studies in vapor-growth diamonds: Comparison with shock-produced diamonds and the origin of diamonds in ureilites

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Junichi; Fukunaga, Kazuya; Ito, Keisuke )

    1991-07-01

    The authors synthesized vapor-trowth diamonds by two kinds of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using microwave (MWCVD) and hot filament (HFCVD) ionization of gases, and examined elemental abundances and isotopic compositions of the noble gases trapped in the diamonds. It is remarkable that strong differences existed in the noble gas concentrations in the two kinds of CVD diamonds: large amounts of noble gases were trapped in the MWCVD diamonds, but not in the HFCVD diamonds. The heavy noble gases (Ar to Xe) in the MWCVD diamonds were highly fractionated compared with those in the ambient atmosphere, and are in good agreement with the calculated fractionation patterns for plasma at an electron temperature of 7,000-9,000 K. These results strongly suggest that the trapping mechanism of noble gases in CVD diamonds is ion implantation during diamond growth. The degrees of fractionation of heavy noble gases were also in good agreement with those in ureilites. The vapor-growth hypothesis is discussed in comparison with the impact-shock hypothesis as a better model for the origin of diamonds in ureilites. The diamond (and graphite, amorphous carbon, too) may have been deposited on early condensates such as Re, Ir, W, etc. This model explains the chemical features of vein material in ureilites; the refractory siderophile elements are enriched in carbon and noble gases and low in normal siderophiles. The vapor-growth model is also compatible with the oxygen isotopic data of ureilites which suggests that nebular processes are primarily responsible for the composition of ureilites.

  3. Proceedings of the Seventh Applied Diamond Conference/Third Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference (ADC/FCT 2003). Supplement 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakawa, M. (Editor); Miyoshi, K. (Editor); Koga, Y. (Editor); Schaefer, L. (Editor); Tzeng, Y. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This document contains 2 reports which were presented at the Seventh Applied Diamond Conference/Third Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference. The topics discuss the formation of C-N nanofibers as well as the characterization of diamond thin films.

  4. Depth Profiling of N and C in Ion Implanted ZnO and Si Using Deuterium Induced Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, John; Murmu, Peter; Markwitz, Andreas

    2008-11-03

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) with deuteron ion beams has been used to probe for ion implanted nitrogen and carbon with high sensitivity in zinc oxide and silicon single crystals. The ion implanted N was measured using 1.4 MeV deuteron ion beams and was found to be in agreement with calculated values. The limit of detection for N in ZnO is 8x10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. Raman measurements of the ion implanted samples showed three additional modes at 275, 504, and 644 cm{sup -1} compared to the un-implanted ZnO crystals. The NRA and Raman results provided information on the N concentration, depth distribution, and structural changes that occur in dependence on the nitrogen ion fluences. The deuterium induced {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C reaction was used to measure the carbon impurity/dose in ion implanted silicon. It was found that the use of a large cold shield (liquid nitrogen trap) in the ion implanter chamber greatly reduces the amount of carbon impurity on the surface of ion implanted silicon. Various implantations with N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2} and Pb ions were performed with and without cooling of the liquid nitrogen trap. Simultaneous detection of ppm-level concentrations of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N enables highly sensitive measurement of impurities that may be incorporated during the fabrication process, transport of the samples and/or storage of the samples in air.

  5. Industrial applications of ion implantation into metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The modern materials processing technique, ion implantation, has intriguing and attractive features that stimulate the imaginations of scientists and technologists. Success of the technique for introducing dopants into semiconductors has resulted in a stable and growing infrastructure of capital equipment and skills for use of the technique in the economy. Attention has turned to possible use of ion implantation for modification of nearly all surface related properties of materials - optical, chemical and corrosive, tribological, and several others. This presentation provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of equipment, technique, and materials science of ion implantation. Practical and economic factors pertaining to the technology are discussed. Applications and potential applications are surveyed. There are already available a number of ion-implanted products, including ball-and-roller bearings and races, punches-and-dies, injection screws for plastics molding, etc., of potential interest to the machine tool industry.

  6. Microstructure evolution and non-diamond carbon incorporation in CVD diamond thin films grown at low substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michler, J.; Stiegler, J.; von Kaenel, Y.; Moeckli, P.; Dorsch, W.; Stenkamp, D.; Blank, E.

    1997-03-01

    We investigated the development of the microstructure and the incorporation of non-diamond carbon close to the low temperature border of the CVD diamond domain. Thin diamond films were deposited at low substrate temperatures (560°C-275°C) by microwave plasma-assisted CVD on silicon, varying only the substrate temperature. At elevated temperatures (560°C-430°C) the film mainly consists of nearly defect free near 112 oriented grains with smooth 111 facets, exhibiting steps and risers at the surface. Decreasing the substrate temperature an apparently sharp transition occurs, below which the film quality undergoes a rapid deterioration as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy, while crystalline faceted grains with a size of several microns and a growth texture of <100> remain. However, X-ray diffraction reveals a strongly decreasing crystal size (from about 1 μm to 10 nm) which can be attributed to an increased twin density within the macroscopic grains. High resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these twins consist of small twin lamellae with a spacing of only several atomic planes. Transmission electron microscopy of near surface areas evidences re-entrant corners at the grain surfaces formed by twin lamellae and the presence of steps and risers. Non-diamond carbon was detected in the form of amorphous inclusions at incoherent twin boundaries and probably at higher order twin boundaries. The observations will be discussed by means of two different competing nucleation mechanisms: above the low temperature limit the grains grow by lateral ledge motion and preferential nucleation at re-entrant corners. Approaching the low temperature limit, two-dimensional nucleation at growth facets becomes an alternate nucleation mechanism, which introduces a high density of microtwins. If two-dimensional nuclei grow together, non-diamond carbon is incorporated during growth at this interface.

  7. Large Magnetoresistance and low temperature Transport anomalies in Ion implanted HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, Nicholas; Zakhidov, Anvar; Salamon, Myron; Gartstein, Yuri; Wang, Xuemei; Freyhardt, Herbert; Kan Chu, Wei

    2012-02-01

    Strong positive magnetoresistance (MR) was found in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) upon ion implantation by boron and phosphorous. Similar effects, but with smaller amplitude, are induced by carbon ion implantation, but due to structural disorder and defect formation without carrier concentration increase. The magnetic field dependence of the MR is linear at high fields with no sign of saturation, but different contact geometries result in a wide range of parameters. Two possible explanations of strong MR are suggested and analyzed. While the MR remains large at all temperatures, plots of R(T) in constant field show a drop at lower T. Future experiments will clarify the origin of the R(T) drop, in particular, whether this might be interpreted as the onset of inhomogeneous superconductivity, as proposed in some previous work, or could be explained in the context of strong linear MR effects seen in high-mobility, disordered materials.

  8. Influence of Si ion implantation on structure and morphology of g-C3N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varalakshmi, B.; Sreenivasulu, K. V.; Asokan, K.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.

    2016-07-01

    Effect of Si ion implantation on structural and morphological features of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was investigated. g-C3N4 was prepared by using a simple atmospheric thermal decomposition process. The g-C3N4 pellets were irradiated with a Si ion beam of energy 200 keV with different fluencies. Structural, morphological and elemental, and phase analysis of the implanted samples in comparison with the pristine samples was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques, respectively. The observations revealed that Si ion implantation results in a negligible change in the crystallite size and alteration of the network-like to the sheet-like morphology of g-C3N4 and Si ions in the g-C3N4 network.

  9. Dynamic effects in the production of diamond from solid-solution carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, V.V.; Didyk, R.P.; Merezhko, Y.I.; Skidanenko, A.I.; Slobodskoi, V.Y.

    1984-03-01

    The authors examine the scope for diamond to grow at atmospheric pressure in iron alloys. For the purpose of this investigation, diamond nuclei were produced in a cast-iron specimen by a dynamic pressure of 80-90GPa. The mass proportion of diamond polycrystals of maximum size 40-50 ..mu..m did not exceed 1%. The largest diamond content occurred in the fraction 0.1-5 ..mu..m and constituted about 80%. The studies show that: the presence of diamond inclusions in a metal matrix substantially influences the structural transformations during isothermal heating and slow cooling; the solid-solution carbon, the carbon compounds, and the graphite inclusions can serve as sources of carbon in the growth of diamond crystals in the metastable region; and dynamic pressures generate numerous defects in cast-iron specimens, which are sources of vacancies, which facilitate the diffusion of the carbon to the growing diamond crystals and the removal of iron from them.

  10. Diamond like carbon coatings: Categorization by atomic number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Dense diamond-like hydrocarbon films grown at the NASA Lewis Research Center by radio frequency self bias discharge and by direct ion beam deposition were studied. A new method for categorizing hydrocarbons based on their atomic number density and elemental composition was developed and applied to the diamond-like hydrocarbon films. It was shown that the diamond-like hydrocarbon films are an entirely new class of hydrocarbons with atomic number densities lying between those of single crystal diamond and adamantanes. In addition, a major review article on these new materials was completed in cooperation with NASA Lewis Research Center personnel.

  11. Activation Mechanisms in Ion-Implanted Gallium -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Neil

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Rapid Thermal Annealing has been used to study the electrical activation of a range of donor and acceptor species in ion-implanted GaAs. By varying the time and temperature of the post implant anneal, it was found that the activation processes for most implants can be characterised in terms of two distinct regions. The first of these occurs at short annealing times, where the electrical activity is seen to follow a time-dependent behaviour. At longer annealing times, however, a time-independent saturation value is reached, this value being dependent on the annealing temperature. By analysing the data from Be, Mg, S and Se implants in GaAs, a comprehensive model has been evolved for the time and temperature dependence of the sheet electrical properties. Application of this model to each of the ions studied suggests that the activation processes may be dominated by the extent to which ions form impurity-vacancy complexes. An analysis of the time-dependent regime also shows that, at short annealing times, the mobile species is more likely to be the substrate atoms (or vacancies) rather than the implanted impurities. In the time-dependent region, the values of diffusion energy were found to be between 2.3 to 3.0 eV for all ions, these values corresponding to a diffusion of Ga or As vacancies (or atoms). In the saturation region, activation energies of 0.3 to 0.4 eV and 1.0 to 1.2 eV were obtained for the activation processes of interstitial or complexed impurities respectively.

  12. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy method and studies of implant damage in single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, D.P.; Kuryliw, E.; Siebein, K.; Jones, K.S.; Chodelka, R.; Elliman, R.

    2006-07-15

    Few transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of single crystal diamond have been reported, most likely due to the time and difficulty involved in sample preparation. A method is described for creating a TEM cross section of single crystal diamond using a focused ion beam and in situ lift-out. The method results in samples approximately 10 {mu}m long by 3 {mu}m deep with an average thickness of 100-300 nm. The total time to prepare a cross-sectional TEM sample of diamond is less than 5 h. The method also allows for additional thinning to facilitate high resolution TEM imaging, and can be applied to oddly shaped diamond samples. This sample preparation technique has been applied to the study of ion implantation damage in single crystal diamond and its evolution upon annealing. High-pressure-high-temperature diamonds were implanted with Si{sup +} at an energy of 1 MeV and a temperature of 30 deg. C. One sample, with a (110) surface, was implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 14} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 950 deg. C for 10 and 40 min. No significant defect formation or evolution was discernible by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Another sample, with a (100) orientation, was implanted with 1 MeV at 1x10{sup 15} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 1050 deg. C for 10 min. Prior to annealing, a heavily damaged but still crystalline region was observed. Upon annealing, the sample showed no signs of conversion either to an amorphous form of carbon or to graphite. This is unexpected as the energy and dose are above the previously reported graphitization threshold for diamond. Higher annealing temperatures and possibly a high vacuum will be required for future study of defect formation, evolution, and phase transformations in ion-implanted single crystal diamond.

  13. Hydrophilic property by contact angle change of ion implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chan Young; Kil, Jae Keun

    2008-02-15

    In this study, ion implantation was performed onto a polymer, polycarbonate (PC), in order to investigate surface hydrophilic property through contact angle measurement. PC was irradiated with N, Ar, and Xe ions at the irradiation energy of 20-50 keV and the dose range of 5x10{sup 15}, 1x10{sup 16}, 7x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The contact angle of water was estimated by means of the sessile drop method and was reduced with increasing fluence and ion mass but increased with increasing implanted energy. The changes of chemical and structural properties are discussed in view of Furier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which shows increasing C-O bonding and C-C bonding. The surface roughness examined by atomic force microscopy measurement changed smoothly from 3.59 to 2.22 A as the fluence increased. It is concluded that the change in wettability may be caused by surface carbonization and oxidation as well as surface roughness.

  14. Fluctuation microscopy studies of medium-range ordering in amorphous diamond-like carbon films.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Sullivan, J. P.; Friedmann, T. A.; Gibson, J. M.; Cedarville Univ.; SNL

    2004-04-12

    In this letter, we report fluctuation microscopy studies of medium-range ordering in amorphous diamond-like carbon films and the effect of annealing on this ordering. Annealed and unannealed diamond-like carbon films have almost identical short-range order. Our fluctuation microscopy results, however, indicate the presence of medium range order or clustering in the films on a lateral length scale that exceeds 1 nm. Within the clustered regions, the dominant local ordering appears to be diamond-like, and graphite-like ordering is not observed. Thermal annealing up to 600 {sup o}C leads to an increase in diamond-like clustering with no onset of graphite-like clustering. However, after high temperature annealing up to 1000 {sup o}C, graphite-like clustering becomes apparent as a result of the conversion of diamond-like carbon to graphite-like carbon. The results on the as-deposited films and films annealed up to 600 {sup o}C suggest that a spontaneous medium range ordering process occurs in diamond-like carbon films during and subsequent to film growth, and this may play an important role in stress relaxation.

  15. Electronic Power System Application of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Kosai, H.; Fries-Carr, S.; Weimer, J.; Freeman, M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype manufacturing technology for producing high volume efficiency and high energy density diamond-like carbon (DLC) capacitors has been developed. Unique dual ion-beam deposition and web-handling systems have been designed and constructed to deposit high quality DLC films simultaneously on both sides of capacitor grade aluminum foil and aluminum-coated polymer films. An optimized process, using inductively coupled RF ion sources, has been used to synthesize electrically robust DLC films. DLC films are amorphous and highly flexible, making them suitable for the production of wound capacitors. DLC capacitors are reliable and stable over a wide range of AC frequencies from 20 Hz to 1 MHz, and over a temperature range from .500 C to 3000 C. The compact DLC capacitors offer at least a 50% decrease in weight and volume and a greater than 50% increase in temperature handling capability over equal value capacitors built with existing technologies. The DLC capacitors will be suitable for high temperature, high voltage, pulsed power and filter applications.

  16. Diamond synthesis from carbon nanofibers at low temperature and low pressure.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengzhi; Qi, Xiang; Pan, Chunxu; Yang, Wenge

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report a new route to synthesize diamond by converting "solid" carbon nanofibers with a Spark Plasma Sintering system under low temperature and pressure (even at atmospheric pressure). Well-crystallized diamond crystals are obtained at the tips of the carbon nanofibers after sintering at 1500 °C and atmospheric pressure. Combining with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron-energy loss spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations, we propose the conversion mechanism as follows: the disorder "solid" carbon nanofibers→well crystallined carbon nanofibers→bent graphitic sheets→onion-liked rings→diamond single crystal→the bigger congregated diamond crystal. It is believed that the plasma generated by low-voltage, vacuum spark, via a pulsed DC in Spark Plasma Sintering process, plays a critical role in the low temperature and low pressure diamond formation. This Spark Plasma Sintering process may provide a new route for diamond synthesis in an economical way to a large scale. PMID:26351089

  17. Diamond synthesis from carbon nanofibers at low temperature and low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Qi, Xiang; Pan, Chunxu; Yang, Wenge

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we report a new route to synthesize diamond by converting “solid” carbon nanofibers with a Spark Plasma Sintering system under low temperature and pressure (even at atmospheric pressure). Well-crystallized diamond crystals are obtained at the tips of the carbon nanofibers after sintering at 1500 °C and atmospheric pressure. Combining with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron-energy loss spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations, we propose the conversion mechanism as follows: the disorder “solid” carbon nanofibers → well crystallined carbon nanofibers → bent graphitic sheets → onion-liked rings → diamond single crystal → the bigger congregated diamond crystal. It is believed that the plasma generated by low-voltage, vacuum spark, via a pulsed DC in Spark Plasma Sintering process, plays a critical role in the low temperature and low pressure diamond formation. This Spark Plasma Sintering process may provide a new route for diamond synthesis in an economical way to a large scale.

  18. Diamond synthesis from carbon nanofibers at low temperature and low pressure.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengzhi; Qi, Xiang; Pan, Chunxu; Yang, Wenge

    2015-09-09

    In this article, we report a new route to synthesize diamond by converting "solid" carbon nanofibers with a Spark Plasma Sintering system under low temperature and pressure (even at atmospheric pressure). Well-crystallized diamond crystals are obtained at the tips of the carbon nanofibers after sintering at 1500 °C and atmospheric pressure. Combining with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron-energy loss spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations, we propose the conversion mechanism as follows: the disorder "solid" carbon nanofibers→well crystallined carbon nanofibers→bent graphitic sheets→onion-liked rings→diamond single crystal→the bigger congregated diamond crystal. It is believed that the plasma generated by low-voltage, vacuum spark, via a pulsed DC in Spark Plasma Sintering process, plays a critical role in the low temperature and low pressure diamond formation. This Spark Plasma Sintering process may provide a new route for diamond synthesis in an economical way to a large scale.

  19. Diamond synthesis from carbon nanofibers at low temperature and low pressure

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengzhi; Qi, Xiang; Pan, Chunxu; Yang, Wenge

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report a new route to synthesize diamond by converting “solid” carbon nanofibers with a Spark Plasma Sintering system under low temperature and pressure (even at atmospheric pressure). Well-crystallized diamond crystals are obtained at the tips of the carbon nanofibers after sintering at 1500 °C and atmospheric pressure. Combining with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron-energy loss spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations, we propose the conversion mechanism as follows: the disorder “solid” carbon nanofibers → well crystallined carbon nanofibers → bent graphitic sheets → onion-liked rings → diamond single crystal → the bigger congregated diamond crystal. It is believed that the plasma generated by low-voltage, vacuum spark, via a pulsed DC in Spark Plasma Sintering process, plays a critical role in the low temperature and low pressure diamond formation. This Spark Plasma Sintering process may provide a new route for diamond synthesis in an economical way to a large scale. PMID:26351089

  20. Nanoscale triboactivity of functionalized c-Si surfaces by Fe+ ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, B.; Alves, E.; Colaço, R.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we present a study of the effect of Fe+ ion implantation on the tribological response at nanoscale contact lengths of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. (1 0 0) silicon wafers were implanted with Fe+ at a fluence of 2  ×  1017 cm-2, followed by annealing treatments at temperatures of 800 °C and 1000 °C. After microstructural characterization, nanoabrasive wear tests were performed with an atomic force microscope (AFM) using an AFM diamond tip with a stiff steel cantilever that enables the application of loads between 1 μN and 8 μN. After the nanowear tests, the same AFM was used to visualize and measure the worn craters. It was observed that the as-implanted samples present the poorest nanowear response, i.e. the highest wear rate, even higher than that of the unimplanted Si wafers used as a reference. Nevertheless, annealing treatments result in a measurable increase in the nanowear resistance. In this way we show that Fe+ ion implantation of c-Si, followed by the proper post-heat treatment, results in the formation of FeSi2 nanoprecipitates finely dispersed in a recrystallized matrix. This can be a valuable way of optimizing the nanotribological behavior of silicon.

  1. Nanoscale triboactivity of functionalized c-Si surfaces by Fe⁺ ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Nunes, B; Alves, E; Colaço, R

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we present a study of the effect of Fe(+) ion implantation on the tribological response at nanoscale contact lengths of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. (1 0 0) silicon wafers were implanted with Fe(+) at a fluence of 2  ×  10(17) cm(-2), followed by annealing treatments at temperatures of 800 °C and 1000 °C. After microstructural characterization, nanoabrasive wear tests were performed with an atomic force microscope (AFM) using an AFM diamond tip with a stiff steel cantilever that enables the application of loads between 1 μN and 8 μN. After the nanowear tests, the same AFM was used to visualize and measure the worn craters. It was observed that the as-implanted samples present the poorest nanowear response, i.e. the highest wear rate, even higher than that of the unimplanted Si wafers used as a reference. Nevertheless, annealing treatments result in a measurable increase in the nanowear resistance. In this way we show that Fe(+) ion implantation of c-Si, followed by the proper post-heat treatment, results in the formation of FeSi2 nanoprecipitates finely dispersed in a recrystallized matrix. This can be a valuable way of optimizing the nanotribological behavior of silicon. PMID:26931630

  2. Synthesis of sea urchin-like carbon nanotubes on nano-diamond powder.

    PubMed

    Hwang, E J; Lee, S K; Jeong, M G; Lee, Y B; Lim, D S

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique atomic structure and properties, such as a high aspect ratio and high mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. On the other hand, the agglomeration and entanglement of CNTs restrict their applications. Sea urchin-like multiwalled carbon nanotubes, which have a small aspect ratio, can minimize the problem of dispersion. The high hardness, thermal conductivity and chemical inertness of the nano-diamond powder make it suitable for a wide range of applications in the mechanical and electronic fields. CNTs were synthesized on nano-diamond powder by thermal CVD to fabricate a filler with suitable mechanical properties and chemical stability. This paper reports the growth of CNTs with a sea urchin-like structure on the surface of the nano-diamond powder. Nano-diamond powders were dispersed in an attritional milling system using zirconia beads in ethanol. After the milling process, 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) was added as a linker. Silanization was performed between the nano-diamond particles and the metal catalyst. Iron chloride was used as a catalyst for the fabrication of the CNTs. After drying, catalyst-attached nano-diamond powders could be achieved. The growth of the carbon nanotubes was carried out by CVD. The CNT morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mean diameter and length of the CNTs were 201 nm and 3.25 microm, respectively. PMID:22966673

  3. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  4. Emission Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Silicon Emitter Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Takayuki; Kanemaru, Seigo; Tanoue, Hisao; Itoh, Junji

    1995-12-01

    An ion implantation technique has been applied to control the energy band structure of Si field-emitter tip surface. B+ or P+ ions were implanted after fabrication of a gated emitter structure. No changes in emitter structure were observed after ion implantation and successive annealing at 800° C. Current-voltage ( I-V ) characteristics of n, p, p/n and n/p emitter tips were measured: p/n indicates an n-type tip with B+ ions implanted into the tip surface. It was found from the experimental results that n and p/n tips had I-V characteristics in agreement with the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The p and n/p tips, on the other hand, exhibited a current saturation property in high electric field. The present saturation mechanism is explained by considering the energy band structure of the tip surface.

  5. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  6. Ion implantation for manufacturing bent and periodically bent crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bellucci, Valerio; Camattari, Riccardo; Guidi, Vincenzo Mazzolari, Andrea; Paternò, Gianfranco; Lanzoni, Luca

    2015-08-10

    Ion implantation is proposed to produce self-standing bent monocrystals. A Si sample 0.2 mm thick was bent to a radius of curvature of 10.5 m. The sample curvature was characterized by interferometric measurements; the crystalline quality of the bulk was tested by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry through synchrotron light at ESRF (Grenoble, France). Dislocations induced by ion implantation affect only a very superficial layer of the sample, namely, the damaged region is confined in a layer 1 μm thick. Finally, an elective application of a deformed crystal through ion implantation is here proposed, i.e., the realization of a crystalline undulator to produce X-ray beams.

  7. Optimised Charging Performance On Quantum X Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, David A.; Sakase, Takao; Miura, Ryuichi; Goldberg, Richard D.; Murrell, Adrian J.

    2006-11-01

    A key parameter in the optimisation of CMOS device yield is the minimisation of charging-induced damage and/or breakdown of the gate dielectric material during ion implantation. In typical ion beams used for transistor doping applications, beam potentials can charge up the wafer surface if not controlled, and hence this potential must be neutralised to avoid damage to devices. MOS capacitor TEG (Test Element Group) wafers are an industry standard metric for determining the charging performance of ion implanters. By optimising the performance of the High Density Plasma Flood System (HDPFS) of the Applied Materials Quantum X ion implanter, TEG device yields of >90% at antenna ratios of 1E5:1 for a gate dielectric thickness of 3.5 nm on 300 mm wafers have been demonstrated.

  8. Chromium plating pollution source reduction by plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.; Sridharan, K.; Dodd, R.A.; Conrad, J.R.; Qiu, X.; Hamdi, A.H.; Elmoursi, A.A.; Malaczynski, G.W.; Horne, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    There is growing concern over the environmental toxicity and workers` health issues due to the chemical baths and rinse water used in the hard chromium plating process. In this regard the significant hardening response of chromium to nitrogen ion implantation can be environmentally beneficial from the standpoint of decreasing the thickness and the frequency of application of chromium plating. In this paper the results of a study of nitrogen ion implantation of chrome plated test flats using the non-line-of-sight Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) process, are discussed. Surface characterization was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA). The surface properties were evaluated using a microhardness tester, a pin-on-disk wear tester, and a corrosion measurement system. Industrial field testing of nitrogen PSII treated chromium plated parts showed an improvement by a factor of two compared to the unimplanted case.

  9. Evidence for deep mantle convection and primordial heterogeneity from nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palot, M.; Cartigny, P.; Harris, J. W.; Kaminsky, F. V.; Stachel, T.

    2012-12-01

    Diamond, as the deepest sample available for study, provides a unique opportunity to sample and examine parts of the Earth's mantle not directly accessible. In order to provide further constraints on mantle convection and deep volatile cycles, we analysed nitrogen and carbon isotopes and nitrogen abundances in 133 diamonds from Juina (Brazil) and Kankan (Guinea). Host syngenetic inclusions within these diamonds indicate origins from the lithosphere, the asthenosphere-transition zone and the lower mantle. Juina and Kankan diamonds both display overall carbon isotopic compositions within the current upper mantle range but the δ13C signatures of diamonds from the asthenosphere-transition zone extend toward very negative and positive values, respectively. Two Kankan diamonds with both lower mantle and asthenosphere-transition zone inclusions (KK-45 and KK-83) are zoned in δ13C, and have signatures consistent with multiple growth steps likely within both the lower mantle and the asthenosphere-transition zone illustrating the transfer of material through the 670 km seismic discontinuity. At a given locality, diamonds from the upper and the lower mantle show similar δ15N distributions with coinciding modes within the range defined by typical upper mantle samples, as one might expect for a well stirred reservoir resulting from whole mantle convection. Kankan diamonds KK-11 (lower mantle), KK-21 and KK-92 (both lithospheric) display the lowest δ15N values (-24.9%, -39.4% and -30.4%) ever measured in terrestrial samples, which we interpret as reflecting primordial heterogeneity preserved in an imperfectly mixed convective mantle. Our diamond data thus provide support for deeply rooted convection cells, together with the preservation of primordial volatiles in an imperfectly mixed convecting mantle, thereby reconciling the conflicting interpretations regarding mantle homogeneity derived from geochemical and geophysical studies.

  10. Cell adhesion and growth on ultrananocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon films after different surface modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksovsky, J.; Voss, A.; Kozarova, R.; Kocourek, T.; Pisarik, P.; Ceccone, G.; Kulisch, W.; Jelinek, M.; Apostolova, M. D.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Popov, C.

    2014-04-01

    Diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films possess a set of excellent physical and chemical properties which together with a high biocompatibility make them attractive candidates for a number of medical and biotechnological applications. In the current work thin ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and DLC films were comparatively investigated with respect to cell attachment and proliferation after different surface modifications. The UNCD films were prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the DLC films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films were comprehensively characterized with respect to their basic properties, e.g. crystallinity, morphology, chemical bonding nature, etc. Afterwards the UNCD and DLC films were modified applying O2 or NH3/N2 plasmas and UV/O3 treatments to alter their surface termination. The surface composition of as-grown and modified samples was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore the films were characterized by contact angle measurements with water, formamide, 1-decanol and diiodomethane; from the results obtained the surface energy with its dispersive and polar components was calculated. The adhesion and proliferation of MG63 osteosarcoma cells on the different UNCD and DLC samples were assessed by measurement of the cell attachment efficiency and MTT assays. The determined cell densities were compared and correlated with the surface properties of as-deposited and modified UNCD and DLC films.

  11. Aggregated diamond nanorods, the densest and least compressible form of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Crichton, Wilson; Langenhorst, Falko; Richter, Asta

    2005-08-01

    We report the synthesis of aggregated diamond nanorods (ADNRs) from fullerene C60 at 20(1) GPa and 2200 °C using a multianvil apparatus. Individual diamond nanoroads are of 5-20 nm in diameter and longer than 1μm. The x-ray and measured density of ADNRs is ˜0.2%-0.4% higher than that of usual diamond. The extremely high isothermal bulk modulus KT=491(3)GPa [compare to KT=442(4)GPa of diamond] was obtained by in situ x-ray diffraction study. Thus, ADNRs is the densest among all carbon materials and it has the lowest so far experimentally determined compressibility.

  12. Diamond and diamondlike carbon as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings for silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited fine-grain diamond, polished coarse-grain diamond, and as-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in humid air at a relative humidity of approximately 40 percent and in dry nitrogen is reviewed. Two types of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes are used to deposit diamond films on silicon nitride (Si3N4) substrates: microwave-plasma and hot-filament. Ion beams are used to deposit DLC films of Si3N4 substrates. The diamond and DLC films in sliding contact with hemispherical bare Si3N4 pins have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.2) and low wear rates (less than 10(exp -7) mm(exp 2)/N-m), and thus, can be used effectively as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings for Si3N4 in the aforementioned two environments.

  13. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braceras, Iñigo; Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana; Muñoz, Roberto; Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia; de Maeztu, Miguel Ángel

    2014-08-01

    Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40-80 keV), fluence (1-2 e17 ion/cm2) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted surfaces, without surface chemistry modification, are in the same range and that such modifications, in certain conditions, do have a statistically significant effect on bone tissue forming cell adhesion.

  14. Software for goniometer control in the Triple Ion Implantation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.R.

    1994-02-01

    A computer program is described tat controls the goniometer employed in the ion scattering chamber of the Triple Ion Implantation Facility (TIF) in the Metals and Ceramics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Details of goniometer operation and its incorporation into the ion scattering setup specific to the TIF are also discussed.

  15. PARMELA simulations of RF linear accelerators for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, D. R.; Wan Zhimin; Di Vergilio, W. F.; Saadatmand, K.

    1999-06-10

    RF linear accelerators (LINACs) offer the highest beam energies and currents available to the high-energy segment of the ion-implantation industry. We are using the computer code PARMELA to simulate a variety of beam parameters. The simulations are used to generate beam tunes, optimize LINAC performance, and to design new LINACs.

  16. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-06-13

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Ions that are implanted include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and a preferred co-implant of Ar/sup +/ and Ne/sup +/. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the band gap energy threshold of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible blue light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to these positive ions of sufficient density and with sufficient energy to provide an image. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%; a lead zirconate content ranging from 62 to 70 mole %; and a lead titanate content ranging from 38 to 30%. The region of ion implantation is in a range from 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate. Density of ions is in the range from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and having an energy in the range from 100 to 500 keV.

  17. Magnetic and Transport Properties of Mn-ion implanted Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisler, V.; Ogawa, M.; Han, X.; Wang, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic and transport properties of Mn-ion implanted Si. Both temperature dependent and field dependent measurements of the samples using a SQUID magnometer reveal ferromagnetic properties at room temperature. Magnetotransport measurements show a large positive magnetoresistance up to 4.5 T with no signs of saturation.

  18. The history of uniformity mapping in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarling, C. B.; Keenan, W. A.; Larson, L. A.

    1991-04-01

    In the early days of semiconductor manufacturing, the four-point probe became established as the tool-of-choice for monitoring diffusion processes. The application of the four-point probe to ion implantation in the early 1960s was basically limited to the single-point measurement of dose, since the equipment did not have the necessary precision or repeatability to provide useful uniformity results. As a result, implanter uniformity was determined by either a visual observation of a heavily doped wafer or by a mylar bum. Unfortunately, these techniques were either subject to interpretation by the user or could not provide a parameter that could be statistically tracked or characterized. During the last 30 years, the commercial ion implanter as well as the dose and uniformity characterization equipment used to characterize this production tool have progressed significantly. Indeed, several generations of electrical and optical equipment have been developed to measure both the dose and uniformity of the increasingly advanced and complex ion implanter. This paper will review all of the techniques and equipment used to measure the uniformity of ion implantation. In addition, various graphical techniques developed to present early measurement results will be discussed.

  19. Ion Implanted Passivated Contacts for Interdigitated Back Contacted Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Young, David L.; Nemeth, William; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Reedy, Robert; Bateman, Nicholas; Stradins, Pauls

    2015-06-14

    We describe work towards an interdigitated back contacted (IBC) solar cell utilizing ion implanted, passivated contacts. Formation of electron and hole passivated contacts to n-type CZ wafers using tunneling SiO2 and ion implanted amorphous silicon (a-Si) are described. P and B were ion implanted into intrinsic amorphous Si films at several doses and energies. A series of post-implant anneals showed that the passivation quality improved with increasing annealing temperatures up to 900 degrees C. The recombination parameter, Jo, as measured by a Sinton lifetime tester, was Jo ~ 14 fA/cm2 for Si:P, and Jo ~ 56 fA/cm2 for Si:B contacts. The contact resistivity for the passivated contacts, as measured by TLM patterns, was 14 milliohm-cm2 for the n-type contact and 0.6 milliohm-cm2 for the p-type contact. These Jo and pcontact values are encouraging for forming IBC cells using ion implantation to spatially define dopants.

  20. Compilation of diamond-like carbon properties for barriers and hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Outka, D.A.; Hsu, Wen L.; Phillips, K.; Boehme, D.R.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Ottesen, D.K.; Johnsen, H.A.; Clift, W.M.; Headley, T.J.

    1994-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an amorphous form of carbon which resembles diamond in its hardness, lubricity, and resistance to chemical attack. Such properties make DLC of interest for use in barrier and hard coating technology. This report examines a variety of properties of DLC coatings. This includes examining substrates on which DLC coatings can be deposited; the resistance of DLC coatings to various chemical agents; adhension of DLC coatings; and characterization of DLC coatings by electron microscopy, FTIR, sputter depth profiling, stress measurements and nanoindentation.

  1. Compilation of diamond-like carbon properties for barriers and hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Outka, D.A.; Hsu, Wen L.; Boehme, D.R.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Ottesen, D.K.; Johnsen, H.A.; Clift, W.M.; Headley, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an amorphous form of carbon which resembles diamond in its hardness, lubricity, and interest for hardness, lubricity, and resistance to chemical attack. Such properties make DLC of use in barrier and hard coating technology. This report examines a variety of properties of DLC coatings which are relevant to its use as a protective coating. This includes examining substrates on which DLC coatings can be deposited; the resistance of DLC coatings to various chemical agents; adhesion of DLC coatings; and characterization of DLC coatings by electron microscopy, FTIR, sputter depth profiling, stress measurements, and nanoindentation.

  2. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intarasiri, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Bootkul, D.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  3. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricating Diamond Films and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    The tribological properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films vary with the environment, possessing a Jekyll-and-Hyde character. CVD diamond has low coefficient of friction and high wear resistance in air but high coefficient of friction and low wear resistance in vacuum. Improving the tribological functionality of materials (such as achieving low friction and good wear resistance) was an aim of this investigation. Three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of CVD diamond have shown that its friction and wear are significantly reduced in ultrahigh vacuum. The main criteria for judging whether diamond films are an effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating material were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which must be less than 0.1 and on the order of 10(exp 6) cu mm/N(dot)m, respectively. In the first study the presence of a thin film (less than 1 micron thick) of amorphous, nondiamond carbon (hydrogenated carbon, also called diamondlike carbon or DLC) on CVD diamond greatly decreased the coefficient of friction and the wear rate. Therefore, a thin DLC film on CVD diamond can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating in ultrahigh vacuum. In the second study the presence of an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by ion implantation significantly reduced the coefficient of friction and the wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. Therefore, such surface layers are acceptable for effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant applications of CVD diamond. In the third study CVD diamond in contact with cubic boron nitride exhibited low coefficient of friction in ultra high vacuum. Therefore, this materials combination can provide an effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant couple in ultrahigh vacuum.

  4. Physical and tribological properties of diamond films grown in argon-carbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zuiker, C.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Pan, X.; Li, J.C.; Csencsits, R.; Erdemir, A.; Bindal, C.; Fenske, G.

    1995-06-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films have been deposited using a microwave plasma consisting of argon, 2--10% hydrogen and a carbon precursor such as C{sub 60} or CH{sub 4}. It was found that it is possible to grow the diamond phase with both carbon precursors, although the hydrogen concentration in the plasma was 1--2 orders of magnitude lower than normally required in the absence of the argon. Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction measurements and transmission electron microscopy indicate the films are predominantly composed of diamond. Surface roughness, as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicate the nanocrystalline films grown in low hydrogen content plasmas grow exceptionally smooth (30--50 nm) to thicknesses of 10 {mu}m. The smooth nanocrystalline films result in low friction coefficients ({mu}=0.04--0.06) and low average wear rates as determined by pin-on-disk measurements.

  5. Synthesis of Diamond Nanoplatelets/Carbon Nanowalls on Graphite Substrate by MPCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Lyu, Jilei; Lin, Xiaoqi; Zhu, Jinfeng; Man, Weidong; Jiang, Nan

    2015-07-01

    The films composed of carbon nanowalls and diamond nanoplatelets, respectively, can be simultaneously formed on graphite substrate by controlling the hydrogen etching rate during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. To modulate the etching rate, two kinds of substrate design were used: a bare graphite plate and a graphite groove covered with a single crystal diamond sheet. After deposition at 1200°C for 3 hours, we find that dense diamond nanoplatelets were grown on the bare graphite, whereas carbon nanowalls were formed on the grooved surface, indicating that not only reaction temperature but also etching behavior is a key factor for nanostructure formation. supported by the Public Welfare Technology Application Projects of Zhejiang Province, China (No. 2013C33G3220012)

  6. Diamond crystallization in a CO2-rich alkaline carbonate melt with a nitrogen additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhryakov, Alexander F.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Nechaev, Denis V.

    2016-09-01

    Diamond crystallization was experimentally studied in a CO2-bearing alkaline carbonate melt with an increased content of nitrogen at pressure of 6.3 GPa and temperature of 1500 °C. The growth rate, morphology, internal structure of overgrown layers, and defect-impurity composition of newly formed diamond were investigated. The type of growth patterns on faces, internal structure, and nitrogen content were found to be controlled by both the crystallographic orientation of the growth surfaces and the structure of the original faces of diamond seed crystals. An overgrown layer has a uniform structure on the {100} plane faces of synthetic diamond and a fibrillar (fibrous) structure on the faceted surfaces of a natural diamond cube. The {111} faces have a polycentric vicinal relief with numerous twin intergrowths and micro twin lamellae. The stable form of diamond growth under experimental conditions is a curved-face hexoctahedron with small cube faces. The nitrogen impurity concentration in overgrown layers varies depending on the growth direction and surface type, from 100 to 1100 ppm.

  7. Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Swain; Greg M.

    2009-04-13

    The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

  8. Adhesion, cytoskeletal architecture and activation status of primary human macrophages on a diamond-like carbon coated surface.

    PubMed

    Linder, Stefan; Pinkowski, Wolfhard; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2002-02-01

    Diamond-like carbon is a promising surface coating for biomedicinal implants like coronary stents or hip joints. Before widespread clinical use of this material, its biocompatibility has to be thoroughly assessed. Cells likely to encounter a diamond-like coated implant in the human body are cells of the monocytic lineage. Their interaction with the diamond-like carbon coated surface will probably critically influence the fate of the implant, as monocytes orchestrate inflammatory reactions and also affect osseointegration of implants. We therefore investigated adhesion, cytoarchitecture and activation status of primary human monocytes and their differentiated derivatives, macrophages, on diamond-like coated glass coverslips using immunofluorescence technique. We show that adhesion of primary monocytes to a diamond-like-coated coverslip is slightly, but not significantly, enhanced in comparison to uncoated coverslips, while the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons of mature macrophages show a normal development. The activation status of macrophages, as judged by polarization of the cell body, was not affected by growth on a diamond-like carbon surface. We conclude that diamond-like carbon shows good indications for biocompatibility to blood monocytes in vitro. It is therefore unlikely that contact with a diamond-like carbon coated surface in the human body will elicit inflammatory signals by these cells.

  9. Optimization and Analysis of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coated Micro End Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Christopher D.

    This study compares the wear and performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coated and uncoated tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills when machining 6061-T6 aluminum. Images of the tool profiles before and after milling are used to track changes in geometry caused by tool wear. Tool performance was characterized by the magnitude of cutting and thrust forces acting on 300 mum diameter end mills and through imaging and analysis of the tool and workpiece surfaces. Thin NCD coatings (<300 nm) allowed for an average of approximately 30 mm of milling before cutting edge fracture. Before edge fracture, the NCD coated tools produced highly uniform, burr free channels. In contrast, significant burring and surface irregularities were evident when using the uncoated tools. Even after cutting edge fracture, the NCD coated tools continued to produce cleaner channels with a lower amount of burring than the uncoated tools but fractured much more severely. However, NCD remaining within the tools' flutes resulted in lower cutting forces due to a reduced effective friction coefficient (friction and adhesion) between the tool surface and the cut chip. Carbon ion implantation (CII), one method to prevent the severe edge failure experienced by the NCD coated end mills, was used as a surface preparation technique to enhance both the cutting edge wear resistance and to increase the nucleation and growth of the diamond coating. Initial milling tests from the carbon ion implanted tools have indicated a drastic improvement in resistance to cutting edge fracture. The implantation of ions into the tool's surface induced compressive stress on the cutting edge, thereby increasing tool resistance. However, the inconsistency of CII has thus far resulted in poorly adhered diamond coatings. Additional stress analysis on the cutting edge has revealed the formation of detrimental bending stresses present during micro milling with an NCD coating. Increasing the cutting edge radius and the coating

  10. Dosimetric characterization of a microDiamond detector in clinical scanned carbon ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G. Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A.; Mairani, A.; Raffaele, L.; Magro, G.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate for the first time the dosimetric properties of a new commercial synthetic diamond detector (PTW microDiamond) in high-energy scanned clinical carbon ion beams generated by a synchrotron at the CNAO facility. Methods: The detector response was evaluated in a water phantom with actively scanned carbon ion beams ranging from 115 to 380 MeV/u (30–250 mm Bragg peak depth in water). Homogeneous square fields of 3 × 3 and 6 × 6 cm{sup 2} were used. Short- and medium-term (2 months) detector response stability, dependence on beam energy as well as ion type (carbon ions and protons), linearity with dose, and directional and dose-rate dependence were investigated. The depth dose curve of a 280 MeV/u carbon ion beam, scanned over a 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} area, was measured with the microDiamond detector and compared to that measured using a PTW Advanced Markus ionization chamber, and also simulated using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The detector response in two spread-out-Bragg-peaks (SOBPs), respectively, centered at 9 and 21 cm depths in water and calculated using the treatment planning system (TPS) used at CNAO, was measured. Results: A negligible drift of detector sensitivity within the experimental session was seen, indicating that no detector preirradiation was needed. Short-term response reproducibility around 1% (1 standard deviation) was found. Only 2% maximum variation of microDiamond sensitivity was observed among all the evaluated proton and carbon ion beam energies. The detector response showed a good linear behavior. Detector sensitivity was found to be dose-rate independent, with a variation below 1.3% in the evaluated dose-rate range. A very good agreement between measured and simulated Bragg curves with both microDiamond and Advanced Markus chamber was found, showing a negligible LET dependence of the tested detector. A depth dose curve was also measured by positioning the microDiamond with its main axis oriented orthogonally to the beam

  11. Lithium Nitride Synthesized by in situ Lithium Deposition and Ion Implantation for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitama, Shintaro; Baba, Yuji; Fujii, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaru; Imahori, Yoshio

    Li3N synthesis on Li deposition layer was conducted without H2O and O2 by in situ lithium deposition in high vacuum chamber of 10-6 Pa and ion implantation techniques and the thermo-chemical stability of the Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) under laser heating and air exposure was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following conclusions were derived; (1) Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target with very low oxide and carbon contamination was synthesized by in situ lithium vacuum deposition and N2+ ion implantation without H2O and O2 additions, (2) The starting temperature of evaporation of Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target increased by 120K compared to that of the Li/Cu target and (3) Remarkable oxidation and carbon contamination were observed on the surface of Li3N/Li/Cu after air exposure and these contaminated compositions was not removed by Ar+ heavy sputtering.

  12. Mo-containing diamond-like carbon films with blue emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, T.; Wu, X. L.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Fan, J. Y.; Yang, L. W.; Chu, Paul K.; Siu, G. G.

    2005-08-01

    Molybdenum-containing diamond-like carbon (Mo-DLC) thin films were synthesized on silicon substrate using metal cathodic arc and acetylene dual plasma deposition. Microstructural observations show that fine γ-MoC nanocrystallites with sizes of 1-2 nm are embedded in amorphous carbon cross-linked structures. The Mo-DLC films were found to have a photoluminescence (PL) band in blue. Due to obvious PL spectral asymmetry, we Gaussian divided the PL peak into two bands with the peak positions at about 405 and 455 nm. Spectral analyses suggest that the two blue PL bands arise from sp 2 hybridized carbon clusters with different sizes and γ-MoC nanocrystallites. Our experimental results provide the understanding of the blue-emitting properties of metal-containing diamond-like carbon films.

  13. Multi-scale studies on diamond crystal and carbon microtubular growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhimarasetti, Gopinath

    Diamond and one-dimensional carbon tubular structures are two of the most technologically important materials today. Electronic devices utilizing the extreme properties of diamond could not be fully realized due to the lack of processes for large single crystals. The traditional methods for producing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) lack the ability to tune the internal diameters and morphologies essential for nano/microfluidics. In the case of diamond, limited understanding on the origin of defects during homoepitaxy on {100} surfaces or during growth on {100} facets of individual crystals limits our ability to grow large single crystals (or wafers). In this dissertation, it is hypothesized that the inconsistency in producing defect free diamond layers could be due to the role of gas phase impurities or the initial substrate surface topography. In this dissertation, multi-scale studies comprising zero-dimensional gas phase computations, interrupted growth experiments at different time scales and topographic characterization at different length scales are performed to provide insight into the role of gas phase impurities (such as sulfur) and the role of initial surface topography of diamond substrates on the origin and propagation of defects. A C-H-O ternary diagram is constructed based on steady state gas phase calculations and the role of sulfur on diamond deposition is studied using this diagram. Based on these studies, it is determined that sulfur increases the compositional window for diamond deposition by altering the gas phase compositions significantly even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm. It is also determined experimentally that sulfur addition affects the quality of diamond crystals by altering the surface chemistry at the growth interface. Based on the interrupted homoepitaxial growth experiments on diamond {100} substrates, the origin of defects have been identified to be the polishing grooves in the <110> direction present on a well polished substrate (<1

  14. SERS activity of Ag decorated nanodiamond and nano-β-SiC, diamond-like-carbon and thermally annealed diamond thin film surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kuntumalla, Mohan Kumar; Srikanth, Vadali Venkata Satya Siva; Ravulapalli, Satyavathi; Gangadharini, Upender; Ojha, Harish; Desai, Narayana Rao; Bansal, Chandrahas

    2015-09-01

    In the recent past surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based bio-sensing has gained prominence owing to the simplicity and efficiency of the SERS technique. Dedicated and continuous research efforts have been made to develop SERS substrates that are not only stable, durable and reproducible but also facilitate real-time bio-sensing. In this context diamond, β-SiC and diamond-like-carbon (DLC) and other related thin films have been promoted as excellent candidates for bio-technological applications including real time bio-sensing. In this work, SERS activities of nanodiamond, nano-β-SiC, DLC, thermally annealed diamond thin film surfaces were examined. DLC and thermally annealed diamond thin films were found to show SERS activity without any metal nanostructures on their surfaces. The observed SERS activities of the considered surfaces are explained in terms of the electromagnetic enhancement mechanism and charge transfer resonance process. PMID:25691097

  15. SERS activity of Ag decorated nanodiamond and nano-β-SiC, diamond-like-carbon and thermally annealed diamond thin film surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kuntumalla, Mohan Kumar; Srikanth, Vadali Venkata Satya Siva; Ravulapalli, Satyavathi; Gangadharini, Upender; Ojha, Harish; Desai, Narayana Rao; Bansal, Chandrahas

    2015-09-01

    In the recent past surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based bio-sensing has gained prominence owing to the simplicity and efficiency of the SERS technique. Dedicated and continuous research efforts have been made to develop SERS substrates that are not only stable, durable and reproducible but also facilitate real-time bio-sensing. In this context diamond, β-SiC and diamond-like-carbon (DLC) and other related thin films have been promoted as excellent candidates for bio-technological applications including real time bio-sensing. In this work, SERS activities of nanodiamond, nano-β-SiC, DLC, thermally annealed diamond thin film surfaces were examined. DLC and thermally annealed diamond thin films were found to show SERS activity without any metal nanostructures on their surfaces. The observed SERS activities of the considered surfaces are explained in terms of the electromagnetic enhancement mechanism and charge transfer resonance process.

  16. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Hunter, Jerry L.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-06-01

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500-1625 °C, were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  17. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Jerry L. Hunter, Jr.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-17

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500–1625°C, were investigated in this study by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Lastly, estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  18. Concepts and designs of ion implantation equipment for semiconductor processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Peter H.; Ryding, Geoffrey

    2006-11-01

    Manufacturing ion implantation equipment for doping semiconductors has grown into a two billion dollar business. The accelerators developed for nuclear physics research and isotope separation provided the technology from which ion implanters have been developed but the unique requirements of the semiconductor industry defined the evolution of the architecture of these small accelerators. Key elements will be described including ion generation and beam transport systems as well as the techniques used to achieve uniform doping over large wafers. The wafers are processed one at a time or in batches and are moved in and out of the vacuum by automated handling systems. The productivity of an implanter is of economic importance and there is continuing need to increase the usable beam current especially at low energies.

  19. Method of fabricating optical waveguides by ion implantation doping

    DOEpatents

    Appleton, Bill R.; Ashley, Paul R.; Buchal, Christopher J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for fabricating high-quality optical waveguides in optical quality oxide crystals by ion implantation doping and controlled epitaxial recrystallization is provided. Masked LiNbO.sub.3 crystals are implanted with high concentrations of Ti dopant at ion energies of about 350 keV while maintaining the crystal near liquid nitrogen temperature. Ion implantation doping produces an amorphous, Ti-rich nonequilibrium phase in the implanted region. Subsequent thermal annealing in a water-saturated oxygen atmosphere at up to 1000.degree. C. produces solid-phase epitaxial regrowth onto the crystalline substrate. A high-quality single crystalline layer results which incorporates the Ti into the crystal structure at much higher concentrations than is possible by standard diffusion techniques, and this implanted region has excellent optical waveguides properties.

  20. Method of fabricating optical waveguides by ion implantation doping

    DOEpatents

    Appleton, B.R.; Ashley, P.R.; Buchal, C.J.

    1987-03-24

    A method for fabricating high-quality optical waveguides in optical quality oxide crystals by ion implantation doping and controlled epitaxial recrystallization is provided. Masked LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals are implanted with high concentrations of Ti dopant at ion energies of about 360 keV while maintaining the crystal near liquid nitrogen temperature. Ion implantation doping produces an amorphous, Ti-rich nonequilibrium phase in the implanted region. Subsequent thermal annealing in a water-saturated oxygen atmosphere at up to 1000/degree/C produces solid-phase epitaxial regrowth onto the crystalline substrate. A high-quality crystalline layer results which incorporates the Ti into the crystal structure at much higher concentrations than is possible by standard diffusion techniques, and this implanted region has excellent optical waveguiding properties.

  1. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, John R.

    1988-01-01

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner.

  2. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, J.R.

    1988-08-16

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner. 7 figs.

  3. Annealing of Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Films: AN Ion Beam Analysis Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorman, Christian Aaron

    The Van de Graaff accelerator at Case Western Reserve University was used to study annealed diamond and diamondlike carbon films. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection analysis were used to characterize the as-deposited and annealed samples. The diamond films were deposited by microwave enhanced CVD while the diamondlike carbon films were deposited by plasma enhanced CVD and ion beam techniques. Included in the study were nitrogenated diamondlike carbon films. The samples were annealed inside the ion scattering chamber via a heated sample holder. The samples were annealed in a stepwise manner, beginning at room temperature and ending at 550^circC. RBS and ERD spectra were simultaneously collected at each step in the annealing process. The compositional stability of the diamondlike carbon samples was determined. PECVD diamondlike carbon films remained stable up to 400^circ C, above which the hydrogen effusion was quite high. Nitrogenated diamondlike carbon films containing less than 10 atomic percent hydrogen remained stable up to 400^ circC while the hydrogenated samples were not stable above 200^circC. A distinct hydrogen enriched surface region was observed on the diamond samples. This region disappeared upon annealing at 400^circC and is most likely due to hydrogen containing adsorbates on the surface. The dynamics of this region were investigated and compared with secondary electron emission data on these samples.

  4. GaAs Hall devices produced by local ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettenpaul, E.; Huber, J.; Weidlich, H.; Flossmann, W.; von Borcke, U.

    1981-08-01

    GaAs Hall devices were produced by complete planar technology using two selective silicon ion implantation steps. The fundamental characteristics of these devices with respect to reproducible implantation dose and geometry of cross-shaped elements are obtained both by experiment and calculation. The prominent properties of the GaAs Hall elements presented are high sensitivity and linearity, small temperature dependence of sensitivity and resistance, and low residual voltage.

  5. Urinary catheter with polyurethane coating modified by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurina, I.; Nechitailo, G. S.; Svistkov, A. L.; Kondyurin, A.; Bilek, M.

    2015-01-01

    A low friction urinary catheter that could be used without a lubricant is proposed in this work. A polyurethane coating was synthesised on the surface of a metal guide wire catheter. Ion implantation was applied to surface modify the polyurethane coating. FTIR ATR, wetting angle, AFM and friction tests were used for analysis. Low friction was found to be provided by the formation of a hard carbonised layer on the polyurethane surface.

  6. The role of nanographitic phase on enhancing the electron field emission properties of hybrid granular structured diamond films: the electron energy loss spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Joji; Jothiramalingam Sankaran, Kamatchi; Thomas, Joseph P.; Tai, N. H.; Chen, Huang-Chin; Lin, I.-Nan

    2014-10-01

    The electron field emission (EFE) properties of the hybrid granular structured diamond (HiD) films were markedly improved by N-ion implantation and annealing processes. The evolution of microstructure/bonding structure of the films due to these processes was investigated using the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), respectively. The N-ion implanted/annealed HiD films showed a low turn-on field of (E0)HiD = 7.4 V µm-1 with large current density of (Je)HiD = 600 µA cm-2, at 17.8 V µm-1, compared with pristine HiD films ((E0) = 10.3 V µm-1, (Je) = 95 µA cm-2 at the same applied field). While the TEM studies revealed only the microstructural evolution due to N-ion implantation/annealing processes, the EELS elucidated the change in bonding structure, namely the transformation between the sp3-bonded carbons and the sp2-bonded ones. Therefore, the combined TEM/EELS analyses provided more insight into understand the mechanism by which the N-ion implantation/annealing processes enhanced the EFE properties of HiD films. These studies clearly demonstrated that the N-ion implantation/annealing processes induced the formation of nanographitic clusters. These nanographitic phases form an interconnected path throughout the film surface facilitating the easy transport of electrons and thereby markedly enhancing the EFE properties for the N implanted/annealed HiD films.

  7. Biologic stability of plasma ion-implanted miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Chae; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Park, Young-Chel; Jung, Han-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To gain basic information regarding the biologic stability of plasma ion-implanted miniscrews and their potential clinical applications. Methods Sixteen plasma ion-implanted and 16 sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) miniscrews were bilaterally inserted in the mandibles of 4 beagles (2 miniscrews of each type per quadrant). Then, 250 - 300 gm of force from Ni-Ti coil springs was applied for 2 different periods: 12 weeks on one side and 3 weeks contralaterally. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and mandibular specimens including the miniscrews were collected. The insertion torque and mobility were compared between the groups. The bone-implant contact and bone volume ratio were calculated within 800 µm of the miniscrews and compared between the loading periods. The number of osteoblasts was also quantified. The measurements were expressed as percentages and analyzed by independent t-tests (p < 0.05). Results No significant differences in any of the analyzed parameters were noted between the groups. Conclusions The preliminary findings indicate that plasma ion-implanted miniscrews have similar biologic characteristics to SLA miniscrews in terms of insertion torque, mobility, bone-implant contact rate, and bone volume rate. PMID:23814706

  8. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods - ion implantation - is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  9. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Land, Cecil E.; Peercy, Paul S.

    1983-01-01

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Implanted ions include H.sup.+, He.sup.+, Ne.sup.+, Ar.sup.+, as well as chemically reactive ions from Fe, Cr, and Al. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the absorption characteristics of the PLZT material from near-UV light to visible light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to the positive ions at sufficient density, from 1.times.10.sup.12 to 1.times.10.sup.17, and with sufficient energy, from 100 to 500 KeV, to provide photosensitivity enhancement. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%, a lead zirconate content of 62 to 70 mole %, and a lead titanate content of 38 to 30%. The ions are implanted at a depth of 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate.

  10. High concentration of deuterium in palladium from plasma ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Lee, W.M. )

    1991-11-01

    Based on a theoretical calculation, a new scheme to increase deuterium density in palladium over its initial value is presented. This deuterium enrichment scheme makes use of plasma ion implantation. A cylindrical palladium rod (target) preloaded with deuterium atoms, coated with a diffusion-barrier material, is immersed in a deuterium plasma. The palladium rod is connected to a high-power modulator which provides a series of negative-voltage pulses. During these negative pulses, deuterium ions fall into the target, penetrate the diffusion barrier, and are implanted inside the palladium. For reasonable system parameters allowed by present technology, it is found from theoretical calculations that the saturation deuterium density after prolonged ion implantation can be several times the palladium atomic number density. Assuming an initial deuterium density, {ital n}{sub 0}=4{times}10{sup 22} cm{sup {minus}3}, it is also found that the deuterium density in palladium can triple its original value within a few days of the ion implantation for a reasonable target size. Because of the small diffusion coefficient in palladium, the incoming ions do not diffuse quickly inward, thereby accumulating near the target surface at the beginning of the implantation.

  11. Ion implantation effects in 'cosmic' dust grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibring, J. P.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.; Meunier, R.; Jouffrey, B.; Jouret, C.

    1974-01-01

    Cosmic dust grains, whatever their origin may be, have probably suffered a complex sequence of events including exposure to high doses of low-energy nuclear particles and cycles of turbulent motions. High-voltage electron microscope observations of micron-sized grains either naturally exposed to space environmental parameters on the lunar surface or artificially subjected to space simulated conditions strongly suggest that such events could drastically modify the mineralogical composition of the grains and considerably ease their aggregation during collisions at low speeds. Furthermore, combined mass spectrometer and ionic analyzer studies show that small carbon compounds can be both synthesized during the implantation of a mixture of low-energy D, C, N ions in various solids and released in space by ion sputtering.

  12. Proceedings of the Seventh Applied Diamond Conference/Third Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference (ADC/FCT 2003)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakawa, M. (Editor); Miyoshi, K. (Editor); Koga, Y. (Editor); Schaefer, L. (Editor); Tzeng, Y. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    These are the Proceedings of the Seventh Applied Diamond Conference/Third Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference held at Epochal Tsukuba International Conference Center from August 18 to 21, 2003. The diamond CVD process was first reported by Dr. Spitsyn in 1981 and Prof. S. Iijima reported his discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991. In the past years, both diamond-related materials and novel carbon materials have attracted considerable interest by the scientific, technological, and industrial community. Many practical and commercial products of diamond materials are reported in these proceedings. A broad variety of applications of carbon nanotubes and novel carbons have also been explored and demonstrated. Having more than 175 invited and contributing papers by authors from over 18 countries for presentations at ADC/FCT 2003 clearly demonstrates that these materials, due to the combination of their superior properties, are both scientifically amazing and economically significant.

  13. Proceedings of the Sixth Applied Diamond Conference/Second Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference (ADC/FCT 2001)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Y. (Editor); Miyoshi, K. (Editor); Yoshikawa, M. (Editor); Murakawa, M. (Editor); Koga, Y. (Editor); Kobashi, K. (Editor); Amaratunga, G. A. J. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    These are the Proceedings of the Sixth Applied Diamond Conference/Second Frontier Carbon Technology Joint Conference hosted by Auburn University from August 6 to 10, 2001. The diamond CVD process was first reported by Dr. Spitsyn in 1981 and Prof. S. Iijima reported his discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991. In the past years, both diamond-related materials and novel carbon materials have attracted considerable interest by the scientific, technological, and industrial community. Many practical and commercial products of diamond materials are reported in these proceedings. A broad variety of applications of carbon nanotubes and novel carbons have also been explored and demonstrated. Having more than 200 invited and contributing papers by authors from over 20 countries for presentations at ADC/FCT 2001 clearly demonstrates that these materials, due to the combination of their superior properties, are both scientifically amazing and economically significant.

  14. Global mantle convection: Evidence from carbon and nitrogen isotopes in super-deep diamonds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palot, M.; Cartigny, P.; Harris, J.; Kaminsky, F. V.; Stachel, T.

    2009-12-01

    Constraining the convective regime of the Earth’s mantle has profound implications for our understanding of the Earth’s cooling and the geodynamics of plate tectonics. Although subducting plates seem to be occasionally deflected at 660 km, evidence from seismic tomography and fluid dynamics suggest that substantial amounts of material reach the core-mantle boundary. Most geochemists, on the other hand, based on evidence from noble gases, would argue for the presence of separate upper and lower mantle reservoirs. Diamond provides a unique opportunity to sample those parts of the mantle that remains inaccessible by any other means. Some mineral associations in diamond, such as majoritic garnet, calcic and magnesian perovskite and manganoan ilmenite with ferropericlase have been recognised as originated from the transition zone down to the lower mantle (Stachel et al., 1999; Kaminsky et al., 2001). In addition, nitrogen in these diamonds is potentially a good tracer for mantle geodynamics. Exchanges between an inner reservoir (characterised by negative δ15N) via degassing at oceanic ridges with an outer reservoir (characterised by positive δ15N) via recycling at a subduction zones can lead to isotopic contrast in a stratified mantle. Because of common super-deep mineral inclusion assemblages in diamonds from Juina (Brazil) and Kankan (Guinea), we carried out a detailed study of nitrogen and carbon isotopes. The Juina diamonds show broadly similar ranges of δ15N from +3.8‰ down to -8.8‰ for both upper (UM) and lower (LM) mantle diamonds. This important feature is also found for UM and LM diamonds from Kankan, although the range of δ15N differs with values from +9.6‰ down to -39.4‰. Both sets of results suggest extensive material-isotopic exchange through the 660km discontinuity, contrary to the idea of an isolated reservoir. Transition zone (TZ) diamonds are enriched in 13C with δ13C from -3.1‰ up to +3.8‰ at Kankan but those of Juina are depleted

  15. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Juan; Ding, Gang; Li, Jinlu; Yang, Shenhui; Fang, Bisong; Sun, Hongchen; Zhou, Yanmin

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased ( p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  16. Processing of silicon solar cells by ion implantation and laser annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnucci, J. A.; Matthei, K. W.; Greenwald, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods to improve the radiation tolerance of silicon cells for spacecraft use are described. The major emphasis of the program was to reduce the process-induced carbon and oxygen impurities in the junction and base regions of the solar cell, and to measure the effect of reduced impurity levels on the radiation tolerance of cells. Substrates of 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 ohm-cm float-zone material were used as starting material in the process sequence. High-dose, low-energy ion implantation was used to form the junction in n+p structures. Implant annealing was performed by conventional furnace techniques and by pulsed laser and pulsed electron beam annealing. Cells were tested for radiation tolerance at Spire and NASA-LeRC. After irradiation by 1 MeV electrons to a fluence of 10 to the 16th power per sq cm, the cells tested at Spire showed no significant process induced variations in radiation tolerance. However, for cells tested at Lewis to a fluence of 10 to the 15th power per sq cm, ion-implanted cells annealed in vacuum by pulsed electron beam consistently showed the best radiation tolerance for all cell resistivities.

  17. Osteopontin (OPN) is an important protein to mediate improvements in the biocompatibility of C ion-implanted silicone rubber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-liang; Shi, Xiao-hua; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yi-ming; Shen, Li-ru; Lei, Ze-yuan; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Cao, Cong; Fan, Dong-li

    2014-01-01

    Medical device implants are drawing increasing amounts of interest from modern medical practitioners. However, this attention is not evenly spread across all such devices; most of these implantable devices can cause adverse reactions such as inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis, and infection. In this work, the biocompatibility of silicone rubber (SR) was improved through carbon (C) ion implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that these newly generated carbon-implanted silicone rubbers (C-SRs) had large, irregular peaks and deep valleys on their surfaces. The water contact angle of the SR surface decreased significantly after C ion implantation. C ion implantation also changed the surface charge distribution, silicone oxygen rate, and chemical-element distribution of SR to favor cell attachment. The dermal fibroblasts cultured on the surface C-SR grew faster and showed more typical fibroblastic shapes. The expression levels of major adhesion proteins, including talin-1, zyxin, and vinculin, were significantly higher in dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR coated plates than in dermal fibroblasts cultured on SR. Those same dermal fibroblasts on C-SRs showed more pronounced adhesion and migration abilities. Osteopontin (OPN), a critical extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, was up-regulated and secreted from dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity was also increased. These cells were highly mobile and were able to adhere to surfaces, but these abilities were inhibited by the monoclonal antibody against OPN, or by shRNA-mediated MMP-9 knockdown. Together, these results suggest that C ion implantation significantly improves SR biocompatibility, and that OPN is important to promote cell adhesion to the C-SR surface.

  18. Osteopontin (OPN) Is an Important Protein to Mediate Improvements in the Biocompatibility of C Ion-Implanted Silicone Rubber

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-ming; Shen, Li-ru; Lei, Ze-yuan; Zhang, Zhi-qing; Cao, Cong; Fan, Dong-li

    2014-01-01

    Medical device implants are drawing increasing amounts of interest from modern medical practitioners. However, this attention is not evenly spread across all such devices; most of these implantable devices can cause adverse reactions such as inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis, and infection. In this work, the biocompatibility of silicone rubber (SR) was improved through carbon (C) ion implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that these newly generated carbon-implanted silicone rubbers (C-SRs) had large, irregular peaks and deep valleys on their surfaces. The water contact angle of the SR surface decreased significantly after C ion implantation. C ion implantation also changed the surface charge distribution, silicone oxygen rate, and chemical-element distribution of SR to favor cell attachment. The dermal fibroblasts cultured on the surface C-SR grew faster and showed more typical fibroblastic shapes. The expression levels of major adhesion proteins, including talin-1, zyxin, and vinculin, were significantly higher in dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR coated plates than in dermal fibroblasts cultured on SR. Those same dermal fibroblasts on C-SRs showed more pronounced adhesion and migration abilities. Osteopontin (OPN), a critical extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, was up-regulated and secreted from dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity was also increased. These cells were highly mobile and were able to adhere to surfaces, but these abilities were inhibited by the monoclonal antibody against OPN, or by shRNA-mediated MMP-9 knockdown. Together, these results suggest that C ion implantation significantly improves SR biocompatibility, and that OPN is important to promote cell adhesion to the C-SR surface. PMID:24911051

  19. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  20. Doping and effect of nano-diamond and carbon-nanotubes on flux pinning properties of MgB 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Yang, Y.; Cheng, C. H.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-10-01

    Doping effects of two types of nano-carbons: nano-diamond and carbon-nanotubes (CNTs), on the flux pinning properties of MgB2 bulk materials have been studied. Compared with nano-diamond, CNTs is prone to be doped into MgB2 lattice. Nano-diamond doping improves Jc(H) characteristics more significantly than CNTs doping in MgB2. TEM analysis reveals a unique microstructure in diamond-doped MgB2, which consists of tightly packed MgB2 nanograins (50-100 nm) with dense distribution of diamond nanoparticles (10-20 nm) inside the grains. Relatively, such a unique microstructure is not easy to form in CNTs-doped MgB2 due to an active reaction between CNTs and MgB2.

  1. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high

  2. Electrochemical Behavior of Carbon Nanostructured Electrodes: Graphene, Carbon Nanotubes, and Nanocrystalline Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Akshay Sanjay

    The primary goals of this research were to investigate the electrochemical behavior of carbon nanostructures of varying morphology, identify morphological characteristics that improve electrochemical capacitance for applications in energy storage and neural stimulation, and engineer and characterize a boron-­doped diamond (BDD) electrode based electrochemical system for disinfection of human liquid waste. Carbon nanostructures; ranging from vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-­CNTs) to carbon nanosheets (CNS); were synthesized using a MPECVD system. The nanostructures were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. In addition to employing commonly used electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), a new technique was developed to evaluate the energy and power density of individual electrodes. This facilitated comparison of a variety of electrode materials without having to first develop complex device packaging schemes. It was found that smaller pore size and higher density of carbon foliates on a three-dimensional scaffold of carbon nanotubes increased specific capacitance. A design of experiments (DOE) study was conducted to explore the parametric space of the MWCNT system. A range of carbon nanostructures of varying morphology were obtained. It was observed that the capacitance was dependent on defect density. Capacitance increased with defect density. A BDD electrode was characterized for use in a module designed to disinfect human liquid waste as a part of a new advanced energy neutral, water and additive-free toilet designed for treating waste at the point of source. The electrode was utilized in a batch process system that generated mixed oxidants from ions present in simulated urine and inactivated E. Coli bacteria. Among the mixed oxidants, the concentration of chlorine species was measured and was

  3. On diamond, graphitic and amorphous carbons in primitive extraterrestrial solar system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon is among the most abundant elements in the universe and carbon chemistry in meteorites and comets is an important key to understanding many Solar System and interstellar processes. Yet, the mineralogical properties and interrelations between various structural forms of elemental carbon remain ambiguous. Crystalline elemental carbons include rhombohedral graphite, hexagonal graphite, cubic diamond, hexagonal diamond (i.e., lonsdaleite or carbon-2H) and chaoite. Elemental carbon also occurs as amorphous carbon and poorly graphitized (or turbostratic) carbon but of all the forms of elemental carbon only graphite is stable under physical conditions that prevail in small Solar System bodies and in the interstellar medium. The recent discovery of cubic diamond in carbonaceous chondrites and hexagonal diamond in chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have created a renewed interest in the crystalline elemental carbons that were not formed by shock processes on a parent body. Another technique, Raman spectroscopy, confirms a widespread occurrence of disordered graphite in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite and in chondritic IDPs. Elemental carbons have also been identified by their characteristic K-edge features in electron energy loss spectra (EELS). However, the spectroscopic data do not necessarily coincide with those obtained by selected area electron diffraction (SAED). In order to interpret these data in terms of rational crystalline structures, it may be useful to consider the principles underlying electron diffraction and spectroscopic analyses. Electron diffraction depends on electron scattering, on the type of atom and the distance between atoms in a crystal lattice. Spectroscopic data are a function of the type of atom and the energy of bonds between atoms. Also, SAED is a bulk sampling technique when compared to techniques such as Raman spectroscopy or EELS. Thus, it appears that combined analyses provide contradictory results and that amorphous

  4. Creation of deep blue light emitting nitrogen-vacancy center in nanosized diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Himics, L. Tóth, S.; Veres, M.; Koós, M.; Balogh, Z.

    2014-03-03

    This paper reports on the formation of complex defect centers related to the N3 center in nanosized diamond by employing plasma immersion and focused ion beam implantation methods. He{sup +} ion implantation into nanosized diamond “layer” was performed with the aim of creating carbon atom vacancies in the diamond structure, followed by the introduction of molecular N{sub 2}{sup +} ion and heat treatment in vacuum at 750 °C to initiate vacancy diffusion. To decrease the sp{sup 2} carbon content of nanosized diamond formed during the implantation processes, a further heat treatment at 450 °C in flowing air atmosphere was used. The modification of the bonding properties after each step of defect creation was monitored by Raman scattering measurements. The fluorescence measurements of implanted and annealed nanosized diamond showed the appearance of an intensive and narrow emission band with fine structures at 2.98 eV, 2.83 eV, and 2.71 eV photon energies.

  5. Creation of deep blue light emitting nitrogen-vacancy center in nanosized diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himics, L.; Tóth, S.; Veres, M.; Balogh, Z.; Koós, M.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on the formation of complex defect centers related to the N3 center in nanosized diamond by employing plasma immersion and focused ion beam implantation methods. He+ ion implantation into nanosized diamond "layer" was performed with the aim of creating carbon atom vacancies in the diamond structure, followed by the introduction of molecular N2+ ion and heat treatment in vacuum at 750 °C to initiate vacancy diffusion. To decrease the sp2 carbon content of nanosized diamond formed during the implantation processes, a further heat treatment at 450 °C in flowing air atmosphere was used. The modification of the bonding properties after each step of defect creation was monitored by Raman scattering measurements. The fluorescence measurements of implanted and annealed nanosized diamond showed the appearance of an intensive and narrow emission band with fine structures at 2.98 eV, 2.83 eV, and 2.71 eV photon energies.

  6. A light carbon reservoir recorded in zircon-hosted diamond from the Jack Hills.

    PubMed

    Nemchin, Alexander A; Whitehouse, Martin J; Menneken, Martina; Geisler, Thorsten; Pidgeon, Robert T; Wilde, Simon A

    2008-07-01

    The recent discovery of diamond-graphite inclusions in the Earth's oldest zircon grains (formed up to 4,252 Myr ago) from the Jack Hills metasediments in Western Australia provides a unique opportunity to investigate Earth's earliest known carbon reservoir. Here we report ion microprobe analyses of the carbon isotope composition of these diamond-graphite inclusions. The observed delta(13)C(PDB) values (expressed using the PeeDee Belemnite standard) range between -5 per mil and -58 per mil with a median of -31 per mil. This extends beyond typical mantle values of around -6 per mil to values observed in metamorphic and some eclogitic diamonds that are interpreted to reflect deep subduction of low-delta(13)C(PDB) biogenic surface carbon. Low delta(13)C(PDB) values may also be produced by inorganic chemical reactions, and therefore are not unambiguous evidence for life on Earth as early as 4,250 Myr ago. Regardless, our results suggest that a low-delta(13)C(PDB) reservoir may have existed on the early Earth. PMID:18596808

  7. Evaluation of bacterial adhesion on Si-doped diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.

    2007-06-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films as biomaterial for medical devices have been attracting great interest due to their excellent properties such as hardness, low friction and chemical inertness. It has been demonstrated that the properties of DLC films can be further improved by the addition of silicon into DLC films, such as thermal stability, compressive stress, etc. However no research work on anti-bacterial properties of silicon-doped diamond-like carbon films has been reported. In this paper the surface physical and chemical properties of Si-doped diamond-like carbon films with various Si contents on 316 stainless steel substrate prepared by a magnetron sputtering technique were investigated, including surface topography, surface chemistry, the sp 3/sp 2 ratio, contact angle, surface free energy, etc. Bacterial adhesion to Si-doped DLC films was evaluated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus which frequently cause medical device-associated infections. The experimental results showed that bacterial adhesion decreased with increasing the silicon content in the films. All the Si-doped DLC films performed much better than stainless steel 316L on reducing bacterial attachment.

  8. Characterisation of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) laser targets by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddock, D.; Parker, T.; Spindloe, C.; Tolley, M.

    2016-04-01

    The search for target materials suitable for High Power Laser Experiments at ultralow thicknesses (below ten nanometres) is ongoing. Diamond-Like Carbon is investigated as an answer for a low-Z material that can survive target chamber pump-down and laser prepulse. DLC was produced using Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition, using with varying gas flow mixtures of argon and methane. The methane plasma deposits amorphous carbon onto the substrate and the argon plasma re-sputters the weakly bonded carbon leaving a high proportion of diamond-like bonding. Bonding natures were probed using Raman spectroscopy; analysis of the resulting spectrum showed that flow rates of 40sccm/60sccm methane to argon produced DLC films with a diamond-like (sp 3) content of ∼20%. Increasing the methane gas flow decreased this value to less than 5%. DLC foils were processed into laser targets by method of float off; using a sodium chloride release layer and lowering into water, this was then lifted onto an array of apertures allowing for laser irradiation of the material with no backing. DLC with 20% sp 3 content showed superior yield when compared to other materials such as metals and some plastics of the same thickness, with ∼70% of the target positions surviving the float off procedure at <10nm. As a result of this work DLC targets have been available for a number of experiments at the Central Laser Facility.

  9. Temperature-dependant study of phosphorus ion implantation in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, M. A.; Smith, A. J.; Jeynes, C.; Gwilliam, R. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present experimental results on shallow junction formation in germanium by phosphorus ion implantation and standard rapid thermal processing. An attempt is made to improve phosphorus activation by implanting phosphorus at high and low temperature. The focus is on studying the germanium damage and phosphorus activation as a function of implant temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with channelling and Hall Effect measurements are employed for characterisation of germanium damage and phosphorus activation, respectively. High and low temperature implants were found to be better compared to room temperature implant.

  10. Ion implantation in semiconductors studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.

    1989-03-01

    The application of Mössbauer spectroscopy as an extremely sensitive characterization technique for ion-implanted semiconductors, is illustrated. Factors influencing the final landing site of implanted ions are first reviewed, as well as ion beam induced material modifications. Recent applications of Mössbauer spectroscopy in this field are then discussed including the study of supersaturated solutions of Sb and Sn in Si, the formation of epitaxial and buried silicides and the search for the DX-center in GaAs.

  11. Characterization of an RF plasma ion source for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopalidis, Peter M.; Wan Zhimin

    2012-11-06

    A novel inductively coupled RF plasma ion source has been developed for use in a beamline ion implanter. Ion density data have been taken with an array of four Langmuir probes spaced equally at the source extraction arc slit. These provide ion density uniformity information as a function of source pressure, RF power and gas mixture composition. In addition, total extracted ion beam current data are presented for the same conditions. The comparative advantages of the RF source in terms of higher beam current, reduced maintenance and overall productivity improvement compared to a hot cathode source are discussed.

  12. Pulsed-electron-beam annealing of ion-implantation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, A. C.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Little, R. G.; Minnucci, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Short-duration high-intensity pulsed electron beams have been used to anneal ion-implantation damage in silicon and to electrically activate the dopant species. Lattice regrowth and dopant activation were determined using He(+)-4 backscattering, SEM, TEM, and device performance characteristics as diagnostic techniques. The annealing mechanism is believed to be liquid-phase epitaxial regrowth initiating from the substrate. The high-temperature transient pulse produced by the electron beam causes the dopant to diffuse rapidly in the region where the liquid state is achieved.

  13. Microwave annealing of ion implanted 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.A.; Rao, M.V.; Tian, Y.L.; Holland, O.W.; Kelner, G.; Freitas, J.A. Jr.; Ahmad, I.

    1996-05-01

    Microwave rapid thermal annealing has been utilized to remove the lattice damage caused by nitrogen (N) ion-implantation as well as to activate the dopant in 6H-SiC. Samples were annealed at temperatures as high as 1,400 C, for 10 min. Van der Pauw Hall measurements indicate an implant activation of 36%, which is similar to the value obtained for the conventional furnace annealing at 1,600 C. Good lattice quality restoration was observed in the Rutherford backscattering and photoluminescence spectra.

  14. Magnetic insulation of secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Wood, B.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1993-09-01

    The uncontrolled loss of accelerated secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation (PSII) can significantly reduce system efficiency and poses a potential x-ray hazard. This loss might be reduced by a magnetic field applied near the workpiece. The concept of magnetically-insulated PSII is proposed, in which secondary electrons are trapped to form a virtual cathode layer near the workpiece surface where the local electric field is essentially eliminated. Subsequent electrons that are emitted can then be reabsorbed by the workpiece. Estimates of anomalous electron transport from microinstabilities are made. Insight into the process is gained with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  15. Photoreflectance Study of Boron Ion-Implanted (100) Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amirtharaj, P. M.; Odell, M. S.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Alt, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Ion implanted (100) cadmium telluride was studied using the contactless technique of photoreflectance. The implantations were performed using 50- to 400-keV boron ions to a maximum dosage of 1.5 x 10(16)/sq cm, and the annealing was accomplished at 500 C under vacuum. The spectral measurements were made at 77 K near the E(0) and E(1) critical points; all the spectra were computer-fitted to Aspnes' theory. The spectral line shapes from the ion damaged, partially recovered and undamaged, or fully recovered regions could be identified, and the respective volume fraction of each phase was estimated.

  16. Does the Use of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating and Organophosphate Lubricant Additive Together Cause Excessive Tribochemical Material Removal?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Meyer, Harry M.; Luo, Huimin; Qu, Jun

    2015-08-22

    We observe unexpected wear increase on a steel surface that rubbed against diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings only when lubricated by phosphate-based antiwear additives. Contrary to the literature hypothesis of a competition between zinc dialkyldithiophosphate produced tribofilms and DLC-induced carbon transfer, here a new wear mechanism based on carbon-catalyzed tribochemical interactions supported by surface characterization is proposed

  17. Research and Technology Transfer Ion Implantation Technology for Specialty Materials: Proceedings of a joint workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeber, Robert R.

    1991-02-01

    The ion implantation research and technology transfer workshop brought together a diverse group of academic, industrial, and government participants. Several key issues highlighted were: (1) a need exists for new technology transfer infrastructures between universities, research labs and industry; (2) ion implantation technology has promise for several Army and industry applications because of environmental concerns and technological benefits; (3) the U.S. ion implantation industry is primarily service oriented; and (4) the cost of ion implantation technology could be significantly reduced if larger scale production equipment was available for on-line processing. A need exists in the U.S. for mechanisms and funds to develop such equipment.

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Packed Electrospun PAN-Based Carbon Fibers Incorporated with Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi; Lu, Chunyuan; Tulugan, Kelimu; Jin, Chunzi; Yoon, Soo Jong; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2016-02-01

    Multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond are renowned as superlative material due to their relatively high thermal conductivity and hardness while comparing with any bulk materials. In this research, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution incorporated with MWCNTs at an alteration of mass fractions (0 wt%, 0.6 wt%, 1 wt%, 2 wt%) were fabricated via electrospinning under optimized parameters. Dried composite nanofibers were stabilized and carbonized, after which water base polytrafluorethylene (PTFE) mixed with nano diamond powder solution was spin coated on them. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray scattering and Laserflash thermal conductivity were used to characterize the composite nanofiber sheets. The result shows that the thermal conductivity increased to 4.825 W/m K from 2.061 W/mK. The improvement of thermal conductivities is suggesting the incorporation of MWCNTs.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Packed Electrospun PAN-Based Carbon Fibers Incorporated with Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi; Lu, Chunyuan; Tulugan, Kelimu; Jin, Chunzi; Yoon, Soo Jong; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2016-02-01

    Multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond are renowned as superlative material due to their relatively high thermal conductivity and hardness while comparing with any bulk materials. In this research, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution incorporated with MWCNTs at an alteration of mass fractions (0 wt%, 0.6 wt%, 1 wt%, 2 wt%) were fabricated via electrospinning under optimized parameters. Dried composite nanofibers were stabilized and carbonized, after which water base polytrafluorethylene (PTFE) mixed with nano diamond powder solution was spin coated on them. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray scattering and Laserflash thermal conductivity were used to characterize the composite nanofiber sheets. The result shows that the thermal conductivity increased to 4.825 W/m K from 2.061 W/mK. The improvement of thermal conductivities is suggesting the incorporation of MWCNTs. PMID:27433684

  20. Method of synthesizing metal doped diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Mayumi (Inventor); Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of synthesizing metal doped carbon films by placing a substrate in a chamber with a selected amount of a metalorganic compound. An electron cyclotron resonance is applied to the chamber in order to vaporize the metalorganic compound. The resonance is applied to the chamber until a metal doped carbon film is formed. The metalorganic compound is preferably selected from the group consisting of an organic salt of ruthenium, palladium, gold or platinum.

  1. Proceedings of the conference on electrochemistry of carbon allotropes: Graphite, fullerenes and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, K.; Scherson, D.

    1998-02-01

    This conference provided an opportunity for electrochemists, physicists, materials scientists and engineers to meet and exchange information on different carbon allotropes. The presentations and discussion among the participants provided a forum to develop recommendations on research and development which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes. The following topics which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes were addressed: Graphitized and disordered carbons, as Li-ion intercalation anodes for high-energy-density, high-power-density Li-based secondary batteries; Carbons as substrate materials for catalysis and electrocatalysis; Boron-doped diamond film electrodes; and Electrochemical characterization and electrosynthesis of fullerenes and fullerene-type materials. Abstracts of the presentations are presented.

  2. Hybrid Quantum Device with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond Coupled to Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng-Bo; Xiang, Ze-Liang; Rabl, Peter; Nori, Franco

    2016-07-01

    We show that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond interfaced with a suspended carbon nanotube carrying a dc current can facilitate a spin-nanomechanical hybrid device. We demonstrate that strong magnetomechanical interactions between a single NV spin and the vibrational mode of the suspended nanotube can be engineered and dynamically tuned by external control over the system parameters. This spin-nanomechanical setup with strong, intrinsic, and tunable magnetomechanical couplings allows for the construction of hybrid quantum devices with NV centers and carbon-based nanostructures, as well as phonon-mediated quantum information processing with spin qubits.

  3. Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Zhu; Brewer, Marilee; Brown, Ian; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    1994-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment.

  4. Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Z.; Brewer, M.; Brown, I.; Komvopoulos, K.

    1994-05-03

    A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment. 6 figures.

  5. Antimicrobial properties of diamond-like carbon-silver-platinum nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, R. J.; Abernathy, H.; Riester, L.; Berry, C. J.; Brigmon, R.

    2005-08-01

    Silver and platinum were incorporated within diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films using a multicomponent target pulsed laser deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy of the DLC-silver and DLC-platinum composite films reveals that these films self-assemble into particulate nanocomposite structures that possess a high fraction of sp 3-hybridized carbon atoms. Nanoindentation testing of DLC-silver nanocomposite films demonstrates that these films possess hardness and Young’s modulus values of approximately 35 and 350 GPa, respectively. DLC-silver-platinum films demonstrated exceptional antimicrobial properties against Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria.

  6. Carbon nanoscrolls on the surface of nanocrystalline graphite and diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Skovorodnikov, N. O. Malykhin, S. A.; Tuyakova, F. T.; Ismagilov, R. R.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2015-07-15

    Nanocrystalline graphite and diamond films with needlelike nanostructures on their surface have been obtained by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. According to the experimental data, these aggregates have the same nature for films of both types: they are tubular carbon nanoscrolls with a polygonal cross section. Nanoscrolls are formed by a helically folded graphene sheet; they look like twisted prisms. The needlelike prismatic structures have an average diameter in the range of 50‒500 nm, and their length reaches several micrometers. Possible mechanisms of formation of carbon nanostructures are discussed.

  7. Hybrid Quantum Device with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond Coupled to Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Bo; Xiang, Ze-Liang; Rabl, Peter; Nori, Franco

    2016-07-01

    We show that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond interfaced with a suspended carbon nanotube carrying a dc current can facilitate a spin-nanomechanical hybrid device. We demonstrate that strong magnetomechanical interactions between a single NV spin and the vibrational mode of the suspended nanotube can be engineered and dynamically tuned by external control over the system parameters. This spin-nanomechanical setup with strong, intrinsic, and tunable magnetomechanical couplings allows for the construction of hybrid quantum devices with NV centers and carbon-based nanostructures, as well as phonon-mediated quantum information processing with spin qubits. PMID:27419577

  8. Etching and structural changes in nitrogen plasma immersion ion implanted polystyrene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, B. K.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Kondyurin, A.; Mizuno, K.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2006-06-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), with nitrogen ions of energy 20 keV in the fluence range of 5 × 1014-2 × 1016 ions cm-2, is used to modify 100 nm thin films of polystyrene on silicon wafer substrates. Ellipsometry is used to study changes in thickness with etching and changes in optical constants. Two distinctly different etch rates are observed as the polymer structure is modified. FTIR spectroscopy data reveals the structural changes, including changes in aromatic and aliphatic groups and oxidation and carbonisation processes, occurring in the polystyrene film as a function of the ion fluence. The transformation to a dense amorphous carbon-like material was observed to progress through an intermediate structural form containing a high concentration of Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds.

  9. Experimental investigation of plasma-immersion ion implantation treatment for biocompatible polyurethane implants production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iziumov, R. I.; Beliaev, A. Y.; Kondyurina, I. V.; Shardakov, I. N.; Kondyurin, A. V.; Bilek, M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Modification of the surface layer of polyurethane with plasma-immersion ion implantation (PIII) and studying its physical and chemical changes have been discussed in this paper. The goal of the research was to obtain carbonized layer allowing creating biocompatible polyurethane implants. The experiments of PIII treatment in various modes were performed. The investigation of the modified surface characteristics was carried out by observing the kinetics of free surface energy for two weeks after treatment. The regularities between treatment time and the level of free surface energy were detected. The explanation of high energy level was given through the appearance of free radicals in the surface layer of material. The confirmation of the chemical activation of the polyurethane surface after PIII treatment was obtained.

  10. Synthesis of (SiC){sub 3}N{sub 4} thin films by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Uslu, C.; Lee, D.H.; Berta, Y.; Park, B.; Thadhani, N.N.; Poker, D.B.

    1993-12-31

    We have investigated the synthesis of carbon-silicon-nitride compounds by ion implantation. In these experiments, 100 keV nitrogen ions were implanted into polycrystalline {beta}-SiC (cubic phase) at various substrate temperatures and ion doses. These thin films were characterized by x-ray diffraction with a position-sensitive detector, transmission electron microscopy with chemical analysis, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The as-implanted samples show a buried amorphous layer at a depth of 170 nm. Peak concentration of nitrogen saturates at approximately 45 at. % with doses above {approximately} 9.0 {times} 10{sup 17} N/cm{sup 2} at 860{degree}C. These results suggest formation of a new phase by nitrogen implantation into {beta}-SiC.

  11. Wettability conversion of an aluminum-hydroxide nanostructure by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jihoon; Choi, Dukhyun; Kim, Hyungdae; Park, Yong Tae; Choi, Min-Jun; Chung, Kwun-Bum

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a method for controlling the wettability of an aluminum-hydroxide (Al(OH)3) nanostructure by using ion implantation. We implant Xe ions into Al(OH)3 nanostructures at dosages between 5 × 1014 to 1 × 1016 ions/cm2. The microscopic surface morphology of the nanostructure after implantation does not change under our dosing conditions. However, a drastic increase in the surface contact angle (CA) from 0° to 100° is observed at a dosage of 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. We attribute this significant change in CA to the composition and chemical bonding states of carbon contained within the Al(OH)3 nanostructure.

  12. Diamond formation by carbon saturation in C-O-H fluids during cold subduction of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria-Luce; Huizenga, Jan-Marten; Compagnoni, Roberto; Selverstone, Jane

    2014-10-01

    Microdiamonds in garnet of graphite-free ultrahigh pressure metamorphic (UHPM) rocks from Lago di Cignana (western Alps, Italy) represent the first occurrence of diamond in a low-temperature subduction complex of oceanic origin (T = ∼600 °C; P ⩾ 3.2 GPa). The presence of diamonds in fluid inclusions provides evidence for carbon transport and precipitation in an oxidized H2O-rich C-O-H crustal fluid buffered by mineral equilibria at sub-arc mantle depths. The structural state of carbon in fluid-precipitated diamonds was analyzed with 514 nm excitation source confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The first order peak of sp3-bonded carbon in crystalline diamonds lies at 1331 (±2) cm-1, similar to diamonds in other UHPM terranes. The analysis of the spectra shows additional Raman features due to sp2 carbon phases indicating the presence of both hydrogenated carbon (assigned to trans-polyacetylene segments) in grain boundaries, and graphite-like amorphous carbon in the bulk, i.e. showing a structural disorder much greater than that found in graphite of other UHPM rocks. In one rock sample, disordered microdiamonds are recognized inside fluid inclusions by the presence of a weaker and broader Raman band, downshifted from 1332 to 1328 cm-1. The association of sp3- with sp2-bonded carbon indicates variable kinetics during diamond precipitation. We suggest that precipitation of disordered sp2 carbon acted as a precursor for diamond formation outside the thermodynamic stability field of crystalline graphite. Diamond formation started when the H2O-rich fluid reached the excess concentration of C required for the spontaneous nucleation of diamond. The interplay of rock buffered fO2 and the prograde P-T path at high pressures controlled carbon saturation. Thermodynamic modeling confirms that the C-O-H fluids from which diamond precipitated must have been water rich (0.992

  13. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang, Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods—ion implantation—is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  14. Ion sources for energy extremes of ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, A; Johnson, B M; Batalin, V A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Kulevoy, T V; Kolomiets, A A; Pershin, V I; Petrenko, S V; Rudskoy, I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Gushenets, V I; Litovko, I V; Oks, E M; Yushkov, G Yu; Masunov, E S; Polozov, S M; Poole, H J; Storozhenko, P A; Svarovski, A Ya

    2008-02-01

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques that meet the two energy extreme range needs of meV and hundreads of eV ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of antimony and phosphorus ions: P(2+) [8.6 pmA (particle milliampere)], P(3+) (1.9 pmA), and P(4+) (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb(3+)Sb(4+), Sb(5+), and Sb(6+) respectively. For low energy ion implantation, our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA (electrical milliampere) of positive decaborane ions was extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bernas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  15. ION SOURCES FOR ENERGY EXTREMES OF ION IMPLANTATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HERSCHCOVITCH,A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; BATALIN, V.A.; KROPACHEV, G.N.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; KULEVOY, T.V.; KOLOMIETS, A.A.; PERSHIN, V.I.; PETRENKO, S.V.; RUDSKOY, I.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; BUGAEV, A.S.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; LITOVKO, I.V.; OKS, E.M.; YUSHKOV, G. YU.; MASEUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.; POOLE, H.J.; STOROZHENKO, P.A.; SVAROVSKI, YA.

    2007-08-26

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques, which meet the two energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. For low energy ion implantation our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, Boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bemas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  16. Self-organized surface ripple pattern formation by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofsäss, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Bobes, Omar

    2016-10-01

    Ion induced ripple pattern formation on solid surfaces has been extensively studied in the past and the theories describing curvature dependent ion erosion as well as redistribution of recoil atoms have been very successful in explaining many features of the pattern formation. Since most experimental studies use noble gas ion irradiation, the incorporation of the ions into the films is usually neglected. In this work we show that the incorporation or implantation of non-volatile ions also leads to a curvature dependent term in the equation of motion of a surface height profile. The implantation of ions can be interpreted as a negative sputter yield; and therefore, the effect of ion implantation is opposite to the one of ion erosion. For angles up to about 50°, implantation of ions stabilizes the surface, whereas above 50°, ion implantation contributes to the destabilization of the surface. We present simulations of the curvature coefficients using the crater function formalism and we compare the simulation results to the experimental data on the ion induced pattern formation using non-volatile ions. We present several model cases, where the incorporation of ions is a crucial requirement for the pattern formation.

  17. FeN foils by nitrogen ion-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Wang, Jian-Ping; Al Mehedi, Md; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-05-07

    Iron nitride samples in foil shape (free standing, 500 nm in thickness) were prepared by a nitrogen ion-implantation method. To facilitate phase transformation, the samples were bonded on the substrate followed by a post-annealing step. By using two different substrates, single crystal Si and GaAs, structural and magnetic properties of iron nitride foil samples prepared with different nitrogen ion fluences were characterized. α″-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase in iron nitride foil samples was obtained and confirmed by the proposed approach. A hard magnetic property with coercivity up to 780 Oe was achieved for the FeN foil samples bonded on Si substrate. The feasibility of using nitrogen ion implantation techniques to prepare FeN foil samples up to 500 nm thickness with a stable martensitic phase under high ion fluences has been demonstrated. A possible mechanism was proposed to explain this result. This proposed method could potentially be an alternative route to prepare rare-earth-free FeN bulk magnets by stacking and pressing multiple free-standing thick α″-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} foils together.

  18. Quantitative photothermal characterization of ion-implanted layers in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnick, Alex; Opsal, Jon

    2002-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of ion-implanted layers in Si using the damage-based theoretical modeling and experimental results obtained with the photomodulated reflectance (PMR) technique are described. Our theoretical approach combines the conventional quantum mechanics based calculations of the ion-induced damage depth profiles in semiconductors with the corresponding scaling of the thermal and carrier plasma parameters followed by the calculation of the photothermal response from a multilayered sample. The theoretical limit of the photothermal signal sensitivity to the implantation dose in the absence of optical and carrier plasma-wave interference effects is estimated. Simulations of the photothermal amplitude and phase dose dependencies allow us to follow the dynamics of the thermal- and carrier plasma waves in an ion-implanted semiconductor. The validity of the proposed damage-based modeling approach to the problem of quantitative analysis of surface-modified semiconductors is analyzed. It is shown that the results of the photothermal damage-based modeling are in a very good agreement with experimentally observed PMR signal implantation dose behavior for B+-implanted Si across the entire range of practically important implantation doses: 109-1015 cm-2.

  19. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Jerry L. Hunter, Jr.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-17

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500–1625°C, were investigated in this study by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated,more » including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Lastly, estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.« less

  20. Miniaturized EAPs with compliant electrodes fabricated by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, H.

    2011-04-01

    Miniaturizing dielectric electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators will lead to highly-integrated mechanical systems on a chip, combining dozens to thousands of actuators and sensors on a few cm2. We present here µm to mm scale electroactive polymer (EAP) devices, batch fabricated on the chip or wafer scale, based on ion-implanted electrodes. Low-energy (2-10 keV) implantation of gold ions into a silicone elastomer leads to compliant stretchable electrodes consisting of a buried 20 nm thick layer of gold nanoparticles in a silicone matrix. These electrodes: 1) conduct at strains up to 175%, 2) are patternable on the µm scale, 3) have stiffness similar to silicone, 4) have good conductivity, and 5) excellent adhesion since implanted in the silicone. The EAP devices consist of 20 to 30 µm thick silicone membranes with µm to mm-scale ion-implanted electrodes on both sides, bonded to a holder. Depending on electrode shape and membrane size, several actuation modes are possible. Characterization of 3mm diameter bi-directional buckling mode actuators, mm-scale tunable lens arrays, 2-axis beam steering mirrors, as well as arrays of 72 cell-size (100x200 µm2) actuators to apply mechanical strain to single cells are reported. Speeds of up to several kHz are observed.

  1. Influence of ion implantation on titanium surfaces for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krischok, Stefan; Blank, Claudia; Engel, Michael; Gutt, Richard; Ecke, Gernot; Schawohl, Jens; Spieß, Lothar; Schrempel, Frank; Hildebrand, Gerhard; Liefeith, Klaus

    2007-09-01

    The implantation of ions into the near surface layer is a new approach to improve the osseointegration of metallic biomaterials like titanium. Meanwhile it is well known that surface topography and surface physico-chemistry as well as visco-elastic properties influence the cell response after implantation of implants into the human body. To optimize the cell response of titanium, ion implantation techniques have been used to integrate calcium and phosphorus, both elements present in the inorganic bone phase. In this context, the concentration profile of the detected elements and their chemical state have been investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. Ion implantation leads to strong changes of the chemical composition of the near surface region, which are expected to modify the biofunctionality as observed in previous experiments on the cell response. The co-implantation of calcium and phosphorus samples, which showed best results in the performed tests (biological and physical), leads to a strong modification of the chemical surface composition.

  2. Plasma source ion implantation technology for engineering surfaces of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. H.; Lawrence, D. F.; Sridharan, K.; Sandstrom, P. W.

    2001-07-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation* (PSII) is a non-line-of-sight technique for energetic ion surface modification of materials. At the University of Wisconsin there are presently three PSII systems two of which measure about 1 m3 and a third that measures 0.1 m3. Plasma generation is achieved in vacuum through filamentary, RF, DC-pulsed, or glow discharge. High voltage pulsing is achieved using a tetrode modulator that pulses at up to 60kV or by a solid-state pulser that can supply 20kV. Recently, a crossatron modulator capable of 40kV and 1kA peak anode current was built in-house. Surface properties of a wide range of materials have been beneficially modified using PSII in ion implantation, film deposition, energetic ion mixing, and sputtering modes. Industrial field testing of PSII-treated parts has yielded promising results but successful commercialization requires judicious selection of applications which effectively exploit the unique aspects of PSII as a surface modification tool.*J.R. Conrad U.S. Patent#4764394, 1988

  3. Highly tunable formation of nitrogen-vacancy centers via ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Sangtawesin, S.; Brundage, T. O.; Atkins, Z. J.; Petta, J. R.

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate highly tunable formation of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers using 20 keV {sup 15}N{sup +} ion implantation through arrays of high-resolution apertures fabricated with electron beam lithography. By varying the aperture diameters from 80 to 240 nm, as well as the average ion fluences from 5×10{sup 10} to 2 × 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}, we can control the number of ions per aperture. We analyze the photoluminescence on multiple sites with different implantation parameters and obtain ion-to-NV conversion yields of 6%–7%, consistent across all ion fluences. The implanted NV centers have spin dephasing times T{sub 2}{sup *} ∼ 3 μs, comparable to naturally occurring NV centers in high purity diamond with natural abundance {sup 13}C. With this technique, we can deterministically control the population distribution of NV centers in each aperture, allowing for the study of single or coupled NV centers and their integration into photonic structures.

  4. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Wei Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  5. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp3 bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp3-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40-70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  6. Nickel concentration dependent structural and optical properties of electrodeposited diamond like carbon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Beauty; Mukherjee, Jonaki; Das, Bidyut; Kar, Asit K.

    2014-04-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) and composite nickel incorporated diamond-like carbon (Ni-DLC) films have been synthesized on ITO coated glass substrates using low voltage electrodeposition method. Modifications of structural and optical properties of thin films have been investigated with varying Ni concentration. Average grain size of Ni-DLC granules is found to decrease with increasing molarity of Ni in electrolytic solution. XRD pattern depicts multi-phase nature of Ni-DLC film. Incorporation of Ni nanoparticles in DLC matrix has been confirmed by TEM. Interestingly optical bandgap energy decreases from 2.31 to 1.58 eV with decrease in nickel content in the electrolytic bath. Simultaneously Urbach energy exhibits an increasing trend from 1.972 to 2.374 eV. Presence of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbons has been indicated by FTIR spectra. The number of sp2 bonding in carbon matrix is enhanced with dilution of electrolyte. The peaks in the range of ~600-750 cm-1 in Ni-DLC films have been attributed to metal incorporation into DLC matrix. Study reveals that the bandgap and the particle size of carbon nanocomposite films can be tailored by controlling the amount of nickel in the electrolyte.

  7. Nucleation of diamond by pure carbon ion bombardment--a transmission electron microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Y.; Liao, M.Y.; Wang, Z.G.; Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, S.

    2005-08-08

    A cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of a film deposited by a 1 keV mass-selected carbon ion beam onto silicon held at 800 deg. C is presented. Initially, a graphitic film with its basal planes perpendicular to the substrate is evolving. The precipitation of nanodiamond crystallites in upper layers is confirmed by HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nucleation of diamond on graphitic edges as predicted by Lambrecht et al. [W. R. L. Lambrecht, C. H. Lee, B. Segall, J. C. Angus, Z. Li, and M. Sunkara, Nature, 364 607 (1993)] is experimentally confirmed. The results are discussed in terms of our recent subplantation-based diamond nucleation model.

  8. Isotopic fractionation of oxygen and carbon in decomposed lower-mantle inclusions in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, Felix; Matzel, Jennifer; Jacobsen, Ben; Hutcheon, Ian; Wirth, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Two carbonatitic mineral assemblages, calcite + wollastonite and calcite + monticellite, which are encapsulated in two diamond grains from the Rio Soriso basin in the Juina area, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, were studied utilizing the NanoSIMS technique. The assemblages were formed as the result of the decomposition of the lower-mantle assemblage calcite + CaSi-perovskite + volatile during the course of the diamond ascent under pressure conditions from 15 to less than 0.8 GPa. The oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of the studied minerals are inhomogeneous. They fractionated during the process of the decomposition of primary minerals to very varying values: δ18O from -3.3 to +15.4 ‰ SMOW and δ13C from -2.8 to +9.3 ‰ VPDB. These values significantly extend the mantle values for these elements in both isotopically-light and isotopically-heavy areas.

  9. Synthesis and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon films by electrochemical anode deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, GuiFeng; Hou, XiaoDuo; Deng, DeWei

    2012-06-01

    Diamond-like carbon films (DLC) are deposited on Ti substrate by electrochemical anodic deposition at room temperature in pure methanol solution using a pulsed DC voltage at a range from 200 V to 2000 V. Raman spectroscopy analysis of the films reveals two broaden characteristic absorption peaks centred at ˜1350 cm-1 and 1580 cm-1, relating to D- and G-band of typical DLC films, respectively. A broad peak centred at 1325-1330 cm-1 is observed when an applied potential is 1200 V, which can confirm that the deposited films contained diamond structure phase. Tribological properties of the coated Ti substrates have been measured by means of a ball-on-plate wear test machine. A related growth mechanism of DLC films by the anodic deposition mode has also been discussed.

  10. The semi-empirical tight-binding model for carbon allotropes “between diamond and graphite”

    SciTech Connect

    Lytovchenko, V.; Kurchak, A.; Strikha, M.

    2014-06-28

    The new carbon allotropes “between diamond and graphite” have come under intensive examination during the last decade due to their numerous technical applications. The modification of energy gap in thin films of these allotropes was studied experimentally using optical methods. The proposed simple model of carbon clusters with variable lengths of chemical bonds allows us to imitate the transfer from diamond and diamond-like to graphite-like structures, as well as the corresponding modification of hybridization sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} for diamond-like and sp{sub z} for graphite-like phases. This enables us to estimate various allotropes parameters, like the gap E{sub g}, energies of valence E{sub v}, and conduction E{sub c} band edges, and the value of electronic affinity, i.e., optical work function X, which are all of practical importance. The obtained estimations correspond to the experimental data.

  11. 4-Diamond Formation from Amorphouse Carbon and Graphite in the Presence of COH Fluids : An InSitu High-Pressure and -Temperature Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Prakapenka, V.; Kubo, A.; Kavner, A.; Green, H.W.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L.

    2011-10-14

    Microdiamonds from orogenic belts contain nanometer-size fluid inclusions suggesting diamond formation from supercritical carbon - oxygen - hydrogen (COH) fluids. Here we report experimental results of diamond nucleation from amorphous carbon and polycrystalline graphite in the presence of COH fluids in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our results show that: (i) diamonds can nucleate from graphite or amorphous carbon at pressures of 9-11 GPa and temperatures of 1200-1400 K in the presence of COH fluids; (ii) it is easier to nucleate diamond from amorphous carbon than from graphite with or without the COH fluids; and (iii) the fluid from decomposition of glucose is more efficient in promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation than the fluid from decomposition of oxalic acid dihydrate. Carbon crystallinity has strong effects on the kinetics of diamond nucleation and growth. The experimental results demonstrated the critical role of presence and composition of supercritical COH fluids for promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation.

  12. The Oxidation Behaviour of Diamond Like Carbon for Phase-Change Probe Memory Application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Cihui; Wen, Jing; Yang, Guowei

    2015-06-01

    Phase-change probe memory, as a promising candidate for next-generation storage device, usually requires a capping layer to protect phase-change media from wear and corrosion. Diamond-like carbon film has been commonly used for capping layer due to its high mechanical hardness and easiness for tailoring physical properties. However, the possibility for such carbon thin film to react to surrounding oxygen when subjected to Joule heating during the recording process of phase-change probe memory is rarely investigated before from both experimental and simulation point of view. Therefore, a novel carbon oxidation model was developed to mimic the chemical reaction of carbon film to the surrounding oxygen in terms of the degradation of layer thickness. Results obtained from this model are in a good agreement with the experimental counterpart, indicating the physical reality of this proposed model.

  13. Origin of sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite (Brazil): constraints from carbon isotopes and inclusion compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, A. R.; Kohn, S. C.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smith, C. B.; Araujo, D.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Forty-one diamonds sourced from the Juina-5 kimberlite pipe in Southern Brazil, which contain optically identifiable inclusions, have been studied using an integrated approach. The diamonds contain <20 ppm nitrogen (N) that is fully aggregated as B centres. Internal structures in several diamonds revealed using cathodoluminescence (CL) are unlike those normally observed in lithospheric samples. The majority of the diamonds are composed of isotopically light carbon, and the collection has a unimodal distribution heavily skewed towards δ13C ~ -25 ‰. Individual diamonds can display large carbon isotope heterogeneity of up to ~15 ‰ and predominantly have isotopically lighter cores displaying blue CL, and heavier rims with green CL. The light carbon isotopic compositions are interpreted as evidence of diamond growth from abiotic organic carbon added to the oceanic crust during hydrothermal alteration. The bulk isotopic composition of the oceanic crust, carbonates plus organics, is equal to the composition of mantle carbon (-5 ‰), and we suggest that recycling/mixing of subducted material will replenish this reservoir over geological time. Several exposed, syngenetic inclusions have bulk compositions consistent with former eclogitic magnesium silicate perovskite, calcium silicate perovskite and NAL or CF phases that have re-equilibrated during their exhumation to the surface. There are multiple occurrences of majoritic garnet with pyroxene exsolution, coesite with and without kyanite exsolution, clinopyroxene, Fe or Fe-carbide and sulphide minerals alongside single occurrences of olivine and ferropericlase. As a group, the inclusions have eclogitic affinity and provide evidence for diamond formation at pressures extending to Earth's deep transition zone and possibly the lower mantle. It is observed that the major element composition of inclusions and isotopic compositions of host Juina-5 diamonds are not correlated. The diamond and inclusion compositions are

  14. Ion implantation for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloys in saline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. M.; Gonzales, A.; Quintana, J.; Lee, I.-S.; Buchanan, R. A.; Burns, F. C.; Culbertson, R. J.; Levy, M.; Treglio, J. R.

    1991-07-01

    The effects of ion implantation treatments on corrosion of 2014 and 1100 aluminum in saline media were investigated. Implanted constituents were N, Si, Ti, and Cr. Techniques included salt spray testing, electrochemical studies, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and profilometry. The principal conclusion was that ion implantation of Cr is of potential practical benefit for corrosion inhibition of 2014 Al in salt environments.

  15. Infrared spectral and carbon isotopic characteristics of micro- and macro-diamonds from the Panda kimberlite (Central Slave Craton, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, G. L.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.; Carlson, J.; Harris, J. W.

    2013-09-01

    One hundred and twenty-one micro-diamonds (< 1 mm) and 90 macro-diamonds (2.5 mm to 3.4 mm) from the Panda kimberlite (Ekati mine, Central Slave Craton, Canada) were analyzed for nitrogen content, nitrogen aggregation state (%B) and platelet and hydrogen peak areas (cm- 2). Micro-diamond nitrogen concentrations range from < 10 at. ppm to 1696 at. ppm (median = 805 at. ppm) and the median aggregation state is 23%B. Macro-diamonds range from < 10 at. ppm to 1260 at. ppm (median = 187 at. ppm) nitrogen and have a median nitrogen aggregation of 26%B. Platelet and hydrogen peaks were observed in 37% and 79% of the micro-diamonds and 79% and 56% of the macro-diamonds, respectively. Nitrogen based time averaged residence temperatures indicate that micro- and macro-diamonds experienced similar thermal mantle residence histories, both populations displaying bimodal residence temperature distributions with a gap between 1130 °C and 1160 °C (at 3.5 Ga residence). In addition, SIMS carbon isotopic analyses for the micro-diamonds were obtained: δ13C compositions range from - 6.9‰ to + 1.8‰ (median = - 4.3‰). CL imaging reveals distinct growth layers that in some samples differ by > 2‰, but mostly vary by < 0.5‰. Comparison of only the “gem-quality” samples (n = 49 micro- and 90 macro-diamonds) between the two diamond sets, indicates a statistically significant shift of + 1.3‰ in average δ13C from macro- to micro-diamonds and this shift documents distinct diamond forming fluids, fractionation process or growth histories. A broad transition to heavier isotopic values is also observed in connection to decreasing mantle residence temperatures. The bimodal mantle residence temperature distribution may coincide with the transition from highly depleted shallow to more fertile deep lithospheric mantle observed beneath the Central Slave Craton. The increase in δ13C with decreasing residence temperature (proxy for decreasing depth) is interpreted to reflect diamond

  16. Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Ruthenium-Doped Diamond like Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkara, M. K.; Ueno, M.; Lian, G.; Dickey, E. C.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated metalorganic precursor deposition using a Microwave Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma for depositing metal-doped diamondlike carbon films. Specifically, the deposition of ruthenium doped diamondlike carbon films was investigated using the decomposition of a novel ruthenium precursor, Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)-ruthenium (Ru(C5H4C2H5)2). The ruthenium precursor was introduced close to the substrate stage. The substrate was independently biased using an applied RF power. Films were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Four Point Probe. The conductivity of the films deposited using ruthenium precursor showed strong dependency on the deposition parameters such as pressure. Ruthenium doped sample showed the presence of diamond crystallites with an average size of approx. 3 nm while un-doped diamondlike carbon sample showed the presence of diamond crystallites with an average size of 11 nm. TEM results showed that ruthenium was atomically dispersed within the amorphous carbon network in the films.

  17. Controlling the work function of a diamond-like carbon surface by fluorination with XeF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tarditi, Ana; Kondratyuk, Petro; Wong, Pak Kin; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2010-09-15

    Thin diamond-like carbon films were subjected to fluorination with gaseous XeF{sub 2} under ultrahigh vacuum conditions in order to increase the work function of the diamond-like carbon surface. Changes in the work function and surface composition were monitored with UV photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, respectively. Successive XeF{sub 2} exposures raised the work function by as much as 1.55 eV. Surprisingly, approximately half of the increase in the work function occurred while the coverage of fluorine remained below 0.02 monolayers (ML). This suggests that initial doses of XeF{sub 2} remove extrinsic adsorbates from the diamond-like carbon film and that fluorine desorbs with the reaction products. Increasing the exposure of the diamond-like carbon to XeF{sub 2} leads to the expected covalent fluorination of the surface, which saturates at fluorine coverages of 6 F atoms/nm{sup 2} ({approx}0.3 ML). Annealing of the diamond-like carbon to temperatures above 850 K was required to reduce the surface fluorine concentration to undetectable levels. This did not, however, cause the work function to return to its original, prefluorination value.

  18. Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela; Gutierrez, Humberto; Narayanan, Deepa; Burgess Clifford, Caroline E.; Jain, Puja

    2010-07-13

    Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Plasma Immersion Ion Implanted PEEK for Bioactivation of Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Wakelin, Edgar A; Fathi, Ali; Kracica, Masturina; Yeo, Giselle C; Wise, Steven G; Weiss, Anthony S; McCulloch, Dougal G; Dehghani, Fariba; Mckenzie, David R; Bilek, Marcela M M

    2015-10-21

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is used to modify the surface properties of polyether ether ketone for biomedical applications. Modifications to the mechanical and chemical properties are characterized as a function of ion fluence (treatment time) to determine the suitability of the treated surfaces for biological applications. Young's modulus and elastic recovery were found to increase with respect to treatment time at the surface from 4.4 to 5.2 MPa and from 0.49 to 0.68, respectively. The mechanical properties varied continuously with depth, forming a graded layer where the mechanical properties returned to untreated values deep within the layer. The treated surface layer exhibited cracking under cyclical loads, associated with an increased modulus due to dehydrogenation and cross-linking; however, it did not show any sign of delamination, indicating that the modified layer is well integrated with the substrate, a critical factor for bioactive surface coatings. The oxygen concentration remained unchanged at the surface; however, in contrast to ion implanted polymers containing only carbon and hydrogen, the oxygen concentration within the treated layer was found to decrease. This effect is attributed to UV exposure and suggests that PIII treatments can modify the surface to far greater depths than previously reported. Protein immobilization on PIII treated surfaces was found to be independent of treatment time, indicating that the surface mechanical properties can be tuned for specific applications without affecting the protein coverage. Our findings on the mechanical properties demonstrate such treatments render PEEK well suited for use in orthopedic implantable devices. PMID:26366514

  20. Study of the corrosion rate behavior of ion implanted Fe-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Weiping; Tian Wei; Wu Run ); Godechot, X.; Brown, I. )

    1991-06-01

    We report on some studies we have made of the time evolution of the corrosion behavior of ion implanted samples of pure iron, medium carbon steel, and 18-8 Cr-Ni stainless steel. Ti, Cr, Ni, Cu, Mo and Yb were implanted at mean ion energies near 100 keV and at doses up to 1 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2} using a Mevva metal ion implantation facility. A novel feature of this experiment was the simultaneous implantation with several different implanted species. The implanted samples were immersed in sulfuric acid solution at 40{degrees}C and the corrosion monitored as a function of time. The loss in mass was accurately measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The functional dependence of the corrosion behavior was established for all samples. The cumulative mass loss Q is given as a function of time t by Q = At{sup N}, where A and N are parameters; thus the corrosion rate V is given by V = ANt{sup N-1}. A is dominated by the initial mass loss and N reflects the long-time corrosion behavior. The values of the parameters A and N were obtained by a least-squares regression for all the samples investigated. We determined that for the samples investigated here, N > 1 always and V increases with time throughout the experimental duration. In this paper we summarize the experimental results and discuss the effect of A and N on corrosion rate and the relationship between the corrosion current density and the parameters A and N. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Empirical evidence for the fractionation of carbon isotopes between diamond and iron carbide from the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhail, S.; Guillermier, C.; Franchi, I. A.; Beard, A. D.; Crispin, K.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Jones, A. P.; Milledge, H. J.

    2014-04-01

    have studied two samples of mantle diamond containing iron carbide inclusions from Jagersfontein kimberlite, South Africa. Syngenetic crystal growth is inferred using morphological characteristics. These samples provide an opportunity to investigate the isotopic partitioning of 13C in a terrestrial natural high-pressure and high-temperature (HPHT) system. The difference for the δ13C values between the diamond and coexisting iron carbide averaged 7.2 ± 1.3‰. These data are consistent with available data from the literature showing iron carbide to be 13C-depleted relative to elemental carbon (i.e., diamond). We infer that the minerals formed by crystallization of diamond and iron carbide at HPHT in the mantle beneath the Kaapvaal Craton. It is unclear whether crystallization occurred in subcratonic or sublithospheric mantle; in addition, the source of the iron is also enigmatic. Nonetheless, textural coherence between diamond and iron carbide resulted in isotopic partitioning of 13C between these two phases. These data suggest that significant isotopic fractionation of 13C/12C (Δ13C up to >7‰) can occur at HPHT in the terrestrial diamond stability field. We note that under reducing conditions at or below the iron-iron wustite redox buffer in a cratonic or deep mantle environment in Earth, the cogenesis of carbide and diamond may produce reservoirs of 13C-depleted carbon that have conventionally been interpreted as crustal in origin. Finally, the large Δ13C for diamond-iron carbide shown here demonstrates Δ13C for silicate-metallic melts is a parameter that needs to be constrained to better determine the abundance of carbon within the Earth's metallic core.

  2. Biological responses of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films with different structures in biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Liao, T T; Zhang, T F; Li, S S; Deng, Q Y; Wu, B J; Zhang, Y Z; Zhou, Y J; Guo, Y B; Leng, Y X; Huang, N

    2016-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are potential candidates for artificial joint surface modification in biomedical applications, and the influence of the structural features of DLC surfaces on cell functions has attracted attention in recent decades. Here, the biocompatibility of DLC films with different structures was investigated using macrophages, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. The results showed that DLC films with a low ratio of sp(2)/sp(3), which tend to have a structure similar to that of diamond, led to less inflammatory, excellent osteogenic and fibroblastic reactions, with higher cell viability, better morphology, lower release of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) and IL-6 (interleukin-6), and higher release of IL-10 (interleukin-10). The results also demonstrated that the high-density diamond structure (low ratio of sp(2)/sp(3)) of DLC films is beneficial for cell adhesion and growth because of better protein adsorption without electrostatic repulsion. These findings provide valuable insights into the mechanisms underlying inhibition of an inflammatory response and the promotion of osteoblastogenesis and fibrous propagation, and effectively build a system for evaluating the biocompatibility of DLC films. PMID:27612769

  3. Develop techniques for ion implantation of PLZT for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, R. A.; Batishko, C. R.; Brimhall, J. L.; Pawlewicz, W. T.; Stahl, K. A.

    1989-11-01

    Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted research into the preparation and characterization of ion-implanted adaptive optic elements based on lead-lanthanum-zirconate-titanate (PLZT). Over the 4-yr effort beginning FY 1985, the ability to increase the photosensitivity of PLZT and extend it to longer wavelengths was developed. The emphasis during the last two years was to develop a model to provide a basis for choosing implantation species and parameters. Experiments which probe the electronic structure were performed on virgin and implanted PLZT samples. Also performed were experiments designed to connect the developing conceptual model with the experimental results. The emphasis in FY 1988 was to extend the photosensitivity out to diode laser wavelengths. The experiments and modelling effort indicate that manganese will form appropriate intermediate energy states to achieve the longer wavelength photosensitivity. Preliminary experiments were also conducted to deposit thin film PLZT.

  4. Surface induced reactivity for titanium by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Pham, M T; Reuther, H; Matz, W; Mueller, R; Steiner, G; Oswald, S; Zyganov, I

    2000-06-01

    Calcium and phosphorus storage in a thin layer of titanium surface was achieved by ion implantation. We study the reactivity of this surface in response to a hydrothermal treatment. The incipient implanted species are observed to convert to Ca(2+) and PO(4)(3-), the precursors for generating calcium phosphate polymorphs. Hydroxyapatite is formed from these precursors by an interface-liquid mediated mineralization preceded by the hydrolysis of oxygen compounds of Ca and P from the solid phase. The morphology and organization of apatite mineral is controlled by the fluid dynamics reflecting the surface remodeling to adapt to the available local environment. Exposed to calcium and phosphate ion containing solution, the hydrothermally treated surface templates hydroxyapatite deposition. Ca and P implanted Ti surface was shown to be chemically and morphologically actively involved in the interfacial reactions.

  5. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  6. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  7. Low erosion behavior of polystyrene films under erbium ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, M.; Sanyal, M.K.; Chini, T.K.; Chakraborty, P.

    2006-02-13

    Erbium ion implantation in polystyrene (PS) thin films has been performed with 40 and 60 keV ions to a dose range between 1x10{sup 14} and 1x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The x-ray reflectivity technique was applied to determine the ion-induced eroded layer thickness and interestingly, the erosion rate is found to decrease with increasing ion doses exhibiting simple power law behavior of the form {approx}(dose){sup -b}. We propose the formation of a carbonaceous network at the top surface, which seems to prevent further erosion of the polymer with increasing the duration of implantation time. These findings may open up a possibility of loading a large amount of erbium in a polymer matrix by the implantation technique to make it suitable for various optoelectronic applications.

  8. Deep Trench Doping by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Nizou, S.; Vervisch, V.; Etienne, H.; Torregrosa, F.; Roux, L.; Ziti, M.; Alquier, D.; Roy, M.

    2006-11-13

    The realization of three dimensional (3D) device structures remains a great challenge in microelectronics. One of the main technological breakthroughs for such devices is the ability to control dopant implantation along silicon trench sidewalls. Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) has shown its wide efficiency for specific doping processing in semiconductor applications. In this work, we propose to study the capability of PIII method for large scale silicon trench doping. Ultra deep trenches with high aspect ratio were etched on 6'' N type Si wafers. Wafers were then implanted with a PIII Pulsion system using BF3 gas source at various pressures and energies. The obtained results evidence that PIII can be used and are of grateful help to define optimized processing conditions to uniformly dope silicon trench sidewalls through the wafers.

  9. Stoichiometric disturbances in compound semiconductors due to ion implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, R. E.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    A method is developed to calculate the depth distribution of the local stoichiometric disturbance (SD) resulting from ion implantation in binary-compound substrates. The calculation includes first-order recoils considering projected range straggle of projectiles and recoils and lateral straggle of recoils. The method uses tabulated final-range statistics to infer the projectile range distributions at intermediate energies. This approach greatly simplifies the calculation with little compromise on accuracy as compared to existing procedures. As an illustration, the SD profile is calculated for implantation of boron, silicon, and aluminum in silicon carbide. The results for the latter case suggest that the SD may be responsible for otherwise unexplained distortions in the annealed aluminum profile. A comparison with calculations by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation shows good agreement.

  10. Ion implantation induced swelling in 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Nipoti, R.; Albertazzi, E.; Bianconi, M.; Lotti, R.; Lulli, G.; Cervera, M.; Carnera, A.

    1997-06-01

    Ion implantation induced surface expansion (swelling) of 6H-SiC was investigated through the measurement of the step height between implanted and unimplanted areas. The samples were irradiated at room temperature with 500 keV Al{sup +} ions in the dose range 1.25{times}10{sup 14}{endash}3{times}10{sup 15}ionscm{sup {minus}2}. Swelling was related to dose and the area density of ion-induced damage measured by Rutherford backscattering channeling technique. The observed trend is consistent with the hypothesis that the volume expansion of the ion damaged crystal is proportional to the area density of displaced atoms, plus an additional relaxation occurring at the onset of the crystalline to amorphous transition. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Ion implantation of erbium into polycrystalline cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, V. V. Klevkov, Yu. V.; Dravin, V. A.

    2015-05-15

    The specific features of the ion implantation of polycrystalline cadmium telluride with grains 20–1000 μm in dimensions are studied. The choice of erbium is motivated by the possibility of using rare-earth elements as luminescent “probes” in studies of the defect and impurity composition of materials and modification of the composition by various technological treatments. From the microphotoluminescence data, it is found that, with decreasing crystal-grain dimensions, the degree of radiation stability of the material is increased. Microphotoluminescence topography of the samples shows the efficiency of the rare-earth probe in detecting regions with higher impurity and defect concentrations, including regions of intergrain boundaries.

  12. The Behavior of Ion-Implanted Hydrogen in Gallium Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Headley, T.J.; Hills, C.R.; Han, J.; Petersen, G.A.; Seager, C.H.; Wampler, W.R.

    1999-01-07

    Hydrogen was ion-implanted into wurtzite-phase GaN, and its transport, bound states, and microstructural effects during annealing up to 980 C were investigated by nuclear-reaction profiling, ion-channeling analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and infrared (IR) vibrational spectroscopy. At implanted concentrations 1 at.%, faceted H{sub 2} bubbles formed, enabling identification of energetically preferred surfaces, examination of passivating N-H states on these surfaces, and determination of the diffusivity-solubility product of the H. Additionally, the formation and evolution of point and extended defects arising from implantation and bubble formation were characterized. At implanted H concentrations 0.1 at.%, bubble formation was not observed, and ion-channeling analysis indicated a defect-related H site located within the [0001] channel.

  13. Single ion implantation for solid state quantum computer development

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas; Meijers, Jan; Persaud, Arun; McDonald, Joseph W.; Holder, Joseph P.; Schneider, Dieter H.

    2001-12-18

    Several solid state quantum computer schemes are based on the manipulation of electron and nuclear spins of single donor atoms in a solid matrix. The fabrication of qubit arrays requires the placement of individual atoms with nanometer precision and high efficiency. In this article we describe first results from low dose, low energy implantations and our development of a low energy (<10 keV), single ion implantation scheme for {sup 31}P{sup q+} ions. When {sup 31}P{sup q+} ions impinge on a wafer surface, their potential energy (9.3 keV for P{sup 15+}) is released, and about 20 secondary electrons are emitted. The emission of multiple secondary electrons allows detection of each ion impact with 100% efficiency. The beam spot on target is controlled by beam focusing and collimation. Exactly one ion is implanted into a selected area avoiding a Poissonian distribution of implanted ions.

  14. Intravascular brachytherapy with radioactive stents produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, M.-A.; Heise, S.; Schloesser, K.; Schuessler, B.; Schweickert, H.

    2003-05-01

    About 1 million patients are treated for stenosis of coronary arteries by percutaneous balloon angioplasty annually worldwide. In many cases a so called stent is inserted into the vessel to keep it mechanically open. Restenosis is observed in about 20-30% of these cases, which can be treated by irradiating the stented vessel segment. In our approach, we utilized the stent itself as radiation source by ion implanting 32P. Investigations of the surface properties were performed with special emphasis on activity retention. Clinical data of about 400 patients showed radioactive stents can suppress instent restenosis, but a so called edge effect appeared, which can be avoided by the new "drug eluting stents".

  15. Versatile, high-sensitivity faraday cup array for ion implanters

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Patterson, Robert G.

    2003-01-01

    An improved Faraday cup array for determining the dose of ions delivered to a substrate during ion implantation and for monitoring the uniformity of the dose delivered to the substrate. The improved Faraday cup array incorporates a variable size ion beam aperture by changing only an insertable plate that defines the aperture without changing the position of the Faraday cups which are positioned for the operation of the largest ion beam aperture. The design enables the dose sensitivity range, typically 10.sup.11 -10.sup.18 ions/cm.sup.2 to be extended to below 10.sup.6 ions/cm.sup.2. The insertable plate/aperture arrangement is structurally simple and enables scaling to aperture areas between <1 cm.sup.2 and >750 cm.sup.2, and enables ultra-high vacuum (UHV) applications by incorporation of UHV-compatible materials.

  16. Simulated plasma immersion ion implantation processing of thin wires

    SciTech Connect

    Lejars, A.; Duday, D.; Wirtz, T.; Manova, D.; Maendl, S.

    2010-09-15

    In plasma immersion ion implantation, the dependencies of sheath expansion and ion flux density on substrate geometry are well established. However, effects of extreme diameter variations have not been investigated explicitly. Using an analytical simulation code assuming an infinite mean free path, the sheath expansion, ion flux density, and resulting substrate temperature are explored down to wire diameters of 150 {mu}m. Comparing the results for planar substrates and cylindrical, thin wires, a reduction in the sheath width up to a factor of 10, a faster establishing of a new equilibrium sheath position, and an increase in the ion fluence by a factor of 100 is encountered. The smaller plasma sheath allows for a denser packing of wires during the treatment than for planar substrates. Additionally, the implantation time is reduced, allowing a fast wire transport through the chamber, further increasing the throughput.

  17. Dopant profile engineering of advanced Si MOSFET's using ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolk, P. A.; Ponomarev, Y. V.; Schmitz, J.; van Brandenburg, A. C. M. C.; Roes, R.; Montree, A. H.; Woerlee, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    Ion implantation has been used to realize non-uniform, steep retrograde (SR) dopant profiles in the active channel region of advanced Si MOSFET's. After defining the transistor configuration, SR profiles were formed by dopant implantation through the polycrystalline Si gate and the gate oxide (through-the-gate, TG, implantation). The steep nature of the as-implanted profile was retained by applying rapid thermal annealing for dopant activation and implantation damage removal. For NMOS transistors, TG implantation of B yields improved transistor performance through increased carrier mobility, reduced junction capacitances, and reduced susceptibility to short-channel effects. Electrical measurements show that the gate oxide quality is not deteriorated by the ion-induced damage, demonstrating that transistor reliability is preserved. For PMOS transistors, TG implantation of P or As leads to unacceptable source/drain junction broadening as a result of transient enhanced dopant diffusion during thermal activation.

  18. Surface modification of SKD-61 steel by ion implantation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, F. L.; Lo, Y.-L.; Yu, Y.-C.

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how ion implantation affects the surface characteristics and nitrogenizing depth of the thin film by the use of a NEC 9SDH-2 3 MV Pelletron accelerator that implants nitrogen ions into SKD-61 tool steels for surface modification. Nitrogen ions were implanted into the surface layer of materials so that the hardness of modified films could be improved. Also, the nitride film stripping problems of the traditional nitrogenizing treatment could be overcome by a new approach in surface process engineering. As nitrogen ions with high velocity impacted on the surface of the substrate, the ions were absorbed and accumulated on the surface of the substrate. The experiments were performed with two energies (i.e., 1 and 2 MeV) and different doses (i.e., 2.5x10{sup 15}, 7.5x10{sup 15}, and 1.5x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}). Nitrogen ions were incorporated into the interface and then diffused through the metal to form a nitride layer. Analysis tools included the calculation of stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM), the detection of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and nanoindentation testing. Through the depth analysis of SIMS, the effects of the ion-implanted SKD-61 steels after heating at 550 deg. C in a vacuum furnace were examined. The nanoindenting results indicate the variation of hardness of SKD-61 steels with the various ion doses. It reaches two to three times the original hardness of SKD-61 steels.

  19. Palladium-defect complexes in diamond and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiona, A. A.; Kemp, W.; Timmers, H.; Bharuth-Ram, K.

    2015-04-01

    Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) studies, supported by Density Functional Theory (DFT) modelling, have shown that palladium atoms in silicon and germanium pair with vacancies. Building on these results, here we present DFT predictions and some tentative TDPAC results on palladium-defect complexes and site locations of palladium impurities in diamond and silicon carbide. For both diamond and silicon carbide, the DFT calculations predict that a split-vacancy V-PdBI-V complex is favoured, with the palladium atom on a bond-centred interstitial site having a nearest-neighbour semi-vacancy on either side. Consistent with experimental results, this configuration is also assigned to palladium complexes in silicon and germanium. For silicon carbide, the DFT modelling predicts furthermore that a palladium atom in replacing a carbon atom moves to a bond-centred interstitial site and pairs with a silicon vacancy to form a complex that is more stable than that of a palladium atom which replaces a silicon atom and then moves to a bond-centred interstitial site pairings with a carbon vacancy. These two competing alternatives differ by 8.94 eV. The favourable pairing with a silicon vacancy is also supported independently by TRIM Monte Carlo calculations, which predict that more silicon vacancies than carbon vacancies are created during heavy ion. implantation.

  20. Transmission photocathodes based on stainless steel mesh coated with deuterated diamond like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huran, J.; Balalykin, N. I.; Feshchenko, A. A.; Kobzev, A. P.; Kleinová, A.; Sasinková, V.; Hrubčín, L.

    2014-07-01

    In this study we report on the dependence of electron emission properties on the transmission photocathodes DC gun based on stainless steel mesh coated with diamond like carbon films prepared at various technological conditions. Diamond like carbon films were deposited on the stainless steel mesh and silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from gas mixtures CH4+D2+Ar, CH4+H2+Ar and reactive magnetron sputtering using a carbon target and gas mixtures Ar+D2, Ar+H2. The concentration of elements in films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection (ERD) analytical methods simultaneously. Chemical compositions were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Raman spectroscopy at visible excitation wavelength was used for the intensity ratio determination of Gaussian fit D-peak and G-peak of Raman spectra. The quantum efficiency was calculated from the measured laser energy and the measured cathode charge. The quantum efficiency of a prepared transmission photocathode was increased with increasing intensity ratio of D-peak and G-peak, which was increased by adding deuterium to the gas mixture and using technology reactive magnetron sputtering.

  1. Quenching of liquid carbon under intensive heat transfer to the cold diamond substrate: Molecular-dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozhdikov, V. S.; Basharin, A. Yu; Levashov, P. R.

    2015-11-01

    Quenching of liquid carbon (T = 6600 K) on a cold diamond substrate at T = 300 K in conditions close to the experimental laser melting of dispersed graphite on the substrate of natural diamond is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Quenching was carried out for two types of boundary conditions on the side opposite to the diamond substrate. The simulations confirmed the experimental result of the formation of amorphous carbon under such conditions. The calculations showed that the destruction of the diamond substrate did not take place because of its very high thermal conductivity. The estimation of the cooling rate of liquid carbon was done, the result is 1015 K/s. Temperature profiles in different layers of liquid carbon were restored to reproduce the detailed picture of the quenching process. We evaluated the radial distribution functions (RDF), the distribution of carbon atom bond fractions sp1-sp2-sp3, the average bond length and the azimuthal angles distributions for amorphous carbon atoms. This analysis confirmed that the amorphous carbon obtained by quenching in MD-simulations had a graphite-like structure.

  2. a Steinberg-Guinan Model for High-Pressure Carbon: Diamond Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlikowski, Daniel; Correa, Alfredo A.; Schwegler, Eric; Klepeis, John E.

    2007-12-01

    Since the diamond phase of carbon has such a high yield strength, dynamic simulations must account for strength even for strong shock waves (˜3 Mbar). We have determined an initial parametrization of two strength models: Steinberg-Guinan (SG) and a modified or improved SG(ISG), that captures the high pressure dependence of the calculated shear modulus up to 10 Mbar. The models are based upon available experimental data and on calculated elastic moduli using robust density functional theory. Additionally, we have evaluated these models using hydrodynamic simulations of planar shocks experiments.

  3. A Steinberg-Guinan model for High-Pressure Carbon, Diamond Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Correa, A; Schwegler, E; Klepeis, J

    2007-07-27

    Since the carbon, diamond phase has such a high yield strength, dynamic simulations must account for strength even for strong shock waves ({approx} 3 Mbar). We have determined an initial parametrization of two strength models: Steinberg-Guinan (SG) and a modified or improved SG, that captures the high pressure dependence of the calculated shear modulus up to 10 Mbar. The models are based upon available experimental data and on calculated elastic moduli using robust density functional theory. Additionally, we have evaluated these models using hydrodynamic simulations of planar shocks experiments.

  4. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Tracy, C. Edwin; King, David E.; Stanley, James T.

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  5. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  6. Cleaning of diamond nanoindentation probes with oxygen plasma and carbon dioxide snow

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Dylan J.

    2009-12-15

    Diamond nanoindentation probes may perform thousands of indentations over years of service life. There is a broad agreement that the probes need frequent cleaning, but techniques for doing so are mostly anecdotes shared between experimentalists. In preparation for the measurement of the shape of a nanoindentation probe by a scanning probe microscope, cleaning by carbon dioxide snow jets and oxygen plasma was investigated. Repeated indentation on a thumbprint-contaminated surface formed a compound that was very resistant to removal by solvents, CO{sub 2} snow, and plasma. CO{sub 2} snow cleaning is found to be a generally effective cleaning procedure.

  7. Effects of cesium ion-implantation on mechanical and electrical properties of organosilicate low-k films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Pei, D.; Guo, X.; Cheng, M. K.; Lee, S.; Lin, Q.; King, S. W.; Shohet, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    The effects of cesium (Cs) ion-implantation on uncured plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited organosilicate low dielectric constant (low-k) (SiCOH) films have been investigated and compared with an ultraviolet (UV) cured film. The mechanical properties, including the elastic modulus and hardness, of the SiCOH low-k films are improved by up to 30% with Cs implantation, and further up to 52% after annealing at 400 °C in a N2 ambient for 1 h. These improvements are either comparable to or better than the effects of UV-curing. They are attributed to an enhancement of the Si-O-Si network structure. The k-value of the SiCOH films increased slightly after Cs implantation, and increased further after annealing. These increases are attributed to two carbon-loss mechanisms, i.e., the carbon loss due to Si-CH3 bond breakage from implanted Cs ions, and the carbon loss due to oxidation during the annealing. The time-zero dielectric breakdown strength was improved after the Cs implantation and the annealing, and was better than the UV-cured sample. These results indicate that Cs ion implantation could be a supplement to or a substitution for the currently used UV curing method for processing SiCOH low-k films.

  8. Electron-Beam Irradiation Effect on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Nylon-6 Nanocomposite Fibers Infused with Diamond and Diamond Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, Muhammad A.; Jeelani, Shaik; Rangari, Vijaya K.; Gome, Michelle G.; Moura, Esperidiana. A. B.

    2016-02-01

    Nylon-6 is an engineering plastic with excellent properties and processability, which are essential in several industrial applications. The addition of filler such as diamond (DN) and diamond coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to form molded composites may increase the range of Nylon-6 applications due to the resulting increase in strength. The effects of electron-beam irradiation on these thermoplastic nanocomposites are either increase in the cross-linking or causes chain scission. In this study, DN-coated CNTs were synthesized using the sonochemical technique in the presence of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The DN-coated CNTs nanoparticles and diamond nanoparticles were then introduced into Nylon-6 polymer through a melt extrusion process to form nanocomposite fibers. They were further tested for their mechanical (Tensile) and thermal properties (thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)). These composites were further exposed to the electron-beam (160kGy, 132kGy and 99kGy) irradiation using a 1.5MeV electron-beam accelerator, at room temperature, in the presence of air and tested for their thermal and mechanical properties. The best ultimate tensile strength was found to be 690MPa and 864MPa irradiated at 132 for DN/CNTs/Nylon-6 and Diamond/Nylon-6 nanocomposite fiber as compared to 346MPa and 321MPa for DN/CNTs/Nylon-6 and Diamond/Nylon-6 nanocomposite fiber without irradiation. The neat Nylon-6 tensile strength was 240MPa. These results are consistent with the activation energy calculated from TGA graphs. DSC analysis result shows that the slight increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) and decrease in melting temperature (Tm) which was expected from high electron-beam radiation dose.

  9. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  10. The local crystallization in nanoscale diamond-like carbon films during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpakov, A. Ya. Poplavsky, A. I.; Galkina, M. E.; Gerus, J. V.; Manokhin, S. S.

    2014-12-08

    The local crystallization during annealing at 600 °C in nanoscale diamond-like carbon coatings films grown by pulsed vacuum-arc deposition method was observed using modern techniques of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The crystallites formed by annealing have a face-centred cubic crystal structure and grow in the direction [01{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}] as a normal to the film surface. The number and size of the crystallites depend on the initial values of the intrinsic stresses before annealing, which in turn depend on the conditions of film growth. The sizes of crystallites are 10 nm for films with initial compressive stresses of 3 GPa and 17 nm for films with initial compressive stresses of 12 GPa. Areas of local crystallization arising during annealing have a structure different from the graphite. Additionally, the investigation results of the structure of nanoscale diamond-like carbon coatings films using Raman spectroscopy method are presented, which are consistent with the transmission electron microscopy research results.

  11. Electrochemical behavior of triflusal, aspirin and their metabolites at glassy carbon and boron doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2010-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of triflusal (TRF) and aspirin (ASA), before and after hydrolysis in water and in alkaline medium using two different electrode surfaces, glassy carbon and boron doped diamond, was study by differential pulse voltammetry over a wide pH range. The hydrolysis products are 2-(hydroxyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-benzoic acid (HTB) for triflusal and salicylic acid (SA) for aspirin, which in vivo represent their main metabolites. The hydrolysis processes were also followed by spectrophotometry. The UV results showed complete hydrolysis after one hour for TRF and after two hours for ASA in alkaline solution. The glassy carbon electrode enables only indirect determination of TRF and ASA through the electrochemical detection of their hydrolysis products HTB and SA, respectively. The oxidation processes of HTB and SA are pH dependent and involve different numbers of electrons and protons. Moreover, the difference between the oxidation peak potential of SA and HTB was equal to 100 mV in the studied pH range from 1 to 8 due to the CF3 of the aromatic ring of HTB molecule. Due to its wider oxidation potential range, the boron doped diamond electrode was used to study the direct oxidation of TRF and ASA, as well as of their respective metabolites HTB and SA.

  12. Graphene and nano-diamond synthesis in expansions of molten liquid carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ileri, Nazar; Goldman, Nir

    2014-10-28

    Despite their widespread use in high-pressure experiments, little is known about the physical and chemical properties of carbon-containing materials as they expand and cool to ambient conditions. As a result, interpretation of experiments can rely on use of unconstrained models with poor accuracy for the ensuing equation of state properties and final chemical products. To this end, we use quantum simulations to study the free expansion and cooling of carbon from metallic liquid states achieved during shock compression. Expansions from three different sets of shock conditions yielded of a variety of chain and ring structures. We then quantify the relative amounts of graphite-like and diamond-like particles formed during cooling and equilibration. We observe that for all cases, graphene sheets are the majority product formed with more extreme initial conditions producing increasingly larger amounts of diamond particles. Our results can address key needs for future meso-scale models of experiments, where knowledge of material properties and chemical end products can have a pronounced effect on interpreting experimental observables.

  13. Graphene and nano-diamond synthesis in expansions of molten liquid carbon.

    PubMed

    Ileri, Nazar; Goldman, Nir

    2014-10-28

    Despite their widespread use in high-pressure experiments, little is known about the physical and chemical properties of carbon-containing materials as they expand and cool to ambient conditions. As a result, interpretation of experiments can rely on use of unconstrained models with poor accuracy for the ensuing equation of state properties and final chemical products. To this end, we use quantum simulations to study the free expansion and cooling of carbon from metallic liquid states achieved during shock compression. Expansions from three different sets of shock conditions yielded of a variety of chain and ring structures. We then quantify the relative amounts of graphite-like and diamond-like particles formed during cooling and equilibration. We observe that for all cases, graphene sheets are the majority product formed with more extreme initial conditions producing increasingly larger amounts of diamond particles. Our results can address key needs for future meso-scale models of experiments, where knowledge of material properties and chemical end products can have a pronounced effect on interpreting experimental observables.

  14. A study on the preparation of diamond like carbon film and its electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shen-jiang; Li, Dang-juan; Xu, Junqi

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have attracted much attention because of their excellent performance; however, the low anti-laser damage ability of such films seriously restricts their applicability. To overcome this problem, applying the bias field to the DLC film could slow down the DLC film graphitization process and improve the LIDT of the DLC film. Results showed that the longitudinal electric field could decrease the sp3 hybridization to sp2 hybridization, prevent the formation of sp2 clusters. in this study, Unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBMS) was used to deposit a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film on Si substrates. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the DLC films were measured using elliptical polarization spectrometer. The transmittance and the surface roughness of DLC films were examined using optical microscopy, SEM, AFM and Raman spectroscopy. Ti electrodes were deposited on DLC films directly, forming a transverse and longitudinal bias field on films' surfaces. The 3D electrodes morphology of the DLC film was observed. The electrode thickness was measured by a white-light interferometer, and the average thickness of the electrodes was 325.90 nm. The surface roughness of the electrodes was tested using the Talysurf CCI 2000 noncontact surface-measuring instrument, and the average roughness of the electrodes was 0.50 nm. The electrodes have good Ohmic contact and little thermal stress, and it can be used to form a parallel electric field.

  15. Fluorine doping into diamond-like carbon coatings inhibits protein adsorption and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Terumitsu; Yohena, Satoshi; Kamijo, Aki; Okazaki, Yuko; Hotta, Atsushi; Takahashi, Koki; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2007-12-15

    The first major event when a medical device comes in contact with blood is the adsorption of plasma proteins. Protein adsorption on the material surface leads to the activation of the blood coagulation cascade and the inflammatory process, which impair the lifetime of the material. Various efforts have been made to minimize protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. Recently, diamond-like carbon (DLC) has received much attention because of their antithrombogenicity. We recently reported that coating silicon substrates with fluorine-doped diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) drastically suppresses platelet adhesion and activation. Here, we evaluated the protein adsorption on the material surfaces and clarified the relationship between protein adsorption and platelet behaviors, using polycarbonate and DLC- or F-DLC-coated polycarbonate. The adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen were assessed using a colorimetric protein assay, and platelet adhesion and activation were examined using a differential interference contrast microscope. A higher ratio of albumin to fibrinogen adsorption was observed on F-DLC than on DLC and polycarbonate films, indicating that the F-DLC film should prevent thrombus formation. Platelet adhesion and activation on the F-DLC films were more strongly suppressed as the amount of fluorine doping was increased. These results show that the F-DLC coating may be useful for blood-contacting devices.

  16. Electrochemical behavior of triflusal, aspirin and their metabolites at glassy carbon and boron doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2010-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of triflusal (TRF) and aspirin (ASA), before and after hydrolysis in water and in alkaline medium using two different electrode surfaces, glassy carbon and boron doped diamond, was study by differential pulse voltammetry over a wide pH range. The hydrolysis products are 2-(hydroxyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-benzoic acid (HTB) for triflusal and salicylic acid (SA) for aspirin, which in vivo represent their main metabolites. The hydrolysis processes were also followed by spectrophotometry. The UV results showed complete hydrolysis after one hour for TRF and after two hours for ASA in alkaline solution. The glassy carbon electrode enables only indirect determination of TRF and ASA through the electrochemical detection of their hydrolysis products HTB and SA, respectively. The oxidation processes of HTB and SA are pH dependent and involve different numbers of electrons and protons. Moreover, the difference between the oxidation peak potential of SA and HTB was equal to 100 mV in the studied pH range from 1 to 8 due to the CF3 of the aromatic ring of HTB molecule. Due to its wider oxidation potential range, the boron doped diamond electrode was used to study the direct oxidation of TRF and ASA, as well as of their respective metabolites HTB and SA. PMID:20402644

  17. Architectural design of diamond-like carbon coatings for long-lasting joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujing; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lai-Chang; Habibi, Daryoush; Xie, Zonghan

    2013-07-01

    Surface engineering through the application of super-hard, low-friction coatings as a potential approach for increasing the durability of metal-on-metal replacements is attracting significant attention. In this study innovative design strategies are proposed for the development of diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coatings against the damage caused by wear particles on the joint replacements. Finite element modeling is used to analyze stress distributions induced by wear particles of different sizes in the newly-designed coating in comparison to its conventional monolithic counterpart. The critical roles of architectural design in regulating stress concentrations and suppressing crack initiation within the coatings is elucidated. Notably, the introduction of multilayer structure with graded modulus is effective in modifying the stress field and reducing the magnitude and size of stress concentrations in the DLC diamond-like-carbon coatings. The new design is expected to greatly improve the load-carrying ability of surface coatings on prosthetic implants, in addition to the provision of damage tolerance through crack arrest.

  18. Surface characterization of diamond-like carbon for ultracold neutron storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, F.; Bergmaier, A.; Daum, M.; Döbeli, M.; Dollinger, G.; Fierlinger, P.; Foelske, A.; Henneck, R.; Heule, S.; Kasprzak, M.; Kirch, K.; Knecht, A.; Kuźniak, M.; Pichlmaier, A.; Schelldorfer, R.; Zsigmond, G.

    2008-03-01

    We report the characterization of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces to be used for the storage of ultracold neutrons (UCN). The samples investigated were 100-300-nm-thick tetragonal amorphous carbon (ta-C) coatings produced by vacuum-arc technology on thin foils (0.1-0.2 mm aluminum, stainless steel, PET). The diamond sp 3 fraction was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to be in the range 45-65%. Secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) yielded consistent results for the hydrogen contribution (about 1×10 16 cm -2 within the top 20 nm), strongly concentrated within a surface layer of 1 nm thickness. The boron contamination was found to be around 50 at. ppm. The fractional hole area of the coatings is on a level of about 1×10 -4. Temperature cycling of mechanically pre-stressed samples between 77 and 380 K revealed no detrimental effect.

  19. The ion implantation-induced properties of one-dimensional nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, ion implantation is an extensively used technique for material modification. Using this method, we can tailor the properties of target materials, including morphological, mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. All of these modifications impel nanomaterials to be a more useful application to fabricate more high-performance nanomaterial-based devices. Ion implantation is an accurate and controlled doping method for one-dimensional nanomaterials. In this article, we review recent research on ion implantation-induced effects in one-dimensional nanostructure, such as nanowires, nanotubes, and nanobelts. In addition, the optical property of single cadmium sulfide nanobelt implanted by N+ ions has been researched. PMID:23594476

  20. Structure analysis of bimetallic Co-Au nanoparticles formed by sequential ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-jian; Wang, Yu-hua; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Song, Shu-peng; chen, Hong; Zhang, Ke; Xiong, Zu-zhao; Ji, Ling-ling; Dai, Hou-mei; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Wang, Ru-wu; Zheng, Li-rong

    2016-08-01

    Co-Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by sequential ion implantation of Co and Au into silica glass at room temperature. The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. We have used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to study the local structural information of bimetallic nanoparticles. With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Hence, three oscillations, respectively, Co-O, Co-Co and Co-Au coordination are determined.

  1. Bacterial adhesion to diamond-like carbon as compared to stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Antti; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Konttinen, Yrjö T; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are suitable candidates for application on biomedical devices and implants, due to their high hardness, low friction, high wear and corrosion resistance, chemical inertness, smoothness, and tissue and blood compatibility. However, most studies have neglected the potential susceptibility of DLC coatings to bacterial adhesion, which is the first step in the development of implant-related infections. This study compares adhesion of seven bacterial strains, commonly implicated in implant-related infections, to tetrahedral amorphous carbon, with their adhesion to AISI 316L surgical steel. The results show that bacterial adhesion to DLC was similar to the adhesion to commonly used stainless steel. This suggests that DLC coating can be advantageously used on implants made of AISI 316L or other materials without increasing the risk to implant-related infections.

  2. Carbon and oxygen isotope variations in diamonds and graphite eclogites from Orapa, Botswana, and the nitrogen content of their diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, P. ); Harris, J.W. ); Robinson, D.N. ); Gurney, J.J. ); Shee, S.R. )

    1991-02-01

    In eclogite xenoliths from Orapa, Botswana, {delta}{sup 13}C of graphite varies between {minus}4.6 and {minus}7.8 per thousand vs. PDB, while that of diamonds ranges from {minus}4.0 to {minus}22.3 per thousand. In graphite eclogites, {delta}{sup 18}O values of garnets fall between 5.2 and 7 per thousand vs. SMOW and those of clinopyroxenes between 4.6 and 6.5 per thousand. For diamond eclogites the respective ranges are wider, i.e., 3.9 to 9.2 per thousand and 5.2 to 8.3 per thousand. The {sup 18}O enrichment above normal mantle in which diamond is stable. Eclogites with {delta} {sup 13}C values in the range {minus}4 to {minus}8 per thousand and {delta}{sup 18}O values in the normal mantle range tend to have positive garnet-clinopyroxene {sup 18}O fractionations and lower Fe/Ca and Fe/Mg ratios than eclogites which have simultaneously {delta}{sup 13}C values lower than {minus}8 per thousand and {delta}{sup 18}O values higher than 6.5 per thousand. In these eclogites the garnet-clinopyroxene fractionations tend to be negative. Positive garnet-clinopyroxene {sup 18}O fractionations increase slightly in the sequence: diamond eclogites (0.36 {plus minus} 0.15,n = 6), graphic/diamond ecologites (0.46 {plus minus} 0.36, n = 3), and graphite eclogites (0.53 {plus minus} 0.15, n = 3). Neither igneous fractionation processes, subduction, nor metasomatic alteration can satisfactory explain all observed chemical and isotopic trends.

  3. Temperature Activated Diffusion of Radicals through Ion Implanted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wakelin, Edgar A; Davies, Michael J; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a promising technique for immobilizing biomolecules on the surface of polymers. Radicals generated in a subsurface layer by PIII treatment diffuse throughout the substrate, forming covalent bonds to molecules when they reach the surface. Understanding and controlling the diffusion of radicals through this layer will enable efficient optimization of this technique. We develop a model based on site to site diffusion according to Fick's second law with temperature activation according to the Arrhenius relation. Using our model, the Arrhenius exponential prefactor (for barrierless diffusion), D0, and activation energy, EA, for a radical to diffuse from one position to another are found to be 3.11 × 10(-17) m(2) s(-1) and 0.31 eV, respectively. The model fits experimental data with a high degree of accuracy and allows for accurate prediction of radical diffusion to the surface. The model makes useful predictions for the lifetime over which the surface is sufficiently active to covalently immobilize biomolecules and it can be used to determine radical fluence during biomolecule incubation for a range of storage and incubation temperatures so facilitating selection of the most appropriate parameters.

  4. Pitting behavior of aluminum ion implanted with nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Natishan, P.M.; Hubler, G.K.

    1997-07-01

    Ion implantation of {approx} 2 at% N into aluminum increased the pitting potential in 0.1 M sodium chloride by an average of 0.35 V. Surface analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed implanted nitrogen was present as several species: NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NO or NH{sub 3} (as a ligand), AIN, and weakly bound or interstitial nitrogen. With anodic polarization, there was an increase in the total amount of nitrogen in the near-surface region, a decrease in the relative amount of nitride, and an increase in the relative amount of NO or NH{sub 3}. These changes resulted from migration of implanted nitrogen from the substrate into the near-surface region with partial conversion of the AIN species to NO or NH{sub 3}. It was suggested that the effect of implanted nitrogen on pitting behavior of aluminum is similar to that in nitrogen-containing stainless steels, where nitrogen at the metal surface inhibits the dissolution kinetics or aids the repassivation process in the pit by forming NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions that buffer the pit electrolyte.

  5. Defect engineering in the MOSLED structure by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prucnal, S.; Wójtowicz, A.; Pyszniak, K.; Drozdziel, A.; Zuk, J.; Turek, M.; Rebohle, L.; Skorupa, W.

    2009-05-01

    When amorphous SiO2 films are bombarded with energetic ions, various types of defects are created as a consequence of ion-solid interaction (peroxy radicals POR, oxygen deficient centres (ODC), non-bridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHC), E‧ centres, etc.). The intensity of the electroluminescence (EL) from oxygen deficiency centres at 2.7 eV, non-bridging oxygen hole centres at 1.9 eV and defect centres with emission at 2.07 eV can be easily modified by the ion implantation of the different elements (H, N, O) into the completely processed MOSLED structure. Nitrogen implanted into the SiO2:Gd layer reduces the concentration of the ODC and NBOHC while the doping of the oxygen increases the EL intensity observed from POR defect and NBOHC. Moreover, after oxygen or hydrogen implantation into the SiO2:Ge structure fourfold or fifth fold increase of the germanium related EL intensity was observed.

  6. Control of microelectromechanical systems membrane curvature by silicon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Mavoori, H.; Kim, J.; Aksyuk, V. A.

    2003-09-01

    Thin silicon membranes in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) optical devices such as beam-steering, movable mirrors may exhibit undesirable curvature when their surface is metallized with light-reflecting metals to enhance optical performance. We have applied Si+ ion implantations at dose levels of 0.4-5×1016/cm2 into the gold metallization layer to successfully reduce the mirror curvature as well as the degree of its temperature-dependent changes. The curvature change as well as the temperature dependence is found to be dependent on the implantation dose. The mechanism of the observed curvature flattening effect is attributed mostly to the induced compressive stress in gold metallization caused by the insertion of foreign implanted atoms of silicon. Such a Si implantation approach can be useful as a means for post-fabrication correction of unwanted curvature in MEMS membranes, as well as a technique to intentionally introduce a desired degree of curvature if needed. A convenient blanket implantation process can be utilized with minimal contamination problems as Si is a common element already present in the MEMS.

  7. [Improve wear resistance of UHMWPE by O+ ion implanted].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dangsheng

    2003-12-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was implanted with 450 keV and 100 keV O+ ions at dosage of 1 x 10(15)/cm2, 5 x 10(15)/cm2, 3 x 10(14)/cm2, respectively. Its wear behaviors were studied under dry friction condition and lubrication by means of distilled water using a pin-on-disk tribometer with a Si3N4 ceramic ball as a counterface. The wear surfaces were examined with SEM. The experimental results showed that the wear rate of implanted UHMWPE is lower than that of un-implanted UHMWPE under both dry and distilled friction conditions, especially for 450 keV energy and 5 x 10(15)/cm2 dose implantation. The friction coefficient of O+ ions implanted UHMWPE is higher than that of un-implanted UHMWPE under both dry and distilled friction conditions. The adhesive, plow and plastic deformation are the wearing mechanism for un-implanted UHMWPE; the fatigue and abrasive wear are that for implanted UHMWPE.

  8. MAGNESIUM PRECIPITATION AND DIFUSSION IN Mg+ ION IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-02

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. Calculations by Sawan et al. predict that at a dose of ~100 dpa (displacements per atom), there is ~0.5 at.% Mg generated in SiC. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the <100> axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C–SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C–SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4E-19 m2/s.

  9. Operations manual for the plasma source ion implantation economics program

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeault, M.L.; Thayer, G.R.

    1995-10-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a surface modification technique for metal. PSIICOSTMODEL95 is an EXCEL-based program that estimates the cost for implementing a PSII system in a manufacturing setting where the number of parts to be processed is over 5,000 parts per day and the shape of each part does not change from day to day. Overall, the manufacturing process must be very well defined and should not change. This document is a self-contained manual for PSIICOSTMODEL95. It assumes the reader has some general knowledge of the technical requirements for PSII. Configuration of the PSII process versus design is used as the methodology in PSIICOSTMODEL95. The reason behind this is twofold. First, the design process cannot be programmed into a computer when the relationships between design variables are not understood. Second, the configuration methodology reduces the number of assumptions that must be programmed into our software. Misuse of results are less likely to occur if the user has fewer assumptions to understand.

  10. Ion implantation and annealing studies in III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Pearton, S.J.; Williams, J.S.; Tan, H.H.; Karlicek, R.J. Jr.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation doping and isolation is expected to play an enabling role for the realization of advanced III-Nitride based devices. In fact, implantation has already been used to demonstrate n- and p-type doping of GaN with Si and Mg or Ca, respectively, as well as to fabricate the first GaN junction field effect transistor. Although these initial implantation studies demonstrated the feasibility of this technique for the III-Nitride materials, further work is needed to realize its full potential. After reviewing some of the initial studies in this field, the authors present new results for improved annealing sequences and defect studies in GaN. First, sputtered AlN is shown by electrical characterization of Schottky and Ohmic contacts to be an effect encapsulant of GaN during the 1,100 C implant activation anneal. The AlN suppresses N-loss from the GaN surface and the formation of a degenerate n{sup +}-surface region that would prohibit Schottky barrier formation after the implant activation anneal. Second, they examine the nature of the defect generation and annealing sequence following implantation using both Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Hall characterization. They show that for a Si-dose of 1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}2} 50% electrical donor activation is achieved despite a significant amount of residual implantation-induced damage in the material.

  11. Nanocomposite formed by titanium ion implantation into alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Spirin, R. E.; Salvadori, M. C. Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-11-14

    Composites of titanium nanoparticles in alumina were formed by ion implantation of titanium into alumina, and the surface electrical conductivity measured in situ as the implantation proceeded, thus generating curves of sheet conductivity as a function of dose. The implanted titanium self-conglomerates into nanoparticles, and the spatial dimensions of the buried nanocomposite layer can thus be estimated from the implantation depth profile. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was performed to measure the implantation depth profile, and was in good agreement with the calculated profile. Transmission electron microscopy of the titanium-implanted alumina was used for direct visualization of the nanoparticles formed. The measured conductivity of the buried layer is explained by percolation theory. We determine that the saturation dose, φ{sub 0}, the maximum implantation dose for which the nanocomposite material still remains a composite, is φ{sub 0} = 2.2 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, and the corresponding saturation conductivity is σ{sub 0} = 480 S/m. The percolation dose φ{sub c}, below which the nanocomposite still has basically the conductivity of the alumina matrix, was found to be φ{sub c} = 0.84 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}. The experimental results are discussed and compared with a percolation theory model.

  12. Defect trapping of ion-implanted deuterium in nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Besenbacher, F.; Bottiger, J.; Myers, S.M.

    1982-05-01

    Trapping of ion-implanted deuterium by lattice defects in nickel has been studied by ion-beam-analysis techniques in the temperature range between 30 and 380 K. The deuterium-depth profiles were determined by measuring either the ..cap alpha.. particles or the protons from the /sup 3/He-excited nuclear reaction D(/sup 3/He,..cap alpha..)p, and the deuterium lattice location was obtained by means of ion channeling. Linear-ramp annealing (1 K/min) following a 10-keV D/sup +/ implantation in nickel produced two annealing stages at 275 and 320 K, respectively. The release-vs-temperature data were analyzed by solving the diffusion equation with appropriate trapping terms, yielding 0.24 and 0.43 eV for the trap-binding enthalpies associated with the two stages, referred to as an untrapped solution site. The 0.24-eV trap corresponds to deuterium close to the octahedral interstitial site where it is believed to be trapped at a vacancy, whereas it is suggested that the defect correlated with the 0.43-eV trap is a multiple-vacancy defect. The previously air-exposed and electropolished nickel surface was essentially permeable; the surface-recombination coefficient was determined to be K> or approx. =10/sup -19/ cm/sup 4//s at 350 K.

  13. Transient enhanced diffusion in ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.; Culbertson, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    We discuss the transient-enhanced diffusion of Sb, As, P, In, Ga, and B in ion-implanted Si, where the near-surface region has been amorphized by the dopant or by a self-implantation process. With Sb, a large transient diffusion enhancement is observed proportional to dopant concentration. For Sb, As, P, and In, the enhancement follows the relative interstitialcy diffusion coefficient. We believe this behavior is caused by stable implantation-induced point defects present in the amorphous surface layer, which decay during thermal processing to release high concentrations of self-interstitials. This process occurs in competition with the solid phase epitaxial (SPE) growth process, and for high dopant concentrations can occur in the amorphous phase ahead of the crystallization front. We believe this may be the origin of the dopant redistribution which can occur during SPE growth, which sets the upper limit to the dopant concentration which can be incorporated in the lattice by SPE growth. These effects are reduced for Ga and are absent for B, although transient enhanced diffusion of these species can still occur from defects emitted from the damaged crystal underlying the original amorphous/crystalline interface.

  14. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, H.; Bethge, K.; Bilger, G.; Jones, D.; Symietz, I.

    2002-11-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (α,α) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction 1H( 15N,αγ) 12C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of marrow bone cells on the implanted sample surface with that of titanium.

  15. Nitrogen and boron ion implantation into electrodeposited hard chrome

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Tesmer, J.R.; Scarborough, W.K.; Woodring, J.S.; Nastasi, M.; Kern, K.T.

    1996-10-01

    Electrodeposited hard chrome was ion implanted with N alone, B alone, and a combination. Separate N and B implantation was done at 75 keV and incident doses of 2, 4, and 8x10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2}. Samples with both N/B implants used 75 keV and incident dose levels of 4x10{sup 17} N- and B-at/cm{sup 2}. Beam-line system was used. Retained dose was measured using ion beam analysis, which indicated most of the incident dose was retained. Surface hardness, wear coefficient, and friction coefficient were determined by nanohardness indentation and pin-on-disk wear. At a depth of 50 nm, surface hardness increased from 18{+-}1 GPa (unimplanted) to a max of 23{+-}4 GPa for B implant and 26{+-}1 GPa for N implant. the wear coefficient was reduced by 1.3x to 7.4x, depending on implantation. N implant results in lower wear coefficients than B implant.

  16. Ion-implanted high microwave power indium phosphide transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, Michael D.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Messick, Louis J.; Nguyen, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Encapsulated rapid thermal annealing (RTA) has been used in the fabrication of InP power MISFETs with ion-implanted source, drain, and active-channel regions. The MISFETs had a gate length of 1.4 microns. Six to ten gate fingers per device, with individual gate finger widths of 100 or 125 microns, were used to make MISFETs with total gate widths of 0.75, 0.8, or 1 mm. The source and drain contact regions and the channel region of the MISFETs were fabricated using Si implants in InP at energies from 60 to 360 keV with doses of (1-560) x 10 to the 12th/sq cm. The implants were activated using RTA at 700 C for 30 sec in N2 or H2 ambients using an Si3N4 encapsulant. The high-power high-efficiency MISFETs were characterized at 9.7 GHz, and the output microwave power density for the RTA conditions used was as high as 2.4 W/mm. For a 1-W input at 9.7 GHz gains up to 3.7 dB were observed, with an associated power-added efficiency of 29 percent and output power density 70 percent greater than that of GaAs MESFETs.

  17. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Metal ion implantation in inert polymers for strain gauge applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Giovanni; Massaro, Marcello; Piscopiello, Emanuela; Tapfer, Leander

    2010-10-01

    Metal ion implantation in inert polymers may produce ultra-thin conducting films below the polymer surface. These subsurface films are promising structures for strain gauge applications. To this purpose, polycarbonate substrates were irradiated at room temperature with low-energy metal ions (Cu + and Ni +) and with fluences in the range between 1 × 10 16 and 1 × 10 17 ions/cm 2, in order to promote the precipitation of dispersed metal nanoparticles or the formation of a continuous thin film. The nanoparticle morphology and the microstructural properties of polymer nanocomposites were investigated by glancing-incidence X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. At lower fluences (<5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2) a spontaneous precipitation of spherical-shaped metal nanoparticles occurred below the polymer top-surface (˜50 nm), whereas at higher fluences the aggregation of metal nanoparticles produced the formation of a continuous polycrystalline nanofilm. Furthermore, a characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak was observed for nanocomposites produced at lower ion fluences, due to the presence of Cu nanoparticles. A reduced electrical resistance of the near-surface metal-polymer nanocomposite was measured. The variation of electrical conductivity as a function of the applied surface load was measured: we found a linear relationship and a very small hysteresis.

  19. Study on the Growth and the Photosynthetic Characteristics of Low Energy C+ Ion Implantation on Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuguo; Xu, Lei; Yang, Peiling; Ren, Shumei

    2013-01-01

    Employing the Nonghua 5 peanut as experimental material, the effects of low energy C+ ion implantation on caulis height, root length, dry weight, photosynthetic characteristics and leaf water use efficiency (WUE) of Peanut Ml Generation were studied. Four fluences were observed in the experiment. The results showed that ion implantation harmed the peanut seeds because caulis height, root length and dry weight all were lower in the treatments than in CK, and the harm was aggravated with the increase of ion fluence. Both Pn and Tr show a saddle-shape curve due to midday depression of photosynthesis. Low fluence of low energy C+ ion implantation could increase the diurnal average Pn of peanut. The diurnal variation of Tr did not change as significantly as Pn. The light saturation point (LSP) was restrained by the ions. After low energy C+ ion implantation, WUE was enhanced. When the fluence increased to a certain level, the WUE began to decrease. PMID:23861939

  20. Evaluation of the ion implantation process for production of solar cells from silicon sheet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    For the ion implantation tooling was fabricated with which to hold dendritic web samples. This tooling permits the expeditious boron implantation of the back to form the back surface field (BSF). Baseline BSF web cells were fabricated.

  1. Characterization and control of wafer charging effects during high-current ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Current, M.I.; Lukaszek, W.; Dixon, W.; Vella, M.C.; Messick, C.; Shideler, J.; Reno, S.

    1994-02-01

    EEPROM-based sense and memory devices provide direct measures of the charge flow and potentials occurring on the surface of wafers during ion beam processing. Sensor design and applications for high current ion implantation are discussed.

  2. Synthesis of graphene and graphene nanostructures by ion implantation and pulsed laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaotie; Berke, Kara; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Venkatachalam, Dinesh K.; Elliman, Robert G.; Fridmann, Joel; Hebard, Arthur F.; Ren, Fan; Gila, Brent P.; Appleton, Bill R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report a systematic study that shows how the numerous processing parameters associated with ion implantation (II) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) can be manipulated to control the quantity and quality of graphene (G), few-layer graphene (FLG), and other carbon nanostructures selectively synthesized in crystalline SiC (c-SiC). Controlled implantations of Si- plus C- and Au+ ions in c-SiC showed that both the thickness of the amorphous layer formed by ion damage and the doping effect of the implanted Au enhance the formation of G and FLG during PLA. The relative contributions of the amorphous and doping effects were studied separately, and thermal simulation calculations were used to estimate surface temperatures and to help understand the phase changes occurring during PLA. In addition to the amorphous layer thickness and catalytic doping effects, other enhancement effects were found to depend on other ion species, the annealing environment, PLA fluence and number of pulses, and even laser frequency. Optimum II and PLA conditions are identified and possible mechanisms for selective synthesis of G, FLG, and carbon nanostructures are discussed.

  3. Array of lenses with individually tunable focal-length based on transparent ion-implanted EAPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklaus, Muhamed; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2010-04-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of 2x2 arrays of mm-diameter PDMS lenses whose focal length can be electrically tuned. Dielectric elastomer actuators generally rely on carbon powder or carbon grease electrodes, which are not transparent, precluding the polymer actuator from also being a lens. However compliant electrodes fabricated by low-energy ion implantation are over 50% transparent in the visible, enabling the polymer lens to simultaneously be an actuator. We have developed a chip-scale process to microfabricate lens arrays, consisting of a molded socket bonded to a Pyrex chip supporting 4 membrane actuators. The actuators are interconnected via an incompressible fluid. The Pyrex chip has four through-holes, 1 to 3 mm in diameter, on which a 30 μm thick Polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) layer is bonded. The PDMS layer is implanted on both sides with 5 keV gold ions to define the transparent electrodes for EAP actuation. Applying a voltage to one of the lens/actuators leads to an area expansion and hence to a change in radius of curvature, varying the focal length. We report tuning the focal length from 4 mm to 8 mm at 1.7 kV, and present changes in optical transmission and membrane stiffness following gamma and proton irradiation.

  4. Carbonate dissolution and transport in H2O fluids during subduction revealed by diamond-bearing rocks from the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, M.; Selverstone, J.; Sharp, Z. D.; Compagnoni, R.

    2011-12-01

    Here we discuss the fate of subducted carbonates and its implications for recycling of crustal carbon. Thermodynamic models predict little decarbonation along most subduction geotherms, and the mechanisms by which carbon is transferred from the subducting slab to the overlying mantle remain poorly constrained. Diamond-bearing fluid inclusions in garnet in oceanic metasedimentary rocks from Lago di Cignana (western Alps) represent the first occurrence of diamond from a low-temperature subduction complex of clearly oceanic origin (T ≤600°C; P ≥3.5 GPa). The presence of diamonds in and associated with fluid inclusions provides clear evidence of carbon transport by fluids at depths that are directly relevant to slab-mantle fluid transfer during subduction. At room temperature, the fluid inclusions contain aqueous fluid, a vapor bubble, and multiple solid daughter crystals. Daughter crystals identified by Raman spectroscopy and microprobe analysis include ubiquitous Mg-calcite/calcite and rutile, and less common diamond, quartz, paragonite, dawsonite, rhodochrosite, dypingite, and pentahydrite. Molecular CO2 is absent or in trace amounts. The aqueous liquid phase contains ≥0.2 wt%, HCO3-, CO32-, and SO42- ions. In Raman spectra, broad peaks at 773 and 1017 cm-1 point to the presence of both Si(OH)4(aq) and deprotonated monomers (e.g., SiO(OH)3-(aq), and SiO2(OH)22-(aq)), indicative of alkaline solutions. The absence of CO2 in the vapor, and the presence of carbonate daughter minerals, CO32-(aq), and HCO3-(aq) also show that the trapped fluids are alkaline at ambient conditions. High activities of aqueous carbon species reveal that carbonate dissolution is an important mechanism for mobilizing slab carbon at sub-arc depths (100-200 km) during oceanic subduction. Our results imply that the magnitude of carbon release and transport from the slab at sub-arc depths is greater than experimentally predicted on the basis of decarbonation reactions alone.

  5. Direction-dependent RBS channelling studies in ion implanted LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, E.; Becker, G.; Rensberg, J.; Schmidt, E.; Wolf, S.; Wesch, W.

    2016-07-01

    Damage formation in ion implanted LiNbO3 was studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) along various directions of the LiNbO3 crystal. From the results obtained it can be unambiguously concluded that Nb atoms being displaced during ion implantation preferably occupy the free octahedron sites of the LiNbO3 lattice structure and most likely also form NbLi antisite defects.

  6. A simple ion implanter for material modifications in agriculture and gemmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singkarat, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Intarasiri, S.; Bootkul, D.; Phanchaisri, B.; Techarung, J.; Rhodes, M. W.; Suwankosum, R.; Rattanarin, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In our efforts in developing ion beam technology for novel applications in biology and gemmology, an economic simple compact ion implanter especially for the purpose was constructed. The designing of the machine was aimed at providing our users with a simple, economic, user friendly, convenient and easily operateable ion implanter for ion implantation of biological living materials and gemstones for biotechnological applications and modification of gemstones, which would eventually contribute to the national agriculture, biomedicine and gem-industry developments. The machine was in a vertical setup so that the samples could be placed horizontally and even without fixing; in a non-mass-analyzing ion implanter style using mixed molecular and atomic nitrogen (N) ions so that material modifications could be more effective; equipped with a focusing/defocusing lens and an X-Y beam scanner so that a broad beam could be possible; and also equipped with a relatively small target chamber so that living biological samples could survive from the vacuum period during ion implantation. To save equipment materials and costs, most of the components of the machine were taken from decommissioned ion beam facilities. The maximum accelerating voltage of the accelerator was 100 kV, ideally necessary for crop mutation induction and gem modification by ion beams from our experience. N-ion implantation of local rice seeds and cut gemstones was carried out. Various phenotype changes of grown rice from the ion-implanted seeds and improvements in gemmological quality of the ion-bombarded gemstones were observed. The success in development of such a low-cost and simple-structured ion implanter provides developing countries with a model of utilizing our limited resources to develop novel accelerator-based technologies and applications.

  7. Isotopic fractionation of oxygen and carbon in decomposed lower-mantle inclusions in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, Felix; Matzel, Jennifer; Jacobsen, Ben; Hutcheon, Ian; Wirth, Richard

    2015-07-25

    Two carbonatitic mineral assemblages, calcite + wollastonite and calcite + monticellite, which are encapsulated in two diamond grains from the Rio Soriso basin in the Juina area, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, were studied utilizing the NanoSIMS technique. The assemblages were formed as the result of the decomposition of the lower-mantle assemblage calcite + CaSi-perovskite + volatile during the course of the diamond ascent under pressure conditions from 15 to less than 0.8 GPa. The oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of the studied minerals are inhomogeneous. They fractionated during the process of the decomposition of primary minerals to very varying values: δ18O from –3.3 to +15.4 ‰ SMOW and δ13C from –2.8 to +9.3 ‰ VPDB. As a result, these values significantly extend the mantle values for these elements in both isotopically-light and isotopically-heavy areas.

  8. Isotopic fractionation of oxygen and carbon in decomposed lower-mantle inclusions in diamond

    DOE PAGES

    Kaminsky, Felix; Matzel, Jennifer; Jacobsen, Ben; Hutcheon, Ian; Wirth, Richard

    2015-07-25

    Two carbonatitic mineral assemblages, calcite + wollastonite and calcite + monticellite, which are encapsulated in two diamond grains from the Rio Soriso basin in the Juina area, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, were studied utilizing the NanoSIMS technique. The assemblages were formed as the result of the decomposition of the lower-mantle assemblage calcite + CaSi-perovskite + volatile during the course of the diamond ascent under pressure conditions from 15 to less than 0.8 GPa. The oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of the studied minerals are inhomogeneous. They fractionated during the process of the decomposition of primary minerals to very varying values:more » δ18O from –3.3 to +15.4 ‰ SMOW and δ13C from –2.8 to +9.3 ‰ VPDB. As a result, these values significantly extend the mantle values for these elements in both isotopically-light and isotopically-heavy areas.« less

  9. Effect of phosphorous ion implantation on the mechanical properties and bioactivity of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Muramatsu, Takehiro; Teranishi, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has ability of bone-like apatite formation, which consists with chemical interaction between the surface of HA and ions included in body fluid. Thus, proper surface modification might enhance the function. In the present study, the effect of phosphorous ion implantation on mechanical properties and bioactivity of HA was investigated. In order to clarify the effect of ion implantation dose, ion dose of 1 × 10(12), 1 × 10(13) and 1 × 10(14) ions/cm(2) were selected. Mechanical properties and bioactivity were evaluated in 4-point bending tests and immersion test in simulated body fluid. Bending strength was reduced due to ion implantation. The amount of decreasing strength was similar regardless of ion implantation dose. Bone-like apatite formation was slightly delayed with ion implantation, however, improvement in interfacial strength between bone-like apatite layer and the base HA was indicated. From the results, the possibility of phosphorous ion implantation for enhancement of bioactivity of HA was proved.

  10. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan; Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Nayak, B. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2016-04-01

    Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV-Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 1017 N-ions/cm2 fluence, formation of colour centres (F+, F2, F2+ and F22+) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  11. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes on diamond-like carbon by the hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Chang; Park, Yong Seob; Hong, Byungyou

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention as possible routes to device miniaturization due to their excellent mechanical, thermal, and electronic properties. These properties show great potential for devices such as field emission displays, transistors, and sensors. The growth of CNTs can be explained by interaction between small carbon patches and the metal catalyst. The metals such as nickel, cobalt, gold, iron, platinum, and palladium are used as the catalysts for the CNT growth. In this study, diamond-like carbon (DLC) was used for CNT growth as a nonmetallic catalyst layer. DLC films were deposited by a radio frequency (RF) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) method with a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases. CNTs were synthesized by a hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HF-PECVD) method with ammonia (NH3) as a pretreatment gas and acetylene (C2H2) as a carbon source gas. The grown CNTs and the pretreated DLC films were observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) measurement, and the structure of the grown CNTs was analyzed by high resolution transmission scanning electron microscopy (HR-TEM). Also, using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurement, we confirmed that only the carbon component remained on the substrate. PMID:19318258

  12. Aqueous electro-oxidative probe-based patterning of diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühl, Thomas; Myhra, Sverre

    2007-04-01

    The production of gaseous H2 and CO/CO2 by aqueous electro-oxidation of solid carbon is a well-established process. It can be used as a method for masked and maskless local probe-induced lithography of conducting ion-beam assisted CVD deposited diamond-like carbon films. The masking route constitutes a parallel rapid processing technology, while the local probe method is a serial technology with a higher spatial resolution. The reaction cell is either a reservoir of bulk fluid or a thin adsorbed film. In the latter case the cell will be attached to the probe tip by the meniscus effect; the tip becomes a travelling electrode while the spatial extent of the cell defines the lateral spatial resolution of the pattern down to about 10 nm. The process is constrained kinetically in the early stages by limitations on charge transport through the surface barrier at the fluid-to-solid interface, and subsequently by the availability of oxidants and by their arrival at the reactive sites. The results may have implications for new technologies exploiting the properties of carbon-based materials, but may also add to our present understanding of the electrochemistry of carbon solids.

  13. Nanoindentation Fracture Behaviors of Diamond-Like Carbon Film on Aluminum Alloy with Different Interface Toughnesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Kenji; Sasaki, Yuto; Kamiko, Masao; Mitsuda, Yoshitaka

    2012-09-01

    Fracture behaviors of a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film on an aluminum alloy (AA2017) were analyzed by a nanoindentation test under conditions of deep and full penetrations of an indenter tip through the DLC film. The interface structure between the DLC and AA2017 was modified by using the substrate sputtering and redeposition (SSRD) method. The films deposited with a shorter (30 min) SSRD duration showed weak adhesion to the substrate and often resulted in wide delamination from the impressions. At the same time, films deposited with a longer (120 min) SSRD duration showed no such delamination. Obvious brittle fractures were detected in the load-displacement curves mainly in the film with the short SSRD duration. These results suggest that a long SSRD inhibited the delamination of the DLC film from AA2017 under local and strong stress conditions because of the improved interface toughness.

  14. The structural basis for function in diamond-like carbon binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Gabryelczyk, Bartosz; Szilvay, Géza R; Linder, Markus B

    2014-07-29

    The molecular structural basis for the function of specific peptides that bind to diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces was investigated. For this, a competition assay that provided a robust way of comparing relative affinities of peptide variants was set up. Point mutations of specific residues resulted in significant effects, but it was shown that the chemical composition of the peptide was not sufficient to explain peptide affinity. More significantly, rearrangements in the sequence indicated that the binding is a complex recognition event that is dependent on the overall structure of the peptide. The work demonstrates the unique properties of peptides for creating functionality at interfaces via noncovalent binding for potential applications in, for example, nanomaterials, biomedical materials, and sensors. PMID:25007096

  15. Study of RF PACVD diamond like carbon coatings deposited at low bias for vacuum applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercammen, K.; Meneve, J.; Dekempeneer, E.; Roberts, E. W.; Eiden, M. J.

    2001-09-01

    Currently, sputtered molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is an established coating for space applications. However, when operated in air, molybdenum disulphide loses much of its lubricating power, thus preventing in-air ground testing. In this work, the tribological properties in vacuum, dry N2 and air of a-C:H films produced by radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition (RF PACVD) were studied in order to assess their potential for applications in space. We demonstrated that diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited at low bias voltage show lubricating capacity under vacuum conditions. However, the shorter lifetime of the DLC films as compared to MoS2 under vacuum is considered as an important limiting factor.

  16. Engineering of the function of diamond-like carbon binding peptides through structural design.

    PubMed

    Gabryelczyk, Bartosz; Szilvay, Géza R; Singh, Vivek K; Mikkilä, Joona; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Koskinen, Jari; Linder, Markus B

    2015-02-01

    The use of phage display to select material-specific peptides provides a general route towards modification and functionalization of surfaces and interfaces. However, a rational structural engineering of the peptides for optimal affinity is typically not feasible because of insufficient structure-function understanding. Here, we investigate the influence of multivalency of diamond-like carbon (DLC) binding peptides on binding characteristics. We show that facile linking of peptides together using different lengths of spacers and multivalency leads to a tuning of affinity and kinetics. Notably, increased length of spacers in divalent systems led to significantly increased affinities. Making multimers influenced also kinetic aspects of surface competition. Additionally, the multivalent peptides were applied as surface functionalization components for a colloidal form of DLC. The work suggests the use of a set of linking systems to screen parameters for functional optimization of selected material-specific peptides.

  17. Electron-beam induced diamond-like-carbon passivation of plasmonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaur, Eugeniu; Sadatnajafi, Catherine; Langley, Daniel; Lin, Jiao; Kou, Shan Shan; Abbey, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Engineered materials with feature sizes on the order of a few nanometres offer the potential for producing metamaterials with properties which may differ significantly from their bulk counterpart. Here we describe the production of plasmonic colour filters using periodic arrays of nanoscale cross shaped apertures fabricated in optically opaque silver films. Due to its relatively low loss in the visible and near infrared range, silver is a popular choice for plasmonic devices, however it is also unstable in wet or even ambient conditions. Here we show that ultra-thin layers of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) can be used to prevent degradation due to oxidative stress, ageing and corrosion. We demonstrate that DLC effectively protects the sub-micron features which make up the plasmonic colour filter under both atmospheric conditions and accelerated aging using iodine gas. Through a systematic study we confirm that the nanometre thick DLC layers have no effect on the device functionality or performance.

  18. Enhancing the stability of microplasma device utilizing diamond coated carbon nanotubes as cathode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tinghsun; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Tai, Nyanhwa E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw; Kunuku, Srinivasu; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw

    2014-06-02

    This paper reports the enhanced stability of a microplasma device by using hybrid-granular-structured diamond (HiD) film coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as cathode, which overcomes the drawback of short life time in the CNTs-based one. The microplasma device can be operated more than 210 min without showing any sign of degradation, whereas the CNTs-based one can last only 50 min. Besides the high robustness against the Ar-ion bombardment, the HiD/CNTs material also possesses superior electron field emission properties with low turn-on field of 3.2 V/μm, which is considered as the prime factor for the improved plasma illumination performance of the devices.

  19. Dielectric performance of diamond-like carbon nanofilms deposited by electron-beam-induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G.

    2008-12-01

    The effect of electron beam dose and low accelerating voltage on diamond-like-carbon (DLC) deposition rate and the resulting current-voltage characteristics in thin metal/DLC/semiconductor junctions was studied. We show that thicker DLC films can be obtained using lower accelerating voltages (2 kV) than when using higher accelerating voltage (20 kV). However, under the conditions used the insulating performance of the thicker films is worse than the thinner films. We attribute this effect to the variation of tunnelling barrier height in DLC deposited using different accelerating voltages. DLC films with a tunnelling barrier height of up to 3.12 eV were obtained using a 20 kV electron-beam, while only 0.73 eV was achieved for 2 kV DLC films.

  20. Method of making a Josephson junction with a diamond-like carbon insulating barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Hed, A.Z.

    1991-11-12

    This patent describes a method of making a Josephson junction. It comprises depositing upon a substrate a first layer of high-temperature superconductive oxide having a critical temperature above 23 K.; depositing on the first layer to a thickness in excess of 200 angstroms an insulating layer of diamond-like carbon resistant to cation diffusion therethrough and incapable of interdiffusing with superconductive oxides of the junction; plasma etching the insulating layer to leave the insulating layer with a thickness of 20 to 100 angstroms on the first layer; to leave a continuous film thereof on the first layer of a thickness of 20 to 100 angstroms; and depositing on the insulating layer a second layer of high-temperature superconductive oxide having a critical temperature above 23 K. and forming with the first layer and the insulating layer a Josephson junction at a temperature at least equal to one of the critical temperatures.

  1. Stress reduction of Cu-doped diamond-like carbon films from ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaowei; Ke, Peiling; Wang, Aiying

    2015-01-15

    Structure and properties of Cu-doped diamond-like carbon films (DLC) were investigated using ab initio calculations. The effect of Cu concentrations (1.56∼7.81 at.%) on atomic bond structure was mainly analyzed to clarify the residual stress reduction mechanism. Results showed that with introducing Cu into DLC films, the residual compressive stress decreased firstly and then increased for each case with the obvious deterioration of mechanical properties, which was in agreement with the experimental results. Structural analysis revealed that the weak Cu-C bond and the relaxation of both the distorted bond angles and bond lengths accounted for the significant reduction of residual compressive stress, while at the higher Cu concentration the increase of residual stress attributed to the existence of distorted Cu-C structures and the increased fraction of distorted C-C bond lengths.

  2. Characterization of boron doped diamond-like carbon film by HRTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. J.; He, L. L.; Li, Y. S.; Yang, Q.; Hirose, A.

    2015-12-01

    Boron doped diamond-like carbon (B-DLC) film was synthesized on silicon (1 0 0) wafer by biased target ion beam deposition. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is employed to investigate the microstructure of the B-DLC thin film in cross-sectional observation. Many crystalline nanoparticles randomly dispersed and embedded in the amorphous matrix film are observed. Through chemical compositional analysis of the B-DLC film, some amount of O element is confirmed to be contained. And also, some nanoparticles with near zone axes are indexed, which are accordance with B2O phase. Therefore, the contained O element causing the B element oxidized is proposed, resulting in the formation of the nanoparticles. Our work indicates that in the B-DLC film a significant amount of the doped B element exists as boron suboxide nanoparticles.

  3. Patterned growth of neuronal cells on modified diamond-like carbon substrates.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Stephen; Regan, Edward M; Uney, James B; Dick, Andrew D; McGeehan, Joseph P; Mayer, Eric J; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2008-06-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) has been explored as a biomaterial with potential use for coating implantable devices and surgical instruments. In this study the interaction of DLC with mammalian neuronal cells has been studied along with its modifications to improve its function as a biomaterial. We describe the use of DLC, oxidised DLC and phosphorus-doped DLC to support the growth and survival of primary central nervous system neurones and neuroblastoma cells. None of these substrates were cytotoxic and primary neurones adhered better to phosphorus-doped DLC than unmodified DLC. This property was used to culture cortical neurones in a predetermined micropattern. This raises the potential of DLC as a biomaterial for central nervous system (CNS) implantation. Furthermore, patterned DLC and phosphorus-doped DLC can direct neuronal growth, generating a powerful tool to study neuronal networks in a spatially distinct way. This study reports the generation of nerve cell patterns via patterned deposition of DLC.

  4. Diamond-like carbon as biological compatible material for cell culture and medical application.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Jones, M W; Wu, R L

    1993-01-01

    Ion beam assisted diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been used for growing the human hematopoietic myeloblastic ML-1 cells and human embryo kidney 293 cells in the control environment. DLC films were directly deposited onto the P-35 plastic dishes by impacting the high kinetic energy (1000 eV) of methane ions at room temperature. The present results showed that both ML-1 and HEK 293 cells continuously grow with and without DLC films. It has demonstrated that human cells proliferated on DLC film with very high viability and DLC material had no toxicity to cultured human ML-1 and HEK 293 cells. We conclude that DLC film is a biological compatible material for potential cell culture matrix and bio-medical applications.

  5. [Coating with plasma-deposited functionalized diamond-like carbon to decrease encrustations on urological implants].

    PubMed

    Laube, N; Kleinen, L; Böde, U; Fisang, C; Meissner, A; Bradenahl, J; Syring, I; Busch, H; Pinkowski, W; Müller, S C

    2007-09-01

    The double-J stents used today for palliative artificial urinary diversion very often show extreme formation of encrustations, even a short time after implantation. Despite increased scientific material development, the complication rate has not really been strongly influenced. Grant-aided by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, we chose a new interdisciplinary and translational approach by coating standard stent materials with plasma-deposited amorphous diamond-like carbon. These stents show clearly reduced rates of encrustation in vitro. Ongoing clinical trials demonstrate a further enhancement of this effect in vivo. The underlying mechanisms are being investigated by extending the established in vitro model, thereby pushing research in this field to a new level.

  6. Optical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon films synthesized by plasma immersion ion processing

    SciTech Connect

    He, X-M.; Walter, K.C.; Bardeau, J-F.; Nastasi, M.; Lee, S-T.; Sun, X.S.

    1999-04-12

    Hard diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been prepared on PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate), glass, and Si(100) substrates using C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-Ar plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP). The composition, structure, and properties of the films were investigated with regard to variation of the deposition parameters. It was found that the modulation of reactive gas composition during PIIP could enhance the formation of DLC films with an increased sp{sup 3} bonding structure, improved surface smoothness, high density and high hardness. An optimal combination of good optical properties and high hardness was highly dependent on the control of hydrogen content in the DLC films. Tribological tests showed that DLC-coated glass and PMMA samples exhibited a reduced friction coefficient and enhanced wear resistance relative to uncoated glass and PMMA materials. The effects of ion energy and gas composition during PIIP deposition on the formation of optically transparent and wear resistant DLC films are discussed.

  7. Electrochemical Response of Biomolecules on Carbon Substrates: Comparison between Oxidized HOPG and O-Terminated Boron-Doped CVD Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, Claudia; Sternschulte, Hadwig; Denisenko, Andrej; Schlichtiger, Alice; Stimming, Ulrich

    In this work, two types of electroactive proteins, namely azurin and ferrocene-labeled papain, were adsorbed on differently oxidized diamond and investigated by cyclic voltammetry. A comparison was made with oxidized highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). A direct electron transfer to the biomolecules was confirmed for all oxidized carbon electrodes. A strong influence of the oxygen termination process of diamond on the charge transfer through the interface has been observed. This effect has been attributed to different defects and electronic states at the interface, as confirmed by capacitance-voltage measurements in electrolyte, electrical characterisation and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Wet chemical oxidized diamond was proved to be the most effective electrode material for biomolecule anchoring with an electron transfer rate higher by factor of three than that of HOPG.

  8. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  9. Metallic contamination in hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Paul K.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Zeng, Xuchu; Kwok, Dixon T. K.

    2001-10-01

    In plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), ions bombard all surfaces inside the PIII vacuum chamber, especially the negatively pulsed biased sample stage and to a lesser extent the interior of the vacuum chamber. As a result, contaminants sputtered from these exposed surfaces can be reimplanted into or adsorb on the silicon wafer. Using particle-in-cell theoretical simulation, we determine the relative ion doses incident on the top, side, and bottom surfaces of three typical sample chuck configurations: (i) a bare conducting stage with the entire sample platen and high-voltage feedthrough/supporting rod exposed and under a high voltage, (ii) a stage with only the sample platen exposed to the plasma but the high-voltage feedthrough protected by an insulating quartz shroud, and (iii) a bare stage with a silicon extension or guard ring to reduce the number of ions bombarding the side and bottom of the sample platen. Our simulation results reveal that the ratio of the incident dose impacting the top of the sample platen to that impacting the side and bottom of the sample stage can be improved to 49% using a guard ring. To corroborate our theoretical results, we experimentally determine the amounts of metallic contaminants on 100 mm silicon wafers implanted using a bare chuck and with a 150 mm silicon wafer inserted between the 100 mm wafer and sample stage to imitate the guard ring. We also discuss the effectiveness of a replaceable all-silicon liner inside the vacuum chamber to address the second source of contamination, that from the interior wall of the vacuum chamber. Our results indicate a significant improvement when an all-silicon liner and silicon guard ring are used simultaneously.

  10. Improved wear properties of high energy ion-implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, G.R.; Lee, E.H. ); Bhattacharya, R.; McCormick, A.W. )

    1995-01-01

    Polycarbonate (Lexan[sup TM]) (PC) was implanted with 2 MeV B[sup +] and O[sup +] ions separately to fluences of 5[times]10[sup 17], 1[times]10[sup 18], and 5[times]10[sup 18] ions/m[sup 2], and characterized for changes in surface hardness and tribological properties. Results of tests showed that hardness values of all implanted specimens increased over those of the unirradiated material, and the O[sup +] implantation was more effective in improving hardness for a given fluence than the B[sup +] implantation. Reciprocating sliding wear tests using a nylon ball counterface yielded significant improvements for all implanted specimens except for the 5[times]10[sup 17] ions/m[sup 2] B[sup +]-implanted PC. Wear tests conducted with a 52100 steel ball yielded significant improvements for the highest fluence of 5[times]10[sup 18] ions/m[sup 2] for both ions, but not for the two lower fluences. The improvements in properties were related to Linear Energy Transfer (LET) mechanisms, where it was shown that the O[sup +] implantation caused greater ionization, thereby greater cross-linking at the surface corresponding to much better improvements in properties. The results were also compared with a previous study on PC using 200 keV B[sup +] ions. The present study indicates that high energy ion irradiation produces thicker, more cross-linked, harder, and more wear-resistant surfaces on polymers and thereby improves properties to a greater extent and more efficiently than lower energy ion implantation.

  11. Multiple ion implantation effects on hardness and fatigue properties of Fe13Cr15Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G. R.; Lee, E. H.; Boatner, L. A.; Chin, B. A.; Mansur, L. K.

    1992-09-01

    Eight complex alloys based on the composition Fe13Cr15Ni2Mo2Mn0.2Ti0.8Si0.06C were implanted simultaneously with 400 keV boron and 550 keV nitrogen, and investigated for microhardness changes and bending fatigue life. The dual implantation was found to decrease the fatigue life of all eight alloys although the implantation increased near-surface hardness of all eight alloys. This result was in contrast to the significant improvements found in the fatigue life of four B, N implanted simple Fe13Cr15Ni alloys. It was determined that the implantation suppressed surface slip band formation, the usual crack initiation site, but in the complex alloys, this suppression promoted a shift to grain boundary cracking. A similar phenomenon was also observed when the simple Fe13Cr15Ni alloys were simultaneously implanted with boron, nitrogen and carbon wherein fatigue life decreased, and gain, grain boundary cracks were observed. To test the hypothesis that ion implantation made the overall surface more fatigue resistant but led to a shift to grain boundary cracking, single crystal specimens of the ternary Fe15Cr15Ni were also implanted with boron and nitrogen ions. The fatigue life decreased for the single crystal specimens also, due to concentration of applied stress along fewer slip bands as compared to the control single crystal specimens were applied stress was relieved by slip band formation over the entire gauge region.

  12. Screening of Bioflocculant-Producing Strain by Ion Implantation and Flocculating Characteristics of Bioflocculants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peirui; Li, Zongwei; Li, Zongyi; Qin, Guangyong; Huo, Yuping

    2008-06-01

    A bioflocculant-producing mutator strain, NIM-192, was screened out through nitrogen ion implanting into FJ-7 strain. The results showed that NIM-192 had good genetic stability and high flocculating activity, and the flocculating rate increased by 34.26% than that of the original. Sucrose, complex nitrogen source contained yeast extract, urea and pH 7.0 ~ 9.0 were chosen as the best carbon source, nitrogen source and initial solution pH for bioflocculant production, respectively. The bioflocculant kept high and stable flocculating activity at alkalinous reaction mixture with a pH beyond 7.0, while the flocculating activity was remarkably reduced when the reaction pH was lower than 7.0. Addition of many cations could obviously increase the flocculating rate, among which Ca2+ demonstrated the best effect. The bioflocculant had very strong acid-base stability and thermo-stability. The flocculating rate kept over 86% when pH of the bioflocculant was in a range of 3.0 ~ 12.0, and the change of flocculating activity was not great when heated at 100°C for 60 min.

  13. Preparation and investigation of diamond-like carbon nanocomposite thin films for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panosyan, Zh.; Gharibyan, A.; Sargsyan, A.; Panosyan, H.; Hayrapetyan, D.; Yengibaryan, Y.

    2010-08-01

    Flexible Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) technology of Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) thin film preparation on the surface of Si and organic glasses has been elaborated. Modification of PECVD equipment has been implemented by integrating ion and magnetron sources. In this paper toluene (C7H8) has been used as a nanocmposite film forming hydrocarbon which decomposition yields to the multi component plasma in vacuum chamber. Nitrogen has been used as a dopand. Investigation of plasma composition influence to the optical and mechanical properties of DLC films has been observed. The presence of sp3 and sp2 hybridization states have been proven by Raman spectroscopy and their ratios have been estimated with the help of ID, IG characteristic lines for different technological conditions. High precision refractive index and thickness measurements of DLC films have been implemented by means of laser ellipsometer. Refractive indices of prepared films have been varied in the region 1.5-3.1 and thicknesses have been varied in the region 50-250 nm. Extraordinary change in refractive index has been explained with the help of formation of differently sized sp2 carbon based clusters in the sp3 matrix. Different types of carbon and hydrogen bonds have been observed in the obtained structures by means of FTIR. Obvious prospectives of DLC nanocomposite film as a promissing nanophotonic material has been discussed.

  14. Adsorption of glycine on diamond (001): Role of bond angle of carbon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Xu, Jing; Xu, Li-Fang; Lian, Chao-Sheng; Li, Jun-Jie; Wang, Jian-Tao; Gu, Chang-Zhi

    2015-05-01

    The adsorption behaviors of glycine on diamond (001) are systematically investigated by first-principles calculations. We have considered all possible adsorption configurations without a surface dangling bond and give a quantitative analysis for the relationship between the deviation of carbon bond angle and adsorption energy. We found that a smaller distortion of carbon covalent bond angle results in a more stable adsorption structure, and the most stable adsorption has a benzene-ring-like structure with the highest adsorption energy of 5.11 eV per molecule and the minimum distortion of carbon covalent bond angle. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272278, 91323304, 10774177, and 11374341), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grand No. 2009CB930502), the Knowledge Innovation Project of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grand No. KJCX2-EW-W02), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of Ministry of Education of China, and the Research Funds of Renmin University of China.

  15. Electrochemical performance of porous diamond-like carbon electrodes for sensing hormones, neurotransmitters, and endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tiago A; Zanin, Hudson; May, Paul W; Corat, Evaldo J; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-12-10

    Porous diamond-like carbon (DLC) electrodes have been prepared, and their electrochemical performance was explored. For electrode preparation, a thin DLC film was deposited onto a densely packed forest of highly porous, vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the carbon nanotubes to clump together to form a microstructured surface with an enlarged surface area. DLC:VACNT electrodes show fast charge transfer, which is promising for several electrochemical applications, including electroanalysis. DLC:VACNT electrodes were applied to the determination of targeted molecules such as dopamine (DA) and epinephrine (EP), which are neurotransmitters/hormones, and acetaminophen (AC), an endocrine disruptor. Using simple and low-cost techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, analytical curves in the concentration range from 10 to 100 μmol L(-1) were obtained and excellent analytical parameters achieved, including high analytical sensitivity, good response stability, and low limits of detection of 2.9, 4.5, and 2.3 μmol L(-1) for DA, EP, and AC, respectively.

  16. Effect of source gas chemistry on tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films.

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Fenske, G. R.; Nilufer, I. B.

    1999-08-23

    In this study, we investigated the effects of various source gases (i. e., methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene and methane + hydrogen) on friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. Specifically, we described the anomalous nature and fundamental friction and wear mechanisms of DLC films derived from gas discharge plasmas with very low to very high hydrogen content. The films were deposited on steel substrates by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature and the tribological tests were performed in dry nitrogen. The results of tribological tests revealed a close correlation between the friction and wear coefficients of the DLC films and the source gas chemistry. Specifically, films grown in source gases with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios had much lower friction coefficients and wear rates than the films derived from source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.002) was achieved with a film derived from 25% methane--75% hydrogen while the films derived from acetylene had a coefficient of 0.15. Similar correlations were observed on wear rates. Specifically, the films derived from hydrogen rich plasmas had the least wear while the films derived from pure acetylene suffered the highest wear. We used a combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structural chemistry of the resultant DLC films.

  17. High Stability Electron Field Emitters Synthesized via the Combination of Carbon Nanotubes and N₂-Plasma Grown Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Films.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Hsun; Hsieh, Ping-Yen; Kunuku, Srinivasu; Lou, Shiu-Cheng; Manoharan, Divinah; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2015-12-16

    An electron field emitter with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties and improved lifetime stability is being demonstrated via the combination of carbon nanotubes and the CH4/N2 plasma grown ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) films. The resistance of the carbon nanotubes to plasma ion bombardment is improved by the formation of carbon nanocones on the side walls of the carbon nanotubes, thus forming strengthened carbon nanotubes (s-CNTs). The N-UNCD films can thus be grown on s-CNTs, forming N-UNCD/s-CNTs carbon nanocomposite materials. The N-UNCD/s-CNTs films possess good conductivity of σ = 237 S/cm and marvelous EFE properties, such as low turn-on field of (E0) = 3.58 V/μm with large EFE current density of (J(e)) = 1.86 mA/cm(2) at an applied field of 6.0 V/μm. Moreover, the EFE emitters can be operated under 0.19 mA/cm(2) for more than 350 min without showing any sign of degradation. Such a superior EFE property along with high robustness characteristic of these combination of materials are not attainable with neither N-UNCD films nor s-CNTs films alone. Transmission electron microscopic investigations indicated that the N-UNCD films contain needle-like diamond grains encased in a few layers of nanographitic phase, which enhanced markedly the transport of electrons in the N-UNCD films. Moreover, the needle-like diamond grains were nucleated from the s-CNTs without the necessity of forming the interlayer that facilitate the transport of electrons crossing the diamond-to-Si interface. Both these factors contributed to the enhanced EFE behavior of the N-UNCD/s-CNTs films.

  18. Development and characterization of a diamond-insulated graphitic multi electrode array realized with ion beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Picollo, Federico; Battiato, Alfio; Carbone, Emilio; Croin, Luca; Enrico, Emanuele; Forneris, Jacopo; Gosso, Sara; Olivero, Paolo; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carabelli, Valentina

    2014-12-30

    The detection of quantal exocytic events from neurons and neuroendocrine cells is a challenging task in neuroscience. One of the most promising platforms for the development of a new generation of biosensors is diamond, due to its biocompatibility, transparency and chemical inertness. Moreover, the electrical properties of diamond can be turned from a perfect insulator into a conductive material (resistivity ~mΩ·cm) by exploiting the metastable nature of this allotropic form of carbon. A 16‑channels MEA (Multi Electrode Array) suitable for cell culture growing has been fabricated by means of ion implantation. A focused 1.2 MeV He+ beam was scanned on a IIa single-crystal diamond sample (4.5 × 4.5 × 0.5 mm3) to cause highly damaged sub-superficial structures that were defined with micrometric spatial resolution. After implantation, the sample was annealed. This process provides the conversion of the sub-superficial highly damaged regions to a graphitic phase embedded in a highly insulating diamond matrix. Thanks to a three-dimensional masking technique, the endpoints of the sub-superficial channels emerge in contact with the sample surface, therefore being available as sensing electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry measurements of solutions with increasing concentrations of adrenaline were performed to characterize the biosensor sensitivity. The reported results demonstrate that this new type of biosensor is suitable for in vitro detection of catecholamine release.

  19. Development and characterization of a diamond-insulated graphitic multi electrode array realized with ion beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Picollo, Federico; Battiato, Alfio; Carbone, Emilio; Croin, Luca; Enrico, Emanuele; Forneris, Jacopo; Gosso, Sara; Olivero, Paolo; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carabelli, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    The detection of quantal exocytic events from neurons and neuroendocrine cells is a challenging task in neuroscience. One of the most promising platforms for the development of a new generation of biosensors is diamond, due to its biocompatibility, transparency and chemical inertness. Moreover, the electrical properties of diamond can be turned from a perfect insulator into a conductive material (resistivity ~mΩ·cm) by exploiting the metastable nature of this allotropic form of carbon. A 16‑channels MEA (Multi Electrode Array) suitable for cell culture growing has been fabricated by means of ion implantation. A focused 1.2 MeV He+ beam was scanned on a IIa single-crystal diamond sample (4.5 × 4.5 × 0.5 mm3) to cause highly damaged sub-superficial structures that were defined with micrometric spatial resolution. After implantation, the sample was annealed. This process provides the conversion of the sub-superficial highly damaged regions to a graphitic phase embedded in a highly insulating diamond matrix. Thanks to a three-dimensional masking technique, the endpoints of the sub-superficial channels emerge in contact with the sample surface, therefore being available as sensing electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry measurements of solutions with increasing concentrations of adrenaline were performed to characterize the biosensor sensitivity. The reported results demonstrate that this new type of biosensor is suitable for in vitro detection of catecholamine release. PMID:25558992

  20. Development and Characterization of a Diamond-Insulated Graphitic Multi Electrode Array Realized with Ion Beam Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Picollo, Federico; Battiato, Alfio; Carbone, Emilio; Croin, Luca; Enrico, Emanuele; Forneris, Jacopo; Gosso, Sara; Olivero, Paolo; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carabelli, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    The detection of quantal exocytic events from neurons and neuroendocrine cells is a challenging task in neuroscience. One of the most promising platforms for the development of a new generation of biosensors is diamond, due to its biocompatibility, transparency and chemical inertness. Moreover, the electrical properties of diamond can be turned from a perfect insulator into a conductive material (resistivity ∼mΩ·cm) by exploiting the metastable nature of this allotropic form of carbon. A 16-channels MEA (Multi Electrode Array) suitable for cell culture growing has been fabricated by means of ion implantation. A focused 1.2 MeV He+ beam was scanned on a IIa single-crystal diamond sample (4.5 × 4.5 × 0.5 mm3) to cause highly damaged sub-superficial structures that were defined with micrometric spatial resolution. After implantation, the sample was annealed. This process provides the conversion of the sub-superficial highly damaged regions to a graphitic phase embedded in a highly insulating diamond matrix. Thanks to a three-dimensional masking technique, the endpoints of the sub-superficial channels emerge in contact with the sample surface, therefore being available as sensing electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry measurements of solutions with increasing concentrations of adrenaline were performed to characterize the biosensor sensitivity. The reported results demonstrate that this new type of biosensor is suitable for in vitro detection of catecholamine release. PMID:25558992

  1. Comparative study of metal and non-metal ion implantation in polymers: Optical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta, V.; Quarta, G.; Farella, I.; Maruccio, L.; Cola, A.; Calcagnile, L.

    2014-07-01

    The implantation of 1 MeV metal (63Cu+, 107Ag+, 197Au+) and non-metal (4He+, 12C+) ions in a polycarbonate (PC) matrix has been studied in order to evaluate the role of ion species in the modification of optical and electrical properties of the polymer. When the ion fluence is above ∼1 × 1013 ions cm-2, the threshold for latent tracks overlapping is overcome and π-bonded carbon clusters grow and aggregate forming a network of conjugated Cdbnd C bonds. For fluences around 1 × 1017 ions cm-2, the aggregation phenomena induce the formation of amorphous carbon and/or graphite like structures. At the same time, nucleation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) from implanted species can take place when the supersaturation threshold is overcome. The optical absorption of the samples increases in the visible range and the optical band gap redshifts from 3.40 eV up to 0.70 eV mostly due to the carbonization process and the formation of C0x clusters and cluster aggregates. Specific structures in the extinction spectra are observed when metal ions are selected in contrast to the non-metal ion implanted PC, thus revealing the possible presence of noble metal based NPs interstitial to the C0x cluster network. The corresponding electrical resistance decreases much more when metal ions are implanted with at least a factor of 2 orders of magnitude difference than the non-metal ions based samples. An absolute value of ∼107 Ω/sq has been measured for implantation with metals at doses higher than 5 × 1016 ions cm-2, being 1017 Ω/sq the corresponding sheet resistance for pristine PC.

  2. SEM analysis of ion implanted SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, Johan B.; van der Berg, N. G.; Botha, A. J.; Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Kuhudzai, R. J.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.; Chakraborty, P.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2013-11-01

    SiC is a material used in two future energy production technologies, firstly as a photovoltaic layer to harness the UV spectrum in high efficient power solar cells, and secondly as a diffusion barrier material for radioactive fission products in the fuel elements of the next generation of nuclear power plants. For both applications, there is an interest in the implantation of reactive and non-reactive ions into SiC and their effects on the properties of the SiC. In this study 360 keV Ag+, I+ and Xe+ ions were separately implanted into 6H-SiC and in polycrystalline SiC at various substrate temperatures. The implanted samples were also annealed in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1600 °C for various times. In recent years, there had been significant advances in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the introduction of an in-lens detector combined with field emission electron guns. This allows defects in solids, such as radiation damage created by the implanted ions, to be detected with SEM. Cross-sectional SEM images of 6H-SiC wafers implanted with 360 keV Ag+ ions at room temperature and at 600 °C and then vacuum annealed at different temperatures revealed the implanted layers and their thicknesses. A similar result is shown of 360 keV I+ ions implanted at 600 °C into 6H-SiC and annealed at 1600 °C. The 6H-SiC is not amorphized but remained crystalline when implanting at 600 °C. There are differences in the microstructure of 6H-SiC implanted with silver at the two temperatures as well as with reactive iodine ions. Voids (bubbles) are created in the implanted layers into which the precipitation of silver and iodine can occur after annealing of the samples. The crystallinity of the substrate via implantation temperature caused differences in the distribution and size of the voids. Implantation of xenon ions in polycrystalline SiC at 350 °C does not amorphize the substrate as is the case with room temperature heavy ion bombardment. Subsequent

  3. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm2. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  4. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm(2). The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  5. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm(2). The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research. PMID:26931931

  6. Three-layer photocarrier radiometry model of ion-implanted silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bincheng; Shaughnessy, Derrick; Mandelis, Andreas; Batista, Jerias; Garcia, Jose

    2004-06-01

    A three-dimensional three-layer model is presented for the quantitative understanding of the infrared photocarrier radiometry (PCR) response of ion-implanted semiconductors, specifically Si. In addition to the implanted layer and intact substrate normally assumed in all existing two-layer theoretical models to describe the photothermal response of ion-implanted semiconductors, a surface layer is considered in this three-layer model to represent a thin, less severally damaged region close to the surface. The effects on the PCR signal of several structural, transport, and optical properties of ion-implanted silicon wafers affected significantly by the ion implantation process (minority carrier lifetime, diffusion coefficient, optical absorption coefficient, thickness of the implanted layer, and front surface recombination velocity) are discussed. The dependence of the PCR signal on the ion implantation dose is theoretically calculated and compared to experimental results. Good agreement between experimental data and theoretical calculations is obtained. Both theoretical and experimental results show the PCR dependence on dose can be separated into four regions with the transition across each region defined by the implantation-induced electrical and optical degrees of damage, respectively, as the electrical and optical damage occurs at different dose ranges. It is also shown that the PCR amplitude decreases monotonically with increasing implantation dose. This monotonic dependence provides the potential of the PCR technique for industrial applications in semiconductor metrology.

  7. Monitoring of ion implantation in microelectronics production environment using multi-channel reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersbach, Peter; Urbanowicz, Adam M.; Likhachev, Dmitry; Hartig, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Optical metrology techniques such as ellipsometry and reflectometry are very powerful for routine process monitoring and control in the modern semiconductor manufacturing industry. However, both methods rely on optical modeling therefore, the optical properties of all materials in the stack need to be characterized a priori or determined during characterization. Some processes such as ion implantation and subsequent annealing produce slight variations in material properties within wafer, wafer-to-wafer, and lot-to-lot; such variation can degrade the dimensional measurement accuracy for both unpatterned optical measurements as well as patterned (2D and 3D) scatterometry measurements. These variations can be accounted for if the optical model of the structure under investigation allows one to extract not just dimensional but also material information already residing within the optical spectra. This paper focuses on modeling of ion implanted and annealed poly Si stacks typically used in high-k technology. Monitoring of ion implantation is often a blind spot in mass production due to capability issues and other limitations of common methods. Typically, the ion implantation dose can be controlled by research-grade ellipsometers with extended infrared range. We demonstrate that multi-channel spectroscopic reflectometry can also be used for ion implant monitoring in the mass-production environment. Our findings are applicable across all technology nodes.

  8. Preparation and investigation of diamond-like carbon stripper foils by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qiwen; Du, Yinghui; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guoji

    2013-04-01

    Thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) stripper foils ˜5 μg/cm2 in thickness were produced and evaluated as heavy-ion strippers for the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator. The DLC layers ˜4 μg/cm2 in thickness were produced by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology onto glass slides coated with betaine-saccharose as releasing agent, which were previously covered with evaporated carbon layers ˜1 μg/cm2 in thickness by the controlled ac arc-discharge method. Irradiation lifetimes of the DLC stripper foils were tested using the heavy-ion beams at the terminal of the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, and compared with those of the standard carbon stripper foils made by the combined dc and ac arc-discharge method. The measurements indicate that the DLC stripper foils outlast the standard combined dc and ac arc-discharge carbon stripper foils by a factor of at least 13 and 4for the 197Au- (˜9 MeV, ˜1 μA) and 63Cu- (˜9 MeV, ˜1 μA) ion beams, respectively. The structure and properties of the DLC foils deposited onto silicon substrates by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology were also evaluated and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the DLC foils contain hardly droplets through the double 90° filters. The X-ray photoelectron spectrum indicates that sp3 bonds of the DLC foils exceed 70%. The integral intensity ratio of the D peak to the G peak (ID/IG) measured by the Raman spectroscopy is0.78.

  9. Relationship between the structure and electrical characteristics of diamond-like carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Takabayashi, Susumu Otsuji, Taiichi; Yang, Meng; Ogawa, Shuichi; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ješko, Radek; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2014-09-07

    To elucidate the relationship between the structure and the electrical characteristics of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, DLC films were synthesized in a well-controlled glow discharge with the aid of photoelectrons in an argon/methane atmosphere. The dielectric constant and breakdown strength of the films exhibited opposite behaviors, depending on the total pressure during the synthesis. The product of these two values decreased monotonically as the pressure increased. The Raman spectra were analyzed with a Voigt-type formula. Based on the results, the authors propose the “sp{sup 2} cluster model” for the DLC structure. This model consists of conductive clusters of sp{sup 2} carbons surrounded by a dielectric matrix sea of sp{sup 2} carbon, sp{sup 3} carbon, and hydrogen, and indicates that the dielectric constant of the whole DLC film is determined by the balance between the dielectric constant of the matrix and the total size of the clusters, while the breakdown strength is determined by the reciprocal of the cluster size. The model suggests that a high-κ DLC film can be synthesized at a middle pressure and consists of well-grown sp{sup 2} clusters and a dense matrix. A low-κ DLC film can be synthesized both at low and high pressures. The sp{sup 2} cluster model explains that a low-κ DLC film synthesized at low pressure consists of a dense matrix and a low density of sp{sup 2} clusters, and exhibits a high breakdown strength. On the other hand, a low-κ film synthesized at high pressure consists of a coarse matrix and a high density of clusters and exhibits a low breakdown strength.

  10. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, Andreas; Gupta, Prasanth; Mohr, Berit; Hübner, René; Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert; Becker, Hans-Werner

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction 1H(15N, αγ)12C (Eres = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0-10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp2 hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  11. Surface properties and blood compatibility of commercially available diamond-like carbon coatings for cardiovascular devices.

    PubMed

    Fedel, Mariangela; Motta, Antonella; Maniglio, Devid; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships between the surface properties and blood compatibility of in-use diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings for cardiovascular components. Commercially available DLC films were characterized with respect to surface topography and wettability, protein adsorption from human plasma, and platelets adhesion/activation. Fibrinogen (Fng) and human serum albumin (HSA) adsorbed onto the sample surfaces were in particular quantified as two of the main proteins involved in blood compatibility. A low tendency of platelets to spread and form aggregates onto the DLC-coated surfaces has been described and related to a low Fng-to-HSA adsorption ratio. This study provides evidence that the rapid and tenacious binding of albumin molecules to DLC materials tends to passivate the surfaces and to inhibit Fng adsorption, thus imparting thromboresistance to the carbon coatings by rendering the surfaces less adhesive and activating for platelets. Albumin preferential adsorption was ascribed to high chemical heterogeneity of the DLC sample surfaces. The DLC films tested present a favorable behavior as regards blood compatibility with respect to platelet thrombus formation by reason of their surface properties.

  12. Treating orthopedic prosthesis with diamond-like carbon: minimizing debris in Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciane Y S; Kuromoto, Neide K; Siqueira, Carlos J M

    2014-10-01

    Prostheses are subject to various forms of failing mechanisms, including wear from ordinary patient motion. Superficial treatments can improve tribological properties of the contact pair, minimizing wear and increasing prostheses lifetime. One possibility is the diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating, where Carbon is deposited with variable ratio of sp(2)/sp(3) structures, leading to an increase in surface hardness. So in this research Ti6Al4V samples were coated with DLC using sputtering process to evaluate the debris release. The Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al4V plus DLC coating surfaces were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and instrumented indentation (hardness). The wear behavior was tested using a reciprocating linear tribometer. The wear rate was smaller in the coated samples, producing less debris than the untreated Ti6Al4V alloy. Debris morphology was also evaluated, using scanning electronic microscopy, and it was observed that debris size from the coated samples were bigger than those observed from the uncoated Ti6Al4V alloy, above the size that generally triggers biological response from the host. PMID:24948374

  13. Diamond: electronic ground state of carbon at temperatures approaching 0 K.

    PubMed

    Grochala, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    The relative stability of graphite and diamond is revisited with hybrid density functional theory calculations. The electronic energy of diamond is computed to be more negative by 1.1 kJ mol(-1) than that of graphite at T=0 K and in the absence of external pressure. Graphite gains thermodynamic stability over diamond at 298 K only because of the differences in the zero-point energy, specific heat, and entropy terms for both polymorphs.

  14. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of carbon-based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, in human glioblastoma and hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Samluk, Anna; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Pijanowska, Dorota Genowefa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests.

  15. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of carbon-based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, in human glioblastoma and hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Samluk, Anna; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Pijanowska, Dorota Genowefa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests. PMID:25816103

  16. Single ion implantation for single donor devices using Geiger mode detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejec, E.; Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic devices that are designed to use the properties of single atoms such as donors or defects have become a reality with recent demonstrations of donor spectroscopy, single photon emission sources, and magnetic imaging using defect centers in diamond. Ion implantation, an industry standard for atom placement in materials, requires augmentation for single ion capability including a method for detecting a single ion arrival. Integrating single ion detection techniques with the single donor device construction region allows single ion arrival to be assured. Improving detector sensitivity is linked to improving control over the straggle of the ion as well as providing more flexibility in lay-out integration with the active region of the single donor device construction zone by allowing ion sensing at potentially greater distances. Using a remotely located passively gated single ion Geiger mode avalanche diode (SIGMA) detector we have demonstrated 100% detection efficiency at a distance of >75 µm from the center of the collecting junction. This detection efficiency is achieved with sensitivity to ~600 or fewer electron-hole pairs produced by the implanted ion. Ion detectors with this sensitivity and integrated with a thin dielectric, for example a 5 nm gate oxide, using low energy Sb implantation would have an end of range straggle of <2.5 nm. Significant reduction in false count probability is, furthermore, achieved by modifying the ion beam set-up to allow for cryogenic operation of the SIGMA detector. Using a detection window of 230 ns at 1 Hz, the probability of a false count was measured as ~10-1 and 10-4 for operation temperatures of ~300 K and ~77 K, respectively. Low temperature operation and reduced false, 'dark', counts are critical to achieving high confidence in single ion arrival. For the device performance in this work, the confidence is calculated as a probability of >98% for counting one and only one ion for a false count probability of 10-4 at

  17. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Preparation and Thermal Characterization of Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Su-Yuan; Tang, Zhen-An; Huang, Zheng-Xing; Yu, Jun; Wang, Jing; Liu, Gui-Chang

    2009-07-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared on silicon substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the films have an amorphous structure and typical characteristics. The topographies of the films are presented by AFM images. Effective thermal conductivities of the films are measured using a nanosecond pulsed photothermal reflectance method. The results show that thermal conductivity is dominated by the microstructure of the films.

  18. Mechanical properties of nitrogen-rich surface layers on SS304 treated by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, B. B.; Mändl, S.; Oliveira, R. M.; Ueda, M.

    2014-08-01

    The formation of hard and wear resistant surface regions for austenitic stainless steel through different nitriding and nitrogen implantation processes at intermediate temperatures is an established technology. As the inserted nitrogen remains in solid solution, an expanded austenite phase is formed, accounting for these surface improvements. However, experiments on long-term behavior and exact wear processes within the expanded austenite layer are still missing. Here, the modified layers were produced using plasma immersion ion implantation with nitrogen gas and had a thickness of up to 4 μm, depending on the processing temperature. Thicker layers or those with higher surface nitrogen contents presented better wear resistance, according to detailed microscopic investigation on abrasion, plastic deformation, cracking and redeposition of material inside the wear tracks. At the same time, cyclic fatigue testing employing a nanoindenter equipped with a diamond ball was carried out at different absolute loads and relative unloadings. As the stress distribution between the modified layer and the substrate changes with increasing load, additional simulations were performed for obtaining these complex stress distributions. While high nitrogen concentration and/or thicker layers improve the wear resistance and hardness, these modifications simultaneously reduce the surface fatigue resistance.

  19. Effects of sequential tungsten and helium ion implantation on nano-indentation hardness of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D. E. J.; Edmondson, P. D.; Roberts, S. G.

    2013-06-24

    To simulate neutron and helium damage in a fusion reactor first wall sequential self-ion implantation up to 13 dpa followed by helium-ion implantation up to 3000 appm was performed to produce damaged layers of {approx}2 {mu}m depth in pure tungsten. The hardness of these layers was measured using nanoindentation and was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Substantial hardness increases were seen in helium implanted regions, with smaller hardness increases in regions which had already been self-ion implanted, thus, containing pre-existing dislocation loops. This suggests that, for the same helium content, helium trapped in distributed vacancies gives stronger hardening than helium trapped in vacancies condensed into dislocation loops.

  20. High Curie temperature drive layer materials for ion-implanted magnetic bubble devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Wolfe, R.; Blank, S. L.; Nelson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ion implantation of bubble garnets can lower the Curie temperature by 70 C or more, thus limiting high temperature operation of devices with ion-implanted propagation patterns. Therefore, double-layer materials were made with a conventional 2-micron bubble storage layer capped by an ion-implantable drive layer of high Curie temperature, high magnetostriction material. Contiguous disk test patterns were implanted with varying doses of a typical triple implant. Quality of propagation was judged by quasistatic tests on 8-micron period major and minor loops. Variations of magnetization, uniaxial anisotropy, implant dose, and magnetostriction were investigated to ensure optimum flux matching, good charged wall coupling, and wide operating margins. The most successful drive layer compositions were in the systems (SmDyLuCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and (BiGdTmCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and had Curie temperatures 25-44 C higher than the storage layers.

  1. High yield antibiotic producing mutants of Streptomyces erythreus induced by low energy ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chen; Zhixin, Lin; Zuyao, Zou; Feng, Zhang; Duo, Liu; Xianghuai, Liu; Jianzhong, Tang; Weimin, Zhu; Bo, Huang

    1998-05-01

    Conidia of Streptomyces erythreus, an industrial microbe, were implanted by nitrogen ions with energy of 40-60 keV and fluence from 1 × 10 11 to 5 × 10 14 ions/cm 2. The logarithm value of survival fraction had good linear relationship with the logarithm value of fluence. Some mutants with a high yield of erythromycin were induced by ion implantation. The yield increment was correlated with the implantation fluence. Compared with the mutation results induced by ultraviolet rays, mutation effects of ion implantation were obvious having higher increasing erythromycin potency and wider mutation spectrum. The spores of Bacillus subtilis were implanted by arsenic ions with energy of 100 keV. The distribution of implanted ions was measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and calculated in theory. The mechanism of mutation induced by ion implantation was discussed.

  2. Parallel Simulation of Ion Implantation for Multi-Component Targets Using Boltzmann Transport Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shyh-Wei; Guo, Shuang-Fa

    1998-07-01

    A stepwise Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) simulation using non-uniform energy grid momentum matrix and exact nuclear scattering cross-section is successfully parallelized to simulate the ion implantation of multi-component targets. Assuming that the interactions of ion with different target atoms are independent, the scattering of ions with different components can be calculated concurrently by different processors. It is developed on CONVEX SPP-1000 and the software environment of parallel virtual machine (PVM) with a master-slave paradigm. A speedup of 3.3 has been obtained for the simulation of As ions implanted into AZ1350 (C6.2H6O1N0.15S0.06) which is composed of five components. In addition, our new scheme gives better agreement with the experimental results for heavy ion implantation than the conventional method using a uniform energy grid and approximated scattering function.

  3. Phosphorous ion implantation in C{sub 60} for the photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, K. L.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2001-06-15

    Thin films of C{sub 60} deposited on p-type Si(100) wafer are implanted with low energy phosphorous ions for the photovoltaic applications. An attempt has been made on the device fabrication with phosphorous ion implanted C{sub 60} films grown on the p-type Si wafer. The photovoltaic properties of the solar cell structure are discussed with the dark and illuminated J{endash}V characteristics. The efficiency of the structure in the multiple energy phosphorous ion implanted C{sub 60} film/p-Si heterojunction is found to be 0.01% under air mass 1.5 conditions. The low efficiency is attributed to the ion implantation induced damage effects and subsequent larger series resistance values. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Osteoblast adhesion to orthopaedic implant alloys: Effects of cell adhesion molecules and diamond-like carbon coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kornu, R.; Kelly, M.A.; Smith, R.L.; Maloney, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    In total joint arthroplasty, long-term outcomes depend in part on the biocompatibility of implant alloys. This study analyzed effects of surface finish and diamond-like carbon coating on osteoblast cell adhesion to polished titanium-aluminum-vanadium and polished or grit-blasted cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. Osteoblast binding was tested in the presence and absence of the cell adhesion proteins fibronectin, laminin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin and was quantified by measurement of DNA content. Although adherence occurred in serum-free medium, maximal osteoblast binding required serum and was similar for titanium and cobalt alloys at 2 and 12 hours. With the grit-blasted cobalt alloy, cell binding was reduced 48% (p < 0.05) by 24 hours. Coating the alloys with diamond-like carbon did not alter osteoblast adhesion, whereas fibronectin pretreatment increased cell binding 2.6-fold (p < 0.05). In contrast, fibrinogen, vitronectin, and laminin did not enhance cell adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that cell adhesion proteins can modify cell binding to orthopaedic alloys. Although osteoblast binding was not affected by the presence of diamond-like carbon, this coating substance may influence other longer term processes, such as bone formation, and deserves further study. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Deposition of hard and adherent diamond-like carbon films inside steel tubes using a pulsed-DC discharge.

    PubMed

    Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir Jesus; Capote, Gil; Bonetti, Luís Francisco; Fernandes, Jesum; Blando, Eduardo; Hübler, Roberto; Radi, Polyana Alves; Santos, Lúcia Vieira; Corat, Evaldo José

    2009-06-01

    A new, low cost, pulsed-DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system that uses a bipolar, pulsed power supply was designed and tested to evaluate its capacity to produce quality diamond-like carbon films on the inner surface of steel tubes. The main focus of the study was to attain films with low friction coefficients, low total stress, a high degree of hardness, and very good adherence to the inner surface of long metallic tubes at a reasonable growth rate. In order to enhance the diamond-like carbon coating adhesion to metallic surfaces, four steps were used: (1) argon ion sputtering; (2) plasma nitriding; (3) a thin amorphous silicon interlayer deposition, using silane as the precursor gas; and (4) diamond-like carbon film deposition using methane atmosphere. This paper presents various test results as functions of the methane gas pressure and of the coaxial metal anode diameter, where the pulsed-DC voltage constant is kept constant. The influence of the coaxial metal anode diameter and of the methane gas pressure is also demonstrated. The results obtained showed the possibilities of using these DLC coatings for reduced friction and to harden inner surface of the steel tubes. PMID:19504937

  6. Effect of nickel incorporation on microstructural and optical properties of electrodeposited diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B.; Pal, P. P.; Bera, S.; Ray, S. K.; Kar, A. K.

    2012-11-01

    A simple electrodeposition technique was used to synthesize diamond like carbon (DLC) and nickel incorporated diamond like carbon (Ni-DLC) thin films on ITO coated glass substrates. Initial concentration of nickel in the electrolyte was kept fixed at 4.76 × 10-4 M for all depositions of Ni-DLC films. Growth process of the films was studied by synthesizing films with variation of deposition time. With nickel addition to DLC the band gap and the Urbach energy varied from 2.67 eV to 2.48 eV and 1.0803 eV to 1.452 eV, respectively as estimated from UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometry of DLC and Ni-DLC. Results indicated that the metal incorporation effectively increased the graphitization of DLC films. Microstructural studies by SEM and AFM revealed that the particles in the Ni-DLC films were evenly distributed and the packing density of particles increased with increased time of deposition. XRD pattern exhibited the presence of Ni crystallites in an amorphous carbon network along with the phases of diamond and graphite in the Ni-DLC film. The FTIR spectrum showed peaks accountable for both CH3 and CH2 bonding. It was also apparent that nickel incorporation significantly modulated the FTIR spectrum of DLC film, as several new peaks appeared only in the case of Ni-DLC film at ˜776 cm-1, 745 cm-1 and 668 cm-1.

  7. Deposition of hard and adherent diamond-like carbon films inside steel tubes using a pulsed-DC discharge.

    PubMed

    Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir Jesus; Capote, Gil; Bonetti, Luís Francisco; Fernandes, Jesum; Blando, Eduardo; Hübler, Roberto; Radi, Polyana Alves; Santos, Lúcia Vieira; Corat, Evaldo José

    2009-06-01

    A new, low cost, pulsed-DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system that uses a bipolar, pulsed power supply was designed and tested to evaluate its capacity to produce quality diamond-like carbon films on the inner surface of steel tubes. The main focus of the study was to attain films with low friction coefficients, low total stress, a high degree of hardness, and very good adherence to the inner surface of long metallic tubes at a reasonable growth rate. In order to enhance the diamond-like carbon coating adhesion to metallic surfaces, four steps were used: (1) argon ion sputtering; (2) plasma nitriding; (3) a thin amorphous silicon interlayer deposition, using silane as the precursor gas; and (4) diamond-like carbon film deposition using methane atmosphere. This paper presents various test results as functions of the methane gas pressure and of the coaxial metal anode diameter, where the pulsed-DC voltage constant is kept constant. The influence of the coaxial metal anode diameter and of the methane gas pressure is also demonstrated. The results obtained showed the possibilities of using these DLC coatings for reduced friction and to harden inner surface of the steel tubes.

  8. Integration of Ion Implantation with Scanning ProbeAlignment

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Rangelow, I.W.; Schenkel, T.

    2005-03-01

    V. This energy is deposited within {approx}10 fs when an ion impinges on a target. The highly localized energy deposition results in efficient resist exposure, and is associated with strongly enhanced secondary electron emission, which allows monitoring of single ion impacts [4]. The ex situ scanning probe image with line scan in Fig. 3 shows a single ion impact site in PMMA (after standard development). In our presentation, we will discuss resolution requirements for ion placement in prototype quantum computer structures [3] with respect to resolution limiting factors in ion implantation with scanning probe alignment.

  9. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manojkumar, P. A.; Chirayath, V. A.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A. K.; Raj, Baldev

    2016-09-01

    Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  10. Productivity Improvement for the SHX--SEN's Single-Wafer High-Current Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, Shiro; Ochi, Akihiro; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Yumiyama, Toshio; Kudo, Tetsuya; Kurose, Takeshi; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ishikawa, Koji; Ueno, Kazuyoshi

    2011-01-07

    Equipment productivity is a critical issue for device fabrication. For ion implantation, productivity is determined both by ion current at the wafer and by utilization efficiency of the ion beam. Such improvements not only result in higher fabrication efficiency but also reduce consumption of both electrical power and process gases. For high-current ion implanters, reduction of implant area is a key factor to increase efficiency. SEN has developed the SAVING system (Scanning Area Variation Implantation with Narrower Geometrical pattern) to address this opportunity. In this paper, three variations of the SAVING system are introduced along with discussion of their effects on fab productivity.

  11. Biodegradable radioactive implants for glaucoma filtering surgery produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, W.; Schubert, M.; Held, A.; Pichler, A.; Chill, A.; Kiermaier, S.; Schlösser, K.; Busch, H.; Schenk, K.; Streufert, D.; Lanzl, I.

    2007-04-01

    A biodegradable, β-emitting implant has been developed and successfully tested which prevents fresh intraocular pressure increase after glaucoma filtering surgery. Ion implantation has been used to load the polymeric implants with the β-emitter 32P. The influence of ion implantation and gamma sterilisation on degradation and 32P-fixation behavior has been studied by ion beam and chemical analysis. Irradiation effects due to the applied ion fluence (1015 ions/cm2) and gamma dose (25 kGy) are found to be tolerable.

  12. Method of making an ion-implanted planar-buried-heterostructure diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, Burrell E.; Myers, David R.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1992-01-01

    Planar-buried-heterostructure, graded-index, separate-confinement-heterostructure semiconductor diode laser 10 includes a single quantum well or multi-quantum well active stripe 12 disposed between a p-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding lever 14 and an n-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 16. The laser 10 includes an iion implanted n-type region 28 within the p-type cladding layer 14 and further includes an ion implanted p-type region 26 within the n-type cladding layer 16. The ion implanted regions are disposed for defining a lateral extent of the active stripe.

  13. Fundamental Discovery of New Phases and Direct Conversion of Carbon into Diamond and hBN into cBN and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Jagdish; Bhaumik, Anagh

    2016-04-01

    We review the discovery of new phases of carbon (Q-carbon) and BN (Q-BN) and address critical issues related to direct conversion of carbon into diamond and hBN into cBN at ambient temperatures and pressures in air without any need for catalyst and the presence of hydrogen. The Q-carbon and Q-BN are formed as a result of quenching from super undercooled state by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses. We discuss the equilibrium phase diagram ( P vs T) of carbon, and show that by rapid quenching, kinetics can shift thermodynamic graphite/diamond/liquid carbon triple point from 5000 K/12 GPa to super undercooled carbon at atmospheric pressure in air. Similarly, the hBN-cBN-Liquid triple point is shifted from 3500 K/9.5 GPa to as low as 2800 K and atmospheric pressure. It is shown that nanosecond laser heating of amorphous carbon and nanocrystalline BN on sapphire, glass, and polymer substrates can be confined to melt in a super undercooled state. By quenching this super undercooled state, we have created a new state of carbon (Q-carbon) and BN (Q-BN) from which nanocrystals, microcrystals, nanoneedles, microneedles, and thin films are formed depending upon the nucleation and growth times allowed and the presence of growth template. The large-area epitaxial diamond and cBN films are formed, when appropriate planar matching or lattice matching template is provided for growth from super undercooled liquid. The Q-phases have unique atomic structure and bonding characteristics as determined by high-resolution SEM and backscatter diffraction, HRTEM, STEM-Z, EELS, and Raman spectroscopy, and exhibit new and improved mechanical hardness, electrical conductivity, and chemical and physical properties, including room-temperature ferromagnetism and enhanced field emission. The Q-carbon exhibits robust bulk ferromagnetism with estimated Curie temperature of about 500 K and saturation magnetization value of 20 emu g-1. We have also deposited diamond on cBN by using a novel

  14. Comparison between nano-diamond and carbon nanotube doping effects on critical current density and flux pinning in MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. H.; Yang, Y.; Munroe, P.; Zhao, Y.

    2007-03-01

    Doping effects of nano-diamond and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on critical current density of bulk MgB2 have been studied. CNTs are found prone to be doped into the MgB2 lattice whereas nano-diamond tends to form second-phase inclusions in the MgB2 matrix, leading to a more significant improvement of Jc(H) by doping by nano-diamond than by CNTs in MgB2. TEM reveals tightly packed MgB2 nanograins (50-100 nm) with a dense distribution of diamond nanoparticles (10-20 nm) inside MgB2 grains in nano-diamond-doped samples. Such a unique microstructure leads to a flux pinning behaviour different from that in CNTs-doped MgB2.

  15. Electrochemical evaluation and determination of antiretroviral drug fosamprenavir using boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gumustas, Mehmet; Ozkan, Sibel A

    2010-05-01

    Fosamprenavir is a pro-drug of the antiretroviral protease inhibitor amprenavir and is oxidizable at solid electrodes. The anodic oxidation behavior of fosamprenavir was investigated using cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry at boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes. In cyclic voltammetry, depending on pH values, fosamprenavir showed one sharp irreversible oxidation peak or wave depending on the working electrode. The mechanism of the oxidation process was discussed. The voltammetric study of some model compounds allowed elucidation of the possible oxidation mechanism of fosamprenavir. The aim of this study was to determine fosamprenavir levels in pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples by means of electrochemical methods. Using the sharp oxidation response, two voltammetric methods were described for the determination of fosamprenavir by differential pulse and square-wave voltammetry at the boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes. These two voltammetric techniques are 0.1 M H(2)SO(4) and phosphate buffer at pH 2.0 which allow quantitation over a 4 x 10(-6) to 8 x 10(-5) M range using boron-doped diamond and a 1 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-4) M range using glassy carbon electrodes, respectively, in supporting electrolyte. All necessary validation parameters were investigated and calculated. These methods were successfully applied for the analysis of fosamprenavir pharmaceutical dosage forms, human serum and urine samples. The standard addition method was used in biological media using boron-doped diamond electrode. No electroactive interferences from the tablet excipients or endogenous substances from biological material were found. The results were statistically compared with those obtained through an established HPLC-UV technique; no significant differences were found between the voltammetric and HPLC methods.

  16. Carbon speciation in the asthenosphere: Experimental measurements of the redox conditions at which carbonate-bearing melts coexist with graphite or diamond in peridotite assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagno, Vincenzo; Frost, Daniel J.

    2010-11-01

    The speciation of carbon in the Earth's mantle is largely governed by oxygen fugacity. Under reducing conditions carbon forms graphite, diamond or CH 4, while under more oxidising conditions carbonate minerals or CO 2-bearing melts or fluids are stable. Using an Ir-Fe alloy sliding redox sensor we have measured the oxygen fugacity at which carbon (graphite or diamond) oxidises to carbonate minerals or melts within mantle peridotite assemblages between 2.5 and 11 GPa at 1100-1600 °C. The experiments were performed up to temperatures where carbonate melts evolve towards more silicate-rich compositions. The dilution of the carbonate melt component lowers the relative fo 2, expanding the melt stability field with respect to reduced carbon. We parameterise our results for the a Ca-bearing system as a function of P (in bars), T (K) and mole fraction of CO 2 ( XCO 2) in the melt with the equation. Logfo=5.44 - 21380/T+0.078P-1/T+Log X This expression reproduces our experimental results to within 0.3 log units between 2.5 and 11 GPa. A further equation is fitted to Ca-free results. Studies indicate that garnet peridotite mantle rocks become progressively more reduced with depth due to the effects of pressure on the governing ferric/ferrous equilibria. It has been proposed that small degree carbonate-rich melts may form at depths up to 300 km beneath mid ocean ridges; however, if the current garnet peridotite oxy-thermometer is correct then our results indicate that the fo 2 of peridotitic mantle will remain in the diamond/graphite stability field up to at least 100-150 km depth. Only at depths shallower than 150 km would Fe 3+ in mantle silicates react with graphite to produce carbonate-rich melts in a redox melting process. Redox melting, therefore, limits the depth interval over which carbonate-rich melts can form beneath ridges. If current estimates for the effect of pressure on mantle fo 2 in the garnet peridotite stability field are correct, graphite or diamond

  17. Properties of vaccum arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Raoux, S.

    1995-12-31

    Amorphous hard carbon films formed by vacuum arc deposition are, hydrogen-free, dense, and very hard. The properties of amorphous hard carbon films depend strongly on the energy of the incident ions. A technique which is called Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation can be applied to vacuum arc deposition of amorphous hard carbon films to influence the ion energy. We have studied the influence of the ion energy on the elastic modulus determined by an ultrasonic method, and have measured the optical gap for films with the highest sp{sup 3} content we have obtained so far with this deposition technique. The results show an elastic modulus close to that of diamond, and an optical gap of 2.1 eV which is much greater than for amorphous hard carbon films deposited by other techniques.

  18. Properties of vacuum arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Raoux, S.

    1995-04-01

    Amorphous hard carbon films formed by vacuum arc deposition are hydrogen-free, dense, and very hard. The properties of amorphous hard carbon films depend strongly on the energy of the incident ions. A technique which is called Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation can be applied to vacuum arc deposition of amorphous hard carbon films to influence the ion energy. The authors have studied the influence of the ion energy on the elastic modulus determined by an ultrasonic method, and have measured the optical gap for films with the highest sp{sup 3} content they have obtained so far with this deposition technique. The results show an elastic modulus close to that of diamond, and an optical gap of 2.1 eV which is much greater than for amorphous hard carbon films deposited by other techniques.

  19. Annealing Effects on Structure and Optical Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Containing Silver.

    PubMed

    Meškinis, Šarūnas; Čiegis, Arvydas; Vasiliauskas, Andrius; Šlapikas, Kęstutis; Gudaitis, Rimantas; Yaremchuk, Iryna; Fitio, Volodymyr; Bobitski, Yaroslav; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, diamond-like carbon films with embedded Ag nanoparticles (DLC:Ag) were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Structure of the films was investigated by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to define thickness of DLC:Ag films as well as to study the surface morphology and size distribution of Ag nanoparticles. Optical absorbance and reflectance spectra of the films were studied in the 180-1100-nm range. Air annealing effects on structure and optical properties of the DLC:Ag were investigated. Annealing temperatures were varied in the 180-400 °C range. Changes of size and shape of the Ag nanoclusters took place due to agglomeration. It was found that air annealing of DLC:Ag films can result in graphitization following destruction of the DLC matrix. Additional activation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect in DLC:Ag films can be achieved by properly selecting annealing conditions. Annealing resulted in blueshift as well as significant narrowing of the plasmonic absorbance and reflectance peaks. Moreover, quadrupole surface plasmon resonance peaks appeared. Modeling of absorption spectra of the nanoclusters depending on the shape and surrounding media has been carried out. PMID:26979724

  20. Porous Silicon Coated with Ultrathin Diamond-Like Carbon Film Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Evtukh, A A; Litovchenko, V G; Litvin, Y M; Fedin, D V; Rassamakin, Y V; Sarikov, A V; Chakhovskoi, A G; Felter, T E

    2001-04-01

    The main requirements to electron field emission cathodes are their efficiency, stability and uniformity. In this work we combined the properties of porous silicon layers and diamond-like carbon (DLC) film to obtain emission cathodes with improved parameters. The layered structures of porous silicon and DLC film were formed both on flat n-Si surface and silicon tips created by chemical etching. The conditions of the anodic and stain etching of silicon in HF containing solution under the illumination have been widely changed. The influence of thin ({le} 10nm) DLC film coating of the porous silicon layer on electron emission has been investigated. The parameters of emission efficiency such as field enhancement coefficient, effective emission areas and threshold voltages have been estimated from current-voltage dependencies to compare and characterize different layered structures. The improvement of the emission efficiency of silicon tip arrays with porous layers coated with thin DLC film has been observed. These silicon-based structures are promising for flat panel display applications.

  1. Formation of Diamond-like Carbon Thin Films by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Isao; Takano, Ichiro; Sasaki, Michiko; Takashika, Masaru; Kasiwagi, Tomohumi; Sawada, Yohio

    The mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films on SUS304 substrate have been studied. DLC thin films were prepared by the ion beam assisted deposition method. In this method, He+ ion irradiation was carried out in a C2H4 gas atmosphere. He+ ions were accelerated at an energy of 15 keV, and the ion beam current densities were changed from 10 to 100 μA/cm2. Atomic concentration and structure of the films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The mechanical properties of hardness and friction coefficient were determined using the Knoop hardness tester and the pin-on-disk tribometer. The DLC thin films had amorphous structure that composed chiefly of graphite and disorder of graphite states. The Knoop hardness of the films increased with increasing He+ ion current density, and the film prepared at a current density of 80 μA/cm2 showed the maximum Knoop hardness value of 890 kgf/cm2. The friction coefficient of the film prepared at a current density of 60 μA/cm2 indicated lower value than that of the other current densities. From these results, it was cleared that the mechanical properties and structure of DLC thin films were greatly affected by the He+ ion beam current density.

  2. Spectroscopic studies on diamond like carbon films synthesized by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Madhusmita; Krishnan, R.; Ravindran, T. R.; Das, Arindam; Mangamma, G.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen free Diamond like Carbon (DLC) thin films enriched with C-C sp3 bonding were grown on Si (111) substrates at laser pulse energies varying from 100 to 400 mJ (DLC-100, DLC-200, DLC-300, DLC-400), by Pulsed Laser Ablation (PLA) utilizing an Nd:YAG laser operating at fundamental wavelength. Structural, optical and morphological evolutions as a function of laser pulse energy were studied by micro Raman, UV-Vis spectroscopic studies and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), respectively. Raman spectra analysis provided critical clues for the variation in sp3 content and optical energy gap. The sp3 content was estimated using the FWHM of the G peak and found to be in the range of 62-69%. The trend of evolution of sp3 content matches well with the evolution of ID/IG ratio with pulse energy. UV-Vis absorption study of DLC films revealed the variation of optical energy gap with laser pulse energy (1.88 - 2.23 eV), which matches well with the evolution of G-Peak position of the Raman spectra. AFM study revealed that roughness, size and density of particulate in DLC films increase with laser pulse energy.

  3. Fabrication of Semiordered Nanopatterned Diamond-like Carbon and Titania Films for Blood Contacting Applications.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Deepika; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Philip J; Harris, Kenneth D; Ruys, Andrew J; Lord, Megan S

    2016-03-23

    Biomaterials with the ability to interface with, but not activate, blood components are essential for a multitude of medical devices. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titania (TiO2) have shown promise for these applications; however, both support platelet adhesion and activation. This study explored the fabrication of nanostructured DLC and TiO2 thin film coatings using a block copolymer deposition technique that produced semiordered nanopatterns with low surface roughness (5-8 nm Rrms). These surfaces supported fibrinogen and plasma protein adsorption that predominantly adsorbed between the nanofeatures and reduced the overall surface roughness. The conformation of the adsorbed fibrinogen was altered on the nanopatterned surfaces as compared with the planar surfaces to reveal higher levels of the platelet binding region. Planar DLC and TiO2 coatings supported less platelet adhesion than nanopatterned DLC and TiO2. However, platelets on the nanopatterned DLC coatings were less spread indicating a lower level of platelet activation on the nanostructured DLC coatings compared with the planar DLC coatings. These data indicated that nanostructured DLC coatings may find application in blood contacting medical devices in the future. PMID:26928086

  4. Annealing Effects on Structure and Optical Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Containing Silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meškinis, Šarūnas; Čiegis, Arvydas; Vasiliauskas, Andrius; Šlapikas, Kęstutis; Gudaitis, Rimantas; Yaremchuk, Iryna; Fitio, Volodymyr; Bobitski, Yaroslav; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, diamond-like carbon films with embedded Ag nanoparticles (DLC:Ag) were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Structure of the films was investigated by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to define thickness of DLC:Ag films as well as to study the surface morphology and size distribution of Ag nanoparticles. Optical absorbance and reflectance spectra of the films were studied in the 180-1100-nm range. Air annealing effects on structure and optical properties of the DLC:Ag were investigated. Annealing temperatures were varied in the 180-400 °C range. Changes of size and shape of the Ag nanoclusters took place due to agglomeration. It was found that air annealing of DLC:Ag films can result in graphitization following destruction of the DLC matrix. Additional activation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect in DLC:Ag films can be achieved by properly selecting annealing conditions. Annealing resulted in blueshift as well as significant narrowing of the plasmonic absorbance and reflectance peaks. Moreover, quadrupole surface plasmon resonance peaks appeared. Modeling of absorption spectra of the nanoclusters depending on the shape and surrounding media has been carried out.

  5. Ferromagnetic order in diamond-like carbon films by Co implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Prasanth; Williams, Grant; Markwitz, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    We report the observation of ferromagnetic order in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films made by mass selective ion beam deposition and after low energy implantation with Co ions. Different Co fluences were studied with a peak concentration of up to 25% at an average Co implantation depth of 30 nm. The saturation moment per Co atom (0.2-0.3 μ B) was found to be strongly dependent on temperature and it was significantly lower than that reported in bulk cobalt or cobalt nanoparticles (1.67 μ B per Co atom). The observed magnetic moment cannot be attributed to ferromagnetic nanoparticles as no evidence for superparamagnetism was detected. The magnetic order observed may be due to Co bonding in DLC possibly leading to dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor behaviour with an inhomogeneous distribution of cobalt atoms. Raman spectroscopy measurements showed that Co implantation resulted in an increase in the sp2 clustering with increasing Co fluence. Thus, our results show that Co implantation into DLC films increases the graphitic properties of the film and leads to magnetic order at room temperature.

  6. Characteristics of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Deposited on Polymer Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtake, Naoto; Uchi, Tomio; Yasuhara, Toshiyuki; Takashima, Mai

    2012-09-01

    Characterizations of diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposited on a polymer artificial tooth were performed. DLC films were deposited on dental parts made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) resin by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from methane. Wear resistance test results revealed that a DLC-coated resin tooth has a very high wear resistance against tooth brushing, and endures 24 h brushing without a marked weight decrease. Cell cultivation test results show that DLC plays an important role in preventing cell death. Moreover, a biocompatibility test using a rabbit revealed that a connective tissue in the vicinity of DLC-coated PMMA is significantly thinner than that of noncoated PMMA. The numbers of inflammatory cells in the vicinity of DLC-coated and noncoated surfaces are 0 and 508 cells/mm2, respectively. These results led us to conclude that DLC films are an excellent material for use as the coating of a polymer artificial tooth in terms of not only high wear resistance but also biocompatibility.

  7. Correlations between microstructure and hydrophobicity properties of pulsed laser deposited diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modabber Asl, A.; Kameli, P.; Ranjbar, M.; Salamati, H.; Jannesari, M.

    2015-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on Si-(1 0 0) substrates in the substrate temperature range of room temperature (RT) to 300 °C. The structural, hydrophobicity, mechanical, and morphological properties of the DLC films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nanoindentation, water contact angle (CA) measurement, atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that the DLC films deposited at RT were purely amorphous in structure with high sp3 bonding and had very smooth surfaces. Raman and XPS results indicated a structural transition from amorphous to nano-crystalline graphitic nature, structural ordering of DLC films, and decrease of the sp3 content with increasing substrate temperature. Degradation of the surface morphology and enhancement of the surface roughness with the substrate temperature were observed by AFM. It was also found that the mechanical properties such as nanohardness, elastic modulus, plastic index parameter, and elastic recovery decreased with the increasing substrate temperature. The CA measurements indicated that the hydrophobicity of DLC films increased with the substrate temperature and was sensitive not only to sp2/sp3 ratio, but also to the ordering of sp2 clusters. The observed hydrophobicity, mechanical and morphological properties were attributed to structural changes during deposition based on the sub-plantation model and stress induced mechanism.

  8. Segment-Structured Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings on Polymer Catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Taku; Ohishi, Ryusuke; Ohtake, Naoto; Takai, Osamu; Tsutsui, Nobumasa; Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Muraki, Yasuhiro; Ogura, Jyunpei

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) has remarkable mechanical and tribological properties. Besides those mechanical properties, it has been clarified that DLC shows high biocompatibility in recent years. DLC coating can give high strength, abrasion resistance, and biocompatibility for surface of substrates. Hence DLC is a candidate for the coating material for medical devices such as artificial organ, joint, catheter, etc. The objective of this study is to develop safety protection films for implantable medical polymer devices utilizing segment-structured DLC (S-DLC) coatings. S-DLC and continuous-structured DLC were deposited on polyurethane and nylon sheet for balloon catheters. As a result, friction coefficient of DLC coated polyurethane sheet was approximately one-sixth of that of pristine polyurethane sheet, and S-DLC showed very low friction coefficient of μ=0.1-0.15. DLC coating can prevent polyurethane sheet from worn out. The puncture-resistance of nylon sheets increased 0.2MPa on average by DLC coatings regardless of the film structure. It was confirmed that DLC inhibits adsorption of blood coagulation factor. In conclusion, we succeed to verify that these DLC films can improve tribological property, abrasion-resistance, puncture-resistance, and anti-thrombogenicity of polymer catheters. Moreover, segment-structured DLC films exhibits high performance for protection of polymer material for polymer catheters.

  9. Fabrication of Semiordered Nanopatterned Diamond-like Carbon and Titania Films for Blood Contacting Applications.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Deepika; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Philip J; Harris, Kenneth D; Ruys, Andrew J; Lord, Megan S

    2016-03-23

    Biomaterials with the ability to interface with, but not activate, blood components are essential for a multitude of medical devices. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titania (TiO2) have shown promise for these applications; however, both support platelet adhesion and activation. This study explored the fabrication of nanostructured DLC and TiO2 thin film coatings using a block copolymer deposition technique that produced semiordered nanopatterns with low surface roughness (5-8 nm Rrms). These surfaces supported fibrinogen and plasma protein adsorption that predominantly adsorbed between the nanofeatures and reduced the overall surface roughness. The conformation of the adsorbed fibrinogen was altered on the nanopatterned surfaces as compared with the planar surfaces to reveal higher levels of the platelet binding region. Planar DLC and TiO2 coatings supported less platelet adhesion than nanopatterned DLC and TiO2. However, platelets on the nanopatterned DLC coatings were less spread indicating a lower level of platelet activation on the nanostructured DLC coatings compared with the planar DLC coatings. These data indicated that nanostructured DLC coatings may find application in blood contacting medical devices in the future.

  10. Fluorinated diamond-like carbon as antithrombogenic coating for blood-contacting devices.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Terumitsu; Shimada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Matsuoka, Yoshiaki; Saito, Toshiya; Yohena, Satoshi; Kamijo, Aki; Shiraga, Nobuyuki; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Kimura, Kanako; Yoshimura, Hirokuni; Kuribayashi, Sachio

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is being considered for widespread clinical use as a surface coating for cardiovascular devices. We synthesized fluorinated DLC (F-DLC) coatings in order to create a more hydrophobic surface with improved antithrombogenicity and flexibility when compared with conventional DLC coatings by combining the inertness of DLC films with the advantage of fluorination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro hemocompatibility and in vivo biocompatibility of the F-DLC coating for medical devices. The in vitro whole blood model confirmed that platelet loss was lower in the F-DLC group than in the noncoated group (SUS316L), which suggests the adhesion of a smaller number of platelets to F-DLC-coated materials. Furthermore, the biomarkers of mechanically induced platelet activation (beta-thromboglobulin) and activated coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin-three complex) were markedly reduced in the F-DLC-coated group. In vivo rat implant model studies revealed no excessive local and systemic inflammatory responses in the F-DLC group. The thickness of the fibrous tissue capsule surrounding the F-DLC-coated disk was almost equal to that of the noncoated SUS316L disk, which has the favorable biocompatibility for metallic implant materials. F-DLC coating thus appears to be a promising candidate for use as a coating material in blood-contacting devices.

  11. Chemically modified diamond-like carbon (DLC) for protein enrichment and profiling by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Najam-ul-Haq, M; Rainer, M; Huck, C W; Ashiq, M N; Bonn, G K

    2012-08-01

    The development of new high throughput methods based on different materials with chemical modifications for protein profiling of complex mixtures leads towards biomarkers; used particularly for early diagnosis of a disease. In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) is developed and optimized for serum protein profiling by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). This study is carried out in connection with a material-based approach, termed as material-enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. DLC is selected as carrier surface which provides large surface to volume ratio and offers high sensitivity. DLC has a dual role of working as MALDI target while acting as an interface for protein profiling by specifically binding peptides and proteins out of serum samples. Serum constituents are bound through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) functionality, created through glycidyl methacrylate polymerization under ultraviolet light followed by further derivatization with iminodiacetic acid and copper ion loading. Scanning electron microscopy highlights the morphological characteristics of DLC surface. It could be demonstrated that IMAC functionalized DLC coatings represent a powerful material in trapping biomolecules for their further analysis by MALDI-MS resulting in improved sensitivity, specificity and capacity in comparison to other protein-profiling methods.

  12. Hemocompatibility of surface-modified, silicon-incorporated, diamond-like carbon films.

    PubMed

    Roy, R K; Choi, H W; Yi, J W; Moon, M-W; Lee, K-R; Han, D K; Shin, J H; Kamijo, A; Hasebe, T

    2009-01-01

    The hemocompatibility of plasma-treated, silicon-incorporated, diamond-like carbon (Si-DLC) films was investigated. Si-DLC films with a Si concentration of 2at.% were prepared on Si (100) or Nitinol substrates using a capacitively coupled radiofrequency plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method using a mixed gas of benzene (C(6)H(6)) and diluted silane (SiH(4):H(2)=10:90). The Si-DLC films were then treated with O(2), CF(4) or N(2) glow discharge for surface modification. The plasma treatment revealed an intimate relationship between the polar component of the surface energy and its hemocompatibility. All in vitro characterizations, i.e. protein absorption behavior, activated partial thromboplastin time measurement and platelet adhesion behavior, showed improved hemocompatibility of the N(2-)- or O(2)-plasma-treated surfaces where the polar component of the surface energy was significantly increased. Si-O or Si-N surface bonds played an important role in improving hemocompatibility, as observed in a model experiment. These results support the importance of a negatively charged polar component of the surface in inhibiting fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion. PMID:18753025

  13. Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings as Encapsulants for Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Panosyan, Zh.; Gippius, A. A.; Kontsevoy, J. A.; Touryan, K.; Voskanyan, S.; Yengibaryan, Y.

    2005-02-01

    High-quality single-layer and bilayer diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films are fabricated by two technologies, namely, ion-assisted plasma-enhanced deposition (IAPED) and electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) deposition. Deposition on various substrates, such as sapphires and solar cells, has been performed at low substrate temperatures (50 {approx} 80 C). The two deposition technologies allow good control over the growth conditions to produce DLC films with desired optical properties, thickness, and energy bandgap. The bilayer-structured DLC can be fabricated by using IAPED for the bottom layer followed by ECR for the top layer, or just by IAPED for both layers with different compositions. The DLC films have shown good spatial uniformity, density, microhardness, and adhesion strength. They exhibit excellent stability against attack by strong acids, prolonged damp-heat exposure at 85 C and 85% relative humidity, mechanical scratch, ultrasonication, and irradiation by ultraviolet (UV), protons, and electrons. When deposited on crystalline Si and GaAs solar cells in single-layer and/or bilayer structure, the DLC films not only serve as antireflection coating and protective encapsulant, but also improve the cell efficiencies.

  14. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, K.; Hirakuri, K. K.; Masuzawa, T.

    2011-04-01

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO2) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO2 films and DLC/TiO2/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO2-coated and the DLC/TiO2/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO2 coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO2/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO2/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO2 film was covered with the DLC film.

  15. Characterization of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films deposited by RF ICP PECVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleszkiewicz, Waldemar; Kijaszek, Wojciech; Gryglewicz, Jacek; Zakrzewski, Adrian; Gajewski, Krzysztof; Kopiec, Daniel; Kamyczek, Paulina; Popko, Ewa; Tłaczała, Marek

    2013-07-01

    The work presents the results of a research carried out with Plasmalab Plus 100 system, manufactured by Oxford Instruments Company. The system was configured for deposition of diamond-like carbon films by ICP PECVD method. The deposition processes were carried out in CH4 or CH4/H2 atmosphere and the state of the plasma was investigated by the OES method. The RF plasma was capacitively coupled by 13.56 MHz generator with supporting ICP generator (13.56 Mhz). The deposition processes were conducted in constant value of RF generator's power and resultant value of the DC Bias. The power values of RF generator was set at 70 W and the power values of ICP generator was set at 300 W. In this work we focus on the influence of DLC film's thickness on optical, electrical and structural properties of the deposited DLC films. The quality of deposited DLC layers was examined by the Raman spectroscopy, AFM microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. In the investigated DLC films the calculated sp3 content was ranging from 60 % to 70 %. The films were characterized by the refractive index ranging from 2.03 to 2.1 and extinction coefficient ranging from 0.09 to 0.12.

  16. Tribology of diamond-like carbon films from generic fabrication routes investigated by lateral force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, Alison; Johnston, Colin; Watson, Gregory S.; Myhra, Sverre

    1998-08-01

    The tribological characteristics of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been studied by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Specimens from two fabrication routes, ion-beam assisted deposition and chemical vapour deposition, have been investigated. Thick (micrometres) and thin (a few nanometres) films from both routes have been considered, as have the service environments of ambient air and vacuum. Lateral force data were calculated from `friction loops', obtained as functions of load, surface topography, scan speed and service environment. An identical methodology and LFM probe were used throughout the series of measurements in order to ensure internal consistency, and the validity of the methodology was checked against measurements on epitaxially grown Si. A linear dependence was observed between lateral force and force loading up to ca 0022-3727/31/16/003/img8, in accord with a multi-asperity model, thus allowing determination of coefficients of friction that ranged from 0.05 to 0.15. The results showed that adhesive interactions contributed up to 0022-3727/31/16/003/img9 to the overall dynamic load. Meniscus interaction played a minor role in comparison to that from tribo-generated electrostatic forces. The experiments show that LFM methodologies have value and relevance to the science and technology of tribology, especially when the required spatial resolution cannot be obtained with the traditional macroscopic techniques.

  17. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun

    2014-02-01

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (-200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and -100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  18. Effect of Implantation Machine Parameters on N+ ion Implantation for Upland Cotton(Gossypium hirsutum L.) Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jieyu; Yu, Lixiang; Wu, Yuejin; Tang, Canming

    2008-10-01

    Effect of parameters of ion implantation machine, including ion energy, total dose, dose rate, impulse energy and implantation interval on the pollen grains of upland cotton implanted with nitrogen ion beam were studied. The best parameters were screened out. The results also showed that the vacuum condition before the nitrogen ion implantation does not affect the pollen viability.

  19. Plasma immersion ion implantation for sub-22 nm node devices: FD-SOI and Tri-Gate

    SciTech Connect

    Duchaine, J.; Milesi, F.; Coquand, R.; Barraud, S.; Reboh, S.; Gonzatti, F.; Mazen, F.; Torregrosa, Frank

    2012-11-06

    Here, we present and discuss the electrical characteristics of fully depleted MOSFET transistors of planar and tridimensional architecture, doped by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) or Beam Line Ion Implantation (BLII). Both techniques delivered similar and satisfactory results in considering the planar architecture. For tri-dimensional Tri-Gate transistors, the results obtained with PIII are superior.

  20. Boron Ion Implantation into Silicon by Use of the Boron Vacuum-Arc Plasma Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Chivers, D. J.; Hazelton, R. C.; Moschella, J. J.; Keitz, M. D.

    2006-11-13

    This paper continues with presentation of experimental work pertaining to use of the boron vacuum arc (a.k.a. cathodic arc) plasma generator for boron doping in semiconductor silicon, particularly with a view to the problems associated with shallow junction doping. Progress includes development of an excellent and novel macroparticle filter and subsequent ion implantations. An important perceived issue for vacuum arc generators is the production of copious macroparticles from cathode material. This issue is more important for cathodes of materials such as carbon or boron, for which the particles are not molten or plastic, but instead are elastic, and tend to recoil from baffles used in particle filters. The present design starts with two vanes of special orientation, so as to back reflect the particles, while steering the plasma between the vanes by use of high countercurrents in the vanes. Secondly, behind and surrounding the vanes is a complex system of baffles that has been designed by a computer-based strategy to ultimately trap the particles for multiple bounces. The statistical transmittance of particles is less than 5 per coulomb of boron ions transmitted at a position just a few centimeters outside the filter. This value appears adequate for the silicon wafer application, but improvement is easily visualized as wafers will be situated much further away when they are treated in systems. A total of 11 silicon samples, comprising an area of 250 cm2, have been implanted. Particles were not detected. Sample biases ranged from 60 to 500 V. Boron doses ranged from 5 x 1014 to 5 x 1015/cm2. Exposure times ranged from 20 to 200 ms for average transmitted boron current values of about 125 mA. SIMS concentration profiles from crystalline material are presented. The results appear broadly favorable in relation to competitive techniques and will be discussed. It is concluded that doubly charged boron ions are not present in the plume.

  1. Identification of /sup 13/C depleted mantle carbon in diamonds from the Roberts Victor Kimberlite, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Roberts Victor Kimberlite is known for the abundance of eclogite xenoliths, some of which show an unusual depletion in /sup 18/O. The question whether the observed oxygen isotope variations can be related to carbon isotopic composition variations has been investigated. Peridotite-suite diamons (X = -5.4 per thousand vs. PDB, s = +/-0.9 per thousand, n = 65) and sulfide containing diamonds (X = -4.9, s = +/-0.9, n = 20) do not differ in their /sup 13/C content. For these samples, delta/sup 13/C is not related to diamond shape, color, minerals occluded, or the inclusion chemistry. Eclogite suite diamonds (11) can be subdivided into two groups, GI and GII, based on delta/sup 13/C : GI = (X = -15.4, s = +/-0.4, n = 8); GII = (X = -5.9, s = +/-0.4, n = 3). The composition of the gt and cpx inclusions of the two groups is distinct; e.g. cpx of GI is significantly depleted in SiO/sub 2/, MgO, and CaO, and significantly enriched in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, FeO and MnO, compared to cpx of GII. Comparison of the chemical composition of the inclusions in E-type diamonds with those of eclogite xenoliths showing /sup 18/O depletion suggests that /sup 13/C and /sup 18/O depletion are not likely to be related. Evaluation of compositional trends of gt and cpx in eclogite xenoliths indicates that GI and GII are not related by a single fractionation event, but represent products from different reservoirs. Equilibration conditions deduced from coexisting gt and cpx demonstrate that GI diamonds come from larger depths than eclogite xenoliths and by inference GII diamonds. The high FeO and MnO content of a gt inclusion in cpx of an eclogite xenolith is used to argue for the existence of two separate events responsible for the formation of GI and GII diamonds.

  2. Electroanalytical investigation and determination of pefloxacin in pharmaceuticals and serum at boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Bengi; Topal, Burcu Dogan; Ozkan, Sibel A

    2008-02-15

    The anodic behavior and determination of pefloxacin on boron-doped diamond and glassy carbon electrodes were investigated using cyclic, linear sweep, differential pulse and square wave voltammetric techniques. In cyclic voltammetry, pefloxacin shows one main irreversible oxidation peak and additional one irreversible ill-defined wave depending on pH values for both electrodes. The results indicate that the process of pefloxacin is irreversible and diffusion controlled on boron-doped diamond electrode and irreversible but adsorption controlled on glassy carbon electrode. The peak current is found to be linear over the range of concentration 2x10(-6) to 2x10(-4)M in 0.5M H(2)SO(4) at about +1.20V (versus Ag/AgCl) for differential pulse and square wave voltammetric technique using boron-doped diamond electrode. The repeatability, reproducibility, precision and accuracy of the methods in all media were investigated. Selectivity, precision and accuracy of the developed methods were also checked by recovery studies. The procedures were successfully applied to the determination of the drug in pharmaceutical dosage forms and humans serum samples with good recovery results. No electroactive interferences from the excipients and endogenous substances were found in the pharmaceutical dosage forms and biological samples, respectively.

  3. Structural and Thermal Characterization of Ti+O Ion Implanted UltraHigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Oztarhan, A.; Urkac, E. Sokullu; Kaya, N.; Tihminlioglu, F.; Ila, D.; Chhay, B.; Muntele, C.; Budak, S.; Oks, E.; Nikolaev, A.

    2009-03-10

    In this work, Metal-Gas Hybrid Ion Implantation technique was used as a tool for the surface modification of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE). Samples were Ti+O ion implanted by using Metal-Vapour Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implanter to a fluence of 5x10{sup 16} ion/cm{sup 2} for each species and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Untreated and surface treated samples were investigated by Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) Spectrometry, Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Results indicate that Ti+O ion implantation can be applied on UHMWPE surfaces successfully. ATR-FTIR spectra indicate that the C-H concentration on the surface decreased after Ti+O implantation. Thermal characterization with TGA and DSC shows that polymeric decomposition temperature is shifted after ion implantation.

  4. Fe-ions implantation to modify TiO2 trilayer films for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Pang, Pan; Liao, Bin; Xianying, Wu; Zhang, Xu

    2016-06-01

    A series of Fe-doped TiO2 trilayer films were prepared successfully by using the ion-implantation technique. The aim of the ion implantation was to enhance charge transfer and to reduce charge recombination. A maximum conversion efficiency of 4.86% was achieved in cells using Fe-ion-implanted electrodes with the illumination of 6×1015 atom/cm2. It is 14.1% higher than that of the cells without ion implantations. The significant improvement in conversion efficiency by Fe-ion implantation could be contributed to the enhancement of dye uptake and charge transfer, as indicated from the incident photon-to-collected electron conversion efficiency and ultraviolet-visible measurements. Furthermore, the implanted Fe-ions introduce impurity levels in the bandgap of TiO2, and this improves the electron injection efficiency from lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of excited N719 into the conduction band of TiO2.

  5. Low temperature synthesis of diamond-based nano-carbon composite materials with high electron field emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R.; Yeh, C. J.; Leou, K. C.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-06-08

    A diamond-based nano-carbon composite (d/NCC) material, which contains needle-like diamond grains encased with the nano-graphite layers, was synthesized at low substrate temperature via a bias enhanced growth process using CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma. Such a unique granular structure renders the d/NCC material very conductive (σ = 714.8 S/cm), along with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties (E{sub 0} = 4.06 V/μm and J{sub e} = 3.18 mA/cm{sup 2}) and long lifetime (τ = 842 min at 2.41 mA/cm{sup 2}). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and EFE behavior of d/NCC material can be tuned in a wide range that is especially useful for different kind of applications.

  6. Low temperature synthesis of diamond-based nano-carbon composite materials with high electron field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R.; Yeh, C. J.; Leou, K. C.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-06-01

    A diamond-based nano-carbon composite (d/NCC) material, which contains needle-like diamond grains encased with the nano-graphite layers, was synthesized at low substrate temperature via a bias enhanced growth process using CH4/N2 plasma. Such a unique granular structure renders the d/NCC material very conductive (σ = 714.8 S/cm), along with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties (E0 = 4.06 V/μm and Je = 3.18 mA/cm2) and long lifetime (τ = 842 min at 2.41 mA/cm2). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and EFE behavior of d/NCC material can be tuned in a wide range that is especially useful for different kind of applications.

  7. Surface engineering of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with low energy Ar- or Ca-ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Zhu, Chao; Muntele, Claudiu I; Zhang, Tao; Liaw, Peter K; He, Wei

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, low energy ion implantation was employed to engineer the surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), aiming at improving the biocompatibility and imparting bioactivity to the surface. Ca- or Ar-ions were implanted at 10 or 50 keV at a fluence of 8 × 10(15)ions/cm(2) to (Zr0.55Al0.10Ni0.05Cu0.30)99Y1 (at.%) BMG. The effects of ion implantation on material properties and subsequent cellular responses were investigated. Both Ar- and Ca-ion implantations were suggested to induce atom displacements on the surfaces according to the Monte-Carlo simulation. The change of atomic environment of Zr in the surface regions as implied by the alteration in X-ray absorption measurements at Zr K-edge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the ion implantation process has modified the surface chemical compositions and indicated the presence of Ca after Ca-ion implantation. The surface nanohardness has been enhanced by implantation of either ion species, with Ca-ion implantation showing more prominent effect. The BMG surfaces were altered to be more hydrophobic after ion implantation, which can be attributed to the reduced amount of hydroxyl groups on the implanted surfaces. Higher numbers of adherent cells were found on Ar- and Ca-ion implanted samples, while more pronounced cell adhesion was observed on Ca-ion implanted substrates. The low energy ion implantation resulted in concurrent modifications in atomic structure, nanohardness, surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, and cell behavior on the surface of the Zr-based BMG, which were proposed to be mutually correlated with each other. PMID:25492195

  8. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  9. Germanium ion implantation to Improve Crystallinity during Solid Phase Epitaxy and the effect of AMU Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. S.; Yoo, D. H.; Son, G. H.; Lee, C. H.; Noh, J. H.; Han, J. J.; Yu, Y. S.; Hyung, Y. W.; Yang, J. K.; Song, D. G.; Lim, T. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, H. D.; Moon, J. T.

    2006-11-01

    Germanium ion implantation was investigated for crystallinity enhancement during solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPE) using high current implantation equipment. Electron back-scatter diffraction(EBSD) measurement showed numerical increase of 19 percent of <100> signal, which might be due to pre-amorphization effect on silicon layer deposited by LPCVD process with germanium ion implantation. On the other hand, electrical property such as off-leakage current of NMOS transistor degraded in specific regions of wafers, which implied non-uniform distribution of donor-type impurities into channel area. It was confirmed that arsenic atoms were incorporated into silicon layer during germanium ion implantation. Since the equipment for germanium pre-amorphization implantation(PAI) was using several source gases such as BF3 and AsH3, atomic mass unit(AMU) contamination during PAI of germanium with AMU 74 caused the incorporation of arsenic with AMU 75 which resided in arc-chamber and other parts of the equipment. It was effective to use germanium isotope of AMU 72 to suppress AMU contamination, however it led serious reduction of productivity because of decrease in beam current by 30 percent as known to be difference in isotope abundance. It was effective to use enriched germanium source gas with AMU 72 in order to improve productivity. Spatial distribution of arsenic impurities in wafers was closely related to hardware configuration of ion implantation equipment.

  10. Pulse height defect of energetic heavy ions in ion-implanted Si detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquali, G.; Casini, G.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Steckmeyer, J. C.

    1998-02-01

    The pulse height defect in ion-implanted silicon detectors for elastically scattered 93Nb, 100Mo, 116Sn, 120Sn and 129Xe ions, at energies ranging from about 4 to 25 A MeV has been measured. The results are compared with two widely used parametrizations taken from the literature.

  11. Plasma-based fluorine ion implantation into dental materials for inhibition of bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nurhaerani; Arita, Kenji; Shinonaga, Yukari; Nishino, Mizuho

    2006-12-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the fluorine depth profiles of pure titanium (Ti), stainless steel (SUS), and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) modified by plasma-based fluorine ion implantation and the effects of fluorine ion implantation on contact angle, fluoride ion release, and S. mutans adhesion. Fluorine-based gases used were Ar+F2 and CF4. By means of SIMS, it was found that the peak count of PMMA was the lowest while that of Ti was the highest. Then, up to one minute after Ar sputtering, the presence of fluorine and chromic fluoride could be detected by XPS in the surface and subsurface layer. As for the effects of using CF4 gas for fluorine ion implantation into SUS substrate, the results were: contact angle was significantly increased; no fluoride ion release was detected; antibacterial activity was significantly increased while initial adhesion was decreased. These findings thus indicated that plasma-based fluorine ion implantation into SUS with CF4 gas provided surface antibacterial activity which was useful in inhibiting bacterial adhesion.

  12. Effect of phosphorus-ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium.

    PubMed

    Krupa, D; Baszkiewicz, J; Kozubowski, J A; Barcz, A; Sobczak, J W; Biliński, A; Lewandowska-Szumieł, M; Rajchel, B

    2002-08-01

    This work presents data on the structure and corrosion resistance of titanium after phosphorus-ion implantation with a dose of 10(17)P/cm2. The ion energy was 25keV. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructure of the implanted layer. The chemical composition of the surface layer was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The corrosion resistance was examined by electrochemical methods in a simulated body fluid at a temperature of 37 C. Biocompatibility tests in vitro were performed in a culture of human derived bone cells in direct contact with the materials tested. Both, the viability of the cells determined by an XTT assay and activity of the cells evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity measurements in contact with implanted and non-implanted titanium samples were detected. The morphology of the cells spread on the surface of the materials examined was also observed. The results confirmed the biocompatibility of both phosphorus-ion-implanted and non-implanted titanium under the conditions of the experiment. As shown by transmission electron microscope results, the surface layer formed during phosphorus-ion implantation was amorphous. The results of electrochemical examinations indicate that phosphorus-ion implantation increases the corrosion resistance after short-term as well as long-term exposures.

  13. Surface stiffening and enhanced photoluminescence of ion implanted cellulose - polyvinyl alcohol - silica composite.

    PubMed

    Shanthini, G M; Sakthivel, N; Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P Y; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Meseguer-Dueñas, J M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Krishna, J B M; Kalkura, S Narayana

    2016-11-20

    Novel Cellulose (Cel) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-Silica (Si) composite which has good stability and in vitro degradation was prepared by lyophilization technique and implanted using N(3+) ions of energy 24keV in the fluences of 1×10(15), 5×10(15) and 1×10(16)ions/cm(2). SEM analysis revealed the formation of microstructures, and improved the surface roughness on ion implantation. In addition to these structural changes, the implantation significantly modified the luminescent, thermal and mechanical properties of the samples. The elastic modulus of the implanted samples has increased by about 50 times compared to the pristine which confirms that the stiffness of the sample surface has increased remarkably on ion implantation. The photoluminescence of the native cellulose has improved greatly due to defect site, dangling bonds and hydrogen passivation. Electric conductivity of the ion implanted samples was improved by about 25%. Hence, low energy ion implantation tunes the mechanical property, surface roughness and further induces the formation of nano structures. MG63 cells seeded onto the scaffolds reveals that with the increase in implantation fluence, the cell attachment, viability and proliferation have improved greatly compared to pristine. The enhancement of cell growth of about 59% was observed in the implanted samples compared to pristine. These properties will enable the scaffolds to be ideal for bone tissue engineering and imaging applications. PMID:27561534

  14. P-type Gate Electrode Formation Using B18H22 Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Dietmar; Jakubowski, Frank; Deichler, Josef; Venezia, Vincent C.; Ameen, M. S.; Harris, M. A.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated the use of octadecaborane (B18H22) cluster ion implantation to form highly active p-type gate electrodes in a 90 nm CMOS process. As device dimensions scale, the influence of poly-depletion and short channel effect control on device performance continues to become more significant. Increasing gate electrode doping via high dose ion implantation is a standard method for reducing poly-depletion. Poly-silicon gate doping with the molecular ion B18H22 offers throughput advantages over monatomic B ion implantation. For instance each molecular ion introduces 18-B atoms, thereby reducing the implant dose. In addition, each B constituent of the molecular ion is implanted with 1/20th the ion energy, making it possible to achieve low energy dopant distribution while taking advantage of higher beam energy currents. In this work, B18H22 implantation conditions (energy, dose) were matched to those of the standard B+ process of record (POR) used for gate electrode doping. We show that the poly-depletion, threshold voltage, and yield of devices implanted with B18H22 are comparable to those implanted with the POR. We combine this device results with materials data to demonstrate that the high dose implants necessary to form p-type gate electrodes with minimum poly-depletion can be achieved with B18H22 ion implants without impacting the device performance.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Thin Film Ion Implanted Composite Materials for Integrated Nonlinear Optical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, S.; Curley, M.; Williams, E. K.; Wilkosz, A.; Ila, D.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Smith, C.; Banks, C.; Penn, B.; Clark, R.

    1998-01-01

    Ion implantation has been shown to produce a high density of metal colloids within the layer regions of glasses and crystalline materials. The high-precipitate volume fraction and small size of metal nanoclusters formed leads to values for the third-order susceptibility much greater than those for metal doped solids. This has stimulated interest in use of ion implantation to make nonlinear optical materials. On the other side, LiNbO3 has proved to be a good material for optical waveguides produced by MeV ion implantation. Light confinement in these waveguides is produced by refractive index step difference between the implanted region and the bulk material. Implantation of LiNbO3 with MeV metal ions can therefore result into nonlinear optical waveguide structures with great potential in a variety of device applications. We describe linear and nonlinear optical properties of a waveguide structure in LiNbO3-based composite material produced by silver ion implantation in connection with mechanisms of its formation.

  16. The Effect of Ag and Ag+N Ion Implantation on Cell Attachment Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Urkac, Emel Sokullu; Oztarhan, Ahmet; Gurhan, Ismet Deliloglu; Iz, Sultan Gulce; Tihminlioglu, Funda; Oks, Efim; Nikolaev, Alexey; Ila, Daryush

    2009-03-10

    Implanted biomedical prosthetic devices are intended to perform safely, reliably and effectively in the human body thus the materials used for orthopedic devices should have good biocompatibility. Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly Ethylene (UHMWPE) has been commonly used for total hip joint replacement because of its very good properties. In this work, UHMWPE samples were Ag and Ag+N ion implanted by using the Metal-Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implantation technique. Samples were implanted with a fluency of 1017 ion/cm2 and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used for surface studies. RBS showed the presence of Ag and N on the surface. Cell attachment properties investigated with model cell lines (L929 mouse fibroblasts) to demonstrate that the effect of Ag and Ag+N ion implantation can favorably influence the surface of UHMWPE for biomedical applications. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to demonstrate the cell attachment on the surface. Study has shown that Ag+N ion implantation represents more effective cell attachment properties on the UHMWPE surfaces.

  17. Evaluation of the ion implantation process for production of solar cells from silicon sheet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is the investigation and evaluation of the capabilities of the ion implantation process for the production of photovoltaic cells from a variety of present-day, state-of-the-art, low-cost silicon sheet materials. Task 1 of the program concerns application of ion implantation and furnace annealing to fabrication of cells made from dendritic web silicon. Task 2 comprises the application of ion implantation and pulsed electron beam annealing (PEBA) to cells made from SEMIX, SILSO, heat-exchanger-method (HEM), edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) and Czochralski (CZ) silicon. The goals of Task 1 comprise an investigation of implantation and anneal processes applied to dendritic web. A further goal is the evaluation of surface passivation and back surface reflector formation. In this way, processes yielding the very highest efficiency can be evaluated. Task 2 seeks to evaluate the use of PEBA for various sheet materials. A comparison of PEBA to thermal annealing will be made for a variety of ion implantation processes.

  18. Surface stiffening and enhanced photoluminescence of ion implanted cellulose - polyvinyl alcohol - silica composite.

    PubMed

    Shanthini, G M; Sakthivel, N; Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P Y; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Meseguer-Dueñas, J M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Krishna, J B M; Kalkura, S Narayana

    2016-11-20

    Novel Cellulose (Cel) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-Silica (Si) composite which has good stability and in vitro degradation was prepared by lyophilization technique and implanted using N(3+) ions of energy 24keV in the fluences of 1×10(15), 5×10(15) and 1×10(16)ions/cm(2). SEM analysis revealed the formation of microstructures, and improved the surface roughness on ion implantation. In addition to these structural changes, the implantation significantly modified the luminescent, thermal and mechanical properties of the samples. The elastic modulus of the implanted samples has increased by about 50 times compared to the pristine which confirms that the stiffness of the sample surface has increased remarkably on ion implantation. The photoluminescence of the native cellulose has improved greatly due to defect site, dangling bonds and hydrogen passivation. Electric conductivity of the ion implanted samples was improved by about 25%. Hence, low energy ion implantation tunes the mechanical property, surface roughness and further induces the formation of nano structures. MG63 cells seeded onto the scaffolds reveals that with the increase in implantation fluence, the cell attachment, viability and proliferation have improved greatly compared to pristine. The enhancement of cell growth of about 59% was observed in the implanted samples compared to pristine. These properties will enable the scaffolds to be ideal for bone tissue engineering and imaging applications.

  19. The Effect of Ag and Ag+N Ion Implantation on Cell Attachment Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urkac, Emel Sokullu; Oztarhan, Ahmet; Tihminlioglu, Funda; Gurhan, Ismet Deliloglu; Iz, Sultan Gulce; Oks, Efim; Nikolaev, Alexey; Ila, Daryush

    2009-03-01

    Implanted biomedical prosthetic devices are intended to perform safely, reliably and effectively in the human body thus the materials used for orthopedic devices should have good biocompatibility. Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly Ethylene (UHMWPE) has been commonly used for total hip joint replacement because of its very good properties. In this work, UHMWPE samples were Ag and Ag+N ion implanted by using the Metal-Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implantation technique. Samples were implanted with a fluency of 1017 ion/cm2 and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used for surface studies. RBS showed the presence of Ag and N on the surface. Cell attachment properties investigated with model cell lines (L929 mouse fibroblasts) to demonstrate that the effect of Ag and Ag+N ion implantation can favorably influence the surface of UHMWPE for biomedical applications. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to demonstrate the cell attachment on the surface. Study has shown that Ag+N ion implantation represents more effective cell attachment properties on the UHMWPE surfaces.

  20. Optical Properties of p-type ZnO Doped by As Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, T.S.; Youn, C.J.; Han, M.S.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, W.S.

    2005-06-30

    As-doped p-type ZnO has been achieved by ion implantation. The As-related optical properties were analyzed by using secondary ion mass spectrometry, the Raman scattering, and the photoluminescence experiments. From the I-V measurement, the behavior of rectifying on these samples is confirmed.

  1. Material synthesis for silicon integrated-circuit applications using ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiang

    As devices scale down into deep sub-microns, the investment cost and complexity to develop more sophisticated device technologies have increased substantially. There are some alternative potential technologies, such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and SiGe alloys, that can help sustain this staggering IC technology growth at a lower cost. Surface SiGe and SiGeC alloys with germanium peak composition up to 16 atomic percent are formed using high-dose ion implantation and subsequent solid phase epitaxial growth. RBS channeling spectra and cross-sectional TEM studies show that high quality SiGe and SiGeC crystals with 8 atomic percent germanium concentration are formed at the silicon surface. Extended defects are formed in SiGe and SiGeC with 16 atomic percent germanium concentration. X-ray diffraction experiments confirm that carbon reduces the lattice strain in SiGe alloys but without significant crystal quality improvement as detected by RBS channeling spectra and XTEM observations. Separation by plasma implantation of oxygen (SPIMOX) is an economical method for SOI wafer fabrication. This process employs plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) for the implantation of oxygen ions. The implantation rate for Pm is considerably higher than that of conventional implantation. The feasibility of SPIMOX has been demonstrated with successful fabrication of SOI structures implementing this process. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) micrographs of the SPIMOX sample show continuous buried oxide under single crystal overlayer with sharp silicon/oxide interfaces. The operational phase space of implantation condition, oxygen dose and annealing requirement has been identified. Physical mechanisms of hydrogen induced silicon surface layer cleavage have been investigated using a combination of microscopy and hydrogen profiling techniques. The evolution of the silicon cleavage phenomenon is recorded by a series

  2. Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.

    1998-03-01

    The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency.

  3. Making Diamond in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Herbert

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the graphite to diamond transformation and a phase diagram for carbon. Describes high temperature-higher pressure experimental apparatus and growth of diamonds from seed crystals. Reviews properties of the diamond which suggest uses for the synthetic product. Illustrations with text. (GH)

  4. In vitro adhesion of staphylococci to diamond-like carbon polymer hybrids under dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Antti; Levon, Jaakko; Katsikogianni, Maria; Myllymaa, Katja; Lappalainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Kinnari, Teemu J; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Missirlis, Yannis

    2011-03-01

    This study compares the ability of selected materials to inhibit adhesion of two bacterial strains commonly implicated in implant-related infections. These two strains are Staphylococcus aureus (S-15981) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984). In experiments we tested six different materials, three conventional implant metals: titanium, tantalum and chromium, and three diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings: DLC, DLC-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid (DLC-PDMS-h) and DLC-polytetrafluoroethylene hybrid (DLC-PTFE-h) coatings. DLC coating represents extremely hard material whereas DLC hybrids represent novel nanocomposite coatings. The two DLC polymer hybrid films were chosen for testing due to their hardness, corrosion resistance and extremely good non-stick (hydrophobic and oleophobic) properties. Bacterial adhesion assay tests were performed under dynamic flow conditions by using parallel plate flow chambers (PPFC). The results show that adhesion of S. aureus to DLC-PTFE-h and to tantalum was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than to DLC-PDMS-h (0.671 ± 0.001 × 10(7)/cm(2) and 0.751 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2) vs. 1.055 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2), respectively). No significant differences were detected between other tested materials. Hence DLC-PTFE-h coating showed as low susceptibility to S. aureus adhesion as all the tested conventional implant metals. The adherence of S. epidermidis to biomaterials was not significantly (P < 0.05) different between the materials tested. This suggests that DLC-PTFE-h films could be used as a biomaterial coating without increasing the risk of implant-related infections. PMID:21243516

  5. Dissolution effect and cytotoxicity of diamond-like carbon coatings on orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Ohgoe, Yasuharu; Ozeki, Kazuhide; Hirakuri, Kenji; Aoki, Hideki

    2007-12-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) has been used for implants in orthodontics due to the unique properties such as shape memory effect and superelasticity. However, NiTi alloys are eroded in the oral cavity because they are immersed by saliva with enzymolysis. Their reactions lead corrosion and nickel release into the body. The higher concentrations of Ni release may generate harmful reactions. Ni release causes allergenic, toxic and carcinogenic reactions. It is well known that diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have excellent properties, such as extreme hardness, low friction coefficients, high wear resistance. In addition, DLC film has many other superior properties as a protective coating for biomedical applications such as biocompatibility and chemical inertness. Therefore, DLC film has received enormous attention as a biocompatible coating. In this study, DLC film coated NiTi orthodontic archwires to protect Ni release into the oral cavity. Each wire was immersed in physiological saline at the temperature 37 degrees C for 6 months. The release concentration of Ni ions was detected using microwave induced plasma mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) with the resolution of ppb level. The toxic effect of Ni release was studied the cell growth using squamous carcinoma cells. These cells were seeded in 24 well culture plates and materials were immersed in each well directly. The concentration of Ni ions in the solutions had been reduced one-sixth by DLC films when compared with non-coated wire. This study indicated that DLC films have the protective effect of the diffusion and the non-cytotoxicity in corrosive environment.

  6. Ion beam assisted deposition of Si-diamond-like carbon coatings on large area substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fountzoulas, C.G.

    1996-12-31

    Hard, low-friction silicon-containing diamond-like carbon coatings (Si-DLC), were formed by Ar{sup +} ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD), on 5 in. diameter silicon wafers. The diffusion pump oil precursor (tetraphenyl-tetramethyl-trisiloxane: (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 4}(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}Si{sub 3}O{sub 2}) was evaporated through seven, 3 mm diameter, closely packed apertures (multinozzle/multi-aperture container) arranged in a hexagonal pattern, approximately 5 mm apart according to mathematical model developed at ARL describing the spatial distribution of film deposition from nozzles and apertures onto inclined substrates. The ion energy was kept at 40 keV whereas the ion current density and the oil evaporation temperature were varied to produce hard, lubricious and adherent films. The multinozzle array allowed the relatively uniform ({+-} 20%) coverage of the entire 5 in. substrate. The thickness and the microhardness of the films were measured along the rectilinear surface coordinates of the substrate area. Depending on the deposition parameters the standard deviation of the coating thicknesses and Knoop microhardness varied from 14 to 30% respectively over the substrate. This is a significant improvement from the previously used single nozzle set up where the standard deviation of the coating thickness was 50 to 100% for 2 in. diameter substrates. The Knoop microhardness and the sliding friction coefficient of these coatings ranged from 10,000 to 20,000 MPa and 0.04 and 0.2 respectively. These values are in agreement with the previously reported single nozzle results.

  7. In vitro adhesion of staphylococci to diamond-like carbon polymer hybrids under dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Antti; Levon, Jaakko; Katsikogianni, Maria; Myllymaa, Katja; Lappalainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Kinnari, Teemu J; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Missirlis, Yannis

    2011-03-01

    This study compares the ability of selected materials to inhibit adhesion of two bacterial strains commonly implicated in implant-related infections. These two strains are Staphylococcus aureus (S-15981) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984). In experiments we tested six different materials, three conventional implant metals: titanium, tantalum and chromium, and three diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings: DLC, DLC-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid (DLC-PDMS-h) and DLC-polytetrafluoroethylene hybrid (DLC-PTFE-h) coatings. DLC coating represents extremely hard material whereas DLC hybrids represent novel nanocomposite coatings. The two DLC polymer hybrid films were chosen for testing due to their hardness, corrosion resistance and extremely good non-stick (hydrophobic and oleophobic) properties. Bacterial adhesion assay tests were performed under dynamic flow conditions by using parallel plate flow chambers (PPFC). The results show that adhesion of S. aureus to DLC-PTFE-h and to tantalum was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than to DLC-PDMS-h (0.671 ± 0.001 × 10(7)/cm(2) and 0.751 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2) vs. 1.055 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2), respectively). No significant differences were detected between other tested materials. Hence DLC-PTFE-h coating showed as low susceptibility to S. aureus adhesion as all the tested conventional implant metals. The adherence of S. epidermidis to biomaterials was not significantly (P < 0.05) different between the materials tested. This suggests that DLC-PTFE-h films could be used as a biomaterial coating without increasing the risk of implant-related infections.

  8. Most diamonds were created equal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablon, Brooke Matat; Navon, Oded

    2016-06-01

    Diamonds crystallize deep in the mantle (>150 km), leaving their carbon sources and the mechanism of their crystallization debatable. They can form from elemental carbon, by oxidation of reduced species (e.g. methane) or reduction of oxidized ones (e.g. carbonate-bearing minerals or melts), in response to decreasing carbon solubility in melts or fluids or due to changes in pH. The mechanism of formation is clear for fibrous diamonds that grew from the carbonate-bearing fluids trapped in their microinclusions. However, these diamonds look different and, based on their lower level of nitrogen aggregation, are much younger than most monocrystalline (MC) diamonds. In the first systematic search for microinclusions in MC diamonds we examined twinned crystals (macles), assuming that during their growth, microinclusions were trapped along the twinning plane. Visible mineral inclusions (>10 μm) and nitrogen aggregation levels in these clear macles are similar to other MC diamonds. We found 32 microinclusions along the twinning planes in eight out of 30 diamonds. Eight inclusions are orthopyroxene; four contain >50% K2O (probably as K2(Mg, Ca)(CO3)2); but the major element compositions of the remaining 20 are similar to those of carbonate-bearing high-density fluids (HDFs) found in fibrous diamonds. We conclude that the source of carbon for these macles and for most diamonds is carbonate-bearing HDFs similar to those found here and in fibrous diamonds. Combined with the old ages of MC diamonds (up to 3.5 Ga), our new findings suggest that carbonates have been introduced into the reduced lithospheric mantle since the Archaean and that the mechanism of diamond formation is the same for most diamonds.

  9. Surface structure of tetrahedral-coordinated amorphous diamond-like carbon films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, T.W.; DiNardo, N.J. |; Martinez-Miranda, L.J.; Fang, F.; Friedmann, T.A.; Sullivan, J.P.; Siegal, M.P.

    1994-12-31

    The structure and composition of tetrahedral-coordinated amorphous diamond-like carbon films (a-tC) grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of graphite has been studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The nanometer-scale surface structure has been studied as a function of growth parameters (e.g., laser energy density and film thickness) using contact-mode and tapping-mode AFM. Although the surfaces were found to be generally smooth, they exhibited reproducible structural features on several size scales which correlate with the variation of laser energy and th excited ion etching.

  10. Fabrication of highly transparent diamond-like carbon anti-reflecting coating for Si solar cell application

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Amit Das, Debajyoti

    2014-04-24

    ARC grade highly transparent unhydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were produced, directly from a-C target, using RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique, for optoelectronic applications. Optical band gap, transmittance, reflectance, sp{sup 3} fraction, I{sub D}/I{sub G}, density, and refractive index of the films have been estimated with the help of optical tools like Uv-vis spectrophotometer, ellipsometer and micro-Raman. Optimum ARC-qualities have been identified in low-temperature grown DLC films at an Ar pressure of 4 mTorr in the reactor, accomplishing its key requirements for use in silicon solar cells.

  11. Raman spectroscopy of diamond and doped diamond.

    PubMed

    Prawer, Steven; Nemanich, Robert J

    2004-11-15

    The optimization of diamond films as valuable engineering materials for a wide variety of applications has required the development of robust methods for their characterization. Of the many methods used, Raman microscopy is perhaps the most valuable because it provides readily distinguishable signatures of each of the different forms of carbon (e.g. diamond, graphite, buckyballs). In addition it is non-destructive, requires little or no specimen preparation, is performed in air and can produce spatially resolved maps of the different forms of carbon within a specimen. This article begins by reviewing the strengths (and some of the pitfalls) of the Raman technique for the analysis of diamond and diamond films and surveys some of the latest developments (for example, surface-enhanced Raman and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy) which hold the promise of providing a more profound understanding of the outstanding properties of these materials. The remainder of the article is devoted to the uses of Raman spectroscopy in diamond science and technology. Topics covered include using Raman spectroscopy to assess stress, crystalline perfection, phase purity, crystallite size, point defects and doping in diamond and diamond films.

  12. Diamond-like carbon films for polyethylene femoral parts: Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy before and after incubation in simulated body liquid.

    PubMed

    Dorner-Reisel, A; Gärtner, G; Reisel, G; Irmer, G

    2008-03-01

    In artificial prosthetics for knee, hip, finger or shoulder joints, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) is a significant material. Several attempts to reduce the wear rate of UHMW-PE, i.e. the application of suitable coatings, are in progress. A surface modification of polyethylene with wear-resistant hydrogenated diamond-like carbon is favourable, owing to the chemical similarity of polyethylene (-C-H(2)-)(n) and C:H or amorphous C:H (a-C:H) coatings with diamond-like properties. In the present study, the microstructure of a-C:H coatings on UHMW-PE substrates was investigated by Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. FT-IR spectroscopy shows very broad absorption lines, which point to the disorder and diversity of different symmetric, asymmetric aromatic, olefin sp(2)-hybridized or sp(3)-hybridized C-H groups in the amorphous diamond-like carbon coating. Following a long incubation of 12 months in a simulated body liquid, the structural investigations were repeated. Furthermore, fractured cross-sections and the wetting behaviour with polar liquids were examined. After incubation in simulated body liquid, Raman spectroscopy pointed to a reduction of the C-H bonds in the diamond-like carbon coatings. On the basis of these findings, one can conclude that hydrogenated diamond-like carbon is able to interact with salt solutions by substituting the hydrogen with appropriate ions. PMID:18157668

  13. An elementary framework for judging the cardiovascular toxicity of carbon soot: experiences from an occupational health survey of diamond industry workers.

    PubMed

    Beniwal, Rajesh; Shivgotra, Vijay Kumar

    2009-12-01

    Carbon soot is produced in the process of diamond manufacture. Recent experimental and epidemiological studies have associated exposure to carbon nanoparticles with effects on cardiovascular system and blood cells. The objective of this study is to assess the cardiovascular effects consequent to chronic respiratory exposure of carbon soot. A cross-sectional occupational health survey was conducted in all consenting workers who employed in the production wing of diamond-processing industries. Blood pressure, ECGs, height, weight, and blood counts were measured and evaluated. Blood pressure measurements revealed a high prevalence of hypertension in young workers. Left atrial abnormality (LAA) was the major finding in the electrocardiograms. We found a high prevalence of hypertension in young diamond workers. The LASER saw operators had highest prevalence of LAA. White cell count and prevalence of hypertension was highest for the workers in grinder operations.

  14. Passive Q-switching of diode-pumped Yb:YAG microchip laser with ion-implanted GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonggang; Ma, Xiaoyu; Zhong, Bin; Wang, Desong; Zhang, Qiulin; Feng, Baohua

    2004-01-01

    We reported a passive Q-switched diode laser pumped Yb:YAG microchip laser with an ion-implanted semi-insulating GaAs wafer. The wafer was implanted with 400-keV As^(+) in the concentration of 10^(16) ions/cm^(2). To decrease the non-saturable loss, we annealed the ion-implanted GaAs at 500 oC for 5 minutes and coated both sides of the ion-implanted GaAs with antireflection (AR) and highreflection (HR) films, respectively. Using GaAs wafer as an absorber and an output coupler, we obtained 52-ns pulse duration of single pulse.

  15. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  16. Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Greg M. Swain, PI

    2009-03-10

    The DOE-funded research conducted by the Swain group was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder. (Note: All potentials are reported versus Ag/AgCl (sat'd KCl) and cm{sup 2} refers to the electrode geometric area, unless otherwise stated).

  17. Fluid control of deeply subducted carbonate rocks and diamond formations by Intraslab UHP metasomatism - Modeling by the Kokchetav Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Y.; Sakamaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Deep continental subductions are an input for material cycling from surface to deep mantle. The Kokchetav UHPM rocks are the best samples and evidence to understand chemical processes in subducting materials. Transportation of H2O and CO2, is the most important role of the deep continental subduction. Silicate rocks are H2O reservoirs as hydrate minerals and carbonate rocks are CO2 reservoirs during subduction. The timings of dehydrations in silicate rocks and decarbonations in carbonate rocks are different. Dehydrations precede decarbonations and H2O play as a trigger for decarbonations, which are difficult to occur under dry conditions in P-T range of UHP metamorphism. The amount of H2O infiltrating in carbonate rocks controls the amount of CO2 carried into the mantle. H2O-bearing fluid plays an important role for diamond formation during subduction of continental materials. Diamonds form and dissolve in subducting materials through H2O fluid. In UHP dolomite marble, diamonds formed at two different stages and 2nd stage growth was from H2O fluid. The diamond at 2nd stage growth has light carbon isotope compositions, -17 to -27 ‰, whereas 1st stage diamond has -8 to -15 ‰. The light carbon of 2nd stage could be organic carbon in gneisses carried by fluid; dissolution of diamond in gneisses had occurred. H2O fluid infiltration into dolomite marble caused the change of carbon solubility in fluid to precipitate abundant fine-grained (10-20 mm) diamonds quickly. During deep continental subductions, the abundant carbonate remains and are carried to the mantle. In the case of calc-silicate rocks, for example Grt-Cpx rock of the Kokchetav, the carbonate mode is small; therefore, even a small amount of H2O can decompose all amount of carbonate to form Grt and Cpx which contain several hundreds to 1,000 ppm order of water (OH and H2O), as new water reservoirs. UHP metasomatism with skarn mineral formation causes the swapping of H2O carrier from hydrate minerals in

  18. Isotopic constraints on the nature and circulation of deep mantle C-H-O-N fluids: Carbon and nitrogen systematics within ultra-deep diamonds from Kankan (Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palot, M.; Pearson, D. G.; Stern, R. A.; Stachel, T.; Harris, J. W.

    2014-08-01

    Sublithospheric diamonds that sample the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle provide a unique view into the deep Earth. In order to investigate the origin of diamond-forming C-H-O-N fluids within the deep mantle, within the framework of the terrestrial deep volatile cycle, we conducted a δ13C-δ15N-[N] micro-analytical study, by secondary ion mass spectrometry, of five Kankan diamonds from the asthenosphere/transition zone and the lower mantle. Abrupt and large changes in δ13C within KK-99 (up to 10.2‰) and KK-200A (up to 6.9‰) illustrate distinct episodes of diamond growth, involving different fluids, possibly during transport of diamond to deeper mantle depths from the asthenosphere/transition zone into the lower mantle. Despite limited variability of δ13C within individual samples, diamonds KK-200B, KK-203, KK-204 and KK-207 display systematic δ13C-δ15N-[N] co-variations which can be modelled as a single diamond growth episode in a Rayleigh process from fluids/melts. These data constrain the carbon isotopic fractionation factors to be both negative (ΔC = -0.9‰ for KK-200B and -2.0‰ for both KK-203 and -207) and positive (ΔC = +1.0‰ for KK-204), consistent with equilibrium between diamond and oxidised (CO2 or carbonate) and reduced (CH4 or carbide) fluids respectively. The modelling of δ15N-[N] systematics suggests that the diamonds are depleted by ∼4‰ (KK-200B) and ∼0‰ (KK-204) relative to the oxidised and reduced sources respectively. Modelling the co-variation indicates a compatible behaviour of nitrogen in diamond relative to the growth medium (KN = 4-16), independent of the redox state. The parental fluids to the ultra-deep diamonds exhibit geochemical characteristics (δ13C-δ15N-[N]-KN-ΔC-ΔN) comparable to fluids thought to form lithospheric diamonds, suggesting a common mechanism of diamond genesis. The metaperidotitic parageneses and the slightly negative δ13C signatures for both KK-204 and KK-207 are consistent with

  19. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  20. Simulation of the Elastic and Ultimate Tensile Properties of Diamond, Graphene, Carbon Nanotubes, and Amorphous Carbon Using a Revised ReaxFF Parametrization.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Benjamin D; Wise, Kristopher E; Odegard, Gregory M

    2015-09-17

    In light of the enduring interest in using nanostructured carbon materials as reinforcing elements in composite materials, there is a significant need for a reliable computational tool capable to predict the mechanical properties, both elastic properties and properties at the point of fracture, in large-scale atomistic simulations. A revised version of the ReaxFF reactive force field parametrization for carbon, ReaxFFC-2013, was recently published and is notable because of the inclusion of density functional theory (DFT)-derived mechanical data for diamond and graphite in the fitting set. The purpose of the present work is to assess the accuracy of this new force field for predicting the mechanical properties for several allotropes of carbon, both in the elastic regime and during fracture. The initial discussion focuses on the performance of ReaxFFC-2013 for diamond and graphene, the two carbon forms for which mechanical properties were included in the parametrization data set. After it is established that simulations conducted with the new force field yield results that agree well with DFT and experimental data for most properties of interest, its transferability to amorphous carbon and carbon nanotubes is explored. ReaxFFC-2013 is found to produce results that, for the most part, compare favorably with available experimental data for single and multiwalled nanotubes and for amorphous carbon models prepared over a range of densities. Although there is opportunity for improvement in some predicted properties, the ReaxFFC-2013 parametrization is shown to generally perform well for each form of carbon and to compare favorably with DFT and experimental data.