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Sample records for carbon isotope content

  1. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the isotopic content of atmospheric particulate matter are hampered by difficulties in chemically defining the pools of carbon and analytically isolating the different pools. We are conducting studies on reference materials and atmospheric aerosol samples to develop a method to measure stable and radio- carbon isotopes on the labile and refractory carbon. We are using a flow-through combustion system that allows us to combust, collect and measure the isotopic content of the gases produced at all stages of heating/oxidizing. We compare our results to those measured using a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO) (Gustafsson et al., 2001). In this method, refractory carbon is defined as the material remaining after pre- combusting a sample at 375°C in the presence of oxygen for 24 hours. The reference materials are diesel soot, apple leaves and a hybrid of the two (DiesApple), all from NIST. These provide carbon with two well-defined fractions -- the soot provides refractory carbon that is radiocarbon dead and the apple leaves provide organic carbon that is radiocarbon modern. Radiocarbon results from DiesApple indicate that the "refractory" carbon defined by the CTO method is actually a mixture of old and modern carbon that contains over 25% modern carbon. This suggests that charred material formed from the apples leaves during the pre-combustion step is contributing to the fraction we identify as refractory carbon. We are studying this by analyzing the individual materials and the mixture using our flow-through system. First results with this system indicate that the refractory fraction trapped from the DiesApple contains much less modern carbon than the CTO method, less than 7%. We will present detailed concentration and isotopic results of the generation of carbon dioxide during programmed combustion of each of the reference materials. We studied the radiocarbon content of both the total carbon (TC) and refractory carbon in the fine particulate matter (PM

  2. The carbon isotopes ratio and trace metals content determinations in some Transylvanian fruit juices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehelean, A.; Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.

    2012-02-01

    This work presents a preliminary study on the carbon isotope signature and trace metal content investigated on the soil-plant-fruit pulp chain. The samples were collected from two Transylvanian areas namely Alba and Salaj. The average value of the δ13C at the soil surface was around δ13C ≈ -27%° and important differences of the δ13C values between the two studied areas were not observed. Meanwhile, differences between fruit pulp of grape juice and the pulp of pear juice relived a difference of about 1.5%° for δ13C values.

  3. Environmental forcing does not lead to variation in carbon isotope content of forest soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, David; Egan, Jocelyn; Hall, Steven; Risk, David

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have highlighted fluctuations in the carbon isotope content (δ13C) of CO2 produced by soil respiration. These have been correlated with diel cycles of environmental forcing (e.g., soil temperature), or with synoptic weather events (e.g., rain events and pressure-induced ventilation). We used an extensive suite of observations to examine these phenomena over two months in a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site). Measurements included automated soil respiration chambers and automated measurements of the soil gas profile. We found 1) no diel change in the δ13C of the soil surface flux or the CO2 produced in the soil (despite strong diel change in surface flux rate), 2) no change in δ13C following wetting (despite a significant increase in soil flux rate), and 3) no evidence of pressure-induced ventilation of the soil. Measurements of the δ13C of surface CO2 flux agreed closely with the isotopic composition of soil CO2 production calculated using soil profile measurements. Temporal variation in the δ13C of surface flux was relatively minor and unrelated to measured environmental variables. Deep in the soil profile, results conform to established theory regarding diffusive soil gas transport and isotopic fractionation, and suggest that sampling soil gas at a depth of several tens of centimeters is a simple and effective way to assess the mean δ13C of the surface flux.

  4. A review of volatile compounds in tektites, and carbon content and isotopic composition of moldavite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žák, Karel; SkáLA, Roman; Šanda, Zdeněk.; Mizera, Jiří.

    2012-06-01

    Tektites, natural silica-rich glasses produced during impact events, commonly contain bubbles. The paper reviews published data on pressure and composition of a gas phase contained in the tektite bubbles and data on other volatile compounds which can be released from tektites by either high-temperature melting or by crushing or milling under vacuum. Gas extraction from tektites using high-temperature melting generally produced higher gas yield and different gas composition than the low-temperature extraction using crushing or milling under vacuum. The high-temperature extraction obviously releases volatiles not only from the bubbles, but also volatile compounds contained directly in the glass. Moreover, the gas composition can be modified by reactions between the released gases and the glass melt. Published data indicate that besides CO2 and/or CO in the bubbles, another carbon reservoir is present directly in the tektite glass. To clarify the problem of carbon content and carbon isotopic composition of the tektite glass, three samples from the Central European tektite strewn field—moldavites—were analyzed. The samples contained only 35-41 ppm C with δ13C values in the range from -28.5 to -29.9‰ VPDB. This indicates that terrestrial organic matter was a dominant carbon source during moldavite formation.

  5. [Study on the content and carbon isotopic composition of water dissolved inorganic carbon from rivers around Xi'an City].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Li, Xiang-Zhong; Liu, Wei-Guo

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the content and isotopic compositions of water dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from four typical rivers (Chanhe, Bahe, Laohe and Heihe) around Xi'an City were studied to trace the possible sources of DIC. The results of this study showed that the content of DIC in the four rivers varied from 0.34 to 5.66 mmol x L(-1) with an average value of 1.23 mmol x L(-1). In general, the content of DIC increased from the headstream to the river mouth. The delta13C(DIC) of four rivers ranged from -13.3 per thousand to -7.2 per thousand, with an average value of -10.1 per thousand. The delta13C(DIC) values of river water were all negative (average value of -12.6 per thousand) at the headstream of four rivers, but the delta13C(DIC) values of downstream water were more positive (with an average value of -9.4 per thousand). In addition, delta13C(DIC) of river water showed relatively negative values (the average value of delta13C(DIC) was -10.5 per thousand) near the estuary of the rivers. The variation of the DIC content and its carbon isotope suggested that the DIC sources of the rivers varied from the headstream to the river mouth. The negative delta13C(DIC) value indicated that the DIC may originate from the soil CO2 at the headstream of the rivers. On the other hand, the delta13C(DIC) values of river water at the middle and lower reaches of rivers were more positive, and it showed that soil CO2 produced by respiration of the C4 plants (like corn) and soil carbonates with positive delta13C values may be imported into river water. Meanwhile, the input of pollutants with low delta13C(DIC) values may result in a decrease of delta13C(DIC) values in the rivers. The study indicated that the DIC content and carbon isotope may be used to trace the sources of DIC in rivers around Xi'an City. Our study may provide some basic information for tracing the sources of DIC of rivers in the small watershed area in the Loess Plateau of China.

  6. The Content and Stable Isotopic Composition of Carbon in Individual Micrometeorites from Greenland and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Yates, P. D.; Hutchison, R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1997-01-01

    The carbon contents and d13C values of eleven individual micrometeorites have been determined using a combination of stepped combustion and static mass spectrometry. A new low-blank procedure, involving pre-treatment of the samples with a solvent to remove surficial contaminants, has enabled samples of 6-84 microgram to be analysed successfully. The eleven samples (seven separated from Greenland cryoconite and four from Antarctic ice) were each split prior to carbon determination and a fragment taken for study using analytical electron microscopy. In this way, the chemical compositions were obtained thereby allowing comparison with other investigations. As with previous studies of micrometeorites collected at the Earth's surface, the major difficulty with interpreting the results involves distinguishing indigenous components from terrestrial contaminants. Overall carbon contents were typically less than 0.2 wt%, although one of the Greenland samples contained 1.5 wt% carbon, considered to arise mainly from algal contamination. For the other samples, around 0.05-0.15 wt% of the total carbon in each micrometeorite was considered to be organic in nature with at least some of this (if not all) being terrestrial in origin; the remainder was probably indigenous, being analogous to the macromolecular organic material found in primitive carbonaceous chondrites. The generally low content of this indigenous organic material, compared to conventional meteorites, is presumably a reflection of carbon loss from the micrometeorites either during atmospheric heating, or subsequent weathering. For that carbon combusting between 500 and 600_C, ten of the samples appeared to show a simple two-component system, i.e. a mixture of blank and an isotopically light component (d13C^2 -32). It is possible that the light component is Cd, a fine-grained form of pre-solar diamond which is known to be prevalent in primitive chondritic meteorites. If so then it is present in the micrometeorites

  7. Variability in magnesium, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, and trace element contents of brachiopod shells: implications for paleoceanographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, Claire; Saulnier, Ségolène; Vigier, Nathalie; Schumacher, Aimryc; Chaussidon, Marc; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium content in the ocean is ≈ 1290 ppm and is one of the most abundant elements. It is involved in the carbon cycle via the dissolution and precipitation of carbonates, especially Mg-rich carbonates as dolomites. The Mg/Ca ratio of the ocean is believed to have changed through time. The causes of these variations, i.e. hydrothermal activity change or enhanced precipitation of dolomite, could be constrained using the magnesium isotope composition (δ26Mg) of carbonates. Brachiopods, as marine environmental proxies, have the advantage to occur worldwide in a depth range from intertidal to abyssal, and have been found in the geological record since the Cambrian. Moreover, as their shell is in low-Mg calcite, they are quite resistant to diagenetic processes. Here we report δ26Mg, δ18O, δ13C values along with trace element contents of one modern brachiopod specimen (Terebratalia transversa) and one fossil specimen (Terebratula scillae, 2.3 Ma). We combined δ26Mg values with oxygen and carbon isotope compositions and trace element contents to look for possible shell geochemical heterogeneities in order to investigate the processes that control the Mg isotope composition of brachiopod shells. We also evaluate the potential of brachiopods as a proxy of past seawater δ26Mg values. The two investigated brachiopod shells present the same range of δ26Mg variation (up to 2 ‰)). This variation cannot be ascribed to changes in environmental parameters, i.e. temperature or pH. As previously observed, the primary layer of calcite shows the largest degree of oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibrium relative to seawater. In contrast, the δ26Mg value of this layer is comparable to that of the secondary calcite layer value. In both T. scillae and T. transversa, negative trends are observable between magnesium isotopic compositions and oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions. These trends, combined to linear relationships between δ26Mg values and REE contents, are best

  8. Higher peroxidase activity, leaf nutrient contents and carbon isotope composition changes in Arabidopsis thaliana are related to rutin stress.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2014-09-15

    Rutin, a plant secondary metabolite that is used in cosmetics and food additive and has known medicinal properties, protects plants from UV-B radiation and diseases. Rutin has been suggested to have potential in weed management, but its mode of action at physiological level is unknown. Here, we report the biochemical, physiological and oxidative response of Arabidopsis thaliana to rutin at micromolar concentrations. It was found that fresh weight; leaf mineral contents (nitrogen, sodium, potassium, copper and aluminum) were decreased following 1 week exposure to rutin. Arabidopsis roots generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species after rutin treatment, consequently increasing membrane lipid peroxidation, decreasing leaf Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) contents and losing root viability. Carbon isotope composition in A. thaliana leaves was less negative after rutin application than the control. Carbon isotope discrimination values were decreased following rutin treatment, with the highest reduction compared to the control at 750μM rutin. Rutin also inhibited the ratio of CO2 from leaf to air (ci/ca) at all concentrations. Total protein contents in A. thaliana leaves were decreased following rutin treatment. It was concluded carbon isotope discrimination coincided with protein degradation, increase lipid peroxidation and a decrease in ci/ca values may be the primary action site of rutin. The present results suggest that rutin possesses allelopathic potential and could be used as a candidate to develop environment friendly natural herbicide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Soil carbon isotopic composition and soil carbon content in an agroecosystem during six years of Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE).

    PubMed

    Giesemann, Anette; Weigel, Hans-Joachim

    2008-12-01

    The Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment conducted at the Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL) in Braunschweig in an arable crop rotation (total duration six years) allowed us to trace carbon (C) input in the soil C pool, as the CO(2), used in the experiment to increase the atmospheric CO(2) concentration, was depleted in (13)C. Accurate assessment of the C input by means of stable C isotope analysis requires detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of both the C isotopic composition and the C content in the soil C. Assumed changes in these parameters were examined. CO(2) enrichment treatment over a six year period resulted in a clear trend towards an increase of soil C content in the uppermost 10 cm of soil. About 4.9% of the soil C present under ambient air conditions, and 10.7% present under elevated CO(2) conditions were determined as new input. However, the results are not statistically significant yet.

  10. Environmental forcing does not lead to diel or synoptic variability in carbon isotope content of forest soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, D. R.; Egan, J. E.; Hall, S. J.; Risk, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have highlighted fluctuations in the carbon isotope content (d13C) of CO2 produced by soil respiration. These fluctuations have been correlated with diel cycles of environmental forcing (e.g., soil temperature), or with synoptic weather events (e.g., rain events and pressure-induced ventilation). We used an extensive suite of observations to examine these phenomena over two months in a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site). Measurements included automated soil respiration chambers and automated measurements of the soil gas profile. We found 1) no diel change in the d13C of the soil surface flux or the CO2 produced in the soil (despite strong diel change in surface flux rate), 2) no change in d13C following wetting (despite a significant increase in soil flux rate), and 3) no evidence of pressure-induced ventilation of the soil. Measurements of the d13C of surface CO2 flux agreed closely with the isotopic composition of soil CO2 production calculated using soil profile measurements. Temporal variation in the d13C of surface flux was relatively minor and unrelated to measured environmental variables. Deep in the soil profile, results conform to established theory regarding diffusive soil gas transport and isotopic fractionation, and suggest that sampling soil gas at a depth of several tens of centimeters is a simple and effective way to assess the mean d13C of the surface flux.

  11. Environmental forcing does not induce diel or synoptic variation in carbon isotope content of forest soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, D. R.; Egan, J. E.; Hall, S. J.; Risk, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have examined temporal fluctuations in the amount and carbon isotope content (δ13C) of CO2 produced by respiration of roots and soil organisms. These changes have been correlated with diel cycles of environmental forcing (e.g., sunlight and soil temperature) and with synoptic-scale atmospheric motion (e.g., rain events and pressure-induced ventilation). We used an extensive suite of measurements to examine soil respiration over two months in a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux forest). Observations included automated measurements of CO2 and δ13C of CO2 in the soil efflux, the soil gas profile, and forest air. There was strong diel variability in soil efflux, but no diel change in the δ13C of the soil efflux (δR) or the CO2 produced by biological activity in the soil (δJ). Following rain, soil efflux increased significantly, but δR and δJ did not change. Temporal variation in the δ13C of the soil efflux was unrelated to measured environmental variables. Measurements of the δ13C of the soil efflux with chambers agreed closely with independent observations of the isotopic composition of soil CO2 production derived from soil gas well measurements. Deeper in the soil profile and at the soil surface, results confirmed established theory regarding diffusive soil gas transport and isotopic fractionation. Deviation from best-fit diffusion model results at the shallower depths illuminated a pump-induced ventilation artifact that should be anticipated and avoided in future studies. There was no evidence of natural pressure-induced ventilation of the deep soil. However, higher variability of δ13C of the soil efflux relative to δ13C of production derived from soil profile measurements was likely caused by transient pressure-induced transport with small horizontal length scales.

  12. Environmental forcing does not induce diel or synoptic variation in the carbon isotope content of forest soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, D. R.; Egan, J. E.; Hall, S. J.; Risk, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have examined temporal fluctuations in the amount and carbon isotope content (δ13C) of CO2 produced by the respiration of roots and soil organisms. These changes have been correlated with diel cycles of environmental forcing (e.g., sunlight and soil temperature) and with synoptic-scale atmospheric motion (e.g., rain events and pressure-induced ventilation). We used an extensive suite of measurements to examine soil respiration over 2 months in a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux forest). Observations included automated measurements of CO2 and δ13C of CO2 in the soil efflux, the soil gas profile, and forest air. There was strong diel variability in soil efflux but no diel change in the δ13C of the soil efflux (δR) or the CO2 produced by biological activity in the soil (δJ). Following rain, soil efflux increased significantly, but δR and δJ did not change. Temporal variation in the δ13C of the soil efflux was unrelated to measured environmental variables, and we failed to find an explanation for this unexpected result. Measurements of the δ13C of the soil efflux with chambers agreed closely with independent observations of the isotopic composition of soil CO2 production derived from soil gas well measurements. Deeper in the soil profile and at the soil surface, results confirmed established theory regarding diffusive soil gas transport and isotopic fractionation. Deviation from best-fit diffusion model results at the shallower depths illuminated a pump-induced ventilation artifact that should be anticipated and avoided in future studies. There was no evidence of natural pressure-induced ventilation of the deep soil. However, higher variability in δ13C of the soil efflux relative to δ13C of production derived from soil profile measurements was likely caused by transient pressure-induced transport with small horizontal length scales.

  13. The stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon and elemental contents in modern and fossil seabird guano from Northern Chile - Marine sources and diagenetic effects.

    PubMed

    Lucassen, Friedrich; Pritzkow, Wolfgang; Rosner, Martin; Sepúlveda, Fernando; Vásquez, Paulina; Wilke, Hans; Kasemann, Simone A

    2017-01-01

    Seabird excrements (guano) have been preserved in the arid climate of Northern Chile since at least the Pliocene. The deposits of marine organic material in coastal areas potentially open a window into the present and past composition of the coastal ocean and its food web. We use the stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon as well as element contents to compare the principal prey of the birds, the Peruvian anchovy, with the composition of modern guano. We also investigate the impact of diagenetic changes on the isotopic composition and elemental contents of the pure ornithogenic sediments, starting with modern stratified deposits and extending to fossil guano. Where possible, 14C systematics is used for age information. The nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of the marine prey (Peruvian anchovy) of the birds is complex as it shows strong systematic variations with latitude. The detailed study of a modern profile that represents a few years of guano deposition up to present reveals systematic changes in nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition towards heavier values that increase with age, i.e. depth. Only the uppermost, youngest layers of modern guano show compositional affinity to the prey of the birds. In the profile, the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon occurs by degassing, and non-volatile elements like phosphorous and calcium are passively enriched in the residual guano. Fossil guano deposits are very low in nitrogen and low in carbon contents, and show very heavy nitrogen isotopic compositions. One result of the study is that the use of guano for tracing nitrogen and carbon isotopic and elemental composition in the marine food web of the birds is restricted to fresh material. Despite systematic changes during diagenesis, there is little promise to retrieve reliable values of marine nitrogen and carbon signatures from older guano. However, the changes in isotopic composition from primary marine nitrogen isotopic signatures towards very

  14. The stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon and elemental contents in modern and fossil seabird guano from Northern Chile – Marine sources and diagenetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Pritzkow, Wolfgang; Rosner, Martin; Sepúlveda, Fernando; Vásquez, Paulina; Wilke, Hans; Kasemann, Simone A.

    2017-01-01

    Seabird excrements (guano) have been preserved in the arid climate of Northern Chile since at least the Pliocene. The deposits of marine organic material in coastal areas potentially open a window into the present and past composition of the coastal ocean and its food web. We use the stable isotope composition of nitrogen and carbon as well as element contents to compare the principal prey of the birds, the Peruvian anchovy, with the composition of modern guano. We also investigate the impact of diagenetic changes on the isotopic composition and elemental contents of the pure ornithogenic sediments, starting with modern stratified deposits and extending to fossil guano. Where possible, 14C systematics is used for age information. The nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of the marine prey (Peruvian anchovy) of the birds is complex as it shows strong systematic variations with latitude. The detailed study of a modern profile that represents a few years of guano deposition up to present reveals systematic changes in nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition towards heavier values that increase with age, i.e. depth. Only the uppermost, youngest layers of modern guano show compositional affinity to the prey of the birds. In the profile, the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon occurs by degassing, and non-volatile elements like phosphorous and calcium are passively enriched in the residual guano. Fossil guano deposits are very low in nitrogen and low in carbon contents, and show very heavy nitrogen isotopic compositions. One result of the study is that the use of guano for tracing nitrogen and carbon isotopic and elemental composition in the marine food web of the birds is restricted to fresh material. Despite systematic changes during diagenesis, there is little promise to retrieve reliable values of marine nitrogen and carbon signatures from older guano. However, the changes in isotopic composition from primary marine nitrogen isotopic signatures towards very

  15. Biological and physical influences on the carbon isotope content of CO2 in a subalpine forest snowpack, Niwot Ridge, Colorado

    Treesearch

    D. R. Bowling; W. J. Massman; S. M. Schaeffer; S. P. Burns; R. K. Monson; M. W. Williams

    2009-01-01

    Considerable research has recently been devoted to understanding biogeochemical processes under winter snow cover, leading to enhanced appreciation of the importance of many winter ecological processes. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of the stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13C) of CO2 within a high-elevation subalpine...

  16. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Risatti, J. B.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems.

  17. Carbon isotope fractionation in wood during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, C. S. M.; Wheeler, D.; Chivas, Allan R.

    2006-02-01

    A significant uncertainty exists as to whether δ 13C values in charcoal meaningfully represent the stable isotopic content of the original material, with studies suggesting variable responses to both natural and laboratory heating. An extensive study was undertaken using fully homogenised samples of wood taken from Eucalyptus spp., Quercus robur and Pinus radiata. The results demonstrate that the duration of heating had no tangible effect on the final composition of the charred material, with the δ 13C and carbon content of wood fixed after 30 min of heating. Furthermore, all three wood types become progressively depleted in 13C with increasing temperature. The results demonstrate that even at temperatures commonly reached in natural fires (<450 °C) isotopic fractionation of up to 1.3‰ can take place indicating that the absolute values obtained from charcoal extracted for paleoenvironmental reconstruction must be interpreted with caution.

  18. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  19. Strong linkage of polar cod (Boreogadus saida) to sea ice algae-produced carbon: Evidence from stomach content, fatty acid and stable isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlbach, Doreen; Schaafsma, Fokje L.; Graeve, Martin; Lebreton, Benoit; Lange, Benjamin Allen; David, Carmen; Vortkamp, Martina; Flores, Hauke

    2017-03-01

    The polar cod (Boreogadus saida) is considered an ecological key species, because it reaches high stock biomasses and constitutes an important carbon source for seabirds and marine mammals in high-Arctic ecosystems. Young polar cod (1-2 years) are often associated with the underside of sea ice. To evaluate the impact of changing Arctic sea ice habitats on polar cod, we examined the diet composition and quantified the contribution of ice algae-produced carbon (αIce) to the carbon budget of polar cod. Young polar cod were sampled in the ice-water interface layer in the central Arctic Ocean during late summer 2012. Diets and carbon sources of these fish were examined using 4 approaches: (1) stomach content analysis, (2) fatty acid (FA) analysis, (3) bulk nitrogen and carbon stable isotope analysis (BSIA) and (4) compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of FAs. The ice-associated (sympagic) amphipod Apherusa glacialis dominated the stomach contents by mass, indicating a high importance of sympagic fauna in young polar cod diets. The biomass of food measured in stomachs implied constant feeding at daily rates of ∼1.2% body mass per fish, indicating the potential for positive growth. FA profiles of polar cod indicated that diatoms were the primary carbon source, indirectly obtained via amphipods and copepods. The αIce using bulk isotope data from muscle was estimated to be >90%. In comparison, αIce based on CSIA ranged from 34 to 65%, with the highest estimates from muscle and the lowest from liver tissue. Overall, our results indicate a strong dependency of polar cod on ice-algae produced carbon. This suggests that young polar cod may be particularly vulnerable to changes in the distribution and structure of sea ice habitats. Due to the ecological key role of polar cod, changes at the base of the sea ice-associated food web are likely to affect the higher trophic levels of high-Arctic ecosystems.

  20. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application an authentic continuous-unit products. The experimental details used for stable carbon isotope analyses by the organization that performs most of those analyses under this contract are described. A method was developed previously under this contract to correct the carbon sourcing calculations performed from stable carbon isotope analyses for selective isotopic fractionation. The method relies on three assumptions. This quarter, a study was completed to define the sensitivity of the carbon sourcing results to errors in the assumptions. Carbon contents and carbon isotope ratios were determined for the available feeds and product fractions from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Run 238-10 (Texas lignite/Hondo vacuum still bottoms (VSB), Texas lignite/Cold Lake VSB and Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB). These data were used for carbon sourcing calculations and individual feedstock conversion calculations. A previously devised means for correcting for selective isotope fractionation was applied. 6 refs., 30 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. Isotope engineering of carbon nanotube systems.

    PubMed

    Simon, F; Kramberger, Ch; Pfeiffer, R; Kuzmany, H; Zólyomi, V; Kürti, J; Singer, P M; Alloul, H

    2005-07-01

    The synthesis of a unique isotope engineered system, double-wall carbon nanotubes with natural carbon outer and highly 13C enriched inner walls, is reported from isotope enriched fullerenes encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The material allows the observation of the D line of the highly defect-free inner tubes that can be related to a curvature induced enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling. Ab initio calculations explain the inhomogeneous broadening of inner tube Raman modes due to the distribution of different isotopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance shows a significant contrast of the isotope enriched inner SWCNTs compared to other carbon phases and provides a macroscopic measure of the inner tube mass content. The high curvature of the small diameter inner tubes manifests in an increased distribution of the chemical shift tensor components.

  2. Isotope Engineering of Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, F.; Kramberger, Ch.; Pfeiffer, R.; Kuzmany, H.; Zólyomi, V.; Kürti, J.; Singer, P. M.; Alloul, H.

    2005-06-01

    The synthesis of a unique isotope engineered system, double-wall carbon nanotubes with natural carbon outer and highly 13C enriched inner walls, is reported from isotope enriched fullerenes encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The material allows the observation of the D line of the highly defect-free inner tubes that can be related to a curvature induced enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling. Ab initio calculations explain the inhomogeneous broadening of inner tube Raman modes due to the distribution of different isotopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance shows a significant contrast of the isotope enriched inner SWCNTs compared to other carbon phases and provides a macroscopic measure of the inner tube mass content. The high curvature of the small diameter inner tubes manifests in an increased distribution of the chemical shift tensor components.

  3. [Relationship of intramolecular carbon isotopes in pyruvate decarboxylation].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A; Kniazev, D A; Kaloshin, A G

    1982-01-01

    Relationships were obtained which made possible to calculate isotope content of carbon atoms in the products and reaction compound in the course of piruvate decarboxilation. Isotope composition was determined from kinetic isotope effect accompanying the destruction of carbon bonds. Some applications of the expressions obtained are presented.

  4. Carbon isotopes in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehinger, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The progress is reported of high resolution spectra of selected bright comets with the aim of determining the carbon isotope abundance ratio, C-12/C-13. The ratio was determined for various Solar System objects (in the atmospheres of the giant planets, meteorites, the Earth, and the solar photosphere), where the C-12/C-13 = 89/1. In the interstellar medium, optical and radio observations give a range of C-12/C-13 = 43-67/1 depending on the observing techniques used and the specific interstellar cloud observed. The echelle spectra is presented of the CN(0,0) violet system in three comets: P/Brorsen-Metcalf, C/Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko, and C/Austin. P/Brorsen-Metcalf has a period of 70 y (prograde) compared with P/Halley which is 76 y (retrograde). The similar periods made P/Brorsen-Metcalf of special interest for comparison with P/Halley.

  5. Deep Ocean Circulation and Nutrient Contents from Atlantic-Pacific Gradients of Neodymium and Carbon Isotopes During the Last 1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, A. M.; Elderfield, H.; Howe, J. N. W.

    2014-12-01

    The last few million years saw changing boundary conditions to the Earth system which set the stage for bi-polar glaciation and Milankovich-forced glacial-interglacial cycles which dominate Quaternary climate variability. Recent studies have highlighted the relative importance of temperature, ice volume and ocean circulation changes during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition at ~900 ka (Elderfield et al., 2012, Pena and Goldstein, 2014). Reconstructing the history of global deep water mass propagation and its carbon content is important for fully understanding the ocean's role in amplifying Milankovich changes to cause glacial-interglacial transitions. A new foraminiferal-coating Nd isotope record from ODP Site 1123 on the deep Chatham Rise is interpreted as showing glacial-interglacial changes in the bottom water propagation of Atlantic-sourced waters into the Pacific via the Southern Ocean during the last 1 million years. This is compared to globally-distributed bottom water Nd isotope records; including a new deep western equatorial Atlantic Ocean record from ODP Site 929, as well as published records from ODP 1088 and Site 1090 in the South Atlantic (Pena and Goldstein, 2014), and ODP 758 in the deep Indian Ocean (Gourlan et al., 2010). Atlantic-to-Pacific gradients in deep ocean neodymium isotopes are constructed for key time intervals to elucidate changes in deep water sourcing and circulation pathways through the global ocean. Benthic carbon isotopes are used to estimate deep water nutrient contents of deep water masses and constrain locations and modes of deep water formation. References: Elderfield et al. Science 337, 704 (2012) Pena and Goldstein, Science 345, 318 (2014) Gourlan et al., Quaternary Science Reviews 29, 2484-2498 (2010)

  6. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  7. Correlations of carbon isotope discrimination with element and ash contents in two Sabina evergreen trees in northwest China: patterns and implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youfu; Chen, Tuo; Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao; An, Lizhe; Chen, Yingwu

    2011-06-30

    Foliar carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) is widely used as an integrator of physiological plant responses to environmental change. However, the relationship between foliar Δ and mineral nutrient accumulation is still not well-known. The foliar Δ, K, Ca, Mg, Si and ash contents of S. przewalskii Kom. (SP) and S. chinensis (Lin.) Ant. (SC), two over-winter trees distributed on high altitude plateaux and lower altitude plains, respectively, were measured at monthly intervals over two years under the same growing conditions to examine the genetic and seasonal variation in foliar nutrient concentrations in relation to foliar Δ. The foliar Δ, Mg, K and ash contents were markedly lower in SP than in SC, and the foliar Si content was significantly higher in SP than SC, while the differences in Ca contents between the two Sabina trees were not significant. There was higher foliar Δ in winter than in summer for both Sabina trees. Close negative correlations of foliar Δ with K and Mg content, and significant positive correlations between foliar Δ and Si contents, were observed in SP but not in SC. Thus, higher water-use efficiency of SP than of SC is related to higher Si and lower Mg and K contents that have positive effects on the reduction of transpiration rates or stomatal conductances. The results obtained by the present study will advance the understanding of the adaptive strategies of mineral nutrition and water use in harsh environments.

  8. Carbon isotope effects in carbonate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Global carbon cycle models require a complete understanding of the δ 13C variability of the Earth's C reservoirs as well as the C isotope effects in the transfer of the element among them. An assessment of δ 13C changes during CO 2 loss from degassing magmas requires knowledge of the melt-CO 2 carbon isotope fractionation. In order to examine the potential size of this effect for silicate melts of varying composition, 13C reduced partition functions were computed in the temperature range 275 to 4000 K for carbonates of varying bond strengths (Mg, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba, Pb, Zn, Cd, Li, and Na) and the polymorphs of calcite. For a given cation and a given pressure the 13C content increases with the density of the carbonate structure. For a given structure the tendency to concentrate 13C increases with pressure. The effect of pressure (‰/10 kbar) on the size of the reduced partition function of aragonite varies with temperature; in the pressure range 1 to 10 5 bars the change is given by: Δ 13C p average=-0.01796+0.06635∗ 10 3/T+0.006875∗ 10 6/T2 For calcite III the pressure effect is on average 1.4× larger than that for aragonite at all temperatures. The nature of the cation in a given structure type has a significant effect on the carbon isotope fractionation properties. The tendency to concentrate 13C declines in the series magnesite, aragonite, dolomite, strontianite, siderite, calcite, smithonite, witherite, rhodochrosite, otavite, cerrusite. For divalent cations a general expression for an estimation of the reduced partition function (β) from the reduced mass (μ = [M Cation × M Carbonate]/[M Cation + M Carbonate]) is: 1000 lnβ=(0.032367-0.072563∗ 10 3/T-0.01073∗ 10 6/T2)∗μ-14.003+29.953∗ 10 3/T+9.4610∗ 10 6/T2 For Mg-calcite the 13C content varies with the Mg concentration. The fractionation between Mg-calcite (X = mole fraction of MgCO 3) and calcite is given by: 1000 ln(α MgCalite- Calcite)=[0.013702-0.10957× 10 3/T+1.35940× 10 6/T2

  9. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction using nitrogen and carbon contents and isotopes in lake sediments of Tiefer See, NE Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessen, Birgit; Kienel, Ulrike; Dräger, Nadine; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Lake Tiefer See (Mecklenburg/Germany) is a seasonally stratified lake formed in a north-south directed subglacial channel system with a maximum depth of 63 m. In order to understand the lake productivity and nitrogen cycle depending on natural variability and anthropogenic forcing, we compared the recent input and productivity, monitored in sediment traps in the hypo-, meta- and epilimnion since 2012 with the sedimentary record of the last 400 years. Light stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon are interpreted to reflect human impact by extensive land use, manure, sewage input, and atmospheric nitrogen compounds. The sediment trap material clearly shows high δ 15N (+7 to +14‰), and low δ 13Corg (-28 to -33‰) values, whereas surface soil and terrestrial plant materials are characterised by lower δ 15N (+3 to +6‰), and higher δ 13Corg (-28 to -25‰) values. Recent high δ 15NNO_3 values of up to +15‰ in the epilimnion water together with low δ 18O

  10. [Effects of intensive agricultural production on farmland soil carbon and nitrogen contents and their delta13C and delta15N isotope abundances].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang-Rong; Hao, Xiying; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Zi-Lin; Li, Yong-Mei

    2012-03-01

    Farmland soil carbon and nitrogen contents under intensive agricultural production are the important indices for the assessment of the soil fertility sustainability. This paper measured the soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), and delta13C and delta15N isotope abundances of four types of farmland, i.e., conventional rice-broad bean rotation field, open vegetable field, 3-year plastic covered greenhouse field, and > 10-year plastic covered greenhouse field, aimed to understand the effects of intensive agricultural production degree on soil properties. In the open vegetable field, 3-year plastic covered greenhouse field, and > 10-year plastic covered greenhouse field, the soil (0-20 cm) pH decreased by 1.1, 0.8, and 0.7, and the soil EC was 4.2, 4.9, and 5.2 folds of that in conventional rice-broad bean rotation field, respectively. With the increasing year of plastic covered greenhouse production, the soil SOC and TN contents decreased after an initial increase. Comparing with those under rice-broad bean rotation, the SOC content in 0-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80 and 80-100 cm soil layers in >10-year plastic covered greenhouse decreased by 54%, 46%, 60%, 63%, and 59%, and the TN content decreased by 53%, 53%, 71%, 82%, and 85%, respectively. Intensive agricultural production degree had significant effects on the soil SOC and TN contents and delta13C and delta15N abundances. The delta13C abundance was significantly negatively correlated with the soil SOC, suggesting that the soil delta13C abundance could be regarded as an index for the assessment of carbon cycle in farmland soils under effects of human activities.

  11. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  12. Organic / inorganic carbon content and isotope analysis of 3.1Ga Cleaverville Formation in Pilbara, Australia: Result of DXCL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, T.; Kiyokawa, S.; Ito, T.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Ikehara, M.

    2014-12-01

    DXCL project was targeted for 3.2-3.1 Ga hydrothermal chert-black shale (Dixon Island Formation) and black shale-banded iron formation (Cleaverville Formation). CL3 core (200m long) was drilled from 1) upper part of Black Shale Member (35m thick) to 2) lower part of BIF Member (165m thick) of the Cleaverville Formation. Here, the BIF Member can be divided into three submembers; Greenish shale-siderite (50m thick), Magnetite-siderite (55m thick) and Black shale-siderite (60m) submembers. In this study, we used bulk samples and samples treated by hot hydrochloric acid in order to extract organic carbon.  The Black shale Member consists of black carbonaceous matter and fine grain quartz (< 100μm). Organic carbon content (Corg) of black shale is 1.2% in average and organic carbon isotope ratio (δ13Corg) is -31.4 to -28.7‰. On the other hand, inorganic carbon isotope ratio of siderite (δ13Ccarb) was -5.2 to +12.6‰.  In the BIF Member, the Greenish shale-siderite submember is composed of well laminated greenish sideritic shale and white chert (<7mm thick), which is gradually increase from black shale of the Black shale Member through about 10m. Magnetite-siderite submember contains very fine magnetite lamination with inter-bedded greenish sideritic shale and siderite lamination. Hematite is identified near fractured part. The Black shale-siderite submember is composed of black shale, siderite and chert bands.  1) Siderite layers of these three submembers showedδ13Ccarb value of -14.6 to -3.8‰. Corg and δ13Corg content are 0.2% and -18.3 to -0.3‰. 2) Siderite grains within greenish sideritic shales showedδ13Ccarb value of -12.9 to +15.0‰. 3) Black shale of Corg and δ13Corg content in the BIF Member are 0.1% and -36.3 to -17.1‰ respectively.  We found great difference in values of δ13Ccarb of siderite. One is Corg-rich shale (up to +15.0‰) and the other is Corg-poor siderite layers (up to -3.8‰). The lighter value of siderite layers may be

  13. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  14. Carbonate abundances and isotopic compositions in chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M. L.; Howard, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    We report the bulk C abundances, and C and O isotopic compositions of carbonates in 64 CM chondrites, 14 CR chondrites, 2 CI chondrites, LEW 85332 (C2), Kaba (CV3), and Semarkona (LL3.0). For the unheated CMs, the total ranges of carbonate isotopic compositions are δ13C ≈ 25-75‰ and δ18O ≈ 15-35‰, and bulk carbonate C contents range from 0.03 to 0.60 wt%. There is no simple correlation between carbonate abundance and isotopic composition, or between either of these parameters and the extent of alteration. Unless accretion was very heterogeneous, the uncorrelated variations in extent of alteration and carbonate abundance suggests that there was a period of open system behavior in the CM parent body, probably prior to or at the start of aqueous alteration. Most of the ranges in CM carbonate isotopic compositions can be explained by their formation at different temperatures (0-130 °C) from a single fluid in which the carbonate O isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with water (δ18O ≈ 5‰) and the C isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with CO and/or CH4 (δ13C ≈ -33‰ or -20‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively). However, carbonate formation would have to have been inefficient, otherwise carbonate compositions would have resembled those of the starting fluid. A quite similar fluid composition (δ18O ≈ -5.5‰, and δ13C ≈ -31‰ or -17‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively) can explain the carbonate compositions of the CIs, although the formation temperatures would have been lower (~10-40 °C) and the relative abundances of calcite and dolomite may play a more important role in determining bulk carbonate compositions than in the CMs. The CR carbonates exhibit a similar range of O isotopes, but an almost bimodal distribution of C isotopes between more (δ13C ≈ 65-80‰) and less altered samples (δ13C ≈ 30-40‰). This bimodality can still be explained by precipitation from fluids with the same isotopic

  15. Lipid biomarkers for anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulphate reduction in cold seep sediments of Nyegga pockmarks (Norwegian margin): discrepancies in contents and carbon isotope signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Taphanel, Marie-Hélène; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-06-01

    Distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of microbial lipid biomarkers were investigated in sediment cores from the G11 and G12 pockmarks in the Nyegga sector of the Storegga Slide on the mid-Norwegian margin to explore differences in depth zonation, type and carbon assimilation mode of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANMEs) and associated sulphate-reducing bacteria responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in these cold seep environments. While the G11 site is characterised by black reduced sediments colonized by gastropods and Siboglinidae tubeworms, the G12 site has black reduced sediments devoid of fauna but surrounded by a peripheral occurrence of gastropods and white filamentous microbial mats. At both sites, bulk sediments contained abundant archaeal and bacterial lipid biomarkers substantially depleted in 13C, consisting mainly of isoprenoidal hydrocarbons and dialkyl glycerol diethers, fatty acids and non-isoprenoidal monoalkylglycerol ethers. At the G11 site, down-core profiles revealed that lipid biomarkers were in maximum abundance from 10 cm depth to the core bottom at 16 cm depth, associated with δ13C values of -57 to -136‰. At the G12 site, by contrast, lipid biomarkers were in high abundance in the upper 5 cm sediment layer, associated with δ13C values of -43 to -133‰. This suggests that, as expected from the benthic fauna characteristics of the sites, AOM takes place mainly at depth in the G11 pockmark but just below the seafloor in the G12 pockmark. These patterns can be explained largely by variable fluid flow rates. Furthermore, at both sites, a dominance of ANME-2 archaea accompanied by their bacterial partners is inferred based on lipid biomarker distributions and carbon isotope signatures, which is in agreement with recently published DNA analyses for the G11 pockmark. However, the present data reveal high discrepancies in the contents and δ13C values for both archaeal and bacterial lipid profiles, implying the

  16. Carbon isotope fractionation during microbial methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, James F.; Fritz, Peter

    1981-09-01

    Methane, a common trace constituent of groundwaters, occasionally makes up more than 20% of the total carbon in groundwaters1,2. In aerobic environments CH4-rich waters can enable microbial food chain supporting a mixed culture of bacteria with methane oxidation as the primary energy source to develop3. Such processes may influence the isotopic composition of the residual methane and because 13C/12C analyses have been used to characterize the genesis of methanes found in different environments, an understanding of the magnitude of such effects is necessary. In addition, carbon dioxide produced by the methane-utilizing bacteria can be added to the inorganic carbon pool of affected groundwaters. We found carbon dioxide experimentally produced by methane-utilizing bacteria to be enriched in 12C by 5.0-29.6‰, relative to the residual methane. Where methane-bearing groundwaters discharged into aerobic environments microbial methane oxidation occurred, with the residual methane becoming progressively enriched in 13C. Various models have been proposed to explain the 13C/12C and 14C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of groundwaters in terms of additions or losses during flow in the subsurface4,5. The knowledge of both stable carbon isotope ratios in various pools and the magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation during various processes allows geochemists to use the 13C/12C ratio of the DIC along with water chemistry to estimate corrected 14C groundwater ages4,5. We show here that a knowledge of the carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during microbial methane-utilization could modify such models for application to groundwaters affected by microbial methane oxidation.

  17. An injection method for measuring the carbon isotope content of soil carbon dioxide and soil respiration with a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Andrew B; Schauer, Andrew J; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Bowling, David R

    2010-04-15

    We present a novel technique in which the carbon isotope ratio (delta(13)C) of soil CO(2) is measured from small gas samples (<5 mL) injected into a stream of CO(2)-free air flowing into a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDL). This new method extends the dynamic range of the TDL to measure CO(2) mole fractions ranging from ambient to pure CO(2), reduces the volume of sample required to a few mL, and does not require field deployment of the instrument. The measurement precision of samples stored for up to 60 days was 0.23 per thousand. The new TDL method was applied with a simple gas well sampling technique to obtain and measure gas samples from shallow soil depth increments for CO(2) mole fraction and delta(13)C analysis, and subsequent determination of the delta(13)C of soil-respired CO(2). The method was tested using an artificial soil system containing a controlled CO(2) source and compared with an independent method using the TDL and an open soil chamber. The profile and chamber estimates of delta(13)C of an artificially produced CO(2) flux were consistent and converged to the delta(13)C of the CO(2) source at steady state, indicating the accuracy of both methods under controlled conditions. The new TDL method, in which a small pulse of sample is measured on a carrier gas stream, is analogous for the TDL technique to the development of continuous-flow configurations for isotope ratio mass spectrometry. While the applications presented here are focused on soil CO(2), this new TDL method could be applied in a number of situations requiring measurement of delta(13)C of CO(2) in small gas samples with ambient to high CO(2) mole fractions.

  18. Oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibria in Galapagos corals: isotopic thermometry and calcification physiology

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Biological carbonate skeletons are built largely from carbon dioxide, which reacts to form carbonate ion within thin extracellular solutions. The light isotopes of carbon and oxygen react faster than the heavy isotopes, depleting the resulting carbonate ions in /sup 13/C and /sup 18/O. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurs sufficiently fast that the skeleton remains out of isotopic equilibrium with surrounding fluids. This explanation for isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates was partially simulated in vitro, producing results similar to those seen in non-photosynthetic corals. Photosynthetic corals have higher /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios due to the preferential removal of /sup 12/C (as organic carbon) from the reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon. The oxygen isotopic variations in corals can be used to reconstruct past sea surface temperatures to an accuracy of about 0.5/sup 0/C. The carbon isotopic content of photosynthetic corals provides an indication of cloudiness. Using isotopic data from Galapagos corals, it was possible to construct proxy histories of the El Nino phenomenon. The physiology of skeletogenesis appears to be surprisingly similar in calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, and silica precipitating systems.

  19. Carbon isotopes as indicators of peatland growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alewell, Christine; Krüger, Jan Paul; von Sengbusch, Pascal; Szidat, Sönke; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    As undisturbed and/or growing peatlands store considerable amounts of carbon and are unique in their biodiversity and species assemblage, the knowledge of the current status of peatlands (growing with carbon sequestration, stagnating or degrading with carbon emissions) is crucial for landscape management and nature conservation. However, monitoring of peatland status requires long term measurements and is only feasible with expert knowledge. The latter determination is increasingly impeded in a scientific world, where taxonomic expert knowledge and funding of long term monitoring is rare. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes depth profiles in peatland soils have been shown to be a useful tool to monitor the degradation of peatlands due to permafrost thawing in Northern Sweden (Alewell et al., 2011; Krüger et al., 2014), drainage in Southern Finland (Krüger et al., 2016) as well as land use intensification in Northern Germany (Krüger et al., 2015). Here, we tackle the questions if we are able to differentiate between growing and degrading peats with the use of a combination of carbon stable (δ13C) and radiogenic isotope data (14C) with peat stratification information (degree of humification and macroscopic plant remains). Results indicate that isotope data are a useful tool to approximate peatland status, but that expert taxonomic knowledge will be needed for the final conclusion on peatland growth. Thus, isotope tools might be used for landscape screening to pin point sites for detailed taxonomic monitoring. As the method remains qualitative future research at these sites will need to integrate quantitative approaches to determine carbon loss or gain (soil C balances by ash content or C accumulation methods by radiocarbon data; Krüger et al., 2016). Alewell, C., R. Giesler, J. Klaminder, J. Leifeld, and M. Rollog. 2011. Stable carbon isotopes as indicators for micro-geomorphic changes in palsa peats. Biogeosciences, 8, 1769-1778. Krüger, J. P., Leifeld, J

  20. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  1. The separation of stable isotopes of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziashvili, E. D.; Egiazarov, A. S.

    1989-04-01

    The present state of work on the separation of carbon isotopes by diffusion, fractional distillation, chemical isotopic exchange, and the selective excitation and dissociation of molecules in electrical discharges or in the field of laser radiation has been examined. The characteristics of new laboratory and industrial assemblies for separating carbon isotopes have been described. Promising directions of study aimed at developing effective technological processes for separating carbon isotopes have been noted. The bibliography contains 148 references.

  2. Carbon and its isotopes in mid-oceanic basaltic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Moore, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Sample surface carbon, mantle carbon dioxide in vesicles, and mantle carbon dissolved in glasses, are the three carbon components evident in the 11 mid-oceanic basalts presently analyzed. The total carbon content may be controlled by the depth of the shallowest ridge magma chamber, and carbon isotopic fractionation accompanies magma degassing. Using He-3 and carbon data for submarine hydrothermal fluids, the present day midoceanic ridge carbon flux is approximately estimated to be 1.0 x 10 to the 13th g C/yr, requiring 8 Gyr to accumulate the earth's present crustal carbon inventory.

  3. Combined and isolated effects of pCO2 and soil water content on carbon isotope discrimination during C3 photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, B.; Jahren, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    Biomass produced via C3 photosynthesis dominates the terrestrial organic matter (TOM) found within the geologic record. Our previous work revealed an increase in net discrimination (Δ13C) ≈ +4‰ across an increase in pCO2 level from ambient to RCO2 = 6x within the model C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana, grown to maturity under constant conditions of light, moisture, and nutrient availability (Schubert and Jahren, 2012, GCA), leading us to suggest that changes in ancient pCO2 level can be reconstructed from Δ13C within terrestrial sediments. Others have observed an average change in Δ13C ≈ +4‰ when comparing the δ13C value of herbarium samples collected from cool-cold forests to tropical environments against the MAP recorded (Diefendorf et al., 2010, PNAS), leading those authors to suggest that changes in the Δ13C value of TOM recovered from the geological record can be interpreted as changes in precipitation level and/or water availability. Because decreasing moisture availability and increasing pCO2 level exert control over Δ13C through distinctly different mechanisms (i.e., decreased stomatal conductance vs. inhibition of photorespiration, respectively), a simultaneous change in both pCO2 level and moisture availability could combine to influence carbon isotope fractionation. Here we present experiments in which we grew 230 A. thaliana plants at each of 5 levels of pCO2: 390, 685, 1075, 1585, and 2175 ppmv. Within each growth chamber, soil moisture content (θm) was maintained at 1.50 g g-1 for 11 days following germination. Afterwards, we allowed 170 of the plants to dry to θm = 0.83, 0.44, and 0.38 g g-1. After 3 weeks of total growth, tissues were analyzed for δ13C value. We compare the isolated and combined effects of pCO2 and soil moisture upon carbon isotope fractionation across the total range of pCO2 levels reconstructed for the last 350 million years and across moisture levels associated with a 4.5x change in plant biomass.

  4. Diets of introduced predators using stable isotopes and stomach contents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meckstroth, A.M.; Miles, A.K.; Chandra, S.

    2007-01-01

    In a study of predation on ground-nesting birds at South San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California, USA, we analyzed stomach contents and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to identify commonly consumed prey. We obtained the stomach contents from 206 nonnative red foxes (Vulpes vulpes regalis) collected in the South Bay area and Monterey County during 1995-2001 and from 68 feral cats (Felis silvestris) from the South Bay area during 2001-2002. We determined prey identity, biomass, and frequency, described seasonal diet trends, and derived an Index of Relative Importance. Avian species were the most frequent prey we found in the stomachs of red foxes from South Bay (61%), whereas small rodents were most frequent for red foxes from Monterey County (62%). Small rodents were the most frequent prey we found in feral cats (63%). Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures for foxes supported stomach content findings. However, isotope results indicated that cats received a majority of their energy from a source other than rodents and outside the natural system, which differed from the stomach content analysis. We demonstrated the utility of both stable isotope and stomach content analyses to establish a more complete understanding of predators' diets. This information aids natural resource managers in planning and evaluating future predator-removal programs and increases our understanding of the impacts of nonnative foxes and cats on native species.

  5. Relationships between C3 Plant Foliar Carbon Isotope Composition and Element Contents of Grassland Species at High Altitudes on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong-Chun; Fan, Jiang-Wen; Harris, Warwick; Zhong, Hua-Ping; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Cheng, Xi-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Relationships of foliar carbon isotope composition (δ13C) with foliar C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg contents and their ratios of 219 C3 species leaf samples, obtained in August in 2004 to 2007 from 82 high altitude grassland sites on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau China, were examined. This was done with reference to the proposition that foliar δ13C increases with altitude and separately for the life-form groups of graminoids, forbs and shrubs and for the genera Stipa and Kobresia. For all samples, foliar δ13C was negatively related to foliar K, P and ∑K+ Ca+ Mg, and positively correlated to foliar C, C/N and C/P. The significance of these correlations differed for the taxonomic and life-form groups. Lack of a relationship of foliar δ13C with foliar N was inconsistent with the majority of studies that have shown foliar δ13C to be positively related to foliar N due to a decrease of Ci/Ca (the ratio between intercellular and atmospheric concentration of CO2) and explained as a result of greater photosynthetic capacity at higher foliar N concentration. However this inconsistency relates to other high altitude studies that have found that photosynthetic capacity remains constant as foliar N increases. After accounting for the altitudinal relationship with foliar δ13C, of the elements only the K effect was significant and was most strongly expressed for Kobresia. It is concluded that factors critical to plant survival and growth at very high altitudes, such as low atmospheric pressure and low temperatures, may preclude expression of relationships between foliar δ13C and foliar elements that have been observed at lower altitudes. PMID:23565275

  6. Relationships between C3 plant foliar carbon isotope composition and element contents of grassland species at high altitudes on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong-Chun; Fan, Jiang-Wen; Harris, Warwick; Zhong, Hua-Ping; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Cheng, Xi-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Relationships of foliar carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) with foliar C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg contents and their ratios of 219 C3 species leaf samples, obtained in August in 2004 to 2007 from 82 high altitude grassland sites on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau China, were examined. This was done with reference to the proposition that foliar δ(13)C increases with altitude and separately for the life-form groups of graminoids, forbs and shrubs and for the genera Stipa and Kobresia. For all samples, foliar δ(13)C was negatively related to foliar K, P and ∑K+ Ca+ Mg, and positively correlated to foliar C, C/N and C/P. The significance of these correlations differed for the taxonomic and life-form groups. Lack of a relationship of foliar δ(13)C with foliar N was inconsistent with the majority of studies that have shown foliar δ(13)C to be positively related to foliar N due to a decrease of Ci/Ca (the ratio between intercellular and atmospheric concentration of CO2) and explained as a result of greater photosynthetic capacity at higher foliar N concentration. However this inconsistency relates to other high altitude studies that have found that photosynthetic capacity remains constant as foliar N increases. After accounting for the altitudinal relationship with foliar δ(13)C, of the elements only the K effect was significant and was most strongly expressed for Kobresia. It is concluded that factors critical to plant survival and growth at very high altitudes, such as low atmospheric pressure and low temperatures, may preclude expression of relationships between foliar δ(13)C and foliar elements that have been observed at lower altitudes.

  7. Carbon isotopic composition of Amazon shelf sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Showers, W.J.; Angle, D.G.; Nittrouer, C.A.; Demaster, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    The distribution of carbon isotopes in Amazon shelf sediment is controlled by the same processes that are forming the modern subaqueous delta. The terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) isotopic carbon signal observed in surficial sediments near the river mouth extends over 400 km northwest along the shelf. Terrestrial carbon is associated with areas of rapid sediment accumulation (topset and foreset regions). A sharp boundary between terrestrial (-27 to -25 per thousand) and marine (-23 to -22 per thousand) isotopic carbon values in surficial sediments is associated with a change in depositional conditions (foreset to bottomset regions) and a decrease in sediment accumulation rate. POC water-column isotopic values (-27 per thousand) near the river mouth are similar to the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values, but POC water-column samples collected 20 km off the river mouth have marine carbon isotopic values (-22 to -19 per thousand) and differ from the underlying surficial-sediment TOC isotopic values. These water column observations are related to variations in turbidity and productivity. Down-core isotopic variation is only observed in cores taken in areas of lower sediment accumulation rates. These observations indicate that the organic carbon in Amazon shelf sediment is dominantly terrestrial in composition, and the location of deposition of this carbon is controlled by modern processes of sediment accumulation. The modern Amazon shelf is similar to large clinoform shale deposits of the Cretaceous in North America. Thus, the stratigraphic setting may help predict the isotopic variations of carbon in ancient deposits.

  8. Carbon isotope controlled molecular switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Brian K.

    Single molecules represent one fundamental limit to the downscaling of electronics. As a prototype element for carbon-based nanoscale science and technology, the detailed behavior of carbon monoxide (CO) on the copper surface Cu(111) has been investigated. These investigations span from individual carbon isotope resolution, to single molecules, to compact clusters assembled by molecular manipulation via a homemade scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Sub-nanoscale devices, composed of only a few molecules, which exploit both lone CO properties and molecule-molecule interaction, have been designed and assembled. The devices function as bi-stable switches and can serve as classical bits with densities > 50 Tbits/cm2. Operated in the nuclear mass sensitive regime, each switch can also function as a molecular "centrifuge" capable of identifying the isotope of a single carbon atom in real-time. A model, based on electron-vibron couping and inelastic tunneling, has been developed and explains the dynamic behavior of the switch. The interaction between pairs of switches was also explored and it was found that their behavior ranges from completely independent to strongly coupled. Larger nanostructures, which were composed of many sub-switches organized to leverage the fully coupled interaction, link two spatially separated "bits" on the surface. Such a linked system can set or read a state non-locally, which is equivalent to bidirectional information transfer. The linked system has also exhibited logic functionality. These experiments demonstrate scalable molecular cells for information storage, and for information processing through cellular automata logic schemes.

  9. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report which was a thirty-four month project conducted to develop and demonstrate stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish the source of carbon in products of coal/petroleum coprocessing. The work included assessing precision, accuracy, the range of application and the significance of selective isotopic fractionation effects. A method was devised to correct for selective isotopic fractionation errors. The method was demonstrated through application with samples from twelve continuous-unit coprocessing tests. A data base of carbon isotope analyses is appended. 21 refs.

  10. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  11. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate.

    PubMed

    Gelwicks, J T; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  12. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  13. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and paleohydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3} precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth (due mainly to increased importance of respired CO{sub 2}), decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude (partially due to relatively more C-3 vegetation), and reduced {sup 13}C during spring (due again to higher rates of respiration, and reduced gas permeability of wet soils). These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  14. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelwicks, J.T.; Risatti, J.B.; Hayes, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30??C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken into account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate ??? total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 ?? 0.9% to - 57.2 ?? 2.3z%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 ?? 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring. ?? 1989.

  15. The carbon isotopic composition of ecosystem breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehleringer, J.

    2008-05-01

    At the global scale, there are repeatable annual fluctuations in the concentration and isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide, sometimes referred to as the "breathing of the planet". Vegetation components within ecosystems fix carbon dioxide through photosynthesis into stable organic compounds; simultaneously both vegetation and heterotrophic components of the ecosystem release previously fixed carbon as respiration. These two-way fluxes influencing carbon dioxide exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere impact both the concentration and isotopic composition of carbon dioxide within the convective boundary layer. Over space, the compounding effects of gas exchange activities from ecosystems become reflected in both regional and global changes in the concentration and isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide. When these two parameters are plotted against each other, there are significant linear relationships between the carbon isotopic composition and inverse concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. At the ecosystem scale, these "Keeling plots" intercepts of C3-dominated ecosystems describe the carbon isotope ratio of biospheric gas exchange. Using Farquhar's model, these carbon isotope values can be translated into quantitative measures of the drought-dependent control of photosynthesis by stomata as water availability changes through time. This approach is useful in aggregating the influences of drought across regional landscapes as it provides a quantitative measure of stomatal influence on photosynthetic gas exchange at the ecosystem-to-region scales. Multi-year analyses of the drought-dependent trends across terrestrial ecosystems show a repeated pattern with water stress in all but one C3-ecosystem type. Ecosystems that are dominated by ring-porous trees appear not to exhibit a dynamic stomatal response to water stress and therefore, there is little dependence of the carbon isotope ratio of gas exchange on site water balance

  16. Influence of chemical structure on carbon isotope composition of lignite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdenetsogt, Bat-Orshikh; Lee, Insung; Ko, Yoon-Joo; Mungunchimeg, Batsaikhan

    2017-04-01

    During the last two decades, a number of studies on carbon isotopes in terrestrial organic matter (OM) have been carried out and used to determine changes in paleoatmospheric δ13C value as well as assisting in paleoclimate analysis. Coal is abundant terrestrial OM. However, application of its δ13C value is very limited, because the understanding of changes in isotopic composition during coalification is relatively insufficient. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the chemical structure on the carbon isotope composition of lignite. Generally, lignite has more complex chemical structures than other higher rank coal because of the existence of various types of oxygen-containing functional groups that are eliminated at higher rank level. A total of sixteen Lower Cretaceous lignite samples from Baganuur mine (Mongolia) were studied by ultimate, stable carbon isotope and solid-state 13C CP/MAS NMR analyses. The carbon contents of the samples increase with increase in depth, whereas oxygen content decreases continuously. This is undoubtedly due to normal coalification process and also consistent with solid state NMR results. The δ13C values of the samples range from -23.54‰ to -21.34‰ and are enriched in 13C towards the lowermost samples. Based on the deconvolution of the NMR spectra, the ratios between carbons bonded to oxygen (60-90 ppm and 135-220 ppm) over carbons bonded to carbon and hydrogen (0-50 ppm and 90-135 ppm) were calculated for the samples. These correlate well with δ13C values (R2 0.88). The results indicate that the δ13C values of lignite are controlled by two mechanisms: (i) depletion in 13C as a result of loss of isotopically heavy oxygen-bounded carbons and (ii) enrichment in 13C caused by a loss of isotopically light methane from aliphatic and aromatic carbons. At the rank of lignite, coal is enriched in 13C because the amount of isotopically heavy CO2 and CO, released from coal as a result of changes in the chemical

  17. Sediment source detection by stable isotope analysis, carbon and nitrogen content and CSSI in a small river of the Swiss Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SchindlerWildhaber, Yael; Alewell, Christine; Birkholz, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) and organic matter in rivers can harm the fauna by affecting health and fitness of free swimming fish and by causing siltation of the riverbed. The temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) during the brown trout spawning season in a small river of the Swiss Plateau were assessed and C isotopes as well as the C/N atomic ratio were used to distinguish autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter in SS loads. The visual basic program IsoSource with 13Ctot and 15N as input isotopes was used to quantify the temporal and spatial sources of SS. We determined compound specific stable carbon isotopes (CSSI) in fatty acids of possible sediment source areas to the stream in addition and compared them to SS from selected high flow and low flow events. Organic matter concentrations in the infiltrated and suspended sediment were highest during low flow periods with small sediment loads and lowest during high flow periods with high sediment loads. Peak values in nitrate and dissolved organic C were measured during high flow and high rainfall, probably due to leaching from pasture and arable land. The organic matter was of allochthonous sources as indicated by the C/N atomic ratio and δ13Corg. Organic matter in SS increased from up- to downstream due to an increase in sediment delivery from pasture and arable land downstream of the river. While the major sources of SS are pasture and arable land during base flow conditions, SS from forest soils increased during heavy rain events and warmer winter periods most likely due to snow melt which triggered erosion. Preliminary results of CSSI analysis of sediment source areas and comparison to SS of selected events indicate that differences in d13C values of individual fatty acids are too small to differentiate unambiguously between sediment sources.

  18. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of obtaining stable carbon isotope analyses of coprocessing products is to determine the amount of coal (or petroleum) carbon that is present in any reaction product. This carbon-sourcing of distillate fractions, soluble resid, and insoluble organic matter, etc. is useful in modeling reactions, and evaluating synergistic effects if they exist.

  19. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of obtaining stable carbon isotope analyses of coprocessing products is to determine the amount of coal (or petroleum) carbon that is present in any reaction product. This carbon-sourcing of distillate fractions, soluble resid, and insoluble organic matter, etc. is useful in modeling reactions, and evaluating synergistic effects if they exist.

  20. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  1. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-10-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. 38 references.

  2. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N; Leu, A; Muñoz, E; Olsen, J; Kwong, E; Des Marais, D

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4% depleted in 13C relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3% enriched in 13C. The acetate 13C enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6% depleted in 13C, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7%, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7%, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. PMID:2867741

  3. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  4. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.

    1990-05-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, if necessary, corrections will be applied to account for it. Activities for this quarter include: method development -- investigation of selective fractionation. Three petroleum atmospheric still bottoms (ASBs) were separated by distillation and solubility fractionation to determine the homogeneity of the carbon isotope ratios of the separated fractions. These same three petroleum ASBs and three geographically distinct coals were pyrolyzed at 800{degree}F for 30 min and hydrogenated over a CoMo catalyst at 750{degree}F for 60 min to determine the effects of these treatments on the isotopic compositions of the produce fractions. Twelve coal liquefaction oils were analyzed for carbon isotope ratios. These oils were derived from subbituminous and bituminous coals from the first- and second-stage reactors in the thermal/catalytic and modes; validation and application, analysis. Carbon isotope analyses of samples from HRI bench unit coprocessing run 238-2 (Taiheiyo coal/Maya VSB) were analyzed. A method to correct for selective isotopic fractionation was developed and applied to the data. Five coprocessing samples were analyzed at the request of SRI International. 12 refs., 15 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  6. Oxygen isotope fractionation in double carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Böttcher, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations in double carbonates of different crystal structures were calculated by the increment method. Synthesis experiments were performed at 60 °C and 100 °C to determine oxygen and carbon isotope fractionations involving PbMg[CO3]2. The calculations suggest that the double carbonates of calcite structure are systematically enriched in (18)O relative to those of aragonite and mixture structures. Internally consistent oxygen isotope fractionation factors are obtained for these minerals with respect to quartz, calcite and water at a temperature range of 0-1200 °C. The calculated fractionation factors for double carbonate-water systems are generally consistent with the data available from laboratory experiments. The experimentally determined fractionation factors for PbMg[CO3]2, BaMg[CO3]2 and CaMg[CO3]2 against H2O not only fall between fractionation factors involving pure carbonate end-members but are also close to the calculated fractionation factors. In contrast, experimentally determined carbon isotope fractionation factors between PbMg[CO3]2 and CO2 are much closer to theoretical predictions for the cerussite-CO2 system than for the magnesite-CO2 system, similar to the fractionation behavior for BaMg[CO3]2. Therefore, the combined theoretical and experimental results provide insights into the effects of crystal structure and exchange kinetics on oxygen isotope partitioning in double carbonates.

  7. Clumped isotope thermometry of cryogenic cave carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Affek, Hagit P.; Zhang, Yi Ge; Dublyansky, Yuri; Spötl, Christoph; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.

    2014-02-01

    Freezing of cave pool water that is increasingly oversaturated with dissolved carbonate leads to precipitation of a very specific type of speleothems known as cryogenic cave carbonates (CCC). At present, two different environments for their formation have been proposed, based on their characteristic carbon and oxygen isotope ratios. Rapidly freezing thin water films result in the fast precipitation of fine-grained carbonate powder (CCCfine). This leads to rapid physicochemical changes including CO2 degassing and CaCO3 precipitation, resulting in significantly 13C-enriched carbonates. Alternatively, slow carbonate precipitation in ice-covered cave pools results in coarse crystalline CCC (CCCcoarse) yielding strongly 18O-depleted carbonate. This is due to the formation of relatively 18O-enriched ice causing the gradual depletion of 18O in the water from which the CCC precipitates. Cryogenic carbonates from Central European caves were found to have been formed primarily during the last glacial period, specifically during times of permafrost thawing, based on the oxygen isotope ratios and U-Th dating. Information about the precise conditions of CCCcoarse formation, i.e. whether these crystals formed under equilibrium or disequilibrium conditions with the parent fluid, however, is lacking. An improved understanding of CCCcoarse formation will increase the predictive value of this paleo-permafrost archive. Here we apply clumped isotopes to investigate the formation conditions of cryogenic carbonates using well-studied CCCcoarse from five different cave systems in western Germany. Carbonate clumped isotope measurements yielded apparent temperatures between 3 and 18 °C and thus exhibit clear evidence of isotopic disequilibrium. Although the very negative carbonate δ18O values can only be explained by gradual freezing of pool water accompanied by preferential incorporation of 18O into the ice, clumped isotope-derived temperatures significantly above expected freezing

  8. Exotic Structure of Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Hagino, Kouichi

    2003-12-01

    Ground state properties of C isotopes, deformation and elecromagnetic moments, as well as electric dipole transition strength are investigated. We first study the ground state properties of C isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Isotope dependence of the deformation properties is investigated. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron-rich C isotopes. It is also shown that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in 17C and 19C having almost the same binding energies. Next, we carry out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of C isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformation and spin-parities of the ground states of these nuclei. Electric dipole states of C isotopes are studied focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Low peak energies, two-peak structure and large widths of the giant resonances show deformation effects. Calculated transition strength below dipole giant resonance in heavier C isotopes than 15C is found to exhaust 12 ~ 15% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule value and 50 ~ 80% of the cluster sum rule value.

  9. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry in continental tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Katharine W.; Lechler, Alex R.

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the thermal history of minerals and fluids in continental environments is a cornerstone of tectonics research. Paleotemperature constraints from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry have provided important tests of geodynamic, structural, topographic and basin evolution models. The thermometer is based on the 13C-18O bond ordering in carbonates (mass-47 anomaly, Δ47) and provides estimates of the carbonate formation temperature independent of the δ18O value of the water from which the carbonate grew; Δ47 is measured simultaneously with conventional measurements of carbonate δ13C and δ18O values, which together constrain the isotopic composition of the parent water. Depending on the geologic setting of carbonate growth, this information can help constrain paleoenvironmental conditions or basin temperatures and fluid sources. This review examines how clumped isotope thermometry can shed new light on problems in continental tectonics, focusing on paleoaltimetry, basin evolution and structural diagenesis applications. Paleoaltimetry is inherently difficult, and the precision in carbonate growth temperature estimates is at the limit of what is useful for quantitative paleoelevation reconstruction. Nevertheless, clumped isotope analyses have enabled workers to address previously intractable problems and in many settings offer the best chance of understanding topographic change from the geologic record. The portion of the shallow crust residing at temperatures up to ca. 200 °C is important as host to economic resources and records of tectonics and climate, and clumped isotope thermometry is one of the few proxies that can access this critical range with sensitivity to temperature alone. Only a handful of studies to date have used clumped isotopes to investigate diagenesis and other sub-surface processes using carbonate crystallization temperatures or the sensitivity of Δ47 values to a sample's thermal history. However, the thermometer is

  10. Carbon and its isotopes in mid-oceanic basaltic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Des Marais, D.J.; Moore, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Three carbon components are evident in eleven analyzed mid-oceanic basalts: carbon on sample surfaces (resembling adsorbed gases, organic matter, or other non-magmatic carbon species acquired by the glasses subsequent to their eruption), mantle carbon dioxide in vesicles, and mantle carbon dissolved in the glasses. The combustion technique employed recovered only reduced sulfur, all of which appears to be indigenous to the glasses. The dissolved carbon concentration (measured in vesicle-free glass) increases with the eruption depth of the spreading ridge, and is consistent with earlier data which show that magma carbon solubility increases with pressure. The total glass carbon content (dissolved plus vesicular carbon) may be controlled by the depth of the shallowest ridge magma chamber. Carbon isotopic fractionation accompanies magma degassing; vesicle CO2 is about 3.8??? enriched in 13C, relative to dissolved carbon. Despite this fractionation, ??13CPDB values for all spreading ridge glasses lie within the range -5.6 and -7.5, and the ??13CPDB of mantle carbon likely lies between -5 and -7. The carbon abundances and ??13CPDB values of Kilauea East Rift glasses apparently are influenced by the differentiation and movement of magma within that Hawaiian volcano. Using 3He and carbon data for submarine hydrothermal fluids, the present-day mid-oceanic ridge mantle carbon flux is estimated very roughly to be about 1.0 ?? 1013 g C/yr. Such a flux requires 8 Gyr to accumulate the earth's present crustal carbon inventory. ?? 1984.

  11. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  12. Site-Specific Carbon Isotopes in Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural organic molecules exhibit a wide range of internal site-specific isotope variation (i.e., molecules with same isotopic substitution type but different site). Such variations are generally unconstrained by bulk isotopic measurements. If known, site-specific variations might constrain temperatures of equilibrium, mechanisms of formation or consumption reactions, and possibly other details. For example, lipids can exhibit carbon isotope differences of up to 30‰ between adjacent carbon sites as a result of fractionations arising during decarboxylation of pyruvate and other steps in lipid biosynthesis(1). We present a method for site-specific carbon isotope analysis of propane, based on high-resolution, multi-collector gas source mass spectrometry, using a novel prototype instrument - the Thermo MAT 253 Ultra. This machine has an inlet system and electron bombardment ion source resembling those in conventional stable isotope gas source mass spectrometers, and the energy filter, magnet, and detector array resembling those in multi-collector ICPMS and TIMS. The detector array has 7 detector positions, 6 of which are movable, and each of which can collect ions with either a faraday cup (read through amplifiers ranging from 107-1012 ohms) or an SEM. High mass resolving power (up to 27,000, MRP = M/dM definition) is achieved through a narrow entrance slit, adjustable from 250 to 5 μm. Such resolution can cleanly separate isobaric interferences between isotopologues of organic molecules having the same cardinal mass (e.g., 13CH3 and 12CH2D). We use this technology to analyze the isotopologues and fragments of propane, and use such data to solve for the site-specific carbon isotope fractionation. By measuring isotopologues of both the one-carbon (13CH3) and the two-carbon (13C12CH4) fragment ion, we can solve for both bulk δ13C and the difference in δ13C between the terminal and central carbon position. We tested this method by analyzing mixtures between natural

  13. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.; Burke, F.P.

    1990-07-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, if necessary, corrections will be applied to account for it. Precision, accuracy and range of applicability are being defined. The value of accessory analytical techniques also is being assessed. The program is designed to address a substantial, demonstrated need of coprocessing research (both exploratory and development) for a technique to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of the individual coprocessing feedstocks to the various products. The carbon isotope technique currently is in routine use for other applications. Progress is discussed. 7 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. The isotopic composition and insect content of diet predict tissue isotopic values in a South American passerine assemblage.

    PubMed

    Sabat, Pablo; Ramirez-Otarola, Natalia; Bozinovic, Francisco; del Rio, Carlos Martínez

    2013-04-01

    We analyzed the carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of the muscle, liver, and crop contents ("diet") of 132 individuals of 16 species of Chilean birds. The nitrogen content of diet was tightly correlated with the fraction of gut contents represented by insects relative to plant material. The carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of diet, liver, and muscle were all linearly correlated, implying high temporal consistency in the isotopic value of the diet of these birds. However, δ(15)N was not significantly related with the percentage of insects in diet. These results cast doubt on the applicability of the use of (15)N enrichment to diagnose trophic level in, at least some, terrestrial ecosystems. However, the residuals of the relationship relating the isotopic value of bird tissues with those of their diet were weakly negatively correlated with insect intake. We hypothesize that this negative correlation stems from the higher quality of protein found in insects relative to that of plant materials. Finally, our data corroborated a perplexing and controversial negative relationship between tissue to diet isotopic discrimination and the isotopic value of diet. We suggest that this relationship is an example of the commonly observed regression to the mean effect that plagues many scientific studies.

  15. Carbon and Carbon Isotope Cycling in the Western Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, Jacoba; Thomas, Helmuth

    2016-04-01

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are having drastic effects on the global oceans. The Arctic Ocean is particularly susceptible to change as warming, sea-ice loss and a weak buffering capacity all influence this complicated semi-enclosed sea. In order to investigate the inorganic carbon system in the Canadian Arctic, water samples were collected in the Beaufort Sea, on the Alaskan shelf, at the Mackenzie river delta, and in Amundsen Gulf during the summer of 2014 and were analyzed for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), DI13C and 18O isotopes. Carbon isotopes are used to investigate the role of biological production on the uptake and transfer of inorganic carbon to depth. A preferential uptake of the lighter 12C relative to the heavier 13C isotope during biological production leads to a fractionation of the 13C/12C isotopes in both the organic matter and the water column. This results in an enrichment of DI13C in the high productivity surface waters and a depletion of DI13C at depth. Physical processes including freshwater input, brine rejection, and water mass mixing are investigated through the measurement of oxygen isotopes. Differences in the carbon system across the study area due to both biological and physical processes are assessed using depth profiles of DI13C and related carbon system parameters.

  16. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  17. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  18. Sedimentary organic matter in two Spitsbergen fjords: Terrestrial and marine contributions based on carbon and nitrogen contents and stable isotopes composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziorowska, Katarzyna; Kuliński, Karol; Pempkowiak, Janusz

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the spatial variability of organic carbon (Corg) and total nitrogen (Ntot) concentrations, Corg/Ntot ratios, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen (δ13Corg, δ15Ntot) and the proportions of autochthonous and allochtonous organic matter within recently deposited sediments of two Spitsbergen fjords: the Hornsund and the Adventfjord, which are affected to a different degree by the West Spitsbergen Current. Corg concentrations ranged from 1.38% to 1.98% in the Hornsund and from 1.73% to 3.85% in the Adventfjord. In both fjords the highest Corg concentrations were measured at the innermost stations and they decreased towards the mouths of the fjords. This suggests fresh water runoff to be an important source of organic matter (OM) for surface sediments. The results showed that both fjords differ significantly in terms of sedimentary organic matter characteristics. The samples from the Hornsund, except those from the innermost station in the Brepollen, had relatively low Corg/Ntot ratios, all within a narrow range (from 9.7 to 11.3). On the other hand significantly higher Corg/Ntot ratios, varying within a broad range (from 14.6 to 33.0), were measured in the Adventfjord. The samples from the Hornsund were characterized by higher δ13Corg (from -24.90‰ to -23.87‰) and δ15Ntot (from 3.02‰ to 4.93‰) than those from the Adventfjord (-25.94‰ to -24.69‰ and from 0.71‰ to 4.00‰, respectively). This is attributed to a larger proportion of marine organic matter. Using the two end-member approach proportions of terrestrial organic matter were evaluated. Terrestrial OM contribution for the Adventfjord was in the range of 82-83%, while in case of the Hornsund the results were in the range of 69-75%, with the exception of the innermost part of the fjord, where terrestrial organic matter contribution ranged from 80 to 82%. The strong positive correlation between δ13Corg and δ15Ntot was revealed. This was taken as an indicator

  19. Interpreting the Ca isotope record of marine biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Neil G.; De La Rocha, Christina L.; Tipper, Edward T.; Tripati, Aradhna; Galy, Albert; Bickle, Michael J.

    2007-08-01

    An 18 million year record of the Ca isotopic composition (δ 44/42Ca) of planktonic foraminiferans from ODP site 925, in the Atlantic, on the Ceara Rise, provides the opportunity for critical analysis of Ca isotope-based reconstructions of the Ca cycle. δ 44/42Ca in this record averages +0.37 ± 0.05 (1 σ SD) and ranges from +0.21‰ to +0.52‰. The record is a good match to previously published Neogene Ca isotope records based on foraminiferans, but is not similar to the record based on bulk carbonates, which has values that are as much as 0.25‰ lower. Bulk carbonate and planktonic foraminiferans from core tops differ slightly in their δ 44/42Ca (i.e., by 0.06 ± 0.06‰ ( n = 5)), while the difference between bulk carbonate and foraminiferan values further back in time is markedly larger, leaving open the question of the cause of the difference. Modeling the global Ca cycle from downcore variations in δ 44/42Ca by assuming fixed values for the isotopic composition of weathering inputs (δ 44/42Ca w) and for isotope fractionation associated with the production of carbonate sediments (Δ sed) results in unrealistically large variations in the total mass of Ca 2+ in the oceans over the Neogene. Alternatively, variations of ±0.05‰ in the Ca isotope composition of weathering inputs or in the extent of fractionation of Ca isotopes during calcareous sediment formation could entirely account for variations in the Ca isotopic composition of marine carbonates. Ca isotope fractionation during continental weathering, such as has been recently observed, could easily result in variations in δ 44/42Ca w of a few tenths of permil. Likewise a difference in the fractionation factors associated with aragonite versus calcite formation could drive shifts in Δ sed of tenths of permil with shifts in the relative output of calcite and aragonite from the ocean. Until better constraints on variations in δ 44/42Ca w and Δ sed have been established, modeling the Ca 2+ content

  20. Organic carbon contents and isotopic compositions in the Lake Cuitzeo sediments from the central Mexico during the past 45 Ka: Changes in lake level and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, T.; Bischoff, J. L.; Alcantara, I. I.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Li, H.

    2009-12-01

    A 27-m long core was retrieved from Lake Cuitzeo in south-central Mexico (19°56’N, 101°5’W). A total of 163 sediment samples have been treated by 0.5N HCl to remove carbonates, then washed and frozen dried. The samples were analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC) and δ13Corg by EA-IRMS. High TOC contents present in the intervals of 0.6~1.6, 2.3~3.6, 6.7~6.8 and 8.5~9.5m while the δ13Corg of these intervals are generally heavier (ranging from -22‰ ~ -13‰). The TOC contents in other depths are generally lower than 1 wt.% with relatively light δ13Corg values ranging from -26‰ ~ -20‰. Since the chronology of the upper 9.2m of the core is more reliable, we are able to interpret the lake history and the corresponding climatic and vegetation variations during the past 45 Ka, based on the TOC, CaCO3% (reflected by weight loss of acid-leaching) and δ13Corg. There are four scenarios in the record: (1) During the periods of 2~8, 33~34 and 43~45Ka, TOC and CaCO3% covary at moderate levels with heavy δ13Corg values (>-20‰). The lake was closed and had high productivity under high saline and alkaline conditions. (2) High CaCO3%, low TOC and δ13Corg values during the periods of 8~12, 20~24, 28~31 and 35~38Ka, indicate that the lake dropped in level and became close. (3) High TOC but very low CaCO3% with gradually enriched δ13Corg value during the period of 14~20Ka reflect a fresh, cold and deep lake. However, the high TOC content might be caused by terrestrial input around the lake. (4) All other periods had low CaCO3%, TOC and δ13Corg values (-21‰ ~ -24‰), showing a deep and fresh lake under cold and wet climates.

  1. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-03-01

    Research on coprocessing materials/products continued. Major topics reported here are described below. Microautoclave runs are described in which gases and insoluble organic matter produced from five coals and gases produced from three petroleum resids were analyzed to study feedstock/product selective isotopic fractionation. Selective isotopic fractionation was further explored through isotope analysis of the feed New Mexico coal and products from a continuous coal liquefaction run (HRI CC-10 or 227-68). Feeds (Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and products from two HRI continuous coprocessing runs (227-54 and 238-12) were analyzed. The results were corrected for selective isotopic fractionation and carbon sourcing was performed for the product fractions. {sup 1}H-NMR and phenolic -OH determinations are reported for all continuous unit samples obtained under this contract. 13 refs., 17 figs., 40 tabs.

  2. Soil Carbon: Compositional and Isotopic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Alexander, M. L.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    This is a short chapter to be included in the next edition of the Encyclopedia of Soil Science. The work here describes techniques being developed at PNNL for investigating organic carbon in soils. Techniques discussed include: laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry, laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometry, and nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  3. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.

    1989-06-01

    The program is designed to address a substantial, demonstrated need of the coprocessing community (both exploratory and development) for a technique to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of the individual coprocessing feedstocks to the various products. The carbon isotope technique is currently in routine use for other applications. Results achieved this quarter include: Feed and product fractions from a Kentucky 9 coal/Kentucky tar sand bitumen coprocessing bench unit run at the Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) were analyzed for carbon isotope ratios. Corrections were made to the coal carbon recoveries and selectivities from the products of HRI Run 227-53. Feeds (Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB) and products from two periods of HRI coprocessing Run 238-1 were analyzed. Three petroleum samples and three coal samples were pyrolyzed at 800{degree}F for 30 min to determine the effect of pyrolysis on the isotopic homogeneity of each petroleum and coal sample. Products from each pyrolysis test were separated into five fractions; an additional set of coprocessing samples and a set of two-stage coal liquefaction samples were obtained from HRI for future work; work performed by the Pennsylvania State University show that microscopy is a promising method for distinguishing coal and petroleum products in residual coprocessing materials; and coal and petroleums that have large differences in carbon isotope ratios were identified for Auburn University. 7 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. The stable carbon isotopes in enstatite chondrites and Cumberland Falls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, P.; Wickman, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon-isotopic composition (CIC) of the total carbon in the enstatite chondrites Indarch, Abee, St. Marks, Pillistfer, Hvittis and Daniel's Kuil and the enstatite achondrite Cumberland Falls has been measured. The empirical relationship between CIC and total carbon content is distinct from that of carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. Within the enstatite chondrite group the average C-13 content increases with petrographic type: E4 less than E5 less than E6. Daniel's Kuil shows the largest C-13 enrichment in the bulk carbon of any meteorite. The CIC is most clearly correlated with the abundance of the elements Zn, Cd, and In. Insofar as these elements may hold the key to the understanding of enstatite chondrites, more detailed combined CIC and trace-element studies of these meteorites will play an important role in the deciphering of their history.

  5. Carbon isotopic exchange between dissolved inorganic and organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B.; Freeman, K. H.; House, C. H.; Arthur, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    The pools of inorganic and organic carbon are often considered to be separate and distinct. Isotopic exchange between the inorganic and organic carbon pools in natural waters is rarely considered plausible at low temperatures owing to kinetic barriers to exchange. In certain circumstances, however carboxyl carbon of dissolved organic matter (DOM) may be subject to exchange with the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) pool. We report results from an isotopic labeling experiment that resulted in rapid methanogen-catalyzed isotopic exchange between DIC and the carboxyl carbon of acetate. This exchange rapidly mixes the isotopic composition of the DIC pool into the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) acetate pool. This exchange is likely associated with the reversible nature of the carbon monoxide dehydrogenase enzyme. In nature, many decarboxylase enzymes are also reversible and some can be shown to facilitate similar exchange reactions. Those decarboxylase enzymes that are important in lignin decomposition and other organic carbon (OC) transformations may help to mask the isotopic composition of the precursor DOC with as much as 15% contribution from DIC. Though this dilution is unlikely to matter in soils where DOC and DIC are similar in composition, this exchange may be extremely important in systems where the stable or radioisotope composition of DOC and DIC differ significantly. As an example of the importance of this effect, we demonstrate that the stable and radiocarbon isotopic composition of fluvial DOC could be altered by mixing with marine DIC to produce a DOC composition similar to those observed in the deep marine DOC pool. We hypothesize that this exchange resolves the conundrum of apparently old (>5 kyr) marine-derived DOC. If most of the carboxyl carbon of pre-aged, terrestrial-derived DOC (15% of total carbon) is subject to exchange with marine DIC, the resulting carbon isotopic composition of deep DOC will be similar to that observed in deep marine studies

  6. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  7. Aerosol carbon isotope composition over Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Pabedinskas, Algirdas; Masalaite, Agne; Petelski, Tomasz; Gorokhova, Elena; Sapolaite, Justina; Ezerinskis, Zilvinas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2017-04-01

    Particulate carbonaceous matter is significant contributor to ambient particulate matter originating from intervening sources which contribution is difficult to quantify due to source diversity, chemical complexity and processes during atmospheric transport. Carbon isotope analysis can be extremely useful in source apportionment of organic matter due to the unique isotopic signatures associated with anthropocentric (fossil fuel), continental (terrestrial plants) and marine sources, and is particularly effective when these sources are mixed (Ceburnis et al., 2011;Ceburnis et al., 2016). We will present the isotope ratio measurement results of aerosol collected during the cruise in the Baltic Sea. Sampling campaign of PM10 and size segregated aerosol particles was performed on the R/V "Oceania" in October 2015. Air mass back trajectories were prevailing both from the continental and marine areas during the sampling period. The total carbon concentration varied from 1 µg/m3 to 8 µg/m3. Two end members (δ13C = -25‰ and δ13C = -28 ‰ ) were established from the total stable carbon isotope analysis in PM10 fraction. δ13C analysis in size segregated aerosol particles revealed δ13C values being highest in the 1 - 2.5 µm range (δ13C = -24.9 ‰ ) during continental transport, while lowest TC δ13C values (δ13C ≈ -27 ‰ ) were detected in the size range D50 <1 µm during stormy weather when air mass trajectory prevailed from the western direction. These measurements revealed that simplified isotope mixing model can not be applied for the aerosol source apportionment (Masalaite et al., 2015) in the perturbed marine environment. Additionally, concentration of bacteria and fungi were measured in size segregated and PM10 aerosol fraction. We were able to relate aerosol source δ13C end members with the abundance of bacteria and fungi over Baltic Sea combining air mass trajectories, stable isotope data, fungi and bacteria concentrations. Ceburnis, D., Garbaras, A

  8. Stable isotope mass balances versus concentration differences of dissolved inorganic carbon - implications for tracing carbon turnover in reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Barth, Johannes A C; Mader, Michael; Nenning, Franziska; van Geldern, Robert; Friese, Kurt

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify sources of carbon turnover using stable isotope mass balances. For this purpose, two pre-reservoirs in the Harz Mountains (Germany) were investigated for their dissolved and particulate carbon contents (dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic carbon, particulate organic carbon) together with their stable carbon isotope ratios. DIC concentration depth profiles from March 2012 had an average of 0.33 mmol L(-1). Increases in DIC concentrations later on in the year often corresponded with decreases in its carbon isotope composition (δ(13)CDIC) with the most negative value of -18.4 ‰ in September. This led to a carbon isotope mass balance with carbon isotope inputs of -28.5 ‰ from DOC and -23.4, -31.8 and -30.7 ‰ from algae, terrestrial and sedimentary matter, respectively. Best matches between calculated and measured DIC gains were achieved when using the isotope composition of algae. This shows that this type of organic material is most likely responsible for carbon additions to the DIC pool when its concentrations and δ(13)CDIC values correlate negatively. The presented isotope mass balance is transferable to other surface water and groundwater systems for quantification of organic matter turnover.

  9. Carbon isotopes in biological carbonates: Respiration and photosynthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Burdett, J.; Whelan, J.F.; Paull, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    Respired carbon dioxide is an important constituent in the carbonates of most air breathing animals but is much less important in the carbonates of most aquatic animals. This difference is illustrated using carbon isotope data from freshwater and terrestrial snails, ahermatypic corals, and chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic pelecypods. Literature data from fish otoliths and bird and mammal shell and bone carbonates are also considered. Environmental CO2/O2 ratios appear to be the major controlling variable. Atmospheric CO2/O2 ratios are about thirty times lower than in most natural waters, hence air breathing animals absorb less environmental CO2 in the course of obtaining O2. Tissue CO2 therefore, does not isotopically equilibrate with environmental CO2 as thoroughly in air breathers as in aquatic animals, and this is reflected in skeletal carbonates. Animals having efficient oxygen transport systems, such as vertebrates, also accumulate more respired CO2 in their tissues. Photosynthetic corals calcify mainly during the daytime when photosynthetic CO2 uptake is several times faster than respiratory CO2 release. Photosynthesis, therefore, affects skeletal ??13C more strongly than does respiration. Corals also illustrate how "metabolic" effects on skeletal isotopic composition can be estimated, despite the presence of much larger "kinetic" isotope effects. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  10. Carbon isotopes in biological carbonates: Respiration and photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Burdett, Jim; Whelan, Joseph F.; Paull, Charles K.

    1997-02-01

    Respired carbon dioxide is an important constituent in the carbonates of most air breathing animals but is much less important in the carbonates of most aquatic animals. This difference is illustrated using carbon isotope data from freshwater and terrestrial snails, ahermatypic corals, and chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic pelecypods. Literature data from fish otoliths and bird and mammal shell and bone carbonates are also considered. Environmental CO 2/O 2 ratios appear to be the major controlling variable. Atmospheric CO 2/O 2 ratios are about thirty times lower than in most natural waters, hence air breathing animals absorb less environmental CO 2 in the course of obtaining 0 2. Tissue CO 2 therefore, does not isotopically equilibrate with environmental CO 2 as thoroughly in air breathers as in aquatic animals, and this is reflected in skeletal carbonates. Animals having efficient oxygen transport systems, such as vertebrates, also accumulate more respired CO 2 in their tissues. Photosynthetic corals calcify mainly during the daytime when photosynthetic CO 2 uptake is several times faster than respiratory CO 2 release. Photosynthesis, therefore, affects skeletal δ13C more strongly than does respiration. Corals also illustrate how "metabolic" effects on skeletal isotopic composition can be estimated, despite the presence of much larger "kinetic" isotope effects.

  11. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-02-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, when necessary, corrections are applied to account for it. Precision, accuracy and range of applicability are being defined. The value of accessory analytical techniques also is being assessed. Previously reported data on samples from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Runs 227-53 (Texas lignite/Maya ASB and Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and 238-1 (Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB) were corrected for selective isotopic fractionation. Carbon sourcing was performed on samples from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Run 227-60 (Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and samples from UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 26 (Illinois 6 coal/Lloydminster vacuum resid); the latter data were corrected for isotopic fractionation, though the former could not be corrected. A paper presented at the 1990 DOE Direct Liquefaction Contractor's Review Meeting is appended. 15 refs., 21 figs., 22 tabs.

  12. Deconvolving the Carbon Isotope Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, B. S.

    2003-12-01

    The evolution of the whole-ocean δ 13C value, under an assumption of steady state with respect to mass, can be modeled as: \\[ {d \\over dt}\\delta_\\Sigma(t)+{\\delta_\\Sigma(t) \\over \\tau_C}={1 \\over \\tau_C}\\delta_F(t) \\] where δ Σ is the whole-ocean δ 13C value, τ C is the residence time of carbon and a net instantaneous δ 13C forcing function is defined: \\[ \\delta_F=\\delta_i-f_{carb}\\Delta_{carb}-\\(1-f_{carb}\\)\\Delta_{org} \\] where δ i is the δ 13C value of carbon input (e.g. weathering and volcanism), fcarb is the fraction of carbon removed through burial of carbonates as opposed to organic carbon, and Δ carb and Δ org are the differences between δ Σ and δ 13C values for buried carbonate and organic carbon. The solution to this differential equation is: \\[ \\delta_\\Sigma\\(t\\)={1 \\over \\tau_C}\\int_0^t{{\\delta_F\\(t^\\prime\\)}e^{\\(-{t-t^\\prime \\over \\tau_C}\\)}dt^\\prime} \\] which can be expressed as a convolution \\[ \\delta_\\Sigma\\(t\\)={1 \\over \\tau_C} {{\\delta_F\\(t^\\prime\\)} \\otimes e^{\\(-{t-t^\\prime \\over \\tau_C}\\)}} \\] revealing that the evolution of the whole ocean δ 13C value is determined by the instantaneous δ 13C forcing (δ F) subjected to a causal (i.e. phase-shifting) low-pass filter whose frequency response is dependent only on the carbon residence time. One consequence of this observation is that variance in δ 13C records should be concentrated at wavelengths >0.1 m.y., thereby explaining the persistent appearance of cyclicity dependent on orbital eccentricity ( ˜0.1~and ˜0.4 m.y.~periods) in δ 13C records. I demonstrate that an assumption of non-linear forcing of fcarb by orbitally-forced variations in insolation can explain most of the structure of high-resolution δ 13C records throughout the Cenozoic. A second consequence is that τ C and δ F should be separable by numerical manipulation of δ 13C records. Two applications are 1) estimation of the residence time of carbon at

  13. (Carbon isotope fractionation in plants): Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Plants fractionate carbon isotopes during photosynthesis in ways which reflect photosynthetic pathway and environment. The fractionation is product of contributions from diffusion, carboxylation and other factors which can be understood using models which have been developed in our work. The object of our work is to use this fractionation to learn about the factors which control the efficiency of photosynthesis. Unlike previous studies, we do not rely principally on combustion methods, but instead develop more specific methods with substantially higher resolving power. We have recently developed a new short-term method for studying carbon isotope fractionation which promises to provide a level of detail about temperature, species, and light intensity effects on photosynthesis which has not been available until now. We are studying the isotopic compositions of metabolites (particularly aspartic acid) in C/sub 3/ plants in order to determine the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C/sub 3/ photosynthesis. We are studying the relative roles of diffusion and carboxylation in nocturnal CO/sub 2/ fixation in CAM plants. We are studying the use of isotopic content as an index of water-use efficiency in C/sub 3/ plants. We are developing new methods for studying carbon metabolism in plants. 3 refs

  14. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, C. H.; Schopf, J. W.; McKeegan, K. D.; Coath, C. D.; Harrison, T. M.; Stetter, K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  15. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, C. H.; Schopf, J. W.; McKeegan, K. D.; Coath, C. D.; Harrison, T. M.; Stetter, K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  16. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils.

    PubMed

    House, C H; Schopf, J W; McKeegan, K D; Coath, C D; Harrison, T M; Stetter, K O

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  17. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Christopher H.; Schopf, J. William; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Coath, Christopher D.; Harrison, T. Mark; Stetter, Karl O.

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the ˜850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the ˜2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The δ13CPDB values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 ± 1.7‰ to -31.9 ± 1.2‰, and the δ13CPDB values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 ± 0.7‰ to -45.4 ± 1.2‰. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  18. Lipid Correction for Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Deep-sea Fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lipid extraction is used prior to stable isotope analysis of fish tissues to remove variability in the carbon stable isotope ratio (d13C) caused by varying lipid content among samples. Our objective was to evaluate an application of a mass balance correction for the effect of lip...

  19. Lipid Correction for Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Deep-sea Fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lipid extraction is used prior to stable isotope analysis of fish tissues to remove variability in the carbon stable isotope ratio (d13C) caused by varying lipid content among samples. Our objective was to evaluate an application of a mass balance correction for the effect of lip...

  20. Coprecipitation and isotopic fractionation of boron in modern biogenic carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A. Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem ); Chivas, A.R.; McCulloch, M.T. ); Kolodny, Y.; Starinsky, A. )

    1991-10-01

    The abundances and isotopic composition of boron in modern, biogenic calcareous skeletons from the Gulf of Elat, Israel, the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and in deep-sea sediments have been examined by negative thermal-ionization mass spectrometry. The selected species (Foraminifera, Pteropoda, corals, Gastropoda, and Pelecypoda) yield large variations in boron concentration that range from 1 ppm in gastropod shells to 80 ppm in corals. The variations of {delta}{sup 11}B may be controlled by isotopic exchange of boron species in which {sup 10}B is preferentially partitioned into the tetrahedral species, and coprecipitation of different proportions of trigonal and tetrahedral species in the calcium carbonates. The B content and {delta}{sup 11}B values of deep-sea sediments, Foraminifera tests, and corals are used to estimate the global oceanic sink of elemental boron by calcium carbonate deposition. As a result of enrichment of B in corals, a substantially higher biogenic sink of 6.4 {plus minus} 0.9 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr is calculated for carbonates. This is only slightly lower than the sink for desorbable B in marine sediments (10 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr) and approximately half that of altered oceanic crust (14 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr). Thus, carbonates are an important sink for B in the oceans being {approximately}20% of the total sinks. The preferential incorporation of {sup 10}B into calcium carbonate results in oceanic {sup 11}B-enrichment, estimated as 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 {times} 10{sup 12} per mil {center dot} g/yr. The boron-isotope composition of authigenic, well-preserved carbonate skeletons may provide a useful tool to record secular boron-isotope variations in seawater at various times in the geological record.

  1. Paleoclimate studies in Brazil using carbon isotopes in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessenda, Luiz C. R.; Valencia, E. P. E.; Aravena, R.; Telles, E. C. C.; Boulet, R.

    This chapter presents carbon isotope data of soil organic matter (SOM), collected in natural forest ecosystems in different sites from Brazil. The studied areas are located in Londrina (Southern part of the country), Piracicaba (Southeast), Salitre (Central) and Altamira (Northern). This study is part of the research program on tropical and sub-tropical soils in Brazil, of which the main objective is to use carbon isotopes to provide information on vegetation changes and their relationships with climatic changes during the Holocene. 14C data of charcoal samples, the humin fraction and soil organic matter (SOM) contents, indicate that the organic matter of this area is at least of Holocene age. 13C data in SOM indicate that C4 plants were the dominant vegetation in Londrina and Piracicaba during the early and middle Holocene, while C3 plants were the dominant vegetation in Altamira and probably a mixture of C3 and C4 plants occurred in Salitre during the Holocene.

  2. Tunable Diode Laser Measurements of Leaf-scale Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Ecosystem Respired Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in a Semi-arid Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N.; Chris, B.; Hanson, D.; Kern, S.; Meyer, C.; Pockman, W.; Powers, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present results and speculative interpretation of leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination and ecosystem respired carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from a semi-arid, C3/C4 woodland located in northern New Mexico, USA. Overstory leaf area index (LAI) is dominated by live juniper (Juniperus monosperma) trees with an LAI value of approximately 1.0 m2 per m2 ground area, and has a seasonally dynamic understory of mixed C3 forbs and C4 grasses and cacti, with a maximum LAI of 0.30 m2 per m2 ground area. Ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios showed values characteristic of C3 dominated photosynthesis (Keeling plot intercepts of -35 to -22 per mil). Seasonal variation was typical of that found in wetter, C3 dominated forests, as was the dependence on climate (e.g. relationships with vapor pressure deficit, soil water content, and canopy conductance). Leaf-level carbon isotope discrimination of the junipers, measured by coupling a Li-Cor 6400 photosynthesis system to the TDL, provided discrimination-Ci and discrimination-vpd relationships consistent with measured ecosystem respired carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration was dependent on rain water isotope composition, but was correlated with soil water content during rain-free periods. The cumulative effect of vapor pressure deficit after a rain event was tightly correlated with the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration, suggesting the primary drivers are evaporative enrichment of soil water and perhaps nocturnal leaf enrichment. Instrument precision for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbon dioxide is 0.06 to 0.18 per mil; however, overall precision is somewhat lower due to pressure and sampling effects.

  3. (Carbon isotope fractionation in plants: Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to use carbon isotope fractionation as a means of studying photosynthetic efficiency in plants. During the past year we have developed a new short-term method for measuring the isotope fractionation over a period of about an hour. This method is being used to study a variety of environmental and developmental effects in both C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ plants, and these results are being compared with results of the traditional combustion method. We have made extensive studies of aspartic acid, malic acid, and citric acid as possible indicators of the functioning of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C/sub 3/ plants. We find that most of the aspartic acid in proteins in C/sub 3/ plants is synthesized by action of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase on atmospheric CO/sub 2/ and phosphoenolpyruvate produced by glycolysis. The metabolically active pool of malate, aspartate, and citrate, on the other hand, appear not to be principally synthesized by this route. Studies of C/sub 4/ plants are in progress. During deacidification, CAM plants lose CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere, and this material is highly enriched in carbon-13. Field-grown and growth-chamber grown CAM plants show similar isotope fractionations. Ploidy effects on isotope fractionation in alfalfa are extremely small.

  4. Low stable carbon isotope fractionation by coccolithophore RubisCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Amanda J.; Thomas, Phaedra J.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.; Scott, Kathleen M.

    2011-11-01

    The 13C/ 12C ratio of carbon compounds is used to identify sources and sinks in the global carbon cycle. However, the relatively enriched 13C content observed for marine organic carbon remains enigmatic. The majority of oceanic carbon is fixed by algae and cyanobacteria via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, yet isotopic discrimination by the CO 2 fixation enzyme, RubisCO (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), has only been measured for a single marine cyanobacterium. Different forms of RubisCO occur in different phytoplankton species (overall amino acid identity varying by as much as ˜75%) and thus may vary in the degree to which they fractionate carbon. Here we measured isotope discrimination by RubisCO from the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, a cosmopolitan species used as a marine algal model .E. huxleyi RubisCO discriminated substantially less ( ɛ = 11.1‰) against 13CO 2 than other RubisCO enzymes (18-29‰), despite having Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters ( K = 72 μM; Vmax = 0.66 μmol min -1 mg -1 protein) similar to those measured for RubisCO enzymes from different organisms. If widespread, decreased isotope discrimination of 13C by phytoplankton RubisCO may be a major factor influencing the enriched 13C content of marine organic carbon. This finding emphasizes the necessity of (a) determining ɛ values for RubisCOs of other marine phytoplankton and (b) re-evaluation of δ13C values from physiological, environmental, and geological studies.

  5. BOREAS TE-5 Leaf Carbon Isotope Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. This documentation describes leaf carbon isotope data that were collected in 1993 and 1994 at the NSA and SSA OJP sites, the SSA OBS site, and the NSA UBS site. In addition, leaf carbon isotope data were collected in 1994 only at the NSA and SSA OA sites. These data was collected to provide seasonal integrated physiological information for 10 to 15 common species at these 6 BOREAS sites. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  7. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  8. Equations for Lipid Normalization of Carbon Stable Isotope Ratios in Aquatic Bird Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Kyle H.; Davis, Mikaela; Elliott, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope ratios are biogeochemical tracers that can be used to determine the source of nutrients and contaminants in avian eggs. However, the interpretation of stable carbon ratios in lipid-rich eggs is complicated because 13C is depleted in lipids. Variation in 13C abundance can therefore be obscured by variation in percent lipids. Past attempts to establish an algebraic equation to correct carbon isotope ratios for lipid content in eggs have been unsuccessful, possibly because they relied partly on data from coastal or migratory species that may obtain egg lipids from different habitats than egg protein. We measured carbon, nitrogen and sulphur stable isotope ratios in 175 eggs from eight species of aquatic birds. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotopes were enriched in lipid-extracted egg samples compared with non extracted egg samples. A logarithmic equation using the C∶N ratio and carbon isotope ratio from the non extracted egg tissue calculated 90% of the lipid-extracted carbon isotope ratios within ±0.5‰. Calculating separate equations for eggs laid by species in different habitats (pelagic, offshore and terrestrial-influenced) improved the fit. A logarithmic equation, rather than a linear equation as often used for muscle, was necessary to accurately correct for lipid content because the relatively high lipid content of eggs compared with muscle meant that a linear relationship did not accurately approximate the relationship between percent lipids and the C∶N ratio. Because lipid extraction alters sulphur and nitrogen isotope ratios (and cannot be corrected algebraically), we suggest that isotopic measurement on bulk tissue followed by algebraic lipid normalization of carbon stable isotope ratio is often a good solution for homogenated eggs, at least when it is not possible to complete separate chemical analyses for each isotope. PMID:24465384

  9. Impact of flood events on lacustrine carbonate isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Lucas; Plessen, Birgit; Lauterbach, Stefan; Nantke, Carla; Meyer, Hanno; Chapligin, Bernhard; Höllerer, Hannes; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    runoff). The effect of these events on mean seasonal δ 18O (0 to +3.5‰) and δ 13C composition (0 to +3.6‰) is closely related to sediment influx and, therewith, to runoff magnitude. However, while the strongest floods could be detected in the sediment record as discrete detrital layers (proximal: 2 events >50 m3 s-1, distal: 1 event >80 m3 s-1), lower magnitude floods (>30 m3 s-1) provide a 'hidden' detrital bias of 0 to 0.5‰. Evidence for detecting even this 'hidden' bias in sediment records is given by the linear relation between detrital carbonate content and the isotopic composition, resulting in a strong cross-correlation between δ 18O and δ 13C for samples containing >5{%} detrital carbonate whereas no relation was observed for purely endogenic samples. Hence, cross-correlation between δ 18O and δ 13C in bulk carbonate samples serves as a reasonable indicator for contamination with detrital carbonates, applicable in sediment records from hydrologically open lakes where evaporative effects on stable isotopes are negligible.

  10. Mg Isotopic Compositions of Modern Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, E.; Bizzarro, M.; Hemming, N.

    2003-12-01

    We have used a MC-ICP-MS to measure the isotopic composition of magnesium in a number of samples of modern marine carbonate. Due to the large mass difference between 26Mg and 24Mg (similar to that between 13C and 12C), there is potential for mass fractionation during geologic and biologic processes that may make this isotope system useful for geochemical studies. These samples are from the study of Hemming and Hanson (1992, GCA 56: 537-543). The carbonate minerals analyzed include aragonite, low-Mg calcite, and high-Mg calcite. The samples include corals, echinoderms, ooids, etc., from subtropical to Antarctic settings. Mg purification was accomplished by ion-exchange chromatography, using Bio-Rad AG50W-X12 resin on which greater than 99 percent recovery of Mg is achieved. Samples were introduced into the MC-ICP-MS (VG Axiom) using a Cetac MCN-6000 nebuliser. We use a standard-sample-standard bracketing technique, and samples are analysed at least three times. For lab standards we find that the reproducibility on the 26Mg/24Mg to be about ñ 0.12 permil (2 s.d.). We monitored our separated samples for Na and Ca, as we have found that high Ca/Mg and Na/Mg produce variable magnesium isotopic fractionation during mass spectrometry due to as yet unclear matrix effects. We have normalized our results to our measured values for seawater. We observed a d26Mg(s.w.) range of -1.4 to -2.4 permil in our modern carbonate samples relative to present day seawater. Due to the long residence time of Mg in the oceans (ca. 50 my), this must be due to kinetic or biologic effects. Our d25Mg(s.w.) variations as a function of d26Mg(s.w.) plot along the terrestrial fractionation trend. With an average d26Mg(s.w.) of ca. +0.5 permil in all samples of mantle lithologies and mantle-derived igneous rocks (Bizzarro et al., Goldschmidt abs., 2003), we can assume that the Mg isotopic composition of Earth's river water lies between ca. -2.4 and +0.5 permil (relative to seawater). The actual

  11. Synthetic isotope mixtures for the calibration of isotope amount ratio measurements of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russe, K.; Valkiers, S.; Taylor, P. D. P.

    2004-07-01

    Synthetic isotope mixtures for the calibration of carbon isotope amount ratio measurements have been prepared by mixing carbon tetrafluoride highly enriched in 13C with carbon tetrafluoride depleted in 13C. Mixing procedures based on volumetry and gravimetry are described. The mixtures served as primary measurement standards for the calibration of isotope amount ratio measurements of the Isotopic Reference Materials PEF1, NBS22 and USGS24. Thus SI-traceable measurements of absolute carbon isotope amount ratios have been performed for the first time without any hypothesis needed for a correction of oxygen isotope abundances, such as is the case for measurements on carbon dioxide. As a result, "absolute" carbon isotope amount ratios determined via carbon tetrafluoride have smaller uncertainties than those published for carbon dioxide. From the measurements of the Reference Materials concerned, the absolute carbon isotope amount ratio of Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB)--the hypothetical material upon which the scale for relative carbon isotope ratio measurements is based--was calculated to be R13(VPDB) = (11 101 +/- 16) × 10-6.

  12. Evaluation of bioremediation systems utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, K.; Nowell, C.; Marley, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon, whether in an organic or inorganic form, is composed primarily of two stable isotopes, carbon-12 and carbon-13. The ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 is approximately 99:1. The stable carbon isotope ratios of most natural carbon materials of biological interest range from approximately 0 to {minus}110 per mil ({per_thousand}) versus the PDB standard. Utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis, it is often possible to determine the source(s) of the liberated carbon dioxide, thereby confirming successful mineralization of the targeted carbon compound(s) and, if the carbon dioxide results from multiple carbon compounds, in what ratio the carbon compounds are mineralized. Basic stable isotope `theory` recommended sampling procedures and analysis protocols are reviewed. A case study involving fuel oil presented on the application of stable carbon isotope analysis for the monitoring and evaluation of in situ bioremediation. At the site, where a field bioventing study was being conducted, multiple potential sources of carbon dioxide production existed. Additional potential applications of stable carbon isotope analysis for bioremediation evaluation and monitoring are discussed.

  13. Oxygen isotope fractionation in divalent metal carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K.

    1969-01-01

    Equilibrium fractionation factors for the distribution of 18O between alkaline-earth carbonates and water have been measured over the temperature range 0-500??C. The fractionation factors ?? can be represented by the equations CaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.78(106 T-2)-3.39, SrCO3-H 2O, 1000 ln??=2.69(106 T-2)-3.74, BaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.57(106 T -2)-4.73. Measurements on MnCO3, CdCO3, and PbCO3 were made at isolated temperatures. A statistical-mechanical calculation of the isotopic partition function ratios gives reasonably good agreement with experiment. Both cationic size and mass are important in isotopic fractionation, the former predominantly in its effect on the internal vibrations of the anion, the latter in its effect on the lattice vibrations.

  14. [Effects of lipid extraction on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of Ommastrephes bartramii muscle].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Chen, Xin-Jun; Gao, Chun-Xia; Li, Yun-Kai

    2014-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) has become an important tool to investigate diet shift, habitat use and trophic structure of animal population. Muscle is considered to be the most common tissue for SIA, however, lipid content in muscle causes a considerable bias to the interpretation of isotopic ratios of animals. Neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) is an important economic cephalopod of Chinese distant water fishery, and plays a major role in marine ecosystems. In this study, the effects of lipid extraction on stable isotope ratios of the muscles of 53 neon flying squids were investigated and the interference mechanism of lipid in SIA was clarified with the aim of contrasting the suitability of different lipid correction models of stable carbon isotope. Results showed that the stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of non-lipid extracted samples significantly increased after lipid extractions by 0.71 per thousand and 0.47 per thousand, respectively, which suggested that lipid extraction in cephalopod isotope study is needed prior to stable carbon isotope analysis but not recommended for stable nitrogen isotope analysis. The results could help remove the effects of lipid contents and standardize SIA muscle samples, thereby getting better understanding of the isotopic change of neon flying squids in the future.

  15. Effects of environmental and biotic factors on carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoan; Jia, Yufu; Li, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle because the CO2 emitted from soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2. Carbon isotopic fractionation occurs during SOM decomposition, which leads to 12C to enrich in the released CO2 while 13C to enrich in the residual SOM. Understanding the isotope fractionation has been demonstrated to be helpful for studying the global carbon cycle. Soil and litter samples were collected from soil profiles at 27 different sites located along a vertical transect from 1200 to 4500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the south-eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Their carbon isotope ratios, C and N concentrations were measured. In addition, fiber and lignin in litter samples were also analyzed. Carbon isotope fractionation factor (α) during SOM decomposition was estimated indirectly as the slope of the relationship between carbon isotope ratios of SOM and soil C concentrations. This study shows that litter quality and soil water play a significant role in isotope fractionation during SOM decomposition, and the carbon isotope fractionation factor, α, increases with litter quality and soil water content. However, we found that temperature had no significant impact on the α variance.

  16. Effects of environmental and biotic factors on carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoan; Jia, Yufu; Li, Wei

    2015-06-09

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle because the CO2 emitted from soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2. Carbon isotopic fractionation occurs during SOM decomposition, which leads to (12)C to enrich in the released CO2 while (13)C to enrich in the residual SOM. Understanding the isotope fractionation has been demonstrated to be helpful for studying the global carbon cycle. Soil and litter samples were collected from soil profiles at 27 different sites located along a vertical transect from 1200 to 4500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the south-eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Their carbon isotope ratios, C and N concentrations were measured. In addition, fiber and lignin in litter samples were also analyzed. Carbon isotope fractionation factor (α) during SOM decomposition was estimated indirectly as the slope of the relationship between carbon isotope ratios of SOM and soil C concentrations. This study shows that litter quality and soil water play a significant role in isotope fractionation during SOM decomposition, and the carbon isotope fractionation factor, α, increases with litter quality and soil water content. However, we found that temperature had no significant impact on the α variance.

  17. Effects of environmental and biotic factors on carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of soil organic matter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoan; Jia, Yufu; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle because the CO2 emitted from soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2. Carbon isotopic fractionation occurs during SOM decomposition, which leads to 12C to enrich in the released CO2 while 13C to enrich in the residual SOM. Understanding the isotope fractionation has been demonstrated to be helpful for studying the global carbon cycle. Soil and litter samples were collected from soil profiles at 27 different sites located along a vertical transect from 1200 to 4500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the south-eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Their carbon isotope ratios, C and N concentrations were measured. In addition, fiber and lignin in litter samples were also analyzed. Carbon isotope fractionation factor (α) during SOM decomposition was estimated indirectly as the slope of the relationship between carbon isotope ratios of SOM and soil C concentrations. This study shows that litter quality and soil water play a significant role in isotope fractionation during SOM decomposition, and the carbon isotope fractionation factor, α, increases with litter quality and soil water content. However, we found that temperature had no significant impact on the α variance. PMID:26056012

  18. Carbon content and degassing history of the lunar volcanic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Diane T.; Hauri, Erik H.; Saal, Alberto E.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    2015-10-01

    Volcanic glasses observed on the lunar surface have been interpreted as the products of volatile-rich, fire-fountain eruptions. Revised estimates of the water content of primitive lunar magmas have overturned the notion of a volatile-poor Moon, but degassing of water-rich vapour during volcanic eruptions is inconsistent with geochemical and petrological observations. Although degassing of carbon is compatible with observations, the amount of indigenous carbon in lunar volcanic materials is not well constrained. Here we present high-precision measurements of indigenous carbon contents in primitive lunar volcanic glasses and melt inclusions. From our measurements, in combination with solubility and degassing model calculations, we suggest that carbon degassed before water in lunar magmas, and that the amount of carbon in the lunar lavas was sufficient to trigger fire-fountain eruptions at the lunar surface. We estimate--after correcting for bubble formation in the melt inclusions--that the primitive carbon contents and hydrogen/carbon ratios of lunar magmas fall within the range found in melts from Earth’s depleted upper mantle. Our findings are also consistent with measurements of hydrogen, fluorine, sulphur and chlorine contents, as well as carbon and hydrogen isotopes, in primitive lunar magmas, suggesting a common origin for the volatile elements in the interiors of the Earth and Moon.

  19. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J.; Tomkins, Bruce; Janszen, Derek B.; Carman, April J.

    2012-01-03

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  20. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  1. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  2. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  3. Carbon content of sediments of small reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Carbon content was measured in sediments deposited in 58 small reservoirs across the US. Reservoirs varied from 0.2 to 4,000 km{sup 2} in surface area. The carbon content of sediment ranged from 0.3 to 5.6 percent, with a mean of 1.9 {plus minus} 1.1 percent. No significant differences between the soil and sediment carbon content were found using a paired t-test or ANOVA. The carbon content of sediments in reservoirs was similar to the carbon content of surface soils in the watershed, except in watersheds with shrub or steppe (desert) vegetation. Based on the sediment accumulation rates measured in each reservoir, the calculated organic carbon accumulation rates among reservoirs ranged from 26 to 3,700 gC m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1}, with a mean of 675 {plus minus} 739 gC m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1}. The carbon content and accumulation rates were highest in sediments from grassland watersheds. High variability was found in carbon content, carbon accumulation, and sediment accumulation rates due to individual watershed and reservoir characteristics rather than to any broad physiographic patterns. The carbon accumulation rates in these reservoir sediments indicate that reservoir sediments could be a significant sink of organic carbon.

  4. A carbon isotope mass balance for an anoxic marine sediment: Isotopic signatures of diagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehme, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    A carbon isotope mass balance was determined for the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC to constrain the carbon budgets published previously. The diffusive, ebullitive and burial fluxes of sigma CO2 and CH4, as well as the carbon isotope signatures of these fluxes, were measured. The flux-weighted isotopic signature of the remineralized carbon (-18.9 plus or minus 2.7 per mil) agreed with the isotopic composition of the remineralized organic carbon determined from the particulate organic carbon (POC) delta(C-13) profiles (-19.2 plus or minus 0.2), verifying the flux and isotopic signature estimates. The measured delta(C-13) values of the sigma CO2 and CH4 diffusive fluxes were significantly different from those calculated from porewater gradients. The differences appear to be influenced by methane oxidation at the sediment-water interface, although other potential processes cannot be excluded. The isotope mass balance provides important information concerning the locations of potential diagenetic isotope effects. Specifically, the absence of downcore change in the delta(C-13) value of the POC fraction and the identical isotopic composition of the POC and the products of remineralization indicate that no isotopic fractionation is expressed during the initial breakdown of the POC, despite its isotopically heterogeneous composition.

  5. A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Lacustrine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsunaga, B. A.; Mering, J. A.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Cohen, A. S.; Liu, X.; Kaufman, D. S.; Eagle, R.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of past climate reconstructions. Unfortunately, many terrestrial proxies—tree rings, speleothems, leaf margin analyses, etc.—are influenced by the effects of both temperature and precipitation. Methods that can isolate the effects of temperature alone are needed, and clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful tool for determining terrestrial climates. Multiple studies have shown that the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed and may be a useful proxy for reconstructing temperatures on land. An in-depth survey of lacustrine carbonates, however, has not yet been published. Therefore we have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of modern lake samples' carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature and air temperature. Some of the sample types we have investigated include endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  6. Reconstructions of the 14C cosmogenic isotope content from natural archives after the last glacial termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Volobuev, D. M.; Dergachev, V. A.; Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Ogurtsov, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    Data on the content of the 14C cosmogenic isotope in tree rings, which were obtained as a result of laboratory measurements, are often used when solar activity (SA) is reconstructed for previous epochs, in which direct observations are absent. However, these data contain information not only about SA variations but also about changes in the Earth climatic parameters, such as the global temperature and the CO2 content in the Earth's atmosphere. The effect of these variations on the 14C isotope content in different natural reservoirs after the last glacial termination to the middle of the Holocene is considered. The global temperature and the CO2 content increased on this time interval. In this case the 14C absolute content in the atmosphere increased on this time interval, even though the 14C to 12C isotope concentration ratio (as described by the Δ14C parameter) decreased. These variations in the radiocarbon absolute content can be caused by its redistribution between natural reservoirs. It has been indicated that such a redistribution is possible only when the rate of carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere depends on temperature. The values of the corresponding temperature coefficient for the 17-10 ka BC time interval, which make it possible to describe the carbon redistribution between the ocean and atmosphere, have been obtained.

  7. Carbon and nitrogen isotope systematics in diamond: Different sensitivities to isotopic fractionation or a decoupled origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogberg, K.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    Using stable isotope data obtained on multiple aliquots of diamonds from worldwide sources, it has been argued that carbon and nitrogen in diamond are decoupled. Here we re-investigate the carbon-nitrogen relationship based on the most comprehensive microbeam data set to date of stable isotopes and nitrogen concentrations in diamonds (n = 94) from a single locality. Our diamond samples, derived from two kimberlites in the Chidliak Field (NE Canada), show large variability in δ13C (- 28.4 ‰ to - 1.1‰, mode at - 5.8‰), δ15N (- 5.8 to + 18.8‰, mode at - 3.0‰) and nitrogen contents ([N]; 3800 to less than 1 at.ppm). In combination, cathodoluminescence imaging and microbeam analyses reveal that the diamonds grew from multiple fluid pulses, with at least one major hiatus documented in some samples that was associated with a resorption event and an abrupt change from low δ13C and [N] to mantle-like δ13C and high [N]. Overall, δ13C appears to be uncorrelated to δ15N and [N] on both the inter- and intra-diamond levels. Co-variations of δ15N-log[N], however, result in at least two parallel, negatively correlated linear arrays, which are also present on the level of the individual diamonds falling on these two trends. These arrays emerge from the two principal data clusters, are characterized by slightly negative and slightly positive δ15N (about - 3 and + 2‰, respectively) and variable but overall high [N]. Using published values for the diamond-fluid nitrogen isotope fractionation factor and nitrogen partition coefficient, these trends are perfectly reproduced by a Rayleigh fractionation model. Overall, three key elements are identified in the formation of the diamond suite studied: (1.) a low δ13C and low [N] component that possibly is directly associated with an eclogitic diamond substrate or introduced during an early stage fluid event. (2.) Repeated influx of a variably nitrogen-rich mantle fluid (mildly negative δ13C and δ15N). (3.) In waning

  8. Unusually high stable carbon isotopic values of methane from low organic carbon Mars analog hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Tazaz, A.; Chanton, J.; Bebout, B.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the Mars rovers’ findings of past hypersaline environments and the discovery of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, we examined methanogenesis in hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur and in the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge in northern California. Methane-rich bubbles were observed to be released from below gypsum/halite crusts in these environments. The stable carbon isotopic composition of these bubbles ranged from about -30 to -40 ‰. Methane with these relatively high isotopic values would typically be considered non-biogenic, however incubations of crust and sediments samples over time resulted in the production of methane. We therefore undertook a series of measurements aimed at understanding the isotopic composition of methane in these environments. The concentrations and isotopic composition of the particulate organic carbon (POC) in these environments were measured. POC content was low (relative to most methane-producing sedimentary environments), generally less than 1%, and always less than 2% of the total mass. The isotopic composition of the POC ranged from -13 to -22 ‰. To determine the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled trimethylamine (TMA), monomethylamine, methanol, acetate and bicarbonate were added to incubation vials and the methane produced was monitored for 13C content. The main substrates used by the methanogens in these hypersaline environments were the non-competitive substrates, the methylamines and methanol. When unlabeled, but isotopically known, TMA was added to incubation vials in varying concentrations, the isotopic composition of the methane produced also varied. Little, if any, difference in the isotopic composition between the TMA and methane occurred at the lowest TMA concentration (10 µM final concentration). The lowest methane δ13C values (and so greatest fractionation between methane and TMA) occurred when the most TMA was added (1000 µM final concentration). This change in the

  9. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of meteoritic carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, M.M.; Wright, I.P.; Swart, P.K.; Pillinger, C.T. )

    1988-12-01

    The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O isotopic ratios of carbonates from carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites have been measured on CO{sub 2} released by the action of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} on whole-rock samples. Carbonates from CI, CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites exhibit a range in {delta}{sup 18}O of ca. 15{per thousand} (+20.5{per thousand} to +35.1{per thousand} relative to SMOW). Limited data from CO{sub 2}-water equilibration experiments suggest that meteoritic carbonates do not possess grossly anomalous {sup 17}O isotopic compositions; therefore, they are truly enriched in {sup 13}C, with {delta}{sup 13}C between +23.7{per thousand} and +80.7{per thousand} relative to PDB. Large internal variations in {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O were found in individual meteorites and suggest that two or more isotopically distinct carbonates of different origin may be present. The abundance, {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of carbonate in CM2 chondrites may be related to the extent of aqueous alteration of the meteorites. Carbonates in CI and CR chondrites have a median {delta}{sup 13}C ca. +50 to +60{per thousand}, whereas {delta}{sup 13}C of CM meteorites lie in the range +40 to +50 {per thousand}, although exceptions exist in both sets of samples. CV3 and CO3 carbonaceous chondrites and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites release small amounts of CO{sub 2} on acid treatment, which might be from carbonate dissolution, but which is not enriched in {sup 13}C, exhibiting {delta}{sup 13}C values ca. 0 {plus minus} 10{per thousand}. The exception to this is Bishunpur, with {delta}{sup 13}C ca. {minus}23.5{per thousand}. The difference in {delta}{sup 13}C of the CI, CM and CR vs. CV, CO and ordinary chondrite carbonates may be a result of the progressive enrichment in {sup 13}C of percolating fluids, brought about by increasing solubilization of exotic {sup 13}C-enriched grains.

  10. Global simulation of the carbon isotope exchange of terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Terao, Y.; Mukai, H.

    2009-12-01

    There remain large uncertainties in our quantification of global carbon cycle, which has close interactions with the climate system and is subject to human-induced global environmental change. Information on carbon isotopes is expected to reduce the uncertainty by providing additional constraints on net atmosphere-ecosystem exchange. This study attempted to simulate the dynamics of carbon isotopes at the global scale, using a process-based terrestrial ecosystem model: Vegetation Integrative SImulator for Trace gases (VISIT). The base-model of carbon cycle (Sim-CYCLE, Ito 2003) has already considered stable carbon isotope composition (13C/12C), and here radioactive carbon isotope (14C) was included. The isotope ratios characterize various aspects of terrestrial carbon cycle, which is difficult to be constrained by sole mass balance. For example, isotopic discrimination by photosynthetic assimilation is closely related with leaf stomatal conductance and composition of C3 and C4 plant in grasslands. Isotopic disequilibrium represents mean residence time of terrestrial carbon pools. In this study, global simulations (spatial resolution 0.5-deg, time-step 1-month) were conducted during the period 1901 to 2100 on the basis of observed and projected atmospheric CO2, climate, and land-use conditions. As anthropogenic CO2 accumulates in the atmosphere, heavier stable carbon isotope (13C) was diluted, while radioactive carbon isotope (14C) is strongly affected by atomic bomb experiments mainly in the 1950s and 1960s. The model simulated the decadal change in carbon isotope compositions. Leaf carbon with shorter mean residence time responded rapidly to the atmospheric change, while plant stems and soil humus showed substantial time-lag, leading to large isotopic disequilibrium. In the future, the isotopic disequilibrium was estimated to augment, due to accelerated rate of anthropogenic CO2 accumulation. Spatial distribution of stable isotope composition (12C/13C, or d13C) was

  11. Transforming Content Knowledge: Learning to Teach about Isotopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddis, Arthur N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents a vignette about Karen, a student teacher in her first attempt at teaching chemical isotopes. Karen focuses on transmitting what she knows. An overview of Schulman's conceptions of pedagogical content knowledge is then provided. Shulman's ideas are employed to frame the experiences of Alan, a student teacher, as he and his cooperating…

  12. Transforming Content Knowledge: Learning to Teach about Isotopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddis, Arthur N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents a vignette about Karen, a student teacher in her first attempt at teaching chemical isotopes. Karen focuses on transmitting what she knows. An overview of Schulman's conceptions of pedagogical content knowledge is then provided. Shulman's ideas are employed to frame the experiences of Alan, a student teacher, as he and his cooperating…

  13. Monitoring of carbon isotope composition of snow cover for Tomsk region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulov, P. A.; Volkov, Y. V.; Kalashnikova, D. A.; Markelova, A. N.; Melkov, V. N.; Simonova, G. V.; Tartakovskiy, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    This article shows the potential of using δ13C values of pollutants in snow pack to study the human impact on the environment of Tomsk and its surroundings. We believe that it is possible to use a relation between the isotope compositions of a fuel and black carbon for establishing the origin of the latter. The main object of our investigation was dust accumulated by the snow pack in the winter of 2015-2016. The study of dust samples included the following steps: determination of the total carbon content in snow pack samples of Tomsk and its surroundings, extraction of black carbon from the dust, as well as the determination of δ13C values of the total and black carbon accumulated in the snow pack. A snow survey was carried out on the 26th of January and on the 18th of March. The relative carbon content in the dust samples was determined by using an EA Flash 2000 element analyzer. It varied from 3 to 24%. The maximum carbon content was in the dust samples from areas of cottage building with individual heating systems. The δ13C values of the total and black carbon were determined by using a DELTA V Advantage isotope mass spectrometer (TomTsKP SB RAS). The isotope composition of black carbon corresponded to that of the original fuel. This fact allowed identifying the origin of black carbon in some areas of Tomsk.

  14. The relation between isotopic composition of argon and carbon in natural gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavrilov, Y. Y.; Zhurov, Y. A.; Teplinskiy, G. I.

    1977-01-01

    The methods and results of determination of the argon and carbon isotope compositions of hydrocarbon gases of Mezozoic complexes of Western Siberia are presented. Based on the Ar-36, Ar-40, C-12, C-13 content of the various deposits and on the presumed mechanisms of entry of these isotopes into the deposits, it is concluded that formation of natural gas in some deposits included vertical migration from a lower complex.

  15. [Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in soil ecological studies].

    PubMed

    Tiunov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The development of stable isotope techniques is one of the main methodological advances in ecology of the last decades of the 20th century. Many biogeochemical processes are accompanied by changes in the ratio between stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen (12C/13C and 14N/15N), which allows different ecosystem components and different ecosystems to be distinguished by their isotopic composition. Analysis of isotopic composition makes it possible to trace matter and energy flows through biological systems and to evaluate the rate of many ecological processes. The main concepts and methods of stable isotope ecology and patterns of stable isotope fractionation during organic matter decomposition are considered with special emphasis on the fractionation of isotopes in food chains and the use of stable isotope studies of trophic relationships between soil animals in the field.

  16. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs

  17. Mass transfer and carbon isotope evolution in natural water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Plummer, L.N.; Pearson, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical treatment of the evolution of the carbon isotopes C13 and C14 in natural waters and in precipitates which derive from such waters. The effects of an arbitrary number of sources (such as dissolution of carbonate minerals and oxidation of organic material) and sinks (such as mineral precipitation, CO2 degassing and production of methane), and of equilibrium fractionation between solid, gas and aqueous phases are considered. The results are expressed as equations relating changes in isotopic composition to changes in conventional carbonate chemistry. One implication of the equations is that the isotopic composition of an aqueous phase may approach a limiting value whenever there are simultaneous inputs and outputs of carbonate. In order to unambiguously interpret isotopic data from carbonate precipitates and identify reactants and products in reacting natural waters, it is essential that isotopic changes are determined chiefly by reactant and product stoichiometry, independent of reaction path. We demonstrate that this is so by means of quantitative examples. The evolution equations are applied to: 1. (1) carbon-14 dating of groundwaters; 2. (2) interpretation of the isotopic composition of carbonate precipitates, carbonate cements and diagenetically altered carbonates; and 3. (3) the identification of chemical reaction stoichiometry. These applications are illustrated by examples which show the variation of ??C13 in solutions and in precipitates formed under a variety of conditions involving incongruent dissolution, CO2 degassing, methane production and mineral precipitation. ?? 1978.

  18. Intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid in vinegar.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Ryota; Yamada, Keita; Kikuchi, Makiko; Hirano, Satoshi; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2011-09-14

    Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of acetic acid is useful for origin discrimination and quality control of vinegar. Intramolecular carbon isotope distributions, which are each carbon isotope ratios of the methyl and carboxyl carbons in the acetic acid molecule, may be required to obtain more detailed information to discriminate such origin. In this study, improved gas chromatography-pyrolysis-gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-Py-GC-C-IRMS) combined with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was used to measure the intramolecular carbon isotope distributions of acetic acid in 14 Japanese vinegars. The results demonstrated that the methyl carbons of acetic acid molecules in vinegars produced from plants were mostly isotopically depleted in (13)C relative to the carboxyl carbon. Moreover, isotopic differences (δ(13)C(carboxyl) - δ(13)C(methyl)) had a wide range from -0.3 to 18.2‰, and these values differed among botanical origins, C3, C4, and CAM plants.

  19. Precise carbon isotopic ratio analyses of micro amounts of carbonate and non-carbonate in basalt using continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS).

    PubMed

    Zha, Xiang-Ping; Gong, Bing; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Chen, Yi-Xiang

    2017-10-07

    Continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) is a specialized technique used to quickly analyze very small amounts of sample. We have used CF-IRMS to assess the influences of sample weight and relative carbon content on the accuracy and precision of the δ(13) C values of micro amounts of carbonate and non-carbonate in silicate rocks. The analytical work was performed on a Gasbench II (GB) sample preparation device and on an Element Analyzer (EA), which were both interfaced to CF-IRMS instruments. Potential silicate matrix effects on the carbon isotopic analyses were investigated by measuring mixtures of calibrated carbon reference materials and quartz powder. The calibration lines, established by the measured raw values and the known values of three reference materials mixing with quartz powder, were used to calibrate the δ(13) C values of basalt samples from eastern China. The δ(13) C values measured by GB-CF-IRMS of one national carbonate reference material, GBW04416, deviate slightly from the known value for approximately 20~70 μg of carbonate contained in 4.5-mL vials; the smaller the sample size, the lower the measured δ(13) C values. External precision better than 0.1‰ (1σ, n=26) is achieved at a signal intensity for mass 44 of between 868 and 1614 mV, corresponding to a sample weight of 30.8~50.2 μg, whereas it is reduced to 0.27‰ (1σ, n=34) at a signal intensity between 519 and 1614 mV, corresponding to a sample weight of 21.1~50.2 μg. In the EA-CF-IRMS experiments non-carbonate carbon, at high carbon concentration (greater than 800 ppm) and at optimum sample weights, the accuracy and precision are both better than 0.2‰. For carbon concentrations less than 500 ppm, the measured δ(13) C values deviate from the average by up to -1.2‰ and the precision is 0.74‰. The measured δ(13) C values decrease substantially at lower carbon concentration and higher sample weights, and poorer precision is obtained. Suggestions are made to

  20. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium carbonate minerals produced by reaction of H2O-CO2 with ultramafic rocks occur in a wide range of paragenetic and tectonic settings and can thus provide insights into a variety of geologic processes, including (1) deposition of ore-grade, massive-vein cryptocrystalline magnesite; (2) formation of hydrous magnesium carbonates in weathering environments; and (3) metamorphic carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks. However, the application of traditional geochemical and isotopic methods to infer temperatures of mineralization, the nature of mineralizing fluids, and the mechanisms controlling the transformation of dissolved CO2 into magnesium carbonates in these settings is difficult because the fluids are usually not preserved. Clumped-isotope compositions of magnesium carbonates provide a means to determine primary mineralization or (re)equilibration temperature, which permits the reconstruction of geologic processes that govern magnesium carbonate formation. We first provide an evaluation of the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates using synthetic magnesite and hydromagnesite, along with natural metamorphic magnesite and low-temperature hydromagnesite precipitated within a mine adit. We show that the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates is virtually indistinguishable from other carbonate acid fractionation corrections given current mass spectrometer resolution and error. In addition, we employ carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry on natural magnesium carbonates from various geologic environments and tectonic settings. Cryptocrystalline magnesite vein deposits from California (Red Mountain magnesite mine), Austria (Kraubath locality), Turkey (Tutluca mine, Eskişehir district) and Iran (Derakht-Senjed deposit) exhibit broadly uniform Δ47 compositions that yield apparent clumped-isotope temperatures that average 23.7 ± 5.0 °C. Based on oxygen isotope thermometry, these clumped-isotope temperatures suggest

  1. Determination of carbon isotopic measurement conditions for ceramide in skin using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Keita; Miyashita, Rumiko; Aida, Kazuhiko; Ohnishi, Masao; Gilbert, Alexis; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    The ceramide (Cer) content of skin and glucosylceramide (GlcCer) intake affect skin moisture conditions, but their mutual relation in skin remains unclear. For clarification of that mutual relation, carbon stable isotopes ((12)C and (13)C) are useful as a tracer. However, carbon isotopic measurement has not been applied to the study of clarifying their skin moisturizing effects. Therefore, we used gas chromatography / combustion / isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) to ascertain the appropriate conditions for carbon isotopic measurements using synthesized Cer (SCer) in substitution for very low concentrations of Cer in skin. SCer was derivatized to trimethylsilylated SCer (TMS-SCer) quantitatively using N-trimethylsilylimidazole (TMSI) depending on the amount of SCer. The derivatization rates were 75-85%. Excess TMSI was removed using three cycles of hexane-water distribution. Under these conditions, carbon isotopic measurements of TMS-SCer conducted using GC-C-IRMS showed high repeatability and good inter-day variation (S.D. < 0.3‰). The carbon stable isotope ratio value (δ(13)C) of SCer calculated using a mass balance equation was compared with δ(13)C of underivatized SCer, which was regarded as the actual δ(13)C of SCer obtained using sealed tube combustion method. The difference between the calculated δ(13)C of SCer and δ(13)C of the underivatized SCer depended on the TMSI reagent supplier and on the number of hydroxyl groups to be derivatized in SCer. For accurate δ(13)C of Cer in skin using GC-C-IRMS, the measured δ(13)C of a target TMS-Cer must be calculated using a correction factor representing the difference in δ(13)C of underivatized standard SCer from that of TMS-standard SCer having a structure resembling that of the target Cer in skin. In addition, we show that the same lot of TMSI reagent from a specific supplier must be used throughout the experiments.

  2. Developing a methodology for carbon isotope analysis of lacustrine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Elizabeth R; Barker, Philip A; Leng, Melanie J; Vane, Christopher H; Wynn, Peter; Kendrick, Chris P; Verschuren, Dirk; Street-Perrott, F Alayne

    2011-06-15

    Stable isotope analysis of sedimentary carbon in lakes can help reveal changes in terrestrial and aquatic carbon cycles. A method based on a single, photosynthetic organism, where host effects are minimised, should offer more precision than carbon isotope studies of bulk lake sediments. Here we report the development of a systematic method for use on fossil lacustrine diatom frustules, adapted from previous studies in marine environments. A step-wise cleaning experiment on diatomaceous lake sediments from Lake Challa, near Mount Kilimanjaro, was made to demonstrate the necessary treatment stages to remove external sedimentary carbon. Changes in soluble carbon compounds during these cleaning experiments were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The mass spectrometry methods were refined to measure the small percentage of carbon in these samples and details of these methods are presented. Samples of cleaned diatoms containing <1% carbon yielded robust results. Carbon isotope analyses of diatom samples containing different species mixtures were performed and suggested that differences existed, although the effects lay within current experimental error and require further work. Unlike what was found in work on oxygen and silicon isotopes from diatom frustules, mineral contamination had no discernible impact on the diatom carbon isotope ratios from these sediments. The range of values found in the lakes investigated thus far can be interpreted with reference to the supply and nature of carbon from the catchment as well as to the demand generated from lake primary productivity. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon during the Lomagundi (2.22 2.1 Ga) carbon isotope excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, A.; Holmden, C.; Beukes, N. J.; Kenig, F.; Eglinton, B.; Patterson, W. P.

    2008-07-01

    The Lomagundi (2.22-2.1 Ga) positive carbon isotope excursion in shallow-marine sedimentary carbonates has been associated with the rise in atmospheric oxygen, but subsequent studies have demonstrated that the carbon isotope excursion was preceded by the rise in atmospheric oxygen. The amount of oxygen released to the exosphere during the Lomagundi excursion is constrained by the average global fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon, which is poorly characterized. Because dissolved inorganic and organic carbon reservoirs were arguably larger in the Paleoproterozoic ocean, at a time of lower solar luminosity and lower ocean redox state, decoupling between these two variables might be expected. We determined carbon isotope values of carbonate and organic matter in carbonates and shales of the Silverton Formation, South Africa and in the correlative Sengoma Argillite Formation, near the border in Botswana. These units were deposited between 2.22 and 2.06 Ga along the margin of the Kaapvaal Craton in an open-marine deltaic setting and experienced lower greenschist facies metamorphism. The prodelta to offshore marine shales are overlain by a subtidal carbonate sequence. Carbonates exhibit elevated 13C values ranging from 8.3 to 11.2‰ vs. VPDB consistent with deposition during the Lomagundi positive excursion. The total organic carbon (TOC) contents range from 0.01 to 0.6% and δ13C values range from - 24.8 to - 13.9‰. Thus, the isotopic fractionation between organic and carbonate carbon was on average 30.3 ± 2.8‰ ( n = 32) in the shallow-marine environment. The underlying Sengoma shales have highly variable TOC contents (0.14 to 21.94%) and δ13C values (- 33.7 to - 20.8‰) with an average of - 27.0 ± 3.0‰ ( n = 50). Considering that the shales were also deposited during the Lomagundi excursion, and taking δ13C values of the overlying carbonates as representative of the δ13C value of dissolved inorganic carbon during shale deposition, a carbon

  4. Fractionation of carbon isotopes by phytoplankton and estimates of ancient CO2 levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of the 13C content of marine particulate organic carbon are compiled and on the basis of GEOSECS data and temperatures, concentrations, and isotopic compositions of dissolved CO2 in the waters in which the related phytoplankton grew are estimated. In this way, the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthetic fixation of CO2 is found to be significantly correlated with concentrations of dissolved CO2. Because ancient carbon isotopic fractionations have been determined from analyses of sedimentary porphyrins [Popp et al., 1989], the relationship between isotopic fractionation and concentrations of dissolved CO2 developed here can be employed to estimate concentrations of CO2 dissolved in ancient oceans and, in turn, partial pressures of CO2 in ancient atmospheres. The calculations take into account the temperature dependence of chemical and isotopic equilibria in the dissolved-inorganic-carbon system and of air-sea equilibria. Paleoenvironmental temperatures for each sample are estimated from reconstructions of paleogeography, latitudinal temperature gradients, and secular changes in low-latitude sea surface temperature. It is estimated that atmospheric partial pressures of CO2 were over 1000 micro atm 160 - 100 Ma ago, then declined to values near 300 micro atm during the next 100 Ma. Analysis of a high-resolution record of carbon isotopic fractionation at the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary suggests that the partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere was drawn down from values near 840 micro atm to values near 700 micro atm during the anoxic event.

  5. An isotopic study of biogeochemical relationships between carbonates and organic carbon in the Greenhorn Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Popp, Brian N.; Takigiku, Ray; Johnson, Marcus W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of total carbonate, inoceramid carbonate, micritic carbonate, secondary cements, total organic carbon, and geoporphyrins have been measured in 76 different beds within a 17-m interval of a core through the Greenhorn Formation, an interbedded limestone and calcareous shale unit of Cretaceous age from the Western Interior Seaway of North America. Results are considered in terms of variations in the processes of primary production and in secondary processes. It is shown that the porphyrin isotopic record reflects primary isotopic variations more closely than the TOC isotopic record and that, in these sediments, TOC is enriched in C-13 relative to its primary precursor by 0.6 to 2.8 percent. This enrichment is attributed to isotope effects within the consumer foodweb and is associated with respiratory heterotrophy. Variation in this secondary enrichment are correlated with variations in the isotopic composition of marine carbonate.

  6. An isotopic study of biogeochemical relationships between carbonates and organic carbon in the Greenhorn Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Popp, Brian N.; Takigiku, Ray; Johnson, Marcus W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of total carbonate, inoceramid carbonate, micritic carbonate, secondary cements, total organic carbon, and geoporphyrins have been measured in 76 different beds within a 17-m interval of a core through the Greenhorn Formation, an interbedded limestone and calcareous shale unit of Cretaceous age from the Western Interior Seaway of North America. Results are considered in terms of variations in the processes of primary production and in secondary processes. It is shown that the porphyrin isotopic record reflects primary isotopic variations more closely than the TOC isotopic record and that, in these sediments, TOC is enriched in C-13 relative to its primary precursor by 0.6 to 2.8 percent. This enrichment is attributed to isotope effects within the consumer foodweb and is associated with respiratory heterotrophy. Variation in this secondary enrichment are correlated with variations in the isotopic composition of marine carbonate.

  7. Microbial influences on local carbon isotopic ratios and their preservation in carbonate.

    PubMed

    Sumner, D Y

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the carbon isotopic composition of carbonates is a valuable tool for studying microbial processes and looking for evidence of life. Microbial fixation of CO2 and conversion of organic carbon to CO2 can produce measurable delta 13C shifts in a microbial mat environment. Diffusion modeling demonstrates that substantial isotopic shifts can develop within the mat and in the diffusion boundary layer in the fluid when CO2 fixation is rapid and prolonged for several hours. Carbonates that precipitate during rapid CO2 fixation can preserve these microbially produced isotopic shifts. However, continued precipitation during intervals when respiration dominates or after the cessation of active microbial growth commonly dilutes autotrophic isotopic signatures. Thus, preserved isotopic signatures rarely reflect the magnitude of isotopic shifts within the mat. Interpretation of observed isotopic shifts in microbial mat carbonate depends on fully characterizing ambient delta 13C and eliminating other origins for isotopic shifts. The carbon isotopic composition of reservoirs can vary substantially, both on Earth and on other planets. Characterizing the reservoir composition and any changes through time is critical to evaluating microbially induced shifts. In addition, careful evaluation of non-microbial causes for shifts in isotopic composition is essential for a reliable interpretation. Complicating processes include recrystallization, calcite precipitation over extended periods of time, variable precipitation rates and water chemistry, and mixing of carbonates having different isotopic signatures.

  8. Kinetic and equilibrium Ba isotope fractionation during carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zuilen, Kirsten; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Purgstaller, Bettina; Baldermann, Andre; Nägler, Thomas F.; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Variations in stable isotope ratios recorded in carbonates are widely used to reconstruct the physicochemical conditions, e.g., pH, temperature and redox conditions, prevailing at the time of carbonate mineral formation. Knowledge of isotope fractionation factors during mineral precipitation under varying environmental conditions is irremissible for the interpretation of isotope variations in natural sedimentary archives. However, experimentally derived fractionation factors, of for instance Ca isotopes, are often ambiguous and incommensurable due to differences in experimental parameters. Here, Ba isotope fractionation during carbonate mineral formation was investigated [1]. Time-resolved experiments of witherite (BaCO3) precipitation revealed an initial kinetic isotope effect with increasing Δ137/134Ba values of the ambient solution, following Rayleigh fractionation (αwitherite-fluid = 0.99993 ± 0.00004). After precipitation, the witherite crystals remained in contact with the ambient solution for about nine days. During this time, chemical steady state was achieved between solution and witherite; however, the Δ137/134Ba values of the solution decreased. At isotopic equilibrium, the ambient solution and the witherite crystals exhibited identical δ137/134Ba values, within the analytical uncertainty of ±0.04 ‰Ṫhis observation is interpreted as the result of continuous exchange of Ba2+ ions between witherite and solution after initial preferential uptake of the lighter Ba isotopes in the precipitating carbonates. Mass balance calculations indicate that the ion exchange affects several subsurface layers of the crystals. In summary, Ba isotope exchange between carbonate and ambient solution occurs at chemical equilibrium, and pristine isotopic signatures in carbonates may thus be reset at low temperatures. [1] Mavromatis et al. (2016) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 190, 72-84.

  9. Carbon Monoxide Isotopes: On the Trail of Galactic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.

    1995-01-01

    From the early days of the discovery of radio emission from carbon monoxide it was realized that it offered unusual potential for under- standing the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and external galaxies through measurements of molecular isotopes. These results bear on stellar nucleosynthesis, star formation, and gases in the interstellar medium. Progress in isotopic radio measurements will be reviewed.

  10. Bromine and carbon isotope effects during photolysis of brominated phenols.

    PubMed

    Zakon, Yevgeni; Halicz, Ludwik; Gelman, Faina

    2013-12-17

    In the present study, carbon and bromine isotope effects during UV-photodegradation of bromophenols in aqueous and ethanolic solutions were determined. An anomalous relatively high inverse bromine isotope fractionation (εreactive position up to +5.1‰) along with normal carbon isotope effect (εreactive position of -12.6‰ to -23.4‰) observed in our study may be attributed to coexistence of both mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope fractionation of C-Br bond cleavage. Isotope effects of a similar scale were observed for all the studied reactions in ethanol, and for 4-bromophenol in aqueous solution. This may point out related radical mechanism for these processes. The lack of any carbon and bromine isotope effects during photodegradation of 2-bromophenol in aqueous solution possibly indicates that C-Br bond cleavage is not a rate-limiting step in the reaction. The bromine isotope fractionation, without any detectable carbon isotope effect, that was observed for 3-bromophenol photolysis in aqueous solution probably originates from mass-independent fractionation.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Isotopes: On the Trail of Galactic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.

    1995-01-01

    From the early days of the discovery of radio emission from carbon monoxide it was realized that it offered unusual potential for under- standing the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and external galaxies through measurements of molecular isotopes. These results bear on stellar nucleosynthesis, star formation, and gases in the interstellar medium. Progress in isotopic radio measurements will be reviewed.

  12. BIODEGRADATION OF FLUORANTHENE AS MONITORED USING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement of stable isotope ratios of carbon (d13C values) was investigated as a viable technique to monitor the intrinsic bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biometer-flask experiments were conducted in which the bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis,...

  13. Origin of petroporphyrins. 2. Evidence from stable carbon isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, C. J.; Fookes, C. J.; Popp, B. N.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Compared with the carbon-13 isotopic composition of the ubiquitous C32DPEP (DPEP, deoxophylloerythroetioporphyrin) the heavy but equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for the porphyrin structures 15(2)-methyl-15,17-ethano-17-nor-H-C30DPEP and 15,17-butano-, 13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propano-, and 13(1)-methyl-13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propanoporphyrin suggests a common precursor, presumably chlorophyll c, for these petroporphyrins isolated from the marine Julia Creek oil shale and the lacustrine Condor oil shale. Similarly, the heavy but variable carbon-13 isotopic composition of 7-nor-H-C31DPEP compared with C32DPEP is consistent with an origin from both chlorophyll b and chlorophyll c3. The equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for 13(2)-methyl-C33DPEP compared with C32DPEP suggests a common origin resulting from a weighted average of chlorophyll inputs.

  14. BIODEGRADATION OF FLUORANTHENE AS MONITORED USING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement of stable isotope ratios of carbon (d13C values) was investigated as a viable technique to monitor the intrinsic bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biometer-flask experiments were conducted in which the bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis,...

  15. Global carbon isotope records and carbon cycle feedbacks following the PETM perturbation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, G. J.

    2009-12-01

    Global warming during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum is associated with a transient, multi-phase negative carbon isotope excursion documented throughout the global exogenic carbon cycle. The precipitous drop in carbon isotope ratios at the onset of the event is widely accepted to reflect a massive addition of 13C-depleted carbon to the ocean/atmosphere system and resultant increases in atmospheric pCO2 and ocean water acidity. But what, if anything, does the pattern of continued carbon isotope change tell us about the patterns and mechanisms of carbon cycle change during the subsequent 170 kyr? Carbon isotope ratios remain relatively stable and low for some 60 kyr following the initiation of the event, suggesting either continued perturbation of the system away from its pre-PETM state or a change in the rate or net isotopic composition of the carbon burial flux during this interval. The interval of δ13C stability ended abruptly ca. 80 kyr after the beginning of the PETM, when carbon isotope ratios rapidly increased by at least 2‰ over no more than 30 kyr. The rebound rate of δ13C values was an order of magnitude faster than expected based on the residence time of carbon in the exogenic system, and implies either a dramatic decrease in residence time or a substantial change in the isotopic composition of carbon fluxes between this system and the lithosphere. The isotopic record of the PETM carbon cycle oscillates between stability and instability, suggesting discrete changes in global carbon fluxes at points throughout the event. Understanding whether these changes were driven by variation in bulk carbon fluxes or ‘isofluxes’ will be necessary to accurately interpret the carbon isotope record to better understand lithospheric carbon burial feedbacks, CO2 drawdown, and the termination of the PETM hyperthermal climate.

  16. Carbon isotope fractionation during calcium carbonate precipitation induced by ureolytic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millo, Christian; Dupraz, S.; Ader, M.; Guyot, F.; Thaler, C.; Foy, E.; Ménez, B.

    2012-12-01

    Ureolytic bacteria have been proposed as model organisms to investigate the potential of subsurface microorganisms to enhance carbon capture and storage through solubility- and mineral-trapping of CO2 induced by bacterial ureolysis and carbonate formation. Ideally, CO2 incorporation into carbonates can be readily traced using carbon isotope measurements. However, the carbon isotope systematics of bacterial ureolysis and associated carbonate precipitation is still poorly known. We determined the carbon isotope fractionations expressed during ureolysis and carbonate precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii at 30 °C. Our results indicate that bacterial ureolysis proceeds as a Rayleigh distillation characterized by a 13C-enrichment factor equal to -12.5‰. As precipitation proceeds, the δ13C value of CaCO3, initially 1-2.1‰ lower than that of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), evolves progressively until it is 0.5‰ higher than that of the DIC, i.e. close to the value predicted for isotopic equilibrium. The minor isotope disequilibrium at the onset of precipitation and its rapid evolution towards isotopic equilibrium point to bacterial carbonates as reliable recorders of the carbon isotope composition of DIC. This corroborates the potential utility of 13C-tracing for the quantification of microbially-induced CO2 sequestration into solid carbonates and DIC.

  17. Identification and quantification of base flow using carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Elizabeth L; Kuzara, Shawn L

    2012-01-01

    Six surface water samples from locations along Otter Creek in Southeastern Montana and a groundwater sample from a nearby monitoring well completed in the Knobloch coal were analyzed for stable carbon isotope ratios. Along the length of its perennial reach, between the towns of Otter and Ashland, Otter Creek crosses several coal outcrops, including the Knobloch coal zone. The carbon isotope ratio of the creek becomes progressively more similar to that of the Knobloch coal aquifer groundwater in samples collected downgradient from the town of Otter. The isotope ratio of the stream changes from -10.5 to -8.9‰ reflecting the influence of the coal-aquifer base flow contribution, as represented by Knobloch coal groundwater, which has a carbon isotope value of +3.9‰. The dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of the groundwater and surface water are similar (~100 mg/L), which allowed the use of the simplified, first-order, two-end-member mixing equation. Using carbon isotope ratios, calculations of the fraction of water contributed by coal aquifers indicate that approximately 11% of the surface water in Otter Creek at its mouth near Ashland was supplied by groundwater from the coal aquifers that crop out between Otter and Ashland. This study was conducted in December, when Otter Creek is at low flow. At times of higher surface flow, the contribution from groundwater base flow will be correspondingly smaller. This study illustrates that carbon isotopes can be an effective, low-cost tool in base flow studies.

  18. Isotopic fractionation of alkali earth metals during carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yotsuya, T.; Ohno, T.; Muramatsu, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Goto, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The alkaline earth metals such as magnesium, calcium and strontium play an important role in a variety of geochemical and biological processes. The element ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in marine carbonates have been used as proxies for reconstruction of the past environment. Recently several studies suggested that the study for the isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals in marine carbonates has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields (e.g. Eisenhauer et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to explore the influence of carbonate polymorphs (Calcite and Aragonite) and environmental factors (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) on the level of isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals. We also examined possible correlations between the level of isotopic fractionation of Ca and that of other alkaline earth metals during carbonate precipitation. In order to determine the isotope fractionation factor of Mg, Ca and Sr during carbonate precipitation, calcite and aragonite were synthesized from calcium bicarbonate solution in which the amount of magnesium was controlled based on Kitano method. Calcium carbonates were also prepared from the mixture of calcium chlorite and sodium hydrogen carbonate solutions. The isotope fractionation factors were measured by MC-ICPMS. Results suggested that the level of isotopic fractionation of Mg during carbonate precipitation was correlated with that of Sr and that the change of the carbonate crystal structure could make differences of isotopic fractionations of Mg and Ca, however no difference was found in the case of Sr. In this presentation, the possible mechanism will be discussed.

  19. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The heavy isotopic anomalies observed recently in the fractionation and unknown nuclear inclusions from the Allende meteorite are explained by neutron reactions during the explosive carbon burning (ECB). This model produces heavy anomalies in the same zone where Al-26 and O-16 are produced, thus reducing the number of source zones required for the isotopic anomalies. Unlike the classical r-process, the ECB n-process avoids the problem with the Sr anomaly and may resolve the problem of conflicting time scales between Al-26 and the r-process isotopes I-129 and Pu-244. Experimental studies of Zr and Ce isotopic composition are proposed to test this model.

  20. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The heavy isotopic anomalies observed recently in the fractionation and unknown nuclear inclusions from the Allende meteorite are explained by neutron reactions during the explosive carbon burning (ECB). This model produces heavy anomalies in the same zone where Al-26 and O-16 are produced, thus reducing the number of source zones required for the isotopic anomalies. Unlike the classical r-process, the ECB n-process avoids the problem with the Sr anomaly and may resolve the problem of conflicting time scales between Al-26 and the r-process isotopes I-129 and Pu-244. Experimental studies of Zr and Ce isotopic composition are proposed to test this model.

  1. Carbonate minerals, oxygen and carbon isotopes in modern temperate bryozoa, eastern Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, C.

    1993-12-01

    X-ray analysis of cool temperate bryozoa from eastern shelf carbonates indicates the occurrence of a spectrum of low-Mg calcite to high-Mg calcite with variable amounts of aragonite. Bryozoa contain variable amounts of CaCO 3 cements. In bryozoa δ18O values increase and δ13C values decrease with increasing aragonite content probably due to the occurrence of vaterite. Aragonite contents decrease with decreasing water temperatures as established by oxygen isotope thermometry. Tasmanian bryozoa may be enriched in δ18O up to 0.7‰ due to aragonite and high Mg-calcite contents. δ13C values of bryozoa composed of pure calcite are similar to those of associated brachiopods. δ18O and δ13C values of bryozoa are unaffected by kinetic and metabolic effects. The isotopic field of temperate bryozoa differs from tropical carbonates by having heavier δ18O ( 1.3‰ ± 0.5) and lighter δ13C ( 1.8‰ ± 0.8) values than bulk tropical carbonates. The bryozoa are in equilibrium with upwelling deep seawater and surface subantarctic water and therefore intersect seafloor diagenesis and upwelling water trend lines. Mol% MgCO 3 content ranges from 2 to 11 in calcite and corresponds to 5-14°C water temperatures. The δ18O values of bryozoa give a range of temperatures from 7° to 13°C, slightly less than the 4-15°C obtained from δ18O of Tasmanian brachiopods. This discrepancy is probably due to either minor biochemical fractionation or to bryozoa being in equilibrium with warmer waters.

  2. Isotope Fractionation in Photosynthetic Bacteria during Carbon Dioxide Assimilation 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William; Sackett, William M.; Benedict, C. Roy

    1975-01-01

    The δ PDB13C values have been determined for the cellular constituents and metabolic intermediates of autotrophically grown Chromatium vinosum. The isotopic composition of the HCO3- in the medium and the carbon isotopic composition of the bacterial cells change with the growth of the culture. The δ PDB13C value of the HCO3- in the media changes from an initial value of −6.6‰ to +8.1‰ after 10 days of bacterial growth and the δ PDB13C value of the bacterial cells change from −37.5‰ to −29.2‰ in the same period. The amount of carbon isotope fractionation during the synthesis of hexoses by the photoassimilation of CO2 has a range of −15.5‰ at time zero to −22.0‰ after 10 days. This range of fractionation compares to the range of carbon isotope fractionation for the synthesis of sugars from CO2 by ribulose 1,5-diphosphate carboxylase and the Calvin cycle. The amount of carbon isotope fractionation during the synthesis of aspartic acid from CO2 is −24.9‰ at time zero and −15.0‰ after 10 days of bacterial growth. This amount of fractionation is in the range of carbon isotope fractionation for the synthesis of C4 amino acids by a double carboxylation through ribulose 1,5-diphosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. PMID:16659105

  3. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  4. The isotopic characterization of carbon monoxide in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, Joseph M.

    The distributions of stable isotopes in trace atmospheric species are controlled mainly by the isotopic compositions of precursor molecules and isotope fractionation effects during production and removal of the species. Distributions of radioactive isotopes are controlled mainly by the isotopic compositions of precursor molecules and radioactive decay processes. As a result, through their isotopic compositions, atmospheric species are traceable to sources and sinks. Thus, isotopic compositions provide useful information for estimating source strengths and for understanding the importance of removal processes in the cycling of the species. The use of radioactive 14C and the stable isotopes ( 13C and 18O) are reviewed here for understanding production and removal processes of CO in the troposphere. Carbon monoxide is a critical component in atmospheric chemistry because of its large effect on levels of OH, the principal oxidant in the atmosphere. In the troposphere, this is due to relatively high concentrations of CO and a short lifetime (2-4 months). Initially, 14CO measurements were instrumental in estimating accurately the tropospheric lifetime. Since seasonal 14CO variation is controlled largely by OH, 14CO serves as an important surrogate measure of tropospheric OH. Global 14CO measurements have also been used to estimate the biogenic component of the global CO budget, specifically contributions from biomass burning, oxidized non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions, oceans and plants. Research using 14CO measurements is also active in quantifying fossil and non-fossil urban emissions. Kinetic isotopic fractionation during production of 13CO and C 18O from reduced precursors allows one to distinguish, at least qualitatively, different varieties of CO based on seasonal tropospheric isotopic measurements. Difficulties in interpreting the stable isotopic record arise from large fractionation effects that obscure source isotopic signatures (in particular the oxygen

  5. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in vertical peat profiles of natural and drained boreal peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Rissanen, Antti; Pitkänen, Aki; Turunen, Jukka; Simola, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands form a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Change in peat hydrology, due to global warming is projected to change microbiological processes and peat carbon pool. We tested if bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes serve as indicators of severe long term drying in peatlands drained for forestry. Depth profile analysis of peat, for their carbon and nitrogen content as well as their carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signatures, were conducted for peatlands in southern and eastern Finland, having ombrotrophic and minerotrophic natural and corresponding drained pairs or separate drained sites. The selection of sites allowed us to compare changes due to different fertility and changes due to long term artificial drying. Drainage lasting over 40 years has led to changes in hydrology, vegetation, nutrient mineralization and respiration. Furthermore, increased nutrient uptake and possible recycling of peat nitrogen and carbon trough vegetation back to the peat surface, also possibly has an effect on the stable isotopic composition of peat carbon and nitrogen. We think that drainage induced changes somehow correspond to those caused by changed hydrology due to climate change. We will present data from these measurements and discuss their implications for carbon and nitrogen flows in peatlands.

  6. [Carbon isotope fractionation inplants]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  7. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltmann, Tim; Mandic, Magda; Stöbener, Nils; Wapelhorst, Eric; Aepfler, Rebecca; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Taubner, Heidi; Jost, Hj; Elvert, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  8. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, H. J. H.; Stoltmann, T.; Stöbener, N.; Wapelhorst, E.; Mandic, M.; Aepfler, R.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Taubner, H.; Elvert, M.

    2015-12-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  9. Relationships between tree height and carbon isotope discrimination

    Treesearch

    Nate G. McDowell; Barbara J. Bond; Lee T. Dickman; Michael G. Ryan; David Whitehead

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how tree size impacts leaf- and crown-level gas exchange is essential to predicting forest yields and carbon and water budgets. The stable carbon isotope ratio of organic matter has been used to examine the relationship of gas exchange to tree size for a host of species because it carries a temporally integrated signature of foliar photosynthesis and...

  10. Isotopic Composition of Organic and Inorganic Carbon in Desert Biological Soil Crust Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Hartnett, H.; Anbar, A.; Beraldi, H.; Garcia-Pichel, F.

    2006-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are microbial communities that colonize soil surfaces in many arid regions. BSCs are important sources for fixed carbon and nitrogen in these ecosystems, and they greatly influence the structure, function, and appearance of desert soils. Biological activity of BSCs occurs during pulses of hydration requiring desert crusts to tolerate extremes in UV radiation, temperature, and desiccation. These characteristics make desert crusts unique systems that have received little consideration in the study of biogeochemical processes in extreme environments. This project investigates the impact of BSCs on carbon dynamics within desert soils. Soil cores ranging in depth from 8 to 12 cm were taken in March, 2006 from deserts near Moab, Utah. Two major BSC classes were identified: lichen-dominated (dark and pinnacled) soil crusts and cyanobacteria-dominated (light and flat) soil crusts. These two surface morphologies are related to the different biological communities. Carbon content and stable carbon isotopic composition were determined for the bulk carbon pool, as well as for the organic and inorganic carbon fractions of the soils. Expectedly, there was a net decrease in organic carbon content with depth (0.39-0.27 percent). Stable carbon isotope values for the organic fraction ranged from -5.8 per mil to -24.0 per mil (Avg: -14.4 per mil, S.D: 6.42 per mil). Stable carbon isotope values for the inorganic fraction ranged from 0.3 per mil to -3.6 per mil (Avg: -2.4 per mil, S.D.: 1.05 per mil). The variation in the isotopic composition of the organic carbon was due to a strong depletion below the surface soil value occurring between 3 and 5 cm depth, with an enrichment above the original surface value at depths below 6 to 10 cm. These data suggest that within desert soil crust systems the carbon isotopic signal is complex with both a clear biological imprint (lighter organic carbon) as well as evidence for some mechanism that results in

  11. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  12. Aerosol and graphitic carbon content of snow

    SciTech Connect

    Chy-acute-accentlek, P.; Srivastava, V.; Cahenzli, L.; Pinnick, R.G.; Dod, R.L.; Novakov, T.; Cook, T.L.; Hinds, B.D.

    1987-08-20

    Snow samples from southern New Mexico, west Texas, Antarctica, and Greenland were analyzed for aerosol and graphitic carbon. Graphitic carbon contents were found to be between 2.2 and 25 ..mu..g L/sup -1/ of snow meltwater; water-insoluble aerosol content varied between 0.62 and 8.5 mg L/sup -1/. For comparison, two samples of Camp Century, Greenland, ice core, having approximate ages of 4,000 and 6,000 years, were also analyzed. Ice core graphitic carbon contents were found to be 2.5 and 1.1 ..mu..g L/sup -1/. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

  13. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, Edward D.

    1982-01-01

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

  14. Isotopic Approach to Soil Carbonate Dynamics and Implications for Paleoclimatic Interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendall, E.G.; Harden, J.W.; Trumbore, S.E.; Chadwick, O.A.

    1994-01-01

    The radiocarbon content and stable isotope composition of soil carbonate are best described by a dynamic system in which isotopic reequilibration occurs as a result of recurrent dissolution and reprecipitation. Depth of water penetration into the soil profile, as well as soil age, determines the degree of carbonate isotope reequilibration. We measured ??13C, ??18O and radiocarbon content of gravel rinds and fine (<2 mm) carbonate in soils of 3 .different ages (1000, 3800, and 6300 14 C yr B.P.) to assess the degree to which they record and preserve a climatic signal. In soils developing in deposits independently dated at 3800 and 6300 radiocarbon yr B.P., carbonate radiocarbon content above 40 cm depth suggests continual dissolution and reprecipitation, presumably due to frequent wetting events. Between 40 and 90 cm depth, fine carbonate is dissolved and precipitated as rinds that are not redissolved subsequently. Below 90 cm depth in these soils, radiocarbon content indicates that inherited, fine carbonate undergoes little dissolution and reprecipitation. In the 3800- and 6300-yr-old soils, ??13C in rind and fine carbonate follows a decreasing trend with depth, apparently in equilibrium with modern soil gas, as predicted by a diffusive model for soil CO2. ??18O also decreases with depth due to greater evaporative enrichment above 50 cm depth. In contrast, carbonate isotopes in a 1000-yr-old deposit do not reflect modern conditions even in surficial horizons; this soil has not undergone significant pedogenesis. There appears to be a lag of at least 1000 but less than 3800 yr before carbonate inherited with parent material is modified by ambient climatic conditions. Although small amounts of carbonate are inherited with the parent material, the rate of pedogenic carbonate accumulation indicates that Ca is derived primarily from eolian and rainfall sources. A model describing carbonate input and radiocarbon decay suggests that fine carbonate below 90 cm is mostly

  15. Carbon isotope heterogeneities in deep Earth: Recycling of surface carbon or from core?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satish-Kumar, Madhusoodhan

    2017-04-01

    Subduction of crustal materials, mantle melting and upwelling of deep mantle, in addition to a potential source from the core, largely controls the Earth's deep carbon cycle. Large variations in carbon isotopic composition between different reservoirs have been used widely to differentiate the source of carbon and to understand the carbon inventories and its recycling processes. However, how far high-temperature and hign-pressure conditions can affect the carbon isotope distribution, is a question still unanswered to clearly address the deep carbon cycle. I present here a review on carbon isotope fractionation processes in deep Earth and critically evaluate whether we can easily differentiate between surface carbon and deep carbon based on isotope characteristics. Recent experimental carbon isotope fractionation studies in the Fe-C system suggests that light carbon is selectively partition into metallic core during early magma ocean environment (Satish-Kumar et al., 2011). Furthermore, carbonate melts can be a medium for efficient crystallisation of diamonds in Earth's mantle (Palyanov et al., 2013). Rayleigh fractionation modelling based on fractionation suggests that core can be a reservoir of 12C enriched carbon and can itself form a reservoir which can cause heterogeneity in mantle carbon (Wood et al., 2013). In addition, high pressure experiments in the carbon-saturated model harzburgite system (Enstatite-Magnesite-Olivine-Graphite), carbonated silicate melting resulted in 13C enrichment in the carbon dissolved in the silicate melt relative to elemental graphite (Mizutani et al., 2014). 13C enrichment in carbonate melt were further confirmed in experiments where redox melting between olivine and graphite produced a carbonate melt as well as carbonate reduction experiments to form graphite. A third factor, still unconquered is the effect of pressure on isotope fractionation process. Theoretical studies as well as preliminary experimental studies have suggested

  16. Canopy photosynthesis estimated from sapflux and stable carbon isotope ratios in northern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. D.; Ubierna, N.; Kavanagh, K.; Pangle, R.; Powers, E.

    2008-12-01

    Canopy-scale estimates of photosynthesis have traditionally required either scaling up from a sample of leaf measurements or scaling down from eddy flux measurements contaminated by opposing carbon dioxide fluxes. We propose an alternative based on transpiration estimates using the well established Granier sapflux sensor and scaled by modifications of standard measurements of forest structure. The resulting sapflux estimates are converted to carbon uptake measurements by first estimating canopy conductance and then using stable carbon isotope ratios to estimate the ratio of carbon to water exchange. Carbon isotope ratios were measured on leaf bulk material, phloem contents, and the highly concentrated stem CO2 pool. As found elsewhere, leaves were highly depleted and did not provide adequate estimates. We used transfer conductances estimated in other work to adjust the carbon isotope ratios prior to estimating carbon-water exchange ratios. The resulting estimates were 11 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, well within the range to be expected based on net primar production (3.6 Mg C ha-1 yr-1) in these stands. We observed seasonal variation caused by both canopy conductance and changes in \\d13C. This method of estimating canopy photosynthesis provides an important test of one of the key, and hitherto poorly constrained, components of carbon budget analyses.

  17. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoell, M. ); Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste', J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de ); Summons, R.E. )

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ([sup 13]C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in [sup 18]O ([delta][sup 18]O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes ([delta][sup 13]C = 25.4 [+-] 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C[sub 35] hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing [sup 13]C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples ([delta][sup 13]C = 29.5 to [minus]31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone.

  18. Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and its relationship to the carbon isotope signals of stem, soil and ecosystem respiration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingate, L.; Ogée, J.; Burlett, R.; Bosc, A.; Devaux, M.; Grace, J.; Loustau, D.; Gessler, A.

    2010-12-01

    Photosynthetic carbon (C) isotope discrimination labels photosynthates (δA) and atmospheric CO2 (δa) with variable C isotope compositions during fluctuating environmental conditions. In this context, the C isotope composition of respired CO2 within ecosystems is often hypothesized to vary temporally with photosynthetic discrimination. We investigated the relationship between photosynthetic discrimination and the C isotope signals from stem (δW), soil (δS) and ecosystem (δE) respired CO2 to environmental fluctuations, using novel tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer instrumentation in a mature maritime pine forest. Broad seasonal changes in photosynthetic discrimination were reflected in δW, δS and δE. However, respired CO2 signals had smaller short-term variations than photosynthetic discrimination and were offset and delayed by 2-10 d, indicating fractionation and isotopic mixing in a large C pool. Variations in δS did not follow photosynthetic discrimination at all times, especially during rainy periods and when there is a strong demand for C allocation above ground. It is likely that future isotope-enabled vegetation models will need to develop transfer functions that can account for these phenomena in order to interpret and predict the isotopic impact of biosphere gas exchange on the C isotope composition of atmospheric CO2. L. Wingate, J. Ogée, R. Burlett, A. Bosc, M. Devaux, J. Grace, D. Loustau and A. Gessler. Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and its relationship to the carbon isotope signals of stem, soil and ecosystem respiration. New Phytologist, doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03384.x

  19. Concentrations and isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in ocean-floor basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakai, H.; Marais, D.J.D.; Ueda, A.; Moore, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Fresh submarine basalt glasses from Galapagos Ridge, FAMOUS area, Cayman Trough and Kilauea east rift contain 22 to 160 ppm carbon and 0.3 to 2.8 ppm nitrogen, respectively, as the sums of dissolved species and vesicle-filling gases (CO2 and N2). The large range of variation in carbon content is due to combined effect of depth-dependency of the solubility of carbon in basalt melt and varying extents of vapour loss during magma emplacement as well as in sample crushing. The isotopic ratios of indigenous carbon and nitrogen are in very narrow ranges,-6.2 ?? 0.2% relative to PDB and +0.2 ?? 0.6 %. relative to atmospheric nitrogen, respectively. In basalt samples from Juan de Fuca Ridge, however, isotopically light carbon (??13C = around -24%.) predominates over the indigenous carbon; no indigenous heavy carbon was found. Except for Galapagos Ridge samples, these ocean-floor basalts contain 670 to 1100 ppm sulfur, averaging 810 ppm, in the form of both sulfide and sulfate, whereas basalts from Galapagos Ridge are higher in both sulfur (1490 and 1570 ppm) and iron (11.08% total iron as FeO). The ??34S values average +0.3 ?? 0.5%. with average fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide of +7.4 ?? 1.6%.. The sulfate/sulfide ratios tend to increase with increasing water content of basalt, probably because the oxygen fugacity increases with increasing water content in basalt melt. ?? 1984.

  20. Concentrations and isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in ocean-floor basalts.

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Des Marais, D J; Ueda, A; Moore, J G

    1984-01-01

    Fresh submarine basalt glasses from Galapagos Ridge, FAMOUS area, Cayman Trough and Kilauea east rift contain 22 to 160 ppm carbon and 0.3 to 2.8 ppm nitrogen, respectively, as the sums of dissolved species and vesicle-filling gases (CO2 and N2). The large range of variation in carbon content is due to combined effect of depth-dependency of the solubility of carbon in basalt melt and varying extents of vapour loss during magma emplacement as well as in sample crushing. The isotopic ratios of indigenous carbon and nitrogen are in very narrow ranges, -6.2 +/- 0.2% relative to PDB and +0.2 +/- 0.6% relative to atmospheric nitrogen, respectively. In basalt samples from Juan de Fuca Ridge, however, isotopically light carbon (delta 13 C = around -24%) predominates over the indigenous carbon; no indigenous heavy carbon was found. Except for Galapagos Ridge samples, these ocean-floor basalts contain 670 to 1100 ppm sulfur, averaging 810 ppm in the form of both sulfide and sulfate, whereas basalts from Galapagos Ridge are higher in both sulfur (1490 and 1570 ppm) and iron (11.08% total iron as FeO). the delta 34S values average +0.3 +/- 0.5% with average fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide of +7.4 +/- 1.6%. The sulfate/sulfide ratios tend to increase with increasing water content of basalt, probably because the oxygen fugacity increases with increasing water content in basalt melt.

  1. Does burial diagenesis reset pristine isotopic compositions in paleosol carbonates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, M. K.; Sarkar, A.; Tandon, S. K.; Samanta, A.; Sanyal, P.

    2010-11-01

    Sedimentological study of early Oligocene continental carbonates from the fluvial Dagshai Formation of the Himalayan foreland basin, India resulted in the recognition of four different types namely, soil, palustrine, pedogenically modified palustrine and groundwater carbonates. Stable oxygen and carbon isotopic ( δ18O and δ13C) analyses of fabric selective carbonate microsamples show that although the pristine isotopic compositions are largely altered during deep-burial diagenesis, complete isotopic homogenization does not occur. δ18O and δ13C analyses of ~ 200 calcrete and palustrine carbonates from different stratigraphic horizons and comparison with δ18O of more robust bioapatite (fossil vertebrate tooth) phase show that dense micrites (~ > 70% carbonate) invariably preserve the pristine δ18O value (mean) of ~ - 9.8‰, while altered carbonates show much lower δ18O value ~ - 13.8‰. Such inhomogeneity causes large intra-sample and intra-soil profile variability as high as > 5‰, suggesting that soils behave like a closed system where diagenetic overprinting occurs in local domains. A simple fluid-rock interaction model suggests active participation of clay minerals to enhance the effect of fluid-rock ratio in local domains during diagenesis. This places an upper limit of 70% micrite concentration above which the effect of diagenetic alteration is minimal. Careful sampling of dense micritic part of the soil carbonate nodules, therefore, does provide pristine isotopic composition and it is inappropriate, as proposed recently, to reject the paleoclimatic potential of all paleosol carbonates affected by burial diagenesis. Based on pristine δ13C value of - 8.8 ± 0.2‰ in soil carbonates an atmospheric CO 2 concentration between ~ 764 and ~ 306 ppmv is estimated for the early Oligocene (~ 31 Ma) Dagshai time. These data show excellent agreement between two independent proxy records (viz. soil carbonate and marine alkenone) and support early Oligocene

  2. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient aromatic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, Anna; Huang, Lin; Saccon, Marina; Rudolph, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere were made in Toronto (Canada) in 2009 and 2010. Consistent with the kinetic isotope effect for reactions of aromatic VOC with the OH radical the observed stable carbon isotope ratios are on average significantly heavier than the isotope ratios of their emissions. The change of carbon isotope ratio between emission and observation is used to determine the extent of photochemical processing (photochemical age, [OH]dt) of the different VOC. It is found that [OH]dt of different VOC depends strongly on the VOC reactivity. This demonstrates that for this set of observations the assumption of a uniform [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity is not justified and that the observed values for [OH]dt are the result of mixing of VOC from air masses with different values for [OH]dt. Based on comparison between carbon isotope ratios and VOC concentration ratios it is also found that the varying influence of sources with different VOC emission ratios has a larger impact on VOC concentration ratios than photochemical processing. It is concluded that for this data set the use of VOC concentration ratios to determine [OH]dt would result in values for [OH]dt inconsistent with carbon isotope ratios and that the concept of a uniform [OH]dt for an air mass has to be replaced by the concept of individual values of an average [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity.

  3. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    SciTech Connect

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  4. Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P. L.; Downing, J. A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFAs) was studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The δ13C of different PLFAs were used as proxy for phytoplankton producers and bacterial consumers. Lake pCO2 was primarily determined by autochthonous production (phytoplankton biomass), especially in eutrophic lakes, and governed the δ13C of DIC. All organic-carbon pools showed overall higher isotopic variability in eutrophic lakes (n = 11) compared to oligo-mesotrophic lakes (n = 11) because of the high variability in δ13C at the base of the food web (both autochthonous and allochthonous carbon). Phytoplankton δ13C was negatively related to lake pCO2 over all lakes and positively related to phytoplankton biomass in eutrophic lakes, which was also reflected in a large range in photosynthetic isotope fractionation (ϵCO2-phyto, 8-25‰). The carbon isotope ratio of allochthonous carbon in oligo-mesotrophic lakes was rather constant, while it varied in eutrophic lakes because of maize cultivation in the watershed.

  5. Stable carbon isotope biogeochemistry of lakes along a trophic gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kluijver, A.; Schoon, P. L.; Downing, J. A.; Schouten, S.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2014-05-01

    The stable carbon (C) isotope variability of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC and DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), glucose and polar-lipid derived fatty acids (PLFA) were studied in a survey of 22 North American oligotrophic to eutrophic lakes. The δ13C of different PLFA were used as proxy for phytoplankton producers and bacterial consumers. Lake pCO2 was primarily determined by autochthonous production (phytoplankton biomass), especially in eutrophic lakes, and governed the δ13C of DIC. All organic-carbon pools showed larger isotopic variability in eutrophic lakes compared to oligo-mesotrophic lakes because of the high variability in δ13C at the base of the food web (both autochthonous and allochthonous carbon). Phytoplankton δ13C was negatively related to lake pCO2 over all lakes and positively related to phytoplankton biomass in eutrophic lakes, which was also reflected in a large range in photosynthetic isotope fractionation (ϵCO2-phyto, 8-25 ‰). The carbon isotope ratio of allochthonous carbon in oligo-mesotrophic lakes was rather constant, while it varied in eutrophic lakes because of maize cultivation in the watershed.

  6. Seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of biogenic methane in a coastal sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, C.S.; Blair, N.E.; Green, C.D.; Des Marais, D.J.

    1986-09-19

    Systematic seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of methane gas occur in the anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, a lagoonal basin on North Carolina's Outer Banks. Values for the carbon isotope ratio (delta /sup 13/C) of methane range from -57.3 per mil during summer to -68.5 per mil during winter in gas bubbles with an average methane content of 95%. The variations are hypothesized to result from changes in the pathways of microbial methane production and cycling of key substrates including acetate and hydrogen. The use of stable isotopic signatures to investigate the global methane cycle through mass balance calculations, involving various sediment and soil biogenic sources, appears to require seasonally averaged data from individual sites. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of biogenic methane in a coastal sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.; Green, C. D.; Blair, N. E.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Systematic seasonal variations in the stable carbon isotopic signature of methane gas occur in the anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, a lagoonal basin on North Carolina's Outer Banks. Values for the carbon isotope ratio of methane range from -57.3 per mil during summer to -68.5 per mil during winter in gas bubbles with an average methane content of 95 percent. The variations are hypothesized to result from changes in the pathways of microbial methane production and cycling of key substrates including acetate and hydrogen. The use of stable isotopic signatures to investigate the global methane cycle through mass balance calculations, involving various sediment and soil biogenic sources, appears to require seasonally averaged data from individual sites.

  8. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility that the newly discovered correlated isotopic anomalies for heavy elements in the Allende meteorite were synthesized in the secondary neutron capture episode during the explosive carbon burning, the possible source of the O-16 and Al-26 anomalies, is examined. Explosive carbon burning calculations under typical conditions were first performed to generate time profiles of temperature, density, and free particle concentrations. These quantities were inputted into a general neutron capture code which calculates the resulting isotopic pattern from exposing the preexisting heavy seed nuclei to these free particles during the explosive carbon burning conditions. The interpretation avoids the problem of the Sr isotopic data and may resolve the conflict between the time scales inferred from 1-129, Pu-244, and Al-26.

  9. Measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons and halocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuiderweg, A. T.

    2012-09-01

    behavior of these compounds in terms of their sources, sinks, inter- and intramolecular processes, it was decided in 2006 to develop an instrument capable of selectively measuring NMHC mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios for use in the laboratory of the Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry Group at Universiteit Utrecht. This thesis documents the successful development, construction, testing and first applications of this stable carbon isotope ratio instrument. It is divided into five chapters, representing the content of three publications and additional material: an introduction; a method section; and applications: analysis of NMHC stable carbon isotopes in urban ambient air, laboratory measurments of the isotope effects in UV degradation of monocarbon chlorofluorocarbons, isotope analysis of diverse gases from firn air samples from Greenland, plus a section on future perspectives

  10. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation during Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Silvia A.; Ulrich, Ania C.; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sleep, Brent; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has the potential to distinguish physical from biological attenuation processes in the subsurface. In this study, carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation effects during biodegradation of benzene under anaerobic conditions with different terminal-electron-accepting processes are reported for the first time. Different enrichment factors (ɛ) for carbon (range of −1.9 to −3.6‰) and hydrogen (range of −29 to −79‰) fractionation were observed during biodegradation of benzene under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. These differences are not related to differences in initial biomass or in rates of biodegradation. Carbon isotopic enrichment factors for anaerobic benzene biodegradation in this study are comparable to those previously published for aerobic benzene biodegradation. In contrast, hydrogen enrichment factors determined for anaerobic benzene biodegradation are significantly larger than those previously published for benzene biodegradation under aerobic conditions. A fundamental difference in the previously proposed initial step of aerobic versus proposed anaerobic biodegradation pathways may account for these differences in hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Potentially, C-H bond breakage in the initial step of the anaerobic benzene biodegradation pathway may account for the large fractionation observed compared to that in aerobic benzene biodegradation. Despite some differences in reported enrichment factors between cultures with different terminal-electron-accepting processes, carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis has the potential to provide direct evidence of anaerobic biodegradation of benzene in the field. PMID:12513995

  11. Constraining paleotemperature and water isotope signals at Lake Bonneville using carbonate clumped isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mering, J. A.; Oviatt, C. G.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Canet, J.; Tripati, A.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Bonneville was the largest pluvial system in the Great Basin during the Last Glacial Maximum (23-19 ka BP), reaching nearly 50,000 square kilometers at its high stand. Carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometry provides a new avenue to evaluate lake and atmospheric conditions by constraining the temperature and oxygen isotope ratios of lake water. Here, we present estimates of lake temperature, the oxygen isotope composition of paleowater, and Mean Annual Air Temperature (MAAT) from LGM paleoshoreline sites in Utah and Eastern Nevada. Multiple phases of ancient carbonate were evaluated, including endogenic carbonate from the ubiquitous Bonneville marl stratigraphic unit, and aragonitic shells of two species of aquatic gastropods (genera Pyrgulopsis and Stagnicola) collected from littoral deposits adjacent to the marl. These phases should record surface water conditions. Preliminary results indicate that paleotemperature estimates from gastropods and marl are similar at any given site. However, the latitudinal water isotope gradient reconstructed using marls is steeper than that reconstructed from gastropods, indicating that perhaps carbonate precipitation in marl is more evaporation-driven than shell growth of aquatic snails. Comparison with recent climate data, and clumped isotope measurements of modern samples from the Great Salt Lake, supports moderate temperature change in the Great Basin from the Last Glacial Maximum to present.

  12. BOREAS TE-5 Tree Ring and Carbon Isotope Ratio Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected several data sets to investigate the vegetation-atmosphere CO2 and H2O exchange processes. These data include tree ring widths and cellulose carbon isotope data from coniferous trees collected at the BOREAS NSA and SSA in 1993 and 1994 by the BOREAS TE-5 team. Ring width data are provided for both Picea mariana and Pinus banksiana. The carbon isotope data are provided only for Pinus banksiana. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  13. Magnesium isotopic compositions of the Mesoproterozoic dolostones: Implications for Mg isotopic systematics of marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kang-Jun; Shen, Bing; Lang, Xian-Guo; Tang, Wen-Bo; Peng, Yang; Ke, Shan; Kaufman, Alan J.; Ma, Hao-Ran; Li, Fang-Bing

    2015-09-01

    Available Mg isotope data indicate that dolostones of different ages have overlapping range of Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) and there is no systematic difference among different types of dolomites. To further explore the Mg isotopic systematics of dolomite formation, we measured Mg isotopic compositions of Mesoproterozoic dolostones from the Wumishan Formation in North China Block, because dolomite formation in Mesoproterozoic might have been fundamentally different from the younger counterparts. Based on petrographic observations, three texturally-different dolomite phases (dolomicrite, subhedral dolomite and anhedral dolomite) are recognized in the Wumishan dolostones. Nevertheless, these three types of dolomites have similar δ26Mg values, ranging from -1.35‰ to -1.72‰, which are indistinguishable from Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic dolostones. To explain δ26Mg values of dolostones, we simulate the Mg isotopic system during dolomite formation by applying the one-dimensional Diffusion-Advection-Reaction (1D-DAR) model, assuming that the contemporaneous seawater is the Mg source of dolostone. The 1D-DAR modeling results indicate that the degree of dolomitization is controlled by sedimentation rate, seawater Mg concentration, temperature, and reaction rate of dolomite formation, whereas Mg isotopic composition of dolostone is not only dependent on these factors, but also affected by δ26Mg of seawater and isotope fractionation during dolomite formation. Moreover, the 1D-DAR model predicts that dolomite formation within sediments has limited range of variation in δ26Mg with respect to limestones. Furthermore, the modeling results demonstrate that dolostone is always isotopically heavier than Ca-carbonate precipitated from seawater, explaining the systematic isotopic difference between dolostones and limestones. Finally, we can infer from the 1D-DAR model that early-formed dolostone at shallower depth of sediments is always isotopically lighter than that

  14. Development of a Field-Deployable Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Feng; Baer, Douglas

    2010-05-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, whose atmospheric surface mixing ratio has almost doubled compared with preindustrial values. Methane can be produced by biogenic processes, thermogenic processes or biomass, with different isotopic signatures. As a key molecule involved in the radiative forcing in the atmosphere, methane is thus one of the most important molecules linking the biosphere and atmosphere. Therefore precise measurements of mixing ratios and isotopic compositions will help scientists to better understand methane sources and sinks. To date, high precision isotope measurements have been exclusively performed with conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which involves intensive labor and is not readily field deployable. Optical studies using infrared laser spectroscopy have also been reported to measure the isotopic ratios. However, the precision of optical-based analyses, to date, is typically unsatisfactory without pre-concentration procedures. We present characterization of the performance of a portable Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer (MCIA), based on cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy technique, that provides in-situ measurements of the carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C or del_13C) and methane mixing ratio (CH4). The sample is introduced to the analyzer directly without any requirement for pretreatment or preconcentration. A typical precision of less than 1 per mill (< 0.1%) with a 10-ppm methane sample can be achieved in a measurement time of less than 100 seconds. The MCIA can report carbon isotope ratio and concentration measurements over a very wide range of methane concentrations. Results of laboratory tests and field measurements will be presented.

  15. Aptian Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy in Sierra del Rosario, Northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragan-Manzo, R.; Moreno-Bedmar, J.; Nuñez, F.; Company, M.

    2013-05-01

    In most recent years Aptian carbon isotope stratigraphy has been widely studied in Europe where isotopic stages have been developed to correlate global events. Two negative excursions have been recorded in the Lower Aptian, the older is OAE 1a in the middle part, and a younger negative excursion labeled "Aparein level", which occurs in the uppermost part of the Lower Aptian. In Mexico previous works reported a carbon isotope negative excursion in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation that was assigned to the onset of Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a (=OAE 1a). In this work we study the isotopic record of the δ13Ccarb of 32 bulk rock samples of limestone from the uppermost part of the Cupido Formation and the lower part of the La Peña Formation at the Francisco Zarco Dam Section (=FZD), Durango State, northeastern Mexico. The isotopic data are calibrated using the latest ammonite biostratigraphic biozonation of the Aptian. This age calibration allows us to make a precise correlation between the carbon isotopic record of Mexico and several European sections (e.g. Spain and France). In the studied Francisco Zarco Dam section we recognize a negative carbon isotopic excursion in the Dufrenoyia justinae ammonite Zone that corresponds to the "Aparein level", which we correlate using the ammonite zonation of others European sections (Figure 1). This correlation allows us to see how the negative excursion that characterizes the "Aparein level" is consistent with the C7 segment. Thus, our recent stratigraphic study allows us to conclude that the ammonite record in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation is regionally isochronous, and correlates with the Dufrenoyia justinae Zone and Lower Aptian isotope interval C7. In agreement to these biostratigraphic data, the supposed record of the OAE 1a in the lowermost part of the La Peña Formation is not correct, and the carbon isotope negative excursion must be assigned to the younger event "Aparein level". Taking this into

  16. Mesozoic black shales, source mixing and carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suan, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, considerable attention has been devoted to the paleoenvironmental and biogeochemical significance of Mesozoic black shales. Black shale-bearing successions indeed often display marked changes in the organic carbon isotope composition (δ13Corg), which have been commonly interpreted as evidence for dramatic perturbations of global carbon budgets and CO2 levels. Arguably the majority of these studies have discarded some more "local" explanations when interpreting δ13Corg profiles, most often because comparable profiles occur on geographically large and distant areas. Based on newly acquired data and selected examples from the literature, I will show that the changing contribution of organic components with distinct δ13C signatures exerts a major but overlooked influence of Mesozoic δ13Corg profiles. Such a bias occurs across a wide spectrum of sedimentological settings and ages, as shown by the good correlation between δ13Corg values and proxies of kerogen proportions (such as rock-eval, biomarker, palynofacies and palynological data) recorded in Mesozoic marginal to deep marine successions of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous age. In most of these successions, labile, 12C-enriched amorphous organic matter of marine origin dominates strata deposited under anoxic conditions, while oxidation-resistant, 13C-rich terrestrial particles dominate strata deposited under well-oxygenated conditions. This influence is further illustrated by weathering profiles of Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) black shales from France, where weathered areas dominated by refractory organic matter show dramatic 13C-enrichment (and decreased total organic carbon and pyrite contents) compared to non-weathered portions of the same horizon. The implications of these results for chemostratigraphic correlations and pCO2 reconstructions of Mesozoic will be discussed, as well as strategies to overcome this major bias.

  17. Stable isotope analysis of Dacryoconarid carbonate microfossils: a new tool for Devonian oxygen and carbon isotope stratigraphy.

    PubMed

    Frappier, Amy Benoit; Lindemann, Richard H; Frappier, Brian R

    2015-04-30

    Dacryoconarids are extinct marine zooplankton known from abundant, globally distributed calcite microfossils in the Devonian, but their shell stable isotope composition has not been previously explored. Devonian stable isotope stratigraphy is currently limited to less common invertebrates or bulk rock analyses of uncertain provenance. As with Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera, isotopic analysis of dacryoconarid shells could facilitate higher-resolution, geographically widespread stable isotope records of paleoenvironmental change, including marine hypoxia events, climate changes, and biocrises. We explored the use of Dacryoconarid isotope stratigraphy as a viable method in interpreting paleoenvironments. We applied an established method for determining stable isotope ratios (δ(13) C, δ(18) O values) of small carbonate microfossils to very well-preserved dacryoconarid shells. We analyzed individual calcite shells representing five common genera using a Kiel carbonate device coupled to a MAT 253 isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Calcite shell δ(13) C and δ(18) O values were compared by taxonomic group, rock unit, and locality. Single dacryoconarid calcite shells are suitable for stable isotope analysis using a Kiel-IRMS setup. The dacryoconarid shell δ(13) C values (-4.7 to 2.3‰) and δ(18) O values (-10.3 to -4.8‰) were consistent across taxa, independent of shell size or part, but varied systematically through time. Lower fossil δ(18) O values were associated with warmer water temperature and more variable δ(13) C values were associated with major bioevents. Dacryoconarid δ(13) C and δ(18) O values differed from bulk rock carbonate values. Dacryoconarid individual microfossil δ(13) C and δ(18) O values are highly sensitive to paleoenvironmental changes, thus providing a promising avenue for stable isotope chemostratigraphy to better resolve regional to global paleoceanographic changes throughout the upper Silurian to the upper Devonian. Our results

  18. Carbon Isotope Fractionation In Biotic Vs. Abiotic Anaerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrehiwet, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are thought to play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of Fe, and nutrient elements such as C and P, in the anaerobic subsurface. The consumption of organic carbon sources (including contaminants) by these bacteria can significantly fractionate substrate C isotopes, however the effects of solution composition, electron acceptor, or electron donor on C isotopic fractionation by DMRB is at present poorly quantified. We have conducted experiments to compare the effects of bicarbonate (δ13C = -3‰) and phosphate buffers on carbon isotope fractionation by Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200R. The effects of dissolved carbonate and phosphate on δ13C values of dissolved inorganic C evolved during microbial reduction of ferric citrate (δ 13Cinitial = -25‰) were examined using sodium lactate (δ13Cinitial = -25‰) as electron donor under strict anaerobic conditions at neutral pH and 30°C, under dark and (fluorescent) light conditions. Our results suggest that bicarbonate may enhance the rate of Fe(III) reduction by S. putrefaciens, in comparison with media containing phosphate buffer but no added bicarbonate. Compared with phosphate buffered experiments, the presence of dissolved bicarbonate also resulted in a greater degree of C isotopic fractionation (ɛ=2-3‰ and ɛ=5-7‰, respectively). The effect of light on microbial Fe(III) reduction was negligible, however sterile controls showed a minor but significant quantity of carbon dioxide production in liquid media, most likely from photochemical decomposition of citrate. The abiotic experiments also showed measurable carbon isotope fractionation between the carbon dioxide produced and the organic carbon substrate which will be discussed.

  19. Cellulose and Lignin Carbon Isotope Signatures in Sphagnum Moss Reveal Complementary Environmental Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, J.; Nichols, J. E.; Kaiser, K.; Beilman, D. W.; Yu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The carbon isotope signature (δ13C) of Sphagnum moss is increasingly used as a proxy for past surface wetness in peatlands. However, conflicting interpretations of these carbon isotope records have recently been published. While the water film hypothesis suggests that the presence of a thick (thin) water film around hollow (hummock) mosses leads to less (more) negative δ13C values, the carbon source hypothesis poses that a significant (insignificant) amount of CH4 assimilation by hollow (hummock) mosses leads to more (less) negative δ13C values. To evaluate these competing mechanisms and their impact on moss δ13C, we gathered 30 moss samples from 6 peatlands in southern Patagonia. Samples were collected along a strong hydrological gradient, from very dry hummocks (80 cm above water table depth) to submerged hollows (5 cm below water surface). These peat bogs have the advantage of being colonized by a single cosmopolitan moss species, Sphagnum magellanicum, limiting potential biases introduced by species-specific carbon discrimination. We measured δ13C from stem cellulose and leaf waxes on the same samples to quantify compound-specific carbon signatures. We found that stem cellulose and leaf-wax lipids were both strongly negatively correlated with moss water content, suggesting a primary role of water film thickness on carbon assimilation. In addition, isotopic fractionation during wax synthesis was greater than for cellulose. This offset decreases as conditions get drier, due to (i) a more effective carbon assimilation, or (ii) CH4 uptake through symbiosis with methanotrophic bacteria within the leaves of wet mosses. Biochemical analysis (carbohydrates, amino acids, hydrophenols, cutin acids) of surface moss are currently being conducted to characterize moss carbon allocation under different hydrological conditions. Overall, this modern calibration work should be of use for interpreting carbon isotope records from peatlands.

  20. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.; Gleason, J.D.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a ??D from -580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a ??D of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO2 is 290 to 418 ppm with S 13C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and ??18O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO2 carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, ??18C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H2O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon (??13C = -17.6 per mil). The 18O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100?? to 1300??C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  1. CARBON ISOTOPE DISCRIMINATION AND GROWTH RESPONSE TO STAND DENSITY REDUCTIONS IN OLD PINUS PONDEROSA TREES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon isotope ratios ( 13C) of tree rings are commonly used for paleoclimatic reconstruction and for inferring canopy water-use efficiency (WUE). However, the responsiveness of carbon isotope discrimination ( ) to site disturbance and resource availability has only rarely been ...

  2. CARBON ISOTOPE DISCRIMINATION AND GROWTH RESPONSE TO STAND DENSITY REDUCTIONS IN OLD PINUS PONDEROSA TREES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon isotope ratios ( 13C) of tree rings are commonly used for paleoclimatic reconstruction and for inferring canopy water-use efficiency (WUE). However, the responsiveness of carbon isotope discrimination ( ) to site disturbance and resource availability has only rarely been ...

  3. Soil organic carbon assessments in cropping systems using isotopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín De Dios Herrero, Juan; Cruz Colazo, Juan; Guzman, María Laura; Saenz, Claudio; Sager, Ricardo; Sakadevan, Karuppan

    2016-04-01

    Introduction of improved farming practices are important to address the challenges of agricultural production, food security, climate change and resource use efficiency. The integration of livestock with crops provides many benefits including: (1) resource conservation, (2) ecosystem services, (3) soil quality improvements, and (4) risk reduction through diversification of enterprises. Integrated crop livestock systems (ICLS) with the combination of no-tillage and pastures are useful practices to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) compared with continuous cropping systems (CCS). In this study, the SOC and its fractions in two cropping systems namely (1) ICLS, and (2) CCS were evaluated in Southern Santa Fe Province in Argentina, and the use of delta carbon-13 technique and soil physical fractionation were evaluated to identify sources of SOC in these systems. Two farms inside the same soil cartographic unit and landscape position in the region were compared. The ICLS farm produces lucerne (Medicago sativa Merrill) and oat (Avena sativa L.) grazed by cattle alternatively with grain summer crops sequence of soybean (Glicine max L.) and corn (Zea mays L.), and the farm under continuous cropping system (CCS) produces soybean and corn in a continuous sequence. The soil in the area is predominantly a Typic Hapludoll. Soil samples from 0-5 and 0-20 cm depths (n=4) after the harvest of grain crops were collected in each system and analyzed for total organic carbon (SOC, 0-2000 μm), particulate organic carbon (POC, 50-100 μm) and mineral organic carbon (MOC, <50 μm). Delta carbon-13 was determined by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. In addition, a site with natural vegetation (reference site, REF) was also sampled for delta carbon-13 determination. ANOVA and Tukey statistical analysis were carried out for all data. The SOC was higher in ICLS than in CCS at both depths (20.8 vs 17.7 g kg-1 for 0-5 cm and 16.1 vs 12.7 g kg-1 at 0-20 cm, respectively, P<0.05). MOC was

  4. Parallel trends in organic and inorganic carbon isotopes across the Permian/Triassic boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Magaritz, M. ); Krishnamurthy, R.V. ); Holser, W.T. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY )

    1992-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios in both inorganic and organic reservoirs have been widely applied to model environmental and sedimentological changes on a global scale. Most studies dealing with major extinction events have used the record of inorganic carbon. In this paper the authors report the relation between shifts in carbon-13 content of organic matter and coexisting carbonate fractions at a major extinction event, the Permian/Triassic boundary. They found that both [delta][sup 13]C[sub carb] and [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] of the surface ocean varied dramatically across the boundary, but the fractionation [Delta][sup 13]C between organic matter and carbonate remained constant. This result appreciably restricts the interpretation of changes in the carbon cycle during this critical interval. The new data are best explained by a combination of two mechanisms for variation in [delta][sup 13]C[sub carb]: (1) burial and erosion of organic carbon, with a long time constant; and (2) sequestration of organic carbon into shallow and deep oceanic reservoirs, with a shorter time constant. For application to their case, the first mechanism is limited by possible buildup of marine pCO[sub 2], which would increase the isotopic fractionation factor. The second mechanism is limited in application to short-term transient variations in [delta][sup 13]C. Modeling of the carbon cycle and its variations of [delta][sup 13]C must take both mechanisms into account.

  5. Behaviour of Structural Carbonate Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Compositions in Bioapatite During Burning of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, L. E.; Longstaffe, F. J.; White, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Bioapatite, the principal inorganic phase comprising bone, commonly contains a small fraction of carbonate, which has been substituted into the phosphate structure during bone formation. The isotopic compositions of both the phosphate oxygen and the structural carbonate oxygen are now commonly used in palaeoclimatological and bioarchaeological investigations. The potential for post-mortem alteration of these isotopic compositions, therefore, is of interest, with the behaviour of structural carbonate being of most concern. In bioarchaeological studies, alteration of bone isotopic compositions has the potential to occur not only during low-temperature processes associated with burial but also during food preparation involving heating (burning, boiling). Here, we examine the stable isotopic behaviour of structural carbonate oxygen and carbon, and coexisting phosphate oxygen during the burning of bone. Freshly deceased (6<8 months) white-tailed deer leg bones (Odocoileus virginianus) were collected from Pinery Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Each long bone was sectioned and incrementally heated from 25 to 900° C, in 25° intervals. The samples were then ground to a standardized grain-size (45<63μ m), and changes in bioapatite crystallinity (CI) were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). Combined differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TG) were used to evaluate weight loss and associated reactions during heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of the bioapatite remain relatively constant (+/-1‰ ) during heating to 650° C. A 4‰ increase in stable carbon isotopic composition then occurs between 650-750° C, accompanied by an increase in CI, followed by a 10‰ decline at temperatures above 800° C, as carbonate carbon is lost. Carbonate and phosphate oxygen isotopic compositions are correlated over the entire heating range, with carbonate being enriched relative to phosphate by

  6. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in the study of avian and mammalian trophic ecology

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey F. Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Differential fractionation of stable isotopes of carbon during photosynthesis causes C4 plants and C3 plants to have distinct carbon-isotope signatures. In addition, marine C3 plants have stable-isotope ratios of carbon that are intermediate between C4 and terrestrial C3 plants. The direct incorporation of the carbon-isotope ratio (13C/12C) of plants into consumers...

  7. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  8. The carbon isotopic compositions of individual compounds from ancient and modern depositional environments

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, K.H.

    1991-01-01

    This work examines factors influencing the isotopic compositions of individual compounds and, consequently, that of preserved sedimentary organic matter. Specifically, isotope effects associated with reactions resulting in the production and degradation of organic matter in the water column and reactions affecting preservation during diagenesis are considered in three projects. The first documents the preservation of the isotopic compositions of hydrocarbons altered by diagenetic reaction. Isotopic compositions of structurally-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the Messel Shale show little variation with increased unsaturation. The influence of environmental conditions on the isotopic composition of sedimentary organic carbon is documented by a comparison of the {delta}{sup 13}C of hydrocarbons in the marine Julia Creek Oil Shale and the lacustrine Condor Oil Shale. A model is proposed for identifying relative degrees of oxygenation and productivity within a paleoenvironment based on the observed {sup 13}C contents of biomarkers. Effects of processes proposed in the environmental model are documented by an examination of hydrocarbons from the waters and sediments of the Black Sea and of the Cariaco Trench. Sources of individual compounds are identified by comparison of their {sup 13}C content with that predicted for autotrophic biomass calculated from the concentration and {sup 13}C content of CO{sub 2}(aq) in the surface waters.

  9. New Carbonate Standard Reference Materials for Boron Isotope Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Christopher, S. J.; Day, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of boron (δ11B) in marine carbonates is well established as a proxy for past ocean pH. Yet, before palaeoceanographic interpretation can be made, rigorous assessment of analytical uncertainty of δ11B data is required; particularly in light of recent interlaboratory comparison studies that reported significant measurement disagreement between laboratories [1]. Well characterised boron standard reference materials (SRMs) in a carbonate matrix are needed to assess the accuracy and precision of carbonate δ11B measurements throughout the entire procedural chemistry; from sample cleaning, to ionic separation of boron from the carbonate matrix, and final δ11B measurement by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To date only two carbonate reference materials exist that have been value-assigned by the boron isotope measurement community [2]; JCp-1 (porites coral) and JCt-1 (Giant Clam) [3]. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will supplement these existing standards with new solution based inorganic carbonate boron SRMs that replicate typical foraminiferal and coral B/Ca ratios and δ11B values. These new SRMs will not only ensure quality control of full procedural chemistry between laboratories, but have the added benefits of being both in abundant supply and free from any restrictions associated with shipment of biogenic samples derived from protected species. Here we present in-house δ11B measurements of these new boron carbonate SRM solutions. These preliminary data will feed into an interlaboratory comparison study to establish certified values for these new NIST SRMs. 1. Foster, G.L., et al., Chemical Geology, 2013. 358(0): p. 1-14. 2. Gutjahr, M., et al., Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses. Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU General Assembly 2014, 2014. 16(EGU2014-5028-1). 3. Inoue, M., et al., Geostandards and

  10. Martian carbon dioxide: Clues from isotopes in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, H. R.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Jull, A. J. T.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Attempts to unravel the origin and evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere on Mars from isotopic data have been hampered by the impreciseness of the measurements made by the Viking Lander and by Earth-based telescopes. The SNC meteorites which are possibly pieces of the Martian surface offer a unique opportunity to obtain more precise estimates of the planet's volatile inventory and isotopic composition. Recently, we reported results on oxygen isotopes of water extracted by pyrolysis from samples of Shergotty, Zagami, Nakhla, Chassigny, Lafayette, and EETA-79001. Now we describe complementary results on the stable isotopic composition of carbon dioxide extracted simultaneously from those same samples. We will also report on C-14 abundances obtained by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for some of these CO2 samples.

  11. The origin of carbon isotope vital effects in coccolith calcite

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Bruggeman, J.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Calcite microfossils are widely used to study climate and oceanography in Earth's geological past. Coccoliths, readily preserved calcite plates produced by a group of single-celled surface-ocean dwelling algae called coccolithophores, have formed a significant fraction of marine sediments since the Late Triassic. However, unlike the shells of foraminifera, their zooplankton counterparts, coccoliths remain underused in palaeo-reconstructions. Precipitated in an intracellular chemical and isotopic microenvironment, coccolith calcite exhibits large and enigmatic departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, known as vital effects. Here we show that the calcification to carbon fixation ratio determines whether coccolith calcite is isotopically heavier or lighter than abiogenic calcite, and that the size of the deviation is determined by the degree of carbon utilization. We discuss the theoretical potential for, and current limitations of, coccolith-based CO2 paleobarometry, that may eventually facilitate use of the ubiquitous and geologically extensive sedimentary archive. PMID:28262764

  12. The origin of carbon isotope vital effects in coccolith calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Bruggeman, J.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-03-01

    Calcite microfossils are widely used to study climate and oceanography in Earth's geological past. Coccoliths, readily preserved calcite plates produced by a group of single-celled surface-ocean dwelling algae called coccolithophores, have formed a significant fraction of marine sediments since the Late Triassic. However, unlike the shells of foraminifera, their zooplankton counterparts, coccoliths remain underused in palaeo-reconstructions. Precipitated in an intracellular chemical and isotopic microenvironment, coccolith calcite exhibits large and enigmatic departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, known as vital effects. Here we show that the calcification to carbon fixation ratio determines whether coccolith calcite is isotopically heavier or lighter than abiogenic calcite, and that the size of the deviation is determined by the degree of carbon utilization. We discuss the theoretical potential for, and current limitations of, coccolith-based CO2 paleobarometry, that may eventually facilitate use of the ubiquitous and geologically extensive sedimentary archive.

  13. Sediment Tracking Using Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. F.; Papanicolaou, A.

    2002-12-01

    As landscapes are stripped of valuable, nutrient rich topsoils and streams are clouded with habitat degrading fine sediment, it becomes increasingly important to identify and mitigate erosive surfaces. Particle tracking using vegetative derived carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotopic signatures and carbon/nitrogen (C/N) atomic ratios offer a promising technique to identify such problematic sources. Consultants and researchers successfully use C, N, and other stable isotopes of water for hydrologic purposes, such as quantifying groundwater vs. surface water contribution to a hydrograph. Recently, C and N isotopes and C/N atomic ratios of sediment were used to determine sediment mass balance within estuarine environments. The current research investigates C and N isotopes and C/N atomic ratios of source sediment for two primary purposes: (1) to establish a blueprint methodology for estimating sediment source and erosion rates within a watershed using this isotopic technology coupled with mineralogy fingerprinting techniques, radionuclide transport monitoring, and erosion-transport models, and (2) to complete field studies of upland erosion processes, such as, solifluction, mass wasting, creep, fluvial erosion, and vegetative induced erosion. Upland and floodplain sediment profiles and riverine suspended sediment were sampled on two occasions, May 2002 and August 2002, in the upper Palouse River watershed of northern Idaho. Over 300 samples were obtained from deep intermountain valley (i.e. forest) and rolling crop field (i.e. agriculture) locations. Preliminary sample treatment was completed at the Washington State University Water Quality Laboratory where samples were dried, removed of organic constituents, and prepared for isotopic analysis. C and N isotope and C/N atomic ratio analyses was performed at the University of Idaho Natural Resources Stable Isotope Laboratory using a Costech 4010 Elemental Combustion System connected with a continuous flow inlet system to

  14. Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Leaves of C3 Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon isotope composition is regarded as a powerful tool in understanding carbon cycling, both as a tracer and as a process recorder. However, accurate predictions of, for example, partitioning the net carbon flux into its components or obtaining climate information from tree rings, requires a good understanding of plant metabolism and related isotopic fractionations. Mechanistic models have concentrated largely on photosynthetic pathways and their isotopic composition. This cannot be said for respiratory processes. The mechanistic models of leaf isotope discrimination hence do not describe dawn, dusk and night very realistically or not at all. A new steady-state approach of the carbon isotope distribution in glucose potentially addresses the time of twilight and night (Tcherkez et al. 2004). Here, a new model of 13C discrimination in leaves of C3 plants is presented. The model is based on the steady-state approach of Tcherkez et al. (2004) but with much reduced complexity while retaining its general characteristics. In addition, the model introduces some new concepts such as a day-length dependent starch synthesis, night-length dependent starch degradation, energy-driven biosynthesis rates, and continuous leaf discrimination calculation for the whole diel cycle. It is therefore well adapted for biosphere-atmosphere exchange studies. The model predicts enriched sucrose and starch pools in the leaf compared to assimilated CO2. Biosynthesis on the other hand acts as the sink of the remaining, depleted carbon. The model calculates slightly different absolute starch compositions from the Tcherkez et al. (2004) model but this depends on chosen fractionation factors. The greatest difference between the two models is during dawn, dusk and night. For example, while Tcherkez et al. has changing phloem sucrose isotope composition during night, the model here predicts constant sucrose export composition. Observations seem to support rather constant phloem isotope composition

  15. On the isotopic composition of magmatic carbon in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    SNC meteorites are thought, from many lines of evidence, to come from Mars. A line of investigation which has been pursued in our laboratory over the years involves measurement of the stable isotopic composition of carbon, in its various forms, in SNC meteorites. In order to establish a firm basis for studying the isotopic systematics of carbon in the martian surface environment, it is first necessary to try and constrain the delta C-13 of bulk Mars. Taking all of the available information, it would seem that the delta C-13 of the Earth's mantle lies somewhere in the range of -5 to -7 percent. Preliminary assessment of magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites, would tend to suggest a delta C-13 of 20 to 30 percent, which is conspicuously different from that of the terrestrial mantle. It is not obvious why there should be such a difference between the two planets, although many explanations are possible. One of these possibilities, that previous delta C-13 measurements for magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites are in error to some degree, is being actively investigated. The most recent results seem to constrain the theta C-13 of the magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites to about -20 percent, which is not at odds with previous estimates. As such, it is considered that a detailed investigation of the carbon isotopic systematics of martian surface materials does have the necessary information with which to proceed.

  16. Isotope tracers of organic carbon during artificial recharge

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.

    1998-02-09

    This project developed an analytical technique for measuring the isotope abundance for 14C and 13C in total organic carbon (TOC) in order to test whether these measurements can trace TOC interaction with sedimentary material at the bottom of rivers and lakes, soils, and subsurface aquifer rocks.

  17. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Londry, Kathleen L.; Des Marais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Biogeochemical transformations occurring in the anoxic zones of stratified sedimentary microbial communities can profoundly influence the isotopic and organic signatures preserved in the fossil record. Accordingly, we have determined carbon isotope discrimination that is associated with both heterotrophic and lithotrophic growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). For heterotrophic-growth experiments, substrate consumption was monitored to completion. Sealed vessels containing SRB cultures were harvested at different time intervals, and delta(13)C values were determined for gaseous CO(2), organic substrates, and products such as biomass. For three of the four SRB, carbon isotope effects between the substrates, acetate or lactate and CO(2), and the cell biomass were small, ranging from 0 to 2 per thousand. However, for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the carbon incorporated into biomass was isotopically heavier than the available substrates by 8 to 9 per thousand. SRB grown lithoautotrophically consumed less than 3% of the available CO(2) and exhibited substantial discrimination (calculated as isotope fractionation factors [alpha]), as follows: for Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, alpha values ranged from 1.0100 to 1.0123; for Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus, the alpha value was 0.0138, and for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the alpha value was 1.0310. Mixotrophic growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on acetate and CO(2) resulted in biomass with a delta(13)C composition intermediate to that of the substrates. The extent of fractionation depended on which enzymatic pathways were used, the direction in which the pathways operated, and the growth rate, but fractionation was not dependent on the growth phase. To the extent that environmental conditions affect the availability of organic substrates (e.g., acetate) and reducing power (e.g., H(2)), ecological forces can also influence carbon isotope discrimination by SRB.

  18. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Londry, Kathleen L.; Des Marais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Biogeochemical transformations occurring in the anoxic zones of stratified sedimentary microbial communities can profoundly influence the isotopic and organic signatures preserved in the fossil record. Accordingly, we have determined carbon isotope discrimination that is associated with both heterotrophic and lithotrophic growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). For heterotrophic-growth experiments, substrate consumption was monitored to completion. Sealed vessels containing SRB cultures were harvested at different time intervals, and delta(13)C values were determined for gaseous CO(2), organic substrates, and products such as biomass. For three of the four SRB, carbon isotope effects between the substrates, acetate or lactate and CO(2), and the cell biomass were small, ranging from 0 to 2 per thousand. However, for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the carbon incorporated into biomass was isotopically heavier than the available substrates by 8 to 9 per thousand. SRB grown lithoautotrophically consumed less than 3% of the available CO(2) and exhibited substantial discrimination (calculated as isotope fractionation factors [alpha]), as follows: for Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, alpha values ranged from 1.0100 to 1.0123; for Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus, the alpha value was 0.0138, and for Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans, the alpha value was 1.0310. Mixotrophic growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans on acetate and CO(2) resulted in biomass with a delta(13)C composition intermediate to that of the substrates. The extent of fractionation depended on which enzymatic pathways were used, the direction in which the pathways operated, and the growth rate, but fractionation was not dependent on the growth phase. To the extent that environmental conditions affect the availability of organic substrates (e.g., acetate) and reducing power (e.g., H(2)), ecological forces can also influence carbon isotope discrimination by SRB.

  19. Carbon content on perturbed wetlands of Yucatan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Ojeda, S. M.; Orellana, R.; Herrera Silveira, J.

    2013-05-01

    The north coast of Yucatan Peninsula is a karstic scenario where the water flows mainly underground through the so called "cenotes"-ring system ("sink holes") toward the coast. This underground water system enhances the connection between watershed condition and coastal ecosystem health. Inland activities such as livestock, agriculture and urban development produce changes in the landscape, hydrological connectivity and in the water quality that can decrease wetland coverage specially mangroves and seagrasses. We conducted studies on the description of structure, biomass and carbon content of the soil, above and below ground of four different types of wetland in a perturbed region. The wetland ecological types were freshwater (Typha domingensis), dwarf mangroves (Avicenia germinans), grassland (Cyperacea) and Seagrasses. Due to the area is mainly covered by mangroves, they represent the most important carbon storage nevertheless the condition of the structure determine the carbon content in soil. Through GIS tools we explore the relationships between land use and costal condition in order to determine priority areas for conservation within the watershed that could be efficient to preserve the carbon storage of this area.

  20. Partitioning peat respiration with stable carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanton, J.; Corbett, J.; Burdige, D. J.; Glaser, P. H.; Cooper, W. T.; Tfaily, M. M.

    2010-12-01

    Equimolar production of CO2 and CH4 is assumed with methanogenesis. However, in both field and incubation studies of peat respiration, CO2 is continually reported to be in higher concentrations than CH4. It was assumed that this is due to loss of methane with ebullition and additional CO2 production by HMW organic matter fermentation. To determine the proportions of CO2 formed from both organic matter fermentation and methanogenesis and to determine the percent loss of CH4 from ebullition, isotope mass balance equations were developed. The 13C-CO2 measured in pore water represents a mixture between the 13C-CO2 from organic matter decomposition and methanogenesis. By collecting and analyzing pore water samples for δ13C and concentrations of both CO2 and CH4, the proportion of CO2 formed from organic matter fermentation and methanogenesis was calculated. It was found that, at 0, 154, and 261 cm depths, the percent CO2 from methanogenesis was 56%, 88%, and 91%, and the percent CH4 loss due to ebullition was 69%, 79%, and 85%, respectively. These findings indicate that with increasing depth both the percent CO2 formed from methanogenesis and the percent CH4 lost increased. Incubation experiments consisting of peat from five depth intervals (30-40, 70-80, 130-140, 170-180, and 270-280cm) were used to determine the accuracy of the isotope mass balance equations based on in situ concentrations and isotopic values. Measurements were made biweekly for concentrations and δ13C of CO2 and CH4. The percents of CO2 formed from methanogenesis based on the isotope mass balance equations were found to be to be 53%, 44%, 12%, 51%, and 54% corresponding to the respective depth ranges. The ratios of CH4/CO2 measured were 51%, 39%, 4%, 41%, and 54%, respectively. The average standard deviation between these sample sets was found to be ± 3.5%. This indicates that the isotope mass balance equations are an appropriate model for determining in situ CO2 partitioning in these systems.

  1. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-06-25

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated

  2. CO2-dependent carbon isotope fractionation in the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Elise B.; Carter, Susan J.; Pearson, Ann

    2017-09-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of marine sedimentary organic matter is used to resolve long-term histories of pCO2 based on studies indicating a CO2-dependence of photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation (εP). It recently was proposed that the δ13C values of dinoflagellates, as recorded in fossil dinocysts, might be used as a proxy for pCO2. However, significant questions remain regarding carbon isotope fractionation in dinoflagellates and how such fractionation may impact sedimentary records throughout the Phanerozoic. Here we investigate εP as a function of CO2 concentration and growth rate in the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense. Experiments were conducted in nitrate-limited chemostat cultures. Values of εP were measured on cells having growth rates (μ) of 0.14-0.35 d-1 and aqueous carbon dioxide concentrations of 10.2-63 μmol kg-1 and were found to correlate linearly with μ/[CO2(aq)] (r2 = 0.94) in accord with prior, analogous chemostat investigations with eukaryotic phytoplankton. A maximum fractionation (εf) value of 27‰ was characterized from the intercept of the experiments, representing the first value of εf determined for an algal species employing Form II RubisCO-a structurally and catalytically distinct form of the carbon-fixing enzyme. This value is larger than theoretical predictions for Form II RubisCO and not significantly different from the ∼25‰ εf values observed for taxa employing Form ID RubisCO. We also measured the carbon isotope contents of dinosterol, hexadecanoic acid, and phytol from each experiment, finding that each class of biomarker exhibits different isotopic behavior. The apparent CO2-dependence of εP values in our experiments strengthens the proposal to use dinocyst δ13C values as a pCO2 proxy. Moreover, the similarity between the εf value for A. tamarense and the consensus value of ∼25‰ indicates that the CO2-sensitivity of carbon isotope fractionation saturates at similar CO2 levels across all three

  3. Insights into Belowground Processes from Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    13C and 15N content generally increase with greater depth in the soil but no completely satisfactory explanation of this phenomenon has been advanced. Several explanations have been proposed, including discrimination against 13C and 15N during decomposition, preferential preservation of 13C-enriched compound classes, incorporation of soil CO2 into microbial biomass by anaplerotic reactions, enrichment in 13C and 15N of belowground plant and mycorrhizal fungal components compared to aboveground components, and preferential loss of 15N during nitrification, amonification, and denitrification reactions. Here, I examine the theoretical, experimental, and field evidence for the differing proposed hypotheses. The ratio of enrichment in 15N and 13C with depth is between 2 and 3, suggesting that the movement of carboxyl groups (-CO2) and amino groups (-NH2) during decomposition may control soil isotope patterns. Another important factor is the incorporation of 13C-enriched root and mycorrhizal carbon into deeper soil layers versus the incorporation of 13C-depleted above-ground plant litter at the soil surface. Anaplerotic fixation of soil CO2 appears unimportant as a contributing factor to 13C enrichment of soil profiles, based on the average efficiency of microbial metabolism (40%) and the relative proportion of microbial C attributed to anaplerotic reactions (3-5%). Because mycorrhizal fungi and plant roots appear generally enriched in 13C and 15N relative to above-ground plant components, I suggest that increasing 13C and 15N enrichment of soil relative to above-ground plant foliage should correlate with the relative carbon allocation belowground to roots and mycorrhizal fungi in many terrestrial systems.

  4. Carbon isotopes in three SNC meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, R. H.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1985-02-01

    The presence of several carbonaceous components in SNC meteorites has been inferred from the analyses of samples of three SNC meteorites, Shergotty, Chassigny, and Elephant Moraine. The identification of the actual species involved, however, has not been possible except for that of the terrestrial materials known to contaminate extraterrestrial samples. Above 700 C, there is evidence of the presence of isotropically heavy and light components in all three meteorites, although there are notable differences in their isotopic compositions. The similarities observed may indicate a common origin for the meteorites, but the possibility that magmatic processes on different parent bodies have produced these features must be more fully explored.

  5. A carbon isotope challenge to the snowball Earth.

    PubMed

    Sansjofre, P; Ader, M; Trindade, R I F; Elie, M; Lyons, J; Cartigny, P; Nogueira, A C R

    2011-10-05

    The snowball Earth hypothesis postulates that the planet was entirely covered by ice for millions of years in the Neoproterozoic era, in a self-enhanced glaciation caused by the high albedo of the ice-covered planet. In a hard-snowball picture, the subsequent rapid unfreezing resulted from an ultra-greenhouse event attributed to the buildup of volcanic carbon dioxide (CO(2)) during glaciation. High partial pressures of atmospheric CO(2) (pCO2; from 20,000 to 90,000 p.p.m.v.) in the aftermath of the Marinoan glaciation (∼635 Myr ago) have been inferred from both boron and triple oxygen isotopes. These pCO2 values are 50 to 225 times higher than present-day levels. Here, we re-evaluate these estimates using paired carbon isotopic data for carbonate layers that cap Neoproterozoic glacial deposits and are considered to record post-glacial sea level rise. The new data reported here for Brazilian cap carbonates, together with previous ones for time-equivalent units, provide estimates lower than 3,200 p.p.m.v.--and possibly as low as the current value of ∼400 p.p.m.v. Our new constraint, and our re-interpretation of the boron and triple oxygen isotope data, provide a completely different picture of the late Neoproterozoic environment, with low atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and oxygen that are inconsistent with a hard-snowball Earth.

  6. A Carbonate Li Isotope Record Through Earth's History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asael, D.; Kalderon-Asael, B.; Planavsky, N.

    2016-12-01

    Lithium (Li) isotopes emerge as a powerful geochemical proxy for tracking continental weathering through time. Extensive work on Li fractionation in modern systems has brought to a profound understanding of the modern Li budget as well as to a consensus that marine carbonates faithfully record seawater Li isotope signature. As such record is essential in order to track global-scale changes in weathering processes and intensity through Earth's history, we have generated Li isotope data from marine carbonates from over 40 units, ranging in age from 3.0 Ga to modern. Preliminary results provide evidence for strongly inhibited weathering-mediated clay formation prior to the Paleozoic, which we attribute to the pre-Paleozoic lack of land plants. The initial rise in the Li isotope values is observed during the Ordovician, which is followed by a subsequent drop to background values and then begins the generally increasing trend that is already well reported. These findings are open for interpretation but they still support the view that the emergence of land plants dramatically changed the process of weathering and it seems that biomass has a potentially significant role in mineral breakdown in soils. Li isotopes provide a novel perspective on weathering and the impact on the Earth system of the rise of land plants - one of the most significant transitions in Earth's history.

  7. Chemical changes and carbon isotope variations in a cross-section of a large Miocene gymnospermous log

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Spiker, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    The cross-sectional radius of a 3-m (diam.) brown coal gymnospermous log of Miocene age, previously analyzed for carbohydrate and lignin methoxyl content by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, was examined using stable carbon isotopic ratios in order to determine if the isotopic composition could be related to chemical changes or to radial position. This study found a possible relationship between ??13C-values and radial position; however, these changes cannot be linked to carbohydrate content and are probably attributable to changing growth conditions during the lifetime of the tree. An apparent linear relationship between the changes in carbohydrate content after sodium para-periodate treatment and corresponding changes in the ??13C-values indicates constant isotopic fractionation between lignin and carbohydrates along the cross-sectional radius. This result indicates that diagenesis has not produced any significant change in the lignin-carbohydrate carbon isotopic fractionation or, alternatively, that diagenesis has erased any fractionation pattern that once existed. A sample of fresh wood from another gymnospermous species was analyzed by the same methods and found to have lignin-carbohydrate carbon isotopic fractionation significantly different from that of the Miocene log section samples, suggesting that differences may be species-related or that the complex mixture of carbohydrates in the fresh wood was isotopically different from that of the degraded wood, and the whole Miocene log was uniformly altered. ?? 1992.

  8. Isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen in ureilitic fragments of the Almahata Sitta meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, H.; Abernethy, F. A. J.; Smith, C. L.; Ross, A. J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Grady, M. M.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.

    2015-02-01

    This study characterizes carbon and nitrogen abundances and isotopic compositions in ureilitic fragments of Almahata Sitta. Ureilites are carbon-rich (containing up to 7 wt% C) and were formed early in solar system history, thus the origin of carbon in ureilites has significance for the origin of solar system carbon. These samples were collected soon after they fell, so they are among the freshest ureilite samples available and were analyzed using stepped combustion mass spectrometry. They contained 1.2-2.3 wt% carbon; most showed the major carbon release at temperatures of 600-700 °C with peak values of δ13C from -7.3 to +0.4‰, similar to literature values for unbrecciated ("monomict") ureilites. They also contained a minor low temperature (≤500 °C) component (δ13C = ca -25‰). Bulk nitrogen contents (9.4-27 ppm) resemble those of unbrecciated ureilites, with major releases mostly occurring at 600-750 °C. A significant lower temperature release of nitrogen occurred in all samples. Main release δ15N values of -53 to -94‰ fall within the range reported for diamond separates and acid residues from ureilites, and identify an isotopically primordial nitrogen component. However, they differ from common polymict ureilites which are more nitrogen-rich and isotopically heavier. Thus, although the parent asteroid 2008TC3 was undoubtedly a polymict ureilite breccia, this cannot be deduced from an isotopic study of individual ureilite fragments. The combined main release δ13C and δ15N values do not overlap the fields for carbonaceous or enstatite chondrites, suggesting that carbon in ureilites was not derived from these sources.

  9. Carbon and oxygen isotopes of Maastrichtian Danian shallow marine carbonates: Yacoraite Formation, northwestern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquillas, Rosa; Sabino, Ignacio; Nobrega Sial, Alcides; Papa, Cecilia del; Ferreira, Valderez; Matthews, Stephen

    2007-04-01

    The Maastrichtian-Danian limestones of the Yacoraite Formation (northwestern Argentina) show carbon and oxygen isotopic values consistent with shallow marine conditions. The members of the formation respond to different sedimentary environments and are characterised by distinctive stable isotopes and geochemistry. The basal Amblayo Member is composed of high-energy dolomitic limestones and limestones with positive isotopic values (+2‰ δ 13C, +2‰ δ 18O). The top of the member reveals an isotopic shift of δ 13C (-5‰) and δ 18O (-10‰), probably related to a descent in the sea level. The sandy Güemes Member has isotopically negative (-2‰ δ 13C, -1‰ δ 18O) limestones, principally controlled by water mixing, decreased organic productivity, and compositional changes in the carbonates. The isotopically lighter limestones are calcitic, with a greater terrigenous contribution and different geochemical composition (high Si-Mn-Fe-Na, low Ca-Mg-Sr). These isotopic and lithological changes relate to the Cretaceous-Palaeogene transition. The Alemanía Member, composed of dolomitic limestones and pelites, represents a return to marine conditions and shows a gradual increase in isotopic values, reaching values similar to those of the Amblayo Member. The Juramento Member, composed of stromatolite limestones, shows isotopic variations that can be correlated with the two well-defined, shallowing-upward sequences of the member.

  10. Carbon isotopic fractionation of CFCs during abiotic and biotic degradation.

    PubMed

    Archbold, Marie E; Elliot, Trevor; Kalin, Robert M

    2012-02-07

    Carbon stable isotope ((13)C) fractionation in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds arising from abiotic (chemical) degradation using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and biotic (landfill gas attenuation) processes is investigated. Batch tests (at 25 °C) for CFC-113 and CFC-11 using ZVI show quantitative degradation of CFC-113 to HCFC-123a and CFC-1113 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to a half-life (τ(1/2)) of 20.5 h, and a ZVI surface-area normalized rate constant (k(SA)) of -(9.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-5) L m(-2) h(-1). CFC-11 degraded to trace HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 following pseudo-first-order kinetics corresponding to τ(1/2) = 17.3 h and k(SA) = -(1.2 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) L m(-2) h(-1). Significant kinetic isotope effects of ε(‰) = -5.0 ± 0.3 (CFC-113) and -17.8 ± 4.8 (CFC-11) were observed. Compound-specific carbon isotope analyses also have been used here to characterize source signatures of CFC gases (HCFC-22, CFC-12, HFC-134a, HCFC-142b, CFC-114, CFC-11, CFC-113) for urban (UAA), rural/remote (RAA), and landfill (LAA) ambient air samples, as well as in situ surface flux chamber (FLUX; NO FLUX) and landfill gas (LFG) samples at the Dargan Road site, Northern Ireland. The latter values reflect biotic degradation and isotopic fractionation in LFG production, and local atmospheric impact of landfill emissions through the cover. Isotopic fractionations of Δ(13)C ∼ -13‰ (HCFC-22), Δ(13)C ∼ -35‰ (CFC-12) and Δ(13)C ∼ -15‰ (CFC-11) were observed for LFG in comparison to characteristic solvent source signatures, with the magnitude of the isotopic effect for CFC-11 apparently similar to the kinetic isotope effect for (abiotic) ZVI degradation.

  11. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  12. The temperature and carbonate ion influence on Pleistocene high latitude planktonic foraminiferal carbon isotopic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, C.; Foreman, A. D.; Munson, J.; Slowey, N. C.; Hodell, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Establishing a credible record of the carbon isotopic composition of high latitude surface ocean DIC over ice ages has been an enormous challenge, because the possible archives of this important variable in deep sea sediments all incorporate complex effects of the biomineralization process. For example, culture experiments (by Spero and colleagues) demonstrate a strong temperature and carbonate ion effect on the carbon isotopic composition of G. bulloides--the taxon of planktonic foraminifera that is most abundant in the majority of subpolar sediment sequences. Here we capitalize on the fortuitous observation of exceptionally strong covariation between the oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of G. bulloides in multiple sediment sequences from the Benguela upwelling region. The covariation is most clear during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (an interval when the isotopic composition of the seawater was least variable) and undoubtedly results from the precipitation of tests under variable conditions of temperature and carbonate ion. The unusually clear isotopic relationship in planktonic foraminifera observed off Namibia constitutes a field calibration of the biomineralization effects observed in culture, and we apply it to previously published high latitude carbon isotopic records throughout the Southern Ocean. We find that many of the excursions toward lower planktonic foraminiferal δ13C that have been interpreted previously as the upwelling of nutrient rich water during deglaciations are better explained as increases in upper ocean temperature and carbonate ion. Conversely, the excursions toward high δ13C during ice age intervals that have been interpreted previously as increased export production (purportedly stimulated by dust) are also better explained by temperature and carbonate ion variability. After removal of the inferred temperature and carbonate ion signal from the planktonic foraminiferal time series, the residual is essentially (but not exactly) the same

  13. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  14. Stable Isotope Values of Nitrogen and Carbon in Particulate ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data set from “Patterns in stable isotope values of nitrogen and carbon in particulate matter from the Northwest Atlantic Continental Shelf, from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras” by Oczkowski et al. These are the data upon which all results and conclusion are made. Publishing the data allow for use by wider audience. Stable isotope dynamics on the shelf can inform both nearshore and open ocean research efforts, providing an important link along the marine continuum. To our knowledge, this data set is unique in its spatial coverage and variables measured.

  15. Carbon isotope geochemistry of the Santa Clara River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, Caroline A.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2001-06-01

    The Santa Clara River is a prototypical small mountainous river, with a headwater height greater than 1000 m and a basin area smaller than 10,000 m 2. Although individual small mountainous rivers export trivial amounts of sediment and carbon to the ocean, as a group these rivers may export a major fraction (as much as 50%) of the total global river sediment flux [Milliman and Syvitski, 1992], making their geochemistry relevant the study of the ocean's carbon cycle. In addition, many small rivers export sediment in a few high flux events, causing massive, sporadic discharge of carbon onto coastal shelves, discharge conditions very different from those of large rivers. This class of rivers is an end-member of the river-ocean carbon exchange system,. opposite the Earth's largest river, the Amazon. The carbon mass and isotopic properties of the Santa Clara River are significantly different from previously studied large rivers. During the 1997-1998 winter, all Santa Clara carbon pools were old, with flux-weighted average Δl4C values of-428±76‰ for particulate organic carbon, -73±31‰ for dissolved organic carbon, and-644±58‰ for black carbon. The age of exported carbon is primarily due to the deep erosion of old soils and not to inclusion of fossil fuel carbon. Additionally, the δ13C signatures of exported carbon pools were high relative to terrestrial carbon, bearing a signature quite similar to marine carbon (average particulate organic carbon (POC) δ13C = -22.2±0.8‰). The Santa Clara's estuary is small and drains onto the narrow eastern Pacific coastal margin, exporting this old soil organic matter directly into the ocean. If the Santa Clara export patterns are representative of this class of rivers, they may be a significant source of refractory terrestrial carbon to the ocean.

  16. Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy for Carbon Isotope Analysis with 2 {mu}m Diode Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromoto, K.; Tomita, H.; Watanabe, K.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.

    2009-03-17

    We have made a prototype based on CRDS with 2 {mu}m diode laser for carbon isotope analysis of CO{sub 2} in air. The carbon isotope ratio was obtained to be (1.085{+-}0.012)x10{sup -2} which shows good agreement with the isotope ratio measured by the magnetic sector-type mass spectrometer within uncertainty. Hence, we demonstrated the carbon isotope analysis based on CRDS with 2 {mu}m tunable diode laser.

  17. Rainwater chemistry and isotopic content in the French Basque Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaunat, J.; Huneau, F.; Celle-Jeanton, H.; Dupuy, A.; Le Coustumer, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Northern Basque Country (Southwestern France) is subject to strong water needs in constant increase because of a rising population. Located 25 km from the Atlantic coast, the shallow aquifer of the Ursuya Mount (680 m ASL) is one of the main water supplies able to meet water needs. Unfortunately, this strategic resource suffers from a lack of knowledge about the recharge processes. A hydrological and hydrochemical survey was carried out since 2010 with the aim of enhancing the understanding of the behaviour of this aquifer, particularly through rainwater chemistry study. Rain gauges were disposed at four locations around and in the centre of the study area. Three collectors allowed the sampling of the total monthly height of bulk precipitation and one sequential collector allowed the sampling of the daily wet precipitation. This rainwater survey (height, majors ions, stable isotopes) was carried out between February 2010 and November 2011, which represents almost two hydrological cycles. The chemical and isotopic content of the 125 daily rainwater samples has been coupled with the corresponding air mass back trajectories to investigate the origin of the components. The trajectories were segregated into 5 main transport patterns by taking into account the regions crossed during the previous 72 h: 1) Northwestern part of Atlantic Ocean (exclusively marine origin); 2) Southwestern part of Atlantic Ocean (marine and Iberian Peninsula origin); 3) Northern Europe (continental origin); 4) Spain (exclusively Iberian Peninsula origin); 5) Southeastern (Southeastern Europe, Northern Africa and Mediterranean origin). Principal component analyses applied on the major ions components have shown that four major factors control the chemical composition of the precipitation at this place. The first factor (HCO3-, NO2-, PO43-, NH4+, K+, and Ca2+) is a mixed source of anthropogenic pollution and crustal material. The second factor (Cl-, Na+ and Mg2+) denotes a marine source. The

  18. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

  19. Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1989-12-31

    This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

  20. Simultaneous tracing of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope tracing is a powerful method for interrogating metabolic enzyme activities across the metabolic network of living cells. However, most studies of mammalian cells have used 13C-labeled tracers only and focused on reactions in central carbon metabolism. Cellular metabolism, however, involves other biologically important elements, including nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphate and sulfur. Tracing stable isotopes of such elements may help shed light on poorly understood metabolic pathways. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-resolution mass spectrometry to simultaneously trace carbon and nitrogen metabolism in human cells cultured with 13C- and 15N-labeled glucose and glutamine. To facilitate interpretation of the complex isotopomer data generated, we extend current methods for metabolic flux analysis to handle multivariate mass isotopomer distributions (MMIDs). We find that observed MMIDs are broadly consistent with known biochemical pathways. Whereas measured 13C MIDs were informative for central carbon metabolism, 15N isotopes provided evidence for nitrogen-carrying reactions in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. This computational and experimental methodology expands the scope of metabolic flux analysis beyond carbon metabolism, and may prove important to understanding metabolic phenotypes in health and disease. PMID:27098229

  1. Simultaneous tracing of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Roland; Jain, Mohit

    2016-05-24

    Stable isotope tracing is a powerful method for interrogating metabolic enzyme activities across the metabolic network of living cells. However, most studies of mammalian cells have used (13)C-labeled tracers only and focused on reactions in central carbon metabolism. Cellular metabolism, however, involves other biologically important elements, including nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphate and sulfur. Tracing stable isotopes of such elements may help shed light on poorly understood metabolic pathways. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-resolution mass spectrometry to simultaneously trace carbon and nitrogen metabolism in human cells cultured with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled glucose and glutamine. To facilitate interpretation of the complex isotopomer data generated, we extend current methods for metabolic flux analysis to handle multivariate mass isotopomer distributions (MMIDs). We find that observed MMIDs are broadly consistent with known biochemical pathways. Whereas measured (13)C MIDs were informative for central carbon metabolism, (15)N isotopes provided evidence for nitrogen-carrying reactions in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. This computational and experimental methodology expands the scope of metabolic flux analysis beyond carbon metabolism, and may prove important to understanding metabolic phenotypes in health and disease.

  2. Triple oxygen isotopes in biogenic and sedimentary carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Hu, Huanting; Ji, Haoyuan; Montanari, Shaena; Li, Shuning; Henkes, Gregory A.; Levin, Naomi E.

    2014-09-01

    The 17O anomaly (Δ17O) of natural waters has been shown to be sensitive to evaporation in a way analogous to deuterium excess, with evaporated bodies of water (e.g., leaf waters, lake waters, animal body waters) tending to have lower Δ17O than primary meteoric waters. In animal body water, Δ17O relates to the intake of evaporated waters, evaporative effluxes of water, and the Δ17O value of atmospheric O2, which itself carries signatures of global carbon cycling and photochemical reactions in the stratosphere. Carbonates have the potential to record the triple oxygen isotope compositions of parent waters, allowing reconstruction of past water compositions, but such investigations have awaited development of methods for high-precision measurement of Δ17O of carbonate. We describe optimized methods based on a sequential acid digestion/reduction/fluorination approach that yield Δ17O data with the high precision (∼0.010‰, 1σ) needed to resolve subtle environmental signals. We report the first high-precision Δ17O dataset for terrestrial carbonates, focusing on vertebrate biogenic carbonates and soil carbonates, but also including marine invertebrates and high-temperature carbonates. We determine apparent three-isotope fractionation factors between the O2 analyte derived from carbonate and the parent waters of the carbonate. These in combination with appropriate temperature estimates (from clumped isotope thermometry, or known or estimated body temperatures) are used to calculate the δ18O and Δ17O of parent waters. The clearest pattern to emerge is the strong 17O-depletion in avian, dinosaurian, and mammalian body water (from analyses of eggshell and tooth enamel) relative to meteoric waters, following expected influences of evaporated water (e.g., leaf water) and atmospheric O2 on vertebrate body water. Parent waters of the soil carbonates studied here have Δ17O values that are similar to or slightly lower than global precipitation. Our results suggest

  3. Shear heating and clumped isotope reordering in carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman-Tov, Shalev; Affek, Hagit P.; Matthews, Alan; Aharonov, Einat; Reches, Ze'ev

    2016-07-01

    Natural faults are expected to heat rapidly during seismic slip and to cool quite quickly after the slip event. Here we examine clumped isotope thermometry for its ability to identify such short duration elevated temperature events along frictionally heated carbonate faults. Our approach is based on measured Δ47 values that reflect the distribution of oxygen and carbon isotopes in the calcite lattice, measuring the abundance of 13Csbnd 18O bonds, which is affected by temperature. We examine three types of calcite rock samples: (1) crushed limestone grains that were rapidly heated and then cooled in static laboratory experiments, simulating the temperature cycle experienced by fault rock during an earthquake slip; (2) limestone samples that were experimentally sheared to simulate earthquake slip events; and (3) samples from Fault Mirrors (FMs) collected from principle slip surfaces of three natural carbonate faults. Extensive FM surfaces are believed to form during earthquake slip. Our experimental results show that Δ47 values decrease rapidly (in the course of seconds) with increasing temperature and shear velocity. On the other hand, carbonate shear zones from natural faults do not show such Δ47 decrease. We suggest that the Δ47 response may be controlled by nano-size grains, the high abundance of defects, and highly stressed/strained grain boundaries within the carbonate fault zone that can reduce the activation energy for diffusion, and thus lead to an increased rate of isotopic disordering during shear experiments. In our laboratory experiments the high stress and strain on grain contacts and the presence of nanograins thus allows for rapid disordering so that a change in Δ47 occurs in a very short and relatively low intensity heating events. In natural faults it may also lead to isotopic ordering after the cessation of frictional heating thus erasing the high temperature signature of Δ47.

  4. In situ analysis of carbon isotopes in North American diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rythoven, A. D.; Hauri, E. H.; Wang, J.; McCandless, T.; Shirey, S. B.; Schulze, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Diamonds from three North American kimberlite occurrences were investigated with cathodoluminescence (CL) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to determine their growth history and carbon isotope composition. Diamonds analyzed include fourteen from Lynx (Quebec), twelve from Kelsey Lake (Colorado) and eleven from A154 South (Diavik mine, Northwest Territories). Growth histories for the diamonds vary from simple to highly complex based on their CL images and depending on the individual stone. Deformation laminae are evident in CL images of the Lynx diamonds that typically are brownish in color. Two to five points per diamond were analyzed by SIMS for carbon isotope composition. Sample heterogeneity is minimal in terms of δ13C (vs. PDB) values. Points within single diamond had a maximum range of approximately 1 ‰. The results for the A154 South (-6.4 to -3 ‰) and Kelsey Lake (-11.2 to -2.6 ‰) stones were in accordance with earlier reported values. The Lynx kimberlite stones have anomalously high ratios and range from -3.5 to +0.2 ‰ (average: -1.4 ‰). No previous carbon isotope analyses on diamonds from Lynx or any other eastern Superior craton occurrence have been published. The diamonds possess carbon isotope ratios higher than those for the only other reported analyses of Superior craton diamonds at Wawa, Ontario (-5.5 to -1.1 ‰). In global terms, the only published analyses of diamonds that consistently contain even higher values are those from New South Wales (Australia). However, these diamonds are alluvial and contain eclogitic and/or exotic mineral inclusions. The Lynx diamonds are entirely peridotitic and from a primary deposit. The unusually low (i.e. >-5‰) δ13C values of the Lynx (and Wawa) diamonds may indicate a different carbon reservoir for the Superior craton mantle as compared to other cratons.

  5. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  6. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  7. STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF SUBFOSSIL WOOD FROM AUSTRIAN ALPS

    PubMed Central

    KŁUSEK, MARZENA; PAWEŁCZYK, SŁAWOMIRA

    2015-01-01

    The presented studies were carried out in order to check the usefulness of subfossil wood for stable isotope analysis. The aim of research was also to define the optimal method of subfossil samples preparation. Subfossil samples used during the presented studies are a part of the multi-century dendrochronological scale. This chronology originates in an area situated around a small mountain lake — Schwarzersee, in Austria. The obtained results of stable carbon isotope measurements confirmed that the method of α-cellulose extraction by the application of acidic sodium chlorite and sodium hydroxide solutions removes resins and other mobile compounds from wood. Therefore, in the case of the analysed samples, the additional chemical process of extractives removing was found to be unnecessary. Studied wood samples contained an adequate proportion of α-cellulose similar to the values characteristic for the contemporary trees. This proved an adequate wood preservation which is essential for the conduction of isotopic research. PMID:26346297

  8. Sulfur and carbon isotope biogeochemistry of a rewetted brackish fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Gehre, Matthias; Winkel, Matthias; Koehler, Stefan; Koch, Marian; Jurasinski, Gerald; Spitzy, Alejandro; Liebner, Susanne; Sachs, Torsten; Schmiedinger, Iris; Kretzschmann, Lisett; Saborowski, Anke; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2015-04-01

    Coastal wetlands are at the interface between terrestrial freshwater and marine and exhibit very specific biogeochemical conditions. Intermittent sea water intrusion affects metabolic pathways, i. e. anaerobic carbon metabolism is progressively dominated by sulfate reduction with lower contribution of methanogenesis whilst methane production is increasingly shifted from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic. Due to expanding anthropogenic impact a large proportion of coastal ecosystems is degraded with severe implications for the biogeochemical processes. We use concentration patterns and stable isotope signatures of water, sulfate, dissolved carbonate, and methane (δ2H, δ13C, δ18O, δ34S) to investigate the S and C metabolic cycle in a rewetted fen close to the southern Baltic Sea border. Such studies are crucial to better predict dynamic ecosystem feedback to global change like organic matter (OM) decomposition or greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, little is known about the metabolic pathways in such environments. The study site is part of the TERENO Observatory "Northeastern German Lowlands' and measurements of methane emissions have run since 2009. High methane fluxes up to 800 mg m-2 hr-1 indicate that methanogenesis is the dominant C metabolism pathway despite of high sulfate concentrations (up to 37 mM). The presented data are part of a comprehensive biogeochemical investigation that we conducted in autumn 2014 and that comprises 4 pore water profiles and sediment samples within a transect of 300-1500 m distance to the Baltic Sea. Depth of organic layers ranged from 25 to 140 cm with high OM contents (up to 90 dwt.%). Sulfate/chloride ratios in the pore waters were lower than in the Baltic Sea for most sites and sediment depths indicated a substantial net sulfate loss. Sulfide concentrations were negligible at the top and increased parallel to the sulfate concentrations with depth to values of up to 0.3 mM. One pore water profiles situated 1150 m from the Baltic

  9. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Deegan, Frances M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Jolis, Ester M.; Freda, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ11B values down to −41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of 10B into the assimilating melt. Loss of 11B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports 11B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ11B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle. PMID:27488228

  10. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-04

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  11. Carbon isotopes in xenoliths from the Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii, and the generation of isotopic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Pineau, F. ); Mathez, E.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The isotopic composition of carbon has been determined in a suite of xenoliths from lava of the 1800-1801 Kaupulehu eruption of Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii. Several lithologies are represented in the suite, including websterite, dunite, wehrlite, pyroxenite, and gabbro. In addition, there are composite xenoliths in which contacts between lithologies are preserved. Most of the xenoliths represent deformed cumulates. The contact relations in the composite samples indicate that the lithologies originated from the same source region, which, based on pressures determined from fluid inclusions, is estimated to be at a depth of {approx}20 km, or near the crust-mantle boundary. The observations and isotopic results demonstrate that isotopic variability can be generated by multistage fractionation processes such as degassing of CO{sub 2} from magma and precipitation of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids to form graphitic compounds. Such processes operated over regions the scales of which were determined by style and intensity of deformation and by lithology.

  12. A novel framework for quantifying past methane recycling by Sphagnum-methanotroph symbiosis using carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Jonathan E.; Isles, Peter D. F.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    2014-05-01

    concentration of atmospheric methane is strongly linked to variations in Earth's climate. Currently, we can directly reconstruct the total atmospheric concentration of methane, but not individual terms of the methane cycle. Northern wetlands, dominated by Sphagnum, are an important contributor of atmospheric methane, and we seek to understand the methane cycle in these systems. We present a novel method for quantifying the proportion of carbon Sphagnum assimilates from its methanotrophic symbionts using stable isotope ratios of leaf-wax biomarkers. Carbon isotope ratios of Sphagnum compounds are determined by two competing influences, water content and the isotope ratio of source carbon. We disentangled these effects using a combined hydrogen and carbon isotope approach. We constrained Sphagnum water content using the contrast between the hydrogen isotope ratios of Sphagnum and vascular plant biomarkers. We then used Sphagnum water content to calculate the carbon isotope ratio of Sphagnum's carbon pool. Using a mass balance equation, we calculated the proportion of recycled methane contributed to the Sphagnum carbon pool, "PRM." We quantified PRM in peat monoliths from three microhabitats in the Mer Bleue peatland complex. Modern studies have shown that water table depth and vegetation have strong influences on the peatland methane cycle on instrumental time scales. With this new approach, δ13C of Sphagnum compounds are now a useful tool for investigating the relationships among hydrology, vegetation, and methanotrophy in Sphagnum peatlands over the time scales of entire peatland sediment records, vital to our understanding of the global carbon cycle through the Late Glacial and Holocene.

  13. A Novel Framework for Quantifying past Methane Recycling by Sphagnum-Methanotroph Symbiosis Using Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Ratios of Leaf Wax Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Jonathan E.; Isles, Peter D. F.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric methane is strongly linked to variations in Earth's climate. Currently, we can directly reconstruct the total atmospheric concentration of methane, but not individual terms of the methane cycle. Northern wetlands, dominated by Sphagnum, are an important contributor of atmospheric methane, and we seek to understand the methane cycle in these systems. We present a novel method for quantifying the proportion of carbon Sphagnum assimilates from its methanotrophic symbionts using stable isotope ratios of leaf-wax biomarkers. Carbon isotope ratios of Sphagnum compounds are determined by two competing influences, water content and the isotope ratio of source carbon. We disentangled these effects using a combined hydrogen and carbon isotope approach. We constrained Sphagnum water content using the contrast between the hydrogen isotope ratios of Sphagnum and vascular plant biomarkers. We then used Sphagnum water content to calculate the carbon isotope ratio of Sphagnum's carbon pool. Using a mass balance equation, we calculated the proportion of recycled methane contributed to the Sphagnum carbon pool, 'PRM.' We quantified PRM in peat monoliths from three microhabitats in the Mer Bleue peatland complex. Modern studies have shown that water table depth and vegetation have strong influences on the peatland methane cycle on instrumental time scales. With this new approach, delta C-13 of Sphagnum compounds are now a useful tool for investigating the relationships among hydrology, vegetation, and methanotrophy in Sphagnum peatlands over the time scales of entire peatland sediment records, vital to our understanding of the global carbon cycle through the Late Glacial and Holocene.

  14. Dissolved Organic Carbon Cycling in Forested Watersheds: A Carbon Isotope Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, S. L.; Aravena, R.; Trumbore, S. E.; Dillon, P. J.

    1990-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important in the acid-base chemistry of acid-sensitive freshwater systems; in the complexation, mobility, persistence, and toxicity of metals and other pollutants; and in lake carbon metabolism. Carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) are used to study the origin, transport, and fate of DOC in a softwater catchment in central Ontario. Precipitation, soil percolates, groundwaters, stream, beaver pond, and lake waters, and lake sediment pore water were characterized chemically and isotopically. In addition to total DOC, isotopic measurements were made on the humic and fulvic DOC fractions. The lake is a net sink for DOC. Δ14C results indicate that the turnover time of most of the DOC in streams, lakes, and wetlands is fast, less than 40 years, and on the same time scale as changes in acidic deposition. DOC in groundwaters is composed of older carbon than surface waters, indicating extensive cycling of DOC in the upper soil zone or aquifer.

  15. [The mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation in photosynthesis and carbon dioxide component of the greenhouse effect].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A; Voronin, V I

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between the global climate warming, which is largely induced by increased CO2 atmospheric concentration, and the changes in carbon isotope fractionation in plants was explained in terms of the previously proposed oscillatory mechanism of photosynthesis, according to which CO2 assimilation and photorespiration are two reciprocally coupled oscillating mechanisms controlled by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase switches. This explanation is confirmed by the changes in carbon isotope fractionation in the annual rings of trees and demonstrates that the light carbon isotope 12C enrichment before 1990s resulted from increased photosynthetic assimilation of CO2. The subsequent sharp 13C enrichment of the tree ring carbon until the present time suggests that the compensatory role of photosynthesis in boreal forests has been lost for the global climate.

  16. Carbon isotope fractionation of methyl bromide during agricultural soil fumigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bill, M.; Miller, L.G.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2002-01-01

    The isotopic composition of methyl bromide (CH3Br) has been suggested to be a potentially useful tracer for constraining the global CH3Br budget. In order to determine the carbon isotopic composition of CH3Br emitted from the most significant anthropogenic application (pre-plant fumigation) we directly measured the ??13C of CH3Br released during commercial fumigation. We also measured the isotopic fractionation associated with degradation in agricultural soil under typical field fumigation conditions. The isotopic composition of CH3Br collected in soil several hours after injection of the fumigant was -44.5??? and this value increased to -20.7??? over the following three days. The mean kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil (12???) was smaller than the reported value for methylotrophic bacterial strain IMB-1, isolated from previously fumigated agricultural soil, but was similar to methylotrophic bacterial strain CC495, isolated from a pristine forest litter zone. Using this fractionation associated with the degradation of CH3Br in agricultural soil and the mean ??13C of the industrially manufactured CH3Br (-54.4???), we calculate that the agricultural soil fumigation source has a carbon isotope signature that ranges from -52.8??? to -42.0???. Roughly 65% of industrially manufactured CH3Br is used for field fumigations. The remaining 35% is used for structural and post-harvest fumigations with a minor amount used during industrial chemical manufacturing. Assuming that the structural and post-harvest fumigation sources of CH3Br are emitted without substantial fractionation, we calculate that the ??13C of anthropogenically emitted CH3Br ranges from -53.2??? to -47.5???.

  17. Patterns in Stable Isotope Values of Nitrogen and Carbon in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stable isotope measurements of nitrogen and carbon (15N, 13ddC) are often used to characterize estuarine, nearshore, and open ocean ecosystems. Reliable information about the spatial distribution of base-level stable isotope values, often represented by primary producers, is critical to interpreting values in these ecosystems. While base-level isotope data are generally readily available for estuaries, nearshore coastal waters, and the open ocean, the continental shelf is less studied. To address this, and as a first step toward developing a surrogate for base-level isotopic signature in this region, we collected surface and deep water samples from the United States’ eastern continental shelf in the Western Atlantic Ocean, from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, periodically between 2000 and 2013. During the study, particulate matter 15dN values ranged from 0.8 to 17.4‰, and 13dC values from −26.4 to −15.6‰over the region. We used spatial autocorrelation analysis and random forest modeling to examine the spatial trends and potential environmental drivers of the stable isotope values. We observed general trends toward lower values for both nitrogen and carbon isotopes at the seaward edge of the shelf. Conversely, higher 15dN and 13dC values were observed on the landward edge of the shelf, in particular in the southern portion of the sampling area. Across all sites, the magnitude of the difference between the 15dN of subsurface and surface particulate m

  18. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Kung-Hui; Mahendra, Shaily; Song, Donald L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2003-06-01

    Stable isotope analysis is recognized as a powerful tool for monitoring, assessing, and validating in-situ bioremediation processes. In this study, kinetic carbon isotope fractionation factors () associated with the aerobic biodegradation of vinyl chloride (VC), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cDCE), and trichloroethylene (TCE) were examined. Of the three solvents, the largest fractionation effects were observed for biodegradation of VC. Both metabolic and cometabolic VC degradation were studied using Mycobacterium aurum L1 (grown on VC), Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (grown on methane), Mycobacterium vaccae JOB 5 (grown on propane), and two VC enrichment cultures seeded from contaminated soils of Alameda Point and Travis Air Force Base, CA. M. aurum L1 caused the greatest fractionation (= -5.7) while for the cometabolic cultures, values ranged from -3.2 to -4.8. VC fractionation patterns for the enrichment cultures were within the range of those observed for the metabolic and cometabolic cultures (= -4.5 to -5.5). The fractionation for cometabolic degradation of TCE by Me. trichosporium OB3b was low (= -1.1), while no quantifiable carbon isotopic fractionation was observed during the cometabolic degradation of cDCE. For all three of the tested chlorinated ethenes, isotopic fractionation measured during aerobic degradation was significantly smaller than that reported for anaerobic reductive dechlorination. This study suggests that analysis of compound-specific isotopic fractionation could assist in determining whether aerobic or anaerobic degradation of VC and cDCE predominates in field applications of in-situ bioremediation. In contrast, isotopic fractionation effects associated with metabolic and cometabolic reactions are not sufficiently dissimilar to distinguish these processes in the field.

  19. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically ;heavy; compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  20. Hydrology & isotope tools to quantify carbon sources and sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Johannes A. C.; Lischeid, Gunnar; Gessler, Arthur

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation is fundamental for carbon uptake and usually assumes the largest portion in the evapotranspiration term. While interception can be separated by mapping various plant types in a catchment, the water isotope method yields numbers for pure evaporation. The latter causes enrichment of the heavier isotope in the remaining water phase, while transpiration leaves the isotope signal of water unaltered over longer time periods. Evaporation can thus be quantified in an integral manner over large areas by measuring water stable isotopes at points of river discharge and by comparing them to incoming precipitation. This method has been applied on scales of several thousand square kilometres and its calibration on scales of few square kilometres will allow to better constrain uncertainties. This necessitates comparison with hydrometric methods of well-instrumented catchments in several climatic regimes. Innovative small-scale methods involve determination of effective rainfall by time series analyses of hydrological data. This in turn requires temporal resolution of daily to hourly values to apply methods such as runoff recession or principal component analyses. It is also known that continental water fluxes are related to carbon fluxes through photosynthesis that in turn recycles large amounts of water via transpiration. This is usually described by the water use efficiency (WUE) term that quantifies how many moles of water transpire to accumulate one mole of CO2. However, so far only few empirical numbers are available for the spatio-temporal variability in WUE of plants and plant communities and further field experiments combined with isoscape approaches are necessary to constrain this term on a regional scale and its dependencies on factors such as light, temperature, water availability, plant type and height. Combined data can then serve to determine catchment-wide carbon uptake via the transpiration rates. Carbon accumulation can also be determined with eddy

  1. Rapid Analysis of Carbon Isotopic Compositions of Sedimentary Algal Sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménot-Combes, G.; Sessions, A. L.; Hayes, J. M.; Altabet, M. A.; Higginson, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a new procedure to produce highly resolved records of the carbon isotopic composition of algal sterols. The procedure includes: (i) recovery of geolipids from dry sediments by extraction in organic solvents; (ii) chromatographic fractionation of the extract on silica gel; and (iii) removal of n-alcohols with Silicalite. Simplifications allow processing of 24 samples per day. Miniaturization has reduced the amount of sediment required to 300 mg. The carbon isotopic composition of the extract is measured using a moving-wire combustion system initially developed to accept the effluent of a liquid chromatograph (Brand and Dobberstein, Isotopes Environ. Health Stud. 32, 275-283, 1996). Analyses are made at 25-sec intervals with an average standard error of 0.15‰ for samples ranging from 200 to 900 ngC. Comparison of the resulting records of the isotopic composition of algal lipids to parallel analyses of inorganic carbon allows calculation of the isotopic fractionation associated with primary production and thus provides information about conditions in the photic zone. It serves also to identify samples in which more detailed, compound-specific analysis would be worthwhile. A highly-resolved record of 13C in polar lipids from a sediment core collected on the Oman Margin (ODP 723B) indicates fractionations between 20 and 25‰ . Events occurring on timescales of a few hundred years have caused variations as large as 4‰ . Increases in the fractionation could be caused by slowed rates of growth, an increase of the surface area/volume ratio of the community or an increase in the concentration of CO2. Such changes could be related to varying strengths of upwelling, supplies of key nutrients, or to changes in the dominant population in the producer community. Characterization of the lipids present at selected depths, as well as the comparison of our profile with existing paleoceanographic records from the Oman Margin, should allow refinement of these

  2. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles and soil organic carbon dynamics in the lower Mississippi Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, J.G.; Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of depth trends of 13C abundance in soil organic matter and of 13C abundance from soil-respired CO2 provides useful indications of the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle and of paleoecological change. We measured depth trends of 13C abundance from cropland and control pairs of soils in the lower Mississippi Basin, as well as the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 produced during approximately 1-year soil incubation, to determine the role of several candidate processes on the 13C depth profile of soil organic matter. Depth profiles of 13C from uncultivated control soils show a strong relationship between the natural logarithm of soil organic carbon concentration and its isotopic composition, consistent with a model Rayleigh distillation of 13C in decomposing soil due to kinetic fractionation during decomposition. Laboratory incubations showed that initially respired CO 2 had a relatively constant 13C content, despite large differences in the 13C content of bulk soil organic matter. Initially respired CO2 was consistently 13C-depleted with respect to bulk soil and became increasingly 13C-depleted during 1-year, consistent with the hypothesis of accumulation of 13C in the products of microbial decomposition, but showing increasing decomposition of 13C-depleted stable organic components during decomposition without input of fresh biomass. We use the difference between 13C / 12C ratios (calculated as ??-values) between respired CO 2 and bulk soil organic carbon as an index of the degree of decomposition of soil, showing trends which are consistent with trends of 14C activity, and with results of a two-pooled kinetic decomposition rate model describing CO2 production data recorded during 1 year of incubation. We also observed inconsistencies with the Rayleigh distillation model in paired cropland soils and reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcium and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayr, Andrea; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Kisakürek, Basak; Balzer, Isabelle; Immenhauser, Adrian; Jürgen Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Different isotopic systems are influenced in multiple ways corresponding to the crystal structure, dehydration, deprotonation, adsorption, desorption, isotope exchange and diffusion processes. In this study we investigated the structural and kinetic effects on fractionation of stable Ca- and O-isotopes during CaCO3 precipitation. Calcite, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated using the CO2 diffusion technique[1]at a constant pH of 8.3, but various temperatures (6, 10, 25 and 40° C) and precipitation rates R (101.5 to 105 μmol h-1 m-2). The calcium isotopic fractionation between solution and vaterite is lower (Δ44/40Ca= -0.10 to -0.55 ‰) compared to calcite (-0.69 to -2.04 ‰) and aragonite (-0.91 to -1.55 ‰). In contrast the fractionation of oxygen isotopes is highest for vaterite (32.1 ‰), followed by aragonite (29.2 ‰) and calcite (27.6 ‰) at 25° C and equilibrium. The enrichment of 18O vs. 16O in all polymorphs decreases with increasing precipitation rate by around -0.7 ‰ per log(R). The calcium isotopic fractionation between calcite/ vaterite and aqueous Ca2+ increases with increasing precipitation rate by ˜0.45 ‰ per log(R) and ˜0.1 ‰ per log(R) at 25° C and 40° C, respectively. In contrast the fractionation of Ca-isotopes between aragonite and aqueous Ca2+ decreases with increasing precipitation rates. The large enrichment of 18O vs. 16O isotopes in carbonates is related to the strong bond of oxygen to the small and highly charged C4+-ion. In contrast equilibrium isotopic fractionation between solution and calcite or vaterite is nearly zero as the Ca-O bond length is similar for calcite, vaterite and the hydrated Ca. Aragonite incorporates preferentially the lighter 40Ca isotope as it has very large Ca-O bonds in comparison to the hydrated Ca. At the crystal surface the lighter 40Ca isotopes are preferentially incorporated as dehydration and diffusion of lighter isotopes are faster. Consequently, the surface becomes enriched in 40

  4. Oxygen isotopic disequilibrium in coccolith carbonate from phytoplankton blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, Charles K.; Balch, William M.

    1994-01-01

    Particulate carbonate was concentrated with a flow centrifuge out of the waters from a coccolithophore bloom in the Gulf of Maine for δ 18O CaCO 3 measurement. The particulate samples were composed of diverse organic materials, but most samples were observed to be dominated by Emiliana huxleyi CaCO 3. The oxygen isotopic fractionation associated with these E. huxleyi populations were determined by comparing oxygen isotope ratios in coccoliths with those of anbient waters at the time of collection. The observed isotopic fractionations were large (up to 2.8%), but did not match well with the expected values based on previous laboratory experiments. The temperatures calculated from the isotopic values of surface samples averaged 7.4°C cooler than the waters from which this carbonate was collected. These discrepancies may indicate that the coccoliths were precipatated in cooler water 10-20 m below the surface waters were they were captured, or that the waters had warmed since the coccoliths grew.

  5. Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation by Methylotrophic Methanogenic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Penger, Jörn; Conrad, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    In natural environments methane is usually produced by aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea. However, some methanogens can use C1 compounds such as methanol as the substrate. To determine the contributions of individual substrates to methane production, the stable-isotope values of the substrates and the released methane are often used. Additional information can be obtained by using selective inhibitors (e.g., methyl fluoride, a selective inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis). We studied stable carbon isotope fractionation during the conversion of methanol to methane in Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanosarcina barkeri, and Methanolobus zinderi and generally found large fractionation factors (−83‰ to −72‰). We further tested whether methyl fluoride impairs methylotrophic methanogenesis. Our experiments showed that even though a slight inhibition occurred, the carbon isotope fractionation was not affected. Therefore, the production of isotopically light methane observed in the presence of methyl fluoride may be due to the strong fractionation by methylotrophic methanogens and not only by hydrogenotrophic methanogens as previously assumed. PMID:22904062

  6. Precision performance of a Cavity Ring-down isotope spectrometer for carbon and oxygen isotopes of carbonate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, K. L.; Hoffnagle, J.; He, Y.; Fleck, D.; Saad, N.; Dennis, K.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a novel laser spectrometer intended specifically for the measurement of δ18O and δ13C in solid carbonate material. Carbonate carbon and oxygen isotopes provide key contributions into our understanding of climate, biogeochemical processes and the carbon cycle. For this reason, the isotopic measurements of carbonates are one of the most abundant measures made by Earth scientists today. Conventional measurement techniques using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), although optimized and prevalent, require dedicated personnel and can be expensive to operate. Here we present a new laser-based technique that will simplify measurements of δ18Ocarb and δ13Ccarb without compromising precision. To date, there have been no laser-based instruments with a demonstrated ability to meet the requirements of the carbonates community -- typically better than 0.1 ‰ for δ13C and δ18O for CO2 evolved from 1 mg of pure CaCO3. We will present data showing that the new Picarro G2171-i spectrometer meets these requirements. The spectrometer uses the laser-based spectroscopy technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS), a technology that has been successfully applied to many other isotopic ratio measurements including δ13C of CO2, δ13C of CH4, and δ18O and δD of H2O. The spectrometer has been optimized to analyze the absorption spectra of concentrated CO2, specifically the isotopologues 12C16O16O, 13C16O16O, 12C16O18O, and 12C18O16O. We employ a new sample delivery technique that enables a longer integration time period, and hence more precise data. Long-term results for a run of 540 pulses of tank CO2 (90 hours) records a 1σ standard deviation precision for δ18O and δ13C of < 0.08 ‰ and < 0.055 ‰, respectively. We coupled the CRDS spectrometer to an optimized sample acidification system and analyzed standards to assess the accuracy of the CRDS. We will present an inter-comparison between CRDS and IRMS for carbonates using standards commonly used

  7. Descriptions of carbon isotopes within the energy density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Atef; Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana; Tammam, M.

    2014-10-24

    Within the energy density functional (EDF) theory, the structure properties of Carbon isotopes are systematically studied. The shell model calculations are done for both even-A and odd-A nuclei, to study the structure of rich-neutron Carbon isotopes. The EDF theory indicates the single-neutron halo structures in {sup 15}C, {sup 17}C and {sup 19}C, and the two-neutron halo structures in {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C nuclei. It is also found that close to the neutron drip-line, there exist amazing increase in the neutron radii and decrease on the binding energies BE, which are tightly related with the blocking effect and correspondingly the blocking effect plays a significant role in the shell model configurations.

  8. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of avian uric acid.

    PubMed

    Bird, Michael I; Tait, Elaine; Wurster, Christopher M; Furness, Robert W

    2008-11-01

    We report results obtained using a new technique developed to measure the stable-isotope composition of uric acid isolated from bird excreta (guano). Results from a diet-switch feeding trial using zebra finches suggest that the delta(13)C of uric acid in the guano equilibrates with the diet of the bird within 3 days of a change in diet, while the equilibration time for delta(15)N may be longer. The average carbon isotope discrimination between uric acid and food before the diet switch was +0.34 +/- 1 per thousand (1sigma) while after the diet switch this increased slightly to +0.83 +/- 0.7 per thousand (1sigma). Nitrogen isotope discrimination was +1.3 +/- 0.3 per thousand (1sigma) and +0.3 +/- 0.3 per thousand (1sigma) before and after the diet switch; however, it is possible that the nitrogen isotope values did not fully equilibrate with diet switch over the course of the experiment. Analyses of other chemical fractions of the guano (organic residue after uric acid extraction and non-uric acid organics solubilised during extraction) suggest a total range of up to 3 per thousand for both delta(13)C and delta(15)N values in individual components of a single bulk guano sample. The analysis of natural samples from a range of terrestrial and marine species demonstrates that the technique yields isotopic compositions consistent with the known diets of the birds. The results from natural samples further demonstrate that multiple samples from the same species collected from the same location yield similar results, while different species from the same location exhibit a range of isotopic compositions indicative of different dietary preferences. Given that many samples of guano can be rapidly collected without any requirement to capture specimens for invasive sampling, the stable-isotope analysis of uric acid offers a new, simple and potentially powerful tool for studying avian ecology and metabolism.

  9. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Magdas, D. A. Cristea, G. Bot, A. Mirel, V.

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ{sup 13}C between batches from −29.7 to −31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between −31.3 to −34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  10. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.; Bot, A.; Mirel, V.

    2013-11-01

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in δ13C between batches from -29.7 to -31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between -31.3 to -34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  11. Constraining the global bromomethane budget from carbon stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlmann, Enno; Wittmer, Julian; Greule, Markus; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Seifert, Richard; Keppler, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Despite intense research in the last two decades, the global bromomethane (CH3Br) budget remains unbalanced with the known sinks exceeding the known sources by about 25%. The reaction with OH is the largest sink for CH3Br. We have determined the kinetic isotope effects for the reactions of CH3Br with the OH and Cl radical in order to better constrain the global CH3Br budget from an isotopic perspective. The isotope fractionation experiments were performed at 20±1°C in a 3500 L Teflon smog-chamber with initial CH3Br mixing ratios of about 2 and 10 ppm and perflourohexane (25 ppb) as internal standard. Atomic chlorine (Cl) was generated via photolysis of molecular chlorine (Cl2) using a solar simulator with an actinic flux comparable to that of the sun in mid-summer in Germany. OH radicals were generated via the photolysis of ozone (O3) at 253.7 nm in the presence of water vapor (RH = 70%).The mixing ratios of CH3Br, and perflourohexane were monitored by GC-MS with a time resolution of 15 minutes throughout the experiments. From each experiment 10 to 15 sub samples were taken in regular time intervals for subsequent carbon isotope ratio determinations by GC-IRMS performed at two independent laboratories in parallel. We found a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 17.6±3.3‰ for the reaction of CH3Br with OH and a KIE of 9.8±1.4 ‰ for the reaction with Cl*. We used these fractionation factors along with new data on the isotopic composition of CH3Br in the troposphere (-34±7‰) and the surface ocean (-26±7‰) along with reported source signatures, to constrain the unknown source from an isotopic perspective. The largest uncertainty in estimating the isotopic composition of the unknown source arises from the soil sink. Microbial degradation in soils is the second largest sink and assigned with a large fractionation factors of about 50‰. However, field experiments revealed substantially smaller apparent fractionation factors ranging from 11 to 22‰. In addition

  12. Investigating controls on boron isotope ratios in shallow marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang; Henehan, Michael J.; Hull, Pincelli M.; Reid, R. Pamela; Hardisty, Dalton S.; Hood, Ashleigh v. S.; Planavsky, Noah J.

    2017-01-01

    The boron isotope-pH proxy has been widely used to reconstruct past ocean pH values. In both planktic foraminifera and corals, species-specific calibrations are required in order to reconstruct absolute values of pH, due to the prevalence of so-called vital effects - physiological modification of the primary environmental signals by the calcifying organisms. Shallow marine abiotic carbonate (e.g. ooids and cements) could conceivably avoid any such calibration requirement, and therefore provide a potentially useful archive for reconstructions in deep (pre-Cenozoic) time. However, shallow marine abiotic carbonates could also be affected by local shifts in pH caused by microbial photosynthesis and respiration, something that has up to now not been fully tested. In this study, we present boron isotope measurements from shallow modern marine carbonates, from the Bahama Bank and Belize to investigate the potential of using shallow water carbonates as pH archives, and to explore the role of microbial processes in driving nominally 'abiogenic' carbonate deposition. For Bahama bank samples, our boron-based pH estimates derived from a range of carbonate types (i.e. ooids, peloids, hardground cements, carbonate mud, stromatolitic micrite and calcified filament micrite) are higher than the estimated modern mean-annual seawater pH values for this region. Furthermore, the majority (73%) of our marine carbonate-based pH estimates fall out of the range of the estimated pre-industrial seawater pH values for this region. In shallow sediment cores, we did not observe a correlation between measured pore water pH and boron-derived pH estimates, suggesting boron isotope variability is a depositional rather than early diagenetic signal. For Belize reef cements, conversely, the pH estimates are lower than likely in situ seawater pH at the time of cement formation. This study indicates the potential for complications when using shallow marine non-skeletal carbonates as marine pH archives

  13. A Modern Analogue for Proterozoic Inverse Carbon Isotope Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, H. G.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Pearson, A.

    2008-12-01

    The carbon isotope distribution preserved in sedimentary lipids changes near the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian boundary. In older samples, n-alkyl lipids contain more 13C than both isoprenoid lipids and kerogen [1]. In younger samples, the opposite prevails. Although extreme heterotrophy has been invoked as a mechanism to explain the enrichment in 13C [2], here we suggest another explanation. The switch may reflect a fundamental transition from an oligotrophic ocean dominated by prokaryotic biomass, to an ocean in which carbon fixation is more intensive and burial is dominated by eukaryotic biomass. An analogue for Proterozoic ordering is found in the modern, oligotrophic Pacific Ocean, where n-alkyl lipids of picoplankton (0.2-0.5 μm particulate matter) contain excess 13C relative to the same lipids found in larger size classes (> 0.5 μm). Picoplanktonic lipids are heavier isotopically (-18 ‰) than both the sterols of eukaryotes (-23 ‰ to -26 ‰) and the total organic matter (-20 ‰; TOM). The 0.2-0.5 μm size class also has a distinct chain-length abundance profile. Although large particles must be the vehicle for total carbon export, paradoxically the lipid component of export production appears to be dominated by the 0.2-0.5 μm source. The picoplanktonic chain lengths and isotopic composition dominate lipids of TOM at 670 meters. When the ratio of prokaryotic to eukaryotic production is high, as in the modern central Pacific Ocean, it appears that exported material has an inverse carbon isotope signature similar to that preserved in Precambrian samples. [1] Logan, G. A. et al., Nature 376:53-56 (1995). [2] Rothman, D. H. et al., PNAS 100:8124-8129 (2003).

  14. Carbon Isotope and Isotopomer Fractionation in Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, K.; Aikawa, Y.; Sakai, N.; Yamamoto, S.

    2011-05-01

    Observations of 13C species would be useful to investigate chemistry of carbon-bearing species. Recent observations in TMC-1 indicate that the abundances are different among carbon isotopomers of the same species. For instance, Takano et al. (1998) found that HCC13CN is more abundant than HC13CCN and H13CCCN, which indicates the three carbon atoms are not equivalent in HC_3N. Sakai et al. (2007; 2010) reported the abundance ratios of C13CS/13CCS and CCH/13CCH to be 4.2 and 1.6, respectively. Again, two carbon atoms are not equivalent in CCS and CCH. Sakai et al. (2007; 2010) discussed an origin of these anomalies and pointed out two possibilities: (i) fractionation during the formation of the species and (ii) rearrangements of the 13C position after the formation of molecules by isotopomer-exchange reactions. We construct a gas-grain chemical network model which includes carbon isotopes (12C and 13C) and isotopomers in order to investigate the evolution of molecular abundances, the carbon isotope ratios (12CX/13CX) and the isotopomer ratios (12C13CX/13C12CX) of CCH and CCS in dense molecular cores. We confirm that the isotope ratios of molecules, both in the gas phase and on grain surfaces, mostly depend on whether the species is formed from the carbon atom (ion) or the CO molecule; the isotope ratio is larger than the elemental abundance ratio of 12C/13C if the species is formed from the carbon atom, while the ratio is smaller if the species is formed from the CO molecule (cf. Langer et al. 1984). We successfully reproduce the observed C13CH/13CCH ratio in TMC-1 by considering the isotopomer-exchange reaction, 13CCH + H rightleftharpoons C13CH + H + 8.1 K. However, the C13CS/13CCS ratio remains lower than observed in TMC-1. We then assume the isotopomer-exchange reaction catalyzed by the H atom, 13CCS + H rightleftharpoons C13CS + H + 17.4 K. In the model with this reaction, the observed C13CS/13CCS, CCS/C13CS and CCS/13CCS ratios can be reproduced simultaneously.

  15. Basal area growth, carbon isotope discrimination, and intrinsic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many hectares of intensively managed Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb. Franco) stands in western North America are fertilized with nitrogen to increase growth rates. Understanding the mechanisms of response facilitates prioritization of stands for treatment. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the short-term basal area growth response to a single application of 224 kg N ha-1 as urea was associated with reduced stable carbon isotope discrimination (∆13C) and increased intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) in a 20-yr-old plantation of Douglas-fir in the Oregon Coast Range, USA. Increment cores were measured to estimate earlywood, latewood, and total basal area increment over a time series from 1997 to 2015. Stable carbon isotope discrimination and iWUE were estimated using earlywood and latewood stable carbon isotope concentrations in tree-ring holocellulose starting seven years before fertilization in early 2009 and ending seven years after treatment. A highly significant interaction effect between fertilization treatment and year was found for total basal area growth and earlywood basal area increment. Fertilized trees showed significant total basal area growth and earlywood basal area increment in the first (2009) and second (2010) growing seasons after fertilization in 2009. A marginally significant fertilization effect was found for latewood basal area increment only in the first growing season after treatment. A significant i

  16. Basal area growth, carbon isotope discrimination, and intrinsic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many hectares of intensively managed Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb. Franco) stands in western North America are fertilized with nitrogen to increase growth rates. Understanding the mechanisms of response facilitates prioritization of stands for treatment. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the short-term basal area growth response to a single application of 224 kg N ha-1 as urea was associated with reduced stable carbon isotope discrimination (∆13C) and increased intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) in a 20-yr-old plantation of Douglas-fir in the Oregon Coast Range, USA. Increment cores were measured to estimate earlywood, latewood, and total basal area increment over a time series from 1997 to 2015. Stable carbon isotope discrimination and iWUE were estimated using earlywood and latewood stable carbon isotope concentrations in tree-ring holocellulose starting seven years before fertilization in early 2009 and ending seven years after treatment. A highly significant interaction effect between fertilization treatment and year was found for total basal area growth and earlywood basal area increment. Fertilized trees showed significant total basal area growth and earlywood basal area increment in the first (2009) and second (2010) growing seasons after fertilization in 2009. A marginally significant fertilization effect was found for latewood basal area increment only in the first growing season after treatment. A significant i

  17. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope enrichment in primate tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Melinda L.; Karpanty, Sarah M.; Zihlman, Adrienne L.; Koch, Paul L.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Isotopic studies of wild primates have used a wide range of tissues to infer diet and model the foraging ecologies of extinct species. The use of mismatched tissues for such comparisons can be problematic because differences in amino acid compositions can lead to small isotopic differences between tissues. Additionally, physiological and dietary differences among primate species could lead to variable offsets between apatite carbonate and collagen. To improve our understanding of the isotopic chemistry of primates, we explored the apparent enrichment (ε*) between bone collagen and muscle, collagen and fur or hair keratin, muscle and keratin, and collagen and bone carbonate across the primate order. We found that the mean ε* values of proteinaceous tissues were small (≤1‰), and uncorrelated with body size or phylogenetic relatedness. Additionally, ε* values did not vary by habitat, sex, age, or manner of death. The mean ε* value between bone carbonate and collagen (5.6 ± 1.2‰) was consistent with values reported for omnivorous mammals consuming monoisotopic diets. These primate-specific apparent enrichment values will be a valuable tool for cross-species comparisons. Additionally, they will facilitate dietary comparisons between living and fossil primates. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00442-010-1701-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20628886

  18. The Li isotope composition of modern biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, M.; West, A. J.; Adkins, J. F.; Paris, G.; Eagle, R.; Freitas, P. S.; Bagard, M. L.; Ries, J. B.; Corsetti, F. A.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium stable isotope composition (δ7Li) of sedimentary carbonates has great potential to unravel weathering rates and intensity in the past, with implications for understanding the carbon cycle over geologic time. However, so far very little is known about the potential influence of fractionation of the stable Li isotope composition of biogenic carbonates. Here, we investigate the δ7Li of various organisms (particularly mollusks, echinoderms and brachiopods) abundant in the Phanerozoic record, in order to understand which geologic archives might provide the best targets for reconstructing past seawater composition. The range of measured samples includes (i) modern calcite and aragonite shells from variable natural environments, (ii) shells from organisms grown under controlled conditions (temperature, salinity, pCO2), and (iii) fossil shells from a range of species collected from Miocene deposits. When possible, both the inner and outer layers of bivalves were micro-sampled to assess the intra-shell heterogeneity. For calcitic shells, the measured δ7Li of bivalve species range from +32 to +41‰ and is systematically enriched in the heavy isotope relative to seawater (31 ‰) and to inorganic calcite, which is characterized by Δ7Licalcite-seawater = -2 to -5‰ [1]. The Li isotope composition of aragonitic bivalves, ranging from +16 to +22‰, is slightly fractionated to both high and low δ7Li relative to inorganic aragonite. The largest intra-shell Li isotope variability is observed for mixed calcite-aragonite shells (more than 20‰) whereas in single mineralogy shells, intra-shell δ7Li variability is generally less than 3‰. Overall, these results suggest a strong influence of vital effects on Li isotopes during bio-calcification of bivalve shells. On the contrary, measured brachiopods systematically exhibit fractionation that is very similar to inorganic calcite, with a mean δ7Li of 27.0±1.5‰, suggesting that brachiopods may provide good

  19. Influence of paleoenvironment on the carbon isotope compositions of pedogenic carbonate formed in Paleozoic vertic paleosols

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, C.I.; Driese, S.G.; Seager, P.G. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Pedogenic carbonate occurs in numerous vertic-featured paleosols developed in Paleozoic red bed successions of the southern and central Appalachians. The authors note systematic differences in the delta C-13 values of soil carbonate developed during pedogenesis in coastal-marine and distal alluvial plain environments as compared to pedogenesis in proximal alluvial plain environments. These differences have been measured in pedogenic carbonate occurring in late Silurian (Bloomsburg Fm.) vertic-featured paleosols. Evidence for pre-existing marine skeletal material in these paleosols has been observed only in the lowermost portions of the Bloomsburg Fm.; other paleosols were apparently devoid of any precursor carbonate phase. Therefore, the heavier isotopic signatures of pedogenic carbonate within coastal-marine and distal alluvial plain environments may be due to contributions from marine spray, marine or brackish groundwaters, or to less-extensive biological activity. Although carbonate nodules are commonly developed in all environments, rhizoliths appear to be more abundant in paleosols developed in proximal alluvial plain environments. Despite the large differences in carbon isotope compositions attributed to paleoenvironment, these vertic-featured paleosols share common patterns of carbonate cementation and isotopic trends (nodules enriched in C-13 relative to rhizoliths). Thus, despite the different pedogenic paleoenvironments, there were similar physico-chemical controls on soil carbonate precipitation. Better understanding of the paleoclimatic information retained in paleosols will require thorough petrographic, sedimentologic and geochemical studies.

  20. Local and regional oscillations of carbon and oxygen isotopes in terestrial carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipitytė, Raminta; Stančikaitė, Miglė

    2014-05-01

    Stable isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen in sediment carbonates are used as a tool to identify climatic changes in the past [1], [2]. Carbon is more related to humidity whereas oxygen is thought to respond the temperature [2]. Nevertheless number of questions about local, regional and global scale impacts to these records is left. In this research work carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in lacustrine carbonates are used to identify palaeoenvironmental dynamics of different locations. Samples of lacutrine carbonates were obtained from 8 sequences of different sites in Lithuania (4), Poland (1), Belarus (1) and Kaliningrad (1). Every sequence was divided into 2 cm intervals. The study showed differences in average carbon and oxygen isotope ratios between Lithuania and other countries (Poland, Belarus and Kaliningrad). Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in 4 sites in Lithuania are: ¯U la δ13C -4.72± 2.11, o and δ18O -9.46± 1.9, o ; Zervynos δ13C -4.79± 1.82, o and δ18O -9.57± 1.69, o ; Rudnia δ13C -4.94± 7.53, o and δ18O -9.3± 3.92, o ; Pauliai δ13C -4.15± 0.67, o and δ18O -9.94± 1.07, o : In other countries: Poland δ13C -1.07± 1.94, o and δ18O -7.69± 0.95, o ; Belarus δ13C 0.97± 1.94, o and δ18O -7.61± 1.42, o ; Kaliningrad δ13C -1.14± 1.43, o and δ18O -6.51± 1.00, o : Average stable carbon and oxygen isotope values from four sites in Lithuania were -4.65 o for carbon and -9.51 o for oxygen. Despite homogeneity of average isotope signals in these four sites there are relatively large oscillations of isotopic values in Rudnia and relatively small in Pauliai. These oscillations could be related to local characteristics of particular place such as environmental conditions, water balance, input of terrigenous materials into basin, etc. Total amount of CaCO3 could also play a significant role in reconstructing palaeoenvironment from stable isotopes and creating isomaps. The comparison of isotope records from different locations could enable to

  1. Stable carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotopes in non-carbonate fractions of cold-seep carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dong; Peng, Yongbo; Peckmann, Jörn; Roberts, Harry; Chen, Duofu

    2017-04-01

    Sulfate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) supports chemosynthesis-based communities and limits the release of methane from marine sediments. This process promotes the formation of carbonates close to the seafloor along continental margins. The geochemical characteristics of the carbonate minerals of these rocks are increasingly understood, questions remain about the geochemical characteristics of the non-carbonate fractions. Here, we report stable carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope patterns in non-carbonate fractions of seep carbonates. The authigenic carbonates were collected from three modern seep provinces (Black Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and South China Sea) and three ancient seep deposits (Marmorito, northern Italy, Miocene; SR4 deposit of the Lincoln Creek Formation and Whiskey Creek, western Washington, USA, Eocene to Oligocene). The δ13C values of non-carbonate fractions range from ˜-25‰ to -80‰ VPDB. These values indicate that fossil methane mixed with varying amounts of pelagic organic matter is the dominant source of carbon in these fractions. The relatively small offset between the δ34S signatures of the non-carbonate fractions and the respective sulfide minerals suggests that locally produced hydrogen sulfide is the main source of sulfur in seep environments. The δ15N values of the non-carbonate fractions are generally lower than the corresponding values of deep-sea sediments, suggesting that organic nitrogen is mostly of a local origin. This study reveals the potential of using δ13C, δ15N, δ34S values to discern seep and non-seep deposits. In cases where δ13Ccarbonate values are only moderately low due to mixing processes and lipid biomarkers have been erased in the course of burial, it is difficult to trace back AOM owing to the lack of other records. This problem is even more pronounced when authigenic carbonate is not available in ancient seep environments. Acknowledgments: The authors thank BOEM and NOAA for their years' support

  2. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (-4.3 to -16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from -27.5 to -25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic carbonate

  3. Climate warming, euxinia and carbon isotope perturbations during the Carnian (Triassic) Crisis in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. D.; Wignall, P. B.; Joachimski, M. M.; Bond, D. P. G.; Grasby, S. E.; Lai, X. L.; Wang, L. N.; Zhang, Z. T.; Sun, S.

    2016-06-01

    The Carnian Humid Episode (CHE), also known as the Carnian Pluvial Event, and associated biotic changes are major enigmas of the Mesozoic record in western Tethys. We show that the CHE also occurred in eastern Tethys (South China), suggestive of a much more widespread and probably global climate perturbation. Oxygen isotope records from conodont apatite indicate a double-pulse warming event. The CHE coincided with an initial warming of 4 °C. This was followed by a transient cooling period and then a prolonged ∼7 °C warming in the later Carnian (Tuvalian 2). Carbon isotope perturbations associated with the CHE of western Tethys occurred contemporaneously in South China, and mark the start of a prolonged period of carbon cycle instability that persisted until the late Carnian. The dry-wet transition during the CHE coincides with the negative carbon isotope excursion and the temperature rise, pointing to an intensification of hydrologic cycle activities due to climatic warming. While carbonate platform shutdown in western Tethys is associated with an influx of siliciclastic sediment, the eastern Tethyan carbonate platforms are overlain by deep-water anoxic facies. The transition from oxygenated to euxinic facies was via a condensed, manganiferous carbonate (MnO content up to 15.1 wt%), that records an intense Mn shuttle operating in the basin. Significant siliciclastic influx in South China only occurred after the CHE climatic changes and was probably due to foreland basin development at the onset of the Indosinian Orogeny. The mid-Carnian biotic crisis thus coincided with several phenomena associated with major extinction events: a carbonate production crisis, climate warming, δ13 C oscillations, marine anoxia, biotic turnover and flood basalt eruptions (of the Wrangellia Large Igneous Province).

  4. Bivalve tissue as a carbon and nitrogen isotope baseline indicator in coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumori, Kayoko; Oi, Misa; Doi, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Okuda, Noboru; Miller, Todd W.; Kuwae, Michinobu; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Genkai-Kato, Motomi; Koizumi, Yoshitsugu; Omori, Koji; Takeoka, Hidetaka

    2008-08-01

    Pinctada fucata martensii mantle tissue and gut contents were examined as baseline indicators of carbon and nitrogen isotope composition at six stations in the Uwa Sea, Japan. Substantial variations in δ13C and δ15N values of oysters among stations were observed, with δ13C being consistently lower at Hiburi Island (-18.1‰) than at other stations (-17.2‰). Oysters from fish farm sites were enriched in δ15N (8.1‰) relative to those from unaffected sites (6.8‰), suggesting that fish farming tends to increase baseline δ15N values. The mean Δ δ13C (0.8‰) was consistent over space and time, whereas the average Δ δ15N slightly increased in summer. The relatively low δ15N enrichment compared to the theoretical isotope fractionation factor (3.4‰) may be due to oyster-specific physiological attributes. Carbon and nitrogen isotope turnover rates were roughly similar within a tissue, and mantle tissue turnover rate was estimated to be 120-180 days. These results indicated that oysters are long-term integrators of δ13C and δ15N from their diet and that δ13C of oysters is a more accurate bioindicator of isotopic baselines than δ15N for marine ecological studies.

  5. Biogeochemistry of a mesotrophic lake and it's carbon isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, S.; Ehresman, W.; Sadurski, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    Crystal Lake, located in west-central Ohio, is the main lake of a series of 4 interconnected lakes. The location and orientation indicate that they are most likely moulin-induced glacial lakes. Crystal Lake is about 5 hectares (12.5 acres). The maximum depth and mean depth are about 11.9 meters and 3.8 meters, respectively. As a result of this high depth-to-surface area ratio, it creates a strong thermal stratification during warm season. The lake was classified as eutrophic lake. However, the water quality has improved in the past decades. The chlorophyll in the epillimnion and upper metalimlion is about 4 μg/l and the Secchi disk depth is about 3.0 meters (10 feet). It is therefore reclassified as mesotrophic lake. Dissolved oxygen maximum (15.6 ppm) and pH peak (8.6) existed at 4.1 meter on August 16, 2010. At around 7.3 meter, where redox potential reading shows a sudden change from oxidizing to reducing , a ~half meter layer of dense purple sulfur bacteria coincides with turbidity, chlorophyll, and sulfate maxima. The chemical depth profiles are a result of thermal stratification, oxygenic photosynthesis by algae, non-oxygenic photosynthesis by purple sulfur bacteria, and respiration in the hypolimnion. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in the epilimnion and metalimnion is coupled by it’s dissolution in the hypolimnion. The purpose of the current project is to present extensive background study to form the framework for quantifying the carbon isotope evolution with multiple reaction pathways. Carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon is being analyzed. Wigley-Plummer-Pearson mass transfer model will be used for the quantification of carbon isotope reaction pathways.

  6. Effects of Water on Carbonate Clumped Isotope Bond Reordering Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, D. C.; Passey, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope geothermometry is a powerful tool for reconstructing past temperatures, both in surface environments and in the shallow crust. The method is based on heavy isotope "clumps" within single carbonate groups (e.g., 13C18O16O2-2), whose overabundance beyond levels predicted by chance is determined by mineralization temperature. The degree of clumped isotope overabundance can change at elevated temperatures (ca. >100ºC) owing to solid-state diffusion of C and O through the mineral lattice. Understanding the kinetics of this clumped isotope reordering process is a prerequisite for application to geological questions involving samples that have been heated in the subsurface. Thus far, the effect of water on reordering kinetics has not been explored. The presence of water dramatically increases rates of oxygen self-diffusion in calcite, but whether this water-enhanced diffusion is limited to the mineral surface or extends into the bulk crystal lattice is not clear. Here we present experimentally determined Arrhenius parameters for reordering rates in optical calcite heated under aqueous high pressure (100 MPa) conditions. We observe only marginal increases in reordering rates under these wet, high pressure conditions relative to rates observed for the same material reacted under dry, low pressure conditions. The near identical clumped isotope reordering rates for wet and dry conditions contrasts with the orders of magnitude increase in oxygen diffusivity at the mineral surface when water is present. This suggests the latter effect arises from surface reactions that have minimal influence on the diffusivity of C or O in the bulk mineral. Our results also imply that previously published reordering kinetics determined under dry, low pressure experimental conditions are applicable to geological samples that have been heated in the presence of water.

  7. Cold seep status archived in authigenic carbonates: Mineralogical and isotopic evidence from Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yang; Sun, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhiyong; Xu, Li; Gong, Junli; Lu, Hongfeng

    2015-12-01

    Cold-seep carbonates are precipitated under high alkalinity conditions created by the anaerobic oxidation of methane in cold-seep sites. Multiple Ca-Mg-carbonate phases are identified, including aragonite, low-Mg calcite (LMC), high-Mg calcite (HMC), protodolomite, and dolomite. These phases result from different conditions that are related with cold-seep activities. Here, we report on the relationship between the Ca-Mg-carbonate phases and the cold-seep status. Authigenic carbonates were sampled from northern slope of South China Sea. Carbon isotopic compositions of samples from Shenhu area are lower than -40‰, indicating methane-derived carbon. The δ13C values of samples from Southwest (SW) Taiwan area range from ~-30‰ to ~-20‰, which is the result of the mixture of methane carbon and seawater carbon. Carbonate phases were identified according to the composition and structure results. Samples from Shenhu area are composed of protodolomite and HMC. Three zones were discovered from the center to the rim of the cross-section of the tube-like sample from SW Taiwan area. From the external to the internal zones, the carbonate phases are HMC; LMC and protodolomite; HMC, respectively. The intensity of superstructure reflections of the protodolomite from Shenhu area is stronger than that from SW Taiwan area, indicating higher MgCO3 content. Based on the formation conditions of Ca-Mg-carbonates from LMC to dolomite, those with higher MgCO3 content are formed in more active cold-seep environment. According to the distribution of carbonate phases in each sample, the cold seep flux was high in Shenhu area and was sustained for a long time. By contrast, the flux in SW Taiwan area was relatively low and not stable. It once became higher, but finally returned to low.

  8. The carbon and oxygen isotope records of reef-dwelling foraminifers subjected to five varied pCO2 seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikami, M.; Ishimura, T.; Suzuki, A.; Nojiri, Y.; Kawahata, H.

    2013-12-01

    in imperforate. For oxygen isotope ratio variation possibility among species would be caused by their Mg-content concentration in calcite shells. The distinct difference in the level of carbon isotope ratio between pure calcite and perforate foraminifera might be influenced by the degree of dependency on metabolic CO2 used for shell construction. The imperforate species would use most carbon derived from bicarbonate ion of seawater directly because the carbon isotope ratio of shell is almost same to that of pure calcite. Therefore, oxygen and carbon isotope ratio of foraminiferal test have the potential to reveal calcification mechanism of two species.

  9. STABLE ISOTOPIC EVIDENCE OF CARBON AND NITROGEN USE IN CULTURED ECTOMYCORRHIZAL AND SAPROTROPHIC FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes in sporocarps have proven useful for inferring ectomycorrhizal or saprotrophic status and understanding carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilization. However, greater understanding of processes producing isotopic concentrations is needed. We measured natural abundanc...

  10. STABLE ISOTOPIC EVIDENCE OF CARBON AND NITROGEN USE IN CULTURED ECTOMYCORRHIZAL AND SAPROTROPHIC FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes in sporocarps have proven useful for inferring ectomycorrhizal or saprotrophic status and understanding carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilization. However, greater understanding of processes producing isotopic concentrations is needed. We measured natural abundanc...

  11. Carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate fluorapatite in the Monterey Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Leather, J.M.; Emanuele, G.; Kastner, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Studies from organic-rich continental margins have indicated that carbonate fluorapatite (CFA) forms at or just below the sediment surface and, therefore, may record paleoceanography. To investigate this possibility, CFA from the Miocene Monterey Formation in the Santa Maria (SM) and Santa Barbara (SB) basins was analyzed for {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub c} in the lattice-bound carbonate ion and for {delta}{sup 18}O{sub P} in the phosphate ion. In contrast to modern continental margins, these sections are characterized by low sedimentation rates, but contain high (<5 to >20%) organic carbon contents (possibly related to anoxic bottom-water conditions ). The CFA isotopic data display a more restricted range than the data for dolomites from the same sections. The SM CFA {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} ({minus}6.7 to {minus}3.4% PDB) and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub c} ({minus}7.8 to {minus}3.5% PDB) values are more depleted than the SB CFA {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} ({minus}2.5 to 1.8% PDB) and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub c} ({minus}2.9 to 0.9% PDB) values. The {delta}{sup 18}O{sub p} values (15.4 to 20.9 % SMOW) are strongly correlated with the {delta}{sup 18}O{sub c} values and suggest that both record the same diagenetic environment. The content of lattice-bound carbonate in SM CFA (2 {plus minus} 1%) is also lower than in SB CFA (3.5 {plus minus} 1%). The CFA data suggest an early paleoenvironmental or diagenetic signal overprinted by later deeper burial diagenesis, especially in the SM basin where deeper burial and/or greater geothermal gradients were experienced. In addition, within each site there are inverse relationships between {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} and {delta}{sup 18}o{sub c} and between {delta}{sup 13}C{sub c} and the amount of lattice-bound carbonate that allow various diagenetic environments to be distinguished.

  12. Photosynthetic fractionation of the stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, R.D. ); Fogel, M.L.; Berry, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Isotope discrimination during photosynthetic exchange of O[sub 2] and CO[sub 2] was measured using enzyme, thylakoid, and whole cell preparations. Evolved oxygen from isolated spinach thylakoids was isotopically identical (within analytical error) to its source water. Similar results were obtained with Anacystis nidulans Richter and Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin cultures purged with helium. For consumptive reactions, discrimination ([triangle], where 1 + [triangle]/1000 equals the isotope effect, k[sup 16]/k[sup 18] or k[sup 12]/k[sup 13]) was determined by analysis of residual substrate (O[sub 2] or CO[sub 2]). The [triangle] for the Mehler reaction, mediated by ferredoxin or methylviologen, was 15.3[per thousand]. Oxygen isotope discrimination during oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) catalyzed by RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was 21.3[per thousand] and independent of enzyme source, unlike carbon isotope dicrimination: 30.3[per thousand] for spinach enzyme and 19.6 to 23[per thousand] for Rhodospirillum rubrum and A. nidulans enzymes, depending on reaction conditions. The [triangle] for O[sub 2] consumption catalyzed by glycolate oxidase was 22.7[per thousand]. Consistent with this, when Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesopyll cells approached the compensation point within a sealed vessel, the [delta][sup 18]O of dissolved O[sub 2] came to a steady-state value of about 21.5[per thousand] relative to the source water. The results provide improved estimates of discrimination factors in several reactions prominent in the global oxygen cycle and indicate that photorespiration plays a significant part in determining the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. 47 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Photosynthetic Fractionation of the Stable Isotopes of Oxygen and Carbon.

    PubMed Central

    Guy, R. D.; Fogel, M. L.; Berry, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Isotope discrimination during photosynthetic exchange of O2 and CO2 was measured using enzyme, thylakoid, and whole cell preparations. Evolved oxygen from isolated spinach thylakoids was isotopically identical (within analytical error) to its source water. Similar results were obtained with Anacystis nidulans Richter and Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin cultures purged with helium. For consumptive reactions, discrimination ([delta], where 1 + [delta]/1000 equals the isotope effect, k16/k18 or k12/k13) was determined by analysis of residual substrate (O2 or CO2). The [delta] for the Mehler reaction, mediated by ferredoxin or methylviologen, was 15.3[per mille (thousand) sign]. Oxygen isotope discrimination during oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) catalyzed by RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was 21.3[per mille (thousand) sign] and independent of enzyme source, unlike carbon isotope discrimination: 30.3[per mille (thousand) sign] for spinach enzyme and 19.6 to 23[per mille (thousand) sign] for Rhodospirillum rubrum and A. nidulans enzymes, depending on reaction conditions. The [delta] for O2 consumption catalyzed by glycolate oxidase was 22.7[per mille (thousand) sign]. The expected overall [delta] for photorespiration is about 21.7[per mille (thousand) sign]. Consistent with this, when Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesophyll cells approached the compensation point within a sealed vessel, the [delta]18O of dissolved O2 came to a steady-state value of about 21.5[per mille (thousand) sign] relative to the source water. The results provide improved estimates of discrimination factors in several reactions prominent in the global O cycle and indicate that photorespiration plays a significant part in determining the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. PMID:12231663

  14. Were carbon isotopic gradients in post-snowball oceans inverted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, G. P.; Hoffman, P. F.; MacDonald, F. A.; Higgins, J. A.; Schrag, D. P.

    2008-12-01

    In the Otavi Group of Namibia, 900 m of platform carbonate strata above the 635-Ma post-glacial cap dolostone are consistently lighter in δ13C by up to 2.5 per mil than the adjacent 180-320 m of correlative, >0.6-km-deep, foreslope strat. Assuming the foreslope carbonate was equilibrated with deeper water, the normal isotopic gradient dynamically sustained by the biological 'pump' was inverted. Geochronology of isotopically correlative Doushantuo strata in South China suggests that the inverted gradient lasted for ~2 Myr after the glacial termination. Thereafter, the inverted gradient disappears. A similar transient inverse gradient follows the older Cryogenian glaciation in Arctic Alaska. We hypothesize that the inverse gradients reflect high pCO2 in the glacial aftermaths. This had two consequences. First, the size of the DIC pool was enlarged, reducing the isotopic effect of the biological pump. Second, isotopic fractionation was strongly temperature-dependent due to the large fractionation between CO2 and CO32- coupled with the dominance of CO2(gas) among carbon species at pH<7.2. A difference in SST of ~25° between the areas of air-sea equilibration is required to account for a 2.5 per mil gradient in δ13C. This is realized in non-upwelling zones of the southern hemisphere today, where warm subtropical surface waters are underlain by Antarctic Intermediate Water. For our hypothesis to be valid, a large meridional temperature gradient must have coexisted with strong CO2 radiative forcing.

  15. Determination of Forest Canopy Carbon Respiration From FTIR Measurements of Carbon Dioxide Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambaliza, M. O.; Mount, G.; Lamb, B.; Westberg, H.

    2004-12-01

    Isotopic analysis of atmospheric carbon dioxide provides a means to understand the complex carbon exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Measurements of isotopic concentrations have traditionally been done by laboratory mass spectrometry analysis of grab samples taken from distant field sites with consequent limits on the number and frequency of measurements. In this work, we describe the development of an insitu carbon dioxide isotope analysis method based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Using molecular absorption in a 4-pass 1-meter length cell in the 2100 to 2600 cm-1 region of the 12CO2 and 13CO2 isotopic vibration-rotation bands, concentrations of both isotopes are measured, and from their ratio, \\delta13CO2 is determined. Coupled with the disjunct eddy covariance technique, CO2 fluxes can also be measured. We demonstrate the capabilities of this technique using measurements in a poplar forest plantation near Boardman, Oregon. Beer's law and a nonlinear least squares analysis algorithm were used to analyze the data. Careful attention was paid to avoid analysis in spectral regions of nonlinear absorption. Sequential measurements were made at seven levels on a 25-meter tower erected in an 11-m canopy. Carbon dioxide concentrations are calculated to a precision of about 0.5 ppmv, and \\delta13CO2 to about 0.2‰ precision. In this work, we present initial results of temporal and vertical variations of CO2 concentrations and \\delta13CO2 in this forest.

  16. Carbon Isotope Fractionation Effects During Degradation of Methyl Halides in Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.; Bill, M.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2001-12-01

    Fumigation of agricultural soils prior to planting row crops constitutes the largest anthropogenic source of methyl bromide (MeBr) to the atmosphere. Typically, more than 60% of the MeBr added is lost to the atmosphere during the 5-6 day fumigation period. The remainder is oxidized by bacteria or otherwise degraded in the soil. In experiments using washed cells of methylotrophic bacteria isolated from agricultural soil (strain IMB-1), oxidation of MeBr, methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl iodide to CO2 resulted in large (up to 70‰ ) fractionation of stable carbon isotopes (Miller, et al. 2001). By contrast, fractionation measured in field soils using both in situ techniques and bottle incubations with MeBr was less than 35‰ . This discrepancy was initially attributed to the large transportation losses that occur without isotopic fractionation during field fumigation. However, this rationale cannot explain why bottle incubations with soil resulted in lower fractionation factors than incubations with bacterial cultures. We conducted additional laboratory bottle experiments to examine the biological and chemical controls of carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of MeBr and MeCl by soils and bacteria. Soils were collected from a strawberry field in Santa Cruz County, California within two weeks of the start of each experiment. The rate of removal of methyl halides from the headspace was greatest during incubations at soil moisture contents around 8%. Increasing the amount of soil and hence native bacteria in each bottle minimized the lag in uptake by up to several days. No lag was observed during incubations of soils with added IMB-1. Stable isotope fractionation factors were similar for degradation by live soil and live soil with added IMB-1. Heat-killed controls of cell cultures showed little uptake (<10% over 5 days) and no isotope fractionation. Heat-killed soil controls, by contrast, demonstrated significant loss of MeBr (20-30%) with isotope

  17. Interpreting bryophyte stable carbon isotope composition: Plants as temporal and spatial climate recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royles, Jessica; Horwath, Aline B.; Griffiths, Howard

    2014-04-01

    are unable to control tissue water content although physiological adaptations allow growth in a wide range of habitats. Carbon isotope signals in two mosses (Syntrichia ruralis and Chorisodontium aciphyllum) and two liverworts (Conocephalum conicum and Marchantia polymorpha), whether instantaneous (real time, Δ13C), or organic matter (as δ13COM), provide an assimilation-weighted summary of bryophyte environmental adaptations. In mosses, δ13COM is within the measured range of Δ13C values, which suggests that other proxies, such as compound-specific organic signals, will be representative of historical photosynthetic and growth conditions. The liverworts were photosynthetically active over a wider range of relative water contents (RWC) than the mosses. There was a consistent 5‰ offset between Δ13C values in C. conicum and M. polymorpha, suggestive of greater diffusion limitation in the latter. Analysis of a C. aciphyllum moss-peat core showed the isotopic composition over the past 200 years reflects recent anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Once corrected for source-CO2 inputs, the seasonally integrated Δ13COM between 1350 and 2000 A.D. varied by 1.5‰ compared with potential range of the 12‰ measured experimentally, demonstrating the relatively narrow range of conditions under which the majority of net assimilation takes place. Carbon isotope discrimination also varies spatially, with a 4‰ shift in epiphytic bryophyte organic matter found between lowland Amazonia and upper montane tropical cloud forest in the Peruvian Andes, associated with increased diffusion limitation.

  18. Stable carbon isotope fractionation by acetotrophic sulfur-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goevert, Dennis; Conrad, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    Acetate is the most important intermediate in anaerobic degradation of organic matter. The carbon isotope effects associated with the oxidation of acetate (epsilon(ac)) were examined for four acetotrophic sulfur reducers, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, Desulfuromonas thiophila, Desulfurella acetivorans, and Hippea maritima. During the consumption of acetate and sulfur, acetate was enriched in (13)C by 11.5 and 11.2 per thousand in Desulfuromonas acetoxidans and Desulfuromonas thiophila, respectively. By contrast, isotope fractionation in D. acetivorans and H. maritima resulted in isotope enrichment factors of epsilon(ac)=-6.3 per thousand and -8.4 per thousand, respectively. These sulfur-reducing bacteria all metabolize acetate via the tricarboxylic acid cycle, but have different mechanisms for the initial activation of acetate. In Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, acetyl-CoA is formed by succinyl-CoA : acetate-CoA-transferase, and in D. acetivorans by acetate kinase and phosphate acetyltransferase. Hence, values of epsilon(ac) seem to be characteristic for the type of activation of acetate to acetyl-CoA in acetotrophic sulfur reducers. Summarizing epsilon(ac)-values in anaerobic acetotrophic microorganisms, it appears that isotope fractionation depends on the mechanism of acetate activation to acetyl-CoA, on the key enzyme of the acetate dissimilation pathway, and on the bioavailability of acetate, which all have to be considered when using delta(13)C of acetate in environmental samples for diagnosis of the involved microbial populations.

  19. Hydrogen recycle and isotope exchange from dense carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.

    1987-03-01

    Dense carbon films were prepared by deposition from hydrogen plasmas to which methane was added. The initial hydrogen recycle coefficient from the films ranges from more than two to less than one. The films contain large amounts of hydrogen (up to 50 at. %). They adjust themselves to provide recycling coefficients near unity. Isotope changeover times tend to be long. The reservoir of hydrogen instantly available to the plasma to maintain or stabilize the recycle coefficient and isotopic composition of the plasma is 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ or greater depending on film preparation, temperature, and prior plasma exposure conditions. Simulator observations tend to support and improve the understanding of the observations in TEXTOR and JET; however, they also point out the need for control of film deposition and operating parameters to provide desirable and reproducible properties. The films and the hydrogen isotopes they contain can be removed easily by plasma processes. Since the hydrogen in these films is relatively immobile except in the zone reached by energetic particles, or at temperatures above 400/sup 0/C, dense carbon films may be useful in managing the tritium recovery from near-term fusion experiments.

  20. Oxygen isotopic composition of carbon dioxide in the middle atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mao-Chang; Blake, Geoffrey A; Lewis, Brenton R; Yung, Yuk L

    2007-01-02

    The isotopic composition of long-lived trace molecules provides a window into atmospheric transport and chemistry. Carbon dioxide is a particularly powerful tracer, because its abundance remains >100 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in the mesosphere. Here, we successfully reproduce the isotopic composition of CO(2) in the middle atmosphere, which has not been previously reported. The mass-independent fractionation of oxygen in CO(2) can be satisfactorily explained by the exchange reaction with O((1)D). In the stratosphere, the major source of O((1)D) is O(3) photolysis. Higher in the mesosphere, we discover that the photolysis of (16)O(17)O and (16)O(18)O by solar Lyman-alpha radiation yields O((1)D) 10-100 times more enriched in (17)O and (18)O than that from ozone photodissociation at lower altitudes. This latter source of heavy O((1)D) has not been considered in atmospheric simulations, yet it may potentially affect the "anomalous" oxygen signature in tropospheric CO(2) that should reflect the gross carbon fluxes between the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere. Additional laboratory and atmospheric measurements are therefore proposed to test our model and validate the use of CO(2) isotopic fractionation as a tracer of atmospheric chemical and dynamical processes.

  1. Boron isotope evidence for oceanic carbon dioxide leakage during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Botí, M A; Marino, G; Foster, G L; Ziveri, P; Henehan, M J; Rae, J W B; Mortyn, P G; Vance, D

    2015-02-12

    Atmospheric CO2 fluctuations over glacial-interglacial cycles remain a major challenge to our understanding of the carbon cycle and the climate system. Leading hypotheses put forward to explain glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations invoke changes in deep-ocean carbon storage, probably modulated by processes in the Southern Ocean, where much of the deep ocean is ventilated. A central aspect of such models is that, during deglaciations, an isolated glacial deep-ocean carbon reservoir is reconnected with the atmosphere, driving the atmospheric CO2 rise observed in ice-core records. However, direct documentation of changes in surface ocean carbon content and the associated transfer of carbon to the atmosphere during deglaciations has been hindered by the lack of proxy reconstructions that unambiguously reflect the oceanic carbonate system. Radiocarbon activity tracks changes in ocean ventilation, but not in ocean carbon content, whereas proxies that record increased deglacial upwelling do not constrain the proportion of upwelled carbon that is degassed relative to that which is taken up by the biological pump. Here we apply the boron isotope pH proxy in planktic foraminifera to two sediment cores from the sub-Antarctic Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific as a more direct tracer of oceanic CO2 outgassing. We show that surface waters at both locations, which partly derive from deep water upwelled in the Southern Ocean, became a significant source of carbon to the atmosphere during the last deglaciation, when the concentration of atmospheric CO2 was increasing. This oceanic CO2 outgassing supports the view that the ventilation of a deep-ocean carbon reservoir in the Southern Ocean had a key role in the deglacial CO2 rise, although our results allow for the possibility that processes operating in other regions may also have been important for the glacial-interglacial ocean-atmosphere exchange of carbon.

  2. Terrestrial and Meteorite Carbon Appear to Have the Same Isotopic Composition

    PubMed Central

    Libby, W. F.

    1971-01-01

    The carbon-isotope ratio recently obtained for the carbon found in the Murchison meteorite, which has been shown (by the racemic nature of twelve component amino acids) to be free of terrestrial contamination, agrees with that for average terrestrial sediments. This finding indicates that the earth and the stony meteorites contain carbon of the same isotopic composition. PMID:16591904

  3. Carbon and oxygen isotopes in apatite CO/sub 2/ and co-existing calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodny, Y.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1981-04-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopes were analyzed in carbonate apatite CO/sub 2/ and in co-existing calcite. Both C and O in apatite CO/sub 2/ are enriched in the respective light isotopes relative to calcite. These results confirm the proposition that carbonate is part of the apatite structure.

  4. CARBON ISOTOPE AND ISOTOPOMER FRACTIONATION IN COLD DENSE CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2011-04-10

    We construct a gas-grain chemical network model which includes carbon isotopes ({sup 12}C and {sup 13}C) with an emphasis on isotopomer-exchange reactions. Temporal variations of molecular abundances, the carbon isotope ratios ({sup 12}CX/{sup 13}CX), and the isotopomer ratios ({sup 12}C{sup 13}CX/{sup 13}C{sup 12}CX) of CCH and CCS in cold dense cloud cores are investigated by numerical calculations. We confirm that the isotope ratios of molecules, both in the gas phase and grain surfaces, are significantly different depending on whether the molecule is formed from the carbon atom (ion) or the CO molecule. Molecules formed from carbon atoms have CX/{sup 13}CX ratios greater than the elemental abundance ratio of [{sup 12}C/{sup 13}C]. On the other hand, molecules formed from CO molecules have CX/{sup 13}CX ratios smaller than the [{sup 12}C/{sup 13}C] ratio. We reproduce the observed C{sup 13}CH/{sup 13}CCH ratio in TMC-1, if the isotopomer-exchange reaction, {sup 13}CCH + H {r_reversible} C{sup 13}CH + H + 8.1 K, proceeds with the forward rate coefficient k{sub f} > 10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}. However, the C{sup 13}CS/{sup 13}CCS ratio is lower than that observed in TMC-1. We then assume the isotopomer-exchange reaction catalyzed by the H atom, {sup 13}CCS + H {r_reversible} C{sup 13}CS + H + 17.4 K. In the model with this reaction, we reproduce the observed C{sup 13}CS/{sup 13}CCS, CCS/C{sup 13}CS, and CCS/{sup 13}CCS ratios simultaneously.

  5. Experimental observations on carbon isotope exchange in carbonate-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozeto, A. A.; Fritz, P.; Reardon, E. J.

    1984-03-01

    This study presents data from experiments investigating carbon isotope exchange between carbonate solution and solid calcite using carbon-13 as a tracer. All experiments were done with calcite saturated solutions and results show that a two-step adsorption-recrystallization reaction takes place. Isotope effects are caused by exchange by carbonate on the solid surface with carbon in the aqueous phase. Adsorption reactions are characterized by a maximum isotopic exchange capacity (IEC) on crystal surfaces of about 10 11 reaction sites per cm 2, following a second order rate law with respect to 13C concentration in solution ( constant kex ⋍ 10 6 cm 5 mole -1 s -1 and half-life t 1/2 = 700 s). The adsorption reaction was followed by a first order recrystallization which is characterized by a rate constant of the order of 10 -8 s -1 and a t 1/2 of 10 7 s. Negative isotopic gradient experiments and runs with calcite crystals in Mg 2+ spiked solutions provided the preliminary basis for the characterization of the mechanisms of both proposed reactions.

  6. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    A probable mechanism of effect of processes occurring in the Earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis is considered. According to the hypothesis, this effect is realized through entrance to the Earth's atmosphere of carbon dioxide that stimulates photosynthesis. Supply of CO2 is irregular and is due to irregular movements of the Earth's crust plates. This is accompanied by destruction of carbonates and conversion of carbon of the organic matter to CO2 due to processes of reduction of sulfates. The CO2 content in atmosphere rises for relatively short orogenic periods, due to intensive crust plate movement, while for the subsequent long periods, called the geosynclinal ones, of the relatively slow plate movement, the CO2 content falls due to the higher rate of its consumption for photosynthesis. Owing to the carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying photosynthesis, regular isotopic differences appear between the atmospheric CO2 and the "living" matter (Relay's effect); these differences are then transformed to isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon. At the appearance in atmosphere of free oxygen--product of photosynthesis--in organisms there appears photorespiration that also is accompanied by fractionation of carbon isotopes, but with effect of opposite sign. This leads to enrichment of the photosynthesizing biomass with 13C isotope at the orogenic periods. As a result, the initially pronounced isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon decrease by the end of the geosyclinal periods. According to the proposed model, concentrations of CO2 and O2 are exchanged in the antiphase. They lead to alternation of periods of warning up and cooling off on the Earth. The former coincide with the orogenic periods, the latter appear at the end of geosyclinal periods when oxygen is accumulated in atmosphere, while organic substance in sediments. Accumulation of organic substance leads to formation of petroleum-maternal masses. To substantiate the

  7. Carbon isotopic composition of deep carbon gases in an ombrogenous peatland, northwestern Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Aravena, R. . Center for Groundwater Research and Wetlands Research Center); Warner, B.G. . Wetlands Research Center and Dept. of Geography); Charman, D.J. . Dept. of Geographical Sciences); Belyea, L.R. . School of Biological Sciences); Mathur, S.P. ); Dinel, H. )

    1993-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating and carbon isotope analyses of deep peat and gases in a small ombrogenous peatland in northwestern Ontario reveals the presence of old gases at depth that are 1000-2000 yr younger than the enclosing peat. The authors suggest that the most likely explanation to account for this age discrepancy is the downward movement by advection of younger dissolved organic carbon for use by fermentation and methanogens bacteria. This study identifies a potentially large supply of old carbon gases in peatlands that should be considered in global carbon models of the terrestrial biosphere.

  8. PHOTOCHEMICALLY-INDUCED ALTERATION OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS (DELTA C-13) IN TERRIGENOUS DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of riverine waters to natural sunlight initiated alterations in stable carbon isotope ratios (delta C-13) of the associated dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Water samples were collected from two compositionally distinct coastal river systems in the southeastern United Sta...

  9. PHOTOCHEMICALLY-INDUCED ALTERATION OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS (DELTA C-13) IN TERRIGENOUS DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of riverine waters to natural sunlight initiated alterations in stable carbon isotope ratios (delta C-13) of the associated dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Water samples were collected from two compositionally distinct coastal river systems in the southeastern United Sta...

  10. Carbon isotopes and lipid biomarkers from organic-rich facies of the Shuram Formation, Sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Fike, D A; Love, G D; Sessions, A L; Grotzinger, J P; Summons, R E; Fischer, W W

    2013-09-01

    The largest recorded carbon isotopic excursion in Earth history is observed globally in carbonate rocks of middle Ediacaran age. Known from the Sultanate of Oman as the 'Shuram excursion', this event records a dramatic, systematic shift in δ(13) Ccarbonate values to ca. -12‰. Attempts to explain the nature, magnitude and origin of this excursion include (i) a primary signal resulting from the protracted oxidation of a large dissolved organic carbon reservoir in seawater, release of methane from sediment-hosted clathrates, or water column stratification; and (ii) a secondary signal from diagenetic processes. The compositions and isotope ratios of organic carbon phases during the excursion are critical to evaluating these ideas; however, previous work has focused on localities that are low in organic carbon, hindering straightforward interpretation of the observed time-series trends. We report carbon isotope data from bulk organic carbon, extracted bitumen and kerogen, in addition to lipid biomarker data, from a subsurface well drilled on the eastern flank of the South Oman Salt Basin, Sultanate of Oman. This section captures Nafun Group strata through the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary in the Ara Group and includes an organic-rich, deeper-water facies of the Shuram Formation. Despite the high organic matter contents, the carbon isotopic compositions of carbonates - which record a negative δ(13) C isotope excursion similar in shape and magnitude to sections elsewhere in Oman - do not covary with those of organic phases (bulk TOC, bitumen and kerogen). Paired inorganic and organic δ(13) C data only display coupled behaviour during the latter part of the excursion's recovery. Furthermore, lipid biomarker data reveal that organic matter composition and source inputs varied stratigraphically, reflecting biological community shifts in non-migrated, syngenetic organic matter deposited during this interval. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of oceanic surface water paleonutrient levels based on the carbon isotopic fractionation of C37 alkenones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, S.; Benthien, A.; Müller, P. J.; Rühlemann, C.

    2003-04-01

    Reconstruction of past surface water nutrient concentration is crucial to understand the processes responsible for lowering the atmospheric carbon dioxide by ~90 ppmv during the Last Glacial Maximum compared with peak interglacials. It has been demonstrated that the carbon isotopic composition in planktonic foraminiferal calcite is controlled by a variety of factors which complicates its interpretation as a proxy for dissolved phosphate (e.g. Lynch-Stiegliz et al., 1995; Spero et al., 1997). Benthic foraminiferal Cd/Ca ratios have widely been used as an alternative nutrient proxy in deep waters. However, the incorporation of Cd into planktonic foraminifera is temperature sensitive (Rickaby and Elderfield, 1999) and consequently no genuine alternative to the carbon isotopic composition of planktonic foraminiferal calcite as a surface water nutrient proxy. Additionally, in regions of the ocean where calcite dissolution occurs none of these parameters is suitable. Therefore, it is of greatest interest to explore new surface water paleonutrient proxies. The carbon isotopic fractionation of organic biomarkers (i.e. alkenones, phytol), which was used in former studies as paleogrowth rate proxy (Bidigare et al., 1999; Pagani et al., 2000), appears to be a promising candidate. This potential new paleonutrient proxy is developed from empirical relationships between ocean atlas values of surface parameters (i.e. phosphate and dissolved carbon dioxide concentration) and the isotopic fractionation of C37 alkenones determined from South Atlantic surface sediments and particulate organic matter as well as compiled from the literature. We reconstructed surface water nutrient concentrations for the past 200 000 years from a deep-sea sediment core recovered off Angola using the carbon isotopic fractionation of C37 alkenones. The results suggest high surface water nutrient concentrations, which is consistent with low glacial delta 15N values of bulk sediment pointing to an increased

  12. [Distribution of carbon isotopes ((13)C/(12)C) in cells and temporal organization of cellular processes].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on fractionation of carbon isotopes in biological systems are reviewed. It follows that direct experimental proofs have been obtained that 1) basic fractionation of carbon isotopes in the cell is related to isotope effect in pyruvate decarboxylation; 2) fractionation of carbon isotopes in the above reaction in vivo proceeds with exhausting substrate pool. The latter provides natural relationship between metabolites isotope distribution and sequence of their synthesis in the cell cycle, or with the temporal organization of cellular metabolism. The non-steady and periodic pattern of pyruvate decarboxylation due to the exhausting substrate pool well agrees with the existing notions on reciprocal oscillations in the cell glycolytic chain. Experimental data are presented corroborating indirectly the existence of oscillations in bacterial cells. Earlier proposed model of the mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation based on the above principles can be used for analysing changes in isotopic characteristics of the organisms and interpreting their relations with metabolic processes.

  13. Reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes incident on a proton

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Ibrahim, B.; Horiuchi, W.; Kohama, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    2008-03-15

    We systematically study total reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes with N=6-16 on a proton target for wide range of incident energies. An emphasis is put on the difference from the case of a carbon target. The calculations include the reaction cross sections of {sup 19,20,22}C at 40A MeV, the data of which have recently been measured at RIKEN. The Glauber theory is used to calculate the reaction cross sections. To describe the intrinsic structure of the carbon isotopes, we use a Slater determinant generated from a phenomenological mean-field potential, and construct the density distributions. To go beyond the simple mean-field model, we adopt two types of dynamical models: One is a core+n model for odd-neutron nuclei, and the other is a core+n+n model for {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C. We propose empirical formulas which are useful in predicting unknown cross sections.

  14. Chlorine and carbon isotopes fractionation during volatilization and diffusive transport of trichloroethene in the unsaturated zone.

    PubMed

    Jeannottat, Simon; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2012-03-20

    To apply compound-specific isotope methods to the evaluation of the origin and fate of organic contaminants in the unsaturated subsurface, the effect of physicochemical processes on isotope ratios needs to be known. The main objective of this study is to quantify chlorine and carbon isotope fractionation during NAPL-vapor equilibration, air-water partitioning, and diffusion of trichloroethene (TCE) and combinations of these effects during vaporization in porous media. Isotope fractionation is larger during NAPL-vapor equilibration than air-water partitioning. During NAPL-vapor equilibration, carbon, and chlorine isotope ratios evolve in opposite directions although both elements are present in the same bond, with a normal isotope effect for chlorine (ε(Cl) = -0.39 ± 0.03‰) and an inverse effect for carbon (ε(C) = +0.75 ± 0.04‰). During diffusion-controlled vaporization in a sand column, no significant carbon isotope fractionation is observed (ε(C) = +0.10 ± 0.05‰), whereas fairly strong chlorine isotope fractionation occurs (ε(Cl) = -1.39 ± 0.06‰) considering the molecular weight of TCE. In case of carbon, the inverse isotope fractionation associated with NAPL-vapor equilibration and normal diffusion isotope fractionation cancel, whereas for chlorine both processes are accompanied by normal isotope fractionation and hence they cumulate. A source of contamination that aged might thus show a shift toward heavier chlorine isotope ratios.

  15. Carbon isotopic composition of methane in Florida Everglades soils and fractionation during its transport to the troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chanton, J.P.; Pauly, G.G.; Martens, C.S.; Blair, N.E.; Dacey, J.W.H. )

    1988-09-01

    The delta-C{sup 13} stable carbon isotopic composition of methane collected in bubbles from the submerged soils of specific environments within the Everglades wetland in southern Florida varied from {minus}70{per thousand} to {minus}63{per thousand} across the system while organic carbon in the soils and dominant plants varied from {minus}28{per thousand} to {minus}25{per thousand}. A methane isotopic budget based upon the soil bubble isotope data and published methane flux measurements predicted a flux of isotopic composition {minus}65{per thousand}, a value 5-10{per thousand} more depleted in C{sup 13} than the isotopic composition of methane emanating to the atmosphere. Emergent aquatic plants, which are known to be active methane transporters between soil and atmosphere in this ecosystem, were found to transport methane of delta-C{sup 13} content up to 12{per thousand} different from the delta-C{sup 13} content of the soil methane bubble reservoir. Methane C{sup 13} content at one site was determined to be 108.6% modern (delta-C{sup 13} = 83 + or{minus}10{per thousand}). 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. Dietary interpretations for extinct megafauna using coprolites, intestinal contents and stable isotopes: Complimentary or contradictory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wood, Jamie R.; Bocherens, Herve; Rogers, Karyne M.

    2016-06-01

    For many extinct species, direct evidence of diet (e.g. coprolites, gizzard/intestinal contents) is not available, and indirect dietary evidence (e.g. stable isotopes) must be relied upon. The Late Holocene fossil record of New Zealand provides a unique opportunity to contrast palaeodietary reconstructions for the extinct moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) using stable isotopes and coprolite/gizzard contents. Palaeodietary reconstructions from isotopes are found to contradict those based on direct dietary evidence. We discuss reasons for this and advocate, where possible, for the use of multiple lines of evidence in reconstructing the diets of extinct species.

  17. Literature review of United States utilities computer codes for calculating actinide isotope content in irradiated fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, W.C.; Lu, Ming-Shih

    1991-12-01

    This paper reviews the accuracy and precision of methods used by United States electric utilities to determine the actinide isotopic and element content of irradiated fuel. After an extensive literature search, three key code suites were selected for review. Two suites of computer codes, CASMO and ARMP, are used for reactor physics calculations; the ORIGEN code is used for spent fuel calculations. They are also the most widely used codes in the nuclear industry throughout the world. Although none of these codes calculate actinide isotopics as their primary variables intended for safeguards applications, accurate calculation of actinide isotopic content is necessary to fulfill their function.

  18. Stable and radioactive carbon in forest soils of Chhattisgarh, Central India: Implications for tropical soil carbon dynamics and stable carbon isotope evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, A. H.; Yadava, M. G.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Soils from two sites viz. Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, located ∼5 km apart in a tropical reserve forest (18°52‧N, 81°56‧E) in central India, have been explored for soil organic carbon (SOC) content, its mean residence time (MRT) and the evolution of stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C). SOC stocks in the upper 30 cm of soil layers are ∼5.3 kg/m2 and ∼3.0 kg/m2; in the upper 110 m are ∼10.7 kg/m2 and ∼7.8 kg/m2 at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively. SOC decreases with increasing depth. Bomb carbon signature is observed in the upper ∼10 cm. Organic matters in the top soil layers (0-10 cm) have MRTs of the order of a century which increases gradually with depths, reaching 3500-5000 yrs at ∼100 cm. δ13C values of SOC increase with depth, the carbon isotopic fractionation is obtained to be -1.2‰ and -3‰ for soils at Kotumsar and Tirathgarh, respectively, confirmed using Rayleigh isotopic fractionation model. The evolution of δ13C in soils was also studied using a modified Rayleigh fractionation model incorporating a continuous input into the reservoir: the depth profiles of δ13C for SOC show that the input organic matter from surface into the deeper soil layers is either insignificant or highly labile and decomposes quite fast in the top layers, thus making little contribution to the residual biomasses of the deeper layers. This is an attempt to understand the distillation processes that take place in SOC, assess the extent of decomposition by microbes and effect of percolation of fresh organic matter into dipper soil layers which are important for stable isotope based paleoclimate and paleovegetation reconstruction and understanding the dynamics of organic carbon in soils.

  19. Isotope-based Fluvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) Model: Model formulation, sensitivity, and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, William I.; Fox, James F.

    2015-06-01

    Watershed-scale carbon budgets remain poorly understood, in part due to inadequate simulation tools to assess in-stream carbon fate and transport. A new numerical model termed ISOtope-based FLuvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) is formulated to simulate the fluvial organic carbon budget in watersheds where hydrologic, sediment transport, and biogeochemical processes are coupled to control benthic and transported carbon composition and flux. One ISOFLOC innovation is the formulation of new stable carbon isotope model subroutines that include isotope fractionation processes in order to estimate carbon isotope source, fate, and transport. A second innovation is the coupling of transfers between carbon pools, including algal particulate organic carbon, fine particulate and dissolved organic carbon, and particulate and dissolved inorganic carbon, to simulate the carbon cycle in a comprehensive manner beyond that of existing watershed water quality models. ISOFLOC was tested and verified in a low-gradient, agriculturally impacted stream. Results of a global sensitivity analysis suggested the isotope response variable had unique sensitivity to the coupled interaction between fluvial shear resistance of algal biomass and the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon. Model calibration and validation suggested good agreement at event, seasonal, and annual timescales. Multiobjective uncertainty analysis suggested inclusion of the carbon stable isotope routine reduced uncertainty by 80% for algal particulate organic carbon flux estimates.

  20. Dynamic and transfert of carbon in Loire catchment using carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coularis, Cindy; Fontugne, Michel; Tisnérat-Laborde, Nadine; Pastor, Lucie; Siclet, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Rivers have a major role in carbon transfer between continent and ocean. The organic matter exported from land represents a major source of DOC and POC in oceans. The composition and reactivity of this matter will influence its behavior and fate within the coastal areas and continental shelf. It is thus important to characterize the exported matter and its temporal variability. Stable carbon isotope ratios (d13C) and 14C activity can provide unique information on carbon sources, turnover and exchange processes. We present here a study of the carbon cycle in the Loire River and its major tributaries by combining carbon isotopes measurements and classical biogeochemical parameters (DOC, POC, DIC, pH, Temperature, Alkalinity, pH, chlorophyll …). Three campaigns were performed in April, July and October 2013. The changes in 14C signature due to the controlled liquid release of five nuclear power plants are used to get additional information on the carbon dynamics within the river. First results show a conservative behavior of the organic carbon concentrations contrary to the inorganic carbon all along the Loire River. However, the reactivity of the organic matter varies with rivers catchments and seasons. An inventory of the distribution of the different carbon phases within the Loire River and its tributaries is presented.

  1. A process-based model for non-equilibrium clumped isotope effects in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; Hunt, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The equilibrium clumped isotope composition of carbonate minerals is independent of the composition of the aqueous solution. However, many carbonate minerals grow at rates that place them in a non-equilibrium regime with respect to carbon and oxygen isotopes with unknown consequences for clumped isotopes. We develop a process-based model that allows one to calculate the oxygen, carbon, and clumped isotope composition of calcite as a function of temperature, crystal growth rate, and solution pH. In the model, carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation occurs through the mass-dependent attachment/detachment kinetics of the isotopologues of HCO-3 and CO2-3 to and from the calcite surface, which in turn, influence the clumped isotope composition of calcite. At experimental and biogenic growth rates, the mineral is expected to inherit a clumped isotopic composition that is similar to that of the DIC pool, which helps to explain (1) why different organisms share the same clumped isotope versus temperature calibration curves, (2) why many inorganic calibration curves are slightly different from one another, and (3) why foraminifera, coccoliths, and deep sea corals can have near-equilibrium clumped isotope compositions but far-from-equilibrium carbon and oxygen isotope compositions. Some aspects of the model can be generalized to other mineral systems and should serve as a useful reference in future efforts to quantify kinetic clumped isotope effects.

  2. Certification of the chlorine content of the isotopic reference materials IRMM-641 and IRMM-642.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, M; Berglund, M; Taylor, P D; Máriássy, M

    2001-11-01

    The Slovak Institute of Metrology and the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements have collaborated in the certification of the two chlorine reference materials IRMM-641 and IRMM-642. Until now no isotopically enriched chlorine isotopic reference material certified for isotopic composition and content has been available commercially. The isotopic reference materials IRMM-641 and IRMM-642 described herein are certified for isotopic composition and for chlorine content. The chlorine content of the reference material IRMM-641 was certified by use of high-precision argentometric coulometric titration at the Slovak Institute of Metrology. The base material used for IRMM-641 is NIST Standard Reference Material 975. The chlorine content of the reference material IRMM-642 was measured by isotope dilution, using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements. Both standard reference materials were prepared by dissolving NaCl in water. The reference material IRMM-641 contains 0.025022 +/- 0.00011 mol kg(-1) chlorine of natural isotopic composition with an n(37Cl)/n(35Cl) ratio of 0.31977 +/- 0.00082. The reference material IRMM-642 contains 0.004458 +/- 0.000028 mol kg(-1) chlorine with an n(37Cl)/n(35Cl) ratio of 0.01914 +/- 0.00088.

  3. The stable isotopic and chemical composition of pedogenic carbonate in the Minusinsk Basin, South Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilchuk, Jessica; Ivanova, Elena; Krechetov, Pavel; Litvinskiy, Vladimir; Budantseva, Nadine; Chizhova, Julia; Vasil'chuk, Yurij

    2017-04-01

    Stable isotope composition of carbonate neoformations can be used as a proxy for the reconstructons of environmental conditions of the past. Carbonate coatings on coarse rock framents are studied in order to indicate the climatic conditions and predominant vegetation under which they were formed. Such coatings commonly occur in different types of soils and paleosols of South Siberian intermountain basins mainly in relatively dry modern conditions. The purpose of the research is to characterize the isotopic composition and chemical composition of carbonate pedofeatures in soils of Minusink Hollow and estimate its correlation with defferent factors. The samples of pedogenic carbonates, vegetation, carbonate parent material, soil water and precipitation water were analyzed using the Delta-V mass spectrometer with options of a gas bench and element analyser. The soils we studied are mainly Kastanozems that are poorly moisturized; therefore, soil pore water was extracted by ethanol. Minor and major elements content was also measured by ICP-MS. Carbonates mostly contain calcuim (37-45%) and highly enriched in Pb, Tl and Ba. Oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonates was analyzed in 3 key sites. Kazanovka Khakass state national reserve, Hankul salt lake, region of Sayanogorsk aluminum smelter. Vegetation photosynthetic pathway in the region is mainly C3. δ18O values of carbonate coatings in soils of Kazanovka vary in a range from -7.49 to -10.5‰ (vs V-PDB). The lowest values corresponds the coatings found between two buried mid-Holocene soil horizons. That may indicate cooler conditions of late Holocene than nowadays. In Sayanogorsk carbonates' δ18O values' range is -8.3...-11.1‰ and near the Hankul Lake is -9.0...-10.2‰ all ranges are quite similar and may indicate close conditions of pendants formation. δ13C values of carbonate coatings in Kazanovka vary from -2.5 to -6.7‰, the highest values correspond to the soils of Askiz and Syglygkug

  4. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  5. Variation in the Carbon Isotope Composition of a Plant with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, J. C.; Deleens, Eliane; Nato, Aimé; Moyse, Alexis

    1974-01-01

    The content of 13C varies in plants with Crassulacean acid metabolism. Differences up to 3.5‰ in the 13C/12C ratios were observed between leaves of different age in the same plant of Bryophyllum daigremontianum. Soluble and insoluble carbon in the same leaf differed up to 8‰, the largest difference occurring in the leaves with the highest Crassulacean acid metabolism activity. Models to account for the isotope discrimination by C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism plants are proposed. PMID:16658746

  6. A global deglacial negative carbon isotope excursion in speleothem calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breecker, D.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C values of speleothem calcite decreased globally during the last deglaciation defining a carbon isotope excursion (CIE) despite relatively constant δ13C values of carbon in the ocean-atmosphere system. The magnitude of the CIE varied with latitude, increasing poleward from ~2‰ in the tropics to as much as 7‰ at high latitudes. This recent CIE provides an interesting comparison with CIEs observed in deep time. A substantial portion of this CIE can be explained by the increase in atmospheric pCO2 that accompanied deglaciation. The dependence of C3 plant δ13C values on atmospheric pCO2 predicts a 2‰ δ13C decrease driven by the deglacial pCO2 increase. I propose that this signal was transferred to caves and thus explains nearly 100% of the CIE magnitude observed in the tropics and no less than 30% at the highest latitudes in the compilation. An atmospheric pCO2 control on speleothem δ13C values, if real, will need to be corrected for using ice core data before δ13C records can be interpreted in a paleoclimate context. The decrease in the magnitude of the equilibrium calcite-CO2 carbon isotope fractionation factor explains a maximum of 1‰ of the CIE at the highest northern latitude in the compilation, which experienced the largest deglacial warming. Much of the residual extratropical CIE was likely driven by increasing belowground respiration rates, which were presumably pronounced at high latitudes as glacial retreat exposed fresh surfaces and/or vegetation density increased. The largest increases in belowground respiration would have therefore occurred at the highest latitudes, explaining the meridional trend. This work supports the notion that increases in atmospheric pCO2 and belowground respiration rates can result in large CIEs recorded in terrestrial carbonates, which, as previously suggested, may explain the magnitude of the PETM CIE as recorded by paleosol carbonates.

  7. RAPID AND PRECISE METHOD FOR MEASURING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for rapid preparation, concentration and stable isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon (d13C-DIC). Liberation of CO2 was accomplished by placing 100 ?l phosphoric acid and 0.9 ml water in an evacuated 1.7-ml gas chromatography (GC) injection vial. Fo...

  8. RAPID AND PRECISE METHOD FOR MEASURING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for rapid preparation, concentration and stable isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon (d13C-DIC). Liberation of CO2 was accomplished by placing 100 ?l phosphoric acid and 0.9 ml water in an evacuated 1.7-ml gas chromatography (GC) injection vial. Fo...

  9. Physiological and environmental factors related to carbon isotopic variations in mollusc shell carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Krantz, D.E.; Williams, D.F.; Jones, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of mollusc shell carbonate has been used as a general environmental indicator in numerous studies, but relatively little is known of the factors which affect within-shell variation. Primary control of delta/sup 13/C values in shell carbonate comes from the dissolved bicarbonate source, particularly as related to marine versus fresh water. Present models explain cyclic variations in the delta/sup 13/C profiles of mollusc shells due to upwelling, phytoplankton productivity and stratification, disequilibrium with rapid shell growth, and infaunal versus epifaunal habitat. Carbon and oxygen isotopic profiles in this study were obtained from specimens of Spisula solidissima (surf clam) and Placopecten magellanicus (sea scallop) collected alive from 14 to 57 m water depths off the Virginia coast. Three main factors appear to affect the delta/sup 13/C profiles in these specimens. Isotopically light values commonly associated with the spring and occasionally the fall correspond with seasonal phytoplankton productivity. A significant negative delta/sup 13/C offset of the infaunal Spisula relative to the epifaunal Placopecten probably relates to the inclusion of isotopically more negative pore-water bicarbonate by Spisula. Additionally, occasional transient spikes in both the delta/sup 18/O and delta/sup 13/C profiles correspond to intrusion of reduced-salinity water.

  10. Mantle CO2 degassing through the Icelandic crust: Evidence from carbon isotopes in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árný E.; Heinemeier, Jan; Arnórsson, Stefán; Kjartansdóttir, Ríkey; Kristmannsdóttir, Hrefna

    2016-10-01

    Carbon isotopes of groundwater in Iceland were studied in order to determine the source and reactions of carbon at divergent plate boundaries not associated with active volcanic systems. All the waters were of meteoric origin, with temperatures of 1-130 °C, pH of ∼4.5-10.5 and dissolved inorganic carbon (∑CO2) between 1.8 and 4100 ppm. The measured range of δ13CO2 and 14CO2 in these waters was large, -27.4 to +2.0‰ and 0.6-118 pMC, respectively. The sources and reactions of dissolved inorganic carbon were studied by comparing the measured chemical and isotope composition with those simulated using isotope geochemical models. Three major sources of CO2 were identified: (1) dissolution of partially degassed basaltic rocks formed at the surface or shallow depths, (2) atmospheric CO2 through air-water exchange at surface, and (3) input of gas at depth into the groundwater systems that has similar carbon and isotope composition as the pre-erupted melt of the upper mantle and lower crust beneath Iceland. In the groundwater systems the CO2 chemistry and isotope content are modified due to carbonate mineral precipitation and changes in aqueous species distribution upon progressive water-rock interaction; these changes needed to be quantified in order to reveal the various CO2 sources. The CO2 flux of the Icelandic crust was estimated to be ∼5-10 · 1010 mol/yr with as high as 50% of the flux not associated with active volcanic centers but placed off-axis where a significant proportion of the CO2 may originate from the mantle. The mantle input of the groundwater off-axis corresponds to CO2 partial pressures of ∼10-6-1 bar and to a mantle CO2 flux of <5 · 105 mol/km2/yr for most areas and up to 125 · 105 and 1600 · 105 for the Southern Lowlands and Snæfellsnes Peninsula, respectively. The CO2 flux from active volcanic geothermal systems in Iceland was estimated to be ∼500-3000 · 105 mol CO2/km2/yr, considerably greater than the highest values observed off-axis.

  11. Modeling Chemical and Isotopic Variations in Lab Formed Hydrothermal Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Golden, D. C.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and mineralogical data (e.g. [1]) from Mars suggest that the history of liquid water on the planet was more sporadic in nature than long-lived. The non-equilibrium chemical and isotopic compositions of the carbonates preserved in the martian meteorite ALH84001 are direct evidence of ancient secondary minerals that have not undergone significant diagenesis or stabilization processes typical of long-lived aqueous systems on Earth. Thus secondary minerals and sediments on Mars may primarily record the characteristics of the aqueous environment in which they formed without being significantly overprinted by subsequent diagenetic processes during burial.

  12. The carbon isotopic composition of Novo Urei diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjenova, L. F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diamond grains isolated from the Novo Urei meteorite are discussed. A diamond separate was obtained from 2g of whole rock using the chemical treatments described aimed at obtaining very pure diamond. X ray diffraction of the residue, which represented 5000 ppm of the parent mass, indicated only the presence of the desired mineral. The diamond crystals were 1-30 microns in diameter, and some grains had a yellow color. The chemical treatments were followed by a size separation to give a 1-10 microns and a 5-30 microns fraction, which were named DNU-1 and DNU-2, respectively.

  13. Isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry to assess counterfeiting of active pharmaceutical ingredients: site-specific 13C content of aspirin and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Virginie; Mboula, Vanessa Maroga; Jouitteau, Catherine; Akoka, Serge; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2009-10-15

    Isotope profiling is a well-established technique to obtain information about the chemical history of a given compound. However, the current methodology using IRMS can only determine the global (13)C content, leading to the loss of much valuable data. The development of quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR spectrometry at natural abundance enables the measurement of the (13)C content of each carbon within a molecule, thus giving simultaneous access to a number of isotopic parameters. When it is applied to active pharmaceutical ingredients, each manufactured batch can be characterized better than by IRMS. Here, quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR is shown to be a very promising and effective tool for assessing the counterfeiting of medicines, as exemplified by an analysis of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and paracetamol (acetaminophen) samples collected from pharmacies in different countries. It is proposed as an essential complement to (2)H NMR and IRMS.

  14. Fatty acid and stable carbon isotope characterization of Camelina sativa oil: implications for authentication.

    PubMed

    Hrastar, Robert; Petrisic, Marinka G; Ogrinc, Nives; Kosir, Iztok Joze

    2009-01-28

    The importance of authenticity characterization is an increasing and pressing requirement for all foods. Vegetable oil is one of the most studied foods because of its nutritional and medicinal properties in a correct diet. In this study, a total of 53 Camelina sativa samples, from all known growing areas, were chemically and isotopically characterized. The fatty acid content of camelina oil was determined by gas chromatography (GC), and the ratios of stable carbon isotopes ((13)C/(12)C) of individual fatty acids and seed/bulk oil were determined by gas chromatography-combustion-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) and elemental analysis-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). A total of 17 different fatty acids were detected by GC, with omega3 R-linolenic acid (C(18:3n3)) being the most abundant (29.7-40.0 wt %). Oleic acid (C(18:1n9)), linoleic acid (C(18:2n6)) and eicosenoic acid (C(20:1n9)) all belong to the second group of major fatty acids. The stable carbon isotopic values (delta(13)C) fell into a range typical for C(3) plants. The use of delta(13)C(18:2n6) vs delta(13)C(18:3n3) correlation could show cases where impurity or adulteration is suspected, whereas principal component analysis clearly separates oil samples from different continents. Preliminary results on the camelina oil authentication procedure provide a basis for the investigation of geographical origin and the further distinction between camelina and camelina refined or other, less expensive oils.

  15. Methodologies for extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon for stable carbon isotope studies : evaluation and alternatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassan, Afifa Afifi

    1982-01-01

    The gas evolution and the strontium carbonate precipitation techniques to extract dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for stable carbon isotope analysis were investigated. Theoretical considerations, involving thermodynamic calculations and computer simulation pointed out several possible sources of error in delta carbon-13 measurements of the DIC and demonstrated the need for experimental evaluation of the magnitude of the error. An alternative analytical technique, equilibration with out-gassed vapor phase, is proposed. The experimental studies revealed that delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted from a 0.01 molar NaHC03 solution by both techniques agreed within 0.1 per mil with the delta carbon-13 of the DIC extracted by the precipitation technique, and an increase of only 0.27 per mil in that extracted by the gas evolution technique. The efficiency of extraction of DIC decreased with sulfate concentration in the precipitation technique but was independent of sulfate concentration in the gas evolution technique. Both the precipitation and gas evolution technique were found to be satisfactory for extraction of DIC from different kinds of natural water for stable carbon isotope analysis, provided appropriate precautions are observed in handling the samples. For example, it was found that diffusion of atmospheric carbon dioxide does alter the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the samples contained in polyethylene bottles; filtration and drying in the air change the delta carbon-13 of the precipitation technique; hot manganese dioxide purification changes the delta carbon-13 of carbon dioxide. (USGS)

  16. Isotope composition of carbon in the carbonates of the Gumbeykan scheelite deposits in the southern Urals

    SciTech Connect

    Korzhinskii, A.F.; Mamchur, G.P.; Yarynych, O.A.

    1980-10-01

    Through investigations of the isotope composition of carbon of various generations and carbonates from marbles, skarns, and nested and vein scheelite orebodies, the probable source of carbon of these carbonates has been established as a mixture of sedimentary carbonates, carbon dioxide with carbonic acid that was formed by oxidation of the organic matter from sedimentary terrane (..delta..C/sup 13/ - 0.05 to -0.62%). In the calcite and dolomite phenocrysts of marble and the coarse-grained dolostone, containing scheelite, the carbon was lighter (..delta..C/sup 13/ from -0.60 to -0.87%). For the dolomite and ankerite from scheelite pockets of the Balkan deposit and quartz veins of the Buranovo, ..delta..C/sup 13/ varied from -0.44 to -0.87%. The lightest carbon found in strontianite (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.32%), located near the coating of the organic matter (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.26%) in fractures of the quartz vein of the Buranovo deposit. In the section through the orebodies and near-ore diffusion-metasomatic zones of the Balkan deposit, the lessening of carbon in the carbonates was observed, with increasing distance away from the fracture. ..delta..C/sup 13/ in the altered granitoids ranged from -0.44 to -1.03%; while in the diopside-wollastonite hornfels, from -0.89 to 1.13%. The lessening in weight of the carbon is explained by diffusional fractionation of the isotopes caused apparently by the differential movement of volatile mixtures of carbon during ore-forming processes and the formation of their diffusion-metasomatic zones.

  17. Limitations and opportunities for Permian-Triassic carbonate-carbon isotope stratigraphy posed by microbial-controlled diagenetic mineral additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobben, Martin; van de Velde, Sebastiaan; Suchocka, Jana; Leda, Lucyna; Korn, Dieter; Struck, Ulrich; Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens; Hairapetian, Vachik; Ghaderi, Abbas; Korte, Christoph; Newton, Robert J.; Poulton, Simon W.; Wignall, Paul B.

    2017-04-01

    Bulk-carbonate stable carbon isotope records are used to proxy the ancient biogeochemical carbon cycle as well as aid in determining the age of sedimentary deposits. However, the multicomponent nature and the component-specific diagenetic potential of bulk-rock pose limits on the applicability of this proxy in recording ancient seawater chemistry and its usability as a stratigraphic aid. The aim of this study is to disentangle primary trends from diagenetic signals in carbonate-carbon isotope records traversing the Permian-Triassic boundary in marine carbonate-bearing sequences of Iran and South China. We observe, 1) a global first-order trend towards depleted carbon isotope values across the Permian-Triassic transition, 2) second-order carbon isotope variability superimposed on the first-order trend, and 3) a temporal trend in the amplitude of the second-order carbon isotope fluctuations. By application of a diagenetic model, we show that microbial-steered carbonate additions can introduce diagenetic carbon isotope signals to the carbonate archive. Organic carbon sedimentation has the potential to fuel this (sub)seafloor microbial pathway of carbonate stabilization and determines trajectories of diagenetic bulk-rock carbon isotope alteration. Moreover, we identified through this numerical exercise that lowered marine sulfate levels makes the sedimentary system vulnerable to diagenetic modulations of the primary carbon isotope signal, by modest changes of organic carbon supply. This approach suggests that latest Permian reduced bioturbation, consequential heterogeneous organic matter accumulation and authigenic mineralization can explain the temporal trend of increased second-order carbon isotope scatter, whilst retaining the first-order trend. In conclusion, the combined dataset and calculations suggest that the application of carbon isotope chemostratigraphy of the Permian-Triassic boundary is at present limited to the recognition of broad temporal patterns

  18. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; O'neil, J R; Adami, L H; Gleason, J D; Hardcastle, K

    1970-01-30

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a deltaD from-580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a deltaD of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO(2) is 290 to 418 ppm with delta (13)C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and delta(18)O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO(2) carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, delta(13)C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H(2)O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon(delta(13)C = -17.6 per mil). The (18)O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100 degrees to 1300 degrees C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  19. Carbon elemental and isotopic composition in mantle xenoliths from Spain: Insights on sources and petrogenetic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, G.; Natali, C.

    2017-02-01

    The carbon elemental concentration (C wt%) and isotopic (δ13C ‰) composition of mantle xenoliths from the Tallante and Calatrava volcanic occurrences (in South-East and Central Spain, respectively) have been investigated to identify carbon sources and processes occurring in distinct geodynamic settings of the Iberian Peninsula. The peridotitic mantle xenoliths from Calatrava show elemental C ranging from 0.11 to 2.87 wt% which is coupled with a continuous isotopic variation from very negative values (δ13C - 26.1‰) to typical mantle values (δ13C - 5.9‰). On the other hand, the Tallante mantle xenolith suite displays lower C contents (0.06-0.15 wt%) showing a tighter variation with 13C-depleted values ranging between - 20.1 and - 23.7‰; higher elemental C up to 0.41 wt% displaying distinctly less negative isotopic values (δ13C between - 13.8 and - 11.9‰) have been recorded in veins crosscutting Tallante peridotites, plausibly representing the product of metasomatic reactions. The data from the two investigated xenolith suites invariably display a good correlation between elemental and isotopic composition, suggesting a mantle origin for carbon and Rayleigh-type fractionation as the process responsible for the observed C-δ13C variation. However, the correlation between the carbon isotopic data with other isotopic tracers (e.g. 87Sr/86Sr, 3He/4He) used to identify distinct mantle components and metasomatic reactions, indicates systematic differences between the two xenolith suites suggesting that beneath the Betic Cordillera (where Tallante is located) the deep C-cycle involves recycling, via subduction preceding/accompanying continental collision, of crustal components back in the mantle. Coherently, geochemical trends observed in the Tallante xenoliths seem to be influenced by metasomatic agents generated by melting of crustal lithologies that according to the analysis of a metasedimentary xenolith can contain C up to 1.2 wt% having δ13C of ca. - 18

  20. Carbon stable isotopes as indicators of coastal eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Oczkowski, Autumn; Markham, Erin; Hanson, Alana; Wigand, Cathleen

    2014-04-01

    Coastal ecologists and managers have frequently used nitrogen stable isotopes (delta15N) to trace and monitor sources of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems. However, the interpretation of delta15N data can often be challenging, as the isotope values fractionate substantially due to preferential retention and uptake by biota. There is a growing body of evidence that carbon isotopes may be a useful alternative indicator for eutrophication, as they may be sensitive to changes in primary production that result from anthropogenic nutrient inputs. We provide three examples of systems where delta13C values sensitively track phytoplankton production. First, earlier (1980s) mesocosm work established positive relationships between delta13C and dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved silica concentrations. Consistent with these findings, a contemporary mesocosm experiment designed to replicate a temperate intertidal salt marsh environment also demonstrated that the system receiving supplementary nutrient additions had higher nutrient concentrations, higher chlorophyll concentrations, and higher delta13C values. This trend was particularly pronounced during the growing season, with differences less evident during senescence. And finally, these results were replicated in the open waters of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA, during a spring phytoplankton bloom. These three examples, taken together with the pre-existing body of literature, suggest that, at least in autotrophic, phytoplankton-dominated systems, delta13C values can be a useful and sensitive indicator of eutrophication.

  1. Rapid carbon-carbon bond formation and cleavage revealed by carbon isotope exchange between the carboxyl carbon and inorganic carbon in hydrothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, C. R.; Cody, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of organic compounds in water-rock systems (e.g., hydrothermal vents, sedimentary basins, and carbonaceous meteorites) is generally interpreted in terms of the isotopic composition of the sources of such molecules, and the kinetic isotope effects of metabolic or abiotic reactions that generate or transform such molecules. This hinges on the expectation that the carbon isotopic composition of many organic compounds is conserved under geochemical conditions. This expectation is reasonable in light of the strength of carbon-carbon bonds (ca. 81 kcal/mol); in general, environmental conditions conducive to carbon-carbon bond cleavage typically lead to transformations of organic molecules (decarboxylation is a notable example). Geochemically relevant reactions that involve isotopic exchange between carbon atoms in organic molecules and inorganic forms of carbon with no change in molecular structure appear to be rare. Notwithstanding such rarity, there have been preliminary reports of relatively rapid carbon isotope exchange between the carboxyl group in carboxylic acids and carbon dioxide in hot water [1,2]. We have performed laboratory hydrothermal experiments to gain insights into the mechanism of this surprising reaction, using phenylacetate as a model structure. By mass spectrometry, we confirm that the carboxyl carbon undergoes facile isotopic exchange with 13C-labeled bicarbonate at moderate temperatures (i.e., 230 C). Detailed kinetic analysis reveals that the reaction rate is proportional to the concentrations of both reactants. Further experiments demonstrate that the exchange reaction only occurs if the carbon atom adjacent to the carboxyl carbon is bonded to a hydrogen atom. As an example, no carbon isotope exchange was observed for benzoate in experiments lasting up to one month. The requirement of an alpha C-H bond suggests that enolization (i.e., deprotonation of the H) is a critical step in the mechanism of the exchange

  2. Carbon isotope fractionation of sapropelic organic matter during early diagenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    Study of an algal, sapropelic sediment from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda shows that the mass balance of carbon and stable carbon isotopes in the major organic constituents is accounted for by a relatively straightforward model of selective preservation during diagenesis. The loss of 13C-enriched carbohydrates is the principal factor controlling the intermolecular mass balance of 13C in the sapropel. Results indicate that labile components are decomposed leaving as a residual concentrate in the sediment an insoluble humic substance that may be an original biochemical component of algae and associated bacteria. An overall decrease of up to about 4??? in the ?? 13C values of the organic matter is observed as a result of early diagenesis. ?? 1984.

  3. Seasonality of Leaf Carbon Isotopic Composition and Leaf Water Isotopic Enrichment in a Mixed Evergreen Forest in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. S.; Sickman, J. O.; Goulden, M.; DeVan, C.; Pasquini, S. C.; Pivovaroff, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Leaf carbon isotopic composition and leaf water isotopic enrichment reflect physiological processes and are important for linking local and regional scale processes to global patterns. We investigated how seasonality affects the isotopic composition of bulk leaf carbon, leaf sugar carbon, and leaf water hydrogen under a Mediterranean climate. Leaf and stem samples were collected monthly from four tree species (Calocedrus decurrens, Pinus lambertiana, Pinus ponderosa, and Quercus chrysolepis) at the James San Jacinto Mountain Reserve in southern California. Mean monthly bulk leaf carbon isotopic composition varied from -34.5 % in P. ponderosa to -24.7 % in P. lambertiana and became more depleted in 13C from the spring to the summer. Mean monthly leaf sugar varied from -29.3 % in P. ponderosa to -21.8 % in P. lambertiana and was enriched in 13C during the winter, spring and autumn, but depleted during the mid-summer. Leaf water hydrogen isotopic composition was 28.4 to 68.8 % more enriched in deuterium than source water and this enrichment was greater as seasonal drought progressed. These data indicate that leaf carbon and leaf water hydrogen isotopic composition provide sensitive measures that connect plant physiological processes to short-term climatic variability.

  4. Mathematical modeling of stable carbon isotope ratios in natural gases^@?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Perry, J. K.; Jenden, P. D.; Schoell, M.

    2000-08-01

    A new approach is presented for mathematical modeling of stable carbon isotope ratios in hydrocarbon gases based on both theoretical and experimental data. The kinetic model uses a set of parallel first-order gas generation reactions in which the relative cracking rates of isotopically substituted (k∗) and unsubstituted (k) bonds are represented by the equation k∗/k=(Af∗/Af) exp(-ΔEa/RT), where R is the gas constant and T is temperature. Quantum chemistry calculations have been used to estimate the entropic (A f∗/A f) and enthalpic (ΔEa) terms for homolytic bond cleavage in a variety of simple molecules. For loss of a methyl group from a short-chain n-alkane (≤ C 6), for example, we obtain an average ΔEa of 42.0 cal/mol and an average A f∗/A f of 1.021. Expressed differently, 13C-methane generation is predicted to be 2.4% (24‰) slower than 12C-methane generation (from a short-chain n-alkane) in a sedimentary basin at 200°C but only 0.7% (7‰) slower in a laboratory heating experiment at 500°C. Similar calculations carried out for homolytic bond cleavage in other molecules show that with few exceptions, ΔEa varies between 0 and 60 cal/mol and A f∗/A f between 1.00 and 1.04. Examination of this larger data set reveals: (1) a weak sigmoid relationship between ΔEa and bond dissociation energy; and (2) a strong positive correlation between ΔEa and A f∗/A f. The significance of these findings is illustrated by fitting a kinetic model to chemical and isotopic data for the generation of methane from n-octadecane under isothermal closed-system conditions. For a specific temperature history, the fitted model provides quantitative relationships among methane carbon isotope composition, total methane yield and methane generation rate which may have relevance to the cracking of oil-prone kerogens and crude oil. The observed variability of the kinetic reactivity of various methane source rocks highlights the need to apply and adequately calibrate such

  5. Carbon isotope variation in mid-continent Ordovician-type oils: relationship to a major middle Ordovician carbon isotope shift

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, J.R.; Jacobson, S.R.; Witzke, B.J.; Anders, D.E.; Watney, W.L.; Newell, K.D.

    1985-05-01

    Detailed organic geochemical comparisons of Mid-Continent Ordovician oils with extracts of potential source rocks show that in the Forest City basin of northeastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska, oil source rocks are Middle Ordovician shales of the Simpson Group. For the Keota Dome field, Washington County, Iowa, the oil source rock is the Middle Ordovician Glenwood Shale Member of the Platteville Formation. Analyses of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of Ordovician-type oils from the Forest City basin, Keota Dome field, and the Michigan basin show that sigma TC of the two fractions are similar and that sigma T varies over a considerable range, from -32.5 per mil to -25.5 per mil (PDB). This large range in sigma TC reflects a major shift in the carbon isotope composition of organic matter during the Middle Ordovician. This shift is shown in a 62.5-ft (19 m) interval of core from the Decorah and Platteville Formations in the E.M. Greene 1 well in Washington County, Iowa, where organic carbon sigma TC changes regularly upward from -32.2 per mil to -22.7 per mil (PDB). The change in organic carbon sigma TC in this core is not related to variations in amount (0.13-41.4% TOC) or type (hydrogen index = 69 to 1000 mg HC/g TOC) of the marginally mature (T/sub max/ = 440 +/- 5C) organic matter. Ordovician-type oils in both the Forest City and Michigan basins show variable sigma TC, suggesting that the sigma TC shift displayed in the Middle Ordovician rocks of southeastern Iowa is a regional and possibly a global effect, related to changes in the sigma TC of the ocean-atmosphere carbon reservoir. Isotopic analyses of coexisting carbonate minerals support this interpretation.

  6. Abundances in red giant stars - Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter-wave observations have been made of isotopically substituted CO toward the envelopes of 11 carbon-rich stars. In every case, C-13O was detected and model calculations were used to estimate the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio. C-17O was detected toward three, and possibly four, envelopes, with sensitive upper limits for two others. The CO-18 variant was detected in two envelopes. New results include determinations of oxygen isotopic ratios in the two carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae CRL 26688 and CRL 618. As with other classes of red giant stars, the carbon-rich giants seem to be significantly, though variably, enriched in O-17. These results, in combination with observations in interstellar molecular clouds, indicate that current knowledge of stellar production of the CNO nuclides is far from satisfactory.

  7. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  8. On-line measurement of intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Keita; Tanaka, Misato; Nakagawa, Fumiko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2002-01-01

    Molecular and intramolecular carbon isotope measurements of acetic acid present in natural environments have been performed by off-line procedures. The off-line method is complicated and time-consuming and requires micromolar to millimolar amounts of sample. This limits geochemical isotopic studies, especially at the intramolecular level, on acetic acid present in natural samples. Here, we examine an on-line measurement of intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid using continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) coupled with an on-line pyrolysis system. This is achieved by measurement of the respective carbon isotope ratios of CH4 and CO2 produced by on-line pyrolysis of acetic acid. Results for authentic standards of pure acetic acid demonstrated the practicality of this on-line method, although the carbon isotope ratio of the methyl group could not be determined directly. The precision of the carbon isotope measurements was 0.4 per thousand (1sigma). The carbon isotope distribution determined by the on-line method was identical to that determined by the conventional off-line method within analytical error. The advantages of the on-line method compared with the conventional off-line method are that it is less laborious, requires less analytical time (less than one hour per sample) and, most importantly, uses smaller sample sizes (ca. 10 nanomole). An application of this on-line method to natural geochemical samples will provide an insight into the geochemical cycle of acetic acid. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Carbon Reservoir History of Mars Constrained by Atmospheric Isotopic Measurements and Carbonate Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Kass, D. M.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere on Mars is one of the most intriguing problems in the exploration of the Solar System, and the climate of Mars may have evolved from a warmer, wetter early state to the cold, dry current state. Because CO2 is the major constituent of Mars's atmosphere, its isotopic signatures offer a unique window to trace the evolution of climate on Mars. We derive new quantitative constraints on the amount of carbonate deposition and the atmospheric pressure of Mars through time, extending into the Noachian, ~3.8 Gyr before present. This determination is based on recent Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) isotopic measurements of Mars's atmosphere, recent orbiter, lander, and rover measurements of Mars's surface, and a newly identified mechanism (photodissociation of CO) that efficiently enriches the heavy carbon isotope. In particular, we find that escape via CO photodissociation on Mars has a fractionation factor of 0.6 and hence, photochemical escape processes can effectively enrich 13C in the Mars's atmosphere during the Amazonian. This enrichment is partially compensated by moderate carbonate precipitation during the late Noachian and/or Hesperian. The current atmospheric 13C/12C and rock and soil carbonate measurements indicate an early atmosphere with a surface pressure less than 1 bar. Only scenarios with large amounts of carbonate formation in open lakes permit higher values up to 1.8 bars. The evolutionary scenarios are fully testable with data from the MAVEN mission and further studies of the isotopic composition of carbonate in the Martian rock record through time.

  10. Factors affecting the isotopic composition of organic matter. (1) Carbon isotopic composition of terrestrial plant materials.

    PubMed

    Yeh, H W; Wang, W M

    2001-07-01

    The stable isotope composition of the light elements (i.e., H, C, N, O and S) of organic samples varies significantly and, for C, is also unique and distinct from that of inorganic carbon. This is the result of (1) the isotope composition of reactants, (2) the nature of the reactions leading to formation and post-formational modification of the samples, (3) the environmental conditions under which the reactions took place, and (4) the relative concentration of the reactants compared to that of the products (i.e., [products]/[reactants] ratio). This article will examine the carbon isotope composition of terrestrial plant materials and its relationship with the above factors. delta13C(PDB) values of terrestrial plants range approximately from -8 to -38%, inclusive of C3-plants (-22 to -38%), C4-plants (-8 to -15%) and CAM-plants (-13 to -30%). Thus, the delta13C(PDB) values largely reflect the photosynthesis pathways of a plant as well as the genetics (i.e., species difference), delta13C(PDB) values of source CO2, relevant humidity, CO2/O2 ratios, wind and light intensity etc. Significant variations in these values also exist among different tissues, different portions of a tissue and different compounds. This is mainly a consequence of metabolic reactions. Animals mainly inherit the delta13C(PDB) values of the foods they consume; therefore, their delta13C(PDB) values are similar. The delta13C(PDB) values of plant materials, thus, contain information regarding the inner workings of the plants, the environmental conditions under which they grow, the delta13C(PDB) values of CO2 sources etc., and are unique. Furthermore, this uniqueness is passed on to their derivative matter, such as animals, humus etc. Hence, they are very powerful tools in many areas of research, including the ecological and environmental sciences.

  11. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, N.; Gessler, A.; Kayler, Z.; Keel, S. G.; Badeck, F.; Barthel, M.; Boeckx, P.; Buchmann, N.; Brugnoli, E.; Esperschütz, J.; Gavrichkova, O.; Ghashghaie, J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Keitel, C.; Knohl, A.; Kuptz, D.; Palacio, S.; Salmon, Y.; Uchida, Y.; Bahn, M.

    2011-11-01

    The terrestrial carbon (C) cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual), including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as CO2 diffusion and dissolution processes within the

  12. Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Intermediary Photosynthetic Modes 1

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O'Reilly; Deniro, Michael J.; Ting, Irwin P.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from species of greenhouse plants having different photosynthetic modes were determined. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, four clusters of points are discernible, each representing different photosynthetic modes: C3 plants, C4 plants, CAM plants, and C3 plants that can shift to CAM or show the phenomenon referred to as CAM-cycling. The combination of oxygen and carbon isotope ratios does not distinguish among the different photosynthetic modes. Analysis of the carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate should prove useful for screening different photosynthetic modes in field specimens that grew near one another. This method will be particularly useful for detection of plants which show CAM-cycling. PMID:16663360

  13. Follow the Carbon: Isotopic Labeling Studies of Early Earth Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Raea K; Day, Douglas A; Jimenez, Jose L; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the faint young Sun, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 in mixing ratios higher than those found on Earth today. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing these trace gases could lead to the formation of organic aerosol haze due to UV photochemistry. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain haze formation rely on CH4 as the source of carbon and treat CO2 as a source of oxygen only, but this has not previously been verified experimentally. In the present work, we use isotopically labeled precursor gases and unit-mass resolution (UMR) and high-resolution (HR) aerosol mass spectrometry to examine the sources of carbon and oxygen to photochemical aerosol formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. UMR results suggest that CH4 contributes 70-100% of carbon in the aerosol, while HR results constrain the value from 94% to 100%. We also confirm that CO2 contributes approximately 10% of the total mass to the aerosol as oxygen. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archean rocks on Earth and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres. Key Words: Atmosphere-Early Earth-Planetary atmospheres-Carbon dioxide-Methane. Astrobiology 16, 822-830.

  14. Isotope anomalies of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen in peat from the area of the tunguska cosmic body explosion (1908).

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, E M; Böttger, T; Hiller, A; Junge, F W; Kolesnikova, N V

    1996-12-01

    Abstract Peat profiles from the area of the Tunguska explosion epicentre indicate significant carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects which are clearly associated with the zone of the 1908 "catastrophe", and which cannot be attributed to any known terrestrial processes. We explain them with the presence of extraterrestrial matter similar to carbonaceous chondrites or, more probably, to cometary matter. Initial data on nitrogen content and its isotope composition are consistent with the assumption of acid rainfall following the passage and explosion of the Tunguska cosmic body, as is known to have occurred during the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary.

  15. Carbon isotopic characterization of cider CO2 by isotope ratio mass spectrometry: a tool for quality and authenticity assessment.

    PubMed

    Cabañero, Ana I; Rupérez, Mercedes

    2012-08-30

    The cider market is an important sector of the food industry in certain regions. Adulteration of cider can happen in several ways: for example, by the addition of sugar, or of exogenous CO(2) to certain types of cider. Because such practices are not allowed by either Spanish legislation or the legislation of other countries, it is essential to study possible methods to detect these unauthorized practices. For this purpose a procedure was required to study the stable carbon isotopic composition of CO(2) in cider. A liquid sample of cider was transferred to a vial and CO(2) from the headspace of the vial was analyzed using a peripheral device interfaced to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Separation of the CO(2) from water and ethanol was achieved using a gas chromatography column located in the peripheral device. The values for repeatability and reproducibility obtained indicated the robustness of the method, which is required for routine analysis. Ninety cider samples from various origins were analyzed, most of which showed a (13)C content consistent with the declared origin. The δ(13)C ranged from -24.80‰ to -20.89‰ for ciders with endogenous carbon dioxide (-22.74 ± 0.79‰) and -37.13‰ to -26.00‰ if industrial CO(2) was added. Several samples were also suspected of C4 sugar addition prior to the fermentation. A fast, accurate and simple method for cider adulteration detection was developed. The addition of exogenous CO(2) as well as C4 sugar addition prior to fermentation could be detected. The method showed advantages over existing methods in term of simplicity (no sample preparation and very long-term stability of the sample), speed (less than 10 min/sample) and precision ((r ≤0.32 and R ≤0.42). Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Osteoblast response to nanocrystalline calcium hydroxyapatite depends on carbonate content.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brandy R; Mostafa, Amany; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2014-09-01

    Normal bone mineral is a carbonated-apatite, but there are limited data on the effect of mineral containing carbonate on cell response. We characterized surface chemical compositions of three experimental carbonated hydroxyapatite (CO3(2-) HA) substrates and investigated their effect on osteoblast differentiation. Carbonate was incorporated into the hydroxyapatite powders while phosphate and hydroxyl groups were shown to be reduced by analyzing the chemical composition of the substrate surfaces. CO3(2-) HA powders with increasing carbonate concentrations designated as C1 (3.88%), C2 (4.85%), and C3 (5.82%) were molded, pressed, and fired into 14 mm discs. We observed that calcium phosphate ratios increased monotonically with increasing carbonate content, whereas differentiation of MG63 cells decreased. CO3(2-) HA surfaces also affected factor production. Addition of carbonate caused a 70% reduction in osteoprotegerin (OPG) compared to cultures on pure HA, but the effect of carbonate was not dose-dependent. Low carbonate content reduced VEGF-A by 80%, but higher levels of carbonate reversed this effect in a concentration dependent manner, with the C3 VEFG-A levels approximately twice that of C1 levels. These observations collectively indicate that bone cells are sensitive to carbonate content in bone mineral and the effects of carbonate substitution vary with the outcome being measured. Overall, this study provides a preliminary understanding of how carbonate substitution within hydroxyapatite modulates cellular behavior. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Carbon and oxygen isotope study of carbonates from highly shocked clasts of the polymict breccia of the Haughton Crater (Canada)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrinier, P.; Martinez, I.; Javoy, M.; Schaerer, U.

    1992-01-01

    It is known that the release of volatiles on impact is an important controlling factor in cratering processes in carbonate terranes and in the mobility of chemical elements. In order to assess the nature and the role of carbon- and oxygen-bearing volatiles during impact-induced metamorphism of sedimentary rocks, the C-13/C-12 and O-18/O-16 ratios and carbonate contents were determined for 30 shocked clasts from the Haughton Crater polymict breccia as well as for some unshocked carbonates from the sedimentary cover adjacent to the crater. Shock-induced CO2 loss during decarbonation of calcite is known to be a function of peak pressure and ambient partial pressure of the volatile species. In our clast samples, shocked from 20 to 60 GPa, we expect about 20 to 100 percent CO2 loss and preferential depletion in C-13 and O-18 in the residual carbonate. Rayleigh model (progressive loss of CO2) and batch model (single-step loss of CO2) curves for this depletion are shown. The magnitudes of the C-13 and O-18 depletions increase with the increase of the CO2 loss. In addition, the isotopic depletions should be correlated with an enrichment in CaO and MgO in the residual solid.

  18. Inverse carbon isotope patterns of lipids and kerogen record heterogeneous primary biomass.

    PubMed

    Close, H G; Bovee, R; Pearson, A

    2011-05-01

    Throughout the Proterozoic δ(13)C values for preserved n-alkyl lipids are more positive than for syngenetic kerogen. This pattern is the inverse of biosynthetic expectations. It has been suggested that this isotopic inversion results from selective preservation of lipids from (13)C-enriched heterotrophic populations, while the bulk of kerogen derives from primary producers. Here, we formulate a degradation model to calculate the (13)C content of sedimentary total organic carbon and lipid. The model addresses two scenarios. The first scenario explores preferential preservation of heterotrophic lipid, thereby quantifying the existing hypothesis. In the second, we suggest that an inverse signature could be the result of prokaryotic phytoplankton contributing the majority of the total ecosystem biomass. Photosynthetic prokaryotes bearing a relative (13)C enrichment would contribute much of the resulting preserved lipids, while primary eukaryotic biomass would dominate the total organic carbon. We find that our hypothesis of a mixed primary producer community generates inverse isotopic patterns while placing far fewer requirements on specific degradation conditions. It also provides a possible explanation as to why there are large variations in the (13)C content of the isoprenoid lipids pristane and phytane relative to n-alkyl lipid, while the difference between n-alkyl lipid and kerogen is more constant. Our results suggest that the disappearance of the inverse (13)C signature in the late Ediacaran is a natural consequence of the fundamental shift to oceans in which export production has a higher ratio of eukaryotic biomass.

  19. Strontium Isotopes of Gaskiers Cap Carbonate, Avalon, Newfoundland: Sequential Digestion Aids Interpretation of Petrologic Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T.; Raub, T. D.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Harland" of high-Ca, Sr composition; or 4) brine-influenced diagenesis exploiting specific horizons in the cap. As a broader implication, many extant Sr-isotope chemostratigraphies of Marinoan cap carbonate may be inaccurate, and in general, recrystallized impure (and low-Sr) carbonates, and dolomites in particular, are probably best studied with the serial digestion technique. We apply this sequential digestion technique to another Ediacaran cap carbonate with significant siliciclastic content, the anomalous cap limestone synchronous with deglaciation of ~581 Ma Gaskiers ice age in Newfoundland's Avalon zone. Although some textural and compositional differences exist between ~635 Ma Nuccaleena and ~581 Ma Gaskiers cap, the sequential digestion technique again appears to provide clarity by suggesting less-altered and more-altered fractions from various sample levels. We will discuss implications for the nature of Gaskiers glaciation and accompanying environmental oxidation, its global correlations, and the utility of the existing Ediacaran Sr-chemostratigraphic reference curve.

  20. Development of a Carbon Isotope-Based Tracer of Groundwater Fluxes into Estuaries and the Coastal Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkle, D. C.; Gramling, C. M.; Mulligan, A. E.; Woods, T. L.

    2001-05-01

    We will show how the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) - in particular, its radiocarbon content (Δ 14C) - can be used to quantify the contribution of confined groundwater flow to the total land-sea freshwater flux. The key observation underlying this approach is that groundwater in confined aquifers typically has a much lower radiocarbon content than surface fresh water (rivers and streams, and the water table groundwater that feeds them). We illustrate this method using chemical and isotopic data from Pages Creek and Futch Creek, two small estuaries on the Intracoastal Waterway near Wilmington, NC. Isotopic analyses of groundwater in coastal NC, of springs in Pages Creek and Futch Creek, and of the known DIC sources to these tidal creeks (sea water, stream water, and CO2 from salt marsh decomposition processes), show that confined aquifers are the only significant low-Δ 14C DIC source to these estuaries. Salinity data constrain the total freshwater fraction (surface water + artesian groundwater) of each estuarine sample, and the radiocarbon data are then used to estimate the fractional groundwater contribution to the Pages Creek and Futch Creek freshwater budgets. We will also present preliminary carbon isotopic results from a unique set of salty "groundwater" samples from shallow seafloor wells from the South Carolina continental shelf. These data suggest that sub-bottom recirculation of seawater may impart a low-Δ 14C signal to shelf waters in this region.

  1. Turnover of carbon isotopes in tail hair and breath CO2 of horses fed an isotopically varied diet.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, L K; Cerling, T E; Robinson, T; West, A G; Sponheimer, M; Passey, B H; Hammer, J; Roeder, B; Dearing, M D; Ehleringer, J R

    2004-03-01

    Temporal stable isotope records derived from animal tissues are increasingly studied to determine dietary and climatic histories. Despite this, the turnover times governing rates of isotope equilibration in specific tissues following a dietary isotope change are poorly known. The dietary isotope changes recorded in the hair and blood bicarbonate of two adult horses in this study are found to be successfully described by a model having three exponential isotope pools. For horse tail hair, the carbon isotope response observed following a dietary change from a C3 to a C4 grass was consistent with a pool having a very fast turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 0.5 days) that made up approximately 41% of the isotope signal, a pool with an intermediate turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 4 days) that comprised approximately 15% of the isotope signal, and a pool with very slow turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 140 days) that made up approximately 44% of the total isotope signal. The carbon isotope signature of horse blood bicarbonate, in contrast, had a different isotopic composition, with approximately 67% of the isotope signal coming from a fast turnover pool ( t1/2 0.2 days), approximately 17% from a pool with an intermediate turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 3 days) and approximately 16% from a pool with a slow turnover rate ( t1/2 approximately 50 days). The constituent isotope pools probably correspond to one exogenous and two endogenous sources. The exogenous source equates to our fast turnover pool, and the pools with intermediate and slow turnover rates are thought to derive from the turnover of metabolically active tissues and relatively inactive tissues within the body, respectively. It seems that a greater proportion of the amino acids available for hair synthesis come from endogenous sources compared to the compounds undergoing cellular catabolism in the body. Consequently, the isotope composition of blood bicarbonate appears to be much more responsive to

  2. Dynamics of carbon in deep soils inferred from carbon stable isotopes signatures : a worldwide meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balesdent, Jérôme; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Chadoeuf, Joël; Cornu, Sophie; Derrien, Delphine; Fekiacova, Zuzana; Hatté, Christine

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of soil carbon deeper than 30 cm to the atmospheric carbon balance is still poorly understood. A very straightforward quantification of the gross exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and soil organic matter can be obtained at places where the 13C/12C signature of vegetation has been changed for known durations, due to switch of the photosynthetic metabolism (C3 or C4) or to Free Air Carbon Enrichment experiments. We compiled C and 13C profile data of 113 sites of this type, either gahered from the literature or from our own measurements. Each site comprised two profiles : one where the 13C/12C of the vegetation had been changed, and a reference profile with unchanged vegetation 13C/12C. An isotope mixing equation was used, which takes into account the natural isotope enrichments with depth and decay. Three main variables were calculated at any depth from 0 to 100 cm and in a few sites down to 200 cm : the carbon content, the proportion of new carbon (aged less than the duration of change t) and the amount of new carbon. The database concerned 23 countries, various climates (58% intertropical and 42% between 23° to 56° latitude) and various soil types and textures. Landuses and vegetation consisted in 26% of forests and woodlands, 35% of grasslands and 38% of cropped systems. The duration of the natural labelling t ranged from 2 years to ca. 4000 years. Peatlands, boreal, and desert environments were absent from the database. Non-linear regressions with time across the dataset yielded kinetic parameters of the age distribution on one hand and of the flux of new carbon incorporation (kg C m-2 yr-1) on the other, each calculated by 10 cm depth increments. On the average, the median ages of carbon increase from ca. 15 years at 0 cm to more than 1000 years at 100 cm. Turnover is on the average 2 to 3 times slower for the subsoil (30-100 cm) than for the topsoil (0-30 cm). Based on the incorporation of new C in the first decades, the carbon input

  3. Temperature and Oxygen Isotope Composition of The Ediacaran Ocean: Constraints From Clumped Isotope Carbonate Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacie, M.; Eiler, J. M.; Fike, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    The temperature and chemical variations of the early oceans on Earth are highly debated, particularly for periods associated with significant evolutionary change and/or extinction. The temperature of past oceans has been estimated based on conventional carbonate-water and/or silicate-water stable oxygen isotope thermometry. Precambrian carbonates and silicates both exhibit a long-term secular trend of increasing δ18O values with decreasing age. This trend has been used to support two opposite - though related - interpretations: the Earth's oceans gradually cooled over the course of the Proterozoic eon, from a maximum of ~ 60-90°C at ~ 2.5Ga (and were, on average, relatively warm during much of the Paleozoic era) [1]. This interpretation has been supported by Si-isotope proxies and the thermal tolerances of proteins in various classes of microbial organisms [2-3]. Alternatively, the δ18O value of the oceans has gradually increased through time [4-5], and mean Earth surface temperatures varied over a narrow range similar to modern conditions. In other terms, one either assumes an ocean of constant δ18O and infers that climate varied dramatically, or vise versa. Finally, it is possible that post- depositional processes (e.g., diagenesis, burial metamorphism, weathering) has modified the δ18O values of all or most Precambrian sedimentary carbonates and silicates, overprinting any paleoclimatic variations. Carbonate 'clumped isotope' thermometry provides a new way to independently test these hypotheses because it allows one to determine the apparent growth temperatures of carbonate minerals based on their abundances of 13C-18O bonds, as reflected by the 'Δ47' value of CO2 extracted by phosphoric acid digestion [6]. This method is thermodynamically based and independent of the δ18O of water from which the carbonate grew. We will report the initial results of measurements of 'Δ47 for a suite of carbonates from the Sultanate of Oman. This Ediacaran age (~ 635 to

  4. Determination of the abundance and carbon isotope composition of elemental carbon in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Michael I.; Gröcke, Darren R.

    1997-08-01

    We report measurements of the susceptibility of a variety of elemental and organic carbon samples to oxidative degradation using both acid dichromate and basic peroxide reagents. Organic carbon is rapidly oxidized using either reagent, or both reagents sequentially. Elemental carbon exhibits a wide range of susceptibilities to oxidation related both to the degree to which the precursor plant material was carbonized during pyrolysis and to the surface area available for oxidation. Despite a range of susceptibilities, a component of oxidation-resistant elemental carbon has been identified which can be reproducibly separated from organic contaminants. The carbon isotope composition (δ 13C value) of the precursor plant materials underwent a 0-1.6‰ decrease during the production of the elemental carbon by pyrolysis, while the subsequent oxidative degradation of the samples resulted in only small (generally < 0.5%o) changes in the δ 13C value of the remaining elemental carbon. The results suggest that the technique can be used to obtain records of elemental carbon abundance in marine sediment cores, and thus a record of the intensity of biomass burning on adjacent continental land masses in the geologic past. In addition, the δ 13C value of the elemental carbon can provide an indication of the type of vegetation being burnt.

  5. Using Carbon Isotopes in Cenozoic Soil Carbonates to Quantify Primary Productivity from Mid-Latitude Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caves, J. K.; Kramer, S. H.; Ibarra, D. E.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon isotope composition of pedogenic carbonates (δ13Ccarb) from paleosols has been extensively used as a proxy to estimate atmospheric pCO2 over the Phanerozoic. However, a number of other factors - including the concentration of plant-respired CO2 and the isotopic composition of both atmospheric and plant-respired carbon - influence the δ13C of pedogenic carbonates. For example, δ13Ccarb records from the mid-latitudes in central Asia and western North America show increasing trends in δ13Ccarb despite decreasing pCO2 during the late Cenozoic, which suggests that other factors play an important role in determining the isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonates. Instead, we suggest that these records are primarily recording changes in primary productivity rather than changes in atmospheric pCO2 and therefore propose a novel use of paleosol carbonate records to understand paleo-ecosystem dynamics. Here, we compile existing paleosol carbonate records, and present three new records from Wyoming, to estimate soil respiration and primary productivity in western North America during the Paleogene and early Neogene. We observe both an overall increase in δ13Ccarb after the early Eocene, and spatially heterogeneous δ13Ccarb values across western US basins. We combine this δ13Ccarb data with compilations of atmospheric pCO2 to estimate soil respiration and plant productivity. The long-term increase in δ13Ccarb indicates a decrease in plant productivity as conditions became more arid across much of the western US, congruent with both records of regional uplift and of global cooling. Furthermore, significant spatial heterogeneity in δ13Ccarb indicates that regional factors, such as the presence of paleolakes and/or local paleotopography may have provided a second-order control on local and regional productivity. Thus, our results provide a first-order estimate linking changes in primary productivity with regional tectonics and global climatic change.

  6. Environmental impact and magnitude of paleosol carbonate carbon isotope excursions marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abels, Hemmo A.; Lauretano, Vittoria; van Yperen, Anna E.; Hopman, Tarek; Zachos, James C.; Lourens, Lucas J.; Gingerich, Philip D.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2016-05-01

    Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere-ocean carbon system, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE) can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event and also to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is well documented, but CIE records for the subsequent warming events are still rare, especially from the terrestrial realm.Here, we provide new paleosol carbonate CIE records for two of the smaller hyperthermal events, I1 and I2, as well as two additional records of Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2) and H2 in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA. Stratigraphic comparison of this expanded, high-resolution terrestrial carbon isotope history to the deep-sea benthic foraminiferal isotope records from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites 1262 and 1263, Walvis Ridge, in the southern Atlantic Ocean corroborates the idea that the Bighorn Basin fluvial sediments record global atmospheric change. The ˜ 34 m thicknesses of the eccentricity-driven hyperthermals in these archives corroborate precession forcing of the ˜ 7 m thick fluvial overbank-avulsion sedimentary cycles. Using bulk-oxide mean-annual-precipitation reconstructions, we find soil moisture contents during the four younger hyperthermals that are similar to or only slightly wetter than the background, in contrast with soil drying observed during the PETM using the same proxy, sediments, and plant fossils.The magnitude of the CIEs in soil carbonate for the four smaller, post-PETM events scale nearly linearly with the equivalent event magnitudes documented in marine records. In contrast, the magnitude of the PETM terrestrial CIE is at least 5 ‰ smaller than expected based on extrapolation of the scaling relationship established

  7. Regional prediction of carbon isotopes in soil carbonates for Asian dust source tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Yaqiang

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles emitted from deserts and semi-arid lands in northern China cause particulate pollution that increases the burden of disease particularly for urban population in East Asia. The stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of carbonates in soils and dust aerosols in northern China were investigated. We found that the δ13C of carbonates in surface soils in northern China showed clearly the negative correlation (R2 = 0.73) with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived NDVI, we predicted the regional distribution of δ13C of soil carbonates in deserts, sandy lands, and steppe areas. The predictions show the mean δ13C of -0.4 ± 0.7‰ in soil carbonates in Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Deserts, and the isotope values decrease to -3.3 ± 1.1‰ in sandy lands. The increase in vegetation coverage depletes 13C in soil carbonates, thus the steppe areas are predicted by the lowest δ13C levels (-8.1 ± 1.7‰). The measurements of atmospheric dust samples at eight sites showed that the Asian dust sources were well assigned by the 13C mapping in surface soils. Predicting 13C in large geographical areas with fine resolution offers a cost-effective tracer to monitor dust emissions from sandy lands and steppe areas which show an increasing role in Asian dust loading driven by climate change and human activities.

  8. Cryogenic Calcite: A Morphologic and Isotopic Analog to the ALH84001 Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Ming, D. W.; Gibson, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 carbonates preserve large and variable microscale isotopic compositions, which in some way reflect their formation environment. These measurements show large variations (>20%) in the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the carbonates on a 10-20 micron scale that are correlated with chemical composition. However, the utilization of these data sets for interpreting the formation conditions of the carbonates is complex due to lack of suitable terrestrial analogs and the difficulty of modeling under non-equilibrium conditions. Thus, the mechanisms and processes are largely unknown that create and preserve large microscale isotopic variations in carbonate minerals. Experimental tests of the possible environments and mechanisms that lead to large microscale isotopic variations can help address these concerns. One possible mechanism for creating large carbon isotopic variations in carbonates involves the freezing of water. Carbonates precipitate during extensive CO2 degassing that occurs during the freezing process as the fluid s decreasing volume drives CO2 out. This rapid CO2 degassing results in a kinetic isotopic fractionation where the CO2 gas has a much lighter isotopic composition causing an enrichment of 13C in the remaining dissolved bicarbonate. This study seeks to determine the suitability of cryogenically formed carbonates as analogs to ALH84001 carbonates. Specifically, our objective is to determine how accurately models using equilibrium fractionation factors approximate the isotopic compositions of cryogenically precipitated carbonates. This includes determining the accuracy of applying equilibrium fractionation factors during a kinetic process, and determining how isotopic variations in the fluid are preserved in microscale variations in the precipitated carbonates.

  9. Cryogenic Calcite: A Morphologic and Isotopic Analog to the ALH84001 Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Ming, D. W.; Gibson, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 carbonates preserve large and variable microscale isotopic compositions, which in some way reflect their formation environment. These measurements show large variations (>20%) in the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the carbonates on a 10-20 micron scale that are correlated with chemical composition. However, the utilization of these data sets for interpreting the formation conditions of the carbonates is complex due to lack of suitable terrestrial analogs and the difficulty of modeling under non-equilibrium conditions. Thus, the mechanisms and processes are largely unknown that create and preserve large microscale isotopic variations in carbonate minerals. Experimental tests of the possible environments and mechanisms that lead to large microscale isotopic variations can help address these concerns. One possible mechanism for creating large carbon isotopic variations in carbonates involves the freezing of water. Carbonates precipitate during extensive CO2 degassing that occurs during the freezing process as the fluid s decreasing volume drives CO2 out. This rapid CO2 degassing results in a kinetic isotopic fractionation where the CO2 gas has a much lighter isotopic composition causing an enrichment of 13C in the remaining dissolved bicarbonate. This study seeks to determine the suitability of cryogenically formed carbonates as analogs to ALH84001 carbonates. Specifically, our objective is to determine how accurately models using equilibrium fractionation factors approximate the isotopic compositions of cryogenically precipitated carbonates. This includes determining the accuracy of applying equilibrium fractionation factors during a kinetic process, and determining how isotopic variations in the fluid are preserved in microscale variations in the precipitated carbonates.

  10. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zheng, Liange; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modified to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.

  11. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zheng, Liange; ...

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modifiedmore » to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.« less

  12. Seasonal variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of bats reflect environmental baselines.

    PubMed

    Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Quetglas, Juan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Kelm, Detlev H; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of animal tissues is commonly used to trace wildlife diets and analyze food chains. Changes in an animal's isotopic values over time are generally assumed to indicate diet shifts or, less frequently, physiological changes. Although plant isotopic values are known to correlate with climatic seasonality, only a few studies restricted to aquatic environments have investigated whether temporal isotopic variation in consumers may also reflect environmental baselines through trophic propagation. We modeled the monthly variation in carbon and nitrogen isotope values in whole blood of four insectivorous bat species occupying different foraging niches in southern Spain. We found a common pattern of isotopic variation independent of feeding habits, with an overall change as large as or larger than one trophic step. Physiological changes related to reproduction or to fat deposition prior to hibernation had no effect on isotopic variation, but juvenile bats had higher δ13C and δ15N values than adults. Aridity was the factor that best explained isotopic variation: bat blood became enriched in both 13C and 15N after hotter and/or drier periods. Our study is the first to show that consumers in terrestrial ecosystems reflect seasonal environmental dynamics in their isotope values. We highlight the danger of misinterpreting stable isotope data when not accounting for seasonal isotopic baselines in food web studies. Understanding how environmental seasonality is integrated in animals' isotope values will be crucial for developing reliable methods to use stable isotopes as dietary tracers.

  13. Carbon isotope fractionation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to outgassing of carbon dioxide from a headwater stream

    Treesearch

    Daniel H. Doctor; Carol Kendall; Stephen D. Sebestyen; James B. Shanley; Nobuhito Ohte; Elizabeth W. Boyer

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC) was investigated as a potential tracer of streamflow generation processes at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA. Downstream sampling showed δ13C-DIC increased between 3-5% from the stream source to the outlet weir...

  14. Soil Drying Effects on the Carbon Isotope Composition of Soil Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. L.; Nickerson, N.; Risk, D.; Kayler, Z. E.; Rugh, W.; Mix, A. C.; Bond, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotopes are used widely as a tool for determining sources of carbon (C) fluxes in ecosystem C studies. Environmental factors that change over time, such as moisture, can create dynamic changes in the isotopic composition of C assimilated by plants, and offers a unique opportunity to distinguish fast- responding plant C from slower-responding soil C pools, which under steady-state conditions may be too similar isotopically to partition. Monitoring the isotopic composition of soil respiration over a period of changing moisture conditions is potentially a useful approach for characterizing plant contributions to soil respiration. But this partitioning hinges on the assumption that any change in the isotopic signature of soil respiration is solely due to recent photosynthetic discrimination, and that post-photosynthetic processes, such as microbial respiration, do not discriminate as moisture decreases. The purpose of the present study is to test the assumption that δ13CO2 from microbial respiration remains static as soil dries. We conducted a series of greenhouse experiments employing different techniques to isolate microbial respiration from root respiration. The first involves removing roots from soil, and showed that when roots are present, respiration from dry soil is enriched in 13C relative to moist soil, but when roots are absent, respiration is isotopically similar from moist and dry soils. This indicates that rhizospheric respiration changes isotopically with moisture whereas soil microbial respiration does not. In contrast, a second experiment in which soil columns without plants were monitored as they dried, showed respiration from very dry soil to be enriched by 8‰ relative to moist soil. However, simulations with an isotopologue-based soil gas diffusion model demonstrate that at least a portion of the apparent enrichment is due to non-steady state gas transport processes. Careful sampling methodologies which prevent or account for non

  15. Determination of the (13)C/(12)C Carbon Isotope Ratio in Carbonates and Bicarbonates by (13)C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pironti, Concetta; Cucciniello, Raffaele; Camin, Federica; Tonon, Agostino; Motta, Oriana; Proto, Antonio

    2017-10-09

    This paper is the first study focused on the innovative application of (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy to determine the bulk (13)C/(12)C carbon isotope ratio, at natural abundance, in inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates. In the past, (13)C NMR spectroscopy (irm-(13)C NMR) was mainly used to measure isotope ratio monitoring with the potential of conducting (13)C position-specific isotope analysis of organic molecules with high precision. The reliability of the newly developed methodology for the determination of stable carbon isotope ratio was evaluated in comparison with the method chosen in the past for these measurements, i.e., isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), with very encouraging results. We determined the (13)C/(12)C ratio of carbonates and bicarbonates (∼50-100 mg) with a precision on the order of 1‰ in the presence of a relaxation agent, such as Cr(acac)3, and CH3(13)COONa as an internal standard. The method was first applied to soluble inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates and then extended to insoluble carbonates by converting them to Na2CO3, following a simple procedure and without observing isotopic fractionation. Here, we demonstrate that (13)C NMR spectroscopy can also be successfully adopted to characterize the (13)C/(12)C isotope ratio in inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates with applications in different fields, such as cultural heritage and geological studies.

  16. Equilibrium carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [1-3]) have suggested that Si- and Fe-isotopic signatures can be used to characterize the compositions and conditions of segregation of metallic cores in planetary interiors. This study expands the theoretical framework to include carbon and hydrogen, which may also be alloying elements. Hydrogen (D/H) and carbon (13C/12C) fractionations in iron-rich metallic melts are estimated by modeling analogous iron-rich crystals, i.e., dhcp-FeH and η-Fe2C. C- and H-atoms in these crystals are completely coordinated by iron. The driving energy for equilibrium fractionation is assumed to come from the reduction of vibrational frequencies when heavy isotopes are substituted for light ones; vibrations are assumed to be harmonic. This treatment is crude at high temperature, and for the relatively anharmonic vibrations typical of hydrogen-bearing substances, but may provide a reasonably accurate, semi-quantitative approximation of real fractionation behavior. Vibrational frequencies of all crystals are modeled with density functional theory, using gradient-corrected functionals and ultrasoft pseudopotentials. For both carbon and hydrogen, the models suggest that the metal phase will be strongly depleted in heavy isotopes. At 2000 K, 1 atm, η-Fe2C will have 3‰ lower 13C/12C than coexisting diamond. Combining this result with previous high-temperature theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [4]), metal-graphite fractionation is expected to be very similar, while metal-CO2 fractionation will be almost twice as large, ca. -5‰. Deuterium/hydrogen fractionations are expected to be an order of magnitude larger, with 50-70‰ lower D/H in dhcp-FeH than in coexisting H2 gas at 2000 K, and approximately 100‰ lower D/H than water vapor. These fractionations are much larger than those inferred for silicon and iron, as expected given the differences in atomic mass. References: 1. Georg et al. (2007) Nature 447:1102; 2. Rustad & Yin

  17. Preparation of starch and other carbon fractions from higher plant leaves for stable carbon isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Wanek, W; Heintel, S; Richter, A

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the carbon isotope composition of starch and cellulose still relies on chemical isolation of these water-insoluble plant constituents and subsequent elemental analysis by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) of the purified fractions, while delta(13)C values of low-molecular-weight organic compounds are now routinely measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). Here we report a simple and reliable method for processing milligram quantities of dried plant material for the analysis of the carbon isotope composition of lipids, soluble sugars, starch and cellulose from the same sample. We evaluated three different starch preparation methods, namely (1) enzymatic hydrolysis by alpha-amylase, (2) solubilization by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) followed by precipitation with ethanol, and (3) partial hydrolysis by HCl followed by precipitation of the resulting dextrins by ethanol. Starch recovery for three commercially available native starches (from potato, rice and wheat) varied from 48 to 81% for the techniques based on precipitation, whereas the enzymatic technique exhibited yields between 99 and 105%. In addition, the DMSO and HCl techniques introduced a significant (13)C fractionation of up to 1.9 per thousand, while the carbon isotope composition of native starches analyzed after enzymatic digestion did not show any significant difference from that of untreated samples. The enzymatic starch preparation method was then incorporated into a protocol for determination of delta(13)C signatures of lipids, soluble carbohydrates, starch and crude cellulose. The procedure is based on methanol/chloroform/water extraction of dried and ground leaf material. After recovery of the chloroform phase (lipid fraction), the methanol/water phase was deionized by ion exchange (soluble carbohydrate fraction) and the pellet treated with heat-stable alpha-amylase (starch fraction). The remaining insoluble material was subjected

  18. Carbon-isotopic composition of soil-respired carbon dioxide in static closed chambers at equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Mora, Germán; Raich, James W

    2007-01-01

    The carbon-isotopic composition (delta13C) of soil-respired CO2 has been employed to evaluate soil carbon-cycling processes and the contribution of soil CO2 emissions to canopy and tropospheric air. These evaluations can be successful only when accurate isotope values of soil-respired CO2 are available. Here, we tested the robustness of delta13C values of soil-respired CO2 obtained after long incubations in static closed chambers that were initially flushed with soil air. The rationale of this approach is that the equilibrium carbon-isotope values of chamber-headspace CO2 are theoretically equal to those of CO2 produced within the soil. Static closed chambers were installed in replicated grass monocultures, and measurements of headspace CO2 concentrations and delta13C values were performed at regular time intervals for 24 h in July 2005. The results revealed no significant effects of grass species on headspace CO2 concentrations or delta13C values (repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), P>0.1). As predicted by theory, isotope values asymptotically approached equilibrium conditions, which in our experimental setting occurred after 10 h. This good match between model predictions and our results suggests that an accurate determination of delta13C values of CO2 produced within soils is obtained through the isotopic measurement of chamber-headspace CO2 once equilibrium conditions have been reached with the underlying soils. An additional advantage of this approach is that only one sample per chamber is required, which, combined with the low uncertainties of these measurements, facilitates the investigation of the spatial (landscape) variability of soil-respired CO2.

  19. Bringing organic carbon isotopes and phytoliths to the table as additional constraints on paleoelevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, N. D.; Cotton, J. M.; Hren, M. T.; Hyland, E. G.; Smith, S. Y.; Strömberg, C. A. E.

    2015-12-01

    A commonly used tool in paleotectonic and paleoaltimetry studies is the oxygen isotopic composition of authigenic carbonates formed that formed in lakes or soils, with both spatial (e.g., shoreline to mountain top) or temporally resolved records potentially providing constraints. However, in many cases there is a substantial spread in the oxygen isotope data for a given time period, often to the point of allowing for essentially any interpretation of the data depending upon how they have been used by the investigator. One potential way of distinguishing between different potential paleotectonic or paleoaltimetric interpretations is to use carbon isotope and plant microfossil (phytolith) analyses from the same paleosols to screen the oxygen isotope data by looking for evidence of evaporative enrichment. For example, if both inorganic (carbonate) and organic carbon isotopes are measured from the same paleosol, then in it possible to determine if the two isotope record equilibrium conditions or if they record disequilibrium driven by kinetic effects. In the former case, the oxygen isotope results can be considered reliable whereas in the latter case, the oxygen isotope results can be considered unreliable and could be culled from the interpretation. Similarly, because the distribution of C4 plants varies as a function of temperature and elevation, the presence/absence or abundance of C4 plant phytoliths, or of carbon isotope compositions that require a component of C4 vegetation can also be used to constrain paleoelevation by providing a maximum elevation constraint. Worked examples will include the late Miocene-Pliocene of Catamarca, Argentina, where phytoliths and organic carbon isotopes provide a maximum elevation constraint and can be used to demonstrate that oxygen isotopes do not provide a locally useful constraint on paleoelevation, and Eocene-Miocene of southwestern Montana where organic matter and phytoliths can be used to select between different potential

  20. Biomarker and molecular isotope approaches to deconvolve the terrestrial carbon isotope record: modern and Eocene calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Wing, S.; Currano, E. D.

    2010-12-01

    Climate, biome, and plant community are important predictors of carbon isotope patterns recorded in leaves and leaf waxes. However, signatures recorded by terrestrial organic carbon and lipids that have mixed floral sources (e.g., n-alkanes) potentially reflect both plant community changes and climate. More taxonomically specific proxies for plants (i.e., di- and tri-terpenoids for conifers and angiosperms, respectively), can help to resolve the relative influences of changing community and climate, provided differences in biomarker production and lipid biosynthetic fractionation among plants can be better constrained. We present biomarker abundance and carbon isotope values for lipids from leaves, branches and bark of 44 tree species, representing 21 families including deciduous and evergreen conifers and angiosperms. n-alkane production differs greatly between conifer and angiosperm leaves. Both deciduous and evergreen angiosperms make significantly more n-alkanes than conifers, with n-alkanes not detected in over half of the conifers in our study. Terpenoid abundances scale strongly with leaf habit: evergreen species have significantly higher abundances. We combine these relative differences in lipid production with published estimates of fluxes for leaf litter from conifer and angiosperm trees to develop a new proxy approach for estimating paleo plant community inputs to ancient soils and sediments. To test our modern calibration results, we have evaluated n-alkanes and terpenoids from laterally extensive (~18 km) carbonaceous shales and mudstones in Eocene sediments (52.6 Ma) at Fifteenmile Creek in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA). Our terpenoid-based proxy predicts on average a 40% conifer community, which is remarkably close in agreement with a fossil-based estimate of 36%. n-alkane carbon isotope fractionation (leaf-lipid) differs among plant types, with conifer n-alkanes about 2-3‰ 13C enriched relative to those in angiosperms. Since conifer leaves are

  1. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  2. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  3. The Lower Toarcian Carbon-Isotope Perturbation: Geochemical And Biological Evolution During A Methane Release Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Le Callonnec, L.; Minoletti, F.; Renard, M.; Emmanuel, L.

    2005-12-01

    During the lower toarcian anoxic event, the occurrence of a global negative excursion of the δ13C is now well documented. Several interpretations have been proposed: recycling of dissolved inorganic carbon, methane hydrates release from sediments and more recently a thermogenic methane release of Gondwana coals (McElwain et al., 2005).In this study, the evolution of the composition of the sediments is discussed as well as the types of carbonate producers and the geochemical responses (δ13C, δ18O, traces elements in carbonates: Mg, Fe, Mn, Sr) during the carbon isotopic shift. A granulometric separation technique (Minoletti et al., 2001) was applied to define the distribution of each type of calcareous particles (coccoliths, Schizophreaella, macrocrystals, micarbs). The quantification of these particles during the δ13C event and the geochemical signature of each group allow to discriminate variations recorded by primary and diagenetic compounds.In the boreal zone, the "Schistes carton" Fm. of the Paris Basin exhibits a negative excursion with a magnitude of 6‰. This decrease can be decomposed in various stages assuming several input events. A previous warming phase (δ18O decrease) should evoke a thermal destabilization of methane hydrates. In sediments preceding the carbon-isotope shift, ankeritic carbonates (Fe-Mg rich carbonate rhomboedrons) dominate over other carbonate particles. The origin of Fe-Mg flux in carbonates could be explained by more reducing conditions (due to the oxidation of methane into carbon dioxide).During the negative carbon-isotope event, an important decrease in the CaCO3 content is clearly observed and can be explained by an acidification of marine water and a higher dissolution of calcitic particles. Changes in the sea water composition can be deduced from granulometric fractions analyses. Biogenic-rich fractions (mainly coccoliths) effectively record the negative carbon-isotope shift as well as the bulk.A cyclostratigraphic

  4. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechelmann, S.; Buhl, D.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Riechelmann, D. F. C.; Richter, D. K.; Vonhof, H. B.; Wassenburg, J. A.; Geske, A.; Spötl, C.; Immenhauser, A.

    2012-11-01

    Here we explore the potential of magnesium (δ26Mg) isotope time-series data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco), the warm-temperate (Germany), the equatorial-humid (Peru) and the cold-humid (Austria) climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are compared against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and disequilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rainwater or snow as well as soil and host rock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: -4.26 ± 0.07‰ and HK3: -4.17 ± 0.15‰), and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value of all stalagmites (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: -3.96 ± 0.04‰) but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is consistent with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: -4.01 ± 0.07‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: -4.20 ± 0.10‰) suggest changes in outside air temperature was the principal driver rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: -3.00 ± 0.73‰; SPA 59: -3.70 ± 0.43‰) are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature affecting soil zone activity and weathering balance. Several δ26Mg values of the Austrian and two

  5. The magnesium isotope record of cave carbonate archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechelmann, S.; Buhl, D.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Riechelmann, D. F. C.; Richter, D. K.; Vonhof, H. B.; Wassenburg, J. A.; Geske, A.; Spötl, C.; Immenhauser, A.

    2012-05-01

    Here we explore the potential of time-series magnesium (δ26Mg) isotope data as continental climate proxies in speleothem calcite archives. For this purpose, a total of six Pleistocene and Holocene stalagmites from caves in Germany, Morocco and Peru and two flowstones from a cave in Austria were investigated. These caves represent the semi-arid to arid (Morocco), the warm-temperate (Germany), the equatorial-humid (Peru) and the cold-humid (Austria) climate zones. Changes in the calcite magnesium isotope signature with time are placed against carbon and oxygen isotope records from these speleothems. Similar to other proxies, the non-trivial interaction of a number of environmental, equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes governs the δ26Mg fractionation in continental settings. These include the different sources of magnesium isotopes such as rain water or snow as well as soil and hostrock, soil zone biogenic activity, shifts in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios and residence time of water in the soil and karst zone. Pleistocene stalagmites from Morocco show the lowest mean δ26Mg values (GDA: -4.26 ± 0.07 ‰ and HK3: -4.17 ± 0.15 ‰) and the data are well explained in terms of changes in aridity over time. The Pleistocene to Holocene stalagmites from Peru show the highest mean value (NC-A and NC-B δ26Mg: -3.96 ± 0.04 ‰) but only minor variations in Mg-isotope composition, which is in concert with the rather stable equatorial climate at this site. Holocene stalagmites from Germany (AH-1 mean δ26Mg: -4.01 ± 0.07 ‰; BU 4 mean δ26Mg: -4.20 ± 0.10 ‰) record changes in outside air temperature as driving factor rather than rainfall amount. The alpine Pleistocene flowstones from Austria (SPA 52: -3.00 ± 0.73 ‰; SPA 59: -3.70 ± 0.43 ‰) are affected by glacial versus interglacial climate change with outside air temperature affecting soil zone activity and weathering balance. Several data points in the Austrian and two data points in the

  6. Clumped isotope calibration data for lacustrine carbonates: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of reconstructions of past climates. Lake sediments provide important archives of terrestrial climate change, and represent an important tool for reconstructing paleohydrology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, and paleoaltimetry. Unfortunately, while multiple methods for constraining marine temperature exist, quantitative terrestrial proxies are scarcer - tree rings, speleothems, and leaf margin analyses have all been used with varying degrees of accuracy. Clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful instrument for determining terrestrial climates: multiple studies have shown the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed. We have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid in modern lake samples and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature. Here we discuss an extensive calibration dataset comprised of 132 analyses of 97 samples from 44 localities, including microbialites, tufas, and micrites endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  7. Follow the Carbon: Isotopic Labeling Studies of Early Earth Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Raea K.; Day, Douglas A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the faint young Sun, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 in mixing ratios higher than those found on Earth today. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing these trace gases could lead to the formation of organic aerosol haze due to UV photochemistry. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain haze formation rely on CH4 as the source of carbon and treat CO2 as a source of oxygen only, but this has not previously been verified experimentally. In the present work, we use isotopically labeled precursor gases and unit-mass resolution (UMR) and high-resolution (HR) aerosol mass spectrometry to examine the sources of carbon and oxygen to photochemical aerosol formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. UMR results suggest that CH4 contributes 70-100% of carbon in the aerosol, while HR results constrain the value from 94% to 100%. We also confirm that CO2 contributes approximately 10% of the total mass to the aerosol as oxygen. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archean rocks on Earth and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres.

  8. Natural gas constituent and carbon isotopic composition in petroliferous basins, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyou; Wang, Zhengjun; Dai, Jinxing; Su, Jing

    2014-02-01

    There are abundant gas resources in petroliferous basins of China. Large to midsize gas fields are found in Eastern, central and Western of China. However, origin, constituents and isotopic composition of natural gas in different gas fields are varied distinctly, and some present strong chemical secondary alteration and show variation both in age and space. Based on the systematic analysis of constituents and carbon isotope of a large number of gas samples, combined with the geological characteristics, this paper classifies the origins of the gases, explores the gas isotope characteristics and evolutionary regulation with the variation time and space, and further discusses the distinctive geochemistry of the gases in China. These gases are dominated by dry gas, its methane carbon isotope values range from -10‰ to -70‰, ethane from -16‰ to -52‰, propane from -13‰ to -43‰, and butane from -18‰ to -34‰. The carbon isotopes of most gases show the characteristics of humic-derived gas and crude oil cracked gas. In addition, large primary biogenic gas fields have been discovered in the Qaidam basin; inorganic-derived alkane gases have been discovered in deep of the Songliao Basin. Half of these gas fields are characterized by the alkane carbon isotope reversal in different degrees. Research indicates there are several reasons can result in carbon isotope reversal. Firstly, gas charge of different genetic types or different source in one gas reservoir may cause carbon isotope reversal. Besides, high-over mature evolution of gas can also lead to the carbon isotopic reversal of alkanes. Thirdly, secondary alteration of hydrocarbons may also result in abnormal distribution of carbon isotope, isotope transforms to unusual light and heavy.

  9. Genetic Effect on Carbon-Isotope Composition of a Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, H.

    2005-05-01

    Stable carbon isotopes of organic sediments are potential tools in investigating a wide spectrum of geological problems. These include paleoclimate, paleoecology, and the origin of life. The quality of the information the tools provides depends largely on our knowledge on the factors determining the isotopic composition of a plant. This is because most biogenic organic sediments are derived from plants. The factors can be grouped into internal and external. The internal factors are ultimately attributable to the genetic make-up of a plant. The most well known internal factor is the photosynthetic pathway. Others include structure of the leave tissue and metabolic characteristics of a plant. External factors are concentration and the isotopic composition of the source CO2 and the physical and chemical conditions of the plant's growth environments. This study addresses primarily the genetic effect, the internal factors. Based on the results of two suites of natural plant samples, it is concluded that the difference in photosynthetic pathway entails about 20.0 % of spread in terms of ä13CPDB values. Genetic effect is also accountable for up to 7.0 to 8.0 % spread in ä13CPDB values within a single category of photosynthetic pathway (i.e. the Calvin cycle). With constrains from the relevant known knowledge, it is concluded that the ä13CPDB values of terrestrial plants are probably ranging from - 8.0 to equal or less than -44.9 %. This range of ä13CPDB values may also be considered the bio-signature of organic sediments of great antiquity.

  10. The effects of early diagenesis on the chemical and stable carbon isotopic composition of wood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of modern and ancient buried wood show that there is a linear correlation between carbohydrate content and the stable carbon isotope composition as carbohydrates are preferentially degraded during early diagenesis. As the carbohydrate content decreases, the ??13C value of the degraded wood decreases 1 to 2 per mil, approaching the value of the residual lignin. These results indicate that carbohydrate degradation products are lost and not incorporated into the aromatic structure as lignin is selectively preserved during early diagenesis of wood. These results also indicate that attempts to quantify terrestrial inputs to modern sedimentary organic matter based on ??13C values should consider the possibility of a 1 to 2 per mil decrease in the ??13C value of degraded wood. ?? 1987.

  11. Correlation between the Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Leaf Starch and Sugars of C3 Plants and the Ratio of Intercellular and Atmospheric Partial Pressures of Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Brugnoli, Enrico; Hubick, Kerry T.; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Wong, Suan Chin; Farquhar, Graham D.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) was analyzed in leaf starch and soluble sugars, which represent most of the recently fixed carbon. Plants of three C3 species (Populus nigra L. × P. deltoides Marsh., Gossypium hirsutum L. and Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were kept in the dark for 24 hours to decrease contents of starch and sugar in leaves. Then gas exchange measurements were made with constant conditions for 8 hours, and subsequently starch and soluble sugars were extracted for analysis of carbon isotope composition. The ratio of intercellular, pi, and atmospheric, pa, partial pressures of CO2, was calculated from gas exchange measurements, integrated over time and weighted by assimilation rate, for comparison with the carbon isotope ratios in soluble sugars and starch. Carbon isotope discrimination in soluble sugars correlated strongly (r = 0.93) with pi/pa in all species, as did Δ in leaf starch (r = 0.84). Starch was found to contain significantly more 13C than soluble sugar, and possible explanations are discussed. The strong correlation found between Δ and pi/pa suggests that carbon isotope analysis in leaf starch and soluble sugars may be used for monitoring, indirectly, the average of pi/pa weighted by CO2 assimilation rate, over a day. Because pi/pa has a negative correlation with transpiration efficiency (mol CO2/mol H2O) of isolated plants, Δ in starch and sugars may be used to predict differences in this efficiency. This new method may be useful in ecophysiological studies and in selection for improved transpiration efficiency in breeding programs for C3 species. PMID:16666476

  12. Assessment of shock effects on amphibole water contents and hydrogen isotope compositions: 1. Amphibolite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minitti, Michelle E.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Taylor, Bruce E.; Dyar, M. Darby; Schultz, Peter H.

    2008-02-01

    Kaersutitic amphiboles found within a subset of the Martian meteorites have low water contents and variably heavy hydrogen isotope compositions. In order to assess if impact shock-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotope fractionation were determining factors in these water and isotopic characteristics of the Martian kaersutites, we conducted impact shock experiments on samples of Gore Mountain amphibolite in the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). A parallel shock experiment conducted on an anorthosite sample indicated that contamination of shocked samples by the AVGR hydrogen propellant was unlikely. Petrographic study of the experimental amphibolite shock products indicates that only ˜ 10% of the shock products experienced levels of damage equivalent to those found in the most highly shocked kaersutite-bearing Martian meteorites (30-35 GPa). Ion microprobe studies of highly shocked hornblende from the amphibolite exhibited elevated water contents (ΔH 2O ˜ 0.1 wt.%) and enriched hydrogen isotope compositions (Δ D ˜ + 10‰) relative to unshocked hornblende. Water and hydrogen isotope analyses of tens of milligrams of unshocked, moderately shocked, and highly shocked hornblende samples by vacuum extraction/uranium reduction and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), respectively, are largely consistent with analyses of single grains from the ion microprobe. The mechanisms thought to have produced the excess water in most of the shocked hornblendes are shock-induced reduction of hornblende Fe and/or irreversible adsorption of hydrogen. Addition of the isotopically enriched Martian atmosphere to the Martian meteorite kaersutites via these mechanisms could explain their enriched and variable isotopic compositions. Alternatively, regrouping the water extraction and IRMS analyses on the basis of isotopic composition reveals a small, but consistent, degree of impact-induced devolatilization (˜ 0.1 wt.% H 2O) and H isotope enrichment (Δ D ˜ + 10

  13. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of juvenile winter flounder ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured in the muscle tissues of young-of-the-year (YOY) winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, collected from several estuarine systems along the coast of Rhode Island, USA. These systems included three coastal lagoons (Ninigret Pond, Green Hill Pond and Point Judith Pond), an estuarine river (Narrow River) and Narragansett Bay. Results from sampling over a three-year period showed some year-to-year variability for 13C within waterbodies; however, 15N values were not significantly different (P > 0.05) within systems among the three years studied. he 13C trends observed along transects in Narrow River and Narragansett Bay showed isotopically depleted terrestrial signals in the upper reaches of the estuaries and more positive values indicative of marine organic material in the lower regions of these systems. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in 15N were observed among estuarine systems. Fish from the coastal lagoons had the lowest 15N values followed by those from Narrow River and then Narragansett Bay. Some unexpected trends in 15N were observed within Narragansett Bay. The Bay has a strong north-south gradient in nutrient concentrations due to large sewage inputs in the upper Bay which was not reflected in flounder 15N values. As expected, YOY flounder from stations in the lower-Bay had depleted 15N values compared to those from the other locations. However, the 15N ratios o

  14. Site-specific carbon isotope analysis of aromatic carboxylic acids by elemental analysis/pyrolysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Naraoka, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Site-specific carbon isotope composition of organic compounds can provide useful information on their origin and history in natural environments. Site-specific isotope analyses of small amounts of organic compounds (sub-nanomolar level), such as short-chain carboxylic acids and amino acid analogues, have been performed using gas chromatography/pyrolysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/pyrolysis/IRMS). These analyses were previously limited to volatile compounds. In this study, site-specific carbon isotope analysis has been developed for non-volatile aromatic carboxylic acids at sub-micromolar level by decarboxylation using a continuous flow elemental analysis (EA)/pyrolysis/IRMS technique. Benzoic acid, 2-naphthylacetic acid and 1-pyrenecarboxylic acid were pyrolyzed at 500-1000 degrees C by EA/pyrolysis/IRMS to produce CO2 for delta13C measurement of the carboxyl group. These three aromatic acids were most efficiently pyrolyzed at 750 degrees C. Conventional sealed-tube pyrolysis was also conducted for comparison. The delta13C values of CO2 generated by the continuous flow technique were within 1.0 per thousand of those performed by the conventional technique, indicating that the new continuous flow technique can accurately analyze the carbon isotopic composition of the carboxyl group in aromatic carboxylic acids. The new continuous flow technique is simple, rapid and uses small sample sizes, so this technique will be useful for characterizing the isotopic signature of carboxyl groups in organic compounds. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Carbon isotopic evidence for methane hydrate instability during quaternary interstadials

    PubMed

    Kennett; Cannariato; Hendy; Behl

    2000-04-07

    Large (about 5 per mil) millennial-scale benthic foraminiferal carbon isotopic oscillations in the Santa Barbara Basin during the last 60,000 years reflect widespread shoaling of sedimentary methane gradients and increased outgassing from gas hydrate dissociation during interstadials. Furthermore, several large, brief, negative excursions (up to -6 per mil) coinciding with smaller shifts (up to -3 per mil) in depth-stratified planktonic foraminiferal species indicate massive releases of methane from basin sediments. Gas hydrate stability was modulated by intermediate-water temperature changes induced by switches in thermohaline circulation. These oscillations were likely widespread along the California margin and elsewhere, affecting gas hydrate instability and contributing to millennial-scale atmospheric methane oscillations.

  16. Characterization of Northern California petroleum by stable carbon isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lillis, Paul G.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Stanley, Richard G.; McLaughlin, Robert J.; Warden, Augusta

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize natural occurrences of petroleum at the surface and in the subsurface within northern California in order to define and map petroleum systems for U.S. Geological Survey energy resource assessments. Furthermore, the chemical characterization and mapping of natural petroleum occurrences could also be used to discriminate natural occurrences from accidental oil spills during the activities of extraction or transportation of petroleum. Samples include petroleum from exploratory well tests, producing fields, natural seeps, and oil-stained rocks, and condensates from gas wells. Most of the sample localities are in northern California but a few samples from central and southern California are included for comparison (table 1). Even though other analyses were performed, only stable carbon isotope (δ13C) data are presented here for brevity and because δ13C values are one of the most discriminating characteristics of California petroleum.

  17. Carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon reflect utilization of different carbon sources by microbial communities in two limestone aquifer assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Martin E.; Schwab, Valérie F.; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Behrendt, Thomas; Kohlhepp, Bernd; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten; Trumbore, Susan E.

    2017-08-01

    Isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) are used to indicate both transit times and biogeochemical evolution of groundwaters. These signals can be complicated in carbonate aquifers, as both abiotic (i.e., carbonate equilibria) and biotic factors influence the δ13C and 14C of DIC. We applied a novel graphical method for tracking changes in the δ13C and 14C of DIC in two distinct aquifer complexes identified in the Hainich Critical Zone Exploratory (CZE), a platform to study how water transport links surface and shallow groundwaters in limestone and marlstone rocks in central Germany. For more quantitative estimates of contributions of different biotic and abiotic carbon sources to the DIC pool, we used the NETPATH geochemical modeling program, which accounts for changes in dissolved ions in addition to C isotopes. Although water residence times in the Hainich CZE aquifers based on hydrogeology are relatively short (years or less), DIC isotopes in the shallow, mostly anoxic, aquifer assemblage (HTU) were depleted in 14C compared to a deeper, oxic, aquifer complex (HTL). Carbon isotopes and chemical changes in the deeper HTL wells could be explained by interaction of recharge waters equilibrated with post-bomb 14C sources with carbonates. However, oxygen depletion and δ13C and 14C values of DIC below those expected from the processes of carbonate equilibrium alone indicate considerably different biogeochemical evolution of waters in the upper aquifer assemblage (HTU wells). Changes in 14C and 13C in the upper aquifer complexes result from a number of biotic and abiotic processes, including oxidation of 14C-depleted OM derived from recycled microbial carbon and sedimentary organic matter as well as water-rock interactions. The microbial pathways inferred from DIC isotope shifts and changes in water chemistry in the HTU wells were supported by comparison with in situ microbial community structure based on 16S rRNA analyses. Our findings demonstrate the large

  18. Isotopic disequilibrium in Globigerina bulloides and carbon isotope response to productivity increase in Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, K.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Mohan, K.; Anilkumar, N.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides collected from tow samples along a transect from the equatorial Indian ocean to the Southern Ocean (45°E and 80°E and 10°N to 53°S) were analysed and compared with the equilibrium δ18O and δ13C values of calcite calculated using the temperature and isotopic composition of the water column. The results agree within ~0.25‰ for the region between 10°N and 40°S and 75–200 m water depth which is considered to be the habitat of Globigerina bulloides. Further south (from 40°S to 55°S), however, the measured δ18O and δ13C values are higher than the expected values by ~2‰ and ~1‰ respectively. These enrichments can be attributed to either a ‘vital effect’ or a higher calcification rate. An interesting pattern of increase in the δ13C(DIC) value of the surface water with latitude is observed between 35°S and~ 60°S, with a peak at~ 42°S. This can be caused by increased organic matter production and associated removal. A simple model accounting for the increase in the δ13C(DIC) values is proposed which fits well with the observed chlorophyll abundance as a function of latitude. PMID:26903274

  19. Isotopic disequilibrium in Globigerina bulloides and carbon isotope response to productivity increase in Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, K; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharya, S K; Mohan, K; Anilkumar, N

    2016-02-23

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides collected from tow samples along a transect from the equatorial Indian ocean to the Southern Ocean (45°E and 80°E and 10°N to 53°S) were analysed and compared with the equilibrium δ(18)O and δ(13)C values of calcite calculated using the temperature and isotopic composition of the water column. The results agree within ~0.25‰ for the region between 10°N and 40°S and 75-200 m water depth which is considered to be the habitat of Globigerina bulloides. Further south (from 40°S to 55°S), however, the measured δ(18)O and δ(13)C values are higher than the expected values by ~2‰ and ~1‰ respectively. These enrichments can be attributed to either a 'vital effect' or a higher calcification rate. An interesting pattern of increase in the δ(13)C(DIC) value of the surface water with latitude is observed between 35°S and~ 60°S, with a peak at~ 42°S. This can be caused by increased organic matter production and associated removal. A simple model accounting for the increase in the δ(13)C(DIC) values is proposed which fits well with the observed chlorophyll abundance as a function of latitude.

  20. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation by Methylomirabilis oxyfera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2012-07-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to nitrite reduction is a recently discovered methane sink of as yet unknown global significance. The bacteria that have been identified to carry out this process, Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera, oxidize methane via the known aerobic pathway involving the monooxygenase reaction. In contrast to aerobic methanotrophs, oxygen is produced intracellularly and used for the activation of methane by a phylogenetically distinct particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here we report the fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen during methane oxidation by an enrichment culture of M. oxyfera bacteria. In two separate batch incubation experiments with different absolute biomass and methane contents, the specific methanotrophic activity was similar and the progressive isotope enrichment identical. Headspace methane was consumed up to 98% with rates showing typical first order reaction kinetics. The enrichment factors determined by Rayleigh equations were -29.2 ± 2.6‰ for δ13C (εC) and -227.6 ± 13.5‰ for δ2H (εH), respectively. These enrichment factors were in the upper range of values reported so far for aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, two-dimensional specific isotope analysis (Λ = ( α H - 1 - 1)/( α C - 1 - 1)) was performed and also the determined Λ value of 9.8 was within the range determined for other aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs. The results showed that in contrast to abiotic processes biological methane oxidation exhibits a narrow range of fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen irrespective of the underlying biochemical mechanisms. This work will therefore facilitate the correct interpretation of isotopic composition of atmospheric methane with implications for modeling of global carbon fluxes.

  1. Improvement of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization method for carbon isotope analysis of atmospheric acetone.

    PubMed

    Wen, Sheng; Yu, Yingxin; Guo, Songjun; Feng, Yanli; Sheng, Guoying; Wang, Xinming; Bi, Xinhui; Fu, Jiamo; Jia, Wanglu

    2006-01-01

    Through simulation experiments of atmospheric sampling, a method via 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization was developed to measure the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric acetone. Using acetone and a DNPH reagent of known carbon isotopic compositions, the simulation experiments were performed to show that no carbon isotope fractionation occurred during the processes: the differences between the predicted and measured data of acetone-DNPH derivatives were all less than 0.5 per thousand. The results permitted the calculation of the carbon isotopic compositions of atmospheric acetone using a mass balance equation. In this method, the atmospheric acetone was collected by a DNPH-coated silica cartridge, washed out as acetone-DNPH derivatives, and then analyzed by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). Using this method, the first available delta13C data of atmospheric acetone are presented.

  2. CO2-dependent carbon isotope fractionation in dinoflagellates relates to their inorganic carbon fluxes.

    PubMed

    Hoins, Mirja; Eberlein, Tim; Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Sluijs, Appy; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn

    2016-08-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation (εp) between the inorganic carbon source and organic matter has been proposed to be a function of pCO2. To understand the CO2-dependency of εp and species-specific differences therein, inorganic carbon fluxes in the four dinoflagellate species Alexandrium fundyense, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Gonyaulax spinifera and Protoceratium reticulatum have been measured by means of membrane-inlet mass spectrometry. In-vivo assays were carried out at different CO2 concentrations, representing a range of pCO2 from 180 to 1200 μatm. The relative bicarbonate contribution (i.e. the ratio of bicarbonate uptake to total inorganic carbon uptake) and leakage (i.e. the ratio of CO2 efflux to total inorganic carbon uptake) varied from 0.2 to 0.5 and 0.4 to 0.7, respectively, and differed significantly between species. These ratios were fed into a single-compartment model, and εp values were calculated and compared to carbon isotope fractionation measured under the same conditions. For all investigated species, modeled and measured εp values were comparable (A. fundyense, S. trochoidea, P. reticulatum) and/or showed similar trends with pCO2 (A. fundyense, G. spinifera, P. reticulatum). Offsets are attributed to biases in inorganic flux measurements, an overestimated fractionation factor for the CO2-fixing enzyme RubisCO, or the fact that intracellular inorganic carbon fluxes were not taken into account in the model. This study demonstrates that CO2-dependency in εp can largely be explained by the inorganic carbon fluxes of the individual dinoflagellates.

  3. Carbon isotope systematics of individual hydrocarbons in hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough, Northeastern Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoneit, B.R.T.; Schoell, M.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7%, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7 per mill, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.

  4. Integrating stomach content and stable isotope analyses to quantify the diets of pygoscelid penguins.

    PubMed

    Polito, Michael J; Trivelpiece, Wayne Z; Karnovsky, Nina J; Ng, Elizabeth; Patterson, William P; Emslie, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    Stomach content analysis (SCA) and more recently stable isotope analysis (SIA) integrated with isotopic mixing models have become common methods for dietary studies and provide insight into the foraging ecology of seabirds. However, both methods have drawbacks and biases that may result in difficulties in quantifying inter-annual and species-specific differences in diets. We used these two methods to simultaneously quantify the chick-rearing diet of Chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarctica) and Gentoo (P. papua) penguins and highlight methods of integrating SCA data to increase accuracy of diet composition estimates using SIA. SCA biomass estimates were highly variable and underestimated the importance of soft-bodied prey such as fish. Two-source, isotopic mixing model predictions were less variable and identified inter-annual and species-specific differences in the relative amounts of fish and krill in penguin diets not readily apparent using SCA. In contrast, multi-source isotopic mixing models had difficulty estimating the dietary contribution of fish species occupying similar trophic levels without refinement using SCA-derived otolith data. Overall, our ability to track inter-annual and species-specific differences in penguin diets using SIA was enhanced by integrating SCA data to isotopic mixing modes in three ways: 1) selecting appropriate prey sources, 2) weighting combinations of isotopically similar prey in two-source mixing models and 3) refining predicted contributions of isotopically similar prey in multi-source models.

  5. Isotopic Incorporation and the Effects of Fasting and Dietary Lipid Content on Isotopic Discrimination in Large Carnivorous Mammals.

    PubMed

    Rode, K D; Stricker, C A; Erlenbach, J; Robbins, C T; Cherry, S G; Newsome, S D; Cutting, A; Jensen, S; Stenhouse, G; Brooks, M; Hash, A; Nicassio, N

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable emphasis on understanding isotopic discrimination for diet estimation in omnivores. However, discrimination may differ for carnivores, particularly species that consume lipid-rich diets. Here, we examined the potential implications of several factors when using stable isotopes to estimate the diets of bears, which can consume lipid-rich diets and, alternatively, fast for weeks to months. We conducted feeding trials with captive brown bears (Ursus arctos) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). As dietary lipid content increased to ∼90%, we observed increasing differences between blood plasma and diets that had not been lipid extracted (∆(13)Ctissue-bulk diet) and slightly decreasing differences between plasma δ(13)C and lipid-extracted diet. Plasma Δ(15)Ntissue-bulk diet increased with increasing protein content for the four polar bears in this study and data for other mammals from previous studies that were fed purely carnivorous diets. Four adult and four yearling brown bears that fasted 120 d had plasma δ(15)N values that changed by <±2‰. Fasting bears exhibited no trend in plasma δ(13)C. Isotopic incorporation in red blood cells and whole blood was ≥6 mo in subadult and adult bears, which is considerably longer than previously measured in younger and smaller black bears (Ursus americanus). Our results suggest that short-term fasting in carnivores has minimal effects on δ(13)C and δ(15)N discrimination between predators and their prey but that dietary lipid content is an important factor directly affecting δ(13)C discrimination and indirectly affecting δ(15)N discrimination via the inverse relationship with dietary protein content.

  6. Bryophytes as Climate Indicators: moss and liverwort photosynthetic limitations and carbon isotope signals in organic material and peat deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, H.; Royles, J.; Horwath, A.; Hodell, D. A.; Convey, P.; Hodgson, D.; Wingate, L.; Ogeé, J.

    2011-12-01

    -term trends. Once corrected for source CO2 inputs, the carbon isotope signals are consistent with recent increases in growing season length. Laboratory studies on real-time CO2 uptake and isotope discrimination as a function of water content, for the desiccation-tolerant moss Syntrichia ruralis, reveal the interactions between surface water, liquid phase and mesophyll diffusion limitation. These data have been used to develop a model for isotope discrimination in mosses as a function of water status and we will discuss the extent that such a model can be used predictively to determine moss-peat water status, and infer current and past climatic conditions.

  7. Isotope Variations in Terrestrial Carbonates and Thermal Springs as Biomarkers: Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bissada, K. K.

    2006-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements of carbonate minerals contained within ALH84001 [1] suggest that fluids were present at 3.9 Gy on Mars [2, 3, 4, 5]. Both oxygen and carbon isotopes provide independent means of deciphering paleoenvironmental conditions at the time of carbonate mineral precipitation. In terrestrial carbonate rocks oxygen isotopes not only indicate the paleotemperature of the precipitating fluid, but also provide clues to environmental conditions that affected the fluid chemistry. Carbon isotopes, on the other hand, can indicate the presence or absence of organic compounds during precipitation (i.e. biogenically vs. thermogenically-generated methane), thus serving as a potential biomarker. We have undertaken a study of micro scale stable isotope variations measured in some terrestrial carbonates and the influence of organic compounds associated with the formation of these carbonates. Preliminary results indicate that isotope variations occur within narrow and discrete intervals, providing clues to paleoenvironmental conditions that include both biological and non-biological activity. These results carry implications for deciphering Martian isotope data and therefore potential biological prospecting on the planet Mars. Recently, Fourier Transform Spectrometer observations have detected methane occurring in the Martian atmosphere [6] that could be attributed to a possible biogenic source. Indeed, Mars Express has detected the presence of methane in the Martian atmosphere [7], with evidence indicating that methane abundances are greatest above those basins with high water concentrations.

  8. Carbon isotope discrimination as a tool to explore C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    von Caemmerer, Susanne; Ghannoum, Oula; Pengelly, Jasper J L; Cousins, Asaph B

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination is a non-destructive tool for investigating C4 metabolism. Tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy provides new opportunities for making rapid, concurrent measurements of carbon isotope discrimination and CO2 assimilation over a range of environmental conditions, and this has facilitated the use of carbon isotope discrimination as a probe of C4 metabolism. In spite of the significant progress made in recent years, understanding how photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination measured concurrently with gas exchange relates to carbon isotope composition of leaf and plant dry matter remains a challenge that requires resolution if this technique is to be successfully applied as a screening tool in crop breeding and phylogenetic research. In this review, we update our understanding of the factors and assumptions that underlie variations in photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in C4 leaves. Closing the main gaps in our understanding of carbon isotope discrimination during C4 photosynthesis may help advance research aimed at developing higher productivity and efficiency in key C4 food, feed, and biofuel crops. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Prediction of kidney mercury content by isotope techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hursh, J.B.; Clarkson, T.W.; Nowak, T.V.; Pabico, R.C.; McKenna, B.A.; Miles, E.; Gibb, F.R.

    1985-06-01

    A 61-year-old female patient accidentally aspirated liquid mercury during a medically ordered diagnostic procedure. To develop animal-based guidelines, liquid mercury was introduced into the lungs of four dogs. Based on the study of these animals, a method of predicting the kidney inorganic mercury burden was developed using radioactive isotope dilution techniques. It was further demonstrated in dogs that oral administration of dimercaptopropane sulfonate (DMPS) increased mercury excretion and reduced the kidney burden. A rat experiment was performed permitting a statistical evaluation of the assumptions basic to the use of the method. The method was applied to the patient with the result that the kidney inorganic mercury burden was predicted to be 28.1 mg, 8 months after the accident. Treatment with DMPS increased urinary excretion and the post-treatment kidney burden was estimated at 19.6 mg Hg. Inasmuch as the radioactive dose to the subject may be kept at a negligible level and because sensitive methods exist for measurement of radioactive and stable mercury concentrations, the technique may be applicable in special cases to the estimation of kidney inorganic mercury burdens incurred by industrial exposure.

  10. Using carbon isotope fractionation for an improved quantification of CH4 oxidation efficiency in Arctic peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, I.; Knoblauch, C.; Gebert, J.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Much research effort is focused on identifying global CH4 sources and sinks to estimate their current and potential strength in response to land-use change and global warming. Aerobic CH4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing the strength of CH4 emissions in wetlands, but is hitherto difficult to quantify. Recent studies quantify the efficiency of CH4 oxidation based on CH4 stable isotope signatures. The approach utilizes the fact that a significant isotope fractionation occurs when CH4 is oxidized. Moreover, it also considers isotope fractionation by diffusion. For field applications the 'open-system equation' is applied to determine the CH4 oxidation efficiency: fox = (δE - δP)/ (αox - αtrans) where fox is the fraction of CH4 oxidized; δE is δ13C of emitted CH4; δP is δ13C of produced CH4; αox is the isotopic fractionation factor of oxidation; αtrans is the isotopic fractionation factor of transport. We quantified CH4 oxidation in polygonal tundra soils of Russia's Lena River Delta analyzing depth profiles of CH4 concentrations and stable isotope signatures. Therefore, both fractionation factors αox and αtrans were determined for three polygon centers with differing water table positions and a polygon rim. While most previous studies on landfill cover soils have assumed a gas transport dominated by advection (αtrans = 1), other CH4 transport mechanisms as diffusion have to be considered in peatlands and αtrans exceeds a value of 1. At our study we determined αtrans = 1.013 ± 0.003 for CH4 when diffusion is the predominant transport mechanism. Furthermore, results showed that αox differs widely between sites and horizons (αox = 1.013 ± 0.012) and has to be determined for each case. The impact of both fractionation factors on the quantification of CH4 oxidation was estimated by considering both the potential diffusion rate at different water contents and potential oxidation rates. Calculations for a water saturated tundra soil

  11. The Suess Effect and Additional Impacts on the Carbon Isotope Composition of a Belizean Coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, L.; Bunn, S.; Humston, R.; Swart, P. K.; Curran, H.; Rose, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent work has shown that the geochemistry of coral skeletons can reflect large-scale changes in the ocean carbon isotope budget as influenced by the anthropogenic influx of fossil fuel carbon to the atmosphere (the Suess Effect). Yet not all coral carbon records reflect just atmospheric controls on carbon. This study assesses the relative influence of the Suess Effect on carbon chemistry within a Belizean Montastrea faveolota colony and interprets deviations from the Suess Effect signal. The coral sample used for this study was collected off Wee Wee Caye, in South-Central Belize offshore of the Sittee River, Stann Creek District in 2003. Coral carbonate was sampled at an average resolution of 15 samples per coral year. Carbon isotope data from the Belizean coral were compared with mean annual carbon isotope data from Atlantic corals in a study by Swart et. al (2010) to analyze the relative contribution of the Suess Effect and competing controls on the carbon isotope composition of Belizean waters. The observed pattern in the Belize coral suggested two distinct trends in carbon isotopic composition, and segmented regression analysis indicated a significant breakpoint occurs in this record in approximately 1965. Deforestation rates in Belize after the 1960's have been almost double that for the rest of Central America (2.3% vs. 1.2% annually) corresponding with a general shift from rural farming to large scale agriculture in Belize. Consequently, increased rates of deforestation in Belize may have been an important factor in carbon isotope budgets of the area over the last several decades. Compared with data averaged from Atlantic coral samples, annual carbon isotope values in Belizean coral declined more rapidly since the 1960's. We attribute this sharper decline in the Belizean coral to enhanced influx of terrestrial 'light' organic carbon to the reef over the study period.

  12. Calcium isotope evidence for suppression of carbonate dissolution in carbonate-bearing organic-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-11-01

    Pore fluid calcium isotope, calcium concentration and strontium concentration data are used to measure the rates of diagenetic dissolution and precipitation of calcite in deep-sea sediments containing abundant clay and organic material. This type of study of deep-sea sediment diagenesis provides unique information about the ultra-slow chemical reactions that occur in natural marine sediments that affect global geochemical cycles and the preservation of paleo-environmental information in carbonate fossils. For this study, calcium isotope ratios (δ 44/40Ca) of pore fluid calcium from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 984 (North Atlantic) and 1082 (off the coast of West Africa) were measured to augment available pore fluid measurements of calcium and strontium concentration. Both study sites have high sedimentation rates and support quantitative sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation. The pattern of change of δ 44/40Ca of pore fluid calcium versus depth at Sites 984 and 1082 differs markedly from that of previously studied deep-sea Sites like 590B and 807, which are composed of nearly pure carbonate sediment. In the 984 and 1082 pore fluids, δ 44/40Ca remains elevated near seawater values deep in the sediments, rather than shifting rapidly toward the δ 44/40Ca of carbonate solids. This observation indicates that the rate of calcite dissolution is far lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites. The data are fit using a numerical model, as well as more approximate analytical models, to estimate the rates of carbonate dissolution and precipitation and the relationship of these rates to the abundance of clay and organic material. Our models give mutually consistent results and indicate that calcite dissolution rates at Sites 984 and 1082 are roughly two orders of magnitude lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites, and the rate correlates with the abundance of clay. Our calculated rates are conservative for these

  13. Jellyfish body plans provide allometric advantages beyond low carbon content.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Kylie A; Duarte, Carlos M; Lucas, Cathy H; Sutherland, Kelly R; Condon, Robert H; Mianzan, Hermes; Purcell, Jennifer E; Robinson, Kelly L; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world's oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity of jellyfish and

  14. Jellyfish Body Plans Provide Allometric Advantages beyond Low Carbon Content

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Kylie A.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Lucas, Cathy H.; Sutherland, Kelly R.; Condon, Robert H.; Mianzan, Hermes; Purcell, Jennifer E.; Robinson, Kelly L.; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world’s oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity of jellyfish and

  15. The first investigation of Wilms' tumour atomic structure-nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition as a novel biomarker for the most individual approach in cancer disease

    PubMed Central

    Taran, Katarzyna; Frączek, Tomasz; Sikora-Szubert, Anita; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Młynarski, Wojciech; Kobos, Józef; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a novel approach to investigating Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma) biology at the atomic level. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) was used to directly assess the isotope ratios of nitrogen and carbon in 84 Wilms' tumour tissue samples from 28 cases representing the histological spectrum of nephroblastoma. Marked differences in nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios were found between nephroblastoma histological types and along the course of cancer disease, with a breakout in isotope ratio of the examined elements in tumour tissue found between stages 2 and 3. Different isotopic compositions with regard to nitrogen and carbon content were observed in blastemal Wilms' tumour, with and without focal anaplasia, and in poorly- and well-differentiated epithelial nephroblastoma. This first assessment of nitrogen and carbon isotope ratio reveals the previously unknown part of Wilms' tumour biology and represents a potential novel biomarker, allowing for a highly individual approach to treating cancer. Furthermore, this method of estimating isotopic composition appears to be the most sensitive tool yet for cancer tissue evaluation, and a valuable complement to established cancer study methods with prospective clinical impact. PMID:27732932

  16. The first investigation of Wilms' tumour atomic structure-nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition as a novel biomarker for the most individual approach in cancer disease.

    PubMed

    Taran, Katarzyna; Frączek, Tomasz; Sikora-Szubert, Anita; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Młynarski, Wojciech; Kobos, Józef; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-11-22

    The paper describes a novel approach to investigating Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma) biology at the atomic level. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) was used to directly assess the isotope ratios of nitrogen and carbon in 84 Wilms' tumour tissue samples from 28 cases representing the histological spectrum of nephroblastoma. Marked differences in nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios were found between nephroblastoma histological types and along the course of cancer disease, with a breakout in isotope ratio of the examined elements in tumour tissue found between stages 2 and 3. Different isotopic compositions with regard to nitrogen and carbon content were observed in blastemal Wilms' tumour, with and without focal anaplasia, and in poorly- and well-differentiated epithelial nephroblastoma. This first assessment of nitrogen and carbon isotope ratio reveals the previously unknown part of Wilms' tumour biology and represents a potential novel biomarker, allowing for a highly individual approach to treating cancer. Furthermore, this method of estimating isotopic composition appears to be the most sensitive tool yet for cancer tissue evaluation, and a valuable complement to established cancer study methods with prospective clinical impact.

  17. Carbon isotopes and water use efficiency in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Cousins, Asaph B

    2016-06-01

    Drought is a major agricultural problem worldwide. Therefore, selection for increased water use efficiency (WUE) in food and biofuel crop species will be an important trait in plant breeding programs. The leaf carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)Cleaf) has been suggested to serve as a rapid and effective high throughput phenotyping method for WUE in both C3 and C4 species. This is because WUE, leaf carbon discrimination (Δ(13)Cleaf), and δ(13)Cleaf are correlated through their relationships with intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures (Ci/Ca). However, in C4 plants, changing environmental conditions may influence photosynthetic efficiency (bundle-sheath leakiness) and post-photosynthetic fractionation that will potentially alter the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and Ci/Ca. Here we discuss how these factors influence the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and WUE, and the potential of using δ(13)Cleaf as a meaningful proxy for WUE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of benzene and toluene during hydrophobic sorption in multistep batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Imfeld, G; Kopinke, F-D; Fischer, A; Richnow, H-H

    2014-07-01

    The application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for evaluating degradation of organic pollutants in the field implies that other processes affecting pollutant concentration are minor with respect to isotope fractionation. Sorption is associated with minor isotope fractionation and pollutants may undergo successive sorption-desorption steps during their migration in aquifers. However, little is known about isotope fractionation of BTEX compounds after consecutive sorption steps. Here, we show that partitioning of benzene and toluene between water and organic sorbents (i.e. 1-octanol, dichloromethane, cyclohexane, hexanoic acid and Amberlite XAD-2) generally exhibits very small carbon and hydrogen isotope effects in multistep batch experiments. However, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the benzene-octanol pair after several sorption steps (Δδ(13)C=1.6 ± 0.3‰ and Δδ(2)H=88 ± 3‰), yielding isotope fractionation factors of αC=1.0030 ± 0.0005 and αH=1.195 ± 0.026. Our results indicate that the cumulative effect of successive hydrophobic partitioning steps in an aquifer generally results in insignificant isotope fractionation for benzene and toluene. However, significant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation cannot be excluded for specific sorbate-sorbent pairs, such as sorbates with π-electrons and sorbents with OH-groups. Consequently, functional groups of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) may specifically interact with BTEX compounds migrating in an aquifer, thereby resulting in potentially relevant isotope fractionation.

  19. Diurnal and Interannual Variation in Absorption Lines of Isotopic Carbon Dioxide in Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, Timothy A.; Kostiuk, Theodor; Hewagama, Tilak; Kolasinski, John R.; Henning, Wade G.

    2015-11-01

    Groundbased observations of Mars in 2003, 2007, 2012, and 2014 have detected transitions of carbon dioxide containing the stable minor isotopes of oxygen and carbon as well as the primary isotopes, using the ultrahigh resolution spectrometer HIPWAC at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. The most well characterized minor isotope is O-18, due to strong lines and observational opportunities. The average estimated O-18/O-16 isotope ratio is roughly consistent with other in situ and remote spectroscopic measurements but demonstrates an additional feature in that the retrieved ratio appears to increase with greater ground surface temperature. These conclusions primarily come from analyzing a subset of the 2007 data. Additional observations have been acquired over a broad range of local time and meridional position to evaluate variability with respect to ground surface temperature. These additional observations include one run of measurements with C-13. These observations can be compared to local in situ measurements by the Curiosity rover to narrow the uncertainty in absolute isotope ratio and extend isotopic measurements to other regions and seasons on Mars. The relative abundance of carbon dioxide heavy isotopes on Mars is central to estimating the primordial atmospheric inventory on Mars. Preferential freeze-distillation of heavy isotopes means that any measurement of the isotope ratio can be only a lower limit on heavy isotope enrichment due to past and current loss to space.

  20. Evidence from carbon isotope measurements for diverse origins of sedimentary hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.; Trendel, J. M.; Albrecht, P.

    1990-01-01

    The organic matter found in sedimentary rocks must derive from many sources; not only from ancient primary producers but also from consumers and secondary producers. In all of these organisms, isotope effects can affect the abundance and distribution of 13C in metabolites. Here, by using an improved form of a previously described technique in which the effluent of a gas chromatograph is continuously analysed isotopically, we report evidence of the diverse origins of sedimentary organic matter. The record of 13C abundances in sedimentary carbonate and total organic carbon can be interpreted in terms of variations in the global carbon cycle. Our results demonstrate, however, that isotope variations within sedimentary organic mixtures substantially exceed those observed between samples of total organic carbon. Resolution of isotope variations at the molecular level offers a new and convenient means of refining views both of localized palaeoenvironments and of control mechanisms within the global carbon cycle.