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Sample records for carbon isotope content

  1. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the isotopic content of atmospheric particulate matter are hampered by difficulties in chemically defining the pools of carbon and analytically isolating the different pools. We are conducting studies on reference materials and atmospheric aerosol samples to develop a method to measure stable and radio- carbon isotopes on the labile and refractory carbon. We are using a flow-through combustion system that allows us to combust, collect and measure the isotopic content of the gases produced at all stages of heating/oxidizing. We compare our results to those measured using a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO) (Gustafsson et al., 2001). In this method, refractory carbon is defined as the material remaining after pre- combusting a sample at 375°C in the presence of oxygen for 24 hours. The reference materials are diesel soot, apple leaves and a hybrid of the two (DiesApple), all from NIST. These provide carbon with two well-defined fractions -- the soot provides refractory carbon that is radiocarbon dead and the apple leaves provide organic carbon that is radiocarbon modern. Radiocarbon results from DiesApple indicate that the "refractory" carbon defined by the CTO method is actually a mixture of old and modern carbon that contains over 25% modern carbon. This suggests that charred material formed from the apples leaves during the pre-combustion step is contributing to the fraction we identify as refractory carbon. We are studying this by analyzing the individual materials and the mixture using our flow-through system. First results with this system indicate that the refractory fraction trapped from the DiesApple contains much less modern carbon than the CTO method, less than 7%. We will present detailed concentration and isotopic results of the generation of carbon dioxide during programmed combustion of each of the reference materials. We studied the radiocarbon content of both the total carbon (TC) and refractory carbon in the fine particulate matter (PM

  2. The carbon isotopes ratio and trace metals content determinations in some Transylvanian fruit juices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehelean, A.; Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.

    2012-02-01

    This work presents a preliminary study on the carbon isotope signature and trace metal content investigated on the soil-plant-fruit pulp chain. The samples were collected from two Transylvanian areas namely Alba and Salaj. The average value of the δ13C at the soil surface was around δ13C ≈ -27%° and important differences of the δ13C values between the two studied areas were not observed. Meanwhile, differences between fruit pulp of grape juice and the pulp of pear juice relived a difference of about 1.5%° for δ13C values.

  3. [Study on the content and carbon isotopic composition of water dissolved inorganic carbon from rivers around Xi'an City].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Li, Xiang-Zhong; Liu, Wei-Guo

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the content and isotopic compositions of water dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from four typical rivers (Chanhe, Bahe, Laohe and Heihe) around Xi'an City were studied to trace the possible sources of DIC. The results of this study showed that the content of DIC in the four rivers varied from 0.34 to 5.66 mmol x L(-1) with an average value of 1.23 mmol x L(-1). In general, the content of DIC increased from the headstream to the river mouth. The delta13C(DIC) of four rivers ranged from -13.3 per thousand to -7.2 per thousand, with an average value of -10.1 per thousand. The delta13C(DIC) values of river water were all negative (average value of -12.6 per thousand) at the headstream of four rivers, but the delta13C(DIC) values of downstream water were more positive (with an average value of -9.4 per thousand). In addition, delta13C(DIC) of river water showed relatively negative values (the average value of delta13C(DIC) was -10.5 per thousand) near the estuary of the rivers. The variation of the DIC content and its carbon isotope suggested that the DIC sources of the rivers varied from the headstream to the river mouth. The negative delta13C(DIC) value indicated that the DIC may originate from the soil CO2 at the headstream of the rivers. On the other hand, the delta13C(DIC) values of river water at the middle and lower reaches of rivers were more positive, and it showed that soil CO2 produced by respiration of the C4 plants (like corn) and soil carbonates with positive delta13C values may be imported into river water. Meanwhile, the input of pollutants with low delta13C(DIC) values may result in a decrease of delta13C(DIC) values in the rivers. The study indicated that the DIC content and carbon isotope may be used to trace the sources of DIC in rivers around Xi'an City. Our study may provide some basic information for tracing the sources of DIC of rivers in the small watershed area in the Loess Plateau of China.

  4. Variability in magnesium, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, and trace element contents of brachiopod shells: implications for paleoceanographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, Claire; Saulnier, Ségolène; Vigier, Nathalie; Schumacher, Aimryc; Chaussidon, Marc; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium content in the ocean is ≈ 1290 ppm and is one of the most abundant elements. It is involved in the carbon cycle via the dissolution and precipitation of carbonates, especially Mg-rich carbonates as dolomites. The Mg/Ca ratio of the ocean is believed to have changed through time. The causes of these variations, i.e. hydrothermal activity change or enhanced precipitation of dolomite, could be constrained using the magnesium isotope composition (δ26Mg) of carbonates. Brachiopods, as marine environmental proxies, have the advantage to occur worldwide in a depth range from intertidal to abyssal, and have been found in the geological record since the Cambrian. Moreover, as their shell is in low-Mg calcite, they are quite resistant to diagenetic processes. Here we report δ26Mg, δ18O, δ13C values along with trace element contents of one modern brachiopod specimen (Terebratalia transversa) and one fossil specimen (Terebratula scillae, 2.3 Ma). We combined δ26Mg values with oxygen and carbon isotope compositions and trace element contents to look for possible shell geochemical heterogeneities in order to investigate the processes that control the Mg isotope composition of brachiopod shells. We also evaluate the potential of brachiopods as a proxy of past seawater δ26Mg values. The two investigated brachiopod shells present the same range of δ26Mg variation (up to 2 ‰)). This variation cannot be ascribed to changes in environmental parameters, i.e. temperature or pH. As previously observed, the primary layer of calcite shows the largest degree of oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibrium relative to seawater. In contrast, the δ26Mg value of this layer is comparable to that of the secondary calcite layer value. In both T. scillae and T. transversa, negative trends are observable between magnesium isotopic compositions and oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions. These trends, combined to linear relationships between δ26Mg values and REE contents, are best

  5. Chemostratigraphies of carbon, oxygen and strontium isotopes and oxygen contents across the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, T.; Sawaki, Y.; Ishikawa, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Precambrian-Cambrian (PC-C) boundary is one of the most important intervals for evolution of life. However, the scarcity of well-preserved outcrops through the boundary makes it ambiguous to decode change of the surface environment and biological evolution. In south China, strata through the PC-C boundary are continuously exposed and contain many fossils, suitable for study of environmental and biological change. In addition, we conducted excavations at four sites of Three Gorge area to obtain continuous and fresh samples. We measured the delta13C, delta18O and 87Sr/86Sr values of the drill core samples and REE compositions of fresh carbonate rocks, respectively. We identified two positive and two negative isotope excursions of delta13Ccarb within this interval: a moderate increase from 0 to +2 permil and a subsequent dramatic drop to -7 permil at the PC-C boundary, and a continuous increase to +5 permil at the upper part of the Nemakit-Daldynian (ND) stage and the subsequent sharp decrease to -9 permil just below the basal Tommotian unconformity, respectively. The continuous pattern of the delta13C shift is irrespective of lithotype and is comparable to fragmented records of other sections within and outside of the Yangtze Platform, indicating that the profile represents global change of seawater chemistry. A chemostratigraphy of 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the drilled samples also displays a smooth curve and its large positive anomaly just below the PC-C boundary. The estimate of oxygen content of seawater from REE composition of carbonate minerals shows significant decreases around PC-C and ND-Tommotian boundaries, respectively. The combination of chemostratigraphies of delta13C, 87Sr/86Sr and pO2 indicates that the 87Sr/86Sr excursions preceded the delta13C negative excursion at PC-C boundary, and suggests that global regression or formation of the Gondwana supercontinent, evident in increase of influx of continental materials, caused biological depression together

  6. Higher peroxidase activity, leaf nutrient contents and carbon isotope composition changes in Arabidopsis thaliana are related to rutin stress.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2014-09-15

    Rutin, a plant secondary metabolite that is used in cosmetics and food additive and has known medicinal properties, protects plants from UV-B radiation and diseases. Rutin has been suggested to have potential in weed management, but its mode of action at physiological level is unknown. Here, we report the biochemical, physiological and oxidative response of Arabidopsis thaliana to rutin at micromolar concentrations. It was found that fresh weight; leaf mineral contents (nitrogen, sodium, potassium, copper and aluminum) were decreased following 1 week exposure to rutin. Arabidopsis roots generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species after rutin treatment, consequently increasing membrane lipid peroxidation, decreasing leaf Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) contents and losing root viability. Carbon isotope composition in A. thaliana leaves was less negative after rutin application than the control. Carbon isotope discrimination values were decreased following rutin treatment, with the highest reduction compared to the control at 750μM rutin. Rutin also inhibited the ratio of CO2 from leaf to air (ci/ca) at all concentrations. Total protein contents in A. thaliana leaves were decreased following rutin treatment. It was concluded carbon isotope discrimination coincided with protein degradation, increase lipid peroxidation and a decrease in ci/ca values may be the primary action site of rutin. The present results suggest that rutin possesses allelopathic potential and could be used as a candidate to develop environment friendly natural herbicide.

  7. Carbon isotope techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, D.C. ); Fry, B. )

    1991-01-01

    This book is a hands-on introduction to using carbon isotope tracers in experimental biology and ecology. It is a bench-top reference with protocols for the study of plants, animals, and soils. The {sup 11}C, {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, and {sup 14}C carbon isotopes are considered and standard techniques are described by established authors. The compilation includes the following features: specific, well-established, user-oriented techniques; carbon cycles in plants, animals, soils, air, and water; isotopes in ecological research; examples and sample calculations.

  8. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gelwicks, J T; Risatti, J B; Hayes, J M

    1994-02-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems.

  9. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Risatti, J. B.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems.

  10. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  11. Variable Carbon Isotopes in ALH84001 Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2002-12-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains a small amount of carbonate that was deposited from aqueous fluids on the Martian surface approximately 3.9 Ga.. McKay et al. (1996) proposed evidence for the existence of life preserved within the carbonate grains. In order to determine the nature of the ancient Martian aqueous system we have combined previously collected oxygen isotopic data with new carbon isotopic measurements performed on the Cameca 6f ion microprobe at Arizona State University. Isotopic measurements were made at high mass resolution with a spot size of 10 microns. The measured carbon isotopic values range from 29.2‰ to 64.5‰ (PDB) with an average uncertainty of +/-1.6‰ (1σ ). These data agree very well with previous acid dissolution and stepped combustion experiments which range from a δ13C of +32‰ to +41‰ . As observed with the oxygen isotopic data, the carbon isotopic composition is correlated with the chemical composition of the carbonates. This allows us to establish that the earliest (Ca-rich) carbonates had the lightest carbon isotopic composition while the latest forming (Mg-rich) carbonates had the heaviest carbon isotopic composition. The large range of carbon isotopic compositions measured in this study cannot be explained by previously proposed models. Temperature change or a Rayleigh distillation process caused by progressive carbonate precipitation are insufficient to create the observed carbon isotopic compositions. Furthermore, processes such as evaporation or photosynthesis will not produce large carbon isotopic variations due to rapid isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere. We propose two possible models for the formation of the ALH84001 carbonates consistent with the isotopic data collected thus far. Carbonates could have formed from an evolving system where the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates reflects a mixing between magmatic hydrothermal fluids and fluids in equilibrium with an isotopically

  12. Deep Ocean Circulation and Nutrient Contents from Atlantic-Pacific Gradients of Neodymium and Carbon Isotopes During the Last 1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, A. M.; Elderfield, H.; Howe, J. N. W.

    2014-12-01

    The last few million years saw changing boundary conditions to the Earth system which set the stage for bi-polar glaciation and Milankovich-forced glacial-interglacial cycles which dominate Quaternary climate variability. Recent studies have highlighted the relative importance of temperature, ice volume and ocean circulation changes during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition at ~900 ka (Elderfield et al., 2012, Pena and Goldstein, 2014). Reconstructing the history of global deep water mass propagation and its carbon content is important for fully understanding the ocean's role in amplifying Milankovich changes to cause glacial-interglacial transitions. A new foraminiferal-coating Nd isotope record from ODP Site 1123 on the deep Chatham Rise is interpreted as showing glacial-interglacial changes in the bottom water propagation of Atlantic-sourced waters into the Pacific via the Southern Ocean during the last 1 million years. This is compared to globally-distributed bottom water Nd isotope records; including a new deep western equatorial Atlantic Ocean record from ODP Site 929, as well as published records from ODP 1088 and Site 1090 in the South Atlantic (Pena and Goldstein, 2014), and ODP 758 in the deep Indian Ocean (Gourlan et al., 2010). Atlantic-to-Pacific gradients in deep ocean neodymium isotopes are constructed for key time intervals to elucidate changes in deep water sourcing and circulation pathways through the global ocean. Benthic carbon isotopes are used to estimate deep water nutrient contents of deep water masses and constrain locations and modes of deep water formation. References: Elderfield et al. Science 337, 704 (2012) Pena and Goldstein, Science 345, 318 (2014) Gourlan et al., Quaternary Science Reviews 29, 2484-2498 (2010)

  13. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  14. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction using nitrogen and carbon contents and isotopes in lake sediments of Tiefer See, NE Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessen, Birgit; Kienel, Ulrike; Dräger, Nadine; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Lake Tiefer See (Mecklenburg/Germany) is a seasonally stratified lake formed in a north-south directed subglacial channel system with a maximum depth of 63 m. In order to understand the lake productivity and nitrogen cycle depending on natural variability and anthropogenic forcing, we compared the recent input and productivity, monitored in sediment traps in the hypo-, meta- and epilimnion since 2012 with the sedimentary record of the last 400 years. Light stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon are interpreted to reflect human impact by extensive land use, manure, sewage input, and atmospheric nitrogen compounds. The sediment trap material clearly shows high δ 15N (+7 to +14‰), and low δ 13Corg (-28 to -33‰) values, whereas surface soil and terrestrial plant materials are characterised by lower δ 15N (+3 to +6‰), and higher δ 13Corg (-28 to -25‰) values. Recent high δ 15NNO_3 values of up to +15‰ in the epilimnion water together with low δ 18O

  15. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  16. Clumped isotopes in soil carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, J.; Eiler, J. M.; Daeron, M.

    2011-12-01

    We are monitoring soil temperature and measuring clumped isotopes from modern soil carbonate in North and South America, Hawaii, and Tibet. Clumped isotopes from 50-200 cm soil depth show a strong and systematic bias toward formation in the warmest summer months. For example, soil carbonate as these depths exceed local mean annual temperature by 10-15°C in soils from India and Tibet. Clumped isotope temperatures from modern carbonate increase very regularly (r2 = 0.90) with elevation gain from lowland India to Tibet. Here carbonate forms largely in May-June, just prior to the arrival of the soil-cooling monsoon rains. In this regard, clumped isotopes hold great promise as a paleoaltimeter on the plateau. The question is whether these patterns from a monsoonal climate can be generalized (and they probably can't be) to other climate regimes when soil carbonate forms at a different time of year than the pre-monsoon. For example, in winter-dominated rainfall regimes soil carbonate may form as soils dewater in the spring and soil temperature is closer to mean annual temperature. These are open questions. Diurnal temperature information is also archived in the upper 30 cm of soils. Modern carbonate in Tibet appears to form in very late morning through afternoon, when the surface soil is warmest. Shade and aspect also strongly influence measured soil and clumped isotope temperatures. Both variables will have to be controlled for to correctly interpret clumped isotopes from the paleosol record. Clumped isotope values correlate with δ13C values in soil carbonate from shallowly buried (<1 km) paleosols from Nepal and Pakistan. This makes sense since δ13C values in the sub-tropics are determined the fraction of tree (C3) to grass (C4) cover, and soils under tree-covered areas are cooler. Finally, clumped isotopes from carbonates are reset to higher temperatures at burial depths roughly >2-3 km or >50-75°C. This was reproduced from paleosol and lake carbonates from three

  17. Lipid biomarkers for anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulphate reduction in cold seep sediments of Nyegga pockmarks (Norwegian margin): discrepancies in contents and carbon isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Taphanel, Marie-Hélène; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-06-01

    Distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of microbial lipid biomarkers were investigated in sediment cores from the G11 and G12 pockmarks in the Nyegga sector of the Storegga Slide on the mid-Norwegian margin to explore differences in depth zonation, type and carbon assimilation mode of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANMEs) and associated sulphate-reducing bacteria responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in these cold seep environments. While the G11 site is characterised by black reduced sediments colonized by gastropods and Siboglinidae tubeworms, the G12 site has black reduced sediments devoid of fauna but surrounded by a peripheral occurrence of gastropods and white filamentous microbial mats. At both sites, bulk sediments contained abundant archaeal and bacterial lipid biomarkers substantially depleted in 13C, consisting mainly of isoprenoidal hydrocarbons and dialkyl glycerol diethers, fatty acids and non-isoprenoidal monoalkylglycerol ethers. At the G11 site, down-core profiles revealed that lipid biomarkers were in maximum abundance from 10 cm depth to the core bottom at 16 cm depth, associated with δ13C values of -57 to -136‰. At the G12 site, by contrast, lipid biomarkers were in high abundance in the upper 5 cm sediment layer, associated with δ13C values of -43 to -133‰. This suggests that, as expected from the benthic fauna characteristics of the sites, AOM takes place mainly at depth in the G11 pockmark but just below the seafloor in the G12 pockmark. These patterns can be explained largely by variable fluid flow rates. Furthermore, at both sites, a dominance of ANME-2 archaea accompanied by their bacterial partners is inferred based on lipid biomarker distributions and carbon isotope signatures, which is in agreement with recently published DNA analyses for the G11 pockmark. However, the present data reveal high discrepancies in the contents and δ13C values for both archaeal and bacterial lipid profiles, implying the

  18. Carbonate abundances and isotopic compositions in chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M. L.; Howard, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    We report the bulk C abundances, and C and O isotopic compositions of carbonates in 64 CM chondrites, 14 CR chondrites, 2 CI chondrites, LEW 85332 (C2), Kaba (CV3), and Semarkona (LL3.0). For the unheated CMs, the total ranges of carbonate isotopic compositions are δ13C ≈ 25-75‰ and δ18O ≈ 15-35‰, and bulk carbonate C contents range from 0.03 to 0.60 wt%. There is no simple correlation between carbonate abundance and isotopic composition, or between either of these parameters and the extent of alteration. Unless accretion was very heterogeneous, the uncorrelated variations in extent of alteration and carbonate abundance suggests that there was a period of open system behavior in the CM parent body, probably prior to or at the start of aqueous alteration. Most of the ranges in CM carbonate isotopic compositions can be explained by their formation at different temperatures (0-130 °C) from a single fluid in which the carbonate O isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with water (δ18O ≈ 5‰) and the C isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with CO and/or CH4 (δ13C ≈ -33‰ or -20‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively). However, carbonate formation would have to have been inefficient, otherwise carbonate compositions would have resembled those of the starting fluid. A quite similar fluid composition (δ18O ≈ -5.5‰, and δ13C ≈ -31‰ or -17‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively) can explain the carbonate compositions of the CIs, although the formation temperatures would have been lower (~10-40 °C) and the relative abundances of calcite and dolomite may play a more important role in determining bulk carbonate compositions than in the CMs. The CR carbonates exhibit a similar range of O isotopes, but an almost bimodal distribution of C isotopes between more (δ13C ≈ 65-80‰) and less altered samples (δ13C ≈ 30-40‰). This bimodality can still be explained by precipitation from fluids with the same isotopic

  19. Carbon isotope fractionation during microbial methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, James F.; Fritz, Peter

    1981-09-01

    Methane, a common trace constituent of groundwaters, occasionally makes up more than 20% of the total carbon in groundwaters1,2. In aerobic environments CH4-rich waters can enable microbial food chain supporting a mixed culture of bacteria with methane oxidation as the primary energy source to develop3. Such processes may influence the isotopic composition of the residual methane and because 13C/12C analyses have been used to characterize the genesis of methanes found in different environments, an understanding of the magnitude of such effects is necessary. In addition, carbon dioxide produced by the methane-utilizing bacteria can be added to the inorganic carbon pool of affected groundwaters. We found carbon dioxide experimentally produced by methane-utilizing bacteria to be enriched in 12C by 5.0-29.6‰, relative to the residual methane. Where methane-bearing groundwaters discharged into aerobic environments microbial methane oxidation occurred, with the residual methane becoming progressively enriched in 13C. Various models have been proposed to explain the 13C/12C and 14C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of groundwaters in terms of additions or losses during flow in the subsurface4,5. The knowledge of both stable carbon isotope ratios in various pools and the magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation during various processes allows geochemists to use the 13C/12C ratio of the DIC along with water chemistry to estimate corrected 14C groundwater ages4,5. We show here that a knowledge of the carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during microbial methane-utilization could modify such models for application to groundwaters affected by microbial methane oxidation.

  20. Deciphering Carbon Isotope Excursions in Separated Biogenic and Diagenetic Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Minoletti, F.; Hesselbo, S.; Jenkyns, H.; Rickaby, R.; Diester-Haass, L.; Delsate, D.

    2008-12-01

    The long-term evolution of the carbon-isotope ratio in the sedimentary archive is classically linked with changes in primary productivity and organic matter burial. There have been sudden and pronounced shifts, so-called Carbon Isotope Excursions (CIEs) in the long-term trends as evidenced by synchronous shifts from various basins. These geochemical perturbations may have various explanations such as changes of the efficiency of the carbon sink; sudden infusion of isotopically-light carbon into the Ocean-Atmosphere system; or advection of 12C-rich source from bottom water in a stratified water column. Beside the record of primary changes in seawater chemistry, a possible diagenetic overprint may also mime such CIEs in the sedimentary record. The aim of this contribution is to illustrate through three critical intervals (the Early Toarcian, the K-P boundary and the Mid-Miocene Montery Event) how the various micron-sized sedimentary particles specifically record these CIEs, which are respectively associated with major paleoceanographical events. New techniques for getting monotaxic calcareous nannofossil assemblages from the sediment (Minoletti et al., accepted) enable the isotopic measurement at various depths within the surface water and from bottom water by analyzing early diagenetic precipitations (rhombs and micarbs). The integration of these high-resolution isotopic signals in terms of amplitudes affords to recognize diagenetic artifacts in some sections displaying coeval decrease in the carbonate content. For both Early Toarcian and K-P events, corroborative records of CIE records in both primary calcite and bottom water carbonate indicate a global C-isotope perturbation of the water column. For the Monterey event, the evolution of calcareous nannoplankton and the foraminifera isotopic records are in overall agreement, but in detail, the coccolith-discoaster and foraminifer ratio in the sediment, related to environmental changes, is likely to produce isotopic

  1. Carbon isotopes as indicators of peatland growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alewell, Christine; Krüger, Jan Paul; von Sengbusch, Pascal; Szidat, Sönke; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    As undisturbed and/or growing peatlands store considerable amounts of carbon and are unique in their biodiversity and species assemblage, the knowledge of the current status of peatlands (growing with carbon sequestration, stagnating or degrading with carbon emissions) is crucial for landscape management and nature conservation. However, monitoring of peatland status requires long term measurements and is only feasible with expert knowledge. The latter determination is increasingly impeded in a scientific world, where taxonomic expert knowledge and funding of long term monitoring is rare. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes depth profiles in peatland soils have been shown to be a useful tool to monitor the degradation of peatlands due to permafrost thawing in Northern Sweden (Alewell et al., 2011; Krüger et al., 2014), drainage in Southern Finland (Krüger et al., 2016) as well as land use intensification in Northern Germany (Krüger et al., 2015). Here, we tackle the questions if we are able to differentiate between growing and degrading peats with the use of a combination of carbon stable (δ13C) and radiogenic isotope data (14C) with peat stratification information (degree of humification and macroscopic plant remains). Results indicate that isotope data are a useful tool to approximate peatland status, but that expert taxonomic knowledge will be needed for the final conclusion on peatland growth. Thus, isotope tools might be used for landscape screening to pin point sites for detailed taxonomic monitoring. As the method remains qualitative future research at these sites will need to integrate quantitative approaches to determine carbon loss or gain (soil C balances by ash content or C accumulation methods by radiocarbon data; Krüger et al., 2016). Alewell, C., R. Giesler, J. Klaminder, J. Leifeld, and M. Rollog. 2011. Stable carbon isotopes as indicators for micro-geomorphic changes in palsa peats. Biogeosciences, 8, 1769-1778. Krüger, J. P., Leifeld, J

  2. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  3. Oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibria in Galapagos corals: isotopic thermometry and calcification physiology

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Biological carbonate skeletons are built largely from carbon dioxide, which reacts to form carbonate ion within thin extracellular solutions. The light isotopes of carbon and oxygen react faster than the heavy isotopes, depleting the resulting carbonate ions in /sup 13/C and /sup 18/O. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurs sufficiently fast that the skeleton remains out of isotopic equilibrium with surrounding fluids. This explanation for isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates was partially simulated in vitro, producing results similar to those seen in non-photosynthetic corals. Photosynthetic corals have higher /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios due to the preferential removal of /sup 12/C (as organic carbon) from the reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon. The oxygen isotopic variations in corals can be used to reconstruct past sea surface temperatures to an accuracy of about 0.5/sup 0/C. The carbon isotopic content of photosynthetic corals provides an indication of cloudiness. Using isotopic data from Galapagos corals, it was possible to construct proxy histories of the El Nino phenomenon. The physiology of skeletogenesis appears to be surprisingly similar in calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, and silica precipitating systems.

  4. Carbon and oxygen isotope variations in diamonds and graphite eclogites from Orapa, Botswana, and the nitrogen content of their diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, P. ); Harris, J.W. ); Robinson, D.N. ); Gurney, J.J. ); Shee, S.R. )

    1991-02-01

    In eclogite xenoliths from Orapa, Botswana, {delta}{sup 13}C of graphite varies between {minus}4.6 and {minus}7.8 per thousand vs. PDB, while that of diamonds ranges from {minus}4.0 to {minus}22.3 per thousand. In graphite eclogites, {delta}{sup 18}O values of garnets fall between 5.2 and 7 per thousand vs. SMOW and those of clinopyroxenes between 4.6 and 6.5 per thousand. For diamond eclogites the respective ranges are wider, i.e., 3.9 to 9.2 per thousand and 5.2 to 8.3 per thousand. The {sup 18}O enrichment above normal mantle in which diamond is stable. Eclogites with {delta} {sup 13}C values in the range {minus}4 to {minus}8 per thousand and {delta}{sup 18}O values in the normal mantle range tend to have positive garnet-clinopyroxene {sup 18}O fractionations and lower Fe/Ca and Fe/Mg ratios than eclogites which have simultaneously {delta}{sup 13}C values lower than {minus}8 per thousand and {delta}{sup 18}O values higher than 6.5 per thousand. In these eclogites the garnet-clinopyroxene fractionations tend to be negative. Positive garnet-clinopyroxene {sup 18}O fractionations increase slightly in the sequence: diamond eclogites (0.36 {plus minus} 0.15,n = 6), graphic/diamond ecologites (0.46 {plus minus} 0.36, n = 3), and graphite eclogites (0.53 {plus minus} 0.15, n = 3). Neither igneous fractionation processes, subduction, nor metasomatic alteration can satisfactory explain all observed chemical and isotopic trends.

  5. Carbon and its isotopes in mid-oceanic basaltic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Moore, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Sample surface carbon, mantle carbon dioxide in vesicles, and mantle carbon dissolved in glasses, are the three carbon components evident in the 11 mid-oceanic basalts presently analyzed. The total carbon content may be controlled by the depth of the shallowest ridge magma chamber, and carbon isotopic fractionation accompanies magma degassing. Using He-3 and carbon data for submarine hydrothermal fluids, the present day midoceanic ridge carbon flux is approximately estimated to be 1.0 x 10 to the 13th g C/yr, requiring 8 Gyr to accumulate the earth's present crustal carbon inventory.

  6. Diets of introduced predators using stable isotopes and stomach contents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meckstroth, A.M.; Miles, A.K.; Chandra, S.

    2007-01-01

    In a study of predation on ground-nesting birds at South San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California, USA, we analyzed stomach contents and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to identify commonly consumed prey. We obtained the stomach contents from 206 nonnative red foxes (Vulpes vulpes regalis) collected in the South Bay area and Monterey County during 1995-2001 and from 68 feral cats (Felis silvestris) from the South Bay area during 2001-2002. We determined prey identity, biomass, and frequency, described seasonal diet trends, and derived an Index of Relative Importance. Avian species were the most frequent prey we found in the stomachs of red foxes from South Bay (61%), whereas small rodents were most frequent for red foxes from Monterey County (62%). Small rodents were the most frequent prey we found in feral cats (63%). Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures for foxes supported stomach content findings. However, isotope results indicated that cats received a majority of their energy from a source other than rodents and outside the natural system, which differed from the stomach content analysis. We demonstrated the utility of both stable isotope and stomach content analyses to establish a more complete understanding of predators' diets. This information aids natural resource managers in planning and evaluating future predator-removal programs and increases our understanding of the impacts of nonnative foxes and cats on native species.

  7. Further carbon isotope measurements of LEW 88516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    Douglas et al. have previously analyzed the carbon content and isotopic composition of a crushed sample (sub-sample 13) of the shergottite, LEW 88516. The powder, which was from a relatively large portion of the meteorite in order to obtain a representative sample, was distributed amongst the scientific community. However, it is probable that the preparation procedure was not optimized for the purposes of carbon measurements. Indeed, it was found that LEW 88516,13 contained over 1200 ppm carbon, a concentration which is greater than that present in any other SNC meteorite. That a close relative, ALH A77005, contains only 141 ppm carbon seems to implicate the preparation procedure as being responsible for the apparently high carbon content of LEW 88516. However, it may also be the nature of the fine powder which has resulted in contamination. The observation of high carbon content in LEW 88516,13 highlights the extreme difficulty of trying to obtain representative samples of whole meteorites for this kind of investigation. Presented herein are some further measurements of LEW 88516 which should serve to clarify some of the issues raised by the previous investigation.

  8. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  9. Sediment source detection by stable isotope analysis, carbon and nitrogen content and CSSI in a small river of the Swiss Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SchindlerWildhaber, Yael; Alewell, Christine; Birkholz, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) and organic matter in rivers can harm the fauna by affecting health and fitness of free swimming fish and by causing siltation of the riverbed. The temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) during the brown trout spawning season in a small river of the Swiss Plateau were assessed and C isotopes as well as the C/N atomic ratio were used to distinguish autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter in SS loads. The visual basic program IsoSource with 13Ctot and 15N as input isotopes was used to quantify the temporal and spatial sources of SS. We determined compound specific stable carbon isotopes (CSSI) in fatty acids of possible sediment source areas to the stream in addition and compared them to SS from selected high flow and low flow events. Organic matter concentrations in the infiltrated and suspended sediment were highest during low flow periods with small sediment loads and lowest during high flow periods with high sediment loads. Peak values in nitrate and dissolved organic C were measured during high flow and high rainfall, probably due to leaching from pasture and arable land. The organic matter was of allochthonous sources as indicated by the C/N atomic ratio and δ13Corg. Organic matter in SS increased from up- to downstream due to an increase in sediment delivery from pasture and arable land downstream of the river. While the major sources of SS are pasture and arable land during base flow conditions, SS from forest soils increased during heavy rain events and warmer winter periods most likely due to snow melt which triggered erosion. Preliminary results of CSSI analysis of sediment source areas and comparison to SS of selected events indicate that differences in d13C values of individual fatty acids are too small to differentiate unambiguously between sediment sources.

  10. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelwicks, J.T.; Risatti, J.B.; Hayes, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30??C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken into account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate ??? total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 ?? 0.9% to - 57.2 ?? 2.3z%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 ?? 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring. ?? 1989.

  11. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  12. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-10-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. 38 references.

  13. Oxygen isotope fractionation in double carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Böttcher, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations in double carbonates of different crystal structures were calculated by the increment method. Synthesis experiments were performed at 60 °C and 100 °C to determine oxygen and carbon isotope fractionations involving PbMg[CO3]2. The calculations suggest that the double carbonates of calcite structure are systematically enriched in (18)O relative to those of aragonite and mixture structures. Internally consistent oxygen isotope fractionation factors are obtained for these minerals with respect to quartz, calcite and water at a temperature range of 0-1200 °C. The calculated fractionation factors for double carbonate-water systems are generally consistent with the data available from laboratory experiments. The experimentally determined fractionation factors for PbMg[CO3]2, BaMg[CO3]2 and CaMg[CO3]2 against H2O not only fall between fractionation factors involving pure carbonate end-members but are also close to the calculated fractionation factors. In contrast, experimentally determined carbon isotope fractionation factors between PbMg[CO3]2 and CO2 are much closer to theoretical predictions for the cerussite-CO2 system than for the magnesite-CO2 system, similar to the fractionation behavior for BaMg[CO3]2. Therefore, the combined theoretical and experimental results provide insights into the effects of crystal structure and exchange kinetics on oxygen isotope partitioning in double carbonates.

  14. Clumped isotope thermometry of cryogenic cave carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Affek, Hagit P.; Zhang, Yi Ge; Dublyansky, Yuri; Spötl, Christoph; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.

    2014-02-01

    Freezing of cave pool water that is increasingly oversaturated with dissolved carbonate leads to precipitation of a very specific type of speleothems known as cryogenic cave carbonates (CCC). At present, two different environments for their formation have been proposed, based on their characteristic carbon and oxygen isotope ratios. Rapidly freezing thin water films result in the fast precipitation of fine-grained carbonate powder (CCCfine). This leads to rapid physicochemical changes including CO2 degassing and CaCO3 precipitation, resulting in significantly 13C-enriched carbonates. Alternatively, slow carbonate precipitation in ice-covered cave pools results in coarse crystalline CCC (CCCcoarse) yielding strongly 18O-depleted carbonate. This is due to the formation of relatively 18O-enriched ice causing the gradual depletion of 18O in the water from which the CCC precipitates. Cryogenic carbonates from Central European caves were found to have been formed primarily during the last glacial period, specifically during times of permafrost thawing, based on the oxygen isotope ratios and U-Th dating. Information about the precise conditions of CCCcoarse formation, i.e. whether these crystals formed under equilibrium or disequilibrium conditions with the parent fluid, however, is lacking. An improved understanding of CCCcoarse formation will increase the predictive value of this paleo-permafrost archive. Here we apply clumped isotopes to investigate the formation conditions of cryogenic carbonates using well-studied CCCcoarse from five different cave systems in western Germany. Carbonate clumped isotope measurements yielded apparent temperatures between 3 and 18 °C and thus exhibit clear evidence of isotopic disequilibrium. Although the very negative carbonate δ18O values can only be explained by gradual freezing of pool water accompanied by preferential incorporation of 18O into the ice, clumped isotope-derived temperatures significantly above expected freezing

  15. Gluconeogenesis from labeled carbon: estimating isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, J.K.

    1986-03-01

    To estimate the rate of gluconeogenesis from steady-state incorporation of labeled 3-carbon precursors into glucose, isotope dilution must be considered so that the rate of labeling of glucose can be quantitatively converted to the rate of gluconeogenesis. An expression for the value of this isotope dilution can be derived using mathematical techniques and a model of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The present investigation employs a more complex model than that used in previous studies. This model includes the following pathways that may affect the correction for isotope dilution: 1) flux of 3-carbon precursor to the oxaloacetate pool via acetyl-CoA and the TCA cycle; 2) flux of 4- or 5-carbon compounds into the TCA cycle; 3) reversible flux between oxaloacetate (OAA) and pyruvate and between OAA and fumarate; 4) incomplete equilibrium between OAA pools; and 5) isotope dilution of 3-carbon tracers between the experimentally measured pool and the precursor for the TCA-cycle OAA pool. Experimental tests are outlined which investigators can use to determine whether these pathways are significant in a specific steady-state system. The study indicated that flux through these five pathways can significantly affect the correction for isotope dilution. To correct for the effects of these pathways an alternative method for calculating isotope dilution is proposed using citrate to relate the specific activities of acetyl-CoA and OAA.

  16. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry in continental tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Katharine W.; Lechler, Alex R.

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the thermal history of minerals and fluids in continental environments is a cornerstone of tectonics research. Paleotemperature constraints from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry have provided important tests of geodynamic, structural, topographic and basin evolution models. The thermometer is based on the 13C-18O bond ordering in carbonates (mass-47 anomaly, Δ47) and provides estimates of the carbonate formation temperature independent of the δ18O value of the water from which the carbonate grew; Δ47 is measured simultaneously with conventional measurements of carbonate δ13C and δ18O values, which together constrain the isotopic composition of the parent water. Depending on the geologic setting of carbonate growth, this information can help constrain paleoenvironmental conditions or basin temperatures and fluid sources. This review examines how clumped isotope thermometry can shed new light on problems in continental tectonics, focusing on paleoaltimetry, basin evolution and structural diagenesis applications. Paleoaltimetry is inherently difficult, and the precision in carbonate growth temperature estimates is at the limit of what is useful for quantitative paleoelevation reconstruction. Nevertheless, clumped isotope analyses have enabled workers to address previously intractable problems and in many settings offer the best chance of understanding topographic change from the geologic record. The portion of the shallow crust residing at temperatures up to ca. 200 °C is important as host to economic resources and records of tectonics and climate, and clumped isotope thermometry is one of the few proxies that can access this critical range with sensitivity to temperature alone. Only a handful of studies to date have used clumped isotopes to investigate diagenesis and other sub-surface processes using carbonate crystallization temperatures or the sensitivity of Δ47 values to a sample's thermal history. However, the thermometer is

  17. Carbon and its isotopes in mid-oceanic basaltic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Des Marais, D.J.; Moore, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Three carbon components are evident in eleven analyzed mid-oceanic basalts: carbon on sample surfaces (resembling adsorbed gases, organic matter, or other non-magmatic carbon species acquired by the glasses subsequent to their eruption), mantle carbon dioxide in vesicles, and mantle carbon dissolved in the glasses. The combustion technique employed recovered only reduced sulfur, all of which appears to be indigenous to the glasses. The dissolved carbon concentration (measured in vesicle-free glass) increases with the eruption depth of the spreading ridge, and is consistent with earlier data which show that magma carbon solubility increases with pressure. The total glass carbon content (dissolved plus vesicular carbon) may be controlled by the depth of the shallowest ridge magma chamber. Carbon isotopic fractionation accompanies magma degassing; vesicle CO2 is about 3.8??? enriched in 13C, relative to dissolved carbon. Despite this fractionation, ??13CPDB values for all spreading ridge glasses lie within the range -5.6 and -7.5, and the ??13CPDB of mantle carbon likely lies between -5 and -7. The carbon abundances and ??13CPDB values of Kilauea East Rift glasses apparently are influenced by the differentiation and movement of magma within that Hawaiian volcano. Using 3He and carbon data for submarine hydrothermal fluids, the present-day mid-oceanic ridge mantle carbon flux is estimated very roughly to be about 1.0 ?? 1013 g C/yr. Such a flux requires 8 Gyr to accumulate the earth's present crustal carbon inventory. ?? 1984.

  18. Site-Specific Carbon Isotopes in Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural organic molecules exhibit a wide range of internal site-specific isotope variation (i.e., molecules with same isotopic substitution type but different site). Such variations are generally unconstrained by bulk isotopic measurements. If known, site-specific variations might constrain temperatures of equilibrium, mechanisms of formation or consumption reactions, and possibly other details. For example, lipids can exhibit carbon isotope differences of up to 30‰ between adjacent carbon sites as a result of fractionations arising during decarboxylation of pyruvate and other steps in lipid biosynthesis(1). We present a method for site-specific carbon isotope analysis of propane, based on high-resolution, multi-collector gas source mass spectrometry, using a novel prototype instrument - the Thermo MAT 253 Ultra. This machine has an inlet system and electron bombardment ion source resembling those in conventional stable isotope gas source mass spectrometers, and the energy filter, magnet, and detector array resembling those in multi-collector ICPMS and TIMS. The detector array has 7 detector positions, 6 of which are movable, and each of which can collect ions with either a faraday cup (read through amplifiers ranging from 107-1012 ohms) or an SEM. High mass resolving power (up to 27,000, MRP = M/dM definition) is achieved through a narrow entrance slit, adjustable from 250 to 5 μm. Such resolution can cleanly separate isobaric interferences between isotopologues of organic molecules having the same cardinal mass (e.g., 13CH3 and 12CH2D). We use this technology to analyze the isotopologues and fragments of propane, and use such data to solve for the site-specific carbon isotope fractionation. By measuring isotopologues of both the one-carbon (13CH3) and the two-carbon (13C12CH4) fragment ion, we can solve for both bulk δ13C and the difference in δ13C between the terminal and central carbon position. We tested this method by analyzing mixtures between natural

  19. Sedimentary organic matter in two Spitsbergen fjords: Terrestrial and marine contributions based on carbon and nitrogen contents and stable isotopes composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziorowska, Katarzyna; Kuliński, Karol; Pempkowiak, Janusz

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the spatial variability of organic carbon (Corg) and total nitrogen (Ntot) concentrations, Corg/Ntot ratios, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen (δ13Corg, δ15Ntot) and the proportions of autochthonous and allochtonous organic matter within recently deposited sediments of two Spitsbergen fjords: the Hornsund and the Adventfjord, which are affected to a different degree by the West Spitsbergen Current. Corg concentrations ranged from 1.38% to 1.98% in the Hornsund and from 1.73% to 3.85% in the Adventfjord. In both fjords the highest Corg concentrations were measured at the innermost stations and they decreased towards the mouths of the fjords. This suggests fresh water runoff to be an important source of organic matter (OM) for surface sediments. The results showed that both fjords differ significantly in terms of sedimentary organic matter characteristics. The samples from the Hornsund, except those from the innermost station in the Brepollen, had relatively low Corg/Ntot ratios, all within a narrow range (from 9.7 to 11.3). On the other hand significantly higher Corg/Ntot ratios, varying within a broad range (from 14.6 to 33.0), were measured in the Adventfjord. The samples from the Hornsund were characterized by higher δ13Corg (from -24.90‰ to -23.87‰) and δ15Ntot (from 3.02‰ to 4.93‰) than those from the Adventfjord (-25.94‰ to -24.69‰ and from 0.71‰ to 4.00‰, respectively). This is attributed to a larger proportion of marine organic matter. Using the two end-member approach proportions of terrestrial organic matter were evaluated. Terrestrial OM contribution for the Adventfjord was in the range of 82-83%, while in case of the Hornsund the results were in the range of 69-75%, with the exception of the innermost part of the fjord, where terrestrial organic matter contribution ranged from 80 to 82%. The strong positive correlation between δ13Corg and δ15Ntot was revealed. This was taken as an indicator

  20. Carbon and Carbon Isotope Cycling in the Western Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, Jacoba; Thomas, Helmuth

    2016-04-01

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are having drastic effects on the global oceans. The Arctic Ocean is particularly susceptible to change as warming, sea-ice loss and a weak buffering capacity all influence this complicated semi-enclosed sea. In order to investigate the inorganic carbon system in the Canadian Arctic, water samples were collected in the Beaufort Sea, on the Alaskan shelf, at the Mackenzie river delta, and in Amundsen Gulf during the summer of 2014 and were analyzed for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), DI13C and 18O isotopes. Carbon isotopes are used to investigate the role of biological production on the uptake and transfer of inorganic carbon to depth. A preferential uptake of the lighter 12C relative to the heavier 13C isotope during biological production leads to a fractionation of the 13C/12C isotopes in both the organic matter and the water column. This results in an enrichment of DI13C in the high productivity surface waters and a depletion of DI13C at depth. Physical processes including freshwater input, brine rejection, and water mass mixing are investigated through the measurement of oxygen isotopes. Differences in the carbon system across the study area due to both biological and physical processes are assessed using depth profiles of DI13C and related carbon system parameters.

  1. Systematic Relationships between Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Carbonates Deposited by Modern Corals and Algae.

    PubMed

    Keith, M L; Weber, J N

    1965-10-22

    Analyses of organic carbonates from Jamaican coral reefs show a positive correlation between the O(18): O(16) ratio and the C(13) C(12) ratio in some taxonomic groups of corals and algae, but essentially no correlation (nearly constant O(18)) in one suborder of reef-building corals. The strontium and magnesium contents apparently are controlled mainly by skeletal mineralogy and show no correlation with carbon or oxygen isotopic composition. The observed positive correlations between C(13) and O(18) content may be due to calcification processes utilizing carbon-oxygen compounds from two isotopically different sources or utilizing selected portions of a wide spectrum of carbon-oxygen compounds in which there is a positive correlation between C(13) C(12) and O(18);O(16) ratios. Coral and algal carbonates from Jamaican waters, with an annual temperature range of only about 4 degrees C, exhibit a total deltaC(13) range of more than 13 per mil and a sigmaO(18) range of more than 4 per mil. The wide isotopic variability resulting from vital effects of calcifying organisms must be taken into account in applying isotopic analysis to the study of sedimentary carbonate rocks which may include reef-derived carbonates.

  2. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  3. Interpreting the Ca isotope record of marine biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Neil G.; De La Rocha, Christina L.; Tipper, Edward T.; Tripati, Aradhna; Galy, Albert; Bickle, Michael J.

    2007-08-01

    An 18 million year record of the Ca isotopic composition (δ 44/42Ca) of planktonic foraminiferans from ODP site 925, in the Atlantic, on the Ceara Rise, provides the opportunity for critical analysis of Ca isotope-based reconstructions of the Ca cycle. δ 44/42Ca in this record averages +0.37 ± 0.05 (1 σ SD) and ranges from +0.21‰ to +0.52‰. The record is a good match to previously published Neogene Ca isotope records based on foraminiferans, but is not similar to the record based on bulk carbonates, which has values that are as much as 0.25‰ lower. Bulk carbonate and planktonic foraminiferans from core tops differ slightly in their δ 44/42Ca (i.e., by 0.06 ± 0.06‰ ( n = 5)), while the difference between bulk carbonate and foraminiferan values further back in time is markedly larger, leaving open the question of the cause of the difference. Modeling the global Ca cycle from downcore variations in δ 44/42Ca by assuming fixed values for the isotopic composition of weathering inputs (δ 44/42Ca w) and for isotope fractionation associated with the production of carbonate sediments (Δ sed) results in unrealistically large variations in the total mass of Ca 2+ in the oceans over the Neogene. Alternatively, variations of ±0.05‰ in the Ca isotope composition of weathering inputs or in the extent of fractionation of Ca isotopes during calcareous sediment formation could entirely account for variations in the Ca isotopic composition of marine carbonates. Ca isotope fractionation during continental weathering, such as has been recently observed, could easily result in variations in δ 44/42Ca w of a few tenths of permil. Likewise a difference in the fractionation factors associated with aragonite versus calcite formation could drive shifts in Δ sed of tenths of permil with shifts in the relative output of calcite and aragonite from the ocean. Until better constraints on variations in δ 44/42Ca w and Δ sed have been established, modeling the Ca 2+ content

  4. The stable carbon isotopes in enstatite chondrites and Cumberland Falls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, P.; Wickman, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon-isotopic composition (CIC) of the total carbon in the enstatite chondrites Indarch, Abee, St. Marks, Pillistfer, Hvittis and Daniel's Kuil and the enstatite achondrite Cumberland Falls has been measured. The empirical relationship between CIC and total carbon content is distinct from that of carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. Within the enstatite chondrite group the average C-13 content increases with petrographic type: E4 less than E5 less than E6. Daniel's Kuil shows the largest C-13 enrichment in the bulk carbon of any meteorite. The CIC is most clearly correlated with the abundance of the elements Zn, Cd, and In. Insofar as these elements may hold the key to the understanding of enstatite chondrites, more detailed combined CIC and trace-element studies of these meteorites will play an important role in the deciphering of their history.

  5. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  6. Modelling carbon isotopes of carbonates in cave drip water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohlmeister, J.; Scholz, D.; Kromer, B.; Mangini, A.

    2011-09-01

    C isotopes in cave drip water are affected by both the C isotope composition of soil air and host rock carbonate. Furthermore, the C isotope composition of cave drip water strongly depends on the calcite dissolution system, i.e., open, closed and intermediate conditions. Here, we present a calcite dissolution model, which calculates the 14C activity and δ 13C value of the dissolved inorganic carbon of the drip water. The model is based on the chemical equations describing calcite dissolution ( H2O+CaCO+CO⇔Ca+2HCO3-). The most important improvement, relative to previous models, is the combination of the open and closed system conditions in order to simulate the C isotope composition during intermediate states of calcite dissolution and the application to carbon isotope measurements on cave drip waters from Grotta di Ernesto, Italy. The major changes in the C isotope composition of the drip water occur in response to variations in the open-closed system ratio. Additionally, the 14C activity and the δ 13C value of the drip water depend on changes in the partial pressure of soil CO 2. Radiocarbon and δ 13C values of the Grotta di Ernesto drip water are well reproduced by the model.

  7. Carbon isotopes in biological carbonates: Respiration and photosynthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Burdett, J.; Whelan, J.F.; Paull, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    Respired carbon dioxide is an important constituent in the carbonates of most air breathing animals but is much less important in the carbonates of most aquatic animals. This difference is illustrated using carbon isotope data from freshwater and terrestrial snails, ahermatypic corals, and chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic pelecypods. Literature data from fish otoliths and bird and mammal shell and bone carbonates are also considered. Environmental CO2/O2 ratios appear to be the major controlling variable. Atmospheric CO2/O2 ratios are about thirty times lower than in most natural waters, hence air breathing animals absorb less environmental CO2 in the course of obtaining O2. Tissue CO2 therefore, does not isotopically equilibrate with environmental CO2 as thoroughly in air breathers as in aquatic animals, and this is reflected in skeletal carbonates. Animals having efficient oxygen transport systems, such as vertebrates, also accumulate more respired CO2 in their tissues. Photosynthetic corals calcify mainly during the daytime when photosynthetic CO2 uptake is several times faster than respiratory CO2 release. Photosynthesis, therefore, affects skeletal ??13C more strongly than does respiration. Corals also illustrate how "metabolic" effects on skeletal isotopic composition can be estimated, despite the presence of much larger "kinetic" isotope effects. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  8. Modeling stable isotope and organic carbon in hillslope stormflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Marx, Anne; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Votrubova, Jana; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Cislerova, Milena

    2016-04-01

    Reliable prediction of water movement and fluxes of dissolved substances (such as stable isotopes and organic carbon) at both the hillslope and the catchment scales remains a challenge due to complex boundary conditions and soil spatial heterogeneity. In addition, microbially mediated transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are known to affect balance of DOC in soils, hence the transformations need to be included in a conceptual model of a DOC transport. So far, only few studies utilized stable isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing and/or transport models. In this study, stormflow dynamics of oxygen-18 isotope and dissolved organic carbon was analyzed using a physically based modeling approach. One-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model, based on Richards and advection-dispersion equations, was used to simulate the subsurface transport processes in a forest soil during several observed rainfall-runoff episodes. The transport of heat in the soil profile was described by conduction-advection equation. Water flow and transport of solutes and heat were assumed to take place in two mutually communicating porous domains, the soil matrix and the network of preferential pathways. The rate of microbial transformations of DOC was assumed to depend on soil water content and soil temperature. Oxygen-18 and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were observed in soil pore water, hillslope stormflow (collected in the experimental hillslope trench), and stream discharge (at the catchment outlet). The modeling was used to analyze the transformation of input solute signals into output hillslope signals observed in the trench stormflow. Signatures of oxygen-18 isotope in hillslope stormflow as well as isotope concentration in soil pore water were predicted reasonably well. Due to complex nature of microbial transformations, prediction of DOC rate and transport was associated with a high uncertainty.

  9. Oxygen isotope partitioning between phosphate and carbonate in mammalian apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel Bryant, J.; Koch, Paul L.; Froelich, Philip N.; Showers, William J.; Genna, Bernard J.

    1996-12-01

    The oxygen isotope compositions of phosphate and structural carbonate in mammalian enamel and bone apatite are linked to that of body water at constant body temperature near 37°C, but the isotope systematics of oxygen in structural carbonate are not well understood. Using coupled measurements of the oxygen isotope composition of structural carbonate and phosphate from horse tooth enamel, the apparent oxygen isotope fractionation factor between structural carbonate and body water is estimated to be 1.0263 ± 0.0014. These estimates provide a quantitative basis for using the oxygen isotope composition of structural carbonate in mammalian biogenic apatite for ecological, climatological, and physiological reconstruction.

  10. Carbonate Ion Effects on Coccolith Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziveri, P.; Probert, I.; Stoll, H. M.

    2006-12-01

    The stable oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of biogenic calcite constitutes one of the primary tools used in paleoceanographic reconstructions. The δ18O of shells of ocean floor microfossils and corals reflects the composition of the paleo-seawater as they use the oxygen to build up their calcite and aragonite shells. The δ13C is used to reconstruct variations in the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the ocean, which is controlled by biological productivity through the removal of isotopically light carbon in organic matter. To be effective and sensitive tools for understanding photic zone processes it is first necessary to understand the various biological fractionations associated with carbonate precipitation. To date, isotopic fractionation models are mainly based on foraminifera and corals but not on coccoliths, tiny plates produced by coccolithophore algae, which are often the most dominant carbonate contributors to pelagic sediments. As photosynthetic organisms, their chemistry can provide a sensitive tool for understanding photic zone processes. Coccoliths may be the most important carbonate phase for geochemical analysis in sediments where foraminifera are less common and/or core material is limited, such as in subpolar regions and for Early Cenozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Here we report experimental results on a common living coccolithophore species showing that the 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios decrease with the increase of HCO^{3-} (CO32-). The selected species are among the heaviest calcifying extant coccolithophores and are major contributors to present coccolith carbonate export production. Because coccolithophores are photosynthetic organisms that calcify intracellularly in specialized vesicles, the challenge lies in ascertaining how kinetic and thermodynamic processes of isotopic fractionation are linked to cellular carbon "transport" and carbonate precipitation. This is a daunting challenge since studies have not

  11. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, C. H.; Schopf, J. W.; McKeegan, K. D.; Coath, C. D.; Harrison, T. M.; Stetter, K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  12. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils.

    PubMed

    House, C H; Schopf, J W; McKeegan, K D; Coath, C D; Harrison, T M; Stetter, K O

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  13. Lipid Correction for Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Deep-sea Fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lipid extraction is used prior to stable isotope analysis of fish tissues to remove variability in the carbon stable isotope ratio (d13C) caused by varying lipid content among samples. Our objective was to evaluate an application of a mass balance correction for the effect of lip...

  14. Coprecipitation and isotopic fractionation of boron in modern biogenic carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A. Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem ); Chivas, A.R.; McCulloch, M.T. ); Kolodny, Y.; Starinsky, A. )

    1991-10-01

    The abundances and isotopic composition of boron in modern, biogenic calcareous skeletons from the Gulf of Elat, Israel, the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and in deep-sea sediments have been examined by negative thermal-ionization mass spectrometry. The selected species (Foraminifera, Pteropoda, corals, Gastropoda, and Pelecypoda) yield large variations in boron concentration that range from 1 ppm in gastropod shells to 80 ppm in corals. The variations of {delta}{sup 11}B may be controlled by isotopic exchange of boron species in which {sup 10}B is preferentially partitioned into the tetrahedral species, and coprecipitation of different proportions of trigonal and tetrahedral species in the calcium carbonates. The B content and {delta}{sup 11}B values of deep-sea sediments, Foraminifera tests, and corals are used to estimate the global oceanic sink of elemental boron by calcium carbonate deposition. As a result of enrichment of B in corals, a substantially higher biogenic sink of 6.4 {plus minus} 0.9 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr is calculated for carbonates. This is only slightly lower than the sink for desorbable B in marine sediments (10 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr) and approximately half that of altered oceanic crust (14 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr). Thus, carbonates are an important sink for B in the oceans being {approximately}20% of the total sinks. The preferential incorporation of {sup 10}B into calcium carbonate results in oceanic {sup 11}B-enrichment, estimated as 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 {times} 10{sup 12} per mil {center dot} g/yr. The boron-isotope composition of authigenic, well-preserved carbonate skeletons may provide a useful tool to record secular boron-isotope variations in seawater at various times in the geological record.

  15. Tunable Diode Laser Measurements of Leaf-scale Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Ecosystem Respired Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in a Semi-arid Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N.; Chris, B.; Hanson, D.; Kern, S.; Meyer, C.; Pockman, W.; Powers, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present results and speculative interpretation of leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination and ecosystem respired carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from a semi-arid, C3/C4 woodland located in northern New Mexico, USA. Overstory leaf area index (LAI) is dominated by live juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees with an LAI value of approximately 1.0 m2 per m2 ground area, and has a seasonally dynamic understory of mixed C3 forbs and C4 grasses and cacti, with a maximum LAI of 0.30 m2 per m2 ground area. Ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios showed values characteristic of C3 dominated photosynthesis (Keeling plot intercepts of -35 to -22 per mil). Seasonal variation was typical of that found in wetter, C3 dominated forests, as was the dependence on climate (e.g. relationships with vapor pressure deficit, soil water content, and canopy conductance). Leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination of the junipers, measured by coupling a Li-Cor 6400 photosynthesis system to the TDL, provided discrimination-Ci and discrimination-vpd relationships consistent with measured ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration was dependent on rain water isotope composition, but was correlated with soil water content during rain-free periods. The cumulative effect of vapor pressure deficit after a rain event was tightly correlated with the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration, suggesting the primary drivers are evaporative enrichment of soil water and perhaps nocturnal leaf enrichment. Instrument precision for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbon dioxide is 0.06 to 0.18 per mil; however, overall precision is somewhat lower due to pressure and sampling effects.

  16. BOREAS TE-5 Leaf Carbon Isotope Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. This documentation describes leaf carbon isotope data that were collected in 1993 and 1994 at the NSA and SSA OJP sites, the SSA OBS site, and the NSA UBS site. In addition, leaf carbon isotope data were collected in 1994 only at the NSA and SSA OA sites. These data was collected to provide seasonal integrated physiological information for 10 to 15 common species at these 6 BOREAS sites. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  17. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  18. Equations for lipid normalization of carbon stable isotope ratios in aquatic bird eggs.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Kyle H; Davis, Mikaela; Elliott, John E

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios are biogeochemical tracers that can be used to determine the source of nutrients and contaminants in avian eggs. However, the interpretation of stable carbon ratios in lipid-rich eggs is complicated because (13)C is depleted in lipids. Variation in (13)C abundance can therefore be obscured by variation in percent lipids. Past attempts to establish an algebraic equation to correct carbon isotope ratios for lipid content in eggs have been unsuccessful, possibly because they relied partly on data from coastal or migratory species that may obtain egg lipids from different habitats than egg protein. We measured carbon, nitrogen and sulphur stable isotope ratios in 175 eggs from eight species of aquatic birds. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotopes were enriched in lipid-extracted egg samples compared with non extracted egg samples. A logarithmic equation using the C∶N ratio and carbon isotope ratio from the non extracted egg tissue calculated 90% of the lipid-extracted carbon isotope ratios within ±0.5‰. Calculating separate equations for eggs laid by species in different habitats (pelagic, offshore and terrestrial-influenced) improved the fit. A logarithmic equation, rather than a linear equation as often used for muscle, was necessary to accurately correct for lipid content because the relatively high lipid content of eggs compared with muscle meant that a linear relationship did not accurately approximate the relationship between percent lipids and the C∶N ratio. Because lipid extraction alters sulphur and nitrogen isotope ratios (and cannot be corrected algebraically), we suggest that isotopic measurement on bulk tissue followed by algebraic lipid normalization of carbon stable isotope ratio is often a good solution for homogenated eggs, at least when it is not possible to complete separate chemical analyses for each isotope.

  19. Equations for Lipid Normalization of Carbon Stable Isotope Ratios in Aquatic Bird Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Kyle H.; Davis, Mikaela; Elliott, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios are biogeochemical tracers that can be used to determine the source of nutrients and contaminants in avian eggs. However, the interpretation of stable carbon ratios in lipid-rich eggs is complicated because 13C is depleted in lipids. Variation in 13C abundance can therefore be obscured by variation in percent lipids. Past attempts to establish an algebraic equation to correct carbon isotope ratios for lipid content in eggs have been unsuccessful, possibly because they relied partly on data from coastal or migratory species that may obtain egg lipids from different habitats than egg protein. We measured carbon, nitrogen and sulphur stable isotope ratios in 175 eggs from eight species of aquatic birds. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotopes were enriched in lipid-extracted egg samples compared with non extracted egg samples. A logarithmic equation using the C∶N ratio and carbon isotope ratio from the non extracted egg tissue calculated 90% of the lipid-extracted carbon isotope ratios within ±0.5‰. Calculating separate equations for eggs laid by species in different habitats (pelagic, offshore and terrestrial-influenced) improved the fit. A logarithmic equation, rather than a linear equation as often used for muscle, was necessary to accurately correct for lipid content because the relatively high lipid content of eggs compared with muscle meant that a linear relationship did not accurately approximate the relationship between percent lipids and the C∶N ratio. Because lipid extraction alters sulphur and nitrogen isotope ratios (and cannot be corrected algebraically), we suggest that isotopic measurement on bulk tissue followed by algebraic lipid normalization of carbon stable isotope ratio is often a good solution for homogenated eggs, at least when it is not possible to complete separate chemical analyses for each isotope. PMID:24465384

  20. Carbonate clumped isotope bond reordering and geospeedometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Henkes, Gregory A.

    2012-10-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on the preference of 13C and 18O to form bonds with each other. At elevated temperatures such bond ordering is susceptible to resetting by diffusion of C and O through the solid mineral lattice. This type of bond reordering has the potential to obscure primary paleoclimate information, but could also provide a basis for reconstructing shallow crustal temperatures and cooling rates. We determined Arrhenius parameters for solid-state reordering of C-O bonds in two different calcites through a series of laboratory heating experiments. We find that the calcites have different susceptibilities to solid-state reordering. Reaction progress follows a first order rate law in both calcites, but only after an initial period of non-first order reaction that we suggest relates to annealing of nonequilibrium defects when the calcites are first heated to experimental temperature. We show that the apparent equilibrium temperature equations (or "closure temperature" equations) for carbonate clumped isotope reordering are analogous Dodson's equations for first order loss of daughter isotopes. For each calcite, the sensitivity of apparent equilibrium temperature to cooling rate is sufficiently high for inference of cooling rates within a factor of ˜5 or better for cooling rates ranging from tens of degrees per day to a few degrees per million years. However, because the calcites have different susceptibilities to reordering, each calcite defines its own cooling rate-apparent equilibrium temperature relationship. The cooling rates of Carrara marble inferred from carbonate clumped isotope geospeedometry are 10-6-10-3 degrees per annum and are in broad agreement with rates inferred from thermochronometric methods. Cooling rates for 13C-depleted calcites from the late Neoproterozoic Doushantou cap carbonates in south China are on the order of 102-104 degrees per annum, consistent with rapid cooling following formation of these calcites by a

  1. A new method for carbon isotopic analysis of protein

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.E. )

    1991-02-01

    The reaction of ninhydrin with amino acids can be used in carbon isotopic studies of protein. The reaction can be applied to extract as carbon dioxide only peptide-bonded carbon in proteinaceous material, thus avoiding most, if not all, contaminants. Test radiocarbon dates on ancient bone indicate that the method provides reliable ages, and stable carbon isotopic data suggest that our understanding of isotopic dietary reconstruction needs detailed examination. The technique should also be useful in biochemical tracing experiments and in global carbon budget studies, and the underlying principle may be applicable to other isotopes and molecules. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Impact of flood events on lacustrine carbonate isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Lucas; Plessen, Birgit; Lauterbach, Stefan; Nantke, Carla; Meyer, Hanno; Chapligin, Bernhard; Höllerer, Hannes; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    runoff). The effect of these events on mean seasonal δ 18O (0 to +3.5‰) and δ 13C composition (0 to +3.6‰) is closely related to sediment influx and, therewith, to runoff magnitude. However, while the strongest floods could be detected in the sediment record as discrete detrital layers (proximal: 2 events >50 m3 s-1, distal: 1 event >80 m3 s-1), lower magnitude floods (>30 m3 s-1) provide a 'hidden' detrital bias of 0 to 0.5‰. Evidence for detecting even this 'hidden' bias in sediment records is given by the linear relation between detrital carbonate content and the isotopic composition, resulting in a strong cross-correlation between δ 18O and δ 13C for samples containing >5{%} detrital carbonate whereas no relation was observed for purely endogenic samples. Hence, cross-correlation between δ 18O and δ 13C in bulk carbonate samples serves as a reasonable indicator for contamination with detrital carbonates, applicable in sediment records from hydrologically open lakes where evaporative effects on stable isotopes are negligible.

  3. Mg Isotopic Compositions of Modern Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, E.; Bizzarro, M.; Hemming, N.

    2003-12-01

    We have used a MC-ICP-MS to measure the isotopic composition of magnesium in a number of samples of modern marine carbonate. Due to the large mass difference between 26Mg and 24Mg (similar to that between 13C and 12C), there is potential for mass fractionation during geologic and biologic processes that may make this isotope system useful for geochemical studies. These samples are from the study of Hemming and Hanson (1992, GCA 56: 537-543). The carbonate minerals analyzed include aragonite, low-Mg calcite, and high-Mg calcite. The samples include corals, echinoderms, ooids, etc., from subtropical to Antarctic settings. Mg purification was accomplished by ion-exchange chromatography, using Bio-Rad AG50W-X12 resin on which greater than 99 percent recovery of Mg is achieved. Samples were introduced into the MC-ICP-MS (VG Axiom) using a Cetac MCN-6000 nebuliser. We use a standard-sample-standard bracketing technique, and samples are analysed at least three times. For lab standards we find that the reproducibility on the 26Mg/24Mg to be about ñ 0.12 permil (2 s.d.). We monitored our separated samples for Na and Ca, as we have found that high Ca/Mg and Na/Mg produce variable magnesium isotopic fractionation during mass spectrometry due to as yet unclear matrix effects. We have normalized our results to our measured values for seawater. We observed a d26Mg(s.w.) range of -1.4 to -2.4 permil in our modern carbonate samples relative to present day seawater. Due to the long residence time of Mg in the oceans (ca. 50 my), this must be due to kinetic or biologic effects. Our d25Mg(s.w.) variations as a function of d26Mg(s.w.) plot along the terrestrial fractionation trend. With an average d26Mg(s.w.) of ca. +0.5 permil in all samples of mantle lithologies and mantle-derived igneous rocks (Bizzarro et al., Goldschmidt abs., 2003), we can assume that the Mg isotopic composition of Earth's river water lies between ca. -2.4 and +0.5 permil (relative to seawater). The actual

  4. Combined simulation of carbon and water isotopes in a global ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, André; Krandick, Annegret; Gebbie, Jake; Marchal, Olivier; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Losch, Martin; Kurahashi-Nakamura, Takasumi; Tharammal, Thejna

    2013-04-01

    Carbon and water isotopes are included as passive tracers in the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The implementation of the carbon isotopes is based on the existing MITgcm carbon cycle component and involves the fractionation processes during photosynthesis and air-sea gas exchange. Special care is given to the use of a real freshwater flux boundary condition in conjunction with the nonlinear free surface of the ocean model. The isotopic content of precipitation and water vapor is obtained from an atmospheric GCM (the NCAR CAM3) and mapped onto the MITgcm grid system, but the kinetic fractionation during evaporation is treated explicitly in the ocean model. In a number of simulations, we test the sensitivity of the carbon isotope distributions to the formulation of fractionation during photosynthesis and compare the results to modern observations of δ13C and Δ14C from GEOSECS, WOCE and CLIVAR. Similarly, we compare the resulting distribution of oxygen isotopes to modern δ18O data from the NASA GISS Global Seawater Oxygen-18 Database. The overall agreement is good, but there are discrepancies in the carbon isotope composition of the surface water and the oxygen isotope composition of the intermediate and deep waters. The combined simulation of carbon and water isotopes in a global ocean model will provide a framework for studying present and past states of ocean circulation such as postulated from deep-sea sediment records.

  5. Oxygen isotope fractionation in divalent metal carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K.

    1969-01-01

    Equilibrium fractionation factors for the distribution of 18O between alkaline-earth carbonates and water have been measured over the temperature range 0-500??C. The fractionation factors ?? can be represented by the equations CaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.78(106 T-2)-3.39, SrCO3-H 2O, 1000 ln??=2.69(106 T-2)-3.74, BaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.57(106 T -2)-4.73. Measurements on MnCO3, CdCO3, and PbCO3 were made at isolated temperatures. A statistical-mechanical calculation of the isotopic partition function ratios gives reasonably good agreement with experiment. Both cationic size and mass are important in isotopic fractionation, the former predominantly in its effect on the internal vibrations of the anion, the latter in its effect on the lattice vibrations.

  6. [Effects of lipid extraction on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of Ommastrephes bartramii muscle].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Chen, Xin-Jun; Gao, Chun-Xia; Li, Yun-Kai

    2014-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) has become an important tool to investigate diet shift, habitat use and trophic structure of animal population. Muscle is considered to be the most common tissue for SIA, however, lipid content in muscle causes a considerable bias to the interpretation of isotopic ratios of animals. Neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) is an important economic cephalopod of Chinese distant water fishery, and plays a major role in marine ecosystems. In this study, the effects of lipid extraction on stable isotope ratios of the muscles of 53 neon flying squids were investigated and the interference mechanism of lipid in SIA was clarified with the aim of contrasting the suitability of different lipid correction models of stable carbon isotope. Results showed that the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of non-lipid extracted samples significantly increased after lipid extractions by 0.71 per thousand and 0.47 per thousand, respectively, which suggested that lipid extraction in cephalopod isotope study is needed prior to stable carbon isotope analysis but not recommended for stable nitrogen isotope analysis. The results could help remove the effects of lipid contents and standardize SIA muscle samples, thereby getting better understanding of the isotopic change of neon flying squids in the future. PMID:25898636

  7. Effects of environmental and biotic factors on carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of soil organic matter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoan; Jia, Yufu; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle because the CO2 emitted from soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2. Carbon isotopic fractionation occurs during SOM decomposition, which leads to 12C to enrich in the released CO2 while 13C to enrich in the residual SOM. Understanding the isotope fractionation has been demonstrated to be helpful for studying the global carbon cycle. Soil and litter samples were collected from soil profiles at 27 different sites located along a vertical transect from 1200 to 4500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the south-eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Their carbon isotope ratios, C and N concentrations were measured. In addition, fiber and lignin in litter samples were also analyzed. Carbon isotope fractionation factor (α) during SOM decomposition was estimated indirectly as the slope of the relationship between carbon isotope ratios of SOM and soil C concentrations. This study shows that litter quality and soil water play a significant role in isotope fractionation during SOM decomposition, and the carbon isotope fractionation factor, α, increases with litter quality and soil water content. However, we found that temperature had no significant impact on the α variance. PMID:26056012

  8. Effects of environmental and biotic factors on carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoan; Jia, Yufu; Li, Wei

    2015-06-09

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle because the CO2 emitted from soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2. Carbon isotopic fractionation occurs during SOM decomposition, which leads to (12)C to enrich in the released CO2 while (13)C to enrich in the residual SOM. Understanding the isotope fractionation has been demonstrated to be helpful for studying the global carbon cycle. Soil and litter samples were collected from soil profiles at 27 different sites located along a vertical transect from 1200 to 4500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the south-eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Their carbon isotope ratios, C and N concentrations were measured. In addition, fiber and lignin in litter samples were also analyzed. Carbon isotope fractionation factor (α) during SOM decomposition was estimated indirectly as the slope of the relationship between carbon isotope ratios of SOM and soil C concentrations. This study shows that litter quality and soil water play a significant role in isotope fractionation during SOM decomposition, and the carbon isotope fractionation factor, α, increases with litter quality and soil water content. However, we found that temperature had no significant impact on the α variance.

  9. Effects of environmental and biotic factors on carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoan; Jia, Yufu; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle because the CO2 emitted from soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2. Carbon isotopic fractionation occurs during SOM decomposition, which leads to (12)C to enrich in the released CO2 while (13)C to enrich in the residual SOM. Understanding the isotope fractionation has been demonstrated to be helpful for studying the global carbon cycle. Soil and litter samples were collected from soil profiles at 27 different sites located along a vertical transect from 1200 to 4500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the south-eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Their carbon isotope ratios, C and N concentrations were measured. In addition, fiber and lignin in litter samples were also analyzed. Carbon isotope fractionation factor (α) during SOM decomposition was estimated indirectly as the slope of the relationship between carbon isotope ratios of SOM and soil C concentrations. This study shows that litter quality and soil water play a significant role in isotope fractionation during SOM decomposition, and the carbon isotope fractionation factor, α, increases with litter quality and soil water content. However, we found that temperature had no significant impact on the α variance. PMID:26056012

  10. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  11. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J.; Tomkins, Bruce; Janszen, Derek B.; Carman, April J.

    2012-01-03

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  12. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  13. Sensitivity analysis and quantification of uncertainty for isotopic mixing relationships in carbon cycle research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobitz, J. M.; Keener, J. P.; Bowling, D. R.

    2004-12-01

    Quantifying and understanding the uncertainty in isotopic mixing relationships is critical to isotopic applications in carbon cycle studies at all spatial and temporal scales. Studies associated with the North American Carbon Program will depend on stable isotope approaches and quantification of isotopic uncertainty. An important application of isotopic mixing relationships is determination of the isotopic content of large-scale respiration (δ 13CR) via an inverse relationship (a Keeling plot) between atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) and carbon isotope ratios of CO2 (δ 13C). Alternatively, a linear relationship between [CO2] and the product of [CO2] and δ 13C (a Miller/Tans plot) can also be applied. We used an extensive dataset from the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux Site of [CO2] and δ 13C in forest air to examine contrasting approaches to determine δ 13CR and its uncertainty. These included Keeling plots, Miller/Tans plots, Model I, and Model II regressions Our analysis confirms previous observations that increasing the range of measurements ([CO2] range) reduces the uncertainty associated with δ 13CR. For carbon isotope studies, uncertainty in the isotopic measurements has a greater effect on the uncertainty of δ 13CR than the uncertainty in [CO2]. Reducing the uncertainty of isotopic measurements reduces the uncertainty of δ 13CR even when the [CO2] range of samples is small (< 20 ppm). As a result, improvement in isotope (rather than CO2) measuring capability is needed to substantially reduce uncertainty in δ 13CR. We also find for carbon isotope studies no inherent advantage to using either a Keeling or a Miller/Tans approach to determine δ 13CR.

  14. The Oxidant Budget of Dissolved Organic Carbon Driven Isotope Excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, T. F.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope values, falling below the mantle average of about -5 per mil, in carbonate phases of Ediacaran age sedimentary rocks are widely regarded as reflecting negative excursions in the carbon isotopic composition of seawater lasting millions of years. These isotopic signals form the basis of chemostratigraphic correlations between Ediacaran aged sections in different parts of the world, and have been used to track the oxidation of the biosphere. However, these isotopic values are difficult to accommodate within limits prescribed by the current understanding of the carbon cycle, and a hypothetical Precambrian ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool 100 to 1000 times the size of the modern provides a potential source of depleted carbon not considered in Phanerozoic carbon cycle budgets. We present box model results that show the remineralization of such a DOC pool to drive an isotope excursion of the magnitude observed in the geological record exhausts global budgets of free oxygen and sulfate in 800 k.y. These results are incompatible with the estimated duration of late Ediacaran isotope excursions of more than 10 m.y., as well as geochemical and biological indicators that oceanic sulfate and oxygen levels were maintained or even increased at the same time. Therefore the carbon isotope record is probably not a useful tool for monitoring oxygen levels in the atmosphere and ocean. Covariation between the carbon and oxygen isotope records is often observed during negative excursions and is indicative of local processes or diagenetic overprinting.

  15. A carbon isotope mass balance for an anoxic marine sediment: Isotopic signatures of diagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehme, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    A carbon isotope mass balance was determined for the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC to constrain the carbon budgets published previously. The diffusive, ebullitive and burial fluxes of sigma CO2 and CH4, as well as the carbon isotope signatures of these fluxes, were measured. The flux-weighted isotopic signature of the remineralized carbon (-18.9 plus or minus 2.7 per mil) agreed with the isotopic composition of the remineralized organic carbon determined from the particulate organic carbon (POC) delta(C-13) profiles (-19.2 plus or minus 0.2), verifying the flux and isotopic signature estimates. The measured delta(C-13) values of the sigma CO2 and CH4 diffusive fluxes were significantly different from those calculated from porewater gradients. The differences appear to be influenced by methane oxidation at the sediment-water interface, although other potential processes cannot be excluded. The isotope mass balance provides important information concerning the locations of potential diagenetic isotope effects. Specifically, the absence of downcore change in the delta(C-13) value of the POC fraction and the identical isotopic composition of the POC and the products of remineralization indicate that no isotopic fractionation is expressed during the initial breakdown of the POC, despite its isotopically heterogeneous composition.

  16. Unusually high stable carbon isotopic values of methane from low organic carbon Mars analog hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Tazaz, A.; Chanton, J.; Bebout, B.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the Mars rovers’ findings of past hypersaline environments and the discovery of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, we examined methanogenesis in hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur and in the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge in northern California. Methane-rich bubbles were observed to be released from below gypsum/halite crusts in these environments. The stable carbon isotopic composition of these bubbles ranged from about -30 to -40 ‰. Methane with these relatively high isotopic values would typically be considered non-biogenic, however incubations of crust and sediments samples over time resulted in the production of methane. We therefore undertook a series of measurements aimed at understanding the isotopic composition of methane in these environments. The concentrations and isotopic composition of the particulate organic carbon (POC) in these environments were measured. POC content was low (relative to most methane-producing sedimentary environments), generally less than 1%, and always less than 2% of the total mass. The isotopic composition of the POC ranged from -13 to -22 ‰. To determine the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled trimethylamine (TMA), monomethylamine, methanol, acetate and bicarbonate were added to incubation vials and the methane produced was monitored for 13C content. The main substrates used by the methanogens in these hypersaline environments were the non-competitive substrates, the methylamines and methanol. When unlabeled, but isotopically known, TMA was added to incubation vials in varying concentrations, the isotopic composition of the methane produced also varied. Little, if any, difference in the isotopic composition between the TMA and methane occurred at the lowest TMA concentration (10 µM final concentration). The lowest methane δ13C values (and so greatest fractionation between methane and TMA) occurred when the most TMA was added (1000 µM final concentration). This change in the

  17. Transforming Content Knowledge: Learning to Teach about Isotopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddis, Arthur N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents a vignette about Karen, a student teacher in her first attempt at teaching chemical isotopes. Karen focuses on transmitting what she knows. An overview of Schulman's conceptions of pedagogical content knowledge is then provided. Shulman's ideas are employed to frame the experiences of Alan, a student teacher, as he and his cooperating…

  18. Phanerozoic and Neoproterozoic Negative Carbon Isotope Excursions, Diagenesis and Terrestrialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, K.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Comprehensive data sets of Phanerozoic and late Precambrian carbon isotope data derived from carbonate rocks show a similar positive relation when cross-plotted with oxygen isotope values. The range and slope between the time periods is identical and the processes responsible for the relation have been well documented in Quaternary sediments. These processes include the stabilization of isotope values to ambient meteoric water values during shallow burial and flushing of carbonate sediments. Both data sets show strongly depleted carbon (-9 per mil PDB) and oxygen isotope values that retain seemingly systematic stratigraphic patterns with the Quaternary and Phanerozoic examples that demonstrably record meteroric water values. Similar values and patterns in the Precambrian are interpreted as primary marine in origin with significant implications for an ocean carbon mass balance not possible in the Phanerozoic carbon cycle. A similar compilation of carbonates older than one billion years do not show a relation between carbon and oxygen isotopes, lacking the negative carbon values evident in the younger record. We hypothesize that this difference records the onset of significant organic carbon on the land surface and the alteration of meteoric waters toward Phanerozoic values. We demonstrate the meteoric affinities of Neoproterozoic carbonates containing prominent negative isotope excursions recorded in the Shuram and Wonoka Formations of Oman and South Australia commonly attributed to whole ocean isotope variation. The conspicuous absence of negative carbon isotope values with normal marine oxygenisotope values in the Phanerozoic and Neoproterozic identifies a consistent relation between these time intervals and suggests that, as well accepted in the Phanerozoic, negative carbon isotope excursions less than -3 per mil are not a record of marine processes, but rather the later terrestrial biotic influence on meteoric water values.

  19. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes.

    PubMed

    Schoell, M; Schouten, S; Damsté, J S; de Leeuw, J W; Summons, R E

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ((13)C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in (18)O (delta(18)O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes (delta(13)C = 25.4 +/- 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C(35) hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing (13)C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples (delta(13)C = -29.5 to -31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone.

  20. Variable carbon contents of lunar soil 74220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Moore, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Total carbon, sulfur, and inorganic gas release studies have been carried out on an additional split of orange soil 74220. The total carbon content was found to be 4 plus or minus 3 ppm C for this sample as compared to an earlier reported value of 100 plus or minus 10 ppm C. Gas release studies on the two splits of 74220 indicate that the carbon may be present as a surface condensate on the sample showing the higher carbon content. The 'surface condensate' evolves CO2 upon heating to temperatures below 400 C.

  1. Global simulation of the carbon isotope exchange of terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Terao, Y.; Mukai, H.

    2009-12-01

    There remain large uncertainties in our quantification of global carbon cycle, which has close interactions with the climate system and is subject to human-induced global environmental change. Information on carbon isotopes is expected to reduce the uncertainty by providing additional constraints on net atmosphere-ecosystem exchange. This study attempted to simulate the dynamics of carbon isotopes at the global scale, using a process-based terrestrial ecosystem model: Vegetation Integrative SImulator for Trace gases (VISIT). The base-model of carbon cycle (Sim-CYCLE, Ito 2003) has already considered stable carbon isotope composition (13C/12C), and here radioactive carbon isotope (14C) was included. The isotope ratios characterize various aspects of terrestrial carbon cycle, which is difficult to be constrained by sole mass balance. For example, isotopic discrimination by photosynthetic assimilation is closely related with leaf stomatal conductance and composition of C3 and C4 plant in grasslands. Isotopic disequilibrium represents mean residence time of terrestrial carbon pools. In this study, global simulations (spatial resolution 0.5-deg, time-step 1-month) were conducted during the period 1901 to 2100 on the basis of observed and projected atmospheric CO2, climate, and land-use conditions. As anthropogenic CO2 accumulates in the atmosphere, heavier stable carbon isotope (13C) was diluted, while radioactive carbon isotope (14C) is strongly affected by atomic bomb experiments mainly in the 1950s and 1960s. The model simulated the decadal change in carbon isotope compositions. Leaf carbon with shorter mean residence time responded rapidly to the atmospheric change, while plant stems and soil humus showed substantial time-lag, leading to large isotopic disequilibrium. In the future, the isotopic disequilibrium was estimated to augment, due to accelerated rate of anthropogenic CO2 accumulation. Spatial distribution of stable isotope composition (12C/13C, or d13C) was

  2. Syntheses with stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Methods, techniques, ideas, information, and references to prepare compounds labeled with stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are presented, which can be used in selecting or devising synthetic schemes. By studying and comparing methods that other investigators have applied to problems in isotopic labeling, the task of deciding on suitable syntheses for incorporating isotopes into various other compounds can be considerably simplified. The major portion of the book is devoted to synthetic procedures that have been used for preparation of specific labeled compounds. The descriptions are often given in sufficient detail that they can be applied or modified without necessity for recourse to the original literature. Methods can be compared, feasibility for extensions to other isotope isomers or to related compounds can be assessed, and requirements for apparatus, materials, time, effort, and skills can be evaluated. Additional methods and speculations are presented for a number of other compounds whose syntheses are not given in detail. A few biosynthetic preparations, which afford specific products in good isotopic yield, are described; certain other applications of biological methods are considered briefly. Arrangement of the procedures into chapters according to functional groups is somewhat arbitrary; that is, not all preparations of carboxylic acids will be found in the chapter dealing with acids and derivatives; certain alcohols appear as components in multistep syntheses in the chapter on hydrocarbons; some compounds could just as well have been placed elsewhere; and so on. Thus it is important to use the index. Following the introductory chapter, the contents of this book are as follows: (1) acids, anhydrides, amids, esters, and nitriles; (2) aldehydes and ketones; (3) alcohols, ethers, and phenols; (4) amines, and hydrocarbons; (5) heterocyclic compounds; and (6) other compounds.

  3. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs

  4. Mass transfer and carbon isotope evolution in natural water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Plummer, L.N.; Pearson, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical treatment of the evolution of the carbon isotopes C13 and C14 in natural waters and in precipitates which derive from such waters. The effects of an arbitrary number of sources (such as dissolution of carbonate minerals and oxidation of organic material) and sinks (such as mineral precipitation, CO2 degassing and production of methane), and of equilibrium fractionation between solid, gas and aqueous phases are considered. The results are expressed as equations relating changes in isotopic composition to changes in conventional carbonate chemistry. One implication of the equations is that the isotopic composition of an aqueous phase may approach a limiting value whenever there are simultaneous inputs and outputs of carbonate. In order to unambiguously interpret isotopic data from carbonate precipitates and identify reactants and products in reacting natural waters, it is essential that isotopic changes are determined chiefly by reactant and product stoichiometry, independent of reaction path. We demonstrate that this is so by means of quantitative examples. The evolution equations are applied to: 1. (1) carbon-14 dating of groundwaters; 2. (2) interpretation of the isotopic composition of carbonate precipitates, carbonate cements and diagenetically altered carbonates; and 3. (3) the identification of chemical reaction stoichiometry. These applications are illustrated by examples which show the variation of ??C13 in solutions and in precipitates formed under a variety of conditions involving incongruent dissolution, CO2 degassing, methane production and mineral precipitation. ?? 1978.

  5. Intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid in vinegar.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Ryota; Yamada, Keita; Kikuchi, Makiko; Hirano, Satoshi; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2011-09-14

    Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of acetic acid is useful for origin discrimination and quality control of vinegar. Intramolecular carbon isotope distributions, which are each carbon isotope ratios of the methyl and carboxyl carbons in the acetic acid molecule, may be required to obtain more detailed information to discriminate such origin. In this study, improved gas chromatography-pyrolysis-gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-Py-GC-C-IRMS) combined with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was used to measure the intramolecular carbon isotope distributions of acetic acid in 14 Japanese vinegars. The results demonstrated that the methyl carbons of acetic acid molecules in vinegars produced from plants were mostly isotopically depleted in (13)C relative to the carboxyl carbon. Moreover, isotopic differences (δ(13)C(carboxyl) - δ(13)C(methyl)) had a wide range from -0.3 to 18.2‰, and these values differed among botanical origins, C3, C4, and CAM plants.

  6. Linking carbon isotopes and carbon-water exchange of plants across different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibt, U.; Rajabi, A.; Griffiths, H.; Berry, J.

    2007-12-01

    The anthropogenic rise in atmospheric CO2 levels may lead to increased photosynthetic uptake while transpiration rates remain constant or are reduced. Changes in plant regulation of carbon uptake and water loss also affect the carbon isotope signatures of plant material. But environmental conditions may change in addition to CO2. The resulting combination of factors can have different effects on the carbon-water balance of plants, and their carbon isotope signatures. For example, changes in evaporative demand alter the ratio of total carbon gain to water loss of a plant, the parameter of interest from the point of view of the atmosphere. Isotope values, on the other hand, also reflect physiological properties, including C:N allocation to carboxylation and internal conductance. Here, we explore how these factors shape carbon isotope signatures as well as carbon and water fluxes from leaf to ecosystem levels, and across diurnal to decadal timescales. We present new data to illustrate that a correlation between carbon isotope signatures and carbon-water exchange at the leaf level may not be passed on to the whole plant level. We then use a simple coupled model to analyse the relationships between carbon-water fluxes and isotope values. The model calculates gas exchange and carbon isotope signatures at the leaf level (for comparison with leaf samples), and propagates both gas exchange and isotope values to long- term trends in carbon-water exchange and carbon isotope signatures at the canopy scale (for comparison with samples of annual resolution). This approach is useful for exploring the sensitivity of carbon isotope ratios and carbon-water exchange of plants to simultaneous changes in external and internal factors, for example when interpreting trends in carbon isotope signatures obtained from tree rings.

  7. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium carbonate minerals produced by reaction of H2O-CO2 with ultramafic rocks occur in a wide range of paragenetic and tectonic settings and can thus provide insights into a variety of geologic processes, including (1) deposition of ore-grade, massive-vein cryptocrystalline magnesite; (2) formation of hydrous magnesium carbonates in weathering environments; and (3) metamorphic carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks. However, the application of traditional geochemical and isotopic methods to infer temperatures of mineralization, the nature of mineralizing fluids, and the mechanisms controlling the transformation of dissolved CO2 into magnesium carbonates in these settings is difficult because the fluids are usually not preserved. Clumped-isotope compositions of magnesium carbonates provide a means to determine primary mineralization or (re)equilibration temperature, which permits the reconstruction of geologic processes that govern magnesium carbonate formation. We first provide an evaluation of the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates using synthetic magnesite and hydromagnesite, along with natural metamorphic magnesite and low-temperature hydromagnesite precipitated within a mine adit. We show that the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates is virtually indistinguishable from other carbonate acid fractionation corrections given current mass spectrometer resolution and error. In addition, we employ carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry on natural magnesium carbonates from various geologic environments and tectonic settings. Cryptocrystalline magnesite vein deposits from California (Red Mountain magnesite mine), Austria (Kraubath locality), Turkey (Tutluca mine, Eskişehir district) and Iran (Derakht-Senjed deposit) exhibit broadly uniform Δ47 compositions that yield apparent clumped-isotope temperatures that average 23.7 ± 5.0 °C. Based on oxygen isotope thermometry, these clumped-isotope temperatures suggest

  8. Determination of carbon isotopic measurement conditions for ceramide in skin using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Keita; Miyashita, Rumiko; Aida, Kazuhiko; Ohnishi, Masao; Gilbert, Alexis; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    The ceramide (Cer) content of skin and glucosylceramide (GlcCer) intake affect skin moisture conditions, but their mutual relation in skin remains unclear. For clarification of that mutual relation, carbon stable isotopes ((12)C and (13)C) are useful as a tracer. However, carbon isotopic measurement has not been applied to the study of clarifying their skin moisturizing effects. Therefore, we used gas chromatography / combustion / isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to ascertain the appropriate conditions for carbon isotopic measurements using synthesized Cer (SCer) in substitution for very low concentrations of Cer in skin. SCer was derivatized to trimethylsilylated SCer (TMS-SCer) quantitatively using N-trimethylsilylimidazole (TMSI) depending on the amount of SCer. The derivatization rates were 75-85%. Excess TMSI was removed using three cycles of hexane-water distribution. Under these conditions, carbon isotopic measurements of TMS-SCer conducted using GC-C-IRMS showed high repeatability and good inter-day variation (S.D. < 0.3‰). The carbon stable isotope ratio value (δ(13)C) of SCer calculated using a mass balance equation was compared with δ(13)C of underivatized SCer, which was regarded as the actual δ(13)C of SCer obtained using sealed tube combustion method. The difference between the calculated δ(13)C of SCer and δ(13)C of the underivatized SCer depended on the TMSI reagent supplier and on the number of hydroxyl groups to be derivatized in SCer. For accurate δ(13)C of Cer in skin using GC-C-IRMS, the measured δ(13)C of a target TMS-Cer must be calculated using a correction factor representing the difference in δ(13)C of underivatized standard SCer from that of TMS-standard SCer having a structure resembling that of the target Cer in skin. In addition, we show that the same lot of TMSI reagent from a specific supplier must be used throughout the experiments.

  9. Fractionation of carbon isotopes by phytoplankton and estimates of ancient CO2 levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of the 13C content of marine particulate organic carbon are compiled and on the basis of GEOSECS data and temperatures, concentrations, and isotopic compositions of dissolved CO2 in the waters in which the related phytoplankton grew are estimated. In this way, the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthetic fixation of CO2 is found to be significantly correlated with concentrations of dissolved CO2. Because ancient carbon isotopic fractionations have been determined from analyses of sedimentary porphyrins [Popp et al., 1989], the relationship between isotopic fractionation and concentrations of dissolved CO2 developed here can be employed to estimate concentrations of CO2 dissolved in ancient oceans and, in turn, partial pressures of CO2 in ancient atmospheres. The calculations take into account the temperature dependence of chemical and isotopic equilibria in the dissolved-inorganic-carbon system and of air-sea equilibria. Paleoenvironmental temperatures for each sample are estimated from reconstructions of paleogeography, latitudinal temperature gradients, and secular changes in low-latitude sea surface temperature. It is estimated that atmospheric partial pressures of CO2 were over 1000 micro atm 160 - 100 Ma ago, then declined to values near 300 micro atm during the next 100 Ma. Analysis of a high-resolution record of carbon isotopic fractionation at the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary suggests that the partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere was drawn down from values near 840 micro atm to values near 700 micro atm during the anoxic event.

  10. An isotopic study of biogeochemical relationships between carbonates and organic carbon in the Greenhorn Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Popp, Brian N.; Takigiku, Ray; Johnson, Marcus W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of total carbonate, inoceramid carbonate, micritic carbonate, secondary cements, total organic carbon, and geoporphyrins have been measured in 76 different beds within a 17-m interval of a core through the Greenhorn Formation, an interbedded limestone and calcareous shale unit of Cretaceous age from the Western Interior Seaway of North America. Results are considered in terms of variations in the processes of primary production and in secondary processes. It is shown that the porphyrin isotopic record reflects primary isotopic variations more closely than the TOC isotopic record and that, in these sediments, TOC is enriched in C-13 relative to its primary precursor by 0.6 to 2.8 percent. This enrichment is attributed to isotope effects within the consumer foodweb and is associated with respiratory heterotrophy. Variation in this secondary enrichment are correlated with variations in the isotopic composition of marine carbonate.

  11. Tracing the source of Beijing soil organic carbon: a carbon isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingjun; Strauss, Harald; Chen, Tong-Bin; Zhu, Guangxu; Yang, Jun; Yang, Junxing; Lei, Mei; Zhou, Xiaoyong; Peters, Marc; Xie, Yunfeng; Zhang, Hanzhi; Wei, Rongfei; Wang, Chunyu

    2013-05-01

    Bulk soil organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition characterize its sources and fate, identify the anthropogenic input of organic carbon into the soil, and trace soil carbon turnover. Coal and/or coal combustion products represent the prime anthropogenic input of organic carbon into three soil profiles located in the vicinity of a steel company. Three profiles positioned away from any direct industrial contribution display vertical pattern in soil organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition that resemble more commonly observed downward gradients in soil carbon chemistry and indicate microbial soil carbon turnover. Two additional profiles located outside of the immediate industrial area display vertical carbon isotope profiles between typical of those from industrial and non-industrial areas. Eight soil profiles and their vertical distribution of bulk organic carbon isotopic composition and concentration collected in the Beijing area reveal and distinguish both anthropogenic and natural contributions of carbon to these soils.

  12. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  13. Zinc isotope evidence for a large-scale carbonated mantle beneath eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wang, Ze-Zhou; Li, Shu-Guang; Huang, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A large set of zinc (Zn) stable isotope data for continental basalts from eastern China were reported to investigate the application of Zn isotopes as a new tracer of deep carbonate cycling. All of the basalts with ages of <110 Ma have systematically heavy δ66Zn (relative to JMC 3-0749L) ranging from 0.30‰ to 0.63‰ (n = 44) compared to the mantle (0.28 ± 0.05‰; 2sd) and >120 Ma basalts from eastern China (0.27 ± 0.06‰; 2sd). Given that Zn isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation is limited (≤0.1‰), the elevated δ66Zn values reflect the involvement of isotopically heavy crustal materials (e.g., carbonates with an average δ66Zn of ∼0.91‰) in the mantle sources. SiO2 contents of the <110 Ma basalts negatively correlate with parameters that are sensitive to the degree of partial melting (e.g., Sm/Yb, Nb/Y, [Nb]) and with the concentration of Zn, which also behaves incompatibly during mantle melting. This is inconsistent with a volatile-poor peridotite source and instead suggests partial melting of carbonated peridotites which, at lower degree of melting, generates more Si-depleted (and more Ca-rich) melts. Zinc isotopic compositions are positively correlated with Sm/Yb, Nb/Y, [Nb] and [Zn], indicating that melts produced by lower degrees of melting have heavier Zn isotopic compositions. Carbonated peridotites have a lower solidus than volatile-poor peridotites and therefore at lower melting extents, contribute more to the melts, which will have heavier Zn isotopic compositions. Together with the positive relationships of δ66Zn with CaO and CaO/Al2O3, we propose that the heavy Zn isotopic compositions of the <110 Ma basalts were generated by incongruent partial melting of carbonated peridotites. Combined with previously reported Mg and Sr isotope data, we suggest that the large-scale Zn isotope anomaly indicates the widespread presence of recycled Mg (Zn)-rich carbonates in the mantle beneath eastern China since the Late Mesozoic

  14. Bromine and carbon isotope effects during photolysis of brominated phenols.

    PubMed

    Zakon, Yevgeni; Halicz, Ludwik; Gelman, Faina

    2013-12-17

    In the present study, carbon and bromine isotope effects during UV-photodegradation of bromophenols in aqueous and ethanolic solutions were determined. An anomalous relatively high inverse bromine isotope fractionation (εreactive position up to +5.1‰) along with normal carbon isotope effect (εreactive position of -12.6‰ to -23.4‰) observed in our study may be attributed to coexistence of both mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope fractionation of C-Br bond cleavage. Isotope effects of a similar scale were observed for all the studied reactions in ethanol, and for 4-bromophenol in aqueous solution. This may point out related radical mechanism for these processes. The lack of any carbon and bromine isotope effects during photodegradation of 2-bromophenol in aqueous solution possibly indicates that C-Br bond cleavage is not a rate-limiting step in the reaction. The bromine isotope fractionation, without any detectable carbon isotope effect, that was observed for 3-bromophenol photolysis in aqueous solution probably originates from mass-independent fractionation.

  15. Origin of petroporphyrins. 2. Evidence from stable carbon isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, C. J.; Fookes, C. J.; Popp, B. N.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Compared with the carbon-13 isotopic composition of the ubiquitous C32DPEP (DPEP, deoxophylloerythroetioporphyrin) the heavy but equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for the porphyrin structures 15(2)-methyl-15,17-ethano-17-nor-H-C30DPEP and 15,17-butano-, 13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propano-, and 13(1)-methyl-13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propanoporphyrin suggests a common precursor, presumably chlorophyll c, for these petroporphyrins isolated from the marine Julia Creek oil shale and the lacustrine Condor oil shale. Similarly, the heavy but variable carbon-13 isotopic composition of 7-nor-H-C31DPEP compared with C32DPEP is consistent with an origin from both chlorophyll b and chlorophyll c3. The equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for 13(2)-methyl-C33DPEP compared with C32DPEP suggests a common origin resulting from a weighted average of chlorophyll inputs.

  16. BIODEGRADATION OF FLUORANTHENE AS MONITORED USING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement of stable isotope ratios of carbon (d13C values) was investigated as a viable technique to monitor the intrinsic bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biometer-flask experiments were conducted in which the bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis,...

  17. Study of neutron rich carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Electric quadrupole (E2) matrix elements are important quantities in nuclear structure. In particular they are sensitive to nuclear deformation, the decoupling of proton and neutron degrees of freedom, and are often affected by small components of the nuclear wave function. Neutron-rich carbon isotopes have attracted a great deal of attention recently, both experimentally and theoretically, with regards to the question of spatially extended (halo-like) and decoupled valence neutrons. For example, 19C and the drip-line nucleus 22C are proposed to have ground-state neutron halo structures. Electric quadrupole transition rates in 16C 18C and 20C are among the lowest found throughout the nuclear chart and this fact has been cited by some as evidence for a reduced coupling between the valence neutrons and the core nucleons. In this talk I will present the results from our experiments to measure the transition rates in 16,18,20C and discuss the evidence for a ``decoupling'' of valence neutrons from the core that goes beyond the usual shell model approach. Data will be compared to shell model and no-core (ab-initio) shell model calculations with NN and NN+NNN interactions.

  18. Isotopic fractionation of alkali earth metals during carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yotsuya, T.; Ohno, T.; Muramatsu, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Goto, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The alkaline earth metals such as magnesium, calcium and strontium play an important role in a variety of geochemical and biological processes. The element ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in marine carbonates have been used as proxies for reconstruction of the past environment. Recently several studies suggested that the study for the isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals in marine carbonates has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields (e.g. Eisenhauer et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to explore the influence of carbonate polymorphs (Calcite and Aragonite) and environmental factors (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) on the level of isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals. We also examined possible correlations between the level of isotopic fractionation of Ca and that of other alkaline earth metals during carbonate precipitation. In order to determine the isotope fractionation factor of Mg, Ca and Sr during carbonate precipitation, calcite and aragonite were synthesized from calcium bicarbonate solution in which the amount of magnesium was controlled based on Kitano method. Calcium carbonates were also prepared from the mixture of calcium chlorite and sodium hydrogen carbonate solutions. The isotope fractionation factors were measured by MC-ICPMS. Results suggested that the level of isotopic fractionation of Mg during carbonate precipitation was correlated with that of Sr and that the change of the carbonate crystal structure could make differences of isotopic fractionations of Mg and Ca, however no difference was found in the case of Sr. In this presentation, the possible mechanism will be discussed.

  19. Carbonate minerals, oxygen and carbon isotopes in modern temperate bryozoa, eastern Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, C.

    1993-12-01

    X-ray analysis of cool temperate bryozoa from eastern shelf carbonates indicates the occurrence of a spectrum of low-Mg calcite to high-Mg calcite with variable amounts of aragonite. Bryozoa contain variable amounts of CaCO 3 cements. In bryozoa δ18O values increase and δ13C values decrease with increasing aragonite content probably due to the occurrence of vaterite. Aragonite contents decrease with decreasing water temperatures as established by oxygen isotope thermometry. Tasmanian bryozoa may be enriched in δ18O up to 0.7‰ due to aragonite and high Mg-calcite contents. δ13C values of bryozoa composed of pure calcite are similar to those of associated brachiopods. δ18O and δ13C values of bryozoa are unaffected by kinetic and metabolic effects. The isotopic field of temperate bryozoa differs from tropical carbonates by having heavier δ18O ( 1.3‰ ± 0.5) and lighter δ13C ( 1.8‰ ± 0.8) values than bulk tropical carbonates. The bryozoa are in equilibrium with upwelling deep seawater and surface subantarctic water and therefore intersect seafloor diagenesis and upwelling water trend lines. Mol% MgCO 3 content ranges from 2 to 11 in calcite and corresponds to 5-14°C water temperatures. The δ18O values of bryozoa give a range of temperatures from 7° to 13°C, slightly less than the 4-15°C obtained from δ18O of Tasmanian brachiopods. This discrepancy is probably due to either minor biochemical fractionation or to bryozoa being in equilibrium with warmer waters.

  20. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The heavy isotopic anomalies observed recently in the fractionation and unknown nuclear inclusions from the Allende meteorite are explained by neutron reactions during the explosive carbon burning (ECB). This model produces heavy anomalies in the same zone where Al-26 and O-16 are produced, thus reducing the number of source zones required for the isotopic anomalies. Unlike the classical r-process, the ECB n-process avoids the problem with the Sr anomaly and may resolve the problem of conflicting time scales between Al-26 and the r-process isotopes I-129 and Pu-244. Experimental studies of Zr and Ce isotopic composition are proposed to test this model.

  1. Controls on ostracod valve geochemistry: Part 2. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decrouy, Laurent; Vennemann, Torsten Walter; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of fossil ostracods are powerful tools to estimate past environmental and climatic conditions. The basis for such interpretations is that the calcite of the valves reflects the isotopic composition of water and its temperature of formation. However, calcite of ostracods is known not to form in isotopic equilibrium with water and different species may have different offsets from inorganic precipitates of calcite formed under the same conditions. To estimate the fractionation during ostracod valve calcification, the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of 15 species living in Lake Geneva were related to their autoecology and the environmental parameters measured during their growth. The results indicate that: (1) Oxygen isotope fractionation is similar for all species of Candoninae with an enrichment in 18O of more than 3‰ relative to equilibrium values for inorganic calcite. Oxygen isotope fractionation for Cytheroidea is less discriminative relative to the heavy oxygen, with enrichments in 18O for these species of 1.7 to 2.3‰. Oxygen isotope fractionations for Cyprididae are in-between those of Candoninae and Cytheroidea. The difference in oxygen isotope fractionation between ostracods and inorganic calcite has been interpreted as resulting from a vital effect. (2) Comparison with previous work suggests that oxygen isotope fractionation may depend on the total and relative ion content of water. (3) Carbon isotope compositions of ostracod valves are generally in equilibrium with DIC. The specimens' δ 13C values are mainly controlled by seasonal variations in δ 13C DIC of bottom water or variation thereof in sediment pore water. (4) Incomplete valve calcification has an effect on carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of ostracod valves. Preferential incorporation of CO32- at the beginning of valve calcification may explain this effect. (5) Results presented here as well as results from synthetic carbonate

  2. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in vertical peat profiles of natural and drained boreal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Rissanen, Antti; Pitkänen, Aki; Turunen, Jukka; Simola, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands form a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Change in peat hydrology, due to global warming is projected to change microbiological processes and peat carbon pool. We tested if bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes serve as indicators of severe long term drying in peatlands drained for forestry. Depth profile analysis of peat, for their carbon and nitrogen content as well as their carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signatures, were conducted for peatlands in southern and eastern Finland, having ombrotrophic and minerotrophic natural and corresponding drained pairs or separate drained sites. The selection of sites allowed us to compare changes due to different fertility and changes due to long term artificial drying. Drainage lasting over 40 years has led to changes in hydrology, vegetation, nutrient mineralization and respiration. Furthermore, increased nutrient uptake and possible recycling of peat nitrogen and carbon trough vegetation back to the peat surface, also possibly has an effect on the stable isotopic composition of peat carbon and nitrogen. We think that drainage induced changes somehow correspond to those caused by changed hydrology due to climate change. We will present data from these measurements and discuss their implications for carbon and nitrogen flows in peatlands.

  3. [Carbon isotope fractionation inplants]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  4. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, Edward D.

    1982-01-01

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

  5. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltmann, Tim; Mandic, Magda; Stöbener, Nils; Wapelhorst, Eric; Aepfler, Rebecca; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Taubner, Heidi; Jost, Hj; Elvert, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  6. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, H. J. H.; Stoltmann, T.; Stöbener, N.; Wapelhorst, E.; Mandic, M.; Aepfler, R.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Taubner, H.; Elvert, M.

    2015-12-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  7. Variability of carbonate diagenesis in equatorial Pacific sediments deduced from radiogenic and stable Sr isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Janett; Hathorne, Ed C.; Frank, Martin; Vollstaedt, Hauke; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The recrystallisation (dissolution-precipitation) of carbonate sediments has been successfully modelled to explain profiles of pore water Sr concentration and radiogenic Sr isotope composition at different locations of the global ocean. However, there have been few systematic studies trying to better understand the relative importance of factors influencing the variability of carbonate recrystallisation. Here we present results from a multi-component study of recrystallisation in sediments from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 320/321 Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT), where sediments of similar initial composition have been subjected to different diagenetic histories. The PEAT sites investigated exhibit variable pore water Sr concentrations gradients with the largest gradients in the youngest sites. Radiogenic Sr isotopes suggest recrystallisation was relative rapid, consistent with modelling of other sediment columns, as the 87Sr/86Sr ratios are indistinguishable (within 2σ uncertainties) from contemporaneous seawater 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Bulk carbonate leachates and associated pore waters of Site U1336 have lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios than contemporaneous seawater in sediments older than 20.2 Ma most likely resulting from the upward diffusion of Sr from older recrystallised carbonates. It seems that recrystallisation at Site U1336 may still be on-going at depths below 102.5 rmcd (revised metres composite depth) suggesting a late phase of recrystallisation. Furthermore, the lower Sr/Ca ratios of bulk carbonates of Site U1336 compared to the other PEAT sites suggest more extensive diagenetic alteration as less Sr is incorporated into secondary calcite. Compared to the other PEAT sites, U1336 has an inferred greater thermal gradient and a higher carbonate content. The enhanced thermal gradient seems to have made these sediments more reactive and enhanced recrystallisation. In this study we investigate stable Sr isotopes from carbonate-rich deep

  8. Isotopic Composition of Organic and Inorganic Carbon in Desert Biological Soil Crust Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Hartnett, H.; Anbar, A.; Beraldi, H.; Garcia-Pichel, F.

    2006-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are microbial communities that colonize soil surfaces in many arid regions. BSCs are important sources for fixed carbon and nitrogen in these ecosystems, and they greatly influence the structure, function, and appearance of desert soils. Biological activity of BSCs occurs during pulses of hydration requiring desert crusts to tolerate extremes in UV radiation, temperature, and desiccation. These characteristics make desert crusts unique systems that have received little consideration in the study of biogeochemical processes in extreme environments. This project investigates the impact of BSCs on carbon dynamics within desert soils. Soil cores ranging in depth from 8 to 12 cm were taken in March, 2006 from deserts near Moab, Utah. Two major BSC classes were identified: lichen-dominated (dark and pinnacled) soil crusts and cyanobacteria-dominated (light and flat) soil crusts. These two surface morphologies are related to the different biological communities. Carbon content and stable carbon isotopic composition were determined for the bulk carbon pool, as well as for the organic and inorganic carbon fractions of the soils. Expectedly, there was a net decrease in organic carbon content with depth (0.39-0.27 percent). Stable carbon isotope values for the organic fraction ranged from -5.8 per mil to -24.0 per mil (Avg: -14.4 per mil, S.D: 6.42 per mil). Stable carbon isotope values for the inorganic fraction ranged from 0.3 per mil to -3.6 per mil (Avg: -2.4 per mil, S.D.: 1.05 per mil). The variation in the isotopic composition of the organic carbon was due to a strong depletion below the surface soil value occurring between 3 and 5 cm depth, with an enrichment above the original surface value at depths below 6 to 10 cm. These data suggest that within desert soil crust systems the carbon isotopic signal is complex with both a clear biological imprint (lighter organic carbon) as well as evidence for some mechanism that results in

  9. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  10. Isotopic Approach to Soil Carbonate Dynamics and Implications for Paleoclimatic Interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendall, E.G.; Harden, J.W.; Trumbore, S.E.; Chadwick, O.A.

    1994-01-01

    The radiocarbon content and stable isotope composition of soil carbonate are best described by a dynamic system in which isotopic reequilibration occurs as a result of recurrent dissolution and reprecipitation. Depth of water penetration into the soil profile, as well as soil age, determines the degree of carbonate isotope reequilibration. We measured ??13C, ??18O and radiocarbon content of gravel rinds and fine (<2 mm) carbonate in soils of 3 .different ages (1000, 3800, and 6300 14 C yr B.P.) to assess the degree to which they record and preserve a climatic signal. In soils developing in deposits independently dated at 3800 and 6300 radiocarbon yr B.P., carbonate radiocarbon content above 40 cm depth suggests continual dissolution and reprecipitation, presumably due to frequent wetting events. Between 40 and 90 cm depth, fine carbonate is dissolved and precipitated as rinds that are not redissolved subsequently. Below 90 cm depth in these soils, radiocarbon content indicates that inherited, fine carbonate undergoes little dissolution and reprecipitation. In the 3800- and 6300-yr-old soils, ??13C in rind and fine carbonate follows a decreasing trend with depth, apparently in equilibrium with modern soil gas, as predicted by a diffusive model for soil CO2. ??18O also decreases with depth due to greater evaporative enrichment above 50 cm depth. In contrast, carbonate isotopes in a 1000-yr-old deposit do not reflect modern conditions even in surficial horizons; this soil has not undergone significant pedogenesis. There appears to be a lag of at least 1000 but less than 3800 yr before carbonate inherited with parent material is modified by ambient climatic conditions. Although small amounts of carbonate are inherited with the parent material, the rate of pedogenic carbonate accumulation indicates that Ca is derived primarily from eolian and rainfall sources. A model describing carbonate input and radiocarbon decay suggests that fine carbonate below 90 cm is mostly

  11. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoell, M. ); Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste', J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de ); Summons, R.E. )

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ([sup 13]C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in [sup 18]O ([delta][sup 18]O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes ([delta][sup 13]C = 25.4 [+-] 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C[sub 35] hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing [sup 13]C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples ([delta][sup 13]C = 29.5 to [minus]31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone.

  12. Cr isotopic composition of modern carbonates and seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, P.; Parkinson, I. J.; James, R. H.; Fehr, M.; Connelly, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    Recent development in MC-ICP-MS instrumentation, coupled with double-spike techniques has led to the improvement of stable Cr isotopes measurements and allows the determination of Cr isotopes in low concentration samples such as carbonates and seawater. Cr is a redox sensitive element and its isotopes are fractionated during the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) [1]. Chromium isotopic variations in BIFs have been linked to the redox conditions of ancient oceans[2]. However, in order to understand Cr isotopic fractionation in the past it is important to constrain the Cr isotopic composition of modern seawater. Chromium concentrations in seawater are between 2 and 5nM, and therefore the measurement of stable Cr isotopes in seawater is an analytical challenge. We have developed a new technique to measure Cr isotopes in seawater based on the Cr co-precipitation with Fe[3], the chemical purification of Cr using an anion exchange chromatography and analyses using the double-spike technique with a ThermoFisher Neptune MC-ICP-MS. Using this method, seawater samples from the Argentinean Basin and from Southampton Water (UK) have been analysed, which have Cr concentrations of ~6nM of Cr. Chromium isotopic composition of our seawater samples is consistently heavier than continental crust and mantle values (δ53Cr -0.18‰)[4] with δ53Cr values of ~+0.5‰. We have also measured Cr isotopic compositions in ooids from the Bahamas Banks, which represent chemical precipitates from modern seawater. These also record consistently heavy δ53Cr values (0.6-0.8‰), which overlap the range of modern seawater. We conclude that heavy δ53Cr in seawater reflect either redox cycling of Cr in the oceans[3] or fractionation during the weathering of the continental crust. Moreover, Cr isotopes in modern carbonates are not significantly offset from seawater and therefore, these carbonates reflect the Cr composition of seawater. Thus, Cr isotopes in carbonates can be used to reconstruct the Cr

  13. Concentrations and isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in ocean-floor basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakai, H.; Marais, D.J.D.; Ueda, A.; Moore, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Fresh submarine basalt glasses from Galapagos Ridge, FAMOUS area, Cayman Trough and Kilauea east rift contain 22 to 160 ppm carbon and 0.3 to 2.8 ppm nitrogen, respectively, as the sums of dissolved species and vesicle-filling gases (CO2 and N2). The large range of variation in carbon content is due to combined effect of depth-dependency of the solubility of carbon in basalt melt and varying extents of vapour loss during magma emplacement as well as in sample crushing. The isotopic ratios of indigenous carbon and nitrogen are in very narrow ranges,-6.2 ?? 0.2% relative to PDB and +0.2 ?? 0.6 %. relative to atmospheric nitrogen, respectively. In basalt samples from Juan de Fuca Ridge, however, isotopically light carbon (??13C = around -24%.) predominates over the indigenous carbon; no indigenous heavy carbon was found. Except for Galapagos Ridge samples, these ocean-floor basalts contain 670 to 1100 ppm sulfur, averaging 810 ppm, in the form of both sulfide and sulfate, whereas basalts from Galapagos Ridge are higher in both sulfur (1490 and 1570 ppm) and iron (11.08% total iron as FeO). The ??34S values average +0.3 ?? 0.5%. with average fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide of +7.4 ?? 1.6%.. The sulfate/sulfide ratios tend to increase with increasing water content of basalt, probably because the oxygen fugacity increases with increasing water content in basalt melt. ?? 1984.

  14. Carbon dioxide in the Paleozoic atmosphere: Evidence from carbon-isotope compositions of pedogenic carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Claudia I.; Driese, Steven G.; Seager, Paula G.

    1991-10-01

    Stable carbon-isotope compositions of pedogenic carbonate occurring in three clay-rich vertic paleosols within Paleozoic red-bed successions in central Pennsylvania provide a record of past pedogenic environments and can be used to estimate CO2 pressure (PCO2) of the Paleozoic atmosphere. The δ13C values of carbonate nodules from paleosols in the deltaic lower Bloomsburg Formation (Upper Silurian) reflect the contribution of carbon from marine groundwater or fossils, coupled with low biological activity. The δ13C values of carbonate rhizocretions from stratigraphically high paleosols in the Bloomsburg Formation, and in the alluvial Catskill (Upper Devonian) and Mauch Chunk (Upper Mississippian) Formations, suggest an extensive C3 flora and significant contribution of atmospheric CO2. Paleozoic atmospheric CO2 levels inferred from δ13C of pedogenic carbonate are significantly higher than present levels.

  15. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.; Gleason, J.D.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a ??D from -580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a ??D of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO2 is 290 to 418 ppm with S 13C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and ??18O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO2 carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, ??18C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H2O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon (??13C = -17.6 per mil). The 18O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100?? to 1300??C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  16. Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and its relationship to the carbon isotope signals of stem, soil and ecosystem respiration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingate, L.; Ogée, J.; Burlett, R.; Bosc, A.; Devaux, M.; Grace, J.; Loustau, D.; Gessler, A.

    2010-12-01

    Photosynthetic carbon (C) isotope discrimination labels photosynthates (δA) and atmospheric CO2 (δa) with variable C isotope compositions during fluctuating environmental conditions. In this context, the C isotope composition of respired CO2 within ecosystems is often hypothesized to vary temporally with photosynthetic discrimination. We investigated the relationship between photosynthetic discrimination and the C isotope signals from stem (δW), soil (δS) and ecosystem (δE) respired CO2 to environmental fluctuations, using novel tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer instrumentation in a mature maritime pine forest. Broad seasonal changes in photosynthetic discrimination were reflected in δW, δS and δE. However, respired CO2 signals had smaller short-term variations than photosynthetic discrimination and were offset and delayed by 2-10 d, indicating fractionation and isotopic mixing in a large C pool. Variations in δS did not follow photosynthetic discrimination at all times, especially during rainy periods and when there is a strong demand for C allocation above ground. It is likely that future isotope-enabled vegetation models will need to develop transfer functions that can account for these phenomena in order to interpret and predict the isotopic impact of biosphere gas exchange on the C isotope composition of atmospheric CO2. L. Wingate, J. Ogée, R. Burlett, A. Bosc, M. Devaux, J. Grace, D. Loustau and A. Gessler. Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and its relationship to the carbon isotope signals of stem, soil and ecosystem respiration. New Phytologist, doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03384.x

  17. Does burial diagenesis reset pristine isotopic compositions in paleosol carbonates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, M. K.; Sarkar, A.; Tandon, S. K.; Samanta, A.; Sanyal, P.

    2010-11-01

    Sedimentological study of early Oligocene continental carbonates from the fluvial Dagshai Formation of the Himalayan foreland basin, India resulted in the recognition of four different types namely, soil, palustrine, pedogenically modified palustrine and groundwater carbonates. Stable oxygen and carbon isotopic ( δ18O and δ13C) analyses of fabric selective carbonate microsamples show that although the pristine isotopic compositions are largely altered during deep-burial diagenesis, complete isotopic homogenization does not occur. δ18O and δ13C analyses of ~ 200 calcrete and palustrine carbonates from different stratigraphic horizons and comparison with δ18O of more robust bioapatite (fossil vertebrate tooth) phase show that dense micrites (~ > 70% carbonate) invariably preserve the pristine δ18O value (mean) of ~ - 9.8‰, while altered carbonates show much lower δ18O value ~ - 13.8‰. Such inhomogeneity causes large intra-sample and intra-soil profile variability as high as > 5‰, suggesting that soils behave like a closed system where diagenetic overprinting occurs in local domains. A simple fluid-rock interaction model suggests active participation of clay minerals to enhance the effect of fluid-rock ratio in local domains during diagenesis. This places an upper limit of 70% micrite concentration above which the effect of diagenetic alteration is minimal. Careful sampling of dense micritic part of the soil carbonate nodules, therefore, does provide pristine isotopic composition and it is inappropriate, as proposed recently, to reject the paleoclimatic potential of all paleosol carbonates affected by burial diagenesis. Based on pristine δ13C value of - 8.8 ± 0.2‰ in soil carbonates an atmospheric CO 2 concentration between ~ 764 and ~ 306 ppmv is estimated for the early Oligocene (~ 31 Ma) Dagshai time. These data show excellent agreement between two independent proxy records (viz. soil carbonate and marine alkenone) and support early Oligocene

  18. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient aromatic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, Anna; Huang, Lin; Saccon, Marina; Rudolph, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere were made in Toronto (Canada) in 2009 and 2010. Consistent with the kinetic isotope effect for reactions of aromatic VOC with the OH radical the observed stable carbon isotope ratios are on average significantly heavier than the isotope ratios of their emissions. The change of carbon isotope ratio between emission and observation is used to determine the extent of photochemical processing (photochemical age, [OH]dt) of the different VOC. It is found that [OH]dt of different VOC depends strongly on the VOC reactivity. This demonstrates that for this set of observations the assumption of a uniform [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity is not justified and that the observed values for [OH]dt are the result of mixing of VOC from air masses with different values for [OH]dt. Based on comparison between carbon isotope ratios and VOC concentration ratios it is also found that the varying influence of sources with different VOC emission ratios has a larger impact on VOC concentration ratios than photochemical processing. It is concluded that for this data set the use of VOC concentration ratios to determine [OH]dt would result in values for [OH]dt inconsistent with carbon isotope ratios and that the concept of a uniform [OH]dt for an air mass has to be replaced by the concept of individual values of an average [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity.

  19. Seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of biogenic methane in a coastal sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.; Green, C. D.; Blair, N. E.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Systematic seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of methane gas occur in the anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, a lagoonal basin on North Carolina's Outer Banks. Values for the carbon isotope ratio of methane range from -57.3 per mil during summer to -68.5 per mil during winter in gas bubbles with an average methane content of 95 percent. The variations are hypothesized to result from changes in the pathways of microbial methane production and cycling of key substrates including acetate and hydrogen. The use of stable isotopic signatures to investigate the global methane cycle through mass balance calculations, involving various sediment and soil biogenic sources, appears to require seasonally averaged data from individual sites.

  20. Seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of biogenic methane in a coastal sediment.

    PubMed

    Martens, C S; Blair, N E; Green, C D; Des Marais, D J

    1986-09-19

    Systematic seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of methane gas occur in the anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, a lagoonal basin on North Carolina's Outer Banks. Values for the carbon isotope ratio (delta 13C) of methane range from -57.3 per mil during summer to -68.5 per mil during winter in gas bubbles with an average methane content of 95%. The variations are hypothesized to result from changes in the pathways of microbial methane production and cycling of key substrates including acetate and hydrogen. The use of stable isotopic signatures to investigate the global methane cycle through mass balance calculations, involving various sediment and soil biogenic sources, appears to require seasonally averaged data from individual sites.

  1. Chromium Isotopes in Marine Carbonates - an Indicator for Climatic Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.

    2010-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes experience an increased interest as a tracer of Cr (VI) reduction in groundwater and thus showed their potential as a monitor of remediation of anthropogenic and natural contamination in water (Berna et al., 2009; Izbicki et al., 2008). Chromium stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments (BIFs and Fe-cherts) have recently also been used as a tracer for Earth's atmospheric oxygenation through time (Frei et al., 2009). We have applied the Cr isotope system to organic-rich carbonates from a late Ediacaran succession in Uruguay (Polanco Formation), from which we have previously analyzed BIFs with extremely fractionated (δ53Cr up to 5.0 ‰) Cr isotope signatures that are part of an underlying deep water clastic sediment (shale-dominated) sequence (Yerbal Formation) deposited in a glacio-marine environment (Gaucher et al.,2004). δ53Cr values of organic rich carbonates correlate with positive and negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13C PDB between -3 and +3 ‰) and with systematic changes in strontium isotope compositions, commonly interpreted as to reflect fluctuations in organic (photosynthetic algae) production related to fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen and weathering intensities, respectively. Slightly positively fractioned δ53Cr values (up to +0.25‰), paralleling positive (δ13C PDB and 87Sr/86Sr ratio excursions would thereby trace elevated atmospheric oxygen levels/pulses possibly related to glacier retreat/melting stages that caused bioproductivity to increase. While the causal link between these multiple isotopic tracers and the mechanisms of Cr stripping into carbonates has to be further investigated in detail, the first indications from this study point to a potentially promising use of stable Cr isotopes in organic-rich carbonates to monitor fluctuations of atmospheric oxygen, particularly over the Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic ice age periods. E.C. Berna et al. (2010) Cr stable isotopes as indicators of Cr

  2. Temperature Dependence of Carbon Isotope Fractionation in CAM Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Deleens, Eliane; Treichel, Isabel; O'Leary, Marion H.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17°C nights, 23°C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is −4‰ (that is, malate is enriched in 13C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0‰ at 27°C/33°C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. PMID:16664371

  3. Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P. L.; Downing, J. A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2014-05-01

    The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFA) were studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The δ13C of different PLFA were used as proxy for phytoplankton producers and bacterial consumers. Lake pCO2 was primarily determined by autochthonous production (phytoplankton biomass), especially in eutrophic lakes, and governed the δ13C of DIC. All organic-carbon pools showed larger isotopic variability in eutrophic lakes compared to oligo-mesotrophic lakes because of the high variability in δ13C at the base of the food web (both autochthonous and allochthonous carbon). Phytoplankton δ13C was negatively related to lake pCO2 over all lakes and positively related to phytoplankton biomass in eutrophic lakes, which was also reflected in a large range in photosynthetic isotope fractionation (ϵCO2-phyto, 8-25 ‰). The carbon isotope ratio of allochthonous carbon in oligo-mesotrophic lakes was rather constant, while it varied in eutrophic lakes because of maize cultivation in the watershed.

  4. Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P. L.; Downing, J. A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFAs) was studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The δ13C of different PLFAs were used as proxy for phytoplankton producers and bacterial consumers. Lake pCO2 was primarily determined by autochthonous production (phytoplankton biomass), especially in eutrophic lakes, and governed the δ13C of DIC. All organic-carbon pools showed overall higher isotopic variability in eutrophic lakes (n = 11) compared to oligo-mesotrophic lakes (n = 11) because of the high variability in δ13C at the base of the food web (both autochthonous and allochthonous carbon). Phytoplankton δ13C was negatively related to lake pCO2 over all lakes and positively related to phytoplankton biomass in eutrophic lakes, which was also reflected in a large range in photosynthetic isotope fractionation (ϵCO2-phyto, 8-25‰). The carbon isotope ratio of allochthonous carbon in oligo-mesotrophic lakes was rather constant, while it varied in eutrophic lakes because of maize cultivation in the watershed.

  5. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility that the newly discovered correlated isotopic anomalies for heavy elements in the Allende meteorite were synthesized in the secondary neutron capture episode during the explosive carbon burning, the possible source of the O-16 and Al-26 anomalies, is examined. Explosive carbon burning calculations under typical conditions were first performed to generate time profiles of temperature, density, and free particle concentrations. These quantities were inputted into a general neutron capture code which calculates the resulting isotopic pattern from exposing the preexisting heavy seed nuclei to these free particles during the explosive carbon burning conditions. The interpretation avoids the problem of the Sr isotopic data and may resolve the conflict between the time scales inferred from 1-129, Pu-244, and Al-26.

  6. Measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons and halocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuiderweg, A. T.

    2012-09-01

    behavior of these compounds in terms of their sources, sinks, inter- and intramolecular processes, it was decided in 2006 to develop an instrument capable of selectively measuring NMHC mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios for use in the laboratory of the Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry Group at Universiteit Utrecht. This thesis documents the successful development, construction, testing and first applications of this stable carbon isotope ratio instrument. It is divided into five chapters, representing the content of three publications and additional material: an introduction; a method section; and applications: analysis of NMHC stable carbon isotopes in urban ambient air, laboratory measurments of the isotope effects in UV degradation of monocarbon chlorofluorocarbons, isotope analysis of diverse gases from firn air samples from Greenland, plus a section on future perspectives

  7. Mesozoic black shales, source mixing and carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suan, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, considerable attention has been devoted to the paleoenvironmental and biogeochemical significance of Mesozoic black shales. Black shale-bearing successions indeed often display marked changes in the organic carbon isotope composition (δ13Corg), which have been commonly interpreted as evidence for dramatic perturbations of global carbon budgets and CO2 levels. Arguably the majority of these studies have discarded some more "local" explanations when interpreting δ13Corg profiles, most often because comparable profiles occur on geographically large and distant areas. Based on newly acquired data and selected examples from the literature, I will show that the changing contribution of organic components with distinct δ13C signatures exerts a major but overlooked influence of Mesozoic δ13Corg profiles. Such a bias occurs across a wide spectrum of sedimentological settings and ages, as shown by the good correlation between δ13Corg values and proxies of kerogen proportions (such as rock-eval, biomarker, palynofacies and palynological data) recorded in Mesozoic marginal to deep marine successions of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous age. In most of these successions, labile, 12C-enriched amorphous organic matter of marine origin dominates strata deposited under anoxic conditions, while oxidation-resistant, 13C-rich terrestrial particles dominate strata deposited under well-oxygenated conditions. This influence is further illustrated by weathering profiles of Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) black shales from France, where weathered areas dominated by refractory organic matter show dramatic 13C-enrichment (and decreased total organic carbon and pyrite contents) compared to non-weathered portions of the same horizon. The implications of these results for chemostratigraphic correlations and pCO2 reconstructions of Mesozoic will be discussed, as well as strategies to overcome this major bias.

  8. Constraining paleotemperature and water isotope signals at Lake Bonneville using carbonate clumped isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mering, J. A.; Oviatt, C. G.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Canet, J.; Tripati, A.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Bonneville was the largest pluvial system in the Great Basin during the Last Glacial Maximum (23-19 ka BP), reaching nearly 50,000 square kilometers at its high stand. Carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometry provides a new avenue to evaluate lake and atmospheric conditions by constraining the temperature and oxygen isotope ratios of lake water. Here, we present estimates of lake temperature, the oxygen isotope composition of paleowater, and Mean Annual Air Temperature (MAAT) from LGM paleoshoreline sites in Utah and Eastern Nevada. Multiple phases of ancient carbonate were evaluated, including endogenic carbonate from the ubiquitous Bonneville marl stratigraphic unit, and aragonitic shells of two species of aquatic gastropods (genera Pyrgulopsis and Stagnicola) collected from littoral deposits adjacent to the marl. These phases should record surface water conditions. Preliminary results indicate that paleotemperature estimates from gastropods and marl are similar at any given site. However, the latitudinal water isotope gradient reconstructed using marls is steeper than that reconstructed from gastropods, indicating that perhaps carbonate precipitation in marl is more evaporation-driven than shell growth of aquatic snails. Comparison with recent climate data, and clumped isotope measurements of modern samples from the Great Salt Lake, supports moderate temperature change in the Great Basin from the Last Glacial Maximum to present.

  9. The clumped isotopic record of Neoproterozoic carbonates, Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, K. D.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Osburn, M. R.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Huqf Supergroup of the Sultanate of Oman records several important events in latest Precambrian time, including two glaciations in the Abu Mahara Group (ca. 725 - <645 Ma), the enigmatic Shuram carbon isotope excursion in the Nafun Group (ca. <645-547 Ma), and the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary in the Ara Group (ca. 547-540 Ma). This interval contains several extreme isotopic excursions, hypothesized to record perturbations of the surficial Earth carbon cycle or post-depositional diagenetic processes. Rigorous interpretation of these records requires a more thorough assessment of diagenetic processes. To better understand the significance and cause of these large amplitude isotopic excursions, we employed carbonate clumped isotope thermometry. This method allows us to estimate the absolute temperature of carbonate precipitation, including recrystallization, based on the temperature dependent abundance of carbonate ions containing both 13C and 18O. These estimates are accompanied by a measurement of carbonate δ18O, which in conjunction with temperature, can be used to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the fluid from which the carbonate precipitated. We analyzed stratigraphically constrained samples from a range of paleoenvironments with differing burial histories (1 - >10km maximum burial depth) to constrain the temperature and fluid composition of recrystallization. Clumped isotope temperatures from Huqf Supergroup samples range from 35-175°C. The isotopic composition of the fluid these rocks equilibrated with ranges from -3.7 to 15.7% VSMOW. This large range in temperature and fluid composition separates into distinct populations that differ systematically with independent constraints on petrography, stratigraphy and burial history. The data indicate the Abu Mahara, Nafun and Ara groups have unique diagenetic histories. In central Oman, the post-glacial Abu Mahara cap dolostone shows high temperature, rock buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 176°C; δ18

  10. BOREAS TE-5 Tree Ring and Carbon Isotope Ratio Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected several data sets to investigate the vegetation-atmosphere CO2 and H2O exchange processes. These data include tree ring widths and cellulose carbon isotope data from coniferous trees collected at the BOREAS NSA and SSA in 1993 and 1994 by the BOREAS TE-5 team. Ring width data are provided for both Picea mariana and Pinus banksiana. The carbon isotope data are provided only for Pinus banksiana. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  11. Development of a Field-Deployable Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Feng; Baer, Douglas

    2010-05-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, whose atmospheric surface mixing ratio has almost doubled compared with preindustrial values. Methane can be produced by biogenic processes, thermogenic processes or biomass, with different isotopic signatures. As a key molecule involved in the radiative forcing in the atmosphere, methane is thus one of the most important molecules linking the biosphere and atmosphere. Therefore precise measurements of mixing ratios and isotopic compositions will help scientists to better understand methane sources and sinks. To date, high precision isotope measurements have been exclusively performed with conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which involves intensive labor and is not readily field deployable. Optical studies using infrared laser spectroscopy have also been reported to measure the isotopic ratios. However, the precision of optical-based analyses, to date, is typically unsatisfactory without pre-concentration procedures. We present characterization of the performance of a portable Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer (MCIA), based on cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy technique, that provides in-situ measurements of the carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C or del_13C) and methane mixing ratio (CH4). The sample is introduced to the analyzer directly without any requirement for pretreatment or preconcentration. A typical precision of less than 1 per mill (< 0.1%) with a 10-ppm methane sample can be achieved in a measurement time of less than 100 seconds. The MCIA can report carbon isotope ratio and concentration measurements over a very wide range of methane concentrations. Results of laboratory tests and field measurements will be presented.

  12. Magnesium isotopic compositions of the Mesoproterozoic dolostones: Implications for Mg isotopic systematics of marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kang-Jun; Shen, Bing; Lang, Xian-Guo; Tang, Wen-Bo; Peng, Yang; Ke, Shan; Kaufman, Alan J.; Ma, Hao-Ran; Li, Fang-Bing

    2015-09-01

    Available Mg isotope data indicate that dolostones of different ages have overlapping range of Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) and there is no systematic difference among different types of dolomites. To further explore the Mg isotopic systematics of dolomite formation, we measured Mg isotopic compositions of Mesoproterozoic dolostones from the Wumishan Formation in North China Block, because dolomite formation in Mesoproterozoic might have been fundamentally different from the younger counterparts. Based on petrographic observations, three texturally-different dolomite phases (dolomicrite, subhedral dolomite and anhedral dolomite) are recognized in the Wumishan dolostones. Nevertheless, these three types of dolomites have similar δ26Mg values, ranging from -1.35‰ to -1.72‰, which are indistinguishable from Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic dolostones. To explain δ26Mg values of dolostones, we simulate the Mg isotopic system during dolomite formation by applying the one-dimensional Diffusion-Advection-Reaction (1D-DAR) model, assuming that the contemporaneous seawater is the Mg source of dolostone. The 1D-DAR modeling results indicate that the degree of dolomitization is controlled by sedimentation rate, seawater Mg concentration, temperature, and reaction rate of dolomite formation, whereas Mg isotopic composition of dolostone is not only dependent on these factors, but also affected by δ26Mg of seawater and isotope fractionation during dolomite formation. Moreover, the 1D-DAR model predicts that dolomite formation within sediments has limited range of variation in δ26Mg with respect to limestones. Furthermore, the modeling results demonstrate that dolostone is always isotopically heavier than Ca-carbonate precipitated from seawater, explaining the systematic isotopic difference between dolostones and limestones. Finally, we can infer from the 1D-DAR model that early-formed dolostone at shallower depth of sediments is always isotopically lighter than that

  13. Carbon Isotope Fractionation In Biotic Vs. Abiotic Anaerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrehiwet, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are thought to play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of Fe, and nutrient elements such as C and P, in the anaerobic subsurface. The consumption of organic carbon sources (including contaminants) by these bacteria can significantly fractionate substrate C isotopes, however the effects of solution composition, electron acceptor, or electron donor on C isotopic fractionation by DMRB is at present poorly quantified. We have conducted experiments to compare the effects of bicarbonate (δ13C = -3‰) and phosphate buffers on carbon isotope fractionation by Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200R. The effects of dissolved carbonate and phosphate on δ13C values of dissolved inorganic C evolved during microbial reduction of ferric citrate (δ 13Cinitial = -25‰) were examined using sodium lactate (δ13Cinitial = -25‰) as electron donor under strict anaerobic conditions at neutral pH and 30°C, under dark and (fluorescent) light conditions. Our results suggest that bicarbonate may enhance the rate of Fe(III) reduction by S. putrefaciens, in comparison with media containing phosphate buffer but no added bicarbonate. Compared with phosphate buffered experiments, the presence of dissolved bicarbonate also resulted in a greater degree of C isotopic fractionation (ɛ=2-3‰ and ɛ=5-7‰, respectively). The effect of light on microbial Fe(III) reduction was negligible, however sterile controls showed a minor but significant quantity of carbon dioxide production in liquid media, most likely from photochemical decomposition of citrate. The abiotic experiments also showed measurable carbon isotope fractionation between the carbon dioxide produced and the organic carbon substrate which will be discussed.

  14. Soil organic carbon assessments in cropping systems using isotopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín De Dios Herrero, Juan; Cruz Colazo, Juan; Guzman, María Laura; Saenz, Claudio; Sager, Ricardo; Sakadevan, Karuppan

    2016-04-01

    Introduction of improved farming practices are important to address the challenges of agricultural production, food security, climate change and resource use efficiency. The integration of livestock with crops provides many benefits including: (1) resource conservation, (2) ecosystem services, (3) soil quality improvements, and (4) risk reduction through diversification of enterprises. Integrated crop livestock systems (ICLS) with the combination of no-tillage and pastures are useful practices to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) compared with continuous cropping systems (CCS). In this study, the SOC and its fractions in two cropping systems namely (1) ICLS, and (2) CCS were evaluated in Southern Santa Fe Province in Argentina, and the use of delta carbon-13 technique and soil physical fractionation were evaluated to identify sources of SOC in these systems. Two farms inside the same soil cartographic unit and landscape position in the region were compared. The ICLS farm produces lucerne (Medicago sativa Merrill) and oat (Avena sativa L.) grazed by cattle alternatively with grain summer crops sequence of soybean (Glicine max L.) and corn (Zea mays L.), and the farm under continuous cropping system (CCS) produces soybean and corn in a continuous sequence. The soil in the area is predominantly a Typic Hapludoll. Soil samples from 0-5 and 0-20 cm depths (n=4) after the harvest of grain crops were collected in each system and analyzed for total organic carbon (SOC, 0-2000 μm), particulate organic carbon (POC, 50-100 μm) and mineral organic carbon (MOC, <50 μm). Delta carbon-13 was determined by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. In addition, a site with natural vegetation (reference site, REF) was also sampled for delta carbon-13 determination. ANOVA and Tukey statistical analysis were carried out for all data. The SOC was higher in ICLS than in CCS at both depths (20.8 vs 17.7 g kg-1 for 0-5 cm and 16.1 vs 12.7 g kg-1 at 0-20 cm, respectively, P<0.05). MOC was

  15. Parallel trends in organic and inorganic carbon isotopes across the Permian/Triassic boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Magaritz, M. ); Krishnamurthy, R.V. ); Holser, W.T. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY )

    1992-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios in both inorganic and organic reservoirs have been widely applied to model environmental and sedimentological changes on a global scale. Most studies dealing with major extinction events have used the record of inorganic carbon. In this paper the authors report the relation between shifts in carbon-13 content of organic matter and coexisting carbonate fractions at a major extinction event, the Permian/Triassic boundary. They found that both [delta][sup 13]C[sub carb] and [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] of the surface ocean varied dramatically across the boundary, but the fractionation [Delta][sup 13]C between organic matter and carbonate remained constant. This result appreciably restricts the interpretation of changes in the carbon cycle during this critical interval. The new data are best explained by a combination of two mechanisms for variation in [delta][sup 13]C[sub carb]: (1) burial and erosion of organic carbon, with a long time constant; and (2) sequestration of organic carbon into shallow and deep oceanic reservoirs, with a shorter time constant. For application to their case, the first mechanism is limited by possible buildup of marine pCO[sub 2], which would increase the isotopic fractionation factor. The second mechanism is limited in application to short-term transient variations in [delta][sup 13]C. Modeling of the carbon cycle and its variations of [delta][sup 13]C must take both mechanisms into account.

  16. CARBON ISOTOPE DISCRIMINATION AND GROWTH RESPONSE TO STAND DENSITY REDUCTIONS IN OLD PINUS PONDEROSA TREES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon isotope ratios ( 13C) of tree rings are commonly used for paleoclimatic reconstruction and for inferring canopy water-use efficiency (WUE). However, the responsiveness of carbon isotope discrimination ( ) to site disturbance and resource availability has only rarely been ...

  17. Behaviour of Structural Carbonate Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Compositions in Bioapatite During Burning of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, L. E.; Longstaffe, F. J.; White, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Bioapatite, the principal inorganic phase comprising bone, commonly contains a small fraction of carbonate, which has been substituted into the phosphate structure during bone formation. The isotopic compositions of both the phosphate oxygen and the structural carbonate oxygen are now commonly used in palaeoclimatological and bioarchaeological investigations. The potential for post-mortem alteration of these isotopic compositions, therefore, is of interest, with the behaviour of structural carbonate being of most concern. In bioarchaeological studies, alteration of bone isotopic compositions has the potential to occur not only during low-temperature processes associated with burial but also during food preparation involving heating (burning, boiling). Here, we examine the stable isotopic behaviour of structural carbonate oxygen and carbon, and coexisting phosphate oxygen during the burning of bone. Freshly deceased (6<8 months) white-tailed deer leg bones (Odocoileus virginianus) were collected from Pinery Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Each long bone was sectioned and incrementally heated from 25 to 900° C, in 25° intervals. The samples were then ground to a standardized grain-size (45<63μ m), and changes in bioapatite crystallinity (CI) were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). Combined differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TG) were used to evaluate weight loss and associated reactions during heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of the bioapatite remain relatively constant (+/-1‰ ) during heating to 650° C. A 4‰ increase in stable carbon isotopic composition then occurs between 650-750° C, accompanied by an increase in CI, followed by a 10‰ decline at temperatures above 800° C, as carbonate carbon is lost. Carbonate and phosphate oxygen isotopic compositions are correlated over the entire heating range, with carbonate being enriched relative to phosphate by

  18. The carbon isotopic compositions of individual compounds from ancient and modern depositional environments

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, K.H.

    1991-01-01

    This work examines factors influencing the isotopic compositions of individual compounds and, consequently, that of preserved sedimentary organic matter. Specifically, isotope effects associated with reactions resulting in the production and degradation of organic matter in the water column and reactions affecting preservation during diagenesis are considered in three projects. The first documents the preservation of the isotopic compositions of hydrocarbons altered by diagenetic reaction. Isotopic compositions of structurally-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the Messel Shale show little variation with increased unsaturation. The influence of environmental conditions on the isotopic composition of sedimentary organic carbon is documented by a comparison of the {delta}{sup 13}C of hydrocarbons in the marine Julia Creek Oil Shale and the lacustrine Condor Oil Shale. A model is proposed for identifying relative degrees of oxygenation and productivity within a paleoenvironment based on the observed {sup 13}C contents of biomarkers. Effects of processes proposed in the environmental model are documented by an examination of hydrocarbons from the waters and sediments of the Black Sea and of the Cariaco Trench. Sources of individual compounds are identified by comparison of their {sup 13}C content with that predicted for autotrophic biomass calculated from the concentration and {sup 13}C content of CO{sub 2}(aq) in the surface waters.

  19. Evolution of carbon isotopes, agglutinates, and the lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D. J.; Basu, A.; Hayes, J. M.; Meinschein, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    Apollo 17 light-mantle soils and Apollo 15 Apennine Front soils are compared with respect to isotopic enrichment of C-13 and the maturity of the site. Analyses of soil-size fractions indicate that while the carbon concentration on particle surfaces remains relatively constant with increasing soil maturity, total surface-correlated carbon increases due to increasing total soil surface area. The role of agglutinates in the incorporation of surface-correlated carbon into aggregate grains is examined; agglutinates contain a major percentage of the carbon found in mature soil, and the volume-correlated carbon component in agglutinates apparently continues to increase after the surface-correlated carbon concentrations have reached a constant value. Constraints that may limit the carbon concentration in lunar soils to a value not greater than 300 micrograms/g are considered.

  20. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in precambrian rocks.

    PubMed

    Oehler, D Z; Schopf, J W; Kvenvolden, K A

    1972-03-17

    Reduced carbon in early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa is isotopically similar (the average value of delta(13)C(PDB) is -28.7 per mil) to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts (Theespruit formation) is anomalously heavy (the average value of delta(13)C(PDB) is -16.5 per mil). This discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  1. Carbon Reservoir History of Mars Constrained by Atmospheric Isotope Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Kass, D. M.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Yung, Y. L.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere on Mars is one of the most intriguing problems in the exploration of the Solar System, and the climate of Mars may have evolved from a warmer, wetter early state to the cold, dry current state. Because CO2 is the major constituent of Mars's atmosphere, its isotopic signatures offer a unique window to trace the evolution of climate on Mars. Here we use a box model to trace the evolution of the carbon reservoir and its isotopic signature on Mars, with carbonate deposition and atmospheric escape as the two sinks and magmatic activity as the sole source. We derive new quantitative constraints on the amount of carbonate deposition and the atmospheric pressure of Mars through time, extending into the Noachian, ~3.8 Gyr before present. This determination is based on recent Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) isotopic measurements of Mars's atmosphere, recent orbiter, lander, and rover measurements of Mars's surface, and a newly identified mechanism (photodissociation of CO) that efficiently enriches the heavy carbon isotope. In particular, we find that escape via CO photodissociation on Mars has a fractionation factor of 0.6 and hence, photochemical escape processes can effectively enrich 13C in the Mars's atmosphere during the Amazonian. As a result, modest carbonate deposition must have occurred early in Mars's history to compensate the enrichment effects of photochemical processes and also sputtering, even when volcanic outgassing up to 200 mbar occurred during the Hesperian. For a photochemical escape flux that scales as the square of the solar EUV flux or more, at least 0.1 bar of CO2 must have been deposited as carbonates in the Noachian and Hesperian. More carbonate deposition would be required if carbonate deposition only occurred in the Noachian or with low fractionation factors.

  2. Carbon Reservoir History of Mars Constrained by Atmospheric Isotope Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Renyu; Kass, David M.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Yung, Yuk

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere on Mars is one of the most intriguing problems in the exploration of the Solar System, and the climate of Mars may have evolved from a warmer, wetter early state to the cold, dry current state. Because CO2 is the major constituent of Mars’s atmosphere, its isotopic signatures offer a unique window to trace the evolution of climate on Mars. Here we use a box model to trace the evolution of the carbon reservoir and its iso-topic signature on Mars, with carbonate deposition and atmospheric escape as the two sinks and magmatic activity as the sole source. We derive new quantitative constraints on the amount of carbonate deposition and the atmospher-ic pressure of Mars through time, extending into the Noachian, ~3.8 Gyr before present. This determination is based on recent Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) isotopic measurements of Mars’s atmosphere, recent orbiter, lander, and rover measurements of Mars’s surface, and a newly identified mechanism (photodissociation of CO) that efficiently enriches the heavy carbon isotope. In particular, we find that escape via CO photodissociation on Mars has a frac-tionation factor of 0.6 and hence, photochemical escape processes can effectively enrich 13C in the Mars’s atmos-phere during the Amazonian. As a result, modest carbonate deposition must have occurred early in Mars’s history to compensate the enrichment effects of photochemical processes and also sputtering, even when volcanic outgassing up to 200 mbar occurred during the Hesperian. For a photochemical escape flux that scales as the square of the solar EUV flux or more, at least 0.1 bar of CO2 must have been deposited as carbonates in the Noachian and Hesperian. More carbonate deposition would be required if carbonate deposition only occurred in the Noachian or with low fractionation factors.

  3. New Carbonate Standard Reference Materials for Boron Isotope Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Christopher, S. J.; Day, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of boron (δ11B) in marine carbonates is well established as a proxy for past ocean pH. Yet, before palaeoceanographic interpretation can be made, rigorous assessment of analytical uncertainty of δ11B data is required; particularly in light of recent interlaboratory comparison studies that reported significant measurement disagreement between laboratories [1]. Well characterised boron standard reference materials (SRMs) in a carbonate matrix are needed to assess the accuracy and precision of carbonate δ11B measurements throughout the entire procedural chemistry; from sample cleaning, to ionic separation of boron from the carbonate matrix, and final δ11B measurement by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To date only two carbonate reference materials exist that have been value-assigned by the boron isotope measurement community [2]; JCp-1 (porites coral) and JCt-1 (Giant Clam) [3]. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will supplement these existing standards with new solution based inorganic carbonate boron SRMs that replicate typical foraminiferal and coral B/Ca ratios and δ11B values. These new SRMs will not only ensure quality control of full procedural chemistry between laboratories, but have the added benefits of being both in abundant supply and free from any restrictions associated with shipment of biogenic samples derived from protected species. Here we present in-house δ11B measurements of these new boron carbonate SRM solutions. These preliminary data will feed into an interlaboratory comparison study to establish certified values for these new NIST SRMs. 1. Foster, G.L., et al., Chemical Geology, 2013. 358(0): p. 1-14. 2. Gutjahr, M., et al., Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses. Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU General Assembly 2014, 2014. 16(EGU2014-5028-1). 3. Inoue, M., et al., Geostandards and

  4. High Resolution Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Laminations in Pedogenic Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breecker, D.; Sharp, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in pedogenic carbonate from buried soils provide a proxy for low-resolution Quaternary climate and environmental conditions. Samples of carbonate are taken from clast rinds, nodules or filaments in calcic soils. Most clast rinds exhibit micro-laminations that may preserve isotopic ratios of formation. The techniques typically utilized to sample pedogenic carbonate, however, are too coarse to sample individual laminations and likely result in time averages and therefore limit temporal resolution. We investigated the heterogeneity of both carbon and oxygen isotopes ratios in clast rinds at a 100 μm scale using a rapid CO2 laser extraction technique (Sharp and Cerling, 1996). A single 20 msec burst at low power releases CO2 from polished carbonate slabs and the CO2 is then analyzed using continuous flow GC-IRMS. Analyses take less than 5 minutes with a reproducibility of better than ±0.3‰ (δ13C) and ±0.4‰ (δ18O). We have made a two dimensional map of a thick carbonate rind on a limestone clast from a stage V soil to explore the potential for preservation of isotopic ratios in well developed soils and plan to analyze additional rinds from less well developed calcic horizons for comparison. The isotopic map reveals heterogeneities in δ13C of up to 4‰ at a sub-millimeter scale, possibly corresponding to 30% changes in the fraction of C4 plants. Also imaged are abrupt changes in δ13C of approximately 2‰ across sub-100 μm scale boundaries. One well-defined carbon isotope boundary is sub parallel to, but crosses, the lamination boundaries. Oxygen isotope compositions do not change systematically across the same boundary and generally appear more random. These observations are most easily explained by alteration of initial isotopic compositions. Alteration may preferentially affect oxygen isotope ratios leaving carbon isotope distributions relatively intact. It is also possible that both carbon and oxygen isotopes

  5. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  6. Martian carbon dioxide: Clues from isotopes in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, H. R.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Jull, A. J. T.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Attempts to unravel the origin and evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere on Mars from isotopic data have been hampered by the impreciseness of the measurements made by the Viking Lander and by Earth-based telescopes. The SNC meteorites which are possibly pieces of the Martian surface offer a unique opportunity to obtain more precise estimates of the planet's volatile inventory and isotopic composition. Recently, we reported results on oxygen isotopes of water extracted by pyrolysis from samples of Shergotty, Zagami, Nakhla, Chassigny, Lafayette, and EETA-79001. Now we describe complementary results on the stable isotopic composition of carbon dioxide extracted simultaneously from those same samples. We will also report on C-14 abundances obtained by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for some of these CO2 samples.

  7. Microscale carbon isotope variability in ALH84001 carbonates and a discussion of possible formation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2005-06-01

    The carbonates in martian meteorite ALH84001 preserve a record of aqueous processes on Mars at 3.9 Ga, and have been suggested to contain signatures of ancient martian life. The conditions of the carbonate formation environment are critical for understanding possible evidence for life on Mars, the history of water on Mars, and the evolution of the martian atmosphere. Despite numerous studies of petrographic relationships, microscale oxygen isotope compositions, microscale chemical compositions, and other minerals associated with the carbonates, formation models remain relatively unconstrained. Microscale carbon isotope analyses of ALH84001 carbonates reveal variable δ 13C values ranging from +27 to +64 ‰. The isotopic compositions are correlated with chemical composition and extent of crystallization such that the Mg-poor, early-formed carbonates are relatively 13C depleted and the Mg-rich, later forming carbonates, are 13C enriched. These data are inconsistent with many of the previously proposed environments for carbonate formation, and a new set of hypotheses are proposed. Specifically, two new models that account for the data involve low temperature (<100°C) aqueous processes: (1) the carbonates formed during mixing of two fluids derived from separate chemical and isotopic reservoirs; or (2) the carbonates formed from high pH fluids that are exposed to a CO 2-rich atmosphere and precipitate carbonate, similar to high pH springs on Earth.

  8. Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Leaves of C3 Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon isotope composition is regarded as a powerful tool in understanding carbon cycling, both as a tracer and as a process recorder. However, accurate predictions of, for example, partitioning the net carbon flux into its components or obtaining climate information from tree rings, requires a good understanding of plant metabolism and related isotopic fractionations. Mechanistic models have concentrated largely on photosynthetic pathways and their isotopic composition. This cannot be said for respiratory processes. The mechanistic models of leaf isotope discrimination hence do not describe dawn, dusk and night very realistically or not at all. A new steady-state approach of the carbon isotope distribution in glucose potentially addresses the time of twilight and night (Tcherkez et al. 2004). Here, a new model of 13C discrimination in leaves of C3 plants is presented. The model is based on the steady-state approach of Tcherkez et al. (2004) but with much reduced complexity while retaining its general characteristics. In addition, the model introduces some new concepts such as a day-length dependent starch synthesis, night-length dependent starch degradation, energy-driven biosynthesis rates, and continuous leaf discrimination calculation for the whole diel cycle. It is therefore well adapted for biosphere-atmosphere exchange studies. The model predicts enriched sucrose and starch pools in the leaf compared to assimilated CO2. Biosynthesis on the other hand acts as the sink of the remaining, depleted carbon. The model calculates slightly different absolute starch compositions from the Tcherkez et al. (2004) model but this depends on chosen fractionation factors. The greatest difference between the two models is during dawn, dusk and night. For example, while Tcherkez et al. has changing phloem sucrose isotope composition during night, the model here predicts constant sucrose export composition. Observations seem to support rather constant phloem isotope composition

  9. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., <10%) in shells from aquatic organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions

  10. On the isotopic composition of magmatic carbon in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    SNC meteorites are thought, from many lines of evidence, to come from Mars. A line of investigation which has been pursued in our laboratory over the years involves measurement of the stable isotopic composition of carbon, in its various forms, in SNC meteorites. In order to establish a firm basis for studying the isotopic systematics of carbon in the martian surface environment, it is first necessary to try and constrain the delta C-13 of bulk Mars. Taking all of the available information, it would seem that the delta C-13 of the Earth's mantle lies somewhere in the range of -5 to -7 percent. Preliminary assessment of magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites, would tend to suggest a delta C-13 of 20 to 30 percent, which is conspicuously different from that of the terrestrial mantle. It is not obvious why there should be such a difference between the two planets, although many explanations are possible. One of these possibilities, that previous delta C-13 measurements for magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites are in error to some degree, is being actively investigated. The most recent results seem to constrain the theta C-13 of the magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites to about -20 percent, which is not at odds with previous estimates. As such, it is considered that a detailed investigation of the carbon isotopic systematics of martian surface materials does have the necessary information with which to proceed.

  11. Isotope tracers of organic carbon during artificial recharge

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.

    1998-02-09

    This project developed an analytical technique for measuring the isotope abundance for 14C and 13C in total organic carbon (TOC) in order to test whether these measurements can trace TOC interaction with sedimentary material at the bottom of rivers and lakes, soils, and subsurface aquifer rocks.

  12. [Humus composition and stable carbon isotope natural abundance in paddy soil under long-term fertilization].

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Yang, Lin-Zhang; Ci, En; Wang, Yan; Yin, Shi-Xue; Shen, Ming-Xing

    2008-09-01

    Soil samples were collected from an experimental paddy field with long-term (26 years) fertilization in Taihu Lake region of Jiangsu Province to study the effects of different fertilization on the organic carbon distribution and stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in the soil profile, and on the humus composition. The results showed that long-term fertilization increased the organic carbon content in top soil significantly, and there was a significantly negative exponential correlation between soil organic carbon content and soil depth (P < 0.01). The organic carbon content in 10-30 cm soil layer under chemical fertilizations and in 20-40 cm soil layer under organic fertilizations was relatively stable. Soil delta 13C increased gradually with soil depth, its variation range being from -24% per thousand to -28 per thousand, and had a significantly negative linear correlation with soil organic carbon content (P < 0.05). In 0-20 cm soil layer, the delta 13C in treatments organic manure (M), M + NP, M + NPK, M + straw (R) + N, and R + N decreased significantly; while in 30-50 cm soil layer, the delta 13C in all organic fertilization treatments except R + N increased significantly. Tightly combined humus (humin) was the main humus composition in the soil, occupying 50% or more, and the rest were loosely and stably combined humus. Long-term fertilization increased the content of loosely combined humus and the ratio of humic acid (HA) to fulvic acid (FA).

  13. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Londry, Kathleen L.; Des Marais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Biogeochemical transformations occurring in the anoxic zones of stratified sedimentary microbial communities can profoundly influence the isotopic and organic signatures preserved in the fossil record. Accordingly, we have determined carbon isotope discrimination that is associated with both heterotrophic and lithotrophic growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). For heterotrophic-growth experiments, substrate consumption was monitored to completion. Sealed vessels containing SRB cultures were harvested at different time intervals, and delta(13)C values were determined for gaseous CO(2), organic substrates, and products such as biomass. For three of the four SRB, carbon isotope effects between the substrates, acetate or lactate and CO(2), and the cell biomass were small, ranging from 0 to 2 per thousand. However, for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the carbon incorporated into biomass was isotopically heavier than the available substrates by 8 to 9 per thousand. SRB grown lithoautotrophically consumed less than 3% of the available CO(2) and exhibited substantial discrimination (calculated as isotope fractionation factors [alpha]), as follows: for Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, alpha values ranged from 1.0100 to 1.0123; for Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus, the alpha value was 0.0138, and for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the alpha value was 1.0310. Mixotrophic growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on acetate and CO(2) resulted in biomass with a delta(13)C composition intermediate to that of the substrates. The extent of fractionation depended on which enzymatic pathways were used, the direction in which the pathways operated, and the growth rate, but fractionation was not dependent on the growth phase. To the extent that environmental conditions affect the availability of organic substrates (e.g., acetate) and reducing power (e.g., H(2)), ecological forces can also influence carbon isotope discrimination by SRB.

  14. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-06-25

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated

  15. Chemical changes and carbon isotope variations in a cross-section of a large Miocene gymnospermous log

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Spiker, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    The cross-sectional radius of a 3-m (diam.) brown coal gymnospermous log of Miocene age, previously analyzed for carbohydrate and lignin methoxyl content by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, was examined using stable carbon isotopic ratios in order to determine if the isotopic composition could be related to chemical changes or to radial position. This study found a possible relationship between ??13C-values and radial position; however, these changes cannot be linked to carbohydrate content and are probably attributable to changing growth conditions during the lifetime of the tree. An apparent linear relationship between the changes in carbohydrate content after sodium para-periodate treatment and corresponding changes in the ??13C-values indicates constant isotopic fractionation between lignin and carbohydrates along the cross-sectional radius. This result indicates that diagenesis has not produced any significant change in the lignin-carbohydrate carbon isotopic fractionation or, alternatively, that diagenesis has erased any fractionation pattern that once existed. A sample of fresh wood from another gymnospermous species was analyzed by the same methods and found to have lignin-carbohydrate carbon isotopic fractionation significantly different from that of the Miocene log section samples, suggesting that differences may be species-related or that the complex mixture of carbohydrates in the fresh wood was isotopically different from that of the degraded wood, and the whole Miocene log was uniformly altered. ?? 1992.

  16. How much do carbon isotope measurements constrain glacial ocean circulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Mix, A. C.

    2010-12-01

    Reconstructions of the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater (d13DIC) are often interpreted as a ventilation or circulation proxy in paleoceanography. The modern deep-sea distribution of d13C in dissolved inorganic carbon (d13DIC) is highly anti-correlated to macronutrient (PO4, NO3) and apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) patterns due to fractionation during photosynthetic carbon uptake by phytoplankton. Nutrient and AOU concentrations in freshly ventilated North Atlantic Deep Water, for example, are low (d13DIC is high), whereas older water masses contain more respired nutrients and (isotopically light) carbon and have high AOU. However, d13DIC is also influenced by fractionation during air sea gas exchange - a process that decouples d13DIC from changes in nutrients and AOU. Moreover, biological fractionation is not constant but spatially and temporally variable. Here we are using a new global three-dimensional model of stable carbon isotope cycling that includes variable biological and air-sea gas exchange fractionation effects in conjunction with modern and glacial d13C observations to reconstruct ocean circulation patterns. Model versions with different rates and patterns of ocean circulation are produced and the resulting d13C patterns are compared to a compilation of measurements from ocean sediment cores in a probabilistic approach. The method allows us to quantify the uncertainty of deep ocean mass fluxes given available d13C observations/reconstructions and provide a quantitative test of the assumption of d13C as a ventilation proxy.

  17. A carbon isotope challenge to the snowball Earth.

    PubMed

    Sansjofre, P; Ader, M; Trindade, R I F; Elie, M; Lyons, J; Cartigny, P; Nogueira, A C R

    2011-10-01

    The snowball Earth hypothesis postulates that the planet was entirely covered by ice for millions of years in the Neoproterozoic era, in a self-enhanced glaciation caused by the high albedo of the ice-covered planet. In a hard-snowball picture, the subsequent rapid unfreezing resulted from an ultra-greenhouse event attributed to the buildup of volcanic carbon dioxide (CO(2)) during glaciation. High partial pressures of atmospheric CO(2) (pCO2; from 20,000 to 90,000 p.p.m.v.) in the aftermath of the Marinoan glaciation (∼635 Myr ago) have been inferred from both boron and triple oxygen isotopes. These pCO2 values are 50 to 225 times higher than present-day levels. Here, we re-evaluate these estimates using paired carbon isotopic data for carbonate layers that cap Neoproterozoic glacial deposits and are considered to record post-glacial sea level rise. The new data reported here for Brazilian cap carbonates, together with previous ones for time-equivalent units, provide estimates lower than 3,200 p.p.m.v.--and possibly as low as the current value of ∼400 p.p.m.v. Our new constraint, and our re-interpretation of the boron and triple oxygen isotope data, provide a completely different picture of the late Neoproterozoic environment, with low atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and oxygen that are inconsistent with a hard-snowball Earth.

  18. Kinetic isotope effects on dehalogenations at an aromatic carbon.

    PubMed

    Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Szatkowski, Lukasz; Kaminski, Rafał; Wujec, Monika; Siwek, Agata; Paneth, Piotr

    2008-11-01

    In order to interpret the observed isotopic fractionation it is necessaryto understand its relationship with the isotope effect(s) on steps that occur during the conversion of the initial reactant to the final product. We examine this relationship from the biochemical point of view and elaborate on the consequences of the assumptions that it is based on. We illustrate the discrepancies between theoretical and experimental interpretation of kinetic isotope effects on examples of dehalogenation reactions that occur at an aromatic carbon atom. The examples include 4-chlorobenzoyl-CoA dehalogenase-catalyzed conversion of 4-chlorobenzoyl-CoA to 4-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA, dehaloperoxidase-catalyzed conversion of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol to 2,6-dichloroquinone, and spontaneous hydrolysis of atrazine at pH 12. For this latter reaction we have measured the chlorine kinetic isotope effect and estimated its value theoretically at the DFT level of theory. Results of chlorine kinetic isotope effects suggest that the studied dechlorination reactions proceed in a single step with significant weakening of the carbon-chlorine bond in the transition state.

  19. Rainwater chemistry and isotopic content in the French Basque Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaunat, J.; Huneau, F.; Celle-Jeanton, H.; Dupuy, A.; Le Coustumer, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Northern Basque Country (Southwestern France) is subject to strong water needs in constant increase because of a rising population. Located 25 km from the Atlantic coast, the shallow aquifer of the Ursuya Mount (680 m ASL) is one of the main water supplies able to meet water needs. Unfortunately, this strategic resource suffers from a lack of knowledge about the recharge processes. A hydrological and hydrochemical survey was carried out since 2010 with the aim of enhancing the understanding of the behaviour of this aquifer, particularly through rainwater chemistry study. Rain gauges were disposed at four locations around and in the centre of the study area. Three collectors allowed the sampling of the total monthly height of bulk precipitation and one sequential collector allowed the sampling of the daily wet precipitation. This rainwater survey (height, majors ions, stable isotopes) was carried out between February 2010 and November 2011, which represents almost two hydrological cycles. The chemical and isotopic content of the 125 daily rainwater samples has been coupled with the corresponding air mass back trajectories to investigate the origin of the components. The trajectories were segregated into 5 main transport patterns by taking into account the regions crossed during the previous 72 h: 1) Northwestern part of Atlantic Ocean (exclusively marine origin); 2) Southwestern part of Atlantic Ocean (marine and Iberian Peninsula origin); 3) Northern Europe (continental origin); 4) Spain (exclusively Iberian Peninsula origin); 5) Southeastern (Southeastern Europe, Northern Africa and Mediterranean origin). Principal component analyses applied on the major ions components have shown that four major factors control the chemical composition of the precipitation at this place. The first factor (HCO3-, NO2-, PO43-, NH4+, K+, and Ca2+) is a mixed source of anthropogenic pollution and crustal material. The second factor (Cl-, Na+ and Mg2+) denotes a marine source. The

  20. Carbon isotopic ratios in some low-delta N-15 lunar breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Lunar soil breccias 10018, 79035 and 79135 were analyzed for carbon and nitrogen contents and isotopic compositions by vacuum pyrolysis, with a 500 C pre-combustion step in some cases. The combustion was used to remove carbon of terrestrial origin. Nitrogen isotopic ratios for the breccias are very low and are in agreement with results in the literature. Nitrogen yields in two cases were lower than literature values, a result attributable to heterogeneous mixing of implanted and implantation-free components in the breccias. Carbon isotopic ratios were found to be low in these breccias, even when reasonable account is taken of terrestrial carbon contamination. The results are consistent with the idea that low-delta N-15 values in lunar soils and breccias are accompanied by low-delta C-13 values, and imply that any secular variation which occurred in the delta N-15 of nitrogen implanted in lunar soils was accompanied by a similar but smaller variation in the delta C-13 of implanted carbon.

  1. Carbon isotopic fractionation of CFCs during abiotic and biotic degradation.

    PubMed

    Archbold, Marie E; Elliot, Trevor; Kalin, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    Carbon stable isotope ((13)C) fractionation in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds arising from abiotic (chemical) degradation using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and biotic (landfill gas attenuation) processes is investigated. Batch tests (at 25 °C) for CFC-113 and CFC-11 using ZVI show quantitative degradation of CFC-113 to HCFC-123a and CFC-1113 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to a half-life (τ(1/2)) of 20.5 h, and a ZVI surface-area normalized rate constant (k(SA)) of -(9.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-5) L m(-2) h(-1). CFC-11 degraded to trace HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to τ(1/2) = 17.3 h and k(SA) = -(1.2 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) L m(-2) h(-1). Significant kinetic isotope effects of ε(‰) = -5.0 ± 0.3 (CFC-113) and -17.8 ± 4.8 (CFC-11) were observed. Compound-specific carbon isotope analyses also have been used here to characterize source signatures of CFC gases (HCFC-22, CFC-12, HFC-134a, HCFC-142b, CFC-114, CFC-11, CFC-113) for urban (UAA), rural/remote (RAA), and landfill (LAA) ambient air samples, as well as in situ surface flux chamber (FLUX; NO FLUX) and landfill gas (LFG) samples at the Dargan Road site, Northern Ireland. The latter values reflect biotic degradation and isotopic fractionation in LFG production, and local atmospheric impact of landfill emissions through the cover. Isotopic fractionations of Δ(13)C ∼ -13‰ (HCFC-22), Δ(13)C ∼ -35‰ (CFC-12) and Δ(13)C ∼ -15‰ (CFC-11) were observed for LFG in comparison to characteristic solvent source signatures, with the magnitude of the isotopic effect for CFC-11 apparently similar to the kinetic isotope effect for (abiotic) ZVI degradation.

  2. Mg isotopic composition of carbonate: insight from speleothem formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy, Albert; Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Halicz, Ludwik; O'Nions, R. Keith

    2002-07-01

    Simultaneous high-precision measurement of 24Mg, 25Mg and 26Mg isotopic compositions were made by multiple collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) relative to the international standard SRM980. Data are presented on low-Mg calcite speleothems and their associated host rocks and waters from four caves, one in the French Alps and three in Israel, covering various climate conditions. In addition, data are presented on three dolostones and three limestones from the Himalaya. The overall variation is 4.13‰ and 2.14‰ in δ 26Mg and δ 25Mg, respectively. This is 35 times the uncertainty of the measurements and clearly demonstrates that the terrestrial isotopic composition of Mg is not unique. Each speleothem shows a characteristic range of δ 26Mg values that are attributed to the isotopic composition of the local water. Differences between the isotopic composition of Mg in the water dripping from stalactites and that of the modern speleothem are interpreted as being due to Mg isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation in the temperature range of 4-18°C. The low-Mg calcite is enriched in light isotopes by 1.35‰/AMU and the dependence on temperature has been found to be less than 0.02‰/AMU/°C. Despite various geological settings, the δ 26Mg of the studied dolostones is 2.0±1.2‰ higher than the δ 26Mg of the limestones. All together, these results suggest a strong mineralogical control and a weak temperature effect on the Mg isotopic composition of carbonate.

  3. Inhomogeneity of C13 isotope distribution in isotope engineered carbon nanotubes: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zólyomi, V.; Simon, F.; Rusznyák, Á.; Pfeiffer, R.; Peterlik, H.; Kuzmany, H.; Kürti, J.

    2007-05-01

    Vibrational modes of C13 isotope enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes are inhomogeneously broadened due to the random distribution of isotopes. We study this effect on the radial breathing mode theoretically using density-functional theory within the local-density approximation and compare the result with experiments on inner tubes in double-walled carbon nanotubes grown from C13 -enriched fullerenes. Increased inhomogeneity was achieved by growing inner tubes from a mixture of enriched and natural fullerenes, which is explained by the calculations. This shows the absence of carbon diffusion along the tube axis during inner tube growth, supporting the theory of inner tube growth by Stone-Wales transformations from interconnected fullerenes.

  4. Constraints on Early Triassic carbon cycle dynamics from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K. M.; Yu, M.; Payne, J.

    2010-12-01

    Marine anoxia and euxinia are widely cited as a leading cause of the end-Permian mass extinction and a factor limiting recovery during the Early Triassic. Middle Triassic diversification coincided with the waning of anoxia and stabilization of the global carbon cycle, suggesting that environment-ecosystem linkages were important to biological recovery. However, the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena remain poorly constrained. Here we employ a carbon isotope approach to examine the nature of the carbon cycle from Late Permian to Middle Triassic time. We measured the carbon isotopic composition of carbonates (δ13Ccarb) and organic matter (δ13Corg) from an exceptionally preserved carbonate platform in the Nanpanjiang Basin of south China. The δ13Ccarb of limestones from 5 stratigraphic sections spanning a paleoenvironmental gradient in south China records multiple large isotope excursions characteristic of the Lower Triassic. Previous modeling suggests that the carbon isotope record is best explained by multiple pulses carbon release to the ocean-atmosphere system. Addition of Δ13C values (δ13Ccarb - δ13Corg) for this interval allows us to evaluate whether the carbon cycle perturbations are indeed due to changes in atmospheric CO2 or from changing sources of organic matter input or fluctuating redox state of the oceans during this interval.

  5. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  6. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  7. Modelling the 13C and 12C isotopes of inorganic and organic carbon in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Erik; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Humborg, Christoph; Gustafsson, Bo G.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, 12C and 13C contents of all carbon containing state variables (dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, detrital carbon, and the carbon content of autotrophs and heterotrophs) have for the first time been explicitly included in a coupled physical-biogeochemical Baltic Sea model. Different processes in the carbon cycling have distinct fractionation values, resulting in specific isotopic fingerprints. Thus, in addition to simulating concentrations of different tracers, our new model formulation improves the possibility to constrain the rates of processes such as CO2 assimilation, mineralization, and air-sea exchange. We demonstrate that phytoplankton production and respiration, and the related air-sea CO2 fluxes, are to a large degree controlling the isotopic composition of organic and inorganic carbon in the system. The isotopic composition is further, but to a lesser extent, influenced by river loads and deep water inflows as well as transformation of terrestrial organic carbon within the system. Changes in the isotopic composition over the 20th century have been dominated by two processes - the preferential release of 12C to the atmosphere in association with fossil fuel burning, and the eutrophication of the Baltic Sea related to increased nutrient loads under the second half of the century.

  8. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-12-31

    This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

  10. Simultaneous tracing of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit

    2016-05-24

    Stable isotope tracing is a powerful method for interrogating metabolic enzyme activities across the metabolic network of living cells. However, most studies of mammalian cells have used (13)C-labeled tracers only and focused on reactions in central carbon metabolism. Cellular metabolism, however, involves other biologically important elements, including nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphate and sulfur. Tracing stable isotopes of such elements may help shed light on poorly understood metabolic pathways. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-resolution mass spectrometry to simultaneously trace carbon and nitrogen metabolism in human cells cultured with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled glucose and glutamine. To facilitate interpretation of the complex isotopomer data generated, we extend current methods for metabolic flux analysis to handle multivariate mass isotopomer distributions (MMIDs). We find that observed MMIDs are broadly consistent with known biochemical pathways. Whereas measured (13)C MIDs were informative for central carbon metabolism, (15)N isotopes provided evidence for nitrogen-carrying reactions in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. This computational and experimental methodology expands the scope of metabolic flux analysis beyond carbon metabolism, and may prove important to understanding metabolic phenotypes in health and disease.

  11. Triple oxygen isotopes in biogenic and sedimentary carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Hu, Huanting; Ji, Haoyuan; Montanari, Shaena; Li, Shuning; Henkes, Gregory A.; Levin, Naomi E.

    2014-09-01

    The 17O anomaly (Δ17O) of natural waters has been shown to be sensitive to evaporation in a way analogous to deuterium excess, with evaporated bodies of water (e.g., leaf waters, lake waters, animal body waters) tending to have lower Δ17O than primary meteoric waters. In animal body water, Δ17O relates to the intake of evaporated waters, evaporative effluxes of water, and the Δ17O value of atmospheric O2, which itself carries signatures of global carbon cycling and photochemical reactions in the stratosphere. Carbonates have the potential to record the triple oxygen isotope compositions of parent waters, allowing reconstruction of past water compositions, but such investigations have awaited development of methods for high-precision measurement of Δ17O of carbonate. We describe optimized methods based on a sequential acid digestion/reduction/fluorination approach that yield Δ17O data with the high precision (∼0.010‰, 1σ) needed to resolve subtle environmental signals. We report the first high-precision Δ17O dataset for terrestrial carbonates, focusing on vertebrate biogenic carbonates and soil carbonates, but also including marine invertebrates and high-temperature carbonates. We determine apparent three-isotope fractionation factors between the O2 analyte derived from carbonate and the parent waters of the carbonate. These in combination with appropriate temperature estimates (from clumped isotope thermometry, or known or estimated body temperatures) are used to calculate the δ18O and Δ17O of parent waters. The clearest pattern to emerge is the strong 17O-depletion in avian, dinosaurian, and mammalian body water (from analyses of eggshell and tooth enamel) relative to meteoric waters, following expected influences of evaporated water (e.g., leaf water) and atmospheric O2 on vertebrate body water. Parent waters of the soil carbonates studied here have Δ17O values that are similar to or slightly lower than global precipitation. Our results suggest

  12. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  13. Shear heating and clumped isotope reordering in carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman-Tov, Shalev; Affek, Hagit P.; Matthews, Alan; Aharonov, Einat; Reches, Ze'ev

    2016-07-01

    Natural faults are expected to heat rapidly during seismic slip and to cool quite quickly after the slip event. Here we examine clumped isotope thermometry for its ability to identify such short duration elevated temperature events along frictionally heated carbonate faults. Our approach is based on measured Δ47 values that reflect the distribution of oxygen and carbon isotopes in the calcite lattice, measuring the abundance of 13Csbnd 18O bonds, which is affected by temperature. We examine three types of calcite rock samples: (1) crushed limestone grains that were rapidly heated and then cooled in static laboratory experiments, simulating the temperature cycle experienced by fault rock during an earthquake slip; (2) limestone samples that were experimentally sheared to simulate earthquake slip events; and (3) samples from Fault Mirrors (FMs) collected from principle slip surfaces of three natural carbonate faults. Extensive FM surfaces are believed to form during earthquake slip. Our experimental results show that Δ47 values decrease rapidly (in the course of seconds) with increasing temperature and shear velocity. On the other hand, carbonate shear zones from natural faults do not show such Δ47 decrease. We suggest that the Δ47 response may be controlled by nano-size grains, the high abundance of defects, and highly stressed/strained grain boundaries within the carbonate fault zone that can reduce the activation energy for diffusion, and thus lead to an increased rate of isotopic disordering during shear experiments. In our laboratory experiments the high stress and strain on grain contacts and the presence of nanograins thus allows for rapid disordering so that a change in Δ47 occurs in a very short and relatively low intensity heating events. In natural faults it may also lead to isotopic ordering after the cessation of frictional heating thus erasing the high temperature signature of Δ47.

  14. Sulfur and carbon isotope biogeochemistry of a rewetted brackish fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Gehre, Matthias; Winkel, Matthias; Koehler, Stefan; Koch, Marian; Jurasinski, Gerald; Spitzy, Alejandro; Liebner, Susanne; Sachs, Torsten; Schmiedinger, Iris; Kretzschmann, Lisett; Saborowski, Anke; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2015-04-01

    Coastal wetlands are at the interface between terrestrial freshwater and marine and exhibit very specific biogeochemical conditions. Intermittent sea water intrusion affects metabolic pathways, i. e. anaerobic carbon metabolism is progressively dominated by sulfate reduction with lower contribution of methanogenesis whilst methane production is increasingly shifted from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic. Due to expanding anthropogenic impact a large proportion of coastal ecosystems is degraded with severe implications for the biogeochemical processes. We use concentration patterns and stable isotope signatures of water, sulfate, dissolved carbonate, and methane (δ2H, δ13C, δ18O, δ34S) to investigate the S and C metabolic cycle in a rewetted fen close to the southern Baltic Sea border. Such studies are crucial to better predict dynamic ecosystem feedback to global change like organic matter (OM) decomposition or greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, little is known about the metabolic pathways in such environments. The study site is part of the TERENO Observatory "Northeastern German Lowlands' and measurements of methane emissions have run since 2009. High methane fluxes up to 800 mg m-2 hr-1 indicate that methanogenesis is the dominant C metabolism pathway despite of high sulfate concentrations (up to 37 mM). The presented data are part of a comprehensive biogeochemical investigation that we conducted in autumn 2014 and that comprises 4 pore water profiles and sediment samples within a transect of 300-1500 m distance to the Baltic Sea. Depth of organic layers ranged from 25 to 140 cm with high OM contents (up to 90 dwt.%). Sulfate/chloride ratios in the pore waters were lower than in the Baltic Sea for most sites and sediment depths indicated a substantial net sulfate loss. Sulfide concentrations were negligible at the top and increased parallel to the sulfate concentrations with depth to values of up to 0.3 mM. One pore water profiles situated 1150 m from the Baltic

  15. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles and soil organic carbon dynamics in the lower Mississippi Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, J.G.; Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of depth trends of 13C abundance in soil organic matter and of 13C abundance from soil-respired CO2 provides useful indications of the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle and of paleoecological change. We measured depth trends of 13C abundance from cropland and control pairs of soils in the lower Mississippi Basin, as well as the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 produced during approximately 1-year soil incubation, to determine the role of several candidate processes on the 13C depth profile of soil organic matter. Depth profiles of 13C from uncultivated control soils show a strong relationship between the natural logarithm of soil organic carbon concentration and its isotopic composition, consistent with a model Rayleigh distillation of 13C in decomposing soil due to kinetic fractionation during decomposition. Laboratory incubations showed that initially respired CO 2 had a relatively constant 13C content, despite large differences in the 13C content of bulk soil organic matter. Initially respired CO2 was consistently 13C-depleted with respect to bulk soil and became increasingly 13C-depleted during 1-year, consistent with the hypothesis of accumulation of 13C in the products of microbial decomposition, but showing increasing decomposition of 13C-depleted stable organic components during decomposition without input of fresh biomass. We use the difference between 13C / 12C ratios (calculated as ??-values) between respired CO 2 and bulk soil organic carbon as an index of the degree of decomposition of soil, showing trends which are consistent with trends of 14C activity, and with results of a two-pooled kinetic decomposition rate model describing CO2 production data recorded during 1 year of incubation. We also observed inconsistencies with the Rayleigh distillation model in paired cropland soils and reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Novel Framework for Quantifying past Methane Recycling by Sphagnum-Methanotroph Symbiosis Using Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Ratios of Leaf Wax Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Jonathan E.; Isles, Peter D. F.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric methane is strongly linked to variations in Earth's climate. Currently, we can directly reconstruct the total atmospheric concentration of methane, but not individual terms of the methane cycle. Northern wetlands, dominated by Sphagnum, are an important contributor of atmospheric methane, and we seek to understand the methane cycle in these systems. We present a novel method for quantifying the proportion of carbon Sphagnum assimilates from its methanotrophic symbionts using stable isotope ratios of leaf-wax biomarkers. Carbon isotope ratios of Sphagnum compounds are determined by two competing influences, water content and the isotope ratio of source carbon. We disentangled these effects using a combined hydrogen and carbon isotope approach. We constrained Sphagnum water content using the contrast between the hydrogen isotope ratios of Sphagnum and vascular plant biomarkers. We then used Sphagnum water content to calculate the carbon isotope ratio of Sphagnum's carbon pool. Using a mass balance equation, we calculated the proportion of recycled methane contributed to the Sphagnum carbon pool, 'PRM.' We quantified PRM in peat monoliths from three microhabitats in the Mer Bleue peatland complex. Modern studies have shown that water table depth and vegetation have strong influences on the peatland methane cycle on instrumental time scales. With this new approach, delta C-13 of Sphagnum compounds are now a useful tool for investigating the relationships among hydrology, vegetation, and methanotrophy in Sphagnum peatlands over the time scales of entire peatland sediment records, vital to our understanding of the global carbon cycle through the Late Glacial and Holocene.

  17. STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF SUBFOSSIL WOOD FROM AUSTRIAN ALPS

    PubMed Central

    KŁUSEK, MARZENA; PAWEŁCZYK, SŁAWOMIRA

    2015-01-01

    The presented studies were carried out in order to check the usefulness of subfossil wood for stable isotope analysis. The aim of research was also to define the optimal method of subfossil samples preparation. Subfossil samples used during the presented studies are a part of the multi-century dendrochronological scale. This chronology originates in an area situated around a small mountain lake — Schwarzersee, in Austria. The obtained results of stable carbon isotope measurements confirmed that the method of α-cellulose extraction by the application of acidic sodium chlorite and sodium hydroxide solutions removes resins and other mobile compounds from wood. Therefore, in the case of the analysed samples, the additional chemical process of extractives removing was found to be unnecessary. Studied wood samples contained an adequate proportion of α-cellulose similar to the values characteristic for the contemporary trees. This proved an adequate wood preservation which is essential for the conduction of isotopic research. PMID:26346297

  18. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-04

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  19. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to −41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle. PMID:27488228

  20. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle. PMID:27488228

  1. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to ‑41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  2. [The mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation in photosynthesis and carbon dioxide component of the greenhouse effect].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A; Voronin, V I

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between the global climate warming, which is largely induced by increased CO2 atmospheric concentration, and the changes in carbon isotope fractionation in plants was explained in terms of the previously proposed oscillatory mechanism of photosynthesis, according to which CO2 assimilation and photorespiration are two reciprocally coupled oscillating mechanisms controlled by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase switches. This explanation is confirmed by the changes in carbon isotope fractionation in the annual rings of trees and demonstrates that the light carbon isotope 12C enrichment before 1990s resulted from increased photosynthetic assimilation of CO2. The subsequent sharp 13C enrichment of the tree ring carbon until the present time suggests that the compensatory role of photosynthesis in boreal forests has been lost for the global climate.

  3. Carbon isotope fractionation of methyl bromide during agricultural soil fumigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bill, M.; Miller, L.G.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2002-01-01

    The isotopic composition of methyl bromide (CH3Br) has been suggested to be a potentially useful tracer for constraining the global CH3Br budget. In order to determine the carbon isotopic composition of CH3Br emitted from the most significant anthropogenic application (pre-plant fumigation) we directly measured the ??13C of CH3Br released during commercial fumigation. We also measured the isotopic fractionation associated with degradation in agricultural soil under typical field fumigation conditions. The isotopic composition of CH3Br collected in soil several hours after injection of the fumigant was -44.5??? and this value increased to -20.7??? over the following three days. The mean kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil (12???) was smaller than the reported value for methylotrophic bacterial strain IMB-1, isolated from previously fumigated agricultural soil, but was similar to methylotrophic bacterial strain CC495, isolated from a pristine forest litter zone. Using this fractionation associated with the degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil and the mean ??13C of the industrially manufactured CH3Br (-54.4???), we calculate that the agricultural soil fumigation source has a carbon isotope signature that ranges from -52.8??? to -42.0???. Roughly 65% of industrially manufactured CH3Br is used for field fumigations. The remaining 35% is used for structural and post-harvest fumigations with a minor amount used during industrial chemical manufacturing. Assuming that the structural and post-harvest fumigation sources of CH3Br are emitted without substantial fractionation, we calculate that the ??13C of anthropogenically emitted CH3Br ranges from -53.2??? to -47.5???.

  4. Hydrology & isotope tools to quantify carbon sources and sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Johannes A. C.; Lischeid, Gunnar; Gessler, Arthur

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation is fundamental for carbon uptake and usually assumes the largest portion in the evapotranspiration term. While interception can be separated by mapping various plant types in a catchment, the water isotope method yields numbers for pure evaporation. The latter causes enrichment of the heavier isotope in the remaining water phase, while transpiration leaves the isotope signal of water unaltered over longer time periods. Evaporation can thus be quantified in an integral manner over large areas by measuring water stable isotopes at points of river discharge and by comparing them to incoming precipitation. This method has been applied on scales of several thousand square kilometres and its calibration on scales of few square kilometres will allow to better constrain uncertainties. This necessitates comparison with hydrometric methods of well-instrumented catchments in several climatic regimes. Innovative small-scale methods involve determination of effective rainfall by time series analyses of hydrological data. This in turn requires temporal resolution of daily to hourly values to apply methods such as runoff recession or principal component analyses. It is also known that continental water fluxes are related to carbon fluxes through photosynthesis that in turn recycles large amounts of water via transpiration. This is usually described by the water use efficiency (WUE) term that quantifies how many moles of water transpire to accumulate one mole of CO2. However, so far only few empirical numbers are available for the spatio-temporal variability in WUE of plants and plant communities and further field experiments combined with isoscape approaches are necessary to constrain this term on a regional scale and its dependencies on factors such as light, temperature, water availability, plant type and height. Combined data can then serve to determine catchment-wide carbon uptake via the transpiration rates. Carbon accumulation can also be determined with eddy

  5. Carbon isotope fractionation during experimental crystallisation of diamond from carbonate fluid at mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutsky, Vadim; Borzdov, Yuri; Palyanov, Yuri; Sokol, Alexander; Izokh, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We report first results of a systematic study of carbon isotope fractionation in a carbonate fluid system under mantle PT conditions. The system models a diamond-forming alkaline carbonate fluid using pure sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4) as the starting material, which decomposes to carbonate, CO2 and elementary carbon (graphite and diamond) involving a single source of carbon following the reaction 2Na2C2O4 → 2Na2CO3 + CO2 + C. Near-liquidus behaviour of carbonate was observed at 1300 °C and 6.3 GPa. The experimentally determined isotope fractionation between the components of the system in the temperature range from 1300 to 1700 °C at 6.3 and 7.5 GPa fit the theoretical expectations well. Carbon isotope fractionation associated with diamond crystallisation from the carbonate fluid at 7.5 GPa decreases with an increase in temperature from 2.7 to 1.6 ‰. This trend corresponds to the function ΔCarbonate fluid-Diamond = 7.38 × 106 T-2.

  6. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically "heavy" compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  7. Carbon isotopes in xenoliths from the Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii, and the generation of isotopic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Pineau, F. ); Mathez, E.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The isotopic composition of carbon has been determined in a suite of xenoliths from lava of the 1800-1801 Kaupulehu eruption of Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii. Several lithologies are represented in the suite, including websterite, dunite, wehrlite, pyroxenite, and gabbro. In addition, there are composite xenoliths in which contacts between lithologies are preserved. Most of the xenoliths represent deformed cumulates. The contact relations in the composite samples indicate that the lithologies originated from the same source region, which, based on pressures determined from fluid inclusions, is estimated to be at a depth of {approx}20 km, or near the crust-mantle boundary. The observations and isotopic results demonstrate that isotopic variability can be generated by multistage fractionation processes such as degassing of CO{sub 2} from magma and precipitation of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids to form graphitic compounds. Such processes operated over regions the scales of which were determined by style and intensity of deformation and by lithology.

  8. Experimentally-controlled carbon and oxygen isotope exchange between bioapatites and water under inorganic and microbially-mediated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazzo, Antoine; Lécuyer, Christophe; Mariotti, André

    2004-01-01

    Modern bone and enamel powders have reacted at 301 K with 13C- and 18O-labelled waters under inorganic and microbial conditions. The aim of the study is to investigate the resistance of stable isotope compositions of bioapatite carbonate (δ 13C, δ 18Oc) and phosphate (δ 18Op) to isotopic alteration during early diagenesis. Rapid and significant carbon and oxygen isotope changes were observed in the carbonate and phosphate fractions of bone apatite before any detectable change occurred in the crystallinity or organic matter content. These observations indicate that chemical alterations of bone apatite are likely to start within days of death. Enamel crystallites are much more resistant than bone crystallites, but are not exempt of alteration. Non removable carbon and oxygen isotope enrichments were measured in the carbonate phase of bone (50-90%) and enamel (40%) after the acetic acid treatment. This result indicates that a significant part of 13C and 18O-labelled coming from the aqueous fluid has been durably incorporated into the apatite structure, probably through isotopic exchange or secondary carbonate apatite precipitation. As a result, acetic acid pre-treatments that are currently used to remove exogenous material by selective dissolution, are not adequate to restore pristine δ 13C and δ 18Oc values of fossil apatites. Under inorganic conditions, kinetics of oxygen isotope exchange are 10 times faster in carbonate than in phosphate. On the opposite, during biologically-mediated reactions, the kinetics of oxygen isotope exchange between phosphate and water is, at least, from 2 to 15 times faster than between carbonate and water. Enamel is a more suitable material than bone for paleoenvironmental or paleoclimatical reconstructions, but interpretations of δ 18Op or δ 13C values must be restricted to specimens for which no or very limited trace of microbial activity can be detected.

  9. Nondestructive determination of the 13C content in isotopic diamond by nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, O.; Ruf, T.; Finkelstein, Y.; Cardona, M.; Anthony, T. R.; Belic, D.; Eckert, T.; Jäger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Maser, H.; Moreh, R.; Nord, A.; Pitz, H. H.; Wolpert, A.

    1998-05-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence excited with continuous electron bremsstrahlung from the 4.3 MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator is used as a nondestructive method to determine the 13C content x of bulk isotopic diamonds (12C1-x13Cx). The smallest detectable amount of 13C in carbon or low Z matrices is on the order of 0.5 mg. The relative accuracy of absolute mass determinations is about ±7%. Errors are mainly due to uncertainties in the natural widths Γ of the 13C nuclear levels at 3089 and 3684 keV used in the measurements. The results confirm a previous calibration which is based on Raman scattering and the destructive determination of x by mass spectroscopy.

  10. Calcium and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayr, Andrea; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Kisakürek, Basak; Balzer, Isabelle; Immenhauser, Adrian; Jürgen Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Different isotopic systems are influenced in multiple ways corresponding to the crystal structure, dehydration, deprotonation, adsorption, desorption, isotope exchange and diffusion processes. In this study we investigated the structural and kinetic effects on fractionation of stable Ca- and O-isotopes during CaCO3 precipitation. Calcite, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated using the CO2 diffusion technique[1]at a constant pH of 8.3, but various temperatures (6, 10, 25 and 40° C) and precipitation rates R (101.5 to 105 μmol h-1 m-2). The calcium isotopic fractionation between solution and vaterite is lower (Δ44/40Ca= -0.10 to -0.55 ‰) compared to calcite (-0.69 to -2.04 ‰) and aragonite (-0.91 to -1.55 ‰). In contrast the fractionation of oxygen isotopes is highest for vaterite (32.1 ‰), followed by aragonite (29.2 ‰) and calcite (27.6 ‰) at 25° C and equilibrium. The enrichment of 18O vs. 16O in all polymorphs decreases with increasing precipitation rate by around -0.7 ‰ per log(R). The calcium isotopic fractionation between calcite/ vaterite and aqueous Ca2+ increases with increasing precipitation rate by ˜0.45 ‰ per log(R) and ˜0.1 ‰ per log(R) at 25° C and 40° C, respectively. In contrast the fractionation of Ca-isotopes between aragonite and aqueous Ca2+ decreases with increasing precipitation rates. The large enrichment of 18O vs. 16O isotopes in carbonates is related to the strong bond of oxygen to the small and highly charged C4+-ion. In contrast equilibrium isotopic fractionation between solution and calcite or vaterite is nearly zero as the Ca-O bond length is similar for calcite, vaterite and the hydrated Ca. Aragonite incorporates preferentially the lighter 40Ca isotope as it has very large Ca-O bonds in comparison to the hydrated Ca. At the crystal surface the lighter 40Ca isotopes are preferentially incorporated as dehydration and diffusion of lighter isotopes are faster. Consequently, the surface becomes enriched in 40

  11. Calcium and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayr, Andrea; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Kisakürek, Basak; Balzer, Isabelle; Immenhauser, Adrian; Jürgen Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Different isotopic systems are influenced in multiple ways corresponding to the crystal structure, dehydration, deprotonation, adsorption, desorption, isotope exchange and diffusion processes. In this study we investigated the structural and kinetic effects on fractionation of stable Ca- and O-isotopes during CaCO3 precipitation. Calcite, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated using the CO2 diffusion technique[1]at a constant pH of 8.3, but various temperatures (6, 10, 25 and 40° C) and precipitation rates R (101.5 to 105 μmol h‑1 m‑2). The calcium isotopic fractionation between solution and vaterite is lower (Δ44/40Ca= -0.10 to -0.55 ‰) compared to calcite (-0.69 to -2.04 ‰) and aragonite (-0.91 to -1.55 ‰). In contrast the fractionation of oxygen isotopes is highest for vaterite (32.1 ‰), followed by aragonite (29.2 ‰) and calcite (27.6 ‰) at 25° C and equilibrium. The enrichment of 18O vs. 16O in all polymorphs decreases with increasing precipitation rate by around -0.7 ‰ per log(R). The calcium isotopic fractionation between calcite/ vaterite and aqueous Ca2+ increases with increasing precipitation rate by ˜0.45 ‰ per log(R) and ˜0.1 ‰ per log(R) at 25° C and 40° C, respectively. In contrast the fractionation of Ca-isotopes between aragonite and aqueous Ca2+ decreases with increasing precipitation rates. The large enrichment of 18O vs. 16O isotopes in carbonates is related to the strong bond of oxygen to the small and highly charged C4+-ion. In contrast equilibrium isotopic fractionation between solution and calcite or vaterite is nearly zero as the Ca-O bond length is similar for calcite, vaterite and the hydrated Ca. Aragonite incorporates preferentially the lighter 40Ca isotope as it has very large Ca-O bonds in comparison to the hydrated Ca. At the crystal surface the lighter 40Ca isotopes are preferentially incorporated as dehydration and diffusion of lighter isotopes are faster. Consequently, the surface becomes enriched in

  12. Descriptions of carbon isotopes within the energy density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Atef; Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana; Tammam, M.

    2014-10-24

    Within the energy density functional (EDF) theory, the structure properties of Carbon isotopes are systematically studied. The shell model calculations are done for both even-A and odd-A nuclei, to study the structure of rich-neutron Carbon isotopes. The EDF theory indicates the single-neutron halo structures in {sup 15}C, {sup 17}C and {sup 19}C, and the two-neutron halo structures in {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C nuclei. It is also found that close to the neutron drip-line, there exist amazing increase in the neutron radii and decrease on the binding energies BE, which are tightly related with the blocking effect and correspondingly the blocking effect plays a significant role in the shell model configurations.

  13. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Magdas, D. A. Cristea, G. Bot, A. Mirel, V.

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ{sup 13}C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  14. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Bot, A.; Mirel, V.

    2013-11-01

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ13C between batches from -29.7 to -31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between -31.3 to -34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  15. A Modern Analogue for Proterozoic Inverse Carbon Isotope Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, H. G.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Pearson, A.

    2008-12-01

    The carbon isotope distribution preserved in sedimentary lipids changes near the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian boundary. In older samples, n-alkyl lipids contain more 13C than both isoprenoid lipids and kerogen [1]. In younger samples, the opposite prevails. Although extreme heterotrophy has been invoked as a mechanism to explain the enrichment in 13C [2], here we suggest another explanation. The switch may reflect a fundamental transition from an oligotrophic ocean dominated by prokaryotic biomass, to an ocean in which carbon fixation is more intensive and burial is dominated by eukaryotic biomass. An analogue for Proterozoic ordering is found in the modern, oligotrophic Pacific Ocean, where n-alkyl lipids of picoplankton (0.2-0.5 μm particulate matter) contain excess 13C relative to the same lipids found in larger size classes (> 0.5 μm). Picoplanktonic lipids are heavier isotopically (-18 ‰) than both the sterols of eukaryotes (-23 ‰ to -26 ‰) and the total organic matter (-20 ‰; TOM). The 0.2-0.5 μm size class also has a distinct chain-length abundance profile. Although large particles must be the vehicle for total carbon export, paradoxically the lipid component of export production appears to be dominated by the 0.2-0.5 μm source. The picoplanktonic chain lengths and isotopic composition dominate lipids of TOM at 670 meters. When the ratio of prokaryotic to eukaryotic production is high, as in the modern central Pacific Ocean, it appears that exported material has an inverse carbon isotope signature similar to that preserved in Precambrian samples. [1] Logan, G. A. et al., Nature 376:53-56 (1995). [2] Rothman, D. H. et al., PNAS 100:8124-8129 (2003).

  16. Constraining the global bromomethane budget from carbon stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlmann, Enno; Wittmer, Julian; Greule, Markus; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Seifert, Richard; Keppler, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Despite intense research in the last two decades, the global bromomethane (CH3Br) budget remains unbalanced with the known sinks exceeding the known sources by about 25%. The reaction with OH is the largest sink for CH3Br. We have determined the kinetic isotope effects for the reactions of CH3Br with the OH and Cl radical in order to better constrain the global CH3Br budget from an isotopic perspective. The isotope fractionation experiments were performed at 20±1°C in a 3500 L Teflon smog-chamber with initial CH3Br mixing ratios of about 2 and 10 ppm and perflourohexane (25 ppb) as internal standard. Atomic chlorine (Cl) was generated via photolysis of molecular chlorine (Cl2) using a solar simulator with an actinic flux comparable to that of the sun in mid-summer in Germany. OH radicals were generated via the photolysis of ozone (O3) at 253.7 nm in the presence of water vapor (RH = 70%).The mixing ratios of CH3Br, and perflourohexane were monitored by GC-MS with a time resolution of 15 minutes throughout the experiments. From each experiment 10 to 15 sub samples were taken in regular time intervals for subsequent carbon isotope ratio determinations by GC-IRMS performed at two independent laboratories in parallel. We found a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 17.6±3.3‰ for the reaction of CH3Br with OH and a KIE of 9.8±1.4 ‰ for the reaction with Cl*. We used these fractionation factors along with new data on the isotopic composition of CH3Br in the troposphere (-34±7‰) and the surface ocean (-26±7‰) along with reported source signatures, to constrain the unknown source from an isotopic perspective. The largest uncertainty in estimating the isotopic composition of the unknown source arises from the soil sink. Microbial degradation in soils is the second largest sink and assigned with a large fractionation factors of about 50‰. However, field experiments revealed substantially smaller apparent fractionation factors ranging from 11 to 22‰. In addition

  17. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Melinda L.; Karpanty, Sarah M.; Zihlman, Adrienne L.; Koch, Paul L.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Isotopic studies of wild primates have used a wide range of tissues to infer diet and model the foraging ecologies of extinct species. The use of mismatched tissues for such comparisons can be problematic because differences in amino acid compositions can lead to small isotopic differences between tissues. Additionally, physiological and dietary differences among primate species could lead to variable offsets between apatite carbonate and collagen. To improve our understanding of the isotopic chemistry of primates, we explored the apparent enrichment (ε*) between bone collagen and muscle, collagen and fur or hair keratin, muscle and keratin, and collagen and bone carbonate across the primate order. We found that the mean ε* values of proteinaceous tissues were small (≤1‰), and uncorrelated with body size or phylogenetic relatedness. Additionally, ε* values did not vary by habitat, sex, age, or manner of death. The mean ε* value between bone carbonate and collagen (5.6 ± 1.2‰) was consistent with values reported for omnivorous mammals consuming monoisotopic diets. These primate-specific apparent enrichment values will be a valuable tool for cross-species comparisons. Additionally, they will facilitate dietary comparisons between living and fossil primates. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00442-010-1701-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20628886

  18. Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, Marcus; Bordier, Louise; Douville, Eric; Farmer, Jesse; Foster, Gavin L.; Hathorne, Ed; Hönisch, Bärbel; Lemarchand, Damien; Louvat, Pascale; McCulloch, Malcolm; Noireaux, Johanna; Pallavicini, Nicola; Rodushkin, Ilia; Roux, Philippe; Stewart, Joseph; Thil, François; You, Chen-Feng

    2014-05-01

    Boron consists of only of two isotopes with a relatively large mass difference (~10 %). It is also volatile in acidic media and prone to contamination during analytical treatment. Nevertheless, an increasing number of isotope laboratories are successfully using boron isotope compositions (expressed in δ11B) in marine biogenic carbonates to reconstruct seawater pH. Recent interlaboratory comparison efforts [1] highlighted the existence of a relatively high level of disagreement between laboratories when measuring such material, so in order to further strengthen the validity of this carbonate system proxy, appropriate reference materials need to be urgently characterised. We describe here the latest results of the Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP) where we aim to characterise the boron isotopic composition of two marine carbonates: Japanese Geological Survey carbonate standard materials JCp-1 (coral porites) [2] and JCt-1 (Giant Clam) [3]. This boron isotope interlaboratory comparison study has two aims: (i) to assess to what extent chemical pre-treatment, aimed at removing organic material, can influence the resulting carbonate δ11B; (ii) to determine the isotopic composition of the two reference materials with a number of analytical techniques to provide the community with reference δ11B values for JCp-1 and JCt-1 and to further explore any differences related to analytical technique. In total eight isotope laboratories participated, of which one determined δ11B via negative thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (NTIMS) and seven used multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). For the latter several different introduction systems and chemical purification methods were used. Overall the results are strikingly consistent between the participating labs. The oxidation of organic material slightly lowered the median δ11B by ~0.1 ‰ for both JCp-1 and JCt-1, while the mean δ11B of all labs for both standards was lowered by 0

  19. The Li isotope composition of modern biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, M.; West, A. J.; Adkins, J. F.; Paris, G.; Eagle, R.; Freitas, P. S.; Bagard, M. L.; Ries, J. B.; Corsetti, F. A.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium stable isotope composition (δ7Li) of sedimentary carbonates has great potential to unravel weathering rates and intensity in the past, with implications for understanding the carbon cycle over geologic time. However, so far very little is known about the potential influence of fractionation of the stable Li isotope composition of biogenic carbonates. Here, we investigate the δ7Li of various organisms (particularly mollusks, echinoderms and brachiopods) abundant in the Phanerozoic record, in order to understand which geologic archives might provide the best targets for reconstructing past seawater composition. The range of measured samples includes (i) modern calcite and aragonite shells from variable natural environments, (ii) shells from organisms grown under controlled conditions (temperature, salinity, pCO2), and (iii) fossil shells from a range of species collected from Miocene deposits. When possible, both the inner and outer layers of bivalves were micro-sampled to assess the intra-shell heterogeneity. For calcitic shells, the measured δ7Li of bivalve species range from +32 to +41‰ and is systematically enriched in the heavy isotope relative to seawater (31 ‰) and to inorganic calcite, which is characterized by Δ7Licalcite-seawater = -2 to -5‰ [1]. The Li isotope composition of aragonitic bivalves, ranging from +16 to +22‰, is slightly fractionated to both high and low δ7Li relative to inorganic aragonite. The largest intra-shell Li isotope variability is observed for mixed calcite-aragonite shells (more than 20‰) whereas in single mineralogy shells, intra-shell δ7Li variability is generally less than 3‰. Overall, these results suggest a strong influence of vital effects on Li isotopes during bio-calcification of bivalve shells. On the contrary, measured brachiopods systematically exhibit fractionation that is very similar to inorganic calcite, with a mean δ7Li of 27.0±1.5‰, suggesting that brachiopods may provide good

  20. Local and regional oscillations of carbon and oxygen isotopes in terestrial carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipitytė, Raminta; Stančikaitė, Miglė

    2014-05-01

    Stable isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen in sediment carbonates are used as a tool to identify climatic changes in the past [1], [2]. Carbon is more related to humidity whereas oxygen is thought to respond the temperature [2]. Nevertheless number of questions about local, regional and global scale impacts to these records is left. In this research work carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in lacustrine carbonates are used to identify palaeoenvironmental dynamics of different locations. Samples of lacutrine carbonates were obtained from 8 sequences of different sites in Lithuania (4), Poland (1), Belarus (1) and Kaliningrad (1). Every sequence was divided into 2 cm intervals. The study showed differences in average carbon and oxygen isotope ratios between Lithuania and other countries (Poland, Belarus and Kaliningrad). Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in 4 sites in Lithuania are: ¯U la δ13C -4.72± 2.11, o and δ18O -9.46± 1.9, o ; Zervynos δ13C -4.79± 1.82, o and δ18O -9.57± 1.69, o ; Rudnia δ13C -4.94± 7.53, o and δ18O -9.3± 3.92, o ; Pauliai δ13C -4.15± 0.67, o and δ18O -9.94± 1.07, o : In other countries: Poland δ13C -1.07± 1.94, o and δ18O -7.69± 0.95, o ; Belarus δ13C 0.97± 1.94, o and δ18O -7.61± 1.42, o ; Kaliningrad δ13C -1.14± 1.43, o and δ18O -6.51± 1.00, o : Average stable carbon and oxygen isotope values from four sites in Lithuania were -4.65 o for carbon and -9.51 o for oxygen. Despite homogeneity of average isotope signals in these four sites there are relatively large oscillations of isotopic values in Rudnia and relatively small in Pauliai. These oscillations could be related to local characteristics of particular place such as environmental conditions, water balance, input of terrigenous materials into basin, etc. Total amount of CaCO3 could also play a significant role in reconstructing palaeoenvironment from stable isotopes and creating isomaps. The comparison of isotope records from different locations could enable to

  1. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (-4.3 to -16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from -27.5 to -25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic carbonate

  2. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (‑4.3 to ‑16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from ‑27.5 to ‑25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic

  3. Climate warming, euxinia and carbon isotope perturbations during the Carnian (Triassic) Crisis in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. D.; Wignall, P. B.; Joachimski, M. M.; Bond, D. P. G.; Grasby, S. E.; Lai, X. L.; Wang, L. N.; Zhang, Z. T.; Sun, S.

    2016-06-01

    The Carnian Humid Episode (CHE), also known as the Carnian Pluvial Event, and associated biotic changes are major enigmas of the Mesozoic record in western Tethys. We show that the CHE also occurred in eastern Tethys (South China), suggestive of a much more widespread and probably global climate perturbation. Oxygen isotope records from conodont apatite indicate a double-pulse warming event. The CHE coincided with an initial warming of 4 °C. This was followed by a transient cooling period and then a prolonged ∼7 °C warming in the later Carnian (Tuvalian 2). Carbon isotope perturbations associated with the CHE of western Tethys occurred contemporaneously in South China, and mark the start of a prolonged period of carbon cycle instability that persisted until the late Carnian. The dry-wet transition during the CHE coincides with the negative carbon isotope excursion and the temperature rise, pointing to an intensification of hydrologic cycle activities due to climatic warming. While carbonate platform shutdown in western Tethys is associated with an influx of siliciclastic sediment, the eastern Tethyan carbonate platforms are overlain by deep-water anoxic facies. The transition from oxygenated to euxinic facies was via a condensed, manganiferous carbonate (MnO content up to 15.1 wt%), that records an intense Mn shuttle operating in the basin. Significant siliciclastic influx in South China only occurred after the CHE climatic changes and was probably due to foreland basin development at the onset of the Indosinian Orogeny. The mid-Carnian biotic crisis thus coincided with several phenomena associated with major extinction events: a carbonate production crisis, climate warming, δ13 C oscillations, marine anoxia, biotic turnover and flood basalt eruptions (of the Wrangellia Large Igneous Province).

  4. The clumped isotope geothermometer in soil and paleosol carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, J.; Eiler, J.; Daëron, M.; Achyuthan, H.

    2013-03-01

    We studied both modern soils and buried paleosols in order to understand the relationship of temperature (T°C(47)) estimated from clumped isotope compositions (Δ47) of soil carbonates to actual surface and burial temperatures. Carbonates from modern soils with differing rainfall seasonality were sampled from Arizona, Nevada, Tibet, Pakistan, and India. T°C(47) obtained from these soils shows that soil carbonate forms in the warmest months of the year, in the late morning to afternoon, and probably in response to intense soil dewatering. T°C(47) obtained from modern soil carbonate ranges from 10.8 to 39.5 °C. On average, T°C(47) exceeds mean annual temperature by 10-15 °C due to summertime bias in soil carbonate formation, and to summertime ground heating by incident solar radiation. Secondary controls on T°C(47) are soil depth and shading. Site mean annual air temperature (MAAT) across a broad range (0-30 °C) of site temperatures is highly correlated with T°C(47) from soils, following the equation: MAAT(°C)=1.20(T°C(47)0)-21.72(r2=0.92) where T°C(47)0 is the effective air temperature at the site estimated from T°C(47). The effective air temperature represents the air temperature required to account for the T°C(47) at each site, after consideration of variations in T°C(47) with soil depth and ground heating. The highly correlated relationship in this equation should now permit mean annual temperature in the past to be reconstructed from T°C(47) in paleosol carbonate, assuming one is studying paleosols that formed in environments generally similar in seasonality and ground cover to our calibration sites. T°C(47)0 decreases systematically with elevation gain in the Himalaya, following the equation: elevation(m)=-229(T°C(47)0)+9300(r2=0.95) Assuming that temperature varied similarly with elevation in the past, this equation can be used to reconstruct paleoelevation from clumped isotope analysis of ancient soil carbonates. We also measured T°C(47

  5. Bivalve tissue as a carbon and nitrogen isotope baseline indicator in coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumori, Kayoko; Oi, Misa; Doi, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Okuda, Noboru; Miller, Todd W.; Kuwae, Michinobu; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Genkai-Kato, Motomi; Koizumi, Yoshitsugu; Omori, Koji; Takeoka, Hidetaka

    2008-08-01

    Pinctada fucata martensii mantle tissue and gut contents were examined as baseline indicators of carbon and nitrogen isotope composition at six stations in the Uwa Sea, Japan. Substantial variations in δ13C and δ15N values of oysters among stations were observed, with δ13C being consistently lower at Hiburi Island (-18.1‰) than at other stations (-17.2‰). Oysters from fish farm sites were enriched in δ15N (8.1‰) relative to those from unaffected sites (6.8‰), suggesting that fish farming tends to increase baseline δ15N values. The mean Δ δ13C (0.8‰) was consistent over space and time, whereas the average Δ δ15N slightly increased in summer. The relatively low δ15N enrichment compared to the theoretical isotope fractionation factor (3.4‰) may be due to oyster-specific physiological attributes. Carbon and nitrogen isotope turnover rates were roughly similar within a tissue, and mantle tissue turnover rate was estimated to be 120-180 days. These results indicated that oysters are long-term integrators of δ13C and δ15N from their diet and that δ13C of oysters is a more accurate bioindicator of isotopic baselines than δ15N for marine ecological studies.

  6. Effects of Water on Carbonate Clumped Isotope Bond Reordering Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, D. C.; Passey, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope geothermometry is a powerful tool for reconstructing past temperatures, both in surface environments and in the shallow crust. The method is based on heavy isotope "clumps" within single carbonate groups (e.g., 13C18O16O2-2), whose overabundance beyond levels predicted by chance is determined by mineralization temperature. The degree of clumped isotope overabundance can change at elevated temperatures (ca. >100ºC) owing to solid-state diffusion of C and O through the mineral lattice. Understanding the kinetics of this clumped isotope reordering process is a prerequisite for application to geological questions involving samples that have been heated in the subsurface. Thus far, the effect of water on reordering kinetics has not been explored. The presence of water dramatically increases rates of oxygen self-diffusion in calcite, but whether this water-enhanced diffusion is limited to the mineral surface or extends into the bulk crystal lattice is not clear. Here we present experimentally determined Arrhenius parameters for reordering rates in optical calcite heated under aqueous high pressure (100 MPa) conditions. We observe only marginal increases in reordering rates under these wet, high pressure conditions relative to rates observed for the same material reacted under dry, low pressure conditions. The near identical clumped isotope reordering rates for wet and dry conditions contrasts with the orders of magnitude increase in oxygen diffusivity at the mineral surface when water is present. This suggests the latter effect arises from surface reactions that have minimal influence on the diffusivity of C or O in the bulk mineral. Our results also imply that previously published reordering kinetics determined under dry, low pressure experimental conditions are applicable to geological samples that have been heated in the presence of water.

  7. The carbon and oxygen isotope records of reef-dwelling foraminifers subjected to five varied pCO2 seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikami, M.; Ishimura, T.; Suzuki, A.; Nojiri, Y.; Kawahata, H.

    2013-12-01

    in imperforate. For oxygen isotope ratio variation possibility among species would be caused by their Mg-content concentration in calcite shells. The distinct difference in the level of carbon isotope ratio between pure calcite and perforate foraminifera might be influenced by the degree of dependency on metabolic CO2 used for shell construction. The imperforate species would use most carbon derived from bicarbonate ion of seawater directly because the carbon isotope ratio of shell is almost same to that of pure calcite. Therefore, oxygen and carbon isotope ratio of foraminiferal test have the potential to reveal calcification mechanism of two species.

  8. Allochthonous carbon hypothesis for bulk OM and n-alkane PETM carbon isotope discrepancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczynski, A. A.; McInerney, F. A.; Wing, S. L.; Kraus, M. J.; Fricke, H. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a period of abrupt, transient, and large-scale global warming fueled by a large release of isotopically light carbon, is a relevant analogue for episodes of rapid global warming and recovery. The PETM is recorded in pedogenic carbonate, bulk organic matter, and n-alkanes as a prominent negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) in paleosols exposed in the Bighorn Basin, WY. Here we present a composite stable carbon isotope record from n-alkanes and dispersed soil organic δ13C records from five individual sections that span the PETM in the southeastern Bighorn Basin. Four sections are from a 10km transect in the Cabin Fork area and one section was collected at Sand Creek Divide. These five new dispersed organic carbon (DOC) isotope records are compared to the previously published Polecat Bench (Magioncalda et al. 2004) and Honeycombs (Yans et al. 2006) isotope records. The high-resolution n-alkane curve shows an abrupt, negative shift in δ13C values, an extended CIE body, and a rapid recovery to more positive δ13C values. Although the five DOC records show similarly abrupt negative shifts in δ13C values, the DOC CIEs are compressed, smaller in magnitude, and return to more positive δ13C values more gradually relative to the n-alkane record. Moreover, the stratigraphic thickness of the body of the excursion and the pattern of the recovery phase are not consistent among the five DOC records. We modeled predicted DOC δ13C values from the n-alkane record by applying enrichment factors based on modern plants to the n-alkane δ13C values. The anomaly, difference between the expected and observed DOC δ13C values, was calculated for the PETM records and compared to weight percent carbon and grain size. There is no correlation between pre- and post-PETM anomaly values and grain size or weight percent carbon. PETM anomaly values, however, do trend with both grain size and weight percent carbon. The largest PETM anomaly values

  9. STABLE ISOTOPIC EVIDENCE OF CARBON AND NITROGEN USE IN CULTURED ECTOMYCORRHIZAL AND SAPROTROPHIC FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes in sporocarps have proven useful for inferring ectomycorrhizal or saprotrophic status and understanding carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilization. However, greater understanding of processes producing isotopic concentrations is needed. We measured natural abundanc...

  10. Interpreting bryophyte stable carbon isotope composition: Plants as temporal and spatial climate recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royles, Jessica; Horwath, Aline B.; Griffiths, Howard

    2014-04-01

    are unable to control tissue water content although physiological adaptations allow growth in a wide range of habitats. Carbon isotope signals in two mosses (Syntrichia ruralis and Chorisodontium aciphyllum) and two liverworts (Conocephalum conicum and Marchantia polymorpha), whether instantaneous (real time, Δ13C), or organic matter (as δ13COM), provide an assimilation-weighted summary of bryophyte environmental adaptations. In mosses, δ13COM is within the measured range of Δ13C values, which suggests that other proxies, such as compound-specific organic signals, will be representative of historical photosynthetic and growth conditions. The liverworts were photosynthetically active over a wider range of relative water contents (RWC) than the mosses. There was a consistent 5‰ offset between Δ13C values in C. conicum and M. polymorpha, suggestive of greater diffusion limitation in the latter. Analysis of a C. aciphyllum moss-peat core showed the isotopic composition over the past 200 years reflects recent anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Once corrected for source-CO2 inputs, the seasonally integrated Δ13COM between 1350 and 2000 A.D. varied by 1.5‰ compared with potential range of the 12‰ measured experimentally, demonstrating the relatively narrow range of conditions under which the majority of net assimilation takes place. Carbon isotope discrimination also varies spatially, with a 4‰ shift in epiphytic bryophyte organic matter found between lowland Amazonia and upper montane tropical cloud forest in the Peruvian Andes, associated with increased diffusion limitation.

  11. Photosynthetic Fractionation of the Stable Isotopes of Oxygen and Carbon.

    PubMed Central

    Guy, R. D.; Fogel, M. L.; Berry, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Isotope discrimination during photosynthetic exchange of O2 and CO2 was measured using enzyme, thylakoid, and whole cell preparations. Evolved oxygen from isolated spinach thylakoids was isotopically identical (within analytical error) to its source water. Similar results were obtained with Anacystis nidulans Richter and Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin cultures purged with helium. For consumptive reactions, discrimination ([delta], where 1 + [delta]/1000 equals the isotope effect, k16/k18 or k12/k13) was determined by analysis of residual substrate (O2 or CO2). The [delta] for the Mehler reaction, mediated by ferredoxin or methylviologen, was 15.3[per mille (thousand) sign]. Oxygen isotope discrimination during oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) catalyzed by RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was 21.3[per mille (thousand) sign] and independent of enzyme source, unlike carbon isotope discrimination: 30.3[per mille (thousand) sign] for spinach enzyme and 19.6 to 23[per mille (thousand) sign] for Rhodospirillum rubrum and A. nidulans enzymes, depending on reaction conditions. The [delta] for O2 consumption catalyzed by glycolate oxidase was 22.7[per mille (thousand) sign]. The expected overall [delta] for photorespiration is about 21.7[per mille (thousand) sign]. Consistent with this, when Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesophyll cells approached the compensation point within a sealed vessel, the [delta]18O of dissolved O2 came to a steady-state value of about 21.5[per mille (thousand) sign] relative to the source water. The results provide improved estimates of discrimination factors in several reactions prominent in the global O cycle and indicate that photorespiration plays a significant part in determining the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. PMID:12231663

  12. Photosynthetic fractionation of the stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, R.D. ); Fogel, M.L.; Berry, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Isotope discrimination during photosynthetic exchange of O[sub 2] and CO[sub 2] was measured using enzyme, thylakoid, and whole cell preparations. Evolved oxygen from isolated spinach thylakoids was isotopically identical (within analytical error) to its source water. Similar results were obtained with Anacystis nidulans Richter and Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin cultures purged with helium. For consumptive reactions, discrimination ([triangle], where 1 + [triangle]/1000 equals the isotope effect, k[sup 16]/k[sup 18] or k[sup 12]/k[sup 13]) was determined by analysis of residual substrate (O[sub 2] or CO[sub 2]). The [triangle] for the Mehler reaction, mediated by ferredoxin or methylviologen, was 15.3[per thousand]. Oxygen isotope discrimination during oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) catalyzed by RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was 21.3[per thousand] and independent of enzyme source, unlike carbon isotope dicrimination: 30.3[per thousand] for spinach enzyme and 19.6 to 23[per thousand] for Rhodospirillum rubrum and A. nidulans enzymes, depending on reaction conditions. The [triangle] for O[sub 2] consumption catalyzed by glycolate oxidase was 22.7[per thousand]. Consistent with this, when Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesopyll cells approached the compensation point within a sealed vessel, the [delta][sup 18]O of dissolved O[sub 2] came to a steady-state value of about 21.5[per thousand] relative to the source water. The results provide improved estimates of discrimination factors in several reactions prominent in the global oxygen cycle and indicate that photorespiration plays a significant part in determining the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. 47 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Determination of the carbon content of airborne fungal spores.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Heidi; Kasper-Giebl, Anne; Zibuschka, Franziska; Hitzenberger, Regina; Kraus, Gunther F; Puxbaum, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Airborne fungal spores contribute potentially to the organic carbon of the atmospheric aerosol, mainly in the "coarse aerosol" size range 2.5-10 microm aerodynamic equivalent diameter (aed). Here, we report about a procedure to determine the organic carbon content of fungal spores frequently observed in the atmosphere. Furthermore, we apply a new (carbon/individual) factor to quantify the amount of fungal-spores-derived organic carbon in aerosol collected at a mountain site in Austria. Spores of representatives of Cladosporium sp., Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., and Alternaria sp., the four predominant airborne genera, were analyzed for their carbon content using two different analytical procedures. The result was an average carbon content of 13 pg C/spore (RSD, 46%), or expressed as a carbon-per-volume ratio, 0.38 pg C/microm3 (RSD, 30%). These values are comparable to conversion factors for bacteria and some representatives of the zooplankton. Because biopolymers are suspected of interfering with elemental carbon determination by thermal methods, the amount of "fungal carbon" that might be erroneously mistaken for soot carbon was determined using the "two-step combustion" method of Cachier et al. and termed as "apparent elemental carbon" (AEC). This fraction amounted to up to 46% of the initial fungal carbon content. Although the aerosol samples were collected in March under wintry conditions, the organic carbon from fungal spores amounted to 2.9-5.4% of organic carbon in the "coarse mode" size fraction.

  14. Boron isotope evidence for oceanic carbon dioxide leakage during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Botí, M A; Marino, G; Foster, G L; Ziveri, P; Henehan, M J; Rae, J W B; Mortyn, P G; Vance, D

    2015-02-12

    Atmospheric CO2 fluctuations over glacial-interglacial cycles remain a major challenge to our understanding of the carbon cycle and the climate system. Leading hypotheses put forward to explain glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations invoke changes in deep-ocean carbon storage, probably modulated by processes in the Southern Ocean, where much of the deep ocean is ventilated. A central aspect of such models is that, during deglaciations, an isolated glacial deep-ocean carbon reservoir is reconnected with the atmosphere, driving the atmospheric CO2 rise observed in ice-core records. However, direct documentation of changes in surface ocean carbon content and the associated transfer of carbon to the atmosphere during deglaciations has been hindered by the lack of proxy reconstructions that unambiguously reflect the oceanic carbonate system. Radiocarbon activity tracks changes in ocean ventilation, but not in ocean carbon content, whereas proxies that record increased deglacial upwelling do not constrain the proportion of upwelled carbon that is degassed relative to that which is taken up by the biological pump. Here we apply the boron isotope pH proxy in planktic foraminifera to two sediment cores from the sub-Antarctic Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific as a more direct tracer of oceanic CO2 outgassing. We show that surface waters at both locations, which partly derive from deep water upwelled in the Southern Ocean, became a significant source of carbon to the atmosphere during the last deglaciation, when the concentration of atmospheric CO2 was increasing. This oceanic CO2 outgassing supports the view that the ventilation of a deep-ocean carbon reservoir in the Southern Ocean had a key role in the deglacial CO2 rise, although our results allow for the possibility that processes operating in other regions may also have been important for the glacial-interglacial ocean-atmosphere exchange of carbon. PMID:25673416

  15. Boron isotope evidence for oceanic carbon dioxide leakage during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Botí, M A; Marino, G; Foster, G L; Ziveri, P; Henehan, M J; Rae, J W B; Mortyn, P G; Vance, D

    2015-02-12

    Atmospheric CO2 fluctuations over glacial-interglacial cycles remain a major challenge to our understanding of the carbon cycle and the climate system. Leading hypotheses put forward to explain glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations invoke changes in deep-ocean carbon storage, probably modulated by processes in the Southern Ocean, where much of the deep ocean is ventilated. A central aspect of such models is that, during deglaciations, an isolated glacial deep-ocean carbon reservoir is reconnected with the atmosphere, driving the atmospheric CO2 rise observed in ice-core records. However, direct documentation of changes in surface ocean carbon content and the associated transfer of carbon to the atmosphere during deglaciations has been hindered by the lack of proxy reconstructions that unambiguously reflect the oceanic carbonate system. Radiocarbon activity tracks changes in ocean ventilation, but not in ocean carbon content, whereas proxies that record increased deglacial upwelling do not constrain the proportion of upwelled carbon that is degassed relative to that which is taken up by the biological pump. Here we apply the boron isotope pH proxy in planktic foraminifera to two sediment cores from the sub-Antarctic Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific as a more direct tracer of oceanic CO2 outgassing. We show that surface waters at both locations, which partly derive from deep water upwelled in the Southern Ocean, became a significant source of carbon to the atmosphere during the last deglaciation, when the concentration of atmospheric CO2 was increasing. This oceanic CO2 outgassing supports the view that the ventilation of a deep-ocean carbon reservoir in the Southern Ocean had a key role in the deglacial CO2 rise, although our results allow for the possibility that processes operating in other regions may also have been important for the glacial-interglacial ocean-atmosphere exchange of carbon.

  16. Carbon isotopic fractionation of CFCs during abiotic and biotic degradation.

    PubMed

    Archbold, Marie E; Elliot, Trevor; Kalin, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    Carbon stable isotope ((13)C) fractionation in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds arising from abiotic (chemical) degradation using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and biotic (landfill gas attenuation) processes is investigated. Batch tests (at 25 °C) for CFC-113 and CFC-11 using ZVI show quantitative degradation of CFC-113 to HCFC-123a and CFC-1113 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to a half-life (τ(1/2)) of 20.5 h, and a ZVI surface-area normalized rate constant (k(SA)) of -(9.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-5) L m(-2) h(-1). CFC-11 degraded to trace HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to τ(1/2) = 17.3 h and k(SA) = -(1.2 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) L m(-2) h(-1). Significant kinetic isotope effects of ε(‰) = -5.0 ± 0.3 (CFC-113) and -17.8 ± 4.8 (CFC-11) were observed. Compound-specific carbon isotope analyses also have been used here to characterize source signatures of CFC gases (HCFC-22, CFC-12, HFC-134a, HCFC-142b, CFC-114, CFC-11, CFC-113) for urban (UAA), rural/remote (RAA), and landfill (LAA) ambient air samples, as well as in situ surface flux chamber (FLUX; NO FLUX) and landfill gas (LFG) samples at the Dargan Road site, Northern Ireland. The latter values reflect biotic degradation and isotopic fractionation in LFG production, and local atmospheric impact of landfill emissions through the cover. Isotopic fractionations of Δ(13)C ∼ -13‰ (HCFC-22), Δ(13)C ∼ -35‰ (CFC-12) and Δ(13)C ∼ -15‰ (CFC-11) were observed for LFG in comparison to characteristic solvent source signatures, with the magnitude of the isotopic effect for CFC-11 apparently similar to the kinetic isotope effect for (abiotic) ZVI degradation. PMID:22191586

  17. A carbon isotope record of CO2 levels during the late Quaternary.

    PubMed

    Jasper, J P; Hayes, J M

    1990-10-01

    Analyses of gases trapped in continental ice sheets have shown that the concentration of CO2 in the Earth's early atmosphere increased from 180 to 280 p.p.m. during the most recent glacial-interglacial transition. This change must have been driven by an increase in the concentration of CO2 dissolved in the mixed layer of the ocean. Biochemical and physiological factors associated with photosynthetic carbon fixation in this layer should lead to a relationship between concentrations of dissolved CO2 and the carbon isotopic composition of phytoplanktonic organic material, such that increased atmospheric CO2 should enhance the difference in 13C content between dissolved inorganic carbon and organic products of photosynthesis. Here we show that a signal related to atmospheric CO2 levels can be seen in the isotope record of a hemipelagic sediment core, which we can correlate with the CO2 record of the Vostok ice core. Calibration of the relationship between isotope fractionation and CO2 levels should permit the extrapolation of CO2 records to times earlier than those for which ice-core records are available.

  18. Measurement of Absolute Carbon Isotope Ratios: Mechanisms and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.; Giacomo, J. A.; Dueker, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    An accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) produced absolute isotope ratio measurements for 14C/13C as tested against >500 samples of NIST SRM-4990-C (OxII 14C standard) to an accuracy of 2.2±0.6‰ over a period of one year with measurements made to 1% counting statistics. The spectrometer is not maximized for 13C/12C, but measured ∂13C to 0.4±0.1‰ accuracy, with known methods for improvement. An AMS produces elemental anions from a sputter ion source and includes a charge-changing collision in a gas cell to isolate the rare 14C from the common isotopes and molecular isobars. Both these physical processes have been modeled to determine the parameters providing such absolute measures. Neutral resonant ionization in a cesium plasma produces mass-independent ionization, while velocity dependent charge-state distributions in gas collisions produce relative ion beam intensities that are linear in mass at specific collision energies. The mechanisms are not specific to carbon isotopes, but stand alone absolute IRMS (AIR-MS) instruments have not yet been made. Aside from the obvious applications in metrology, AIR-MS is particularly valuable in coupled separatory MS because no internal or external standards are required. Sample definition processes can be compared, even if no exact standard reference sample exists. Isotope dilution measurements do not require standards matching the dilution end-points and can be made over an extended, even extrapolated, range.

  19. Bone formation ability of carbonate apatite-collagen scaffolds with different carbonate contents.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Ayumu; Kubo, Takayasu; Doi, Kazuya; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Morita, Kouji; Yokota, Rie; Hayashi, Hidetaka; Hirata, Isao; Okazaki, Masayuki; Akagawa, Yasumasa

    2009-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite and carbonate apatites with different carbonate contents were synthesized, mixed with atelocollagen, and made into sponge scaffolds. The scaffolds were implanted into the bone sockets of the femurs of male New Zealand white rabbits for 2, 3, 12 and 24 weeks. carbonate apatite-collagen scaffold with 4.8 wt% carbonate content appeared to have similar crystallinity and chemical composition to human bone. When the scaffolds were implanted into the rabbit femurs, histological observation indicated that the carbonate apatites-collagen scaffolds with relatively higher carbonate contents were gradually deformed throughout the implantation period, and showed uniform surrounding bone after 24 weeks and could not be distinguished. The carbonate apatite-collagen scaffold with 4.8 wt% carbonate content showed the highest bone area ratio of all of the scaffolds. It is suggested that a carbonate apatite-collagen scaffold with carbonate content similar to that of human bone may have optimal bone formation ability.

  20. Combined carbonate carbon isotopic and cellular ultrastructural studies of individual benthic foraminifera: Method description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jonathan B.; Bernhard, Joan M.; Curtis, Jason; Rathburn, Anthony E.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon isotopes of foraminiferal tests provide a widely used proxy for past oceanographic environmental conditions. This proxy can be calibrated using live specimens, which are reliably identified with observations of cell ultrastructure. Observations of ultrastructures can also be used for studies of biological characteristics such as diet and presence of symbionts. Combining biological and isotopic studies on individual foraminifera could provide novel information, but standard isotopic methods destroy ultrastructures by desiccating specimens and observations of ultrastructure require removal of carbonate tests, preventing isotope measurements. The approach described here preserves cellular ultrastructure during isotopic analyses by keeping the foraminifera in an aqueous buffer (Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS)). The technique was developed and standardized with 36 aliquots of NBS-19 standard of similar weight to foraminiferal tests (5 to 123 μg). Standard errors ranged from ± 0.06 to ± 0.85‰ and were caused by CO2 contaminants dissolved in the PBS. The technique was used to measure δ13C values of 96 foraminifera, 10 of which do not precipitate carbonate tests. Calcareous foraminiferal tests had corrected carbon isotope ratios of -8.5 to +3.2‰. This new technique allows comparisons of isotopic compositions of tests made by foraminifera known to be alive at the time of collection with their biological characteristics such as prey composition and presence or absence of putative symbionts. The approach may be applied to additional biomineralizing organisms such as planktonic foraminifera, pteropods, corals, and coccolithophores to elucidate certain biological controls on their paleoceanographic proxy signatures.

  1. CARBON ISOTOPE AND ISOTOPOMER FRACTIONATION IN COLD DENSE CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2011-04-10

    We construct a gas-grain chemical network model which includes carbon isotopes ({sup 12}C and {sup 13}C) with an emphasis on isotopomer-exchange reactions. Temporal variations of molecular abundances, the carbon isotope ratios ({sup 12}CX/{sup 13}CX), and the isotopomer ratios ({sup 12}C{sup 13}CX/{sup 13}C{sup 12}CX) of CCH and CCS in cold dense cloud cores are investigated by numerical calculations. We confirm that the isotope ratios of molecules, both in the gas phase and grain surfaces, are significantly different depending on whether the molecule is formed from the carbon atom (ion) or the CO molecule. Molecules formed from carbon atoms have CX/{sup 13}CX ratios greater than the elemental abundance ratio of [{sup 12}C/{sup 13}C]. On the other hand, molecules formed from CO molecules have CX/{sup 13}CX ratios smaller than the [{sup 12}C/{sup 13}C] ratio. We reproduce the observed C{sup 13}CH/{sup 13}CCH ratio in TMC-1, if the isotopomer-exchange reaction, {sup 13}CCH + H {r_reversible} C{sup 13}CH + H + 8.1 K, proceeds with the forward rate coefficient k{sub f} > 10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}. However, the C{sup 13}CS/{sup 13}CCS ratio is lower than that observed in TMC-1. We then assume the isotopomer-exchange reaction catalyzed by the H atom, {sup 13}CCS + H {r_reversible} C{sup 13}CS + H + 17.4 K. In the model with this reaction, we reproduce the observed C{sup 13}CS/{sup 13}CCS, CCS/C{sup 13}CS, and CCS/{sup 13}CCS ratios simultaneously.

  2. Literature review of United States utilities computer codes for calculating actinide isotope content in irradiated fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, W.C.; Lu, Ming-Shih

    1991-12-01

    This paper reviews the accuracy and precision of methods used by United States electric utilities to determine the actinide isotopic and element content of irradiated fuel. After an extensive literature search, three key code suites were selected for review. Two suites of computer codes, CASMO and ARMP, are used for reactor physics calculations; the ORIGEN code is used for spent fuel calculations. They are also the most widely used codes in the nuclear industry throughout the world. Although none of these codes calculate actinide isotopics as their primary variables intended for safeguards applications, accurate calculation of actinide isotopic content is necessary to fulfill their function.

  3. Dietary interpretations for extinct megafauna using coprolites, intestinal contents and stable isotopes: Complimentary or contradictory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wood, Jamie R.; Bocherens, Herve; Rogers, Karyne M.

    2016-06-01

    For many extinct species, direct evidence of diet (e.g. coprolites, gizzard/intestinal contents) is not available, and indirect dietary evidence (e.g. stable isotopes) must be relied upon. The Late Holocene fossil record of New Zealand provides a unique opportunity to contrast palaeodietary reconstructions for the extinct moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) using stable isotopes and coprolite/gizzard contents. Palaeodietary reconstructions from isotopes are found to contradict those based on direct dietary evidence. We discuss reasons for this and advocate, where possible, for the use of multiple lines of evidence in reconstructing the diets of extinct species.

  4. Carbon and oxygen isotopes in apatite CO/sub 2/ and co-existing calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodny, Y.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1981-04-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopes were analyzed in carbonate apatite CO/sub 2/ and in co-existing calcite. Both C and O in apatite CO/sub 2/ are enriched in the respective light isotopes relative to calcite. These results confirm the proposition that carbonate is part of the apatite structure.

  5. Carbon isotopic composition of deep carbon gases in an ombrogenous peatland, northwestern Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Aravena, R. . Center for Groundwater Research and Wetlands Research Center); Warner, B.G. . Wetlands Research Center and Dept. of Geography); Charman, D.J. . Dept. of Geographical Sciences); Belyea, L.R. . School of Biological Sciences); Mathur, S.P. ); Dinel, H. )

    1993-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating and carbon isotope analyses of deep peat and gases in a small ombrogenous peatland in northwestern Ontario reveals the presence of old gases at depth that are 1000-2000 yr younger than the enclosing peat. The authors suggest that the most likely explanation to account for this age discrepancy is the downward movement by advection of younger dissolved organic carbon for use by fermentation and methanogens bacteria. This study identifies a potentially large supply of old carbon gases in peatlands that should be considered in global carbon models of the terrestrial biosphere.

  6. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    A probable mechanism of effect of processes occurring in the Earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis is considered. According to the hypothesis, this effect is realized through entrance to the Earth's atmosphere of carbon dioxide that stimulates photosynthesis. Supply of CO2 is irregular and is due to irregular movements of the Earth's crust plates. This is accompanied by destruction of carbonates and conversion of carbon of the organic matter to CO2 due to processes of reduction of sulfates. The CO2 content in atmosphere rises for relatively short orogenic periods, due to intensive crust plate movement, while for the subsequent long periods, called the geosynclinal ones, of the relatively slow plate movement, the CO2 content falls due to the higher rate of its consumption for photosynthesis. Owing to the carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying photosynthesis, regular isotopic differences appear between the atmospheric CO2 and the "living" matter (Relay's effect); these differences are then transformed to isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon. At the appearance in atmosphere of free oxygen--product of photosynthesis--in organisms there appears photorespiration that also is accompanied by fractionation of carbon isotopes, but with effect of opposite sign. This leads to enrichment of the photosynthesizing biomass with 13C isotope at the orogenic periods. As a result, the initially pronounced isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon decrease by the end of the geosyclinal periods. According to the proposed model, concentrations of CO2 and O2 are exchanged in the antiphase. They lead to alternation of periods of warning up and cooling off on the Earth. The former coincide with the orogenic periods, the latter appear at the end of geosyclinal periods when oxygen is accumulated in atmosphere, while organic substance in sediments. Accumulation of organic substance leads to formation of petroleum-maternal masses. To substantiate the

  7. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    A probable mechanism of effect of processes occurring in the Earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis is considered. According to the hypothesis, this effect is realized through entrance to the Earth's atmosphere of carbon dioxide that stimulates photosynthesis. Supply of CO2 is irregular and is due to irregular movements of the Earth's crust plates. This is accompanied by destruction of carbonates and conversion of carbon of the organic matter to CO2 due to processes of reduction of sulfates. The CO2 content in atmosphere rises for relatively short orogenic periods, due to intensive crust plate movement, while for the subsequent long periods, called the geosynclinal ones, of the relatively slow plate movement, the CO2 content falls due to the higher rate of its consumption for photosynthesis. Owing to the carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying photosynthesis, regular isotopic differences appear between the atmospheric CO2 and the "living" matter (Relay's effect); these differences are then transformed to isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon. At the appearance in atmosphere of free oxygen--product of photosynthesis--in organisms there appears photorespiration that also is accompanied by fractionation of carbon isotopes, but with effect of opposite sign. This leads to enrichment of the photosynthesizing biomass with 13C isotope at the orogenic periods. As a result, the initially pronounced isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon decrease by the end of the geosyclinal periods. According to the proposed model, concentrations of CO2 and O2 are exchanged in the antiphase. They lead to alternation of periods of warning up and cooling off on the Earth. The former coincide with the orogenic periods, the latter appear at the end of geosyclinal periods when oxygen is accumulated in atmosphere, while organic substance in sediments. Accumulation of organic substance leads to formation of petroleum-maternal masses. To substantiate the

  8. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  9. Stable and radioactive carbon in forest soils of Chhattisgarh, Central India: Implications for tropical soil carbon dynamics and stable carbon isotope evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, A. H.; Yadava, M. G.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Soils from two sites viz. Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, located ∼5 km apart in a tropical reserve forest (18°52‧N, 81°56‧E) in central India, have been explored for soil organic carbon (SOC) content, its mean residence time (MRT) and the evolution of stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C). SOC stocks in the upper 30 cm of soil layers are ∼5.3 kg/m2 and ∼3.0 kg/m2; in the upper 110 m are ∼10.7 kg/m2 and ∼7.8 kg/m2 at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively. SOC decreases with increasing depth. Bomb carbon signature is observed in the upper ∼10 cm. Organic matters in the top soil layers (0-10 cm) have MRTs of the order of a century which increases gradually with depths, reaching 3500-5000 yrs at ∼100 cm. δ13C values of SOC increase with depth, the carbon isotopic fractionation is obtained to be -1.2‰ and -3‰ for soils at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively, confirmed using Rayleigh isotopic fractionation model. The evolution of δ13C in soils was also studied using a modified Rayleigh fractionation model incorporating a continuous input into the reservoir: the depth profiles of δ13C for SOC show that the input organic matter from surface into the deeper soil layers is either insignificant or highly labile and decomposes quite fast in the top layers, thus making little contribution to the residual biomasses of the deeper layers. This is an attempt to understand the distillation processes that take place in SOC, assess the extent of decomposition by microbes and effect of percolation of fresh organic matter into dipper soil layers which are important for stable isotope based paleoclimate and paleovegetation reconstruction and understanding the dynamics of organic carbon in soils.

  10. PHOTOCHEMICALLY-INDUCED ALTERATION OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS (DELTA C-13) IN TERRIGENOUS DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of riverine waters to natural sunlight initiated alterations in stable carbon isotope ratios (delta C-13) of the associated dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Water samples were collected from two compositionally distinct coastal river systems in the southeastern United Sta...

  11. Stable carbon isotopes and the study of prehistoric human diet.

    PubMed

    Boutton, T W; Lynott, M J; Bumsted, M P

    1991-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of the stable carbon isotope composition (13C/12C or delta 13C) of bone collagen from human remains recovered at archaeological sites provides a direct chemical method for investigating dietary patterns of prehistoric human populations. This methodology is based on the facts that (1) different food items within the human diet have distinct delta 13C values, and (2) the delta 13C value of human bone collagen is determined by the delta 13C value of the diet. Studies of the development of subsistence patterns based on corn agriculture, one of the most significant developments in North American prehistory, can benefit from the use of stable carbon isotope techniques because corn has a high delta 13C value relative to other components of the human diet. Measurements of delta 13C of bone collagen from prehistoric human skeletal remains from southeastern Missouri and northeastern Arkansas indicate that intensive corn agriculture began in this region around A.D. 1000, that the incorporation of corn into the human diet was a rapid phenomenon, and that 35 to 77% of the human diet from A.D. 1000 to A.D. 1600 consisted of corn. Results from an isochronous population in southeastern South Dakota (A.D. 1400) suggest that 78 to 90% of the diet of this group consisted of corn, with no difference between males and females. Coupled with more traditional archaeological methods, stable carbon isotope analysis of bone collagen can significantly enhance reconstruction of dietary patterns of prehistoric humans.

  12. Physiological and environmental factors related to carbon isotopic variations in mollusc shell carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Krantz, D.E.; Williams, D.F.; Jones, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of mollusc shell carbonate has been used as a general environmental indicator in numerous studies, but relatively little is known of the factors which affect within-shell variation. Primary control of delta/sup 13/C values in shell carbonate comes from the dissolved bicarbonate source, particularly as related to marine versus fresh water. Present models explain cyclic variations in the delta/sup 13/C profiles of mollusc shells due to upwelling, phytoplankton productivity and stratification, disequilibrium with rapid shell growth, and infaunal versus epifaunal habitat. Carbon and oxygen isotopic profiles in this study were obtained from specimens of Spisula solidissima (surf clam) and Placopecten magellanicus (sea scallop) collected alive from 14 to 57 m water depths off the Virginia coast. Three main factors appear to affect the delta/sup 13/C profiles in these specimens. Isotopically light values commonly associated with the spring and occasionally the fall correspond with seasonal phytoplankton productivity. A significant negative delta/sup 13/C offset of the infaunal Spisula relative to the epifaunal Placopecten probably relates to the inclusion of isotopically more negative pore-water bicarbonate by Spisula. Additionally, occasional transient spikes in both the delta/sup 18/O and delta/sup 13/C profiles correspond to intrusion of reduced-salinity water.

  13. RAPID AND PRECISE METHOD FOR MEASURING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for rapid preparation, concentration and stable isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon (d13C-DIC). Liberation of CO2 was accomplished by placing 100 ?l phosphoric acid and 0.9 ml water in an evacuated 1.7-ml gas chromatography (GC) injection vial. Fo...

  14. A global deglacial negative carbon isotope excursion in speleothem calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breecker, D.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C values of speleothem calcite decreased globally during the last deglaciation defining a carbon isotope excursion (CIE) despite relatively constant δ13C values of carbon in the ocean-atmosphere system. The magnitude of the CIE varied with latitude, increasing poleward from ~2‰ in the tropics to as much as 7‰ at high latitudes. This recent CIE provides an interesting comparison with CIEs observed in deep time. A substantial portion of this CIE can be explained by the increase in atmospheric pCO2 that accompanied deglaciation. The dependence of C3 plant δ13C values on atmospheric pCO2 predicts a 2‰ δ13C decrease driven by the deglacial pCO2 increase. I propose that this signal was transferred to caves and thus explains nearly 100% of the CIE magnitude observed in the tropics and no less than 30% at the highest latitudes in the compilation. An atmospheric pCO2 control on speleothem δ13C values, if real, will need to be corrected for using ice core data before δ13C records can be interpreted in a paleoclimate context. The decrease in the magnitude of the equilibrium calcite-CO2 carbon isotope fractionation factor explains a maximum of 1‰ of the CIE at the highest northern latitude in the compilation, which experienced the largest deglacial warming. Much of the residual extratropical CIE was likely driven by increasing belowground respiration rates, which were presumably pronounced at high latitudes as glacial retreat exposed fresh surfaces and/or vegetation density increased. The largest increases in belowground respiration would have therefore occurred at the highest latitudes, explaining the meridional trend. This work supports the notion that increases in atmospheric pCO2 and belowground respiration rates can result in large CIEs recorded in terrestrial carbonates, which, as previously suggested, may explain the magnitude of the PETM CIE as recorded by paleosol carbonates.

  15. Chlorine and carbon isotopes fractionation during volatilization and diffusive transport of trichloroethene in the unsaturated zone.

    PubMed

    Jeannottat, Simon; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2012-03-20

    To apply compound-specific isotope methods to the evaluation of the origin and fate of organic contaminants in the unsaturated subsurface, the effect of physicochemical processes on isotope ratios needs to be known. The main objective of this study is to quantify chlorine and carbon isotope fractionation during NAPL-vapor equilibration, air-water partitioning, and diffusion of trichloroethene (TCE) and combinations of these effects during vaporization in porous media. Isotope fractionation is larger during NAPL-vapor equilibration than air-water partitioning. During NAPL-vapor equilibration, carbon, and chlorine isotope ratios evolve in opposite directions although both elements are present in the same bond, with a normal isotope effect for chlorine (ε(Cl) = -0.39 ± 0.03‰) and an inverse effect for carbon (ε(C) = +0.75 ± 0.04‰). During diffusion-controlled vaporization in a sand column, no significant carbon isotope fractionation is observed (ε(C) = +0.10 ± 0.05‰), whereas fairly strong chlorine isotope fractionation occurs (ε(Cl) = -1.39 ± 0.06‰) considering the molecular weight of TCE. In case of carbon, the inverse isotope fractionation associated with NAPL-vapor equilibration and normal diffusion isotope fractionation cancel, whereas for chlorine both processes are accompanied by normal isotope fractionation and hence they cumulate. A source of contamination that aged might thus show a shift toward heavier chlorine isotope ratios.

  16. Influence of nutrients on carbon isotope fractionation by natural populations of Prymnesiophyte algae in NE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eek, Magnus K.; Whiticar, Michael J.; Bishop, J. K. B.; Wong, C. S.

    1999-11-01

    Isotope effects by Prymnesiophyte algae were determined on samples of marine particulate organic material collected by MULVFS pumps during three C-JGOFS cruises along Line P in the northeast Pacific. Carbon isotope fractionation associated with photosynthetic carbon uptake was calculated from 13C/ 12C ratios of dissolved carbon dioxide and the C 37:2 alkenone, a biomarker originating from Prymnesiophyte algae. In the presence of nitrate (N) the magnitude of the carbon isotope fractionation ( ɛp) is dependent on dissolved phosphate concentration (PO 4) normalized to the concentration of dissolved carbon dioxide (C e), i.e. ɛp∝PO 4/C e for N≠0. In nitrate-depleted waters, the magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation is lower than expected from the ɛp vs PO 4/C e relationship. These results suggest that growth conditions approaching nitrogen starvation can severely affect carbon isotope fractionation in these paleo-climatically important algae.

  17. Mantle CO2 degassing through the Icelandic crust: Evidence from carbon isotopes in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árný E.; Heinemeier, Jan; Arnórsson, Stefán; Kjartansdóttir, Ríkey; Kristmannsdóttir, Hrefna

    2016-10-01

    Carbon isotopes of groundwater in Iceland were studied in order to determine the source and reactions of carbon at divergent plate boundaries not associated with active volcanic systems. All the waters were of meteoric origin, with temperatures of 1-130 °C, pH of ∼4.5-10.5 and dissolved inorganic carbon (∑CO2) between 1.8 and 4100 ppm. The measured range of δ13CO2 and 14CO2 in these waters was large, -27.4 to +2.0‰ and 0.6-118 pMC, respectively. The sources and reactions of dissolved inorganic carbon were studied by comparing the measured chemical and isotope composition with those simulated using isotope geochemical models. Three major sources of CO2 were identified: (1) dissolution of partially degassed basaltic rocks formed at the surface or shallow depths, (2) atmospheric CO2 through air-water exchange at surface, and (3) input of gas at depth into the groundwater systems that has similar carbon and isotope composition as the pre-erupted melt of the upper mantle and lower crust beneath Iceland. In the groundwater systems the CO2 chemistry and isotope content are modified due to carbonate mineral precipitation and changes in aqueous species distribution upon progressive water-rock interaction; these changes needed to be quantified in order to reveal the various CO2 sources. The CO2 flux of the Icelandic crust was estimated to be ∼5-10 · 1010 mol/yr with as high as 50% of the flux not associated with active volcanic centers but placed off-axis where a significant proportion of the CO2 may originate from the mantle. The mantle input of the groundwater off-axis corresponds to CO2 partial pressures of ∼10-6-1 bar and to a mantle CO2 flux of <5 · 105 mol/km2/yr for most areas and up to 125 · 105 and 1600 · 105 for the Southern Lowlands and Snæfellsnes Peninsula, respectively. The CO2 flux from active volcanic geothermal systems in Iceland was estimated to be ∼500-3000 · 105 mol CO2/km2/yr, considerably greater than the highest values observed off-axis.

  18. A process-based model for non-equilibrium clumped isotope effects in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; Hunt, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The equilibrium clumped isotope composition of carbonate minerals is independent of the composition of the aqueous solution. However, many carbonate minerals grow at rates that place them in a non-equilibrium regime with respect to carbon and oxygen isotopes with unknown consequences for clumped isotopes. We develop a process-based model that allows one to calculate the oxygen, carbon, and clumped isotope composition of calcite as a function of temperature, crystal growth rate, and solution pH. In the model, carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation occurs through the mass-dependent attachment/detachment kinetics of the isotopologues of HCO-3 and CO2-3 to and from the calcite surface, which in turn, influence the clumped isotope composition of calcite. At experimental and biogenic growth rates, the mineral is expected to inherit a clumped isotopic composition that is similar to that of the DIC pool, which helps to explain (1) why different organisms share the same clumped isotope versus temperature calibration curves, (2) why many inorganic calibration curves are slightly different from one another, and (3) why foraminifera, coccoliths, and deep sea corals can have near-equilibrium clumped isotope compositions but far-from-equilibrium carbon and oxygen isotope compositions. Some aspects of the model can be generalized to other mineral systems and should serve as a useful reference in future efforts to quantify kinetic clumped isotope effects.

  19. Modeling Chemical and Isotopic Variations in Lab Formed Hydrothermal Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Golden, D. C.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and mineralogical data (e.g. [1]) from Mars suggest that the history of liquid water on the planet was more sporadic in nature than long-lived. The non-equilibrium chemical and isotopic compositions of the carbonates preserved in the martian meteorite ALH84001 are direct evidence of ancient secondary minerals that have not undergone significant diagenesis or stabilization processes typical of long-lived aqueous systems on Earth. Thus secondary minerals and sediments on Mars may primarily record the characteristics of the aqueous environment in which they formed without being significantly overprinted by subsequent diagenetic processes during burial.

  20. The carbon isotopic composition of Novo Urei diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjenova, L. F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diamond grains isolated from the Novo Urei meteorite are discussed. A diamond separate was obtained from 2g of whole rock using the chemical treatments described aimed at obtaining very pure diamond. X ray diffraction of the residue, which represented 5000 ppm of the parent mass, indicated only the presence of the desired mineral. The diamond crystals were 1-30 microns in diameter, and some grains had a yellow color. The chemical treatments were followed by a size separation to give a 1-10 microns and a 5-30 microns fraction, which were named DNU-1 and DNU-2, respectively.

  1. Helium-carbon isotopic composition of thermal waters from Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourré, E.; Aiuppa, A.; di Napoli, R.; Parello, F.; Gaubi, E.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Allard, P.; Calabrese, S.; Ben Mammou, A.

    2010-12-01

    Tunisia has numerous thermo-mineral springs. Previous studies have shown that their chemical composition and occurrence are strongly influenced by the regional geology, however little work has been conducted to date to investigate the isotopic composition of volatiles associated with these geothermal manifestations. Here, we report the results of an extensive survey of both natural hot springs and production wells across Tunisia aimed at investigating the spatial distribution of the 3He/4He ratio and associated carbon isotopic compositions. With respect to helium isotopes, not unexpectedly, the lowest 3He/4He values (0.01-0.02 Ra) are associated with the old groundwaters of the “Continental Intercalaire” aquifer of the stable Saharan Platform. The 3He/4He values are equal to the crustal production ratio, with no detectable amount of mantle-derived 3He, in agreement with previous studies of helium isotopes in sedimentary basin, which conclude that tectonically-stable regions are essentially impermeable to mantle volatiles. The low 3He/4He domain extends to the entire Atlasic domain of central Tunisia. This Atlasic domain also displays the highest helium concentrations : along the Gafsa Fault, helium concentrations of 1777 and 4723 x 10-8 cm3STP/g (the highest value of our data set) are observed in the production wells of Sidi Ahmed Zarrouk. This emphasizes the role of deep tectonic features in channelling and transporting deep crustal volatiles to shallow levels. The eastern margin of Tunisia displays higher 3He/4He values indicative of a substantial mantle volatile input. The highest value is recorded in the carbo-gaseous mineral water of Ain Garci (2.4 Ra). This northeastern part of the African plate commonly referred to as the Pelagian block extends from Tunisia to Sicily and is characterized by strong extensional tectonics (Pantelleria rift zone) and present-day magmatic activity. This lithospheric stretching and decompressional mantle melts production in

  2. Isotope composition of carbon in the carbonates of the Gumbeykan scheelite deposits in the southern Urals

    SciTech Connect

    Korzhinskii, A.F.; Mamchur, G.P.; Yarynych, O.A.

    1980-10-01

    Through investigations of the isotope composition of carbon of various generations and carbonates from marbles, skarns, and nested and vein scheelite orebodies, the probable source of carbon of these carbonates has been established as a mixture of sedimentary carbonates, carbon dioxide with carbonic acid that was formed by oxidation of the organic matter from sedimentary terrane (..delta..C/sup 13/ - 0.05 to -0.62%). In the calcite and dolomite phenocrysts of marble and the coarse-grained dolostone, containing scheelite, the carbon was lighter (..delta..C/sup 13/ from -0.60 to -0.87%). For the dolomite and ankerite from scheelite pockets of the Balkan deposit and quartz veins of the Buranovo, ..delta..C/sup 13/ varied from -0.44 to -0.87%. The lightest carbon found in strontianite (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.32%), located near the coating of the organic matter (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.26%) in fractures of the quartz vein of the Buranovo deposit. In the section through the orebodies and near-ore diffusion-metasomatic zones of the Balkan deposit, the lessening of carbon in the carbonates was observed, with increasing distance away from the fracture. ..delta..C/sup 13/ in the altered granitoids ranged from -0.44 to -1.03%; while in the diopside-wollastonite hornfels, from -0.89 to 1.13%. The lessening in weight of the carbon is explained by diffusional fractionation of the isotopes caused apparently by the differential movement of volatile mixtures of carbon during ore-forming processes and the formation of their diffusion-metasomatic zones.

  3. Methodologies for extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon for stable carbon isotope studies : evaluation and alternatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassan, Afifa Afifi

    1982-01-01

    The gas evolution and the strontium carbonate precipitation techniques to extract dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for stable carbon isotope analysis were investigated. Theoretical considerations, involving thermodynamic calculations and computer simulation pointed out several possible sources of error in delta carbon-13 measurements of the DIC and demonstrated the need for experimental evaluation of the magnitude of the error. An alternative analytical technique, equilibration with out-gassed vapor phase, is proposed. The experimental studies revealed that delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted from a 0.01 molar NaHC03 solution by both techniques agreed within 0.1 per mil with the delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted by the precipitation technique, and an increase of only 0.27 per mil in that extracted by the gas evolution technique. The efficiency of extraction of DIC decreased with sulfate concentration in the precipitation technique but was independent of sulfate concentration in the gas evolution technique. Both the precipitation and gas evolution technique were found to be satisfactory for extraction of DIC from different kinds of natural water for stable carbon isotope analysis, provided appropriate precautions are observed in handling the samples. For example, it was found that diffusion of atmospheric carbon dioxide does alter the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the precipitation technique; hot manganese dioxide purification changes the delta carbon-13 of carbon dioxide. (USGS)

  4. Rapid carbon-carbon bond formation and cleavage revealed by carbon isotope exchange between the carboxyl carbon and inorganic carbon in hydrothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, C. R.; Cody, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of organic compounds in water-rock systems (e.g., hydrothermal vents, sedimentary basins, and carbonaceous meteorites) is generally interpreted in terms of the isotopic composition of the sources of such molecules, and the kinetic isotope effects of metabolic or abiotic reactions that generate or transform such molecules. This hinges on the expectation that the carbon isotopic composition of many organic compounds is conserved under geochemical conditions. This expectation is reasonable in light of the strength of carbon-carbon bonds (ca. 81 kcal/mol); in general, environmental conditions conducive to carbon-carbon bond cleavage typically lead to transformations of organic molecules (decarboxylation is a notable example). Geochemically relevant reactions that involve isotopic exchange between carbon atoms in organic molecules and inorganic forms of carbon with no change in molecular structure appear to be rare. Notwithstanding such rarity, there have been preliminary reports of relatively rapid carbon isotope exchange between the carboxyl group in carboxylic acids and carbon dioxide in hot water [1,2]. We have performed laboratory hydrothermal experiments to gain insights into the mechanism of this surprising reaction, using phenylacetate as a model structure. By mass spectrometry, we confirm that the carboxyl carbon undergoes facile isotopic exchange with 13C-labeled bicarbonate at moderate temperatures (i.e., 230 C). Detailed kinetic analysis reveals that the reaction rate is proportional to the concentrations of both reactants. Further experiments demonstrate that the exchange reaction only occurs if the carbon atom adjacent to the carboxyl carbon is bonded to a hydrogen atom. As an example, no carbon isotope exchange was observed for benzoate in experiments lasting up to one month. The requirement of an alpha C-H bond suggests that enolization (i.e., deprotonation of the H) is a critical step in the mechanism of the exchange

  5. Carbon stable isotopes as indicators of coastal eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Oczkowski, Autumn; Markham, Erin; Hanson, Alana; Wigand, Cathleen

    2014-04-01

    Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (delta15N) to trace and monitor sources of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of delta15N data can often be challenging, as the isotope values fractionate substantially due to preferential retention and uptake by biota. There is a growing body of evidence that carbon isotopes may be a useful alternative indicator for eutrophication, as they may be sensitive to changes in primary production that result from anthropogenic nutrient inputs. We provide three examples of systems where delta13C values sensitively track phytoplankton production. First, earlier (1980s) mesocosm work established positive relationships between delta13C and dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved silica concentrations. Consistent with these findings, a contemporary mesocosm experiment designed to replicate a temperate intertidal salt marsh environment also demonstrated that the system receiving supplementary nutrient additions had higher nutrient concentrations, higher chlorophyll concentrations, and higher delta13C values. This trend was particularly pronounced during the growing season, with differences less evident during senescence. And finally, these results were replicated in the open waters of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA, during a spring phytoplankton bloom. These three examples, taken together with the pre-existing body of literature, suggest that, at least in autotrophic, phytoplankton-dominated systems, delta13C values can be a useful and sensitive indicator of eutrophication.

  6. Carbon isotopes and water use efficiency in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Cousins, Asaph B

    2016-06-01

    Drought is a major agricultural problem worldwide. Therefore, selection for increased water use efficiency (WUE) in food and biofuel crop species will be an important trait in plant breeding programs. The leaf carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)Cleaf) has been suggested to serve as a rapid and effective high throughput phenotyping method for WUE in both C3 and C4 species. This is because WUE, leaf carbon discrimination (Δ(13)Cleaf), and δ(13)Cleaf are correlated through their relationships with intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures (Ci/Ca). However, in C4 plants, changing environmental conditions may influence photosynthetic efficiency (bundle-sheath leakiness) and post-photosynthetic fractionation that will potentially alter the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and Ci/Ca. Here we discuss how these factors influence the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and WUE, and the potential of using δ(13)Cleaf as a meaningful proxy for WUE.

  7. Carbon isotope fractionation of sapropelic organic matter during early diagenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    Study of an algal, sapropelic sediment from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda shows that the mass balance of carbon and stable carbon isotopes in the major organic constituents is accounted for by a relatively straightforward model of selective preservation during diagenesis. The loss of 13C-enriched carbohydrates is the principal factor controlling the intermolecular mass balance of 13C in the sapropel. Results indicate that labile components are decomposed leaving as a residual concentrate in the sediment an insoluble humic substance that may be an original biochemical component of algae and associated bacteria. An overall decrease of up to about 4??? in the ?? 13C values of the organic matter is observed as a result of early diagenesis. ?? 1984.

  8. Congener-specific carbon isotopic analysis of technical PCB and PCN mixtures using two-dimensional gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Horii, Yuichi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Petrick, Gert; Gamo, Toshitaka; Falandysz, Jerzy; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi

    2005-06-01

    Analysis of stable carbon isotope fractionation is a useful method to study the sources and fate of anthropogenic organic contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment. To evaluate the utility of carbon isotopes, determination of isotopic ratios of 13C/12C in source materials, for example, technical PCB preparations, is needed. In this study, we determined delta13C values of 31 chlorobiphenyl (CB) congeners in 18 technical PCB preparations and 15 chloronaphthalene (CN) congeners in 6 polychlorinated naphthalene preparations using two-dimensional gas chromatography-combustion furnace-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (2DGC-C-IRMS). Development of 2DGC-IRMS enabled improved resolution and sensitivity of compound-specific carbon isotope analysis (CSIA) of CB or CN congeners. Delta13C values of PCB congeners ranged from -34.4 (Delors) to -22.0/1000 (Sovol). Analogous PCB preparations with similar chlorine content, but different geographical origin, had different delta13C values. PCB preparations from Eastern European countries--Delors, Sovol, Trichlorodiphenyl, and Chlorofen--had distinct delta13C values. PCB mixtures showed increased 13C depletion with increasing chlorine content. Delta13C values for individual CB congeners varied depending on the degree of chlorination in technical mixtures. Delta13C values of CN congeners in Halowaxes ranged from -26.3 to -21.7/1000 and these values are within the ranges observed for PCBs. This study establishes the range of delta13C values in technical PCB and PCN preparations, which may prove to be useful in the determination of sources of these compounds in the environment. This is the first study to employ 2DGC-IRMS analysis of delta13C values in technical PCB and PCN preparations.

  9. Carbon isotope variation in mid-continent Ordovician-type oils: relationship to a major middle Ordovician carbon isotope shift

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, J.R.; Jacobson, S.R.; Witzke, B.J.; Anders, D.E.; Watney, W.L.; Newell, K.D.

    1985-05-01

    Detailed organic geochemical comparisons of Mid-Continent Ordovician oils with extracts of potential source rocks show that in the Forest City basin of northeastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska, oil source rocks are Middle Ordovician shales of the Simpson Group. For the Keota Dome field, Washington County, Iowa, the oil source rock is the Middle Ordovician Glenwood Shale Member of the Platteville Formation. Analyses of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of Ordovician-type oils from the Forest City basin, Keota Dome field, and the Michigan basin show that sigma TC of the two fractions are similar and that sigma T varies over a considerable range, from -32.5 per mil to -25.5 per mil (PDB). This large range in sigma TC reflects a major shift in the carbon isotope composition of organic matter during the Middle Ordovician. This shift is shown in a 62.5-ft (19 m) interval of core from the Decorah and Platteville Formations in the E.M. Greene 1 well in Washington County, Iowa, where organic carbon sigma TC changes regularly upward from -32.2 per mil to -22.7 per mil (PDB). The change in organic carbon sigma TC in this core is not related to variations in amount (0.13-41.4% TOC) or type (hydrogen index = 69 to 1000 mg HC/g TOC) of the marginally mature (T/sub max/ = 440 +/- 5C) organic matter. Ordovician-type oils in both the Forest City and Michigan basins show variable sigma TC, suggesting that the sigma TC shift displayed in the Middle Ordovician rocks of southeastern Iowa is a regional and possibly a global effect, related to changes in the sigma TC of the ocean-atmosphere carbon reservoir. Isotopic analyses of coexisting carbonate minerals support this interpretation.

  10. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  11. Helium and Carbon isotopes of thermal springs hosted by deep faults in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, X.; Wang, Y.; Yuan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Helium and carbon isotopes were important indicators to identify the origin of volatile dissolved in groundwater. Four thermal springs were sampled and discussed by helium and carbon isotopes for they were hosted by local deep faults and had significant connection to deep geothermal activity in Guangdong, China. 4He content of four thermal springs varied greatly from 3.72×10-8 to 199.54×10-8 cm3STP/mL, and 20Ne content varied greatly from 0.21×10-8 to 2.96×10-8 cm3STP/mL. While 3He/4He varied slightly from 0.36 to 0.57Ra (atmosphere 3He/4He ratio Ra=1.4×10-6). It indicated that the mixing of a lot of noble gases from other sources besides atmosphere not only changed the content of noble gases in groundwater, but also changed the isotopic compositions of noble gases, during the runoff process of groundwater. Because 22Ne was almost derived from atmosphere, an improved method of 4He/22Ne - 3He/4He was used to identify the origin of helium. 4% to 6% mantle He in thermal springs revealed that significant mantle He migrating in deep faults can bring a certain amount of energy along with thermal volatile and contribute to thermal spring formation. The δ13C value of four thermal springs was -3.79‰ to -2.17‰. Then dissolved inorganic carbon in thermal springs was speculated from rock metamorphism, it indicated geothermal activity. The four thermal springs were illustrated in the zone of crustal CO2 of rock inorganic chemistry, near to that of crust-mantle mixing CO2. It seemed that negligible or a small amount of volcanic mantle CO2 mixed with crustal CO2, and dissolved in thermal groundwater. So, δ13C revealed that dissolved inorganic carbon in thermal springs was from rock metamorphism occurred in certain deep crust as geothermal activity, which maybe the main energy source of thermal springs. Fig. 1. AIR (ASW)-MORB-CRUST mixing model of He and Ne isotopes. Fig. 2. CO2 origin identified by the relationship of δ13C and 3He/ 4He.

  12. Seasonality of Leaf Carbon Isotopic Composition and Leaf Water Isotopic Enrichment in a Mixed Evergreen Forest in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. S.; Sickman, J. O.; Goulden, M.; DeVan, C.; Pasquini, S. C.; Pivovaroff, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Leaf carbon isotopic composition and leaf water isotopic enrichment reflect physiological processes and are important for linking local and regional scale processes to global patterns. We investigated how seasonality affects the isotopic composition of bulk leaf carbon, leaf sugar carbon, and leaf water hydrogen under a Mediterranean climate. Leaf and stem samples were collected monthly from four tree species (Calocedrus decurrens, Pinus lambertiana, Pinus ponderosa, and Quercus chrysolepis) at the James San Jacinto Mountain Reserve in southern California. Mean monthly bulk leaf carbon isotopic composition varied from -34.5 % in P. ponderosa to -24.7 % in P. lambertiana and became more depleted in 13C from the spring to the summer. Mean monthly leaf sugar varied from -29.3 % in P. ponderosa to -21.8 % in P. lambertiana and was enriched in 13C during the winter, spring and autumn, but depleted during the mid-summer. Leaf water hydrogen isotopic composition was 28.4 to 68.8 % more enriched in deuterium than source water and this enrichment was greater as seasonal drought progressed. These data indicate that leaf carbon and leaf water hydrogen isotopic composition provide sensitive measures that connect plant physiological processes to short-term climatic variability.

  13. Oligocene to Miocene carbon isotope cycles and abyssal circulation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth G.; Fairbanks, Richard G.

    Three cycles of δ13C occurred in Oligocene to Miocene benthic and planktonic foraminifera at western North Atlantic Sites 558 and 563. Intervals of high δ13C occurred at about 35-33 Ma (early Oligocene), 25-22 Ma (across the Oligocene/Miocene boundary), and 18-14 Ma (across the early/middle Miocene boundary). Similar carbon isotopic fluctuations have been measured in benthic and planktonic foraminifera from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans, suggesting that these cycles represent global changes in the δ13C of mean ocean water. The average duration of the carbon cycles is 50 times greater than the residence time of carbon in the oceans. Therefore, the mechanism controlling these cycles must be tied to changes in the input ratio of organic carbon to carbonate from weathering rocks or to changes in the output ratio of organic carbon to carbonate in marine sediments. Following a strategy used to study modern and Pleistocene oceans, benthic foraminiferal δ13C differences between the Atlantic and Pacific are used to infer Oligocene through Miocene abyssal circulation changes. The Atlantic was most enriched in l3C relative to the Pacific from about 36-33 Ma (early Oligocene) and 26-10 Ma (late Oligocene to late Miocene). We interpret this as indicating supply of nutrient-depleted bottom water in the North Atlantic, perhaps analogous to modern North Atlantic Deep Water. High benthic foraminiferal δ13O values at about 36-35 Ma, 31-28 Ma, 25-24 Ma, and younger than 15 Ma indicate the presence of ice sheets at these times. Covariance between benthic and planktonic foraminiferal δ18O records of 0.3-0.5°/ºº at 36 Ma, 31 Ma, and 25 Ma suggests that three periods of continental glaciation caused eustatic (global sea-level) lowerings of 30-50 m during the Oligocene epoch. The δ13C cycles do not correlate with sea-level changes deduced from oxygen isotopic data, nor do they correlate with other proxy indicators for sea level.

  14. Carbon Reservoir History of Mars Constrained by Atmospheric Isotopic Measurements and Carbonate Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Kass, D. M.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere on Mars is one of the most intriguing problems in the exploration of the Solar System, and the climate of Mars may have evolved from a warmer, wetter early state to the cold, dry current state. Because CO2 is the major constituent of Mars's atmosphere, its isotopic signatures offer a unique window to trace the evolution of climate on Mars. We derive new quantitative constraints on the amount of carbonate deposition and the atmospheric pressure of Mars through time, extending into the Noachian, ~3.8 Gyr before present. This determination is based on recent Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) isotopic measurements of Mars's atmosphere, recent orbiter, lander, and rover measurements of Mars's surface, and a newly identified mechanism (photodissociation of CO) that efficiently enriches the heavy carbon isotope. In particular, we find that escape via CO photodissociation on Mars has a fractionation factor of 0.6 and hence, photochemical escape processes can effectively enrich 13C in the Mars's atmosphere during the Amazonian. This enrichment is partially compensated by moderate carbonate precipitation during the late Noachian and/or Hesperian. The current atmospheric 13C/12C and rock and soil carbonate measurements indicate an early atmosphere with a surface pressure less than 1 bar. Only scenarios with large amounts of carbonate formation in open lakes permit higher values up to 1.8 bars. The evolutionary scenarios are fully testable with data from the MAVEN mission and further studies of the isotopic composition of carbonate in the Martian rock record through time.

  15. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  16. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, N.; Gessler, A.; Kayler, Z.; Keel, S. G.; Badeck, F.; Barthel, M.; Boeckx, P.; Buchmann, N.; Brugnoli, E.; Esperschütz, J.; Gavrichkova, O.; Ghashghaie, J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Keitel, C.; Knohl, A.; Kuptz, D.; Palacio, S.; Salmon, Y.; Uchida, Y.; Bahn, M.

    2011-11-01

    The terrestrial carbon (C) cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual), including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as CO2 diffusion and dissolution processes within the

  17. Carbon and oxygen isotope study of carbonates from highly shocked clasts of the polymict breccia of the Haughton Crater (Canada)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrinier, P.; Martinez, I.; Javoy, M.; Schaerer, U.

    1992-01-01

    It is known that the release of volatiles on impact is an important controlling factor in cratering processes in carbonate terranes and in the mobility of chemical elements. In order to assess the nature and the role of carbon- and oxygen-bearing volatiles during impact-induced metamorphism of sedimentary rocks, the C-13/C-12 and O-18/O-16 ratios and carbonate contents were determined for 30 shocked clasts from the Haughton Crater polymict breccia as well as for some unshocked carbonates from the sedimentary cover adjacent to the crater. Shock-induced CO2 loss during decarbonation of calcite is known to be a function of peak pressure and ambient partial pressure of the volatile species. In our clast samples, shocked from 20 to 60 GPa, we expect about 20 to 100 percent CO2 loss and preferential depletion in C-13 and O-18 in the residual carbonate. Rayleigh model (progressive loss of CO2) and batch model (single-step loss of CO2) curves for this depletion are shown. The magnitudes of the C-13 and O-18 depletions increase with the increase of the CO2 loss. In addition, the isotopic depletions should be correlated with an enrichment in CaO and MgO in the residual solid.

  18. Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Intermediary Photosynthetic Modes 1

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O'Reilly; Deniro, Michael J.; Ting, Irwin P.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from species of greenhouse plants having different photosynthetic modes were determined. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, four clusters of points are discernible, each representing different photosynthetic modes: C3 plants, C4 plants, CAM plants, and C3 plants that can shift to CAM or show the phenomenon referred to as CAM-cycling. The combination of oxygen and carbon isotope ratios does not distinguish among the different photosynthetic modes. Analysis of the carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate should prove useful for screening different photosynthetic modes in field specimens that grew near one another. This method will be particularly useful for detection of plants which show CAM-cycling. PMID:16663360

  19. Dynamics of carbon in deep soils inferred from carbon stable isotopes signatures : a worldwide meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balesdent, Jérôme; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Chadoeuf, Joël; Cornu, Sophie; Derrien, Delphine; Fekiacova, Zuzana; Hatté, Christine

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of soil carbon deeper than 30 cm to the atmospheric carbon balance is still poorly understood. A very straightforward quantification of the gross exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and soil organic matter can be obtained at places where the 13C/12C signature of vegetation has been changed for known durations, due to switch of the photosynthetic metabolism (C3 or C4) or to Free Air Carbon Enrichment experiments. We compiled C and 13C profile data of 113 sites of this type, either gahered from the literature or from our own measurements. Each site comprised two profiles : one where the 13C/12C of the vegetation had been changed, and a reference profile with unchanged vegetation 13C/12C. An isotope mixing equation was used, which takes into account the natural isotope enrichments with depth and decay. Three main variables were calculated at any depth from 0 to 100 cm and in a few sites down to 200 cm : the carbon content, the proportion of new carbon (aged less than the duration of change t) and the amount of new carbon. The database concerned 23 countries, various climates (58% intertropical and 42% between 23° to 56° latitude) and various soil types and textures. Landuses and vegetation consisted in 26% of forests and woodlands, 35% of grasslands and 38% of cropped systems. The duration of the natural labelling t ranged from 2 years to ca. 4000 years. Peatlands, boreal, and desert environments were absent from the database. Non-linear regressions with time across the dataset yielded kinetic parameters of the age distribution on one hand and of the flux of new carbon incorporation (kg C m-2 yr-1) on the other, each calculated by 10 cm depth increments. On the average, the median ages of carbon increase from ca. 15 years at 0 cm to more than 1000 years at 100 cm. Turnover is on the average 2 to 3 times slower for the subsoil (30-100 cm) than for the topsoil (0-30 cm). Based on the incorporation of new C in the first decades, the carbon input

  20. Strontium Isotopes of Gaskiers Cap Carbonate, Avalon, Newfoundland: Sequential Digestion Aids Interpretation of Petrologic Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T.; Raub, T. D.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Harland" of high-Ca, Sr composition; or 4) brine-influenced diagenesis exploiting specific horizons in the cap. As a broader implication, many extant Sr-isotope chemostratigraphies of Marinoan cap carbonate may be inaccurate, and in general, recrystallized impure (and low-Sr) carbonates, and dolomites in particular, are probably best studied with the serial digestion technique. We apply this sequential digestion technique to another Ediacaran cap carbonate with significant siliciclastic content, the anomalous cap limestone synchronous with deglaciation of ~581 Ma Gaskiers ice age in Newfoundland's Avalon zone. Although some textural and compositional differences exist between ~635 Ma Nuccaleena and ~581 Ma Gaskiers cap, the sequential digestion technique again appears to provide clarity by suggesting less-altered and more-altered fractions from various sample levels. We will discuss implications for the nature of Gaskiers glaciation and accompanying environmental oxidation, its global correlations, and the utility of the existing Ediacaran Sr-chemostratigraphic reference curve.

  1. Environmental impact and magnitude of paleosol carbonate carbon isotope excursions marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abels, Hemmo A.; Lauretano, Vittoria; van Yperen, Anna E.; Hopman, Tarek; Zachos, James C.; Lourens, Lucas J.; Gingerich, Philip D.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2016-05-01

    Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere-ocean carbon system, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE) can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event and also to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is well documented, but CIE records for the subsequent warming events are still rare, especially from the terrestrial realm.Here, we provide new paleosol carbonate CIE records for two of the smaller hyperthermal events, I1 and I2, as well as two additional records of Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2) and H2 in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA. Stratigraphic comparison of this expanded, high-resolution terrestrial carbon isotope history to the deep-sea benthic foraminiferal isotope records from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites 1262 and 1263, Walvis Ridge, in the southern Atlantic Ocean corroborates the idea that the Bighorn Basin fluvial sediments record global atmospheric change. The ˜ 34 m thicknesses of the eccentricity-driven hyperthermals in these archives corroborate precession forcing of the ˜ 7 m thick fluvial overbank-avulsion sedimentary cycles. Using bulk-oxide mean-annual-precipitation reconstructions, we find soil moisture contents during the four younger hyperthermals that are similar to or only slightly wetter than the background, in contrast with soil drying observed during the PETM using the same proxy, sediments, and plant fossils.The magnitude of the CIEs in soil carbonate for the four smaller, post-PETM events scale nearly linearly with the equivalent event magnitudes documented in marine records. In contrast, the magnitude of the PETM terrestrial CIE is at least 5 ‰ smaller than expected based on extrapolation of the scaling relationship established

  2. Stable carbon isotope ratios of rock varnish organic matter: a new paleoenvironmental indicator.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Deniro, M J

    1985-03-22

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of organic matter in rock varnishes of Holocene age from western North America and the Middle East show a strong association with the environment. This isotopic variability reflects the abundance of plants with different photosynthetic pathways in adjacent vegetation. Analyses of different layers of varnish on late Pleistocene desert landforms indicate that the carbon isotopic composition of varnish organic matter is a paleoenvironmental indicator. PMID:17777781

  3. Stable carbon isotope ratios of rock varnish organic matter: a new paleoenvironmental indicator.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Deniro, M J

    1985-03-22

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of organic matter in rock varnishes of Holocene age from western North America and the Middle East show a strong association with the environment. This isotopic variability reflects the abundance of plants with different photosynthetic pathways in adjacent vegetation. Analyses of different layers of varnish on late Pleistocene desert landforms indicate that the carbon isotopic composition of varnish organic matter is a paleoenvironmental indicator.

  4. Using Carbon Isotopes in Cenozoic Soil Carbonates to Quantify Primary Productivity from Mid-Latitude Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caves, J. K.; Kramer, S. H.; Ibarra, D. E.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon isotope composition of pedogenic carbonates (δ13Ccarb) from paleosols has been extensively used as a proxy to estimate atmospheric pCO2 over the Phanerozoic. However, a number of other factors - including the concentration of plant-respired CO2 and the isotopic composition of both atmospheric and plant-respired carbon - influence the δ13C of pedogenic carbonates. For example, δ13Ccarb records from the mid-latitudes in central Asia and western North America show increasing trends in δ13Ccarb despite decreasing pCO2 during the late Cenozoic, which suggests that other factors play an important role in determining the isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonates. Instead, we suggest that these records are primarily recording changes in primary productivity rather than changes in atmospheric pCO2 and therefore propose a novel use of paleosol carbonate records to understand paleo-ecosystem dynamics. Here, we compile existing paleosol carbonate records, and present three new records from Wyoming, to estimate soil respiration and primary productivity in western North America during the Paleogene and early Neogene. We observe both an overall increase in δ13Ccarb after the early Eocene, and spatially heterogeneous δ13Ccarb values across western US basins. We combine this δ13Ccarb data with compilations of atmospheric pCO2 to estimate soil respiration and plant productivity. The long-term increase in δ13Ccarb indicates a decrease in plant productivity as conditions became more arid across much of the western US, congruent with both records of regional uplift and of global cooling. Furthermore, significant spatial heterogeneity in δ13Ccarb indicates that regional factors, such as the presence of paleolakes and/or local paleotopography may have provided a second-order control on local and regional productivity. Thus, our results provide a first-order estimate linking changes in primary productivity with regional tectonics and global climatic change.

  5. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping. PMID:26358051

  6. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping.

  7. Jellyfish Body Plans Provide Allometric Advantages beyond Low Carbon Content

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Kylie A.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Lucas, Cathy H.; Sutherland, Kelly R.; Condon, Robert H.; Mianzan, Hermes; Purcell, Jennifer E.; Robinson, Kelly L.; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world’s oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity of jellyfish and

  8. Regional prediction of carbon isotopes in soil carbonates for Asian dust source tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Yaqiang

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles emitted from deserts and semi-arid lands in northern China cause particulate pollution that increases the burden of disease particularly for urban population in East Asia. The stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of carbonates in soils and dust aerosols in northern China were investigated. We found that the δ13C of carbonates in surface soils in northern China showed clearly the negative correlation (R2 = 0.73) with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived NDVI, we predicted the regional distribution of δ13C of soil carbonates in deserts, sandy lands, and steppe areas. The predictions show the mean δ13C of -0.4 ± 0.7‰ in soil carbonates in Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Deserts, and the isotope values decrease to -3.3 ± 1.1‰ in sandy lands. The increase in vegetation coverage depletes 13C in soil carbonates, thus the steppe areas are predicted by the lowest δ13C levels (-8.1 ± 1.7‰). The measurements of atmospheric dust samples at eight sites showed that the Asian dust sources were well assigned by the 13C mapping in surface soils. Predicting 13C in large geographical areas with fine resolution offers a cost-effective tracer to monitor dust emissions from sandy lands and steppe areas which show an increasing role in Asian dust loading driven by climate change and human activities.

  9. Temperature and Oxygen Isotope Composition of The Ediacaran Ocean: Constraints From Clumped Isotope Carbonate Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacie, M.; Eiler, J. M.; Fike, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    The temperature and chemical variations of the early oceans on Earth are highly debated, particularly for periods associated with significant evolutionary change and/or extinction. The temperature of past oceans has been estimated based on conventional carbonate-water and/or silicate-water stable oxygen isotope thermometry. Precambrian carbonates and silicates both exhibit a long-term secular trend of increasing δ18O values with decreasing age. This trend has been used to support two opposite - though related - interpretations: the Earth's oceans gradually cooled over the course of the Proterozoic eon, from a maximum of ~ 60-90°C at ~ 2.5Ga (and were, on average, relatively warm during much of the Paleozoic era) [1]. This interpretation has been supported by Si-isotope proxies and the thermal tolerances of proteins in various classes of microbial organisms [2-3]. Alternatively, the δ18O value of the oceans has gradually increased through time [4-5], and mean Earth surface temperatures varied over a narrow range similar to modern conditions. In other terms, one either assumes an ocean of constant δ18O and infers that climate varied dramatically, or vise versa. Finally, it is possible that post- depositional processes (e.g., diagenesis, burial metamorphism, weathering) has modified the δ18O values of all or most Precambrian sedimentary carbonates and silicates, overprinting any paleoclimatic variations. Carbonate 'clumped isotope' thermometry provides a new way to independently test these hypotheses because it allows one to determine the apparent growth temperatures of carbonate minerals based on their abundances of 13C-18O bonds, as reflected by the 'Δ47' value of CO2 extracted by phosphoric acid digestion [6]. This method is thermodynamically based and independent of the δ18O of water from which the carbonate grew. We will report the initial results of measurements of 'Δ47 for a suite of carbonates from the Sultanate of Oman. This Ediacaran age (~ 635 to

  10. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zheng, Liange; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modified to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.

  11. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zheng, Liange; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modifiedmore » to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.« less

  12. Equilibrium carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [1-3]) have suggested that Si- and Fe-isotopic signatures can be used to characterize the compositions and conditions of segregation of metallic cores in planetary interiors. This study expands the theoretical framework to include carbon and hydrogen, which may also be alloying elements. Hydrogen (D/H) and carbon (13C/12C) fractionations in iron-rich metallic melts are estimated by modeling analogous iron-rich crystals, i.e., dhcp-FeH and η-Fe2C. C- and H-atoms in these crystals are completely coordinated by iron. The driving energy for equilibrium fractionation is assumed to come from the reduction of vibrational frequencies when heavy isotopes are substituted for light ones; vibrations are assumed to be harmonic. This treatment is crude at high temperature, and for the relatively anharmonic vibrations typical of hydrogen-bearing substances, but may provide a reasonably accurate, semi-quantitative approximation of real fractionation behavior. Vibrational frequencies of all crystals are modeled with density functional theory, using gradient-corrected functionals and ultrasoft pseudopotentials. For both carbon and hydrogen, the models suggest that the metal phase will be strongly depleted in heavy isotopes. At 2000 K, 1 atm, η-Fe2C will have 3‰ lower 13C/12C than coexisting diamond. Combining this result with previous high-temperature theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [4]), metal-graphite fractionation is expected to be very similar, while metal-CO2 fractionation will be almost twice as large, ca. -5‰. Deuterium/hydrogen fractionations are expected to be an order of magnitude larger, with 50-70‰ lower D/H in dhcp-FeH than in coexisting H2 gas at 2000 K, and approximately 100‰ lower D/H than water vapor. These fractionations are much larger than those inferred for silicon and iron, as expected given the differences in atomic mass. References: 1. Georg et al. (2007) Nature 447:1102; 2. Rustad & Yin

  13. The effects of early diagenesis on the chemical and stable carbon isotopic composition of wood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of modern and ancient buried wood show that there is a linear correlation between carbohydrate content and the stable carbon isotope composition as carbohydrates are preferentially degraded during early diagenesis. As the carbohydrate content decreases, the ??13C value of the degraded wood decreases 1 to 2 per mil, approaching the value of the residual lignin. These results indicate that carbohydrate degradation products are lost and not incorporated into the aromatic structure as lignin is selectively preserved during early diagenesis of wood. These results also indicate that attempts to quantify terrestrial inputs to modern sedimentary organic matter based on ??13C values should consider the possibility of a 1 to 2 per mil decrease in the ??13C value of degraded wood. ?? 1987.

  14. Biomarker and molecular isotope approaches to deconvolve the terrestrial carbon isotope record: modern and Eocene calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Wing, S.; Currano, E. D.

    2010-12-01

    Climate, biome, and plant community are important predictors of carbon isotope patterns recorded in leaves and leaf waxes. However, signatures recorded by terrestrial organic carbon and lipids that have mixed floral sources (e.g., n-alkanes) potentially reflect both plant community changes and climate. More taxonomically specific proxies for plants (i.e., di- and tri-terpenoids for conifers and angiosperms, respectively), can help to resolve the relative influences of changing community and climate, provided differences in biomarker production and lipid biosynthetic fractionation among plants can be better constrained. We present biomarker abundance and carbon isotope values for lipids from leaves, branches and bark of 44 tree species, representing 21 families including deciduous and evergreen conifers and angiosperms. n-alkane production differs greatly between conifer and angiosperm leaves. Both deciduous and evergreen angiosperms make significantly more n-alkanes than conifers, with n-alkanes not detected in over half of the conifers in our study. Terpenoid abundances scale strongly with leaf habit: evergreen species have significantly higher abundances. We combine these relative differences in lipid production with published estimates of fluxes for leaf litter from conifer and angiosperm trees to develop a new proxy approach for estimating paleo plant community inputs to ancient soils and sediments. To test our modern calibration results, we have evaluated n-alkanes and terpenoids from laterally extensive (~18 km) carbonaceous shales and mudstones in Eocene sediments (52.6 Ma) at Fifteenmile Creek in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA). Our terpenoid-based proxy predicts on average a 40% conifer community, which is remarkably close in agreement with a fossil-based estimate of 36%. n-alkane carbon isotope fractionation (leaf-lipid) differs among plant types, with conifer n-alkanes about 2-3‰ 13C enriched relative to those in angiosperms. Since conifer leaves are

  15. Seasonal variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of bats reflect environmental baselines.

    PubMed

    Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Quetglas, Juan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Kelm, Detlev H; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal's isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic variation in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is integrated in animals' isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers. PMID:25700080

  16. Clumped isotope calibration data for lacustrine carbonates: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of reconstructions of past climates. Lake sediments provide important archives of terrestrial climate change, and represent an important tool for reconstructing paleohydrology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, and paleoaltimetry. Unfortunately, while multiple methods for constraining marine temperature exist, quantitative terrestrial proxies are scarcer - tree rings, speleothems, and leaf margin analyses have all been used with varying degrees of accuracy. Clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful instrument for determining terrestrial climates: multiple studies have shown the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed. We have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid in modern lake samples and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature. Here we discuss an extensive calibration dataset comprised of 132 analyses of 97 samples from 44 localities, including microbialites, tufas, and micrites endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  17. The biodegradation of fluoranthene as monitored using stable carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Trust, B.A.; Mueller, J.G.; Coffin, R.B.; Cifuentes, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    The measurement of stable isotope ratios of carbon ({delta}{sup 13}C values) was investigated as a viable technique to monitor the intrinsic bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biometer flask experiments were conducted in which the bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, designated EPA505, was grown on fluoranthene. During growth of EPA505 on fluoranthene, bacterial biomass, respired CO{sub 2}, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), as well as fluoranthene, were sampled over 8 days. The concentrations and {delta}{sup 13}C values of each of these carbon pools were determined. The concentration of fluoranthene decreased from 12.1 {+-} 2.0 (n = 2) to 3.0 {+-} 0.9 (n = 2) mg C per flask over 188 h, and CO{sub 2} increased from undetectable levels to 7.1 {+-} 0.3 (n = 4) mg C per flask. A total of 55.5% mineralization resulted. DOC concentrations remained fairly constant with time, averaging 2.2 to 3.6 mg C per flask. The {delta}{sup 13}C value of fluoranthene remained constant over the course of the experiment, averaging {minus}24.5 {+-} 0.2{per_thousand} (n = 8). Bacterial nucleic acids and respired CO{sub 2} took on {delta}{sup 13}C values similar to those of fluoranthene within 47 h, measuring {minus}22.6 and {minus}24.3{per_thousand}, respectively.

  18. Natural gas constituent and carbon isotopic composition in petroliferous basins, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyou; Wang, Zhengjun; Dai, Jinxing; Su, Jing

    2014-02-01

    There are abundant gas resources in petroliferous basins of China. Large to midsize gas fields are found in Eastern, central and Western of China. However, origin, constituents and isotopic composition of natural gas in different gas fields are varied distinctly, and some present strong chemical secondary alteration and show variation both in age and space. Based on the systematic analysis of constituents and carbon isotope of a large number of gas samples, combined with the geological characteristics, this paper classifies the origins of the gases, explores the gas isotope characteristics and evolutionary regulation with the variation time and space, and further discusses the distinctive geochemistry of the gases in China. These gases are dominated by dry gas, its methane carbon isotope values range from -10‰ to -70‰, ethane from -16‰ to -52‰, propane from -13‰ to -43‰, and butane from -18‰ to -34‰. The carbon isotopes of most gases show the characteristics of humic-derived gas and crude oil cracked gas. In addition, large primary biogenic gas fields have been discovered in the Qaidam basin; inorganic-derived alkane gases have been discovered in deep of the Songliao Basin. Half of these gas fields are characterized by the alkane carbon isotope reversal in different degrees. Research indicates there are several reasons can result in carbon isotope reversal. Firstly, gas charge of different genetic types or different source in one gas reservoir may cause carbon isotope reversal. Besides, high-over mature evolution of gas can also lead to the carbon isotopic reversal of alkanes. Thirdly, secondary alteration of hydrocarbons may also result in abnormal distribution of carbon isotope, isotope transforms to unusual light and heavy.

  19. Carbon isotopic evidence for methane hydrate instability during quaternary interstadials

    PubMed

    Kennett; Cannariato; Hendy; Behl

    2000-04-01

    Large (about 5 per mil) millennial-scale benthic foraminiferal carbon isotopic oscillations in the Santa Barbara Basin during the last 60,000 years reflect widespread shoaling of sedimentary methane gradients and increased outgassing from gas hydrate dissociation during interstadials. Furthermore, several large, brief, negative excursions (up to -6 per mil) coinciding with smaller shifts (up to -3 per mil) in depth-stratified planktonic foraminiferal species indicate massive releases of methane from basin sediments. Gas hydrate stability was modulated by intermediate-water temperature changes induced by switches in thermohaline circulation. These oscillations were likely widespread along the California margin and elsewhere, affecting gas hydrate instability and contributing to millennial-scale atmospheric methane oscillations.

  20. Carbon isotopic evidence for methane hydrate instability during quaternary interstadials

    PubMed

    Kennett; Cannariato; Hendy; Behl

    2000-04-01

    Large (about 5 per mil) millennial-scale benthic foraminiferal carbon isotopic oscillations in the Santa Barbara Basin during the last 60,000 years reflect widespread shoaling of sedimentary methane gradients and increased outgassing from gas hydrate dissociation during interstadials. Furthermore, several large, brief, negative excursions (up to -6 per mil) coinciding with smaller shifts (up to -3 per mil) in depth-stratified planktonic foraminiferal species indicate massive releases of methane from basin sediments. Gas hydrate stability was modulated by intermediate-water temperature changes induced by switches in thermohaline circulation. These oscillations were likely widespread along the California margin and elsewhere, affecting gas hydrate instability and contributing to millennial-scale atmospheric methane oscillations. PMID:10753115

  1. Isotopic Incorporation and the Effects of Fasting and Dietary Lipid Content on Isotopic Discrimination in Large Carnivorous Mammals.

    PubMed

    Rode, K D; Stricker, C A; Erlenbach, J; Robbins, C T; Cherry, S G; Newsome, S D; Cutting, A; Jensen, S; Stenhouse, G; Brooks, M; Hash, A; Nicassio, N

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable emphasis on understanding isotopic discrimination for diet estimation in omnivores. However, discrimination may differ for carnivores, particularly species that consume lipid-rich diets. Here, we examined the potential implications of several factors when using stable isotopes to estimate the diets of bears, which can consume lipid-rich diets and, alternatively, fast for weeks to months. We conducted feeding trials with captive brown bears (Ursus arctos) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). As dietary lipid content increased to ∼90%, we observed increasing differences between blood plasma and diets that had not been lipid extracted (∆(13)Ctissue-bulk diet) and slightly decreasing differences between plasma δ(13)C and lipid-extracted diet. Plasma Δ(15)Ntissue-bulk diet increased with increasing protein content for the four polar bears in this study and data for other mammals from previous studies that were fed purely carnivorous diets. Four adult and four yearling brown bears that fasted 120 d had plasma δ(15)N values that changed by <±2‰. Fasting bears exhibited no trend in plasma δ(13)C. Isotopic incorporation in red blood cells and whole blood was ≥6 mo in subadult and adult bears, which is considerably longer than previously measured in younger and smaller black bears (Ursus americanus). Our results suggest that short-term fasting in carnivores has minimal effects on δ(13)C and δ(15)N discrimination between predators and their prey but that dietary lipid content is an important factor directly affecting δ(13)C discrimination and indirectly affecting δ(15)N discrimination via the inverse relationship with dietary protein content. PMID:27153128

  2. Isotopic Incorporation and the Effects of Fasting and Dietary Lipid Content on Isotopic Discrimination in Large Carnivorous Mammals.

    PubMed

    Rode, K D; Stricker, C A; Erlenbach, J; Robbins, C T; Cherry, S G; Newsome, S D; Cutting, A; Jensen, S; Stenhouse, G; Brooks, M; Hash, A; Nicassio, N

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable emphasis on understanding isotopic discrimination for diet estimation in omnivores. However, discrimination may differ for carnivores, particularly species that consume lipid-rich diets. Here, we examined the potential implications of several factors when using stable isotopes to estimate the diets of bears, which can consume lipid-rich diets and, alternatively, fast for weeks to months. We conducted feeding trials with captive brown bears (Ursus arctos) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). As dietary lipid content increased to ∼90%, we observed increasing differences between blood plasma and diets that had not been lipid extracted (∆(13)Ctissue-bulk diet) and slightly decreasing differences between plasma δ(13)C and lipid-extracted diet. Plasma Δ(15)Ntissue-bulk diet increased with increasing protein content for the four polar bears in this study and data for other mammals from previous studies that were fed purely carnivorous diets. Four adult and four yearling brown bears that fasted 120 d had plasma δ(15)N values that changed by <±2‰. Fasting bears exhibited no trend in plasma δ(13)C. Isotopic incorporation in red blood cells and whole blood was ≥6 mo in subadult and adult bears, which is considerably longer than previously measured in younger and smaller black bears (Ursus americanus). Our results suggest that short-term fasting in carnivores has minimal effects on δ(13)C and δ(15)N discrimination between predators and their prey but that dietary lipid content is an important factor directly affecting δ(13)C discrimination and indirectly affecting δ(15)N discrimination via the inverse relationship with dietary protein content.

  3. Integrating Stomach Content and Stable Isotope Analyses to Quantify the Diets of Pygoscelid Penguins

    PubMed Central

    Polito, Michael J.; Trivelpiece, Wayne Z.; Karnovsky, Nina J.; Ng, Elizabeth; Patterson, William P.; Emslie, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Stomach content analysis (SCA) and more recently stable isotope analysis (SIA) integrated with isotopic mixing models have become common methods for dietary studies and provide insight into the foraging ecology of seabirds. However, both methods have drawbacks and biases that may result in difficulties in quantifying inter-annual and species-specific differences in diets. We used these two methods to simultaneously quantify the chick-rearing diet of Chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarctica) and Gentoo (P. papua) penguins and highlight methods of integrating SCA data to increase accuracy of diet composition estimates using SIA. SCA biomass estimates were highly variable and underestimated the importance of soft-bodied prey such as fish. Two-source, isotopic mixing model predictions were less variable and identified inter-annual and species-specific differences in the relative amounts of fish and krill in penguin diets not readily apparent using SCA. In contrast, multi-source isotopic mixing models had difficulty estimating the dietary contribution of fish species occupying similar trophic levels without refinement using SCA-derived otolith data. Overall, our ability to track inter-annual and species-specific differences in penguin diets using SIA was enhanced by integrating SCA data to isotopic mixing modes in three ways: 1) selecting appropriate prey sources, 2) weighting combinations of isotopically similar prey in two-source mixing models and 3) refining predicted contributions of isotopically similar prey in multi-source models. PMID:22053199

  4. Integrating stomach content and stable isotope analyses to quantify the diets of pygoscelid penguins.

    PubMed

    Polito, Michael J; Trivelpiece, Wayne Z; Karnovsky, Nina J; Ng, Elizabeth; Patterson, William P; Emslie, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    Stomach content analysis (SCA) and more recently stable isotope analysis (SIA) integrated with isotopic mixing models have become common methods for dietary studies and provide insight into the foraging ecology of seabirds. However, both methods have drawbacks and biases that may result in difficulties in quantifying inter-annual and species-specific differences in diets. We used these two methods to simultaneously quantify the chick-rearing diet of Chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarctica) and Gentoo (P. papua) penguins and highlight methods of integrating SCA data to increase accuracy of diet composition estimates using SIA. SCA biomass estimates were highly variable and underestimated the importance of soft-bodied prey such as fish. Two-source, isotopic mixing model predictions were less variable and identified inter-annual and species-specific differences in the relative amounts of fish and krill in penguin diets not readily apparent using SCA. In contrast, multi-source isotopic mixing models had difficulty estimating the dietary contribution of fish species occupying similar trophic levels without refinement using SCA-derived otolith data. Overall, our ability to track inter-annual and species-specific differences in penguin diets using SIA was enhanced by integrating SCA data to isotopic mixing modes in three ways: 1) selecting appropriate prey sources, 2) weighting combinations of isotopically similar prey in two-source mixing models and 3) refining predicted contributions of isotopically similar prey in multi-source models.

  5. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation by Methylomirabilis oxyfera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2012-07-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to nitrite reduction is a recently discovered methane sink of as yet unknown global significance. The bacteria that have been identified to carry out this process, Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera, oxidize methane via the known aerobic pathway involving the monooxygenase reaction. In contrast to aerobic methanotrophs, oxygen is produced intracellularly and used for the activation of methane by a phylogenetically distinct particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here we report the fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen during methane oxidation by an enrichment culture of M. oxyfera bacteria. In two separate batch incubation experiments with different absolute biomass and methane contents, the specific methanotrophic activity was similar and the progressive isotope enrichment identical. Headspace methane was consumed up to 98% with rates showing typical first order reaction kinetics. The enrichment factors determined by Rayleigh equations were -29.2 ± 2.6‰ for δ13C (εC) and -227.6 ± 13.5‰ for δ2H (εH), respectively. These enrichment factors were in the upper range of values reported so far for aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, two-dimensional specific isotope analysis (Λ = ( α H - 1 - 1)/( α C - 1 - 1)) was performed and also the determined Λ value of 9.8 was within the range determined for other aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs. The results showed that in contrast to abiotic processes biological methane oxidation exhibits a narrow range of fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen irrespective of the underlying biochemical mechanisms. This work will therefore facilitate the correct interpretation of isotopic composition of atmospheric methane with implications for modeling of global carbon fluxes.

  6. Lead content and isotopic composition in submound and recent soils of the Volga Upland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampura, T. V.; Probst, A.; Ladonin, D. V.; Demkin, V. A.

    2013-11-01

    Literature data on the historical reconstructions of the atmospheric lead deposition in Europe and the isotopic composition of the ores that are potential sources of the anthropogenic lead in the atmospheric deposition in the lower Volga steppes during different time periods have been compiled. The effect of the increasing anthropogenic lead deposition recorded since the Bronze Age on the level of soil contamination has been investigated. For the first time paleosol buried under a burial mound of the Bronze Age has been used as a reference point to assess of the current contamination level. The contents and isotopic compositions of the mobile and total lead have been determined in submound paleosols of different ages and their recent remote and roadside analogues. An increase in the content and fraction of the mobile lead and a shift of its isotopic composition toward less radiogenic values (typical for lead from the recent anthropogenic sources) has been revealed when going from a Bronze-Age paleosol to a recent soil. In the Bronze-Age soil, the isotopic composition of the mobile lead is inherited from the parent rock to a greater extent than in the modern soils, where the lead is enriched with the less radiogenic component. The effect of the anthropogenic component is traced in the analysis of the mobile lead, but it is barely visible for the total lead. An exception is provided by the recent roadside soils characterized by increased contents and the significantly less radiogenic isotopic composition of the mobile and total lead.

  7. Isotopic disequilibrium in Globigerina bulloides and carbon isotope response to productivity increase in Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, K.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Mohan, K.; Anilkumar, N.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides collected from tow samples along a transect from the equatorial Indian ocean to the Southern Ocean (45°E and 80°E and 10°N to 53°S) were analysed and compared with the equilibrium δ18O and δ13C values of calcite calculated using the temperature and isotopic composition of the water column. The results agree within ~0.25‰ for the region between 10°N and 40°S and 75–200 m water depth which is considered to be the habitat of Globigerina bulloides. Further south (from 40°S to 55°S), however, the measured δ18O and δ13C values are higher than the expected values by ~2‰ and ~1‰ respectively. These enrichments can be attributed to either a ‘vital effect’ or a higher calcification rate. An interesting pattern of increase in the δ13C(DIC) value of the surface water with latitude is observed between 35°S and~ 60°S, with a peak at~ 42°S. This can be caused by increased organic matter production and associated removal. A simple model accounting for the increase in the δ13C(DIC) values is proposed which fits well with the observed chlorophyll abundance as a function of latitude. PMID:26903274

  8. Isotopic disequilibrium in Globigerina bulloides and carbon isotope response to productivity increase in Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna, K.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Mohan, K.; Anilkumar, N.

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides collected from tow samples along a transect from the equatorial Indian ocean to the Southern Ocean (45°E and 80°E and 10°N to 53°S) were analysed and compared with the equilibrium δ18O and δ13C values of calcite calculated using the temperature and isotopic composition of the water column. The results agree within ~0.25‰ for the region between 10°N and 40°S and 75-200 m water depth which is considered to be the habitat of Globigerina bulloides. Further south (from 40°S to 55°S), however, the measured δ18O and δ13C values are higher than the expected values by ~2‰ and ~1‰ respectively. These enrichments can be attributed to either a ‘vital effect’ or a higher calcification rate. An interesting pattern of increase in the δ13C(DIC) value of the surface water with latitude is observed between 35°S and~ 60°S, with a peak at~ 42°S. This can be caused by increased organic matter production and associated removal. A simple model accounting for the increase in the δ13C(DIC) values is proposed which fits well with the observed chlorophyll abundance as a function of latitude.

  9. Isotopic disequilibrium in Globigerina bulloides and carbon isotope response to productivity increase in Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, K; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharya, S K; Mohan, K; Anilkumar, N

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides collected from tow samples along a transect from the equatorial Indian ocean to the Southern Ocean (45°E and 80°E and 10°N to 53°S) were analysed and compared with the equilibrium δ(18)O and δ(13)C values of calcite calculated using the temperature and isotopic composition of the water column. The results agree within ~0.25‰ for the region between 10°N and 40°S and 75-200 m water depth which is considered to be the habitat of Globigerina bulloides. Further south (from 40°S to 55°S), however, the measured δ(18)O and δ(13)C values are higher than the expected values by ~2‰ and ~1‰ respectively. These enrichments can be attributed to either a 'vital effect' or a higher calcification rate. An interesting pattern of increase in the δ(13)C(DIC) value of the surface water with latitude is observed between 35°S and~ 60°S, with a peak at~ 42°S. This can be caused by increased organic matter production and associated removal. A simple model accounting for the increase in the δ(13)C(DIC) values is proposed which fits well with the observed chlorophyll abundance as a function of latitude. PMID:26903274

  10. Stable Carbon Isotope Record in a Palau Sclerosponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.

    2002-12-01

    The ratio of stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) deposited in the calcium carbonate skeleton of marine sclerosponges appears to record the carbon isotopic composition of seawater mixed-layer dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC). Thus the δ13C signature chronicled in sclerosponge skeletons offers a promising multi-century proxy record of seawater mixed-layer δ13CDIC throughout the tropics. Here, a high-resolution (0.1 mm) δ13C record for a 7.7 cm Acanthocheatetes wellsi sclerosponge from Palau (7N, 134W) is presented. At a published growth rate of 0.45 mm per year, this record spans ~s170 years beginning in July 2001 and going back to 1831. The δ13C values for a definitive 10-year A. wellsi record spanning 1989-1998 were similar to δ13C values here for the first 4.7 mm of the record providing supporting evidence for the growth rate. The sclerosponge δ13C shows a distinct Seuss Effect. At the time this abstract was submitted, the analysis of the first 16 mm of the sclerosponge revealed a significant decrease in δ13C with time [δ13C = 0.02 (distance) + 2.64, r2 = 0.73, p < 0.0001, where time is marked by distance in millimeters from the growing edge] corresponding to a decrease in δ13C of 0.076‰ per decade. For comparison, published low-frequency measurements in Australian, New Caledonian and Jamaican sclerosponges have yielded decreases in δ13C of ~s0.05 to 0.08 ‰ per decade over the past 40 years. Preliminary interpretation of the data indicates that the amount of atmospheric CO2 contributing to the seawater δ13CDIC at Palau is intermediate to Australia and Jamaica. In addition, visual examination of the δ13C record reveals regular fluctuation in δ13C that may correspond to annual variability in δ13CDIC. This research presents the first century or longer sclerosponge δ13C record from the northwester equatorial Pacific.

  11. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  12. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Harvey, David; Dutta, Monica; Colbow, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150oC and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metalic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  13. CORRESPONDENCE OF STABLE ISOTOPE AND GUT CONTENTS ANALYSES IN DETERMINING TROPHIC POSITION OF STREAM FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is generally accepted that both stable isotope analysis (SIA) and gut contents analysis (GCA) be used in food web studies; however, few researchers have analyzed these data in concert. We utilized SIA and GCA to determine if longitudinal and seasonal variation in diet affects...

  14. Comparing trophic position of stream fishes using stable isotope and gut contents analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) and gut content analysis (GCA) are commonly used in food web studies, but few studies analyze these data in concert. We used SIA and GCA to identify diets and trophic position (TP) of six stream fishes and to compare TP estimates between methods. Ord...

  15. Carbon isotope systematics of individual hydrocarbons in hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough, Northeastern Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoneit, B.R.T.; Schoell, M.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7%, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7 per mill, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.

  16. Bryophytes as Climate Indicators: moss and liverwort photosynthetic limitations and carbon isotope signals in organic material and peat deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, H.; Royles, J.; Horwath, A.; Hodell, D. A.; Convey, P.; Hodgson, D.; Wingate, L.; Ogeé, J.

    2011-12-01

    -term trends. Once corrected for source CO2 inputs, the carbon isotope signals are consistent with recent increases in growing season length. Laboratory studies on real-time CO2 uptake and isotope discrimination as a function of water content, for the desiccation-tolerant moss Syntrichia ruralis, reveal the interactions between surface water, liquid phase and mesophyll diffusion limitation. These data have been used to develop a model for isotope discrimination in mosses as a function of water status and we will discuss the extent that such a model can be used predictively to determine moss-peat water status, and infer current and past climatic conditions.

  17. Tracing carbonate-silicate interaction during subduction using magnesium and oxygen isotopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shui-Jiong; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Li, Shu-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Subduction of carbonates and carbonated eclogites into the mantle plays an important role in transporting carbon into deep Earth. However, to what degree isotopic exchanges occur between carbonate and silicate during subduction remains unclear. Here we report Mg and O isotopic compositions for ultrahigh pressure metamorphic marbles and enclosed carbonated eclogites from China. These marbles include both calcite- and dolomite-rich examples and display similar O but distinct Mg isotopic signatures to their protoliths. Their δ(26)Mg values vary from -2.508 to -0.531‰, and negatively correlate with MgO/CaO ratios, unforeseen in sedimentary carbonates. Carbonated eclogites have extremely heavy δ(18)O (up to +21.1‰) and light δ(26)Mg values (down to -1.928‰ in garnet and -0.980‰ in pyroxene) compared with their protoliths. These unique Mg-O isotopic characteristics reflect differential isotopic exchange between eclogites and carbonates during subduction, making coupled Mg and O isotopic studies potential tools for tracing deep carbon recycling. PMID:25367068

  18. Calcium isotope evidence for suppression of carbonate dissolution in carbonate-bearing organic-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-11-01

    Pore fluid calcium isotope, calcium concentration and strontium concentration data are used to measure the rates of diagenetic dissolution and precipitation of calcite in deep-sea sediments containing abundant clay and organic material. This type of study of deep-sea sediment diagenesis provides unique information about the ultra-slow chemical reactions that occur in natural marine sediments that affect global geochemical cycles and the preservation of paleo-environmental information in carbonate fossils. For this study, calcium isotope ratios (δ 44/40Ca) of pore fluid calcium from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 984 (North Atlantic) and 1082 (off the coast of West Africa) were measured to augment available pore fluid measurements of calcium and strontium concentration. Both study sites have high sedimentation rates and support quantitative sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation. The pattern of change of δ 44/40Ca of pore fluid calcium versus depth at Sites 984 and 1082 differs markedly from that of previously studied deep-sea Sites like 590B and 807, which are composed of nearly pure carbonate sediment. In the 984 and 1082 pore fluids, δ 44/40Ca remains elevated near seawater values deep in the sediments, rather than shifting rapidly toward the δ 44/40Ca of carbonate solids. This observation indicates that the rate of calcite dissolution is far lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites. The data are fit using a numerical model, as well as more approximate analytical models, to estimate the rates of carbonate dissolution and precipitation and the relationship of these rates to the abundance of clay and organic material. Our models give mutually consistent results and indicate that calcite dissolution rates at Sites 984 and 1082 are roughly two orders of magnitude lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites, and the rate correlates with the abundance of clay. Our calculated rates are conservative for these

  19. Using carbon isotope fractionation for an improved quantification of CH4 oxidation efficiency in Arctic peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, I.; Knoblauch, C.; Gebert, J.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Much research effort is focused on identifying global CH4 sources and sinks to estimate their current and potential strength in response to land-use change and global warming. Aerobic CH4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing the strength of CH4 emissions in wetlands, but is hitherto difficult to quantify. Recent studies quantify the efficiency of CH4 oxidation based on CH4 stable isotope signatures. The approach utilizes the fact that a significant isotope fractionation occurs when CH4 is oxidized. Moreover, it also considers isotope fractionation by diffusion. For field applications the 'open-system equation' is applied to determine the CH4 oxidation efficiency: fox = (δE - δP)/ (αox - αtrans) where fox is the fraction of CH4 oxidized; δE is δ13C of emitted CH4; δP is δ13C of produced CH4; αox is the isotopic fractionation factor of oxidation; αtrans is the isotopic fractionation factor of transport. We quantified CH4 oxidation in polygonal tundra soils of Russia's Lena River Delta analyzing depth profiles of CH4 concentrations and stable isotope signatures. Therefore, both fractionation factors αox and αtrans were determined for three polygon centers with differing water table positions and a polygon rim. While most previous studies on landfill cover soils have assumed a gas transport dominated by advection (αtrans = 1), other CH4 transport mechanisms as diffusion have to be considered in peatlands and αtrans exceeds a value of 1. At our study we determined αtrans = 1.013 ± 0.003 for CH4 when diffusion is the predominant transport mechanism. Furthermore, results showed that αox differs widely between sites and horizons (αox = 1.013 ± 0.012) and has to be determined for each case. The impact of both fractionation factors on the quantification of CH4 oxidation was estimated by considering both the potential diffusion rate at different water contents and potential oxidation rates. Calculations for a water saturated tundra soil

  20. Simultaneous Analysis of Nitrogen, Carbon and Sulfur Stable Isotopes and Concentrations in Organics and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambelli, S.; Brooks, P. D.; Sutka, R.; Hughes, S.; Finstad, K. M.; Pakes, M. J.; Dawson, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    To date, analysis of diet, food web complexities, biogeochemical cycles, and ecosystem functioning have largely focused on using variation in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope ratios. This is because a great deal is understood about what leads to this variation and because the dual stable isotope analysis of these two elements using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is now commonplace. However, the aforementioned studies may all greatly benefit from the additional information one can get from also having sulfur (S) stable isotopes ratio data. Until very recently the analysis of δ34S has traditionally required an additional and often more difficult analytical procedure. Here, we report on the development of a new method that simultaneously analyzes the elemental and isotopic composition of N, C and S in a single sample. The new commercially available instrument includes a modified NCS elemental analyzer in line with an IRMS outfitted with 100 volt AD converters for wide dynamic range. We tested, and modified, this instrument to achieve maximum accuracy and precision for the isotopic measurements of all three elements. We found that the original design needed improvements to achieve our goals by: a) including a component (originally designed for trapping water) as buffer to reduce S memory and obtain reliable δ34S analysis; b) adding an external furnace for complete reduction of nitrogen oxides to N2 gas for accurate δ15N; c) adding a magnesium perchlorate water trap immediately after the reduction tube to minimize any water condensation that could also influence S memory. We analyzed a selection of organic materials and soils with approximately a 1:2 standards versus unknowns ratio per run. Using this NCS set-up, the precision of the N and C isotopic measurements was comparable to the one usually attained in NC mode alone (standard deviation of ± 0.13 δ15N in the range 30 to 400 µg N, and of ± 0.12 δ13C in the range 0.20 to 4 mg

  1. Carbon isotope discrimination as a tool to explore C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    von Caemmerer, Susanne; Ghannoum, Oula; Pengelly, Jasper J L; Cousins, Asaph B

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination is a non-destructive tool for investigating C4 metabolism. Tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy provides new opportunities for making rapid, concurrent measurements of carbon isotope discrimination and CO2 assimilation over a range of environmental conditions, and this has facilitated the use of carbon isotope discrimination as a probe of C4 metabolism. In spite of the significant progress made in recent years, understanding how photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination measured concurrently with gas exchange relates to carbon isotope composition of leaf and plant dry matter remains a challenge that requires resolution if this technique is to be successfully applied as a screening tool in crop breeding and phylogenetic research. In this review, we update our understanding of the factors and assumptions that underlie variations in photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in C4 leaves. Closing the main gaps in our understanding of carbon isotope discrimination during C4 photosynthesis may help advance research aimed at developing higher productivity and efficiency in key C4 food, feed, and biofuel crops.

  2. Isotope Variations in Terrestrial Carbonates and Thermal Springs as Biomarkers: Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bissada, K. K.

    2006-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements of carbonate minerals contained within ALH84001 [1] suggest that fluids were present at 3.9 Gy on Mars [2, 3, 4, 5]. Both oxygen and carbon isotopes provide independent means of deciphering paleoenvironmental conditions at the time of carbonate mineral precipitation. In terrestrial carbonate rocks oxygen isotopes not only indicate the paleotemperature of the precipitating fluid, but also provide clues to environmental conditions that affected the fluid chemistry. Carbon isotopes, on the other hand, can indicate the presence or absence of organic compounds during precipitation (i.e. biogenically vs. thermogenically-generated methane), thus serving as a potential biomarker. We have undertaken a study of micro scale stable isotope variations measured in some terrestrial carbonates and the influence of organic compounds associated with the formation of these carbonates. Preliminary results indicate that isotope variations occur within narrow and discrete intervals, providing clues to paleoenvironmental conditions that include both biological and non-biological activity. These results carry implications for deciphering Martian isotope data and therefore potential biological prospecting on the planet Mars. Recently, Fourier Transform Spectrometer observations have detected methane occurring in the Martian atmosphere [6] that could be attributed to a possible biogenic source. Indeed, Mars Express has detected the presence of methane in the Martian atmosphere [7], with evidence indicating that methane abundances are greatest above those basins with high water concentrations.

  3. Spatial Variability in Instantaneous Photosynthetic Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of CO2 are useful tracers in studies of carbon and water cycling between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. Interpretation of variation in 13CO2 and C16O18O relies on models describing physical and biochemical processes and their associated fractionations. A layer of complexity not currently quantified or accounted for in canopy models is spatial variation in photosynthetic discrimination within a single leaf. A new measurement technique, employing tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry coupled to an open gas exchange system, enables online measurement of photosynthetic discrimination at high temporal resolution. Using this system, photosynthetic 13C and 18O discrimination was measured along leaves of a C3 monocot. For the forage cereal Triticale, 13C discrimination increased by 2‰ and 18O by 20‰ from the base to the tip of mature leaves when measured at saturating irradiance. The increase in 13C discrimination was associated with an increase in the leaf internal conductance of CO2, and 18O discrimination with carry-forward of evaporative enrichment along the leaf. When numerical averages are compared to flux- and area-weighted averages, the portion of the leaf approximately one third of the way from the base can be shown to provide the most representative area for scaling up.

  4. A search for correlatable, isotopically light carbon and nitrogen components in lunar soils and breccias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, S. J.; Swart, P. K.; Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1983-11-01

    Using stepped heating extraction techniques, determinations of carbon and nitrogen content and delta C-13 and delta N-15 values have been obtained for selected lunar soils and breccias. Only nitrogen data have been gathered for representative splits separated by size, density and magnetic properties from 12023. A plot of the total delta C-13 (after terrestrial contamination is removed) versus delta N-15 values for bulk samples reveals little evidence for a correlation between isotopically light carbon and isotopically light nitrogen of putative ancient solar wind origin. Soil 12023 is used to examine the current interpretation for the stepped release profile of nitrogen from bulk lunar samples. Mature agglutinates, postulated by previous workers to be the host of the light nitrogen, are shown to have a very constant delta N-15 value which is heavy rather than light. The actual host of the light nitrogen in 12023 has not been identified. The lowest values encountered during the study were found associated with the finest soil, but none of these was as low as for some temperature steps of the bulk soil. Interpretations regarding the origin of light nitrogen, if it is not present in agglutinates, await the results of more definitive efforts to identify the host phase.

  5. A critical evaluation of carbon isotope stratigraphy and biostratigraphic implications for Late Cretaceous global correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Ines

    2013-11-01

    carbonate, and in partitioning of carbon between organic carbon and carbonate sinks. These variations are mainly controlled by changes in climate and eustasy. Additionally, some globally synchronous shifts in the bulk δ13Ccarb records could result from parallel variation in the contribution of authigenic carbonate to the sediment. Formation of these cements through biologically mediated early diagenetic processes is related to availability of oxygen and organic material and, thus, can be globally synchronized by fluctuations in eustasy, atmospheric and oceanic oxygen levels or in large-scale oceanic circulation. Because the influence of early diagenetic cements on the bulk δ13Ccarb signal can, but need not be synchronized, chemostratigraphy should not be used as a stand-alone method for trans-continental correlation, and especially minor isotopic shifts have to be interpreted with utmost care. Nevertheless, the observed consistency of the δ13C correlations confirms global scale applicability of bulk sediment δ13C chemostratigraphy for the Late Cretaceous, including sediments that underwent lithification and burial diagenesis such as the sediments from the Himalayan and Alpine sections. Limitations arise from increased uncertainties (1) in sediments with very low carbonate content, (2) from larger δ13C variability in sediments from very shallow marine environments, (3) from unrecognized hiatuses or strong changes in sedimentation rates, and (4) in sections with short stratigraphic coverage or with few biostratigraphic marker horizons.

  6. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, N.; Gessler, A.; Kayler, Z.; Keel, S. G.; Badeck, F.; Barthel, M.; Boeckx, P.; Buchmann, N.; Brugnoli, E.; Esperschütz, J.; Gavrichkova, O.; Ghashghaie, J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Keitel, C.; Knohl, A.; Kuptz, D.; Palacio, S.; Salmon, Y.; Uchida, Y.; Bahn, M.

    2011-04-01

    The terrestrial carbon (C) cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual), including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. The last part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as CO2 diffusion and dissolution processes within the

  7. Growth kinetics and stable carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic degradation of cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Tiehm, Andreas; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Pfeifer, Brigitte; Heidinger, Michael; Ertl, Siegmund

    2008-05-01

    Assessing changes in the isotopic signature of contaminants is a promising new tool to monitor microbial degradation processes. In this study, chloroethene degradation was proven by depletion of chloroethenes, formation of chloride, increase in protein content and stable carbon isotope fractionation. Aerobic degradation of vinyl chloride (VC) was found to proceed metabolically, with degradation rates of 0.48 and 0.29 d(-1); and growth yields of 9.7 and 6.4 g of protein/mol of VC at room and groundwater temperature, respectively. Cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) was degraded cometabolically under aerobic conditions when VC was provided as growth substrate. Aerobic degradation was associated with significant stable carbon isotope fractionation, with enrichment factors ranging from -5.4+/-0.4 per thousand for metabolic degradation of VC to -9.8+/-1.7 per thousand for cometabolic degradation of cDCE. Thus, it was demonstrated that stable carbon isotope fractionation is suitable for assessing aerobic chloroethene degradation, which can contribute significantly to site remediation.

  8. Evidence from carbon isotope measurements for diverse origins of sedimentary hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.; Trendel, J. M.; Albrecht, P.

    1990-01-01

    The organic matter found in sedimentary rocks must derive from many sources; not only from ancient primary producers but also from consumers and secondary producers. In all of these organisms, isotope effects can affect the abundance and distribution of 13C in metabolites. Here, by using an improved form of a previously described technique in which the effluent of a gas chromatograph is continuously analysed isotopically, we report evidence of the diverse origins of sedimentary organic matter. The record of 13C abundances in sedimentary carbonate and total organic carbon can be interpreted in terms of variations in the global carbon cycle. Our results demonstrate, however, that isotope variations within sedimentary organic mixtures substantially exceed those observed between samples of total organic carbon. Resolution of isotope variations at the molecular level offers a new and convenient means of refining views both of localized palaeoenvironments and of control mechanisms within the global carbon cycle.

  9. Evidence from carbon isotope measurements for diverse origins of sedimentary hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Freeman, K H; Hayes, J M; Trendel, J M; Albrecht, P

    1990-01-18

    The organic matter found in sedimentary rocks must derive from many sources; not only from ancient primary producers but also from consumers and secondary producers. In all of these organisms, isotope effects can affect the abundance and distribution of 13C in metabolites. Here, by using an improved form of a previously described technique in which the effluent of a gas chromatograph is continuously analysed isotopically, we report evidence of the diverse origins of sedimentary organic matter. The record of 13C abundances in sedimentary carbonate and total organic carbon can be interpreted in terms of variations in the global carbon cycle. Our results demonstrate, however, that isotope variations within sedimentary organic mixtures substantially exceed those observed between samples of total organic carbon. Resolution of isotope variations at the molecular level offers a new and convenient means of refining views both of localized palaeoenvironments and of control mechanisms within the global carbon cycle.

  10. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of benzene and toluene during hydrophobic sorption in multistep batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Imfeld, G; Kopinke, F-D; Fischer, A; Richnow, H-H

    2014-07-01

    The application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for evaluating degradation of organic pollutants in the field implies that other processes affecting pollutant concentration are minor with respect to isotope fractionation. Sorption is associated with minor isotope fractionation and pollutants may undergo successive sorption-desorption steps during their migration in aquifers. However, little is known about isotope fractionation of BTEX compounds after consecutive sorption steps. Here, we show that partitioning of benzene and toluene between water and organic sorbents (i.e. 1-octanol, dichloromethane, cyclohexane, hexanoic acid and Amberlite XAD-2) generally exhibits very small carbon and hydrogen isotope effects in multistep batch experiments. However, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the benzene-octanol pair after several sorption steps (Δδ(13)C=1.6 ± 0.3‰ and Δδ(2)H=88 ± 3‰), yielding isotope fractionation factors of αC=1.0030 ± 0.0005 and αH=1.195 ± 0.026. Our results indicate that the cumulative effect of successive hydrophobic partitioning steps in an aquifer generally results in insignificant isotope fractionation for benzene and toluene. However, significant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation cannot be excluded for specific sorbate-sorbent pairs, such as sorbates with π-electrons and sorbents with OH-groups. Consequently, functional groups of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) may specifically interact with BTEX compounds migrating in an aquifer, thereby resulting in potentially relevant isotope fractionation.

  11. Carbon Retention and Isotopic Evolution in Deeply Subducted Sediments: Evidence from the Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook-Kollars, J.; Bebout, G. E.; Agard, P.; Angiboust, S.

    2012-12-01

    increasing grade, metapelitic carbonaceous matter shows an increase in δ13CVPDB, ranging from about -25‰ in low-grade Schistes Lustres samples to -16‰ in the highest-grade Cignana samples. Carbonate in the entire suite shows decrease in δ18OSMOW, from marine carbonate values > 25‰ to values of 17-22‰ independent of the carbonate content of the rocks. This shift could possibly be explained by isotopic exchange with silicate phases in the same rocks [Henry et al. (1996), Chem. Geol.]. Metapelitic rocks in this suite experienced moderate amounts of dehydration (20-50%) largely related to breakdown of chlorite and carpholite [Bebout et al. (in press), Chem. Geol. (abstract in this session); Angiboust and Agard (2010), Lithos], conceivably providing a source for infiltrating H2O-rich fluids producing negative shifts in calcite δ18O in interlayered metacarbonates. These results indicate that relatively little decarbonation occurred in carbonate-bearing sediments subducted to depths greater than 100 km, arguing against any model of extensive decarbonation driven by infiltration of the sediments by H2O-rich fluids released from mafic and ultramafic parts of the underlying subducting slab. This study provides field evidence for the efficient retention of C in subducting shale-carbonate sequences through forearc depths, potentially affecting the C budget and isotopic evolution of the deeper mantle.

  12. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  13. Carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of core catcher samples from the ICDP deep drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecke, Andreas; Wissel, Holger; Mayr*, Christoph; Oehlerich, Markus; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    The ICDP project PASADO aims to develop a detailed paleoclimatic record for the southern part of the South American continent from sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike (51°58'S, 70°23'W), situated in the Patagonian steppe east of the Andean cordillera and north of the Street of Magellan. The precursor project SALSA recovered the Holocene and Late Glacial sediment infill of Laguna Potrok Aike and developed the environmental history of the semi-arid Patagonian steppe by a consequent interdisciplinary multi-proxy approach (e.g. Haberzettl et al., 2007). From September to November 2008 the ICDP deep drilling took place and successfully recovered in total 510 m of sediments from two sites resulting in a composite depth of 106 m for the selected main study Site 2. A preliminary age model places the record within the last 50.000 years. During the drilling campaign, the core catcher content of each drilled core run (3 m) was taken as separate sample to be shared and distributed between involved laboratories long before the main sampling party. A total of 70 core catcher samples describe the sediments of Site 2 and will form the base for more detailed investigations on the palaeoclimatic history of Patagonia. We here report on the organic carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of bulk sediment and plant debris of the core catcher samples. Similar investigations were performed for Holocene and Late Glacial sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike revealing insights into the organic matter dynamics of the lake and its catchment as well as into climatically induced hydrological variations with related lake level fluctuations (Mayr et al., 2009). The carbon and nitrogen content of the core catcher fine sediment fraction (<200 µm) is low to very low (around 1 % and 0.1 %, respectively) and requires particular attention in isotope analysis. The carbon isotope composition shows comparably little variation around a value of -26.0 per mil. The positive values of the Holocene and the Late

  14. Stable carbon isotope evidence for nitrogenous fertilizer impact on carbonate weathering in a small agricultural watershed.

    PubMed

    Brunet, F; Potot, C; Probst, A; Probst, J-L

    2011-10-15

    The isotopic signature of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC), δ(13)C(DIC), has been investigated in the surface waters of a small agricultural catchment on calcareous substratum, Montoussé, located at Auradé (south-west France). The Montoussé catchment is subjected to intense farming (wheat/sunflower rotation) and a moderated application of nitrogenous fertilizers. During the nitrification of the NH(4)(+), supplied by fertilization, nitrate and H(+) ions are produced in the soil. This anthropogenic acidity is combined with the natural acidity due to carbonic acid in weathering processes. From an isotopic point of view, with 'natural weathering', using carbonic acid, δ(13)C(DIC) is intermediate between the δ(13)C of soil CO(2) produced by organic matter oxidation and that of the carbonate rocks, while it has the same value as the carbonates when carbonic acid is substituted by another acid like nitric acid derived from nitrogen fertilizer. The δ(13)C(DIC) values range from -17.1‰ to -10.7‰ in Montoussé stream waters. We also measured the δ(13)C of calcareous molassic deposits (average -7.9‰) and of soil organic carbon (between -24.1‰ and -26‰) to identify the different sources of DIC and to estimate their contribution. The δ(13) C(DIC) value indicates that weathering largely follows the carbonic acid pathway at the springs (sources of the stream). At the outlet of the basin, H(+) ions, produced during the nitrification of N-fertilizer, also contribute to weathering, especially during flood events. This result is illustrated by the relationship between δ(13)C(DIC) and the molar ratio NO(3)(-)/(Ca(2+) + Mg(2+)). Consequently, when the contribution of nitrate increases, the δ(13)C(DIC) increases towards the calcareous end-member. This new isotopic result provides evidence for the direct influence of nitrogen fertilizer inputs on weathering, CO(2) consumption and base cation leaching and confirms previous results obtained using the chemistry of the

  15. Insights into Paleogene biogeochemistry from coupled carbon and sulfur isotopes in foraminiferal calcite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, V.; Paris, G.; Abramovitch, S.; Sessions, A. L.; Adkins, J. F.; Turchyn, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    The Paleogene witnessed large-scale environmental changes, including the beginning of long-term Cenozoic cooling. The carbon isotope composition of foraminiferal calcite suggests a major reorganization of the carbon cycle over the Paleogene, with enhanced organic carbon burial in the Paleocene, and subsequent oxidation of this organic carbon or increased volcanism throughout the Eocene. The sulfur cycle is linked to the carbon cycle via the breakdown of organic carbon during bacterial sulfate reduction. Over geological time, carbon and sulfur isotopic shifts are often coupled due to enhanced pyrite burial being coupled to enhanced organic carbon burial, and enhanced pyrite weathering being coupled to enhanced organic carbon weathering. However, over the Paleogene, carbon and sulfur isotopes are fully decoupled, with the sulfur isotope record showing only one major shift in the early Eocene, after most of the carbon isotope variability is complete. One complication of interpreting the evolution of the sulfur cycle over the Cenozoic, is the fact that the mineral proxies used (typically barite) may not be temporally coincident with those used to reconstruct the carbon cycle (typically carbonate). Furthermore, these minerals are preserved in different locations, and therefore often must be extracted from different sediment cores in different ocean basins, leading to age-model uncertainty when the records are merged. To properly ascertain the phasing between early Cenozoic changes in the carbon cycle and the sulfur cycle, we would ideally measure all isotope records on the same mineral. A new sulfur isotope analytical technique [1] has been optimised for foraminiferal calcite as a proxy for seawater δ34SSO4. The δ34SSO4 in foraminiferal calcite can then be tied to records of carbon isotopes from stratigraphically identical samples, resolving previous age model uncertainties. We present coupled carbon and sulfur isotope records from the same core over the early

  16. Evaluation of online carbon isotope dilution mass spectrometry for the purity assessment of synthetic peptide standards.

    PubMed

    Cueto Díaz, Sergio; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2014-09-24

    We present a novel method for the purity assessment of peptide standards which is applicable to any water soluble peptide. The method is based on the online (13)C isotope dilution approach in which the peptide is separated from its related impurities by liquid chromatography (LC) and the eluent is mixed post-column with a continuous flow of (13)C-enriched sodium bicarbonate. An online oxidation step using sodium persulfate in acidic media at 99°C provides quantitative oxidation to (12)CO2 and (13)CO2 respectively which is extracted to a gaseous phase with the help of a gas permeable membrane. The measurement of the isotope ratio 44/45 in the mass spectrometer allows the construction of the mass flow chromatogram. As the only species that is finally measured in the mass spectrometer is CO2, the peptide content in the standard can be quantified, on the base of its carbon content, using a generic primary standard such as potassium hydrogen phthalate. The approach was validated by the analysis of a reference material (NIST 8327), and applied to the quantification of two commercial synthetic peptide standards. In that case, the results obtained were compared with those obtained using alternative methods, such as amino acid analysis and ICP-MS. The results obtained proved the value of the method for the fast, accurate and precise mass purity assignment of synthetic peptide standards. PMID:25172815

  17. Evaluation of online carbon isotope dilution mass spectrometry for the purity assessment of synthetic peptide standards.

    PubMed

    Cueto Díaz, Sergio; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2014-09-24

    We present a novel method for the purity assessment of peptide standards which is applicable to any water soluble peptide. The method is based on the online (13)C isotope dilution approach in which the peptide is separated from its related impurities by liquid chromatography (LC) and the eluent is mixed post-column with a continuous flow of (13)C-enriched sodium bicarbonate. An online oxidation step using sodium persulfate in acidic media at 99°C provides quantitative oxidation to (12)CO2 and (13)CO2 respectively which is extracted to a gaseous phase with the help of a gas permeable membrane. The measurement of the isotope ratio 44/45 in the mass spectrometer allows the construction of the mass flow chromatogram. As the only species that is finally measured in the mass spectrometer is CO2, the peptide content in the standard can be quantified, on the base of its carbon content, using a generic primary standard such as potassium hydrogen phthalate. The approach was validated by the analysis of a reference material (NIST 8327), and applied to the quantification of two commercial synthetic peptide standards. In that case, the results obtained were compared with those obtained using alternative methods, such as amino acid analysis and ICP-MS. The results obtained proved the value of the method for the fast, accurate and precise mass purity assignment of synthetic peptide standards.

  18. Carbon isotope variations in a solar pond microbial mat: Role of environmental gradients as steering variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schidlowski, Manfred; Gorzawski, Hendrik; Dor, Inka

    1994-05-01

    A biogeochemical traverse is presented for a juvenile benthic mat covering the depth profile of an artificially stratified and eutrophicated hypersaline heliothermal pond with known gradients of temperature, salinity, pH, and light transmission. It can be shown that visual mat development depends primarily on temperature and salinity as main environmental steering variables whose increase with depth goes along with the attenuation and final disappearance of a visible microbial film in the pond's hypolimnic compartment. Recorded biogeochemical parameters (C org content, cell numbers, chlorophyll-a content) evidently reflect, as either biomass- or productivity-related index functions, the visually perceptible growth gradient of the microbial ecosystem along the pond slope. The observed coincidence of maxima in these index functions with maxima in δ13Corg clearly identifies high rates of primary productivity as the agent ultimately responsible for the generation of isotopically heavy ( 13C-enriched) biomass in these and related environments. Extreme demands placed on the local feeder pool of dissolved inorganic carbon by high rates of primary productivity entertained by the mat-forming microbenthos obviously give rise to severe CO 2 limitation, enforcing the operation of a diffusion-(supply-)limited assimilatory pathway with an isotopically indiscriminate metabolization of the available CO 2 resources.

  19. Lithium contents and isotopic compositions of ferromanganese deposits from the global ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chan, L.-H.; Hein, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    To test the feasibility of using lithium isotopes in marine ferromanganese deposits as an indicator of paleoceanographic conditions and seawater composition, we analyzed samples from a variety of tectonic environments in the global ocean. Hydrogenetic, hydrothermal, mixed hydrogenetic–hydrothermal, and hydrogenetic–diagenetic samples were subjected to a two-step leaching and dissolution procedure to extract first the loosely bound Li and then the more tightly bound Li in the Mn oxide and Fe oxyhydroxide. Total leachable Li contents vary from 2 by coulombic force. Hence, the abundant Li in hydrothermal deposits is mainly associated with the dominant phase, MnO2. The surface of amorphous FeOOH holds a slightly positive charge and attracts little Li, as demonstrated by data for hydrothermal Fe oxyhydroxide. Loosely sorbed Li in both hydrogenetic crusts and hydrothermal deposits exhibit Li isotopic compositions that resemble that of modern seawater. We infer that the hydrothermally derived Li scavenged onto the surface of MnO2 freely exchanged with ambient seawater, thereby losing its original isotopic signature. Li in the tightly bound sites is always isotopically lighter than that in the loosely bound fraction, suggesting that the isotopic fractionation occurred during formation of chemical bonds in the oxide and oxyhydroxide structures. Sr isotopes also show evidence of re-equilibration with seawater after deposition. Because of their mobility, Li and Sr in the ferromanganese crusts do not faithfully record secular variations in the isotopic compositions of seawater. However, Li content can be a useful proxy for the hydrothermal history of ocean basins. Based on the Li concentrations of the globally distributed hydrogenetic and hydrothermal samples, we estimate a scavenging flux of Li that is insignificant compared to the hydrothermal flux and river input to the ocean.

  20. Concentration and isotopic composition of carbon and sulfur in apollo 11 lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, I R; Smith, J W

    1970-01-30

    The concentration of carbon and sulfur in six samples ranged between 20 to 200 and 650 to 2300 parts per million, respectively. Carbon was present in gaseous, volatilizable, and nonvolatile forms, and terrestrial contaminants were recognized. Sulfur appeared to exist only as acid-volatile sulfide. The bulk fines contain a high concentration of carbon and a low concentration of sulfur. They are always enriched in the heavier isotope carbon-13 or sulfur-34. The fine-grained basaltic rocks show the reverse relation; lowest carbon, highest sulfide concentrations, and no apparent enrichment in heavy isotopes. The breccias are of intermediate composition.

  1. Environmental forcing of terrestrial carbon isotope excursion amplification across five Eocene hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, G. J.; Abels, H.

    2015-12-01

    Abrupt changes in the isotope composition of exogenic carbon pools accompany many major episodes of global change in the geologic record. The global expression of this change in substrates that reflect multiple carbon pools provides important evidence that many events reflect persistent, global redistribution of carbon between reduced and oxidized stocks. As the diversity of records documenting any event grows, however, discrepancies in the expression of carbon isotope change among substrates are almost always revealed. These differences in magnitude, pace, and pattern of change can complicate interpretations of global carbon redistribution, but under ideal circumstances can also provide additional information on changes in specific environmental and biogeochemical systems that accompanied the global events. Here we evaluate possible environmental influences on new terrestrial records of the negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) associated with multiple hyperthermals of the Early Eocene, which show a common pattern of amplified carbon isotope change in terrestrial paleosol carbonate records relative to that recorded in marine substrates. Scaling relationships between climate and carbon-cycle proxies suggest that that the climatic (temperature) impact of each event scaled proportionally with the magnitude of its marine CIE, likely implying that all events involved release of reduced carbon with a similar isotopic composition. Amplification of the terrestrial CIEs, however, does not scale with event magnitude, being proportionally less for the first, largest event (the PETM). We conduct a sensitivity test of a coupled plant-soil carbon isotope model to identify conditions that could account for the observed CIE scaling. At least two possibilities consistent with independent lines of evidence emerge: first, varying effects of pCO2 change on photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination under changing background pCO2, and second, contrasting changes in regional

  2. Paleogene plants fractionated carbon isotopes similar to modern plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Wing, Scott L.; Currano, Ellen D.; Mueller, Kevin E.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon isotope composition (δ13 C) of terrestrial plant biomarkers, such as leaf waxes and terpenoids, provides insights into past carbon cycling. The δ13 C values of modern plant biomarkers are known to be sensitive to climate and vegetation type, both of which influence fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by altering plant carbon supply and its biochemical allocation. It is not known if fractionation observed in living plants can be used to interpret fossil lipids because plant biochemical characteristics may have evolved during the Cenozoic in response to changes in global climate and atmospheric CO2. The goal of this study was to determine if fractionation during photosynthesis (Δleaf) in the Paleogene was consistent with expectations based on living plants. To study plant fractionation during the Paleogene, we collected samples from eight stratigraphic beds in the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming, USA) that ranged in age from 63 to 53 Ma. For each sample, we measured the δ13 C of angiosperm biomarkers (triterpenoids and n-alkanes) and, abundance permitting, conifer biomarkers (diterpenoids). Leaf δ13 C values estimated from different angiosperms biomarkers were consistently 2‰ lower than leaf δ13 C values for conifers calculated from diterpenoids. This difference is consistent with observations of living conifers and angiosperms and the consistency among different biomarkers suggests ancient εlipid values were similar to those in living plants. From these biomarker-based δ13Cleaf values and independent records of atmospheric δ13 C values, we calculated Δleaf. These calculated Δleaf values were then compared to Δleaf values modeled by applying the effects that precipitation and major taxonomic group in living plants have on Δleaf values. Calculated and modeled Δleaf values were offset by less than a permil. This similarity suggests that carbon fractionation in Paleogene plants changed with water availability and major taxonomic group to about the

  3. Lipid correction for carbon stable isotope analysis of deep-sea fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Joel C.; Sutton, Tracey T.

    2010-08-01

    Stable isotope analysis of fish tissue can aid studies of deep-sea food webs because sampling difficulties severely limit sample sizes of fish for traditional diet studies. The carbon stable isotope ratio (δ 13C) is widely used in food web studies, but it must be corrected to remove variability associated with varying lipid content in the tissue. A lipid correction has not been determined for any deep-sea fish. These fishes are ideal for studying lipid correction because lipid content varies widely among species. Our objective was to evaluate an application of a mass balance δ 13C correction to a taxonomically diverse group of deep-sea fishes by determining the effect of lipid extraction on the stable isotope ratios, examining the quality of the model parameters derived for the mass balance correction, and comparing the correction to published results. We measured the lipid extraction effect on the nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ 15N) and δ 13C of muscle tissue from 30 North Atlantic species. Lipid extraction significantly increased tissue δ 15N (+0.66‰) and δ 13C values, but the treatment effect on δ 13C was dependent on C:N, a proxy for lipid content. We compared the lipid-extracted δ 13C to the δ 13C predicted by the mass balance correction using model variables estimated from either all individuals (pooled) or species-by-species or using published values from other species. The correction using the species-by-species approach performed best; however, all three approaches produced corrected values that were generally within 0.5‰ of the measured lipid-free δ 13C and that had a small over-all bias (<0.5‰). We conclude that a generalized mass balance correction works well for correcting δ 13C in deep-sea fishes, is similar to that developed for other fishes, and recommend caution when applying a generalized correction to fish with high lipid content (C:N >8).

  4. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: II. In vitro simulation of kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates are built largely from CO{sub 2}, which diffuses across the skeletogenic membrane and reacts to form HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Kinetic discrimination against the heavy isotopes {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation apparently causes most of the isotopic disequilibrium observed in biological carbonates. These kinetic isotope effects are expressed when the extracytosolic calcifying solution is thin and alkaline, and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} precipitates fairly rapidly as CaCO{sub 3}. In vitro simulation of the calcifying environment produced heavy isotope depletions qualitatively similar to, but somewhat more extreme than, those seen in biological carbonates. Isotopic equilibration during biological calcification occurs through CO{sub 2} exchange across the calcifying membrane and by admixture ambient waters (containing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) into the calcifying fluids. Both mechanisms tend to produce linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O.

  5. Stable carbon isotopes in tree rings: the failure of uniformitarianism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarroll, Danny

    2010-05-01

    When tree rings are used to reconstruct past climate we rely on the uniformitarian principle that ‘the present is the key to the past'. Relationships between measured parameters and climate that can be calibrated and verified over the instrumental period are assumed to be applicable at longer timescales. In the case of δ13C, however, the uniformitarian principle fails for two reasons. (1) The instrumental calibration period is also the period of anthropogenic increase in atmospheric CO2. δ13C is a function of the ratio of internal to ambient CO2, so maintaining constant δ13C over the industrial period requires an active plastic response, either restricting stomatal conductance or increasing assimilation rate. In some areas trees may have reached the limits of their plasticity so that over the last few decades δ13C values have been declining, independent of any changes in climate. If no correction is made, the recent response to climate will be a poor indicator of behaviour in the past. (2) Tree ring δ13C is often used to reconstruct past temperatures even though temperature rarely has a strong direct control over fractionation. The link is therefore via either sunshine or humidity, which over the calibration period may be very strongly correlated with temperature. Long isotope chronologies, when compared with independent evidence of past temperatures, however, can show periods of marked divergence. The strong covariance of temperature, sunshine and humidity over the last century may not have persisted over longer timescales with larger climatic perturbations. In the case of carbon isotopes the key to the past is not statistical inference based on recent behaviour, but a clear mechanistic understanding of the influence of climate and other factors on fractionation.

  6. Observations of Carbon Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Geppert, W. D.; Persson, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Primitive Solar System materials (e.g. chondrites. IDPs, the Stardust sample) show large variations in isotopic composition of the major volatiles (H, C, N, and O ) even within samples, witnessing to various degrees of processing in the protosolar nebula. For ex ample. the very pronounced D enhancements observed in IDPs [I] . are only generated in the cold. dense component of the interstellar medium (ISM), or protoplanetary disks, through ion-molecule reactions in the presence of interstellar dust. If this isotopic anomaly has an interstellar origin, this leaves open the possibility for preservation of other isotopic signatures throughout the form ation of the Solar System. The most common form of carbon in the ISM is CO molecules, and there are two potential sources of C-13 fractionation in this reservoir: low temperature chemistry and selective photodissociation. While gas-phase chemistry in cold interstellar clouds preferentially incorporates C-13 into CO [2], the effect of self-shielding in the presence of UV radiation instead leads to a relative enhancement of the more abundant isotopologue, 12CO. Solar System organic material exhibit rather small fluctuations in delta C-13 as compared to delta N-15 and delta D [3][1], the reason for which is still unclear. However, the fact that both C-13 depleted and enhanced material exists could indicate an interstellar origin where the two fractionation processes have both played a part. Formaldehyde (H2CO) is observed in the gas-phase in a wide range of interstellar environments, as well as in cometary comae. It is proposed as an important reactant in the formation of more complex organic molecules in the heated environments around young stars, and formaldehyde polymers have been suggested as the common origin of chondritic insoluable organic matter (IOM) and cometary refractory organic solids [4]. The relatively high gas-phase abundance of H2CO observed in molecular clouds (10(exp- 9) - 10(exp- 8) relative to H2) makes

  7. Carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of plant materials of different quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, I.; Mahieu, N.; Cadisch, G.

    2003-09-01

    Changes in isotopic 13C composition of solid residues and CO2 evolved during decomposition of C3 and C4 plant materials were monitored over 10 months to determine carbon isotopic fractionation at successive stages of biodegradation. We selected plant materials of different chemical quality, e.g., Zea mays (leaves, stems, coarse roots, and fine roots), Lolium perenne (leaves and roots), Pinus pinaster (needles), and Cocos nucifera (coconut shell) and also characterized these by solid-state 13C NMR. Roots were more lignified than aerial parts of the same species. Lignin was always depleted in 13C (up to 5.2‰) as compared with cellulose from the same sample. Proteins were enriched in 13C in C3 plants but depleted in maize. Cumulative CO2 evolved fitted a double-exponential model with two C pools of different lability. During early stages of decomposition, the CO2-C released was usually 13C depleted as compared with the initial substrate but enriched at posterior stages. Consequently, with ongoing decomposition, the solid residue became 13C depleted, which could only partly be explained by an accumulation of lignin-C. The extension of the initial 13C depleted CO2-C phase was significantly correlated with the labile substrate C content, acid-detergent soluble fraction, and total N, pointing to a direct influence of plant quality on C isotopic dynamics during early stages of biodegradation. This isotopic fractionation can also lead to an underestimation of the contribution of plant residues to CO2-C when incubated in soils. We discuss possible implications of these mechanisms of 13C fractionation in ecosystems.

  8. Global synchronous changes in the carbon isotopic composition of carbonate sediments unrelated to changes in the global carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Peter K.

    2008-01-01

    The carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition of bulk carbonate sediments deposited off the margins of four carbonate platforms/ramp systems (Bahamas, Maldives, Queensland Plateau, and Great Australian Bight) show synchronous changes over the past 0 to 10 million years. However, these variations are different from the established global pattern in the δ13C measured in the open oceans over the same time period. For example, from 10 Ma to the present, the δ13C of open oceanic carbonate has decreased, whereas platform margin sediments analyzed here show an increase. It is suggested that the δ13C patterns in the marginal platform deposits are produced through admixing of aragonite-rich sediments, which have relatively positive δ13C values, with pelagic materials, which have lower δ13C values. As the more isotopically positive shallow-water carbonate sediments are only produced when the platforms are flooded, there is a connection between changes in global sea level and the δ13C of sediments in marginal settings. These data indicate that globally synchronous changes in δ13C can take place that are completely unrelated to variations in the global carbon cycle. Fluctuations in the δ13C of carbonate sediments measured during previous geological periods may also be subject to similar processes, and global synchroniety of δ13C can no longer necessarily be considered an indicator that such changes are related to, or caused by, variations in the burial of organic carbon. Inferences regarding the interpretation of changes in the cycling of organic carbon derived from δ13C records should be reconsidered in light of the findings presented here. PMID:18772393

  9. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  10. Natural abundances of carbon isotopes in acetate from a coastal marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N. E.; Martens, C. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the natural abundances of carbon isotopes were made in acetate samples isolated from the anoxic marine sediment of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina. The typical value of the total acetate carbon isotope ratio (delta 13C) was -16.1 +/- 0.2 per mil. The methyl and carboxyl groups were determined to be -26.4 +/- 0.3 and -6.0 +/- 0.3 per mil, respectively, for one sample. The isotopic composition of the acetate is thought to have resulted from isotopic discriminations that occurred during the cycling of that molecule. Measurements of this type, which have not been made previously in the natural environment, may provide information about the dominant microbial pathways in anoxic sediments as well as the processes that influence the carbon isotopic composition of biogenic methane from many sources.

  11. Interpreting carbonate and organic carbon isotope covariance in the sedimentary record.

    PubMed

    Oehlert, Amanda M; Swart, Peter K

    2014-08-19

    Many negative δ(13)C excursions in marine carbonates from the geological record are interpreted to record significant biogeochemical events in early Earth history. The assumption that no post-depositional processes can simultaneously alter carbonate and organic δ(13)C values towards more negative values is the cornerstone of this approach. However, the effects of post-depositional alteration on the relationship between carbonate and organic δ(13)C values have not been directly evaluated. Here we present paired carbonate and organic δ(13)C records that exhibit a coupled negative excursion resulting from multiple periods of meteoric alteration of the carbonate δ(13)C record, and consequent contributions of isotopically negative terrestrial organic matter to the sedimentary record. The possibility that carbonate and organic δ(13)C records can be simultaneously shifted towards lower δ(13)C values during periods of subaerial exposure may necessitate the reappraisal of some of the δ(13)C anomalies associated with noteworthy biogeochemical events throughout Earth history.

  12. Triple oxygen isotope composition of tropospheric carbon dioxide and terrestrial carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M. E.; Horváth, B.; Pack, A.

    2011-12-01

    The triple oxygen isotope composition of tropospheric CO2 is a potential new tracer in urban air studies and for biosphere-atmosphere interactions [1]. In this study, we are analyzing CO2 from different provenances in order to trace the influx of anthropogenic CO2 to urban air and to test predictions on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange flux. Since July 2010, we are monitoring the triple oxygen isotope composition of CO2 in urban air in a two-week interval. For this purpose, carbon dioxide was extracted from ~450L of ambient air on the campus of the University of Göttingen using a Russian Doll type cryogenic trap [2]. The CO2 was analyzed by CO2-CeO2 equilibration at 685°C and subsequent IR laser fluorination of CeO2 and CF-irmMS [3]. All triple oxygen isotope data are reported as Δ17OTFL values relative to the terrestrial fractionation line (TFL) with a slope βTFL=0.5251 and an intercept γTFL=-0.014%. On average, the Δ17OTFL value of ambient CO2 was -0.11±0.05% (SD) with a seasonal cycle of 0.04±0.01%. Lower Δ17O values were observed during wintertime. In order to test the potential of Δ17O as a tracer for anthropogenic CO2, we analyzed CO2 from different combustion processes. Our results showed that the Δ17O anomaly of tropospheric O2 [4] is passed on fully, or partially to the combustion CO2 [5]. We estimate that elevated anthropogenic emission during wintertime could be responsible for a decrease in Δ17O of urban air CO2 of -0.02±0.01%. In order to predict the triple oxygen isotope composition of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale, we revised the box model calculation from Hoag et al. [1]. For the exponent β for CO2-water equilibrium, we assume that βCO2-water=0.522±0.001 [6]. Furthermore, we took into account that the Δ17OTFL value of CO2 released from soils is affected by kinetic fractionation. Thus, we obtained a Δ17OTFL value for global tropospheric CO2 of -0.13%. The model calculation agrees well with the Δ17OTFL value determined for

  13. Combination of carbon isotope ratio with hydrogen isotope ratio determinations in sports drug testing.

    PubMed

    Piper, Thomas; Emery, Caroline; Thomas, Andreas; Saugy, Martial; Thevis, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Carbon isotope ratio (CIR) analysis has been routinely and successfully applied to doping control analysis for many years to uncover the misuse of endogenous steroids such as testosterone. Over the years, several challenges and limitations of this approach became apparent, e.g., the influence of inadequate chromatographic separation on CIR values or the emergence of steroid preparations comprising identical CIRs as endogenous steroids. While the latter has been addressed recently by the implementation of hydrogen isotope ratios (HIR), an improved sample preparation for CIR avoiding co-eluting compounds is presented herein together with newly established reference values of those endogenous steroids being relevant for doping controls. From the fraction of glucuronidated steroids 5β-pregnane-3α,20α-diol, 5α-androst-16-en-3α-ol, 3α-Hydroxy-5β-androstane-11,17-dione, 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one (ANDRO), 3α-hydroxy-5β-androstan-17-one (ETIO), 3β-hydroxy-androst-5-en-17-one (DHEA), 5α- and 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol (5aDIOL and 5bDIOL), 17β-hydroxy-androst-4-en-3-one and 17α-hydroxy-androst-4-en-3-one were included. In addition, sulfate conjugates of ANDRO, ETIO, DHEA, 3β-hydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one plus 17α- and androst-5-ene-3β,17β-diol were considered and analyzed after acidic solvolysis. The results obtained for the reference population encompassing n = 67 males and females confirmed earlier findings regarding factors influencing endogenous CIR. Variations in sample preparation influenced CIR measurements especially for 5aDIOL and 5bDIOL, the most valuable steroidal analytes for the detection of testosterone misuse. Earlier investigations on the HIR of the same reference population enabled the evaluation of combined measurements of CIR and HIR and its usefulness regarding both steroid metabolism studies and doping control analysis. The combination of both stable isotopes would allow for lower reference limits providing the same statistical

  14. Dissolution of barite for the analysis of strontium isotopes and other chemical and isotopic variations using aqueous sodium carbonate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breit, G.N.; Simmons, E.C.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    A simple procedure for preparing barite samples for chemical and isotopic analysis is described. Sulfate ion, in barite, in the presence of high concentrations of aqueous sodium carbonate, is replaced by carbonate. This replacement forms insoluble carbonates with the cations commonly in barite: Ba, Sr, Ca and Pb. Sulfate is released into the solution by the carbonate replacement and is separated by filtration. The aqueous sulfate can then be reprecipitated for analysis of the sulfur and oxygen isotopes. The cations in the carbonate phase can be dissolved by acidifying the solid residue. Sr can be separated from the solution for Sr isotope analysis by ion-exchange chromatography. The sodium carbonate used contains amounts of Sr which will affect almost all barite 87Sr 86Sr ratios by less than 0.00001 at 1.95?? of the mean. The procedure is preferred over other techniques used for preparing barite samples for the determination of 87Sr 86Sr ratios because it is simple, rapid and enables simultaneous determination of many compositional parameters on the same material. ?? 1985.

  15. Atmospheric Aerosol Investigation In Vilnius using Stable Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, Agne; Garbaras, Andrius; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2013-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on the atmosphere, climate, and public health are among the central topics in current environmental research. Spatially urban air pollution is a major public concern world-wide.In this study the results of experimental research are presented, the basis of which is the investigation of 13C/12C variations δ13C of stable carbon isotopes in total carbonaceous aerosols in Vilnius city, Lithuania. The main aim of the work is to identify the origin of carbonaceous aerosols. Two autumns and one spring sampling campaign were designed with the aim to determine the changes in the air caused by the beginning/end of the heating season. The experiment was performed during several sampling periods. The first period lasted from 26 November to 06 December 2010. The second was from 04 April to 16 May 2011. The third was from 12 to 29 October 2012. Atmospheric aerosols, according to their aerodynamic diameters, were collected with an eleven-stage impactor "MOUDI". The stages have 50% aerodynamic diameter cut-offs of 18.0, 10.0, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.18, 0.1 and 0.056 μm, for stages 1-11, respectively. The analysis proceeds essentially in two stages. In the first, MOUDI foils were analyzed with EA-IRMS (FlashEA 1112 coupled to ThermoFinnigan Delta Plus Advantage). Half of the foil was measured directly (TC δ13C values). The rest was heated in the oven (400 °C) to remove organic part and measured EC+CC δ13C values (carbonates were not removed with acid). During the second stage of the analysis, corrections are made and OC δ13C values were calculated using isotopic balance equation: . As the main aim of the study was to identify the origin of incoming carbonaceous aerosols, air mass back trajectories were calculated using the HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model.

  16. Carbon Isotopic Constraints on Arctic Methane Sources, 2008-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. E.; Lowry, D.; Lanoiselle, M.; Sriskantharajah, S.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic methane source strengths are particularly vulnerable to large changes with year-to year meteorological variations and with climatic change. A global increase in methane seen in 2007 (Dlugokencky et al., 2009) may have been in part be due to elevated wetland emissions caused by a warm, wet summer over large parts of Siberia. In 2010 wildfires over large areas of Russia will have added methane to the Arctic atmosphere. Carbon isotopic composition of methane in air from the Arctic arriving at a measurement station can be used to identify sources of the gas. Measurement of methane δ13C in air close to sources, including wetlands, permafrost, pine forest and submarine methane clathrate has extended the available data of source signatures of methane from northern sources. Keeling plot analysis of diurnal records from field campaigns in Arctic wetlands show that bulk wetland methane emissions are typically close to δ13CCH4 -69±1 ‰. Air samples from Zeppelin (Spitsbergen, Norway), Pallas (Finland) and Barra (Outer Hebrides, Scotland) have been regularly analysed for methane δ13C. Summer campaigns at Zeppelin point to a 13C depleted bulk Arctic source of dominantly biogenic origin, at -67‰. In spring, while the wetlands are still frozen, the source signature is more enriched, -53‰, with trajectory analysis implying a large contribution from onshore gas fields. Arctic methane emissions respond rapidly to warming with strong positive feedbacks. With rapid warming there is the potential to release large stores of carbon from permafrost and methane hydrates. Isotopic data are powerful discriminants of sources. High frequency, ideally continuous, monitoring of methane δ13C from a number of Arctic sites, onshore and offshore, coupled with back-trajectory analysis and regional modelling, will be important if future changes in Arctic source strengths are to be quantified. Reference: Dlugokencky, E. J., et al. (2009), Observational constraints on recent increases

  17. A Test of Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratio Process Models in Tree Rings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, J. S.; Farquhar, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotopes ratios of carbon and oxygen in tree ring cellulose have been used to infer environmental change. Process-based models have been developed to clarify the potential of historic tree ring records for meaningful paleoclimatic reconstructions. However, isotopic variation can be influenced by multiple environmental factors making simplistic interpretations problematic. Recently, the dual isotope approach, where the variation in one stable isotope ratio (e.g. oxygen) is used to constrain the interpretation of variation in another (e.g. carbon), has been shown to have the potential to de-convolute isotopic analysis. However, this approach requires further testing to determine its applicability for paleo-reconstructions using tree-ring time series. We present a study where the information needed to parameterize mechanistic models for both carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios were collected in controlled environment chambers for two species (Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus globulus). The seedlings were exposed to treatments designed to modify leaf temperature, transpiration rates, stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Both species were grown for over 100 days under two humidity regimes that differed by 20%. Stomatal conductance was significantly different between species and for seedlings under drought conditions but not between other treatments or humidity regimes. The treatments produced large differences in transpiration rate and photosynthesis. Treatments that effected photosynthetic rates but not stomatal conductance influenced carbon isotope discrimination more than those that influenced primarily conductance. The various treatments produced a range in oxygen isotope ratios of 7 ‰. Process models predicted greater oxygen isotope enrichment in tree ring cellulose than observed. The oxygen isotope ratios of bulk leaf water were reasonably well predicted by current steady-state models. However, the fractional difference between models that

  18. Magnesium and calcium isotopic characteristics of Tengchong volcanics: Recycling of marine carbonates into the SE Tibetan mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, Y.; Zhu, H.; Kang, J.; Zhang, C.; Sun, W.; Wang, G. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Post-collisional high-K calc-alkaline volcanic rocks are widely distributed in Tengchong in the southeastern margin of Tibetan Plateau. Previous considerable petrological and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic researches undoubtedly indicate that the mantle beneath Tengchong is heterogeneous and enriched. However, the genesis of such a kind of mantle is still poor understood and needs more constrains. One of the key points lead to the answer to this question is that, is there any recycled carbonate involved? Therefore, Magnesium and calcium isotopic compositions of mantle-derived volcanics should be investigated because they are good candidates to be potentially used to trace recycling of ancient marine carbonates into the mantle. In this study, we report high-precision Mg and Ca isotopic compositions for calc-alkaline volcanic rocks in Tengchong. These volcanic rocks show significantly lighter δ26Mg values (-0.44 to -0.36‰) than the mantle value (-0.25±0.07‰). Similarly, they display lighter δ44Ca values (0.65-0.80‰) than the mantle value (1.05±0.04‰). Because neither δ26Mg nor δ44Ca are correlated with SiO2 (50.8-61.6 wt.%) contents, and there is no relationships between δ26Mg or δ44Ca and typical trace element abundance ratios (e.g. Sm/Yb, Ba/Y), we conclude that magma differentiation or partial melting would lead to limited Mg and Ca isotopes fractionation. Thus, low δ26Mg and δ44Ca signatures of Tengchong volcanic rocks probably reflect that the δ26Mg and δ44Ca characteristics of the underneath mantle source, and are resulted from adding ancient marine carbonates into the primitive mantle which has low Mg and Ca isotopic compositions. Our model simulation using a two end-member mixing between Mg-Ca isotopic compositions of primitive mantle and ancient marine carbonate indicates that carbonates involved in the mantle source is mainly dolostone with minor limestone. Combined with the geotectonic evolution history in Tengchong, we propose that the enriched

  19. Carbon isotope stratigraphy of an ancient (Ordovician) Bahamian-type carbonate platform: Implications for preservation of global seawater trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltzman, M.; Leslie, S. A.; Edwards, C. T.; Diamond, C. W.; Trigg, C. R.; Sedlacek, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon isotope stratigraphy has a unique role in the interpretation of Earth history as one of the few geochemical proxies that have been widely applied throughout the geologic time scale, from the Precambrian to the Recent, as both a global correlation tool and proxy for the carbon cycle. However, in addition to consideration of the role of diagenesis, numerous studies have raised awareness of the fact that C-isotope trends derived from ancient carbonate platforms may not be representative of dissolved inorganic carbon from a well-mixed global ocean reservoir. Furthermore, the larger carbon isotopic fractionation in the formation of aragonite versus calcite from seawater must be taken into account. All three of these variables (diagenesis, water mass residence time, % aragonite) may change in response to sea level, producing trends in C-isotopes on ancient carbonate platforms that are unrelated to the global carbon cycle. Global carbon cycle fluxes may also have a cause-effect relationship with sea level changes, further complicating interpretations of stratigraphic trends in carbon isotopes from ancient platform environments. Studies of C-isotopes in modern carbonate platform settings such as the Great Bahama Bank (GBB) provide important analogues in addressing whether or not ancient platforms are likely to preserve a record of carbon cycling in the global ocean. Swart et al. (2009) found that waters of the GBB had generally the same or elevated values (ranging from +0.5‰ to +2.5‰) compared to the global oceans, interpreted as reflecting differential photosynthetic fractionation and precipitation of calcium carbonate (which lowers pH and converts bicarbonate into 12-C enriched carbon dioxide, leaving residual bicarbonate heavier). Carbonate sediments of the GBB have elevated C-isotopes, not only because of the high C-isotope composition of the overlying waters, but also due to the greater fractionation associated with precipitation of aragonite versus calcite

  20. Radioactive Carbon Isotope Monitoring System Based on Cavity Ring-down Laser Spectroscopy for Decommissioning Process of Nuclear Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Hideki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Takiguchi, Yu; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    In decommissioning process of nuclear facilities, large amount of radioactive isotopes are discharged as waste. Radioactive carbon isotope (14C) is one of the key nuclides to determine the upper limit of concentration in the waste disposal. In particular, 14C on the graphite reactor decommissioning should be separated from stable carbon isotopes (12C and 13C) and monitored for the public health and safety. We propose an isotope analysis system based on cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy (CRDS) to monitor the carbon isotopes (12C, 13C and 14C) in the isotope separation process for the graphite reactor decommissioning. This system is compact and suitable for a continuous monitoring, because the concentration of molecules including the carbon isotope is derived from its photo absorbance with ultra high sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy. Here are presented the necessary conditions of CRDS system for 14C isotope analysis through the preliminary experimental results of 13C isotope analysis with a prototype system.

  1. Isotopic composition and speciation of sedimentary nitrogen and carbon in the Okinawa Trough over the past 30 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Hsiao, Silver Sung-Yun; Ding, Xiao-Dong; Li, Dawei; Chang, Yuan-Pin; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2015-10-01

    Total organic carbon to total nitrogen ratios (C/N) and their isotopic compositions (δ13CTOC and δ15NTN) are oft-applied proxies to discern terrigenous from marine-sourced organics and to unravel ancient environmental information. In high depositional Asian marginal seas, the inclusion of N-bearing minerals in the bulk sediment dilutes or masks signals sought after in δ15N and δ13C analyses, thus leading to incorrect and even contradictory interpretations. We used KOH-KOBr to separate operationally defined total organic matter into oxidizable (labile) and residual fractions for content and isotope measurements. In a sediment core in the Okinawa Trough, significant amounts of carbon and nitrogen existed in the residual phase, in which the C/N ratio was ~9, resembling most documented sedimentary bulk C/N ratios in the China marginal seas. The residual carbon, which was included in operationally defined total organic carbon (TOC), displayed a δ13C range (-22.7 to -18.9‰, mean -20.7‰) similar to the oft-used marine end-member. After removing the interference from the residual fraction, we found that the temporal pattern of δ13CLOC (LOC denotes labile organic carbon) was more variable. The residual nitrogen content was associated with illite, suggesting a terrestrial origin. Additionally, δ15N in the residual fraction likely reflected the climatic controls (e.g., precipitation) on lithogenic source materials. Further studies are required to explore the controlling factors for carbon and nitrogen isotopic speciation and to retrieve the information locked in the residual fraction.

  2. Isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen of suprabenthic fauna in the NW Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurell, T.; Fanelli, E.; Cartes, J. E.

    Stable isotope (δ 13C and δ 15N) analyses were performed on suprabenthic fauna collected in the western Mediterranean (NW Balearic Islands), at depths ranging between 350 and 780 m. Samples were collected seasonally at bi-monthly intervals during six cruises performed between August 2003 and June 2004, using a Macer-GIROQ suprabenthic sledge (0.5 mm mesh size). Twenty-four separate species (5 mysids, 12 amphipods, 2 cumaceans, 2 isopods, 1 euphausiid, 1 decapod and 1 fish) and bulk copepods were analyzed on a seasonal basis for stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ 15N) ranged from 2.3‰ (the amphipod Lepechinella manco in September 2003) to 13.0‰ (the amphipod Rhachotropis caeca in August 2003). δ 13C values ranged from - 24.2 (the cumacean Campylaspis sulcata in June 2004) to - 16.1 (the amphipod Bruzelia typica in November 2006). Both δ 13C and δ 15N values suggest that there are three trophic levels within the suprabenthic community. However, considering the bathymetric range of the species, the results suggest that the deepest assemblage supported only two trophic levels. The stable isotope ratios of suprabenthic fauna displayed a continuum of values and confirmed a wide spectrum of feeding types (from filter-feeders to predators). In general, and in spite of the poor knowledge about diets available for most suprabenthic species, higher δ 15N were found for carnivorous amphipods (e.g. Rhachotropis spp., Nicippe tumida) consuming copepods. Low overlap for δ 13C and δ 15N values was observed, though δ 15N values where less variable than δ 13C, which suggests high resource partitioning in this assemblage. Seasonal variations in isotopic composition for both δ 13C and δ 15N were low (less than 1‰ and 3‰, respectively) and variable depending on species. Low correlations between δ 13C and δ 15N of suprabenthic fauna were found for all periods studied, though increasing from February 2004 to June 2004 (after the

  3. Landscape variability of the stable carbon isotope composition of soil CO2 concentrations and flux in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros-Iregui, Diego; Liang, Liyin; Risk, David

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotopes are commonly used to understand how physical and biological processes mediate the exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Numerous studies have described fundamental relationships between environmental variables, the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of recently assimilated sugars in plants, litter, soil carbon, or recently respired CO2. However, studies that examine the landscape scale variability of the 13C content of forest soils are lacking. We report on measurements of the carbon isotopic composition of soil CO2 concentrations (δ13CC) and flux (δ13CJ) across a subalpine forest of the northern Rocky Mountains of Montana, United States. Our analysis demonstrates that soil moisture and the lateral redistribution of soil water are strong predictors of the spatial variability of both δ13CC and δ13CJ at the watershed scale. Our analysis suggests that there are concomitant yet independent effects of soil water on physical (i.e., soil gas diffusivity) and biological (i.e., photosynthetic activity) processes that mediate the 13C composition of forest soils. We show systematic spatial variability in the δ13C of forest soils at the landscape scale that can be useful to accurately predict and model land-atmosphere CO2 exchange over complex terrain.

  4. Alteration of the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition in the Martian Surface Rocks Due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Mahaffy, P.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    C-13/C-12 and N-15/N-14 isotopic ratios are pivotal for our understanding of the Martian carbon cycle, history of the Martian atmospheric escape, and origin of the organic compounds on Mars. Here we demonstrate that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of the surface rocks on Mars can be significantly altered by the continuous exposure of Martian surface to cosmic rays. Cosmic rays can effectively produce C-13 and N-15 isotopes via spallation nuclear reactions on oxygen atoms in various Martian rocks. We calculate that in the top meter of the Martian rocks, the rates of production of both C-13 and N-15 due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) exposure can vary within 1.5-6 atoms/cm3/s depending on rocks' depth and chemical composition. We also find that the average solar cosmic rays can produce carbon and nitrogen isotopes at a rate comparable to GCRs in the top 5-10 cm of the Martian rocks. We demonstrate that if the total carbon content in a surface Martian rock is <10 ppm, then the "light," potentially "biological" C-13/C-12 ratio would be effectively erased by cosmic rays over 3.5 billion years of exposure. We found that for the rocks with relatively short exposure ages (e.g., 100 million years), cosmogenic changes in N-15/N-14 ratio are still very significant. We also show that a short exposure to cosmic rays of Allan Hills 84001 while on Mars can explain its high-temperature heavy nitrogen isotopic composition (N-15/N-14). Applications to Martian meteorites and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission are discussed.

  5. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Blank, J G; Delaney, J R; Des Marais, D J

    1993-02-01

    The abundance and 13C/12C ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 degrees C and 600-650 degrees C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at approximately 1200 degrees C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at approximately 1200 degrees C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta 13C values of -4.8 to -9.3%, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta 13C values of -6.1 to -9.2%. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta 13C ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta 13C values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  6. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, Jennifer G.; Delaney, John R.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    The abundance and C-13/C-12 ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 C and 600-650 C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at about 1200 C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at about 1200 C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -4.8 to -9.3 per mil, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -6.1 to -9.2 per mil. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta C-13 ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta C-13 values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  7. Revision of Fontes & Garnier's model for the initial 14C content of dissolved inorganic carbon used in groundwater dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, Liang-Feng; Plummer, L. Niel

    2013-01-01

    The widely applied model for groundwater dating using 14C proposed by Fontes and Garnier (F&G) (Fontes and Garnier, 1979) estimates the initial 14C content in waters from carbonate-rock aquifers affected by isotopic exchange. Usually, the model of F&G is applied in one of two ways: (1) using a single 13C fractionation factor of gaseous CO2 with respect to a solid carbonate mineral, εg/s, regardless of whether the carbon isotopic exchange is controlled by soil CO2 in the unsaturated zone, or by solid carbonate mineral in the saturated zone; or (2) using different fractionation factors if the exchange process is dominated by soil CO2 gas as opposed to solid carbonate mineral (typically calcite). An analysis of the F&G model shows an inadequate conceptualization, resulting in underestimation of the initial 14C values (14C0) for groundwater systems that have undergone isotopic exchange. The degree to which the 14C0 is underestimated increases with the extent of isotopic exchange. Examples show that in extreme cases, the error in calculated adjusted initial 14C values can be more than 20% modern carbon (pmc). A model is derived that revises the mass balance method of F&G by using a modified model conceptualization. The derivation yields a “global” model both for carbon isotopic exchange dominated by gaseous CO2 in the unsaturated zone, and for carbon isotopic exchange dominated by solid carbonate mineral in the saturated zone. However, the revised model requires different parameters for exchange dominated by gaseous CO2 as opposed to exchange dominated by solid carbonate minerals. The revised model for exchange dominated by gaseous CO2 is shown to be identical to the model of Mook (Mook, 1976). For groundwater systems where exchange occurs both in the unsaturated zone and saturated zone, the revised model can still be used; however, 14C0 will be slightly underestimated. Finally, in carbonate systems undergoing complex geochemical reactions, such as oxidation of

  8. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  9. Carbon kinetic isotope effect in the reaction of CH{sub 4} with Cl atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Saueressig, G.; Bergamaschi, P.; Crowley, J.N.

    1995-05-15

    The authors report laser absorption spectroscopy measurements of the carbon kinetic isotope effect involving chlorine reacting with methane under stratospheric type conditions. The authors find a slight isotope effect of 1.066 {+-} 0.002 at 297 K for the ratio of {sup 13}CH{sub 4}/{sup 12}CH{sub 4}. There was also a slight temperature dependence observed.

  10. Soil drying effects on the carbon isotope composition of soil respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are used widely as a tool for determining sources of carbon (C) fluxes in ecosystem C studies. Environmental factors that change over time, such as moisture, can create dynamic changes in the isotopic composition of C assimilated by plants, and offers a unique opp...

  11. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Juvenile Winter Flounder

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotopic ratios of fish otoliths have been used in numerous studies as natural tags or markers to aid the study of connectivity among fish populations. We investigated the use of spatial and temporal changes in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of otoliths to different...

  12. Methane seep carbonates yield clumped isotope signatures out of equilibrium with formation temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Loyd, S. J.; Sample, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Defliese, W. F.; Brooks, K.; Hovland, M.; Torres, M.; Marlow, J.; Hancock, L. G.; Martin, R.; Lyons, T.; Tripati, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Methane cold seep systems typically exhibit extensive buildups of authigenic carbonate minerals, resulting from local increases in alkalinity driven by methane oxidation. Here, we demonstrate that modern seep authigenic carbonates exhibit anomalously low clumped isotope values (Δ47), as much as ∼0.2‰ lower than expected values. In modern seeps, this range of disequilibrium translates into apparent temperatures that are always warmer than ambient temperatures, by up to 50 °C. We examine various mechanisms that may induce disequilibrium behaviour in modern seep carbonates, and suggest that the observed values result from several factors including kinetic isotopic effects during methane oxidation, mixing of inorganic carbon pools, pH effects and rapid precipitation. Ancient seep carbonates studied here also exhibit potential disequilibrium signals. Ultimately, these findings indicate the predominance of disequilibrium clumped isotope behaviour in modern cold seep carbonates that must be considered when characterizing environmental conditions in both modern and ancient cold seep settings. PMID:27447820

  13. Methane seep carbonates yield clumped isotope signatures out of equilibrium with formation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, S. J.; Sample, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Defliese, W. F.; Brooks, K.; Hovland, M.; Torres, M.; Marlow, J.; Hancock, L. G.; Martin, R.; Lyons, T.; Tripati, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Methane cold seep systems typically exhibit extensive buildups of authigenic carbonate minerals, resulting from local increases in alkalinity driven by methane oxidation. Here, we demonstrate that modern seep authigenic carbonates exhibit anomalously low clumped isotope values (Δ47), as much as ~0.2‰ lower than expected values. In modern seeps, this range of disequilibrium translates into apparent temperatures that are always warmer than ambient temperatures, by up to 50 °C. We examine various mechanisms that may induce disequilibrium behaviour in modern seep carbonates, and suggest that the observed values result from several factors including kinetic isotopic effects during methane oxidation, mixing of inorganic carbon pools, pH effects and rapid precipitation. Ancient seep carbonates studied here also exhibit potential disequilibrium signals. Ultimately, these findings indicate the predominance of disequilibrium clumped isotope behaviour in modern cold seep carbonates that must be considered when characterizing environmental conditions in both modern and ancient cold seep settings.

  14. Methane seep carbonates yield clumped isotope signatures out of equilibrium with formation temperatures.

    PubMed

    Loyd, S J; Sample, J; Tripati, R E; Defliese, W F; Brooks, K; Hovland, M; Torres, M; Marlow, J; Hancock, L G; Martin, R; Lyons, T; Tripati, A E

    2016-01-01

    Methane cold seep systems typically exhibit extensive buildups of authigenic carbonate minerals, resulting from local increases in alkalinity driven by methane oxidation. Here, we demonstrate that modern seep authigenic carbonates exhibit anomalously low clumped isotope values (Δ47), as much as ∼0.2‰ lower than expected values. In modern seeps, this range of disequilibrium translates into apparent temperatures that are always warmer than ambient temperatures, by up to 50 °C. We examine various mechanisms that may induce disequilibrium behaviour in modern seep carbonates, and suggest that the observed values result from several factors including kinetic isotopic effects during methane oxidation, mixing of inorganic carbon pools, pH effects and rapid precipitation. Ancient seep carbonates studied here also exhibit potential disequilibrium signals. Ultimately, these findings indicate the predominance of disequilibrium clumped isotope behaviour in modern cold seep carbonates that must be considered when characterizing environmental conditions in both modern and ancient cold seep settings. PMID:27447820

  15. Is my C isotope excursion global, local, or both? Insights from the Mg and Ca isotopic composition of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Husson, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The C isotopic composition of ancient limestones and dolomites is a widely used proxy for the global geochemical cycles of carbon and oxygen in the ocean-atmosphere system and a critical tool for chemostratigraphy in Precambrian rocks. Although relatively robust to diagenesis, the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates can be reset when conditions favor high water-to-rock ratios or fluids with high C concentrations and distinct isotopic compositions. Authigenic carbonates and different pools of primary carbonate (e.g. calcite vs. aragonite) may also bias the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates if they are both abundant and isotopically distinct. New approaches to quantifying contributions from diagenesis, authigenesis, and mixing of primary carbonates to the C isotopic composition of bulk sedimentary carbonates are needed. Here we present preliminary Mg and Ca isotope data sets of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates, both modern and ancient. We show that recrystallization, dolomitization, and authigenesis produce Mg and Ca isotope fingerprints that may be used to identify and characterize these processes in ancient carbonate sediments.

  16. Isotope labeling pattern study of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Young; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Determination of fluxes by (13)C tracer experiments depends on monitoring the (13)C labeling pattern of metabolites during isotope experiments. In metabolome-based (13)C metabolic flux analysis, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry or tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS or LC/MS/MS, respectively) has been mainly used as an analytical platform for isotope pattern studies of central carbon metabolites. However, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has several advantages over LC/MS, such as high sensitivity, low cost, ease of operation, and availability of mass spectra databases for comparison. In this study, analysis of isotope pattern for central carbon metabolites using GC/MS was demonstrated. First, a proper set of mass ions for central carbon metabolites was selected based on carbon backbone information and structural isomers of mass fragment ions. A total of 34 mass fragment ions was selected and used for the quantification of 25 central carbon metabolites. Then, to quantify isotope fractions, a natural mass isotopomer library for selected mass fragment ions was constructed and subtracted from isotopomer mass spectra data. The results revealed a surprisingly high abundance of partially labeled (13)C intermediates, such as 56.4% of fructose 6-phosphate and 47.6% of dihydroxyacetone phosphate at isotopic steady state, which were generated in the pentose phosphate pathway. Finally, dynamic changes of isotope fragments of central metabolites were monitored with a U-(13)C glucose stimulus response experiment in Kluyveromyces marxianus. With a comprehensive study of isotope patterns of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS, 25 central carbon metabolites and their isotopic fractions were successfully quantified. Dynamic and precise acquisition of isotope pattern can then be used in combination with proper kinetic models to calculate metabolic fluxes.

  17. Model-based estimation of the global carbon budget and its uncertainty from carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records

    SciTech Connect

    Kheshgi, Haroon S.; Jain, Atul K.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1999-12-27

    A global carbon cycle model is used to reconstruct the carbon budget, balancing emissions from fossil fuel and land use with carbon uptake by the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere. We apply Bayesian statistics to estimate uncertainty of carbon uptake by the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere based on carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records, and prior information on model parameter probability distributions. This results in a quantitative reconstruction of past carbon budget and its uncertainty derived from an explicit choice of model, data-based constraints, and prior distribution of parameters. Our estimated ocean sink for the 1980s is 17{+-}7 Gt C (90% confidence interval) and is comparable to the estimate of 20{+-}8 Gt C given in the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment [Schimel et al., 1996]. Constraint choice is tested to determine which records have the most influence over estimates of the past carbon budget; records individually (e.g., bomb-radiocarbon inventory) have little effect since there are other records which form similar constraints. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  18. Model-based estimation of the global carbon budget and its uncertainty from carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, Haroon S.; Jain, Atul K.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1999-01-01

    A global carbon cycle model is used to reconstruct the carbon budget, balancing emissions from fossil fuel and land use with carbon uptake by the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere. We apply Bayesian statistics to estimate uncertainty of carbon uptake by the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere based on carbon dioxide and carbon isotope records, and prior information on model parameter probability distributions. This results in a quantitative reconstruction of past carbon budget and its uncertainty derived from an explicit choice of model, data-based constraints, and prior distribution of parameters. Our estimated ocean sink for the 1980s is 17±7 Gt C (90% confidence interval) and is comparable to the estimate of 20±8 Gt C given in the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment [Schimel et al., 1996]. Constraint choice is tested to determine which records have the most influence over estimates of the past carbon budget; records individually (e.g., bomb-radiocarbon inventory) have little effect since there are other records which form similar constraints.

  19. The evolution of Carbon isotopes in calcite in the presence of cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Christian; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions in carbonates are widely used as indicators of environmental conditions prevailing during mineral formation. This reconstruction is substantially based on the assumption that there is no change in the mineral composition over geological time. However, recent experimental studies have shown that carbon and magnesium isotopes in hydrous Mg-carbonates undergo continuous re-equilibration with the ambient solution even after mineral precipitation stopped ([1] and [2], respectively). To verify whether this holds true for anhydrous Ca-bearing carbonates which readily form at earth's surface environments, a series of batch system calcite precipitation experiments were performed in the presence of actively growing cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. The bacteria were grown at ambient temperature in a BG11 culture medium (SIGMA C3061) and continuous stirring, air-bubbling and illumination. Calcite precipitation was initiated by the addition of 8.5mM CaCl2 and 0-50 mM NaHCO3 or NaHCO3-Na2CO3 mixtures. The presence of cyanobacteria is on one hand promoting CaCO3 formation due to increasing pH resulting from photosynthesis. On the other hand, actively growing cyanobacteria drastically change carbon isotope signature of the aqueous fluid phase by preferably incorporating the lighter 12C isotope into biomass [1]. This study explores the effect of continuously changing carbon isotope compositions in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) on precipitated calcite which is in chemical equilibrium with the ambient fluid phase. [1] Mavromatis et al. (2015). The continuous re-equilibration of carbon isotope compositions of hydrous Mg-carbonates in the presence of cyanobacteria. Chem. Geol. 404, 41-51 [2] Mavromatis et al. (2012). Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 76, 161-174

  20. Dual Carbon-Bromine Stable Isotope Analysis Allows Distinguishing Transformation Pathways of Ethylene Dibromide.

    PubMed

    Kuntze, Kevin; Kozell, Anna; Richnow, Hans H; Halicz, Ludwik; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Gelman, Faina

    2016-09-20

    The present study investigated dual carbon-bromine isotope fractionation of the common groundwater contaminant ethylene dibromide (EDB) during chemical and biological transformations, including aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation, alkaline hydrolysis, Fenton-like degradation, debromination by Zn(0) and reduced corrinoids. Significantly different correlation of carbon and bromine isotope fractionation (ΛC/Br) was observed not only for the processes following different transformation pathways, but also for abiotic and biotic processes with, the presumed, same formal chemical degradation mechanism. The studied processes resulted in a wide range of ΛC/Br values: ΛC/Br = 30.1 was observed for hydrolysis of EDB in alkaline solution; ΛC/Br between 4.2 and 5.3 were determined for dibromoelimination pathway with reduced corrinoids and Zn(0) particles; EDB biodegradation by Ancylobacter aquaticus and Sulfurospirillum multivorans resulted in ΛC/Br = 10.7 and 2.4, respectively; Fenton-like degradation resulted in carbon isotope fractionation only, leading to ΛC/Br ∞. Calculated carbon apparent kinetic isotope effects ((13)C-AKIE) fell with 1.005 to 1.035 within expected ranges according to the theoretical KIE, however, biotic transformations resulted in weaker carbon isotope effects than respective abiotic transformations. Relatively large bromine isotope effects with (81)Br-AKIE of 1.0012-1.002 and 1.0021-1.004 were observed for nucleophilic substitution and dibromoelimination, respectively, and reveal so far underestimated strong bromine isotope effects. PMID:27526716

  1. Dual Carbon-Bromine Stable Isotope Analysis Allows Distinguishing Transformation Pathways of Ethylene Dibromide.

    PubMed

    Kuntze, Kevin; Kozell, Anna; Richnow, Hans H; Halicz, Ludwik; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Gelman, Faina

    2016-09-20

    The present study investigated dual carbon-bromine isotope fractionation of the common groundwater contaminant ethylene dibromide (EDB) during chemical and biological transformations, including aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation, alkaline hydrolysis, Fenton-like degradation, debromination by Zn(0) and reduced corrinoids. Significantly different correlation of carbon and bromine isotope fractionation (ΛC/Br) was observed not only for the processes following different transformation pathways, but also for abiotic and biotic processes with, the presumed, same formal chemical degradation mechanism. The studied processes resulted in a wide range of ΛC/Br values: ΛC/Br = 30.1 was observed for hydrolysis of EDB in alkaline solution; ΛC/Br between 4.2 and 5.3 were determined for dibromoelimination pathway with reduced corrinoids and Zn(0) particles; EDB biodegradation by Ancylobacter aquaticus and Sulfurospirillum multivorans resulted in ΛC/Br = 10.7 and 2.4, respectively; Fenton-like degradation resulted in carbon isotope fractionation only, leading to ΛC/Br ∞. Calculated carbon apparent kinetic isotope effects ((13)C-AKIE) fell with 1.005 to 1.035 within expected ranges according to the theoretical KIE, however, biotic transformations resulted in weaker carbon isotope effects than respective abiotic transformations. Relatively large bromine isotope effects with (81)Br-AKIE of 1.0012-1.002 and 1.0021-1.004 were observed for nucleophilic substitution and dibromoelimination, respectively, and reveal so far underestimated strong bromine isotope effects.

  2. Carbon isotope fractionation and the acetyl-CoA pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaser, Martin; Conrad, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Homoacetogenic bacteria can catalyze the reductive synthesis of acetate from CO2 via the acetyl-CoA pathway. Besides this unifying property homoacetogenic bacteria constitute a metabolically and phylogenetically diverse bacteriological group. Therefore their environmental role is difficult to address. It has been recognized that in methanogenic environments homoacetogenic bacteria contribute to the degradation of organic matter. The natural abundance of 13C may be used to understand the functional impact of homoacetogenic bacteria in the soil environment. To distinguish the acetyl-CoA pathway from other dominant processes, the isotopic composition of acetate and CO2 can be determined and the fractionation factors of the individual processes may be used to discriminate between the dominant pathways. To characterize the fractionation factor associated with the acetyl-CoA pathway the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity needs to be considered. Therefore the fractionation factor of substrate utilization and product formation of different homoacetogens (Acetobacterium woodii, Sporomusa ovata, Thermoanaerobacter kivui, Morella thermoautotrophica) has been studied under pure culture conditions in two defined minimal medium with H2/CO2 as sole source of carbon and energy. It became obvious that the cultivation conditions have a major impact on the obtained fractionation factors.

  3. Effects of carbonate leaching on foraminifer stable isotopes ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrochta, S.; Yokoyama, Y.; Sakai, S.; Ishimura, T.

    2011-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were measured on 125 individual epifaunal and infaunal benthic foraminifers from two discrete Holocene intervals in a shallow-water sediment core (~ 450 m) from the Timor Sea. Methane seeps are common in the area, resulting in significant precipitation of secondary calcite that is confirmed by SEM photomicrographs and has likely resulted in inconsistent downcore results. To assess the degree of removal of contaminants, individual Uvigerina peregrina were subjected to varying degrees of pretreatment prior to analysis. All foraminifers received standard cleaning with ethanol and brief sonication. A subset were further cleaned and sonicated in a dilute HCl solution (~ 0.003 M). Foraminifer tests were photographed using both reflected light and scanning electron microscopes during the course of treatment to monitor the changing degree of contaminant removal as increasingly aggressive cleaning methods were employed. Visible contamination remained on individuals not subjected to HCl treatment. The leached individuals exhibit a lower overall relative standard deviation and consistent results within morphotype groups. Based on these results, a 2% value is expected to be typical of the Holocene, though further downcore analyses are pending restoration of equipment adversely effected by the Eastern Japan 3/11 earthquake.

  4. Decoupling of carbon isotope records between organic matter and carbonate prior to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Early Jurassic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Stephane; Kothe, Tim; Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Suan, Guillaume; Heimhofer, Ulrich; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Across the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary (P-To, Early Jurassic), ca. 1 Myr before the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE), an initial negative carbon isotope excursion has been documented in western Tethys sedimentary rocks. In carbonate, its amplitude (2-3 permil) is similar to the subsequent excursion recorded at the onset of the T-OAE. Being also associated with a rapid warming event, the significance of this first carbon isotope shift, in terms of paleoenvironmental interpretation and triggering mechanism, remains however elusive. Taking advantage of expanded and rather continuous sections in the High Atlas of Morocco, several high-resolution, paired organic-inorganic carbon isotope records have been obtained across the Upper Pliensbachian - Lower Toarcian interval. At the onset of the T-OAE, an abrupt 1-2 permil negative shift is recorded in both organic and inorganic phases, succeeded by a relatively longer term 1-2 permil negative trend and a final slow return to pre-excursion conditions. In accordance with previous interpretations, this pattern indicates a perturbation of the entire exogenic carbon isotope reservoir at the onset of the T-OAE by the sudden release of isotopically light carbon into the atmosphere. By contrast, there is no negative shift in carbon isotopes for the P-To event recorded in bulk organic matter of Morocco. Given the strong dominance of terrestrial particles in the bulk organic matter fraction, this absence indicates that massive input of 12C-rich carbon into the atmosphere is not likely to have happened during the P-To event. A pronounced (2 permil) and abrupt negative shift in carbon isotope is however recorded in the bulk carbonate phase. We suggest that this decoupling between organic and inorganic phase is due to changes in the nature of the bulk carbonate phase. Indeed, the negative shift occurs at the lithological transition between Pliensbachian-lowermost Toarcian limestone-marl alternations and the Lower Toarcian marl

  5. A New Method for Evaluating the Carbon Isotope Characteristics of Carbonate Formed Under Cryogenic Conditions Analogous to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Socki, R. A.; Hredzak, P. L.

    2007-01-01

    The two upcoming robotic missions to Mars, Phoenix and MSL, will both have the capability of measuring the carbon isotopic composition of CO2 in the martian atmosphere, as well as possible CO2 trapped in carbonate minerals in the Martian soil. Results from orbital and landed missions now clearly indicate that no large scale deposits of carbonate materials exist at the surface. However, some results from orbital remote sensing have been interpreted to indicate that carbonate minerals are present as fine particles interspersed at low concentrations (approx. 2%) in the martian dust. One likely mechanism for the production of these carbonates is during the freezing of transient water near the surface. Large deposits of near surface ice and photographic evidence for flowing water on the surface suggest that transient melting and refreezing of H2O is an active process on Mars. Any exposure of these fluids to the CO2 rich atmosphere should al-low the production of HCO3- solutions. Carbonates are likely precipitates from these solutions during freezing as extensive CO2 degassing, driven by the fluid s decreasing volume, drives CO2 out. This rapid CO2 degassing increases the pH of the solution and drives carbonate precipitation. It has been shown in previous studies that this rapid CO2 degassing also results in a kinetic isotopic fractionation where the CO2 gas has a much lighter isotopic composition causing a large isotope enrichment of C-13 in the precipitated carbonate. This kinetic isotope enrichment may be very common in the current martian environment, and may be a very important factor in understanding the very high deltaC-13 values of carbonates found in the martian meteorites. However, while previous studies have succeeded in generally quantifying the magnitude of this effect, detailed studies of the consistency of this effect, and the freezing rates needed to produce it are needed to understand any carbon isotope analyses from carbonate minerals in the martian

  6. Modelling carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon and methane in marine porewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Khalili, Arzhang; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4) in marine sedimentary porewaters at near surface temperatures show extremely large variation in apparent fractionation covering a range from -100 ‰ to +30 ‰. This fractionation is essentially the result of microbial activity, but the mechanisms and factors controlling this fractionation are still incompletely understood. This study provides a reaction transport model approach to evaluate the effects of the most important processes and factors on carbon isotope distribution with the goal to better understand carbon isotope distribution in modern sediment porewaters and in the geological record. Our model results show that kinetic fractionation during methanogenesis, both through the acetoclastic and autotrophic pathways, results in a nearly symmetrical distribution of δ13C values in DIC and CH4 with respect to the isotope value of buried organic matter. An increased fractionation factor during methanogenesis leads to a larger difference between δ13CDIC and δ13CCH4. Near the sulphate methane transition zone, DIC is more depleted in 13C due to diffusive mixing with DIC produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulphate reduction. The model also shows that an upward decrease in δ13CCH4 near the SMT can only be caused by equilibrium fractionation during AOM including a backward "leakage" of carbon from DIC to CH4 through the enzymatic pathway. However, this effect of reversibility has no influence on the DIC pool as long as methane is completely consumed at the SMT. Only a release of methane at the sediment-water interface, due to a fraction of the methane escaping re-oxidation, results in a small shift towards more positive δ13CDIC values. Methane escape at the SMT is possible if either the methane flux is too high to be entirely oxidized by AOM, or if bubbles of methane gas by-pass the sulphate reduction zone and escape episodically into the water column

  7. Linking ramped pyrolysis isotope data to oil content through PAH analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendergraft, Matthew A.; Dincer, Zeynep; Sericano, José L.; Wade, Terry L.; Kolasinski, Joanna; Rosenheim, Brad E.

    2013-12-01

    Ramped pyrolysis isotope (13C and 14C) analysis coupled with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) analysis demonstrates the utility of ramped pyrolysis in screening for oil content in sediments. Here, sediments from Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA that were contaminated by oil from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon spill display relationships between oil contamination, pyrolysis profiles, and isotopic composition. Sediment samples with low PAH concentrations are thermochemically stable until higher temperatures, while samples containing high concentrations of PAHs pyrolyze at low temperatures. High PAH samples are also depleted in radiocarbon (14C), especially in the fractions that pyrolyze at low temperatures. This lack of radiocarbon in low temperature pyrolyzates is indicative of thermochemically unstable, 14C-free oil content. This study presents a proof of concept that oil contamination can be identified by changes in thermochemical stability in organic material and corroborated by isotope analysis of individual pyrolyzates, thereby providing a basis for application of ramped pyrolysis isotope analysis to samples deposited in different environments for different lengths of time.

  8. Carbon allocation belowground in Pinus pinaster using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannoura, M.; Bosc, A.; Chipeaux, C.; Sartore, M.; Lambrot, C.; Trichet, P.; Bakker, M.; Loustau, D.; Epron, D.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon allocation belowground competes with aboveground growth and biomass production. In the other hand, it contributes to resource acquisition such as nutrient, water and carbon sequestration in soil. Thus, a better characterization of carbon flow from plant to soil and its residence time within each compartment is an important issue for understanding and modeling forest ecosystem carbon budget. 13C pulse labeling of whole crown was conducted at 4 seasons to study the fate of assimilated carbon by photosynthesis into the root on 12 year old Pinus pinaster planted in the INRA domain of Pierroton. Maritime pine is the most widely planted species in South-West Europe. Stem, root and soil CO2 effluxes and their isotope composition were measured continuously by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with a trace gas analyzer (TGA 100A; Campbell Scientific) coupled to flow-through chambers. 13CO2 recovery and peak were observed in respiration of each compartment after labeling. It appeared sequentially from top of stem to bottom, and to coarse root. The maximum velocity of carbon transfer was calculated as the difference in time lag of recovery between two positions on the trunk or on the root. It ranged between 0.08-0.2 m h-1 in stem and between 0.04-0.12 m h-1 in coarse root. This velocity was higher in warmer season, and the difference between time lag of recovery and peak increased after first frost. Photosynthates arrived underground 1.5 to 5 days after labeling, at similar time in soil CO2 effluxes and coarse root respiration. 0.08-1.4 g of carbon was respired per tree during first 20 days following labeling. It presented 0.6 -10% of 13C used for labeling and it is strongly related to seasons. The isotope signal was detected in fine root organs and microbial biomass by periodical core sampling. The peak was observed 6 days after labeling in early summer while it was delayed more than 10 days in autumn and winter with less amount of carbon allocated

  9. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  10. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (Gamma 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAS) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SO...

  11. USE OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF FATTY ACIDS TO EVALUATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (D 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. We found that intensive sugar cane cultivation leads to ...

  12. PRODUCTION AND TRANSPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN A CONTAMINATED VADOSE ZONE: A STABLE AND RADIOACTIVE CARBON ISOTOPE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of soil gas compositions and stable and radioactive carbon isotopes in the vadose zone above an alluvial aquifer were conducted at an organic solvent disposal site in southeast Phoenix, AZ. The study investigated the source and movement of carbon dioxide above a plume of...

  13. Dual-Carbon sources fuel the OCS deep-reef Community, a stable isotope investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sulak, Kenneth J.; Berg, J.; Randall, Michael; Dennis, George D.; Brooks, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that phytoplankton is the sole carbon source for the OCS deep-reef community (>60 m) was tested. Trophic structure for NE Gulf of Mexico deep reefs was analyzed via carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Carbon signatures for 114 entities (carbon sources, sediment, fishes, and invertebrates) supported surface phytoplankton as the primary fuel for the deep reef. However, a second carbon source, the macroalga Sargassum, with its epiphytic macroalgal associate, Cladophora liniformis, was also identified. Macroalgal carbon signatures were detected among 23 consumer entities. Most notably, macroalgae contributed 45 % of total carbon to the 13C isotopic spectrum of the particulate-feeding reef-crest gorgonian Nicella. The discontinuous spatial distribution of some sessile deep-reef invertebrates utilizing pelagic macroalgal carbon may be trophically tied to the contagious distribution of Sargassum biomass along major ocean surface features.

  14. Carbon mass-balance modeling and carbon isotope exchange processes in the Curonian Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisevičiūtė, Rūta; Žilius, Mindaugas; Ertürk, Ali; Petkuvienė, Jolita

    2016-04-01

    The Curonian lagoon one of the largest coastal lagoons in Europe is located in the southeastern part of the Baltic Sea and lies along the Baltic coast of Lithuania and the Kaliningrad region of Russia. It is influenced by a discharge of the Nemunas and other smaller rivers and saline water of the Baltic Sea. The narrow (width 0.4 km, deep 8-14 m) Klaipėda Strait is the only way for fresh water run-off and brackish water intrusions. This research is focused on carbon isotope fractionations related with air - water exchange, primary production and organic carbon sedimentation, mineralization and uptake from both marine and terrestrial sources.

  15. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  16. Using stable isotopes of carbon to investigate the seasonal variation of carbon transfer in a northwestern Arkansas cave

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knierim, Katherine Joy; Pollock, Erik; Hays, Phillip D.; Khojasteh, Jam

    2015-01-01

    Stable-isotope analyses are valuable in karst settings, where characterizing biogeochemical cycling of carbon along groundwater flow paths is critical for understanding and protecting sensitive cave and karst water resources. This study quantified the seasonal changes in concentration and isotopic composition (δ13C) of aqueous and gaseous carbon species—dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2)—to characterize sources and transfer of these species along a karst flow path, with emphasis on a cave environment. Gas and water samples were collected from the soil and a cave in northwestern Arkansas approximately once a month for one year to characterize carbon cycling along a conceptual groundwater flow path. In the soil, as the DIC concentration increased, the isotopic composition of the DIC became relatively lighter, indicating an organic carbon source for a component of the DIC and corroborating soil DIC as a proxy for soil respiration. In the cave, a positive correlation between DIC and surface temperature was due to increased soil respiration as the organic carbon signal from the soil was transferred to the cave environment via the aqueous phase. CO2 concentration was lowest in the cave during colder months and increased exponentially with increasing surface temperature, presumably due to higher rates of soil respiration during warmer periods and changing ventilation patterns between the surface and cave atmosphere. Isotopic disequilibrium between CO2 and DIC in the cave was greatest when CO2 concentration was changing during November/ December and March/April, presumably due to the rapid addition or removal of gaseous CO2. The isotopic disequilibrium between DIC and CO2 provided evidence that cave CO2 was a mixture of carbon from several sources, which was mostly constrained by mixture between atmospheric CO2 and soil CO2. The concentration and isotopic composition of gaseous and aqueous carbon species were controlled by month

  17. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  18. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth.

  19. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth’s interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ13C ≈ −5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼−40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ13C distributions to the observed low δ13C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe−C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe−Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in 13C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe−C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ13C values. The sharp contrast in the δ13C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5–3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ13C values and that an average δ13C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼−5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ13C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion−differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  20. Stable carbon isotope discrimination and microbiology of methane formation in tropical anoxic lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, R.; Noll, M.; Claus, P.; Klose, M.; Bastos, W. R.; Enrich-Prast, A.

    2010-11-01

    Methane is an important end product of degradation of organic matter in anoxic lake sediments. Methane is mainly produced by either reduction of CO2 or cleavage of acetate involving different methanogenic archaea. The contribution of the different methanogenic paths and of the diverse bacteria and archaea involved in CH4 production exhibits a large variability that is not well understood. Lakes in tropical areas, e.g. in Brazil, are wetlands with high potential impact on the global CH4 budget. However, they have hardly been studied with respect to methanogenesis. Therefore, we used samples from 16 different lake sediments in the Pantanal and Amazon region of Brazil to measure production of CH4, CO2, analyze the content of 13C in the products and in intermediately formed acetate, determine the abundance of bacterial and archaeal microorgansisms and their community composition and diversity by targeting the genes of bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA and of methyl coenzyme M reductase, the key enzyme of methanogenic archaea. These experiments were done in the presence and absence of methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis. While production rates of CH4 and CO2 were correlated to the content of organic matter and the abundance of archaea in the sediment, values of 13C in acetate and CH4 were related to the 13C content of organic matter and to the path of CH4 production with its intrinsic carbon isotope fractionation. Isotope fractionation was small (average 10‰) for conversion of Corg to acetate-methyl, which was hardly further fractionated during CH4 production. However, fractionation was strong for CO2 conversion to CH4 (average 75‰), which generally accounted for >50% of total CH4 production. Canonical correspondence analysis did not reveal an effect of microbial community composition, despite the fact that it exhibited a pronounced variability among the different sediments.

  1. Stable carbon isotope discrimination and microbiology of methane formation in tropical anoxic lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, R.; Noll, M.; Claus, P.; Klose, M.; Bastos, W. R.; Enrich-Prast, A.

    2011-03-01

    Methane is an important end product of degradation of organic matter in anoxic lake sediments. Methane is mainly produced by either reduction of CO2 or cleavage of acetate involving different methanogenic archaea. The contribution of the different methanogenic paths and of the diverse bacteria and archaea involved in CH4 production exhibits a large variability that is not well understood. Lakes in tropical areas, e.g. in Brazil, are wetlands with high potential impact on the global CH4 budget. However, they have hardly been studied with respect to methanogenesis. Therefore, we used samples from 16 different lake sediments in the Pantanal and Amazon region of Brazil to measure production of CH4, CO2, analyze the content of 13C in the products and in intermediately formed acetate, determine the abundance of bacterial and archaeal microorgansisms and their community composition and diversity by targeting the genes of bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA and of methyl coenzyme M reductase, the key enzyme of methanogenic archaea. These experiments were done in the presence and absence of methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis. While production rates of CH4 and CO2 were correlated to the content of organic matter and the abundance of archaea in the sediment, values of 13C in acetate, CO2, and CH4 were related to the 13C content of organic matter and to the path of CH4 production with its intrinsic carbon isotope fractionation. Isotope fractionation was small (average 10‰) for conversion of Corg to acetate-methyl, which was hardly further fractionated during CH4 production. However, fractionation was strong for CO2 conversion to CH4 (average 75‰), which generally accounted for >50% of total CH4 production. Canonical correspondence analysis did not reveal an effect of microbial community composition, despite the fact that it exhibited a pronounced variability among the different sediments.

  2. Stable carbon isotope discrimination and microbiology of methane formation in tropical anoxic lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, R.; Noll, M.; Claus, P.; Klose, M.; Enrich-Prast, A.

    2010-12-01

    Methane is an important end product of degradation of organic matter in anoxic lake sediments. Methane is produced by either reduction of CO2 or cleavage of acetate involving different methanogenic archaea. The contribution of the different methanogenic paths and of the diverse bacteria and archaea involved in CH4 production exhibits a large variability that is not well understood. Lakes in tropical areas, e.g. in Brazil, are wetlands with high potential impact on the global CH4 budget. However, they have hardly been studied with respect to methanogenesis. Therefore, we used samples from 16 different lake sites in the Pantanal and Amazon region of Brazil to measure production of CH4, CO2, analyze the content of 13C in the products and in intermediately formed acetate, determine the abundance of bacterial and archaeal microorganisms and their community composition and diversity by targeting the genes of bacterial and archaeal ribosomal RNA and of methyl coenzyme M reductase, the key enzyme of methanogenic archaea. These experiments were done in the presence and absence of methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis. While production rates of CH4 and CO2 were correlated to the content of organic matter and the abundance of archaea in the sediment, values of 13C in acetate and CH4 were related to the 13C content of organic matter and to the path of CH4 production with its intrinsic carbon isotope fractionation. Isotope fractionation was small (average 10‰) for conversion of C-org to acetate-methyl, which was hardly further fractionated during CH4 production. However, fractionation was strong for CO2 conversion to CH4 (average 75‰), which generally accounted for >50% of total CH4 production. Canonical correspondence analysis did not reveal an effect of microbial community composition, despite the fact that it exhibited a pronounced variability among the different sediments.

  3. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration-rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5-2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2-2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected for

  4. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration–rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5–2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2–2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected

  5. Organic carbon isotope constraints on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir at the Cryogenian-Ediacaran transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ganqing; Wang, Xinqiang; Shi, Xiaoying; Zhang, Shihong; Xiao, Shuhai; Dong, Jin

    2010-10-01

    Prominent negative carbonate carbon isotope (δ 13C carb) anomalies from some Ediacaran successions are accompanied by invariant or decoupled organic carbon isotope (δ 13C org) values and have been interpreted as resulting from the remineralization of a large dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir capable of buffering carbon isotopes of organic matter. This inferred oceanic DOC reservoir was thought to have initiated with the onset of Cryogenian glaciations (ca. 720 Ma) and lasted for millions of years until the late Ediacaran Period (< 560 Ma). Carbon isotope analyses of the basal Doushantuo Formation (ca. 635 Ma) in south China reveal that (1) the cap carbonate has δ 13C org around -26‰ (VPDB) and relatively low Δδ 13C (22 ± 2‰) and (2) the overlying organic-rich black shale and shaly dolostone have more negative δ 13C org (-28‰ to -35‰) and higher Δδ 13C (28‰-30‰). Both δ 13C carb and δ 13C org show a + 6‰ shift within a 4-m-thick interval overlying the Doushantuo cap carbonate. The δ 13C org values of the cap carbonate are associated with low TOC (mostly < 0.1%); their paleoceanographic significance requires further tests in other Ediacaran basins. The co-varying positive shift in δ 13C carb and δ 13C org following cap carbonate deposition is best interpreted as resulting from a rapid increase in organic carbon burial, which may have resulted in the rise of oxygen and heralded the first appearance of animals a few meters above the Doushantuo cap carbonate. The data suggest that a large oceanic DOC reservoir did not exist in the early Ediacaran ocean. Excess oceanic DOC required to explain the Ediacaran Shuram and upper Doushantuo δ 13C excursions, if it existed, had to be developed during the Ediacaran Period after cap carbonate deposition.

  6. Seasonal Variation in Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Values of Bats Reflect Environmental Baselines

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G.; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Quetglas, Juan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Kelm, Detlev H.; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal’s isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic varia-tion in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is inte-grated in animals’ isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers. PMID:25700080

  7. A Novel Airborne Carbon Isotope Analyzer for Methane and Carbon Dioxide Source Fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Owano, T. G.; Leifer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent field studies on major sources of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) indicate significant underestimation of methane release from fossil fuel industrial (FFI) and animal husbandry sources, among others. In addition, uncertainties still exist with respect to carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements, especially source fingerprinting. CO2 isotopic analysis provides a valuable in situ measurement approach to fingerprint CH4 and CO2as associated with combustion sources, leakage from geologic reservoirs, or biogenic sources. As a result, these measurements can characterize strong combustion source plumes, such as power plant emissions, and discriminate these emissions from other sources. As part of the COMEX (CO2 and MEthane eXperiment) campaign, a novel CO2 isotopic analyzer was installed and collected data aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft. Developing methods to derive CH4 and CO2 budgets from remote sensing data is the goal of the summer 2014 COMEX campaign, which combines hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and non-imaging spectroscopy (NIS) with in situ airborne and surface data. COMEX leverages the synergy between high spatial resolution HSI and moderate spatial resolution NIS. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (100-3000 ppm). The laboratory accuracy is ±1.2 ppm (1σ) in CO2 from 370-1000 ppm, with a long-term (1000 s) precision of ±0.012 ppm. The long-term precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.04 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.06 ‰. The analyzer was field-tested as part of the COWGAS campaign, a pre-cursor campaign to COMEX in March 2014, where it successfully discriminated plumes related to combustion processes associated with

  8. Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy of the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary, Northern Calcareous Alps, Southern Bavaria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Vincent P. C.; Prave, Anthony R.; Raub, Timothy D.

    2014-05-01

    The end Triassic is recognized as a period of increased marine biotic turnover, culminating in one of the five major mass extinction events of the Phanerozoic at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Carbon isotope excursions have been reported globally that may be in response to a perturbation to the earth system. Here we present findings from a succession of early Mesozoic Tethyan carbonate strata from the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA) of southern Bavaria, Germany. The succession ranges from Carnian to Middle Jurassic in age and is part of the Bavarian Syncline, which trends East-West along the northern extent of the NCA. The two field areas studied, Wallberg and Buchstein, contain the Tr-J boundary, which is marked by an abrupt change from underlying reefal carbonate rocks to a deeper basinal setting dominated by marls, as well as the disappearance of abundant brachiopod, bivalve and colonial coral populations. The boundary is also characterized by a carbonate carbon isotope excursion. Carbonate C isotope values in the underlying reefal carbonate rocks are marked by values of 2.0 to 2.5‰. Above the contact, the carbonate C isotopes show a 1.5 - 2.0‰ decline, which coincides with the change from shallow to deeper marine carbonate sedimentation. Following the excursion, and whilst the succession maintains a basinal palaeoenvironmental setting, the C isotopes return to values similar to those present beneath the Tr-J boundary ranging from 2.0 - 2.5‰. The negative excursion may be recording a global perturbation to the carbon cycle, however the change from a shallow to deep marine depositional environment must also be considered as a possible influence on isotopic composition. Cross-plots of C and O isotopes show no correlation hence we prefer to interpret the carbonate C isotopic data to record original seawater values. Post-depositional diagenetic and lithification processes, however, likely modified the O isotope values. Our results urge caution in identifying C

  9. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate in fugitive dust in the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. J.; Zhu, C. S.; Chow, J. C.; Liu, W. G.; Han, Y. M.; Watson, J. G.

    Stable C-O isotopic composition of loess samples for TSP, PM 10, PM 2.5, and PM 1 at five sites (Yulin, Yanchi, Huanxian, Luochuan, and Xi'an) in Chinese Loess Plateau are examined. The average δ13C and δ18O abundances were -6.00‰ and -8.30‰ in TSP, -6.05‰ and -8.22‰ in PM 10, -6.07‰ and -8.33‰ in PM 2.5, and -6.00‰ and -8.28‰ in PM 1, respectively. Little differences were found for δ13C and δ18O abundances in four size fractions. The differences of δ13C between the averages of fugitive dust and bulk soil were smaller than 2‰ at five locations, which implied that the isotopic composition of bulk soil (surface soil) can be used as substitute of fugitive dust carbonate in dust source apportion study. The distribution of CO 3-C, δ13C and δ18O in fugitive dust shows that only δ13C is a powerful tracer of source regions. A database about the δ13C distribution in soil carbonate in major source regions of Asian dust was summarized for source apportion study of atmospheric dust.

  10. Moving-wire device for carbon isotopic analyses of nanogram quantities of nonvolatile organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Sessions, Alex L; Sylva, Sean P; Hayes, John M

    2005-10-15

    We describe a moving-wire analyzer for measuring 13C in dissolved, involatile organic materials. Liquid samples are first deposited and dried on a continuously spooling nickel wire. The residual sample is then combusted as the wire moves through a furnace, and the evolved CO2 is analyzed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A typical analysis requires 1 microL of sample solution and produces a CO2 peak approximately 5 s wide. The system can measure "bulk" delta13C values of approximately 10 nmol of organic carbon with precision better than 0.2 per thousand. For samples containing approximately 1 nmol of C, precision is approximately 1 per thousand. Precision and sensitivity are limited mainly by background noise derived from carbon within the wire. Instrument conditions minimizing that background are discussed in detail. Accuracy is better than 0.5 per thousand for nearly all dissolved analytes tested, including lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, sugars, halocarbons, and hydrocarbons. The sensitivity demonstrated here for 13C measurements represents a approximately 1000-fold improvement relative to existing elemental analyzers and should allow the use of many new preparative techniques for collecting and purifying nonvolatile biochemicals for isotopic analysis.

  11. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  12. The pool of organic carbon and its isotopic composition in cryomorphic quasi-gley chernozems of the Trans-Baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybenov, Yu. B.; Chimitdorzhieva, G. D.; Egorova, R. A.; Gongal'skii, K. B.

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-gley chernozems of the Trans-Baikal region are characterized by the clearly pronounced anisotropy of their properties related to carbon sequestration processes. The main carbon pool is concentrated in the humus horizon; the organic carbon content sharply decreases down the soil profile. The pool of organic carbon in the cryogenic fissures is two to three times higher than its pool in the enclosing soil horizons. The analysis of stable carbon isotopes in the plants and soils attests to the predominance of C3 plants. The composition of stable carbon isotopes is clearly differentiated in the soil profile with an increase in the portion of heavy isotopes in the deep horizons. In the humus pockets and cryogenic fissures, the increase in the portion of heavy carbon isotopes with the depth is weaker, which attests to a lower degree of the organic matter transformation. It is probable that the organic matter in the fissures is younger than the organic matter in the enclosing soil mass and derives from the upper humus horizon. The organic matter in the cryogenic fissures preserves the evolutionary properties of humus from the upper horizons.

  13. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from -6.3±0.8 to 10±1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes.

  14. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunde; Zhou, Aiguo; Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from -6.3±0.8 to 10±1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes. PMID:26835895

  15. Carbon and chlorine isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunde; Gan, Yiqun; Zhou, Aiguo; Liu, Cunfu; Li, Xiaoqian; Yu, Tingting

    2014-07-01

    Dual isotope approach has been proposed as a viable tool for characterizing and assessing in situ contaminant transformation, however, little data is currently available on its applicability to chlorinated ethenes. This study determined carbon and chlorine isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE). Carbon and chlorine isotope enrichment factors were εC=-2.9 ± 0.3‰ and εCl=-0.9 ± 0.1‰, respectively. An observed small secondary chlorine isotope effect (AKIECl=1.001) was consistent with an initial transformation by adding hydroxyl radicals (OH) to CC bonds without cleavage of CCl bonds. The relative change in carbon and chlorine isotope ratios (Δ=Δδ(13)C/Δδ(37)Cl) was calculated to be 3.1 ± 0.2, approximately equal to the ratio of chlorine and carbon isotope enrichment factors (εC/εCl=3.2). The similarity of the Δ (or εC/εCl) values between Fenton-like degradation and microbial reductive dechlorination of TCE was observed, indicating that application of solely dual isotope approach may be limited in distinguishing the two transformation pathways.

  16. Biological Apatite Formed from Polyphosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase May Exchange Oxygen Isotopes from Water through Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelon, S. J.; Stanley, S. Y.; Gorelikov, I.; Matsuura, N.

    2011-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition in bone mineral phosphate is known to reflect the local water composition, environmental humidity, and diet1. Once ingested, biochemical processes presumably equilibrate PO43- with "body water" by the many biochemical reactions involving PO43- 2. Blake et al. demonstrated that enzymatic release of PO43- from organophosphorus compounds, and microbial metabolism of dissolved orthophosphate, significantly exchange the oxygen in precipitated apatite within environmental water3,4, which otherwise does not exchange with water at low temperatures. One of the enzymes that can cleave phosphates from organic substrates is alkaline phosphastase5, the enzyme also associated with bone mineralization. The literature often states that the mineral in bone in hydroxylapatite, however the mineral in bone is carbonated apatite that also contains some fluoride6. Deprotonation of HPO32- occurs at pH 12, which is impossibly high for biological system, and the predominate carbonate species in solution at neutral pH is HCO3-. To produce an apatite mineral without a significant hydroxyl content, it is possible that apatite biomineralization occurs through a polyphosphate pathway, where the oxygen atom required to transform polyphosphate into individual phosphate ions is from carbonate: [PO3-]n + CO32- -> [PO3-]n-1 + PO43- + CO2. Alkaline phosphatase can depolymerise polyphosphate into orthophosphate5. If alkaline phosphatase cleaves an oxygen atom from a calcium-carbonate complex, then there is no requirement for removing a hydrogen atom from the HCO3- or HPO43- ions of body water to form bioapatite. A mix of 1 mL of 1 M calcium polyphosphate hydogel, or nano-particles of calcium polyphosphate, and amorphous calcium carbonate were reacted with alkaline phosphatase, and maintained at neutral to basic pH. After two weeks, carbonated apatite and other calcium phosphate minerals were identified by powder x-ray diffraction. Orthophosphate and unreacted

  17. The key factor limiting plant growth in cold and humid alpine areas also plays a dominant role in plant carbon isotope discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng; Wang, Guoan; Li, Xiaoliang; Cai, Xiaobu; Li, Xiaolin; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Junling

    2015-01-01

    Many environmental factors affect carbon isotope discrimination in plants, yet the predominant factor influencing this process is generally assumed to be the key growth-limiting factor. However, to our knowledge this hypothesis has not been confirmed. We therefore determined the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of plants growing in two cold and humid mountain regions where temperature is considered to be the key growth-limiting factor. Mean annual temperature (MAT) showed a significant impact on variation in carbon isotope discrimination value (Δ) irrespective of study area or plant functional type with either partial correlation or regression analysis, but the correlation between Δ and soil water content (SWC) was usually not significant. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, MAT was either the first or the only variable selected into the prediction model of Δ against MAT and SWC, indicating that the effect of temperature on carbon isotope discrimination was predominant. The results therefore provide evidence that the key growth-limiting factor is also crucial for plant carbon isotope discrimination. Changes in leaf morphology, water viscosity and carboxylation efficiency with temperature may be responsible for the observed positive correlation between Δ and temperature. PMID:26579188

  18. Carbon isotopic shift and its cause at the Wuchiapingian-Changhsingian boundary in the Upper Permian at the Zhaojiaba section, South China: Evidences from multiple geochemical proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hengye; Yu, Hao; Wang, Jianguo; Qiu, Zhen; Xiang, Lei; Shi, Guo

    2015-06-01

    The Late Permian environmental change, connecting the Guadalupian-Lopingian (G-L) (Middle-Upper Permian) boundary mass extinction and the Permain-Triassic (P-Tr) boundary mass extinction, has attracted more and more attentions. A significant negative shift for carbon isotope had been found at the Wuchiapingian-Changhsingian (W-C) boundary in the Upper Permian recently. However, the cause(s) of this negative excursion is still unknown. To resolve this problem, we analyzed the bulk organic carbon isotope, total organic carbon (TOC) content, pyritic sulfur (Spy) content, major element concentrations, and molecular organic biomarkers in the Wujiaping and Dalong formations in the Upper Permian from the Zhaojiaba section in western Hubei province, South China. Our results show that (1) there was a significant negative excursion in organic carbon isotopes at the W-C boundary and again a negative excursion at the top of Changhsingian stage; (2) the significant negative excursion at the W-C boundary was probably a global signal and mainly caused by the low primary productivity; and (3) the negative carbon isotope excursion at the top of Changhsingian was probably caused by the Siberian Traps eruptions. A decline in oceanic primary productivity at the W-C boundary probably represents a disturbance of the marine food web, leading to a vulnerable ecosystem prior to the P-Tr boundary mass extinction.

  19. The omnivorous Tyrolean Iceman: colon contents (meat, cereals, pollen, moss and whipworm) and stable isotope analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, J H; Oeggl, K; Holden, T G; Handley, L L; O'Connell, T C; Preston, T

    2000-01-01

    The contents of the colon of the Tyrolean Iceman who lived ca. 5300 years ago include muscle fibres, cereal remains, a diversity of pollen, and most notably that of the hop hornbeam (Ostrya carpinifolia) retaining cellular contents, as well as a moss leaf (Neckera complanata) and eggs of the parasitic whipworm (Trichuris trichiura). Based almost solely on stable isotope analyses and ignoring the work on the colon contents, two recently published papers on the Iceman's diet draw ill-founded conclusions about vegetarianism and even veganism. Neither the pollen nor the moss is likely to have been deliberately consumed as food by the Iceman. All the available evidence concerning the Iceman's broad-based diet is reviewed and the significance of the colon contents for matters other than assessment of food intake is outlined. PMID:11205345

  20. The omnivorous Tyrolean Iceman: colon contents (meat, cereals, pollen, moss and whipworm) and stable isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Dickson, J H; Oeggl, K; Holden, T G; Handley, L L; O'Connell, T C; Preston, T

    2000-12-29

    The contents of the colon of the Tyrolean Iceman who lived ca. 5300 years ago include muscle fibres, cereal remains, a diversity of pollen, and most notably that of the hop hornbeam (Ostrya carpinifolia) retaining cellular contents, as well as a moss leaf (Neckera complanata) and eggs of the parasitic whipworm (Trichuris trichiura). Based almost solely on stable isotope analyses and ignoring the work on the colon contents, two recently published papers on the Iceman's diet draw ill-founded conclusions about vegetarianism and even veganism. Neither the pollen nor the moss is likely to have been deliberately consumed as food by the Iceman. All the available evidence concerning the Iceman's broad-based diet is reviewed and the significance of the colon contents for matters other than assessment of food intake is outlined.

  1. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  2. Variability in carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation associated with bacterial hydrolysis of atrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, A.; Penning, H.; Elsner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Even after legislative prohibition in 1991 by the European Union, the pesticide atrazine and its metabolites are still detected in surface and ground water frequently exceeding the permitted drinking water concentration limit of 0,1 g/L. Despite much recent research on atrazine, its risk assessment in the environment is still a major challenge because of the difficulty of establishing mass balances in the subsurface. To obtain a better insight into the fate of atrazine, we developed compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for atrazine. CSIA has proven valuable for assessing organic contaminants in subsurface environments, on the one hand for source identification and on the other hand to trace (bio)chemical degradation reactions through isotope fractionation in the compounds. Such assessment is based on the Rayleigh equation and therein on the isotope enrichment factor ɛ, which must be determined experimentally beforehand. In ongoing work, we therefore measured carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation associated with biotic hydrolsis of atrazine. C and N isotope enrichment factors were determined in resting cell experiments for Pseudomonas sp. ADP, Chelatobacter heintzii and Arthrobacter aurescens TC1, strains that hydrolyse atrazine in the initial transformation reaction. Carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment factors were distinctly different between the bacterial strains. However, when plotting shifts in carbon isotope ratios versus shifts in nitrogen isotope ratios the slopes of the different degradation experiments coincided well. These results give evidence that all bacterial strains were carrying out the same initial biochemical degradation reaction, but that the associated isotope fractionation, as represented by the enrichment factors, was masked to a different extent owing to different rate determining steps prior to the isotopically sensitive bond cleavage (commitment to catalysis). Our study therefore illustrates the benefit of multi

  3. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  4. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs.

  5. Carbon isotopic fractionation of CH4 and CO2 during canister desorption of coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strapoc, D.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Canister desorption of coal gas from freshly sampled coal is commonly used for exploratory assessment of the coalbed methane (CBM) potential of a basin or prospect, as well as for the sampling of gas for isotopic determination of the gas origin. Compositional and ??13C isotopic time-series of desorbing CBM and carbon dioxide (CO2) over 3-4 months demonstrate considerable compositional and isotopic shifts over time. Non-stationary chemical and isotopic characteristics are due to differences in diffusivity and adsorbance behavior of gas molecules and must be taken into account when attempting to reproducibly sample coal gases. Off-line gas processing on a vacuum line and on-line GC/MS analyses were performed on coal gas samples from the Springfield and Seelyville Coal Members of the Pennsylvanian age that were cored in the SE Illinois Basin in SW Indiana, USA. The coals cover a narrow range of maturity from 0.54% to 0.64% vitrinite reflectance. Methane initially desorbed faster than CO2, resulting in a 50% increase of the CO 2 content in bulk desorbing gas on the 50th day relative to the first day of desorption. After 50 days of desorption, about 90% of all coal gas was desorbed. Over the same time period, ??13C values of incrementally sampled coal gas increased by 2??? and 9???, for CH 4 and CO2, respectively, testifying to the greater retention of 13CH4 and 13CO2 relative to 12CH4 and 12CO2. An isotopic mass balance of the individual, sequentially desorbed and sampled gas amounts yielded weighted mean ??13CCH4 and ??13CCO2 values for characterizing the cumulatively desorbed gas. The overall mean ??13C values were equivalent to ??13C values of gases that desorbed at a time when half of the potentially available gas had been desorbed from coal, corresponding in this study to a time between day 5 and day 12 of canister desorption at 15-18??C. The total expected gas volume and the ???50% midpoint can thus be approximated for a desorbing coal gas sample, based on a

  6. Isotopic evidence for organic matter oxidation by manganese reduction in the formation of stratiform manganese carbonate ore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okita, P.M.; Maynard, J.B.; Spiker, E. C.; Force, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    Unlike other marine-sedimentary manganese ore deposits, which are largely composed of manganese oxides, the primary ore at Molango (Hidalgo State, Mexico) is exclusively manganese carbonate (rhodochrosite, Mn-calcite, kutnahorite). Stable isotope studies of the carbonates from Molango provide critical new information relevant to the controversy over syngenetic and diagenetic models of stratiform manganese deposit formation. Negative ??13C values for carbonates from mineralized zones at Molango are strongly correlated with manganese content both on a whole rock scale and by mineral species. Whole rock ??13C data fall into three groups: high-grade ore = -16.4 to -11.5%.; manganese-rich, sub-ore-grade = -5.2 to 0%.; and unmineralized carbonates = 0 to +2.5%. (PDB). ??18O data show considerable overlap in values among the three groups: +4.8 to -2.8, -5.4 to -0.3%., and -7.4 to +6.2 (PDB), respectively. Isotopic data for individual co-existing minerals suggest a similar separation of ??13C values: ??13C values from calcite range from -1.1 to +0.7%. (PDB), whereas values from rhodochrosite are very negative, -12.9 to -5.5%., and values from kutnahorite or Mn-calcite are intermediate between calcite and rhodochrosite. 13C data are interpreted to indicate that calcite (i.e. unmineralized carbonate) formed from a normal marine carbon reservoir. However, 13C data for the manganese-bearing carbonates suggest a mixed seawater and organic source of carbon. The presence of only trace amounts of pyrite suggests sulfate reduction may have played a minor part in oxidizing organic matter. It is possible that manganese reduction was the predominant reaction that oxidized organic matter and that it released organic-derived CO2 to produce negative ??13C values and manganese carbonate mineralization. ?? 1988.

  7. Stable Isotopic Evidence for a Pedogenic Origin of Carbonates in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Quade, J; Cerling, T E

    1990-12-14

    Layered carbonate and silica encrust fault fractures exposed in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in southern Nevada. Comparison of the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the fracture carbonates with those of modern soil carbonates in the area shows that the fracture carbonates are pedogenic in origin and that they likely formed in the presence of vegetation and rainfall typical of a glacial climate. Their isotopic composition differs markedly from that of carbonate associated with nearby springs. The regional water table therefore remained below the level of Trench 14 during the time that the carbonates and silica precipitated, a period probably covering parts of at least the last 300,000 years. PMID:17818282

  8. Oxygen isotopic constraints on the genesis of carbonates from Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshin, Laurie A.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    1997-03-01

    With a crystallization age of 4.5 Ga, ALH84001 is unique among the Martian meteorites. It is also the only Martian meteorite that contains an appreciable amount of carbonate, and significantly, this carbonate occurs without associated secondary hydrated minerals. Moreover, McKay et al. (1996) have suggested that ALH84001 contains evidence of past Martian life in the form of nanofossils, biogenic minerals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The presence of carbonate in ALH84001 is especially significant. The early Martian environment is thought to have been more hospitable to life than todays cold, dry climate. In order to better assess the true delta-O-18 values, as well as the isotopic diversity and complexity of the ALH84001 carbonates, direct measurements of the oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of individual carbonate phases are needed. Here we report in situ analyses of delta-O-18 values in carbonates from two polished thin sections of ALH84001.

  9. Carbon Stable Isotopes as Indicators of Coastal Eutrophication

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (δ15N) to trace and monitor anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of δ15N data can often be challenging, if not confounding, as the isotope values fractionate su...

  10. Carbon cycling in eutrophic lakes: models for carbon isotopic excursions in middle Ordovician algal-dominated (Gloeocapsamorpha) organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J.A.; Hollander, D.J.; Japy, K.

    1989-03-01

    Eutrophic systems are environments conducive to the formation of organic carbon-rich source rocks. Carbon cycling and the development of seasonal carbon-isotope, surface to bottom water gradients in modern lakes can be used to evaluate changes in the carbon-isotope composition of ancient organic matter thought to have been produced under eutrophic conditions. Studies in a temperate alkaline eutrophic lake, which undergoes complete circulation seasonally oxygenating the bottom waters, indicate that algal blooms are associated with a decrease in available CO/sub 2/ and the organic matter tends to become isotopically heavier as the system converts to bicarbonate use (/Delta//sup 13/C/sub DIC-POC/ = 18 /per thousand/). Photosynthesis-respiration processes promote a transfer of /sup 12/C downward across the thermocline, whereby the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of surface waters becomes isotopically heavier than the bottom waters. Similar studies in a subtropical, acidic, eutrophic lake, which undergoes incomplete winter circulation and remains anoxic year-round, demonstrate that the higher availability of CO/sub 2/ during algal blooms allows for a larger fractionation between the DIC and organic matter /Delta//sup 13/C/sub DIC-POC/ = 23 /per thousand/. Under these extreme anoxic conditions, respiration processes, including methanogenesis, dominate photosynthesis, resulting in a general upward transfer of /sup 12/C whereby the DIC of the surface waters is isotopically lighter than the bottom waters. Thus, the /delta//sup 13/C value of organic matter produced in the subtropical system is relatively more negative than in the temperate system. These eutrophic lake models can be used to evaluate contrasting carbon-isotope excursions recorded in two Middle Ordovician organic carbon-rich formations of the east-central US.

  11. Carbon isotope stratigraphy and palynology of an eastern Tethyan Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary section from Sumbar, Turkmenistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, I.; Pearce, C. A.; Jolley, D.; Sephton, M. A.; Widdowson, M.; Gilmour, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    A number of marine sequences across the K/Pg boundary have been identified that offer reasonably continuous records and relatively high sedimentation rates, most notably those near Tethyan continental margins. However, few Eastern Tethys K/Pg localities have been studied compared to the well-known North African and Southern European sites. Here we present a high-resolution stable carbon isotope and palynological record of a 2m thick section across the K/Pg boundary from the eastern Tethys at Sumbar in Turkmenistan (38°28'N, 56°14'E). The stratigraphy and inorganic geochemistry of the section used in this study, SM-4, has been described in detail by [1]. A moderately diverse series of palynofloras were recovered from the samples spanning the K/Pg boundary with a late Maastrichtian assemblage comparable to that described from Tunisia [2]. Above the K/Pg boundary a dinocyst assemblage dominated by Areoligera is observed, reinforcing the similarity with Tunisia, that we interpret as representing a marine transgression by eutrophic water masses with the levels of Areoligera decreasing up section with a decline in nutrient availability. Carbon isotope stratigraphy of bulk carbonate and bulk organic matter reveal correlated negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) across the K/Pg boundary. The extent of the CIE and the concomitant drop in carbonate content parallels that observed for bulk and fine fraction carbonate isotopic analyses from other K/Pg sections. The negative CIE of bulk organic matter is similar in magnitude to CIEs for organic matter that have been observed at only a few other marine K/Pg sections. In contrast, the marked CIE observed in bulk organic matter is not evident in the carbon isotopic compositions of algal lipids. We interpret this as a geochemical signature of post-K/Pg algal blooms. Recent analysis identified the K/Pg boundary in the Boltysh meteorite crater sediment fill and reported evidence of a marine incursion into the crater during the

  12. Carbon Isotope Evidence for the Stepwise Oxidation of the Proterozoic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; Strauss, Harald; Summons, Roger E.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The oxidation of the Earth's crust and the increase in atmospheric oxygen early in Earth history have been linked to the accumulation of reduced carbon in sedimentary rocks. Trends in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic carbon and carbonate show that during the Proterozoic aeon (2.5-0.54 Gyr ago) the organic carbon reservoir grew in size, relative to the carbonate reservoir. This increase, and the concomitant release of oxidizing power in the environment, occurred mostly during episodes of global rifting and orogeny.

  13. Carbon isotope evidence for the stepwise oxidation of the Proterozoic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, David J.; Strauss, Harald; Summons, Roger E.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The oxidation of the earth's crust and the increase in atmospheric oxygen early in earth history have been linked to the accumulation of reduced carbon in sedimentary rocks. Trends in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic carbon and carbonate show that during the Proterozoic aeon (2.5-0.54 Gyr ago) the organic carbon reservoir grew in size, relative to the carbonate reservoir. This increase, and the concomitant release of oxidizing power in the environment, occurred mostly during episodes of global rifting and orogeny.

  14. Carbon isotope evidence for the stepwise oxidation of the Proterozoic environment

    PubMed

    Des Marais, D J; Strauss, H; Summons, R E; Hayes, J M

    1992-10-15

    The oxidation of the Earth's crust and the increase in atmospheric oxygen early in Earth history have been linked to the accumulation of reduced carbon in sedimentary rocks. Trends in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic carbon and carbonate show that during the Proterozoic aeon (2.5-0.54 Gyr ago) the organic carbon reservoir grew in size, relative to the carbonate reservoir. This increase, and the concomitant release of oxidizing power in the environment, occurred mostly during episodes of global rifting and orogeny.

  15. Recycling of water, carbon, and sulfur during subduction of serpentinites: A stable isotope study of Cerro del Almirez, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, Jeffrey C.; Garrido, Carlos J.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Turchyn, Alexandra; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Gómez Pugnaire, María Teresa; Marchesi, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    We use the concentrations and isotope compositions of water, carbon, and sulfur in serpentinites and their dehydration products to trace the cycling of volatiles during subduction. Antigorite serpentinites from the Cerro del Almirez complex, Spain, contain 9–12 wt.% H2O and 910 ± 730 ppm sulfur, and have bulk δ18O values of 8.6 ± 0.4‰, δD = − 54 ± 5‰, and δ34S = 5.0‰, consistent with serpentinization at temperatures of ~ 200 °C by seawater hydrothermal fluids in a seafloor setting. The serpentinites were dehydrated to chlorite–harzburgite (olivine + orthopyroxene + chlorite) at 700 °C and 1.6–1.9 GPa during subduction metamorphism, resulting in loss of water, and sulfur. The chlorite–harzburgites contain 5.7 ± 1.9 wt.% H2O, and have bulk δ18O = 8.0 ± 0.9‰, and δD = − 77 ± 11‰. The rocks contain 650 ± 620 ppm sulfur having δ34S = 1.2‰. Dehydration of serpentinite resulted in loss of 5 wt.% H2O having δ18O = 8–10‰ and δD = − 27 to − 65‰, and loss of 260 ppm sulfur as sulfate, having δ34S = 14.5‰. The contents and δ13C of total carbon in the two rock types overlap, with a broad trend of decreasing carbon contents and δ13C from ~ 1300 to 200 ppm and − 9.6 to − 20.2‰. This reflects mixing between reduced carbon in the rocks (210 ppm, δ13C ≈ − 26‰) and seawater-derived carbonate (δ13C ≈ − 1‰). Our results indicate: 1) Serpentinized oceanic peridotites carry significant amounts of isotopically fractionated water, carbon and sulfur into subduction zones; 2) Subduction of serpentinites to high P and T results in loss of water, and sulfur, which can induce melting and contribute to 18O, D, and 34S enrichments and oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge; and 3) Isotopically fractionated water, carbon, and sulfur in serpentinite dehydration products are recycled deeper into the mantle where they can contribute to isotope heterogeneities and may be significant for volatile budgets of the deep Earth.

  16. Reconstruction of the isotope activity content of heterogeneous nuclear waste drums.

    PubMed

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive waste must be characterized in order to verify its conformance with national regulations for intermediate storage or its disposal. Segmented gamma scanning (SGS) is a most widely applied non-destructive analytical technique for the characterization of radioactive waste drums. The isotope specific activity content is generally calculated assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution for each measured drum segment. However, real radioactive waste drums exhibit non-uniform isotope and density distributions most affecting the reliability and accuracy of activities reconstruction in SGS. The presence of internal shielding structures in the waste drum contributes generally to a strong underestimation of the activity and this in particular for radioactive sources emitting low energy gamma-rays independently of their spatial distribution. In this work we present an improved method to quantify the activity of spatially concentrated gamma-emitting isotopes (point sources or hot spots) in heterogeneous waste drums with internal shielding structures. The isotope activity is reconstructed by numerical simulations and fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution recorded during the drum rotation in SGS using an analytical expression derived from a geometric model. First results of the improved method and enhancements of this method are shown and are compared to each other as well as to the conventional method which assumes a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution. It is shown that the new model improves the accuracy and the reliability of the activity reconstruction in SGS and that the presented algorithm is suitable with respect to the framework requirement of industrial application.

  17. Soil moisture effects on the carbon isotopic composition of soil respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    The carbon isotopic composition ( 13C) of recently assimilated plant carbon is known to depend on water-stress, caused either by low soil moisture or by low atmospheric humidity. Air humidity has also been shown to correlate with the 13C of soil respiration, which suggests indir...

  18. Carbon Isotopic tests on the Origins of the Shuram Anomaly from the San Juan Fm., Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgin, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon isotope anomalies are associated with perturbations to the carbon cycle that offer insight into the geochemical evolution of the Earth. The largest Carbon isotope anomaly in earth history is the Shuram, which remains poorly understood in spite of being linked to the oxygenation of earth, the rise of metazoans, and a complete reorganization of the carbon cycle. From a basin transect of the carbonate-dominated San Juan Formation in southern Peru, we present evidence for the first clear example of the Shuram isotope anomaly in South America. Unique to this succession are ~140 meters of organic-rich black shale within the anomaly, containing as much as 4% TOC. Preliminary data from the organic-rich black shales of the San Juan Fm. confirm that δ13Corg is relatively invariant and does not covary with δ13Ccarb. These observations are consistent with other Shuram sections and support various models: an exogenous carbon source, an enlarged dissolved organic carbon pool, as well as authigenic carbonate production in organic-rich anoxic sediments. Critical tests of these models have been complicated by a paucity of organics in Shuram facies worldwide. Further analyses of the robust organics from the Shuram facies of the San Juan Fm. therefore hold promise in shedding light on the origin of the Shuram isotope anomaly and critical earth history events to which it has been linked.

  19. Photosynthetic Carbon Isotope Fractionation of the Marine Dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense: A Chemostat Investigation of Taxonomic and Physiological Controls on the Stable Carbon Isotope Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, E.; Carter, S. J.; Pearson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Interpretations of stable carbon isotope excursions in the sedimentary record are strengthened by laboratory culture studies investigating the photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation (ɛp) of marine phytoplankton taxa with long geological records. These studies are essential for understanding organic matter δ13C signals in terms of environmental changes (e.g., atmospheric pCO2 and nutrient availability) or taxonomic changes (e.g., algal species succession and community composition). Dinoflagellates are among the most widespread and ecologically dominant primary producers in modern oceans and throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Compared to more recently evolved phytoplankton taxa, however, dinoflagellate carbon isotope fractionation has received relatively little mechanistic study. Several dilute batch culture experiments with dinoflagellates have investigated ɛp as a function of CO2 availability, but the influences of changing growth rates, nutrient limitation, pH, and irradiance require further systematic exploration. We investigated stable carbon isotope fractionation in the marine dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense under nitrate-limited conditions in a chemostat culture system in which full DIC system parameters, including the concentration and δ13C value of CO2, were determined. Growth rates were varied between experiments, and cells were grown under continuous light. Previously reported ɛp values for seven dinoflagellate species including A. tamarense ranged from approximately -1 to 14‰ in nutrient-replete batch culture studies ([CO2] = 0-50 µmol kg-1). In contrast, in chemostat conditions we measured ɛp values on the order of 20‰ ([CO2] = 20-30 µmol kg-1). These experiments provide an initial step toward understanding the physiological controls on ɛp in dinoflagellates and illuminating the role of algal taxonomy in shaping the Phanerozoic stable carbon isotope record.

  20. Stable isotopes, ecological integration and environmental change: wolves record atmospheric carbon isotope trend better than tree rings.

    PubMed

    Bump, Joseph K; Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Bada, Jeffrey L; Koch, Paul L; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2007-10-01

    Large-scale patterns of isotope ratios are detectable in the tissues of organisms, but the variability in these patterns often obscures detection of environmental trends. We show that plants and animals at lower trophic levels are relatively poor indicators of the temporal trend in atmospheric carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) when compared with animals at higher trophic levels. First, we tested how differences in atmospheric delta13C values were transferred across three trophic levels. Second, we compared contemporary delta13C trends (1961-2004) in atmospheric CO2 to delta13C patterns in a tree species (jack pine, Pinus banksiana), large herbivore (moose, Alces alces) and large carnivore (grey wolf, Canis lupus) from North America. Third, we compared palaeontological (approx. 30000 to 12000 14C years before present) atmospheric CO2 trends to delta13C patterns in a tree species (Pinus flexilis, Juniperus sp.), a megaherbivore (bison, Bison antiquus) and a large carnivore (dire wolf, Canis dirus) from the La Brea tar pits (southern California, USA) and Great Basin (western USA). Contrary to previous expectations, we found that the environmental isotope pattern is better represented with increasing trophic level. Our results indicate that museum specimens of large carnivores would best reflect large-scale spatial and temporal patterns of carbon isotopes in the palaeontological record because top predators can act as ecological integrators of environmental change. PMID:17686730

  1. Stable isotopes, ecological integration and environmental change: wolves record atmospheric carbon isotope trend better than tree rings.

    PubMed

    Bump, Joseph K; Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Bada, Jeffrey L; Koch, Paul L; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2007-10-01

    Large-scale patterns of isotope ratios are detectable in the tissues of organisms, but the variability in these patterns often obscures detection of environmental trends. We show that plants and animals at lower trophic levels are relatively poor indicators of the temporal trend in atmospheric carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) when compared with animals at higher trophic levels. First, we tested how differences in atmospheric delta13C values were transferred across three trophic levels. Second, we compared contemporary delta13C trends (1961-2004) in atmospheric CO2 to delta13C patterns in a tree species (jack pine, Pinus banksiana), large herbivore (moose, Alces alces) and large carnivore (grey wolf, Canis lupus) from North America. Third, we compared palaeontological (approx. 30000 to 12000 14C years before present) atmospheric CO2 trends to delta13C patterns in a tree species (Pinus flexilis, Juniperus sp.), a megaherbivore (bison, Bison antiquus) and a large carnivore (dire wolf, Canis dirus) from the La Brea tar pits (southern California, USA) and Great Basin (western USA). Contrary to previous expectations, we found that the environmental isotope pattern is better represented with increasing trophic level. Our results indicate that museum specimens of large carnivores would best reflect large-scale spatial and temporal patterns of carbon isotopes in the palaeontological record because top predators can act as ecological integrators of environmental change.

  2. Chlorine and carbon isotope measurements can help assessing the effectivenes of a zero valent iron barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretnik, S.; Audi, C.; Bernstein, A.; Palau, J.; Soler, A.; Elsner, M.

    2012-04-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH's) such as trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinylchloride (VC) are extensively used in industrial applications. One of the most promising remediation techniques for CAH's in groundwater is their removal via abiotic reductive dechlorination using Zero Valent Iron (ZVI). This is applied for the treatment of contaminated sites by installing permeable reactive barriers (PRB). In this study, isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethylenes in transformation by cast iron has been investigated, because such types of iron are commonly used in PRBs. Batch experiments have been carried out in closed flasks, containing cast iron with aqueous solutions of TCE, cDCE and VC. These substrates and their respective products have been monitored by headspace samplings for their concentration (by GC-FID) and isotope fractionation of carbon and chlorine (by GC-IRMS). A decreasing reactivity trend was observed when compounds contain less chlorine atoms, with differences in rate constants of about one order of magnitude between each of the substances TCE > cDCE > VC. This resulted in the accumulation of products with fewer chlorine atoms. Therefore a similar observation can be expected if degradation in the field is incomplete, for example in the case of aged or improperly designed PRB. Pronounced carbon and chlorine isotope fractionation was measured for each of the compounds, and characteristic dual isotope plots (C, Cl) were obtained for TCE and cDCE. These results may serve as an important reference for the interpretation of isotope data from field sites, since stable isotope fractionation is widely recognized as robust indicator for such pollutant transformations. However, carbon isotope fractionation in a given parent compound may be caused by either abiotic or biotic degradation. In the field, it can therefore be difficult to delineate the contribution of abiotic transformation by PRB in the presence of ongoing

  3. Microbial in situ degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer monitored by carbon isotope fractionation.

    PubMed

    Richnow, Hans H; Annweiler, Eva; Michaelis, Walter; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2003-08-01

    We present an approach for characterizing in situ microbial degradation using the 13C/12C isotope fractionation of contaminants as an indicator of biodegradation. The 13C/12C isotope fractionation of aromatic hydrocarbons was studied in anoxic laboratory soil percolation columns with toluene or o-xylene as the sole carbon and electron source, and sulfate as electron acceptor. After approximately 2 months' of incubation, the soil microbial community degraded 32 mg toluene l(-1) and 44 mg o-xylene l(-1) to less than 0.05 mg l(-1), generating a stable concentration gradient in the column. The 13C/12C isotope ratio in the residual non-degraded fraction of toluene and o-xylene increased significantly, corresponding to isotope fractionation factors (alphaC) of 1.0015 and 1.0011, respectively. When the extent of biodegradation in the soil column was calculated based on the measured isotope ratios (R(t)) and an isotope fractionation factor (alphaC=1.0017) obtained from a sulfate-reducing batch culture the theoretical residual substrate concentrations (C(t)) matched the measured toluene concentrations in the column. This indicated that a calculation of biodegradation based on isotope fractionation could work in systems like soil columns. In a field study, a polluted, anoxic aquifer was analyzed for BTEX and PAH contaminants. These compounds were found to exhibit a significant concentration gradient along an 800-m groundwater flow path downstream of the source of contamination. A distinct increase in the carbon isotope ratio (delta13C) was observed for the residual non-degraded toluene (7.2 per thousand ), o-xylene (8.1 per thousand ) and naphthalene fractions (1.2 per thousand ). Based on the isotope values and the laboratory-derived isotope fractionation factors for toluene and o-xylene, the extent to which the residual substrate fraction in the monitoring wells had been degraded by microorganisms was calculated. The results revealed significant biodegradation along the

  4. Responses of carbon isotope discrimination in C4 plant to variable N and water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Shenggong

    2016-04-01

    Understanding variations and underlying mechanisms of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) in C4 species is critical for predicting the effects of change in C3/C4 ratio of plant community on ecosystem processes and functionning. However, little is known about the effects of soil resource gradients on Δ of C4 plants. To address Δ responses to drought and nitrogen supply, the leaf carbon isotope composition, bundle sheath leakiness (BLS), and leaf gas exchange (A, gs, Ci/Ca) were measured on Cleistogenes squarrosa, a dominant C4 species in the Inner Mongolia grassland. C. squarrosa were grown in controlled-environment pots from seed under a combination of water and N supply. High N availability and drought stimulated photosynthetic rate (A) and further decreased the ratio of internal and ambient CO2 concentrations (Ci/Ca) through increasing leaf N content. BLS was higher under high N supply and was unchanged by drought. There was significant interaction between N and water supply to affect BLS and Ci/Ca. Δ was negatively related to Ci/Ca and was positively related to BLS. Tradeoff between the responses of BLS and Ci/Ca to changing environmental conditions kept leaf Δ relatively stable, which was also supported by a field N addition experiment. Our results suggested leaf Δ of C4 plant was unchanged under variable water and N environment conditions although the operating efficiency of C4 pathway and CO2 concentration in photosynthesis were changed. Our findings have implications for predicting the change of C3/C4 ratio of plant community and understanding ecosystem processes and functionning.

  5. Carbon and Nitrogen Content of Natural Planktonic Bacteria †

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Toshi

    1986-01-01

    A method of estimating carbon and nitrogen content per unit of natural bacterial cell volume was developed. This method is based on the difference in the retentiveness of bacteria between two kinds of glass fiber filter, GF/C and GF/F (Whatman, Inc., Clifton, N.J.). Biovolume and biomass (carbon and nitrogen content) of bacteria which passed through the GF/C but not the GF/F filter were estimated with an epifluorescence microscopy and a CHN analyzer, respectively. From seasonal determinations of natural planktonic bacteria in epilimnetic waters of a mesotrophic lake, the conversion factors of 106 fg of C/μm3 and 25 fg of N/μm3 were derived as average values. By using these values, the contribution of bacteria to the biomass of lake plankton is discussed. PMID:16347114

  6. Application of dual carbon-bromine isotope analysis for investigating abiotic transformations of tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA).

    PubMed

    Kozell, Anna; Yecheskel, Yinon; Balaban, Noa; Dror, Ishai; Halicz, Ludwik; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2015-04-01

    Many of polybrominated organic compounds, used as flame retardant additives, belong to the group of persistent organic pollutants. Compound-specific isotope analysis is one of the potential analytical tools for investigating their fate in the environment. However, the isotope effects associated with transformations of brominated organic compounds are still poorly explored. In the present study, we investigated carbon and bromine isotope fractionation during degradation of tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA), one of the widely used flame retardant additives, in three different chemical processes: transformation in aqueous alkaline solution (pH 8); reductive dehalogenation by zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) in anoxic conditions; oxidative degradation by H2O2 in the presence of CuO nanoparticles (nCuO). Two-dimensional carbon-bromine isotope plots (δ(13)C/Δ(81)Br) for each reaction gave different process-dependent isotope slopes (Λ(C/Br)): 25.2 ± 2.5 for alkaline hydrolysis (pH 8); 3.8 ± 0.5 for debromination in the presence of nZVI in anoxic conditions; ∞ in the case of catalytic oxidation by H2O2 with nCuO. The obtained isotope effects for both elements were generally in agreement with the values expected for the suggested reaction mechanisms. The results of the present study support further applications of dual carbon-bromine isotope analysis as a tool for identification of reaction pathway during transformations of brominated organic compounds in the environment.

  7. Seasonal variation in kangaroo tooth enamel oxygen and carbon isotopes in southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, Tom H.; Ambrose, Stanley H.

    2012-09-01

    Serial sampling of tooth enamel growth increments for carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of Macropus (kangaroo) teeth was performed to assess the potential for reconstructing paleoseasonality. The carbon isotope composition of tooth enamel apatite carbonate reflects the proportional intake of C3 and C4 vegetation. The oxygen isotopic composition of enamel reflects that of ingested and metabolic water. Tooth enamel forms sequentially from the tip of the crown to the base, so dietary and environmental changes during the tooth's formation can be detected. δ13C and δ18O values were determined for a series of enamel samples drilled from the 3rd and 4th molars of kangaroos that were collected along a 900 km north-south transect in southern Australia. The serial sampling method did not yield pronounced seasonal isotopic variation patterns in Macropus enamel. The full extent of dietary isotopic variation may be obscured by attenuation of the isotopic signal during enamel mineralisation. Brachydont (low-crowned) Macropus teeth may be less sensitive to seasonal variation in isotopic composition due to time-averaging during mineralisation. However, geographic variations observed suggest that there may be potential for tracking latitudinal shifts in vegetation zones and seasonal environmental patterns in response to climate change.

  8. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of bacterial methane in a shallow freshwater lake

    SciTech Connect

    Woltemate, I.; Whiticar, M.J.; Schoell, M.

    1984-09-01

    Anoxic sediments from freshwater environments such as bogs, swamps, and lakes undergoing early diagenesis are frequently characterized by the formation of biogenic methane. Freshwater biogenic methanes exhibit carbon and hydrogen isotopic values strongly depleted in C-13 and deuterium relative to the respective values for carbon dioxide and formation water. The percentages of methane generated by fermentation and carbon dioxide reduction can be estimated by comparison of hydrogen isotopes in the formation water and methane. On the basis of these hydrogen isotope data, about 75% of the methane formation in Wurmsee comes from acetate reduction. Fermentation is thus the dominant although not exclusive process. Carbon dioxide reduction contributed the balance of the bacterial methane generated. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  9. Biogeochemistry of the Stable Isotopes of Hydrogen and Carbon in Salt Marsh Biota 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce N.; Epstein, Samuel

    1970-01-01

    Deuterium to hydrogen ratios of 14 plant species from a salt marsh and lagoon were 55‰ depleted in deuterium relative to the environmental water. Carbon tetrachloride-extractable material from these plants was another 92‰ depleted in deuterium. This gave a fractionation factor from water to CCl4 extract of 1.147. This over-all fractionation was remarkably constant for all species analyzed. Plants also discriminate against 13C, particularly in the lipid fraction. Data suggest that different mechanisms for carbon fixation result in different fractionations of the carbon isotopes. Herbivore tissues reflected the isotopic ratios of plants ingested. Apparently different metabolic processes are responsible for the different degrees of fractionation observed for hydrogen and carbon isotopes. PMID:16657539

  10. Fluids in the damage zone: Insights from clumped isotope thermometry of fault-hosted carbonate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.; Hodson, Keith R.; Huntington, Katharine W.

    2015-04-01

    Carbonate cements in fault zone rocks contain both chemical and physical information about the interaction and coevolution of their source fluids with surrounding fault rock. In this work, we present an analysis of textural relationships and isotopic compositions of carbonate cements in sandstone, within a well-characterized upper-crustal fault intersection zone, 'Courthouse Junction' along the Moab Fault in southeast Utah, USA. Structures exposed at the outcrop record several phases of overprinting brittle deformation, including cataclastic deformation bands, fracturing and faulting. Carbonate diagenesis is thought to be a later stage, possibly facilitated by an increase in fault parallel permeability. Calcite is hosted within joints and concretions associated with both deformation-band faults and fracture-based faults. We have used cathodoluminescence, oxygen and carbon isotopes, and clumped isotope paleothermometry to differentiate two populations of calcite cement in the fault intersection zone: cool (

  11. Detritus derived from eelgrass and macroalgae as potential carbon source for Mytilus edulis in Kiel Fjord, Germany: a preliminary carbon isotopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemeyer, W. L.; Schwamborn, R.

    1996-09-01

    Stable carbon