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Sample records for carbon isotopic composition

  1. Carbonate abundances and isotopic compositions in chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M. L.; Howard, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    We report the bulk C abundances, and C and O isotopic compositions of carbonates in 64 CM chondrites, 14 CR chondrites, 2 CI chondrites, LEW 85332 (C2), Kaba (CV3), and Semarkona (LL3.0). For the unheated CMs, the total ranges of carbonate isotopic compositions are δ13C ≈ 25-75‰ and δ18O ≈ 15-35‰, and bulk carbonate C contents range from 0.03 to 0.60 wt%. There is no simple correlation between carbonate abundance and isotopic composition, or between either of these parameters and the extent of alteration. Unless accretion was very heterogeneous, the uncorrelated variations in extent of alteration and carbonate abundance suggests that there was a period of open system behavior in the CM parent body, probably prior to or at the start of aqueous alteration. Most of the ranges in CM carbonate isotopic compositions can be explained by their formation at different temperatures (0-130 °C) from a single fluid in which the carbonate O isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with water (δ18O ≈ 5‰) and the C isotopes were controlled by equilibrium with CO and/or CH4 (δ13C ≈ -33‰ or -20‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively). However, carbonate formation would have to have been inefficient, otherwise carbonate compositions would have resembled those of the starting fluid. A quite similar fluid composition (δ18O ≈ -5.5‰, and δ13C ≈ -31‰ or -17‰ for CO- or CH4-dominated systems, respectively) can explain the carbonate compositions of the CIs, although the formation temperatures would have been lower (~10-40 °C) and the relative abundances of calcite and dolomite may play a more important role in determining bulk carbonate compositions than in the CMs. The CR carbonates exhibit a similar range of O isotopes, but an almost bimodal distribution of C isotopes between more (δ13C ≈ 65-80‰) and less altered samples (δ13C ≈ 30-40‰). This bimodality can still be explained by precipitation from fluids with the same isotopic

  2. Mg Isotopic Compositions of Modern Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, E.; Bizzarro, M.; Hemming, N.

    2003-12-01

    We have used a MC-ICP-MS to measure the isotopic composition of magnesium in a number of samples of modern marine carbonate. Due to the large mass difference between 26Mg and 24Mg (similar to that between 13C and 12C), there is potential for mass fractionation during geologic and biologic processes that may make this isotope system useful for geochemical studies. These samples are from the study of Hemming and Hanson (1992, GCA 56: 537-543). The carbonate minerals analyzed include aragonite, low-Mg calcite, and high-Mg calcite. The samples include corals, echinoderms, ooids, etc., from subtropical to Antarctic settings. Mg purification was accomplished by ion-exchange chromatography, using Bio-Rad AG50W-X12 resin on which greater than 99 percent recovery of Mg is achieved. Samples were introduced into the MC-ICP-MS (VG Axiom) using a Cetac MCN-6000 nebuliser. We use a standard-sample-standard bracketing technique, and samples are analysed at least three times. For lab standards we find that the reproducibility on the 26Mg/24Mg to be about ñ 0.12 permil (2 s.d.). We monitored our separated samples for Na and Ca, as we have found that high Ca/Mg and Na/Mg produce variable magnesium isotopic fractionation during mass spectrometry due to as yet unclear matrix effects. We have normalized our results to our measured values for seawater. We observed a d26Mg(s.w.) range of -1.4 to -2.4 permil in our modern carbonate samples relative to present day seawater. Due to the long residence time of Mg in the oceans (ca. 50 my), this must be due to kinetic or biologic effects. Our d25Mg(s.w.) variations as a function of d26Mg(s.w.) plot along the terrestrial fractionation trend. With an average d26Mg(s.w.) of ca. +0.5 permil in all samples of mantle lithologies and mantle-derived igneous rocks (Bizzarro et al., Goldschmidt abs., 2003), we can assume that the Mg isotopic composition of Earth's river water lies between ca. -2.4 and +0.5 permil (relative to seawater). The actual

  3. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, C. H.; Schopf, J. W.; McKeegan, K. D.; Coath, C. D.; Harrison, T. M.; Stetter, K. O.

    2000-01-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  4. Carbon isotopic composition of individual Precambrian microfossils.

    PubMed

    House, C H; Schopf, J W; McKeegan, K D; Coath, C D; Harrison, T M; Stetter, K O

    2000-08-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of carbon isotope ratios were made in 30 specimens representing six fossil genera of microorganisms petrified in stromatolitic chert from the approximately 850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, Australia, and the approximately 2100 Ma Gunflint Formation, Canada. The delta 13C(PDB) values from individual microfossils of the Bitter Springs Formation ranged from -21.3 +/- 1.7% to -31.9 +/- 1.2% and the delta 13C(PDB) values from microfossils of the Gunflint Formation ranged from -32.4 +/- 0.7% to -45.4 +/- 1.2%. With the exception of two highly 13C-depleted Gunflint microfossils, the results generally yield values consistent with carbon fixation via either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl-CoA pathway. However, the isotopic results are not consistent with the degree of fractionation expected from either the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle or the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that the microfossils studied did not use either of these pathways for carbon fixation. The morphologies of the microfossils suggest an affinity to the cyanobacteria, and our carbon isotopic data are consistent with this assignment.

  5. Cr isotopic composition of modern carbonates and seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, P.; Parkinson, I. J.; James, R. H.; Fehr, M.; Connelly, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    Recent development in MC-ICP-MS instrumentation, coupled with double-spike techniques has led to the improvement of stable Cr isotopes measurements and allows the determination of Cr isotopes in low concentration samples such as carbonates and seawater. Cr is a redox sensitive element and its isotopes are fractionated during the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) [1]. Chromium isotopic variations in BIFs have been linked to the redox conditions of ancient oceans[2]. However, in order to understand Cr isotopic fractionation in the past it is important to constrain the Cr isotopic composition of modern seawater. Chromium concentrations in seawater are between 2 and 5nM, and therefore the measurement of stable Cr isotopes in seawater is an analytical challenge. We have developed a new technique to measure Cr isotopes in seawater based on the Cr co-precipitation with Fe[3], the chemical purification of Cr using an anion exchange chromatography and analyses using the double-spike technique with a ThermoFisher Neptune MC-ICP-MS. Using this method, seawater samples from the Argentinean Basin and from Southampton Water (UK) have been analysed, which have Cr concentrations of ~6nM of Cr. Chromium isotopic composition of our seawater samples is consistently heavier than continental crust and mantle values (δ53Cr -0.18‰)[4] with δ53Cr values of ~+0.5‰. We have also measured Cr isotopic compositions in ooids from the Bahamas Banks, which represent chemical precipitates from modern seawater. These also record consistently heavy δ53Cr values (0.6-0.8‰), which overlap the range of modern seawater. We conclude that heavy δ53Cr in seawater reflect either redox cycling of Cr in the oceans[3] or fractionation during the weathering of the continental crust. Moreover, Cr isotopes in modern carbonates are not significantly offset from seawater and therefore, these carbonates reflect the Cr composition of seawater. Thus, Cr isotopes in carbonates can be used to reconstruct the Cr

  6. Does burial diagenesis reset pristine isotopic compositions in paleosol carbonates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, M. K.; Sarkar, A.; Tandon, S. K.; Samanta, A.; Sanyal, P.

    2010-11-01

    Sedimentological study of early Oligocene continental carbonates from the fluvial Dagshai Formation of the Himalayan foreland basin, India resulted in the recognition of four different types namely, soil, palustrine, pedogenically modified palustrine and groundwater carbonates. Stable oxygen and carbon isotopic ( δ18O and δ13C) analyses of fabric selective carbonate microsamples show that although the pristine isotopic compositions are largely altered during deep-burial diagenesis, complete isotopic homogenization does not occur. δ18O and δ13C analyses of ~ 200 calcrete and palustrine carbonates from different stratigraphic horizons and comparison with δ18O of more robust bioapatite (fossil vertebrate tooth) phase show that dense micrites (~ > 70% carbonate) invariably preserve the pristine δ18O value (mean) of ~ - 9.8‰, while altered carbonates show much lower δ18O value ~ - 13.8‰. Such inhomogeneity causes large intra-sample and intra-soil profile variability as high as > 5‰, suggesting that soils behave like a closed system where diagenetic overprinting occurs in local domains. A simple fluid-rock interaction model suggests active participation of clay minerals to enhance the effect of fluid-rock ratio in local domains during diagenesis. This places an upper limit of 70% micrite concentration above which the effect of diagenetic alteration is minimal. Careful sampling of dense micritic part of the soil carbonate nodules, therefore, does provide pristine isotopic composition and it is inappropriate, as proposed recently, to reject the paleoclimatic potential of all paleosol carbonates affected by burial diagenesis. Based on pristine δ13C value of - 8.8 ± 0.2‰ in soil carbonates an atmospheric CO 2 concentration between ~ 764 and ~ 306 ppmv is estimated for the early Oligocene (~ 31 Ma) Dagshai time. These data show excellent agreement between two independent proxy records (viz. soil carbonate and marine alkenone) and support early Oligocene

  7. Mg isotopic composition of carbonate: insight from speleothem formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy, Albert; Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Halicz, Ludwik; O'Nions, R. Keith

    2002-07-01

    Simultaneous high-precision measurement of 24Mg, 25Mg and 26Mg isotopic compositions were made by multiple collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) relative to the international standard SRM980. Data are presented on low-Mg calcite speleothems and their associated host rocks and waters from four caves, one in the French Alps and three in Israel, covering various climate conditions. In addition, data are presented on three dolostones and three limestones from the Himalaya. The overall variation is 4.13‰ and 2.14‰ in δ 26Mg and δ 25Mg, respectively. This is 35 times the uncertainty of the measurements and clearly demonstrates that the terrestrial isotopic composition of Mg is not unique. Each speleothem shows a characteristic range of δ 26Mg values that are attributed to the isotopic composition of the local water. Differences between the isotopic composition of Mg in the water dripping from stalactites and that of the modern speleothem are interpreted as being due to Mg isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation in the temperature range of 4-18°C. The low-Mg calcite is enriched in light isotopes by 1.35‰/AMU and the dependence on temperature has been found to be less than 0.02‰/AMU/°C. Despite various geological settings, the δ 26Mg of the studied dolostones is 2.0±1.2‰ higher than the δ 26Mg of the limestones. All together, these results suggest a strong mineralogical control and a weak temperature effect on the Mg isotopic composition of carbonate.

  8. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., <10%) in shells from aquatic organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions

  9. On the isotopic composition of magmatic carbon in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    SNC meteorites are thought, from many lines of evidence, to come from Mars. A line of investigation which has been pursued in our laboratory over the years involves measurement of the stable isotopic composition of carbon, in its various forms, in SNC meteorites. In order to establish a firm basis for studying the isotopic systematics of carbon in the martian surface environment, it is first necessary to try and constrain the delta C-13 of bulk Mars. Taking all of the available information, it would seem that the delta C-13 of the Earth's mantle lies somewhere in the range of -5 to -7 percent. Preliminary assessment of magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites, would tend to suggest a delta C-13 of 20 to 30 percent, which is conspicuously different from that of the terrestrial mantle. It is not obvious why there should be such a difference between the two planets, although many explanations are possible. One of these possibilities, that previous delta C-13 measurements for magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites are in error to some degree, is being actively investigated. The most recent results seem to constrain the theta C-13 of the magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites to about -20 percent, which is not at odds with previous estimates. As such, it is considered that a detailed investigation of the carbon isotopic systematics of martian surface materials does have the necessary information with which to proceed.

  10. The Li isotope composition of modern biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, M.; West, A. J.; Adkins, J. F.; Paris, G.; Eagle, R.; Freitas, P. S.; Bagard, M. L.; Ries, J. B.; Corsetti, F. A.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Ullmann, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium stable isotope composition (δ7Li) of sedimentary carbonates has great potential to unravel weathering rates and intensity in the past, with implications for understanding the carbon cycle over geologic time. However, so far very little is known about the potential influence of fractionation of the stable Li isotope composition of biogenic carbonates. Here, we investigate the δ7Li of various organisms (particularly mollusks, echinoderms and brachiopods) abundant in the Phanerozoic record, in order to understand which geologic archives might provide the best targets for reconstructing past seawater composition. The range of measured samples includes (i) modern calcite and aragonite shells from variable natural environments, (ii) shells from organisms grown under controlled conditions (temperature, salinity, pCO2), and (iii) fossil shells from a range of species collected from Miocene deposits. When possible, both the inner and outer layers of bivalves were micro-sampled to assess the intra-shell heterogeneity. For calcitic shells, the measured δ7Li of bivalve species range from +32 to +41‰ and is systematically enriched in the heavy isotope relative to seawater (31 ‰) and to inorganic calcite, which is characterized by Δ7Licalcite-seawater = -2 to -5‰ [1]. The Li isotope composition of aragonitic bivalves, ranging from +16 to +22‰, is slightly fractionated to both high and low δ7Li relative to inorganic aragonite. The largest intra-shell Li isotope variability is observed for mixed calcite-aragonite shells (more than 20‰) whereas in single mineralogy shells, intra-shell δ7Li variability is generally less than 3‰. Overall, these results suggest a strong influence of vital effects on Li isotopes during bio-calcification of bivalve shells. On the contrary, measured brachiopods systematically exhibit fractionation that is very similar to inorganic calcite, with a mean δ7Li of 27.0±1.5‰, suggesting that brachiopods may provide good

  11. Behaviour of Structural Carbonate Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Compositions in Bioapatite During Burning of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, L. E.; Longstaffe, F. J.; White, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Bioapatite, the principal inorganic phase comprising bone, commonly contains a small fraction of carbonate, which has been substituted into the phosphate structure during bone formation. The isotopic compositions of both the phosphate oxygen and the structural carbonate oxygen are now commonly used in palaeoclimatological and bioarchaeological investigations. The potential for post-mortem alteration of these isotopic compositions, therefore, is of interest, with the behaviour of structural carbonate being of most concern. In bioarchaeological studies, alteration of bone isotopic compositions has the potential to occur not only during low-temperature processes associated with burial but also during food preparation involving heating (burning, boiling). Here, we examine the stable isotopic behaviour of structural carbonate oxygen and carbon, and coexisting phosphate oxygen during the burning of bone. Freshly deceased (6<8 months) white-tailed deer leg bones (Odocoileus virginianus) were collected from Pinery Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Each long bone was sectioned and incrementally heated from 25 to 900° C, in 25° intervals. The samples were then ground to a standardized grain-size (45<63μ m), and changes in bioapatite crystallinity (CI) were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). Combined differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TG) were used to evaluate weight loss and associated reactions during heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of the bioapatite remain relatively constant (+/-1‰ ) during heating to 650° C. A 4‰ increase in stable carbon isotopic composition then occurs between 650-750° C, accompanied by an increase in CI, followed by a 10‰ decline at temperatures above 800° C, as carbonate carbon is lost. Carbonate and phosphate oxygen isotopic compositions are correlated over the entire heating range, with carbonate being enriched relative to phosphate by

  12. Carbon dioxide in the Paleozoic atmosphere: Evidence from carbon-isotope compositions of pedogenic carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Claudia I.; Driese, Steven G.; Seager, Paula G.

    1991-10-01

    Stable carbon-isotope compositions of pedogenic carbonate occurring in three clay-rich vertic paleosols within Paleozoic red-bed successions in central Pennsylvania provide a record of past pedogenic environments and can be used to estimate CO2 pressure (PCO2) of the Paleozoic atmosphere. The δ13C values of carbonate nodules from paleosols in the deltaic lower Bloomsburg Formation (Upper Silurian) reflect the contribution of carbon from marine groundwater or fossils, coupled with low biological activity. The δ13C values of carbonate rhizocretions from stratigraphically high paleosols in the Bloomsburg Formation, and in the alluvial Catskill (Upper Devonian) and Mauch Chunk (Upper Mississippian) Formations, suggest an extensive C3 flora and significant contribution of atmospheric CO2. Paleozoic atmospheric CO2 levels inferred from δ13C of pedogenic carbonate are significantly higher than present levels.

  13. The carbon isotopic composition of Novo Urei diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjenova, L. F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diamond grains isolated from the Novo Urei meteorite are discussed. A diamond separate was obtained from 2g of whole rock using the chemical treatments described aimed at obtaining very pure diamond. X ray diffraction of the residue, which represented 5000 ppm of the parent mass, indicated only the presence of the desired mineral. The diamond crystals were 1-30 microns in diameter, and some grains had a yellow color. The chemical treatments were followed by a size separation to give a 1-10 microns and a 5-30 microns fraction, which were named DNU-1 and DNU-2, respectively.

  14. Magnesium isotopic compositions of the Mesoproterozoic dolostones: Implications for Mg isotopic systematics of marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kang-Jun; Shen, Bing; Lang, Xian-Guo; Tang, Wen-Bo; Peng, Yang; Ke, Shan; Kaufman, Alan J.; Ma, Hao-Ran; Li, Fang-Bing

    2015-09-01

    Available Mg isotope data indicate that dolostones of different ages have overlapping range of Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) and there is no systematic difference among different types of dolomites. To further explore the Mg isotopic systematics of dolomite formation, we measured Mg isotopic compositions of Mesoproterozoic dolostones from the Wumishan Formation in North China Block, because dolomite formation in Mesoproterozoic might have been fundamentally different from the younger counterparts. Based on petrographic observations, three texturally-different dolomite phases (dolomicrite, subhedral dolomite and anhedral dolomite) are recognized in the Wumishan dolostones. Nevertheless, these three types of dolomites have similar δ26Mg values, ranging from -1.35‰ to -1.72‰, which are indistinguishable from Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic dolostones. To explain δ26Mg values of dolostones, we simulate the Mg isotopic system during dolomite formation by applying the one-dimensional Diffusion-Advection-Reaction (1D-DAR) model, assuming that the contemporaneous seawater is the Mg source of dolostone. The 1D-DAR modeling results indicate that the degree of dolomitization is controlled by sedimentation rate, seawater Mg concentration, temperature, and reaction rate of dolomite formation, whereas Mg isotopic composition of dolostone is not only dependent on these factors, but also affected by δ26Mg of seawater and isotope fractionation during dolomite formation. Moreover, the 1D-DAR model predicts that dolomite formation within sediments has limited range of variation in δ26Mg with respect to limestones. Furthermore, the modeling results demonstrate that dolostone is always isotopically heavier than Ca-carbonate precipitated from seawater, explaining the systematic isotopic difference between dolostones and limestones. Finally, we can infer from the 1D-DAR model that early-formed dolostone at shallower depth of sediments is always isotopically lighter than that

  15. Helium-carbon isotopic composition of thermal waters from Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourré, E.; Aiuppa, A.; di Napoli, R.; Parello, F.; Gaubi, E.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Allard, P.; Calabrese, S.; Ben Mammou, A.

    2010-12-01

    Tunisia has numerous thermo-mineral springs. Previous studies have shown that their chemical composition and occurrence are strongly influenced by the regional geology, however little work has been conducted to date to investigate the isotopic composition of volatiles associated with these geothermal manifestations. Here, we report the results of an extensive survey of both natural hot springs and production wells across Tunisia aimed at investigating the spatial distribution of the 3He/4He ratio and associated carbon isotopic compositions. With respect to helium isotopes, not unexpectedly, the lowest 3He/4He values (0.01-0.02 Ra) are associated with the old groundwaters of the “Continental Intercalaire” aquifer of the stable Saharan Platform. The 3He/4He values are equal to the crustal production ratio, with no detectable amount of mantle-derived 3He, in agreement with previous studies of helium isotopes in sedimentary basin, which conclude that tectonically-stable regions are essentially impermeable to mantle volatiles. The low 3He/4He domain extends to the entire Atlasic domain of central Tunisia. This Atlasic domain also displays the highest helium concentrations : along the Gafsa Fault, helium concentrations of 1777 and 4723 x 10-8 cm3STP/g (the highest value of our data set) are observed in the production wells of Sidi Ahmed Zarrouk. This emphasizes the role of deep tectonic features in channelling and transporting deep crustal volatiles to shallow levels. The eastern margin of Tunisia displays higher 3He/4He values indicative of a substantial mantle volatile input. The highest value is recorded in the carbo-gaseous mineral water of Ain Garci (2.4 Ra). This northeastern part of the African plate commonly referred to as the Pelagian block extends from Tunisia to Sicily and is characterized by strong extensional tectonics (Pantelleria rift zone) and present-day magmatic activity. This lithospheric stretching and decompressional mantle melts production in

  16. Seasonality of Leaf Carbon Isotopic Composition and Leaf Water Isotopic Enrichment in a Mixed Evergreen Forest in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. S.; Sickman, J. O.; Goulden, M.; DeVan, C.; Pasquini, S. C.; Pivovaroff, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Leaf carbon isotopic composition and leaf water isotopic enrichment reflect physiological processes and are important for linking local and regional scale processes to global patterns. We investigated how seasonality affects the isotopic composition of bulk leaf carbon, leaf sugar carbon, and leaf water hydrogen under a Mediterranean climate. Leaf and stem samples were collected monthly from four tree species (Calocedrus decurrens, Pinus lambertiana, Pinus ponderosa, and Quercus chrysolepis) at the James San Jacinto Mountain Reserve in southern California. Mean monthly bulk leaf carbon isotopic composition varied from -34.5 % in P. ponderosa to -24.7 % in P. lambertiana and became more depleted in 13C from the spring to the summer. Mean monthly leaf sugar varied from -29.3 % in P. ponderosa to -21.8 % in P. lambertiana and was enriched in 13C during the winter, spring and autumn, but depleted during the mid-summer. Leaf water hydrogen isotopic composition was 28.4 to 68.8 % more enriched in deuterium than source water and this enrichment was greater as seasonal drought progressed. These data indicate that leaf carbon and leaf water hydrogen isotopic composition provide sensitive measures that connect plant physiological processes to short-term climatic variability.

  17. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  18. Calcium and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayr, Andrea; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Kisakürek, Basak; Balzer, Isabelle; Immenhauser, Adrian; Jürgen Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Different isotopic systems are influenced in multiple ways corresponding to the crystal structure, dehydration, deprotonation, adsorption, desorption, isotope exchange and diffusion processes. In this study we investigated the structural and kinetic effects on fractionation of stable Ca- and O-isotopes during CaCO3 precipitation. Calcite, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated using the CO2 diffusion technique[1]at a constant pH of 8.3, but various temperatures (6, 10, 25 and 40° C) and precipitation rates R (101.5 to 105 μmol h-1 m-2). The calcium isotopic fractionation between solution and vaterite is lower (Δ44/40Ca= -0.10 to -0.55 ‰) compared to calcite (-0.69 to -2.04 ‰) and aragonite (-0.91 to -1.55 ‰). In contrast the fractionation of oxygen isotopes is highest for vaterite (32.1 ‰), followed by aragonite (29.2 ‰) and calcite (27.6 ‰) at 25° C and equilibrium. The enrichment of 18O vs. 16O in all polymorphs decreases with increasing precipitation rate by around -0.7 ‰ per log(R). The calcium isotopic fractionation between calcite/ vaterite and aqueous Ca2+ increases with increasing precipitation rate by ˜0.45 ‰ per log(R) and ˜0.1 ‰ per log(R) at 25° C and 40° C, respectively. In contrast the fractionation of Ca-isotopes between aragonite and aqueous Ca2+ decreases with increasing precipitation rates. The large enrichment of 18O vs. 16O isotopes in carbonates is related to the strong bond of oxygen to the small and highly charged C4+-ion. In contrast equilibrium isotopic fractionation between solution and calcite or vaterite is nearly zero as the Ca-O bond length is similar for calcite, vaterite and the hydrated Ca. Aragonite incorporates preferentially the lighter 40Ca isotope as it has very large Ca-O bonds in comparison to the hydrated Ca. At the crystal surface the lighter 40Ca isotopes are preferentially incorporated as dehydration and diffusion of lighter isotopes are faster. Consequently, the surface becomes enriched in 40

  19. Calcium and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayr, Andrea; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Kisakürek, Basak; Balzer, Isabelle; Immenhauser, Adrian; Jürgen Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Different isotopic systems are influenced in multiple ways corresponding to the crystal structure, dehydration, deprotonation, adsorption, desorption, isotope exchange and diffusion processes. In this study we investigated the structural and kinetic effects on fractionation of stable Ca- and O-isotopes during CaCO3 precipitation. Calcite, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated using the CO2 diffusion technique[1]at a constant pH of 8.3, but various temperatures (6, 10, 25 and 40° C) and precipitation rates R (101.5 to 105 μmol h‑1 m‑2). The calcium isotopic fractionation between solution and vaterite is lower (Δ44/40Ca= -0.10 to -0.55 ‰) compared to calcite (-0.69 to -2.04 ‰) and aragonite (-0.91 to -1.55 ‰). In contrast the fractionation of oxygen isotopes is highest for vaterite (32.1 ‰), followed by aragonite (29.2 ‰) and calcite (27.6 ‰) at 25° C and equilibrium. The enrichment of 18O vs. 16O in all polymorphs decreases with increasing precipitation rate by around -0.7 ‰ per log(R). The calcium isotopic fractionation between calcite/ vaterite and aqueous Ca2+ increases with increasing precipitation rate by ˜0.45 ‰ per log(R) and ˜0.1 ‰ per log(R) at 25° C and 40° C, respectively. In contrast the fractionation of Ca-isotopes between aragonite and aqueous Ca2+ decreases with increasing precipitation rates. The large enrichment of 18O vs. 16O isotopes in carbonates is related to the strong bond of oxygen to the small and highly charged C4+-ion. In contrast equilibrium isotopic fractionation between solution and calcite or vaterite is nearly zero as the Ca-O bond length is similar for calcite, vaterite and the hydrated Ca. Aragonite incorporates preferentially the lighter 40Ca isotope as it has very large Ca-O bonds in comparison to the hydrated Ca. At the crystal surface the lighter 40Ca isotopes are preferentially incorporated as dehydration and diffusion of lighter isotopes are faster. Consequently, the surface becomes enriched in

  20. Isotope composition of carbon in the carbonates of the Gumbeykan scheelite deposits in the southern Urals

    SciTech Connect

    Korzhinskii, A.F.; Mamchur, G.P.; Yarynych, O.A.

    1980-10-01

    Through investigations of the isotope composition of carbon of various generations and carbonates from marbles, skarns, and nested and vein scheelite orebodies, the probable source of carbon of these carbonates has been established as a mixture of sedimentary carbonates, carbon dioxide with carbonic acid that was formed by oxidation of the organic matter from sedimentary terrane (..delta..C/sup 13/ - 0.05 to -0.62%). In the calcite and dolomite phenocrysts of marble and the coarse-grained dolostone, containing scheelite, the carbon was lighter (..delta..C/sup 13/ from -0.60 to -0.87%). For the dolomite and ankerite from scheelite pockets of the Balkan deposit and quartz veins of the Buranovo, ..delta..C/sup 13/ varied from -0.44 to -0.87%. The lightest carbon found in strontianite (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.32%), located near the coating of the organic matter (..delta..C/sup 13/ = -1.26%) in fractures of the quartz vein of the Buranovo deposit. In the section through the orebodies and near-ore diffusion-metasomatic zones of the Balkan deposit, the lessening of carbon in the carbonates was observed, with increasing distance away from the fracture. ..delta..C/sup 13/ in the altered granitoids ranged from -0.44 to -1.03%; while in the diopside-wollastonite hornfels, from -0.89 to 1.13%. The lessening in weight of the carbon is explained by diffusional fractionation of the isotopes caused apparently by the differential movement of volatile mixtures of carbon during ore-forming processes and the formation of their diffusion-metasomatic zones.

  1. Soil drying effects on the carbon isotope composition of soil respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are used widely as a tool for determining sources of carbon (C) fluxes in ecosystem C studies. Environmental factors that change over time, such as moisture, can create dynamic changes in the isotopic composition of C assimilated by plants, and offers a unique opp...

  2. Concentration and isotopic composition of carbon and sulfur in apollo 11 lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, I R; Smith, J W

    1970-01-30

    The concentration of carbon and sulfur in six samples ranged between 20 to 200 and 650 to 2300 parts per million, respectively. Carbon was present in gaseous, volatilizable, and nonvolatile forms, and terrestrial contaminants were recognized. Sulfur appeared to exist only as acid-volatile sulfide. The bulk fines contain a high concentration of carbon and a low concentration of sulfur. They are always enriched in the heavier isotope carbon-13 or sulfur-34. The fine-grained basaltic rocks show the reverse relation; lowest carbon, highest sulfide concentrations, and no apparent enrichment in heavy isotopes. The breccias are of intermediate composition.

  3. Natural gas constituent and carbon isotopic composition in petroliferous basins, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyou; Wang, Zhengjun; Dai, Jinxing; Su, Jing

    2014-02-01

    There are abundant gas resources in petroliferous basins of China. Large to midsize gas fields are found in Eastern, central and Western of China. However, origin, constituents and isotopic composition of natural gas in different gas fields are varied distinctly, and some present strong chemical secondary alteration and show variation both in age and space. Based on the systematic analysis of constituents and carbon isotope of a large number of gas samples, combined with the geological characteristics, this paper classifies the origins of the gases, explores the gas isotope characteristics and evolutionary regulation with the variation time and space, and further discusses the distinctive geochemistry of the gases in China. These gases are dominated by dry gas, its methane carbon isotope values range from -10‰ to -70‰, ethane from -16‰ to -52‰, propane from -13‰ to -43‰, and butane from -18‰ to -34‰. The carbon isotopes of most gases show the characteristics of humic-derived gas and crude oil cracked gas. In addition, large primary biogenic gas fields have been discovered in the Qaidam basin; inorganic-derived alkane gases have been discovered in deep of the Songliao Basin. Half of these gas fields are characterized by the alkane carbon isotope reversal in different degrees. Research indicates there are several reasons can result in carbon isotope reversal. Firstly, gas charge of different genetic types or different source in one gas reservoir may cause carbon isotope reversal. Besides, high-over mature evolution of gas can also lead to the carbon isotopic reversal of alkanes. Thirdly, secondary alteration of hydrocarbons may also result in abnormal distribution of carbon isotope, isotope transforms to unusual light and heavy.

  4. Triple oxygen isotope composition of tropospheric carbon dioxide and terrestrial carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M. E.; Horváth, B.; Pack, A.

    2011-12-01

    The triple oxygen isotope composition of tropospheric CO2 is a potential new tracer in urban air studies and for biosphere-atmosphere interactions [1]. In this study, we are analyzing CO2 from different provenances in order to trace the influx of anthropogenic CO2 to urban air and to test predictions on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange flux. Since July 2010, we are monitoring the triple oxygen isotope composition of CO2 in urban air in a two-week interval. For this purpose, carbon dioxide was extracted from ~450L of ambient air on the campus of the University of Göttingen using a Russian Doll type cryogenic trap [2]. The CO2 was analyzed by CO2-CeO2 equilibration at 685°C and subsequent IR laser fluorination of CeO2 and CF-irmMS [3]. All triple oxygen isotope data are reported as Δ17OTFL values relative to the terrestrial fractionation line (TFL) with a slope βTFL=0.5251 and an intercept γTFL=-0.014%. On average, the Δ17OTFL value of ambient CO2 was -0.11±0.05% (SD) with a seasonal cycle of 0.04±0.01%. Lower Δ17O values were observed during wintertime. In order to test the potential of Δ17O as a tracer for anthropogenic CO2, we analyzed CO2 from different combustion processes. Our results showed that the Δ17O anomaly of tropospheric O2 [4] is passed on fully, or partially to the combustion CO2 [5]. We estimate that elevated anthropogenic emission during wintertime could be responsible for a decrease in Δ17O of urban air CO2 of -0.02±0.01%. In order to predict the triple oxygen isotope composition of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale, we revised the box model calculation from Hoag et al. [1]. For the exponent β for CO2-water equilibrium, we assume that βCO2-water=0.522±0.001 [6]. Furthermore, we took into account that the Δ17OTFL value of CO2 released from soils is affected by kinetic fractionation. Thus, we obtained a Δ17OTFL value for global tropospheric CO2 of -0.13%. The model calculation agrees well with the Δ17OTFL value determined for

  5. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping. PMID:26358051

  6. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping.

  7. Soil moisture effects on the carbon isotopic composition of soil respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    The carbon isotopic composition ( 13C) of recently assimilated plant carbon is known to depend on water-stress, caused either by low soil moisture or by low atmospheric humidity. Air humidity has also been shown to correlate with the 13C of soil respiration, which suggests indir...

  8. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of carbonate in fugitive dust in the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. J.; Zhu, C. S.; Chow, J. C.; Liu, W. G.; Han, Y. M.; Watson, J. G.

    Stable C-O isotopic composition of loess samples for TSP, PM 10, PM 2.5, and PM 1 at five sites (Yulin, Yanchi, Huanxian, Luochuan, and Xi'an) in Chinese Loess Plateau are examined. The average δ13C and δ18O abundances were -6.00‰ and -8.30‰ in TSP, -6.05‰ and -8.22‰ in PM 10, -6.07‰ and -8.33‰ in PM 2.5, and -6.00‰ and -8.28‰ in PM 1, respectively. Little differences were found for δ13C and δ18O abundances in four size fractions. The differences of δ13C between the averages of fugitive dust and bulk soil were smaller than 2‰ at five locations, which implied that the isotopic composition of bulk soil (surface soil) can be used as substitute of fugitive dust carbonate in dust source apportion study. The distribution of CO 3-C, δ13C and δ18O in fugitive dust shows that only δ13C is a powerful tracer of source regions. A database about the δ13C distribution in soil carbonate in major source regions of Asian dust was summarized for source apportion study of atmospheric dust.

  9. Controls on ostracod valve geochemistry: Part 2. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decrouy, Laurent; Vennemann, Torsten Walter; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of fossil ostracods are powerful tools to estimate past environmental and climatic conditions. The basis for such interpretations is that the calcite of the valves reflects the isotopic composition of water and its temperature of formation. However, calcite of ostracods is known not to form in isotopic equilibrium with water and different species may have different offsets from inorganic precipitates of calcite formed under the same conditions. To estimate the fractionation during ostracod valve calcification, the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of 15 species living in Lake Geneva were related to their autoecology and the environmental parameters measured during their growth. The results indicate that: (1) Oxygen isotope fractionation is similar for all species of Candoninae with an enrichment in 18O of more than 3‰ relative to equilibrium values for inorganic calcite. Oxygen isotope fractionation for Cytheroidea is less discriminative relative to the heavy oxygen, with enrichments in 18O for these species of 1.7 to 2.3‰. Oxygen isotope fractionations for Cyprididae are in-between those of Candoninae and Cytheroidea. The difference in oxygen isotope fractionation between ostracods and inorganic calcite has been interpreted as resulting from a vital effect. (2) Comparison with previous work suggests that oxygen isotope fractionation may depend on the total and relative ion content of water. (3) Carbon isotope compositions of ostracod valves are generally in equilibrium with DIC. The specimens' δ 13C values are mainly controlled by seasonal variations in δ 13C DIC of bottom water or variation thereof in sediment pore water. (4) Incomplete valve calcification has an effect on carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of ostracod valves. Preferential incorporation of CO32- at the beginning of valve calcification may explain this effect. (5) Results presented here as well as results from synthetic carbonate

  10. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  11. Modelling carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon and methane in marine porewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Khalili, Arzhang; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4) in marine sedimentary porewaters at near surface temperatures show extremely large variation in apparent fractionation covering a range from -100 ‰ to +30 ‰. This fractionation is essentially the result of microbial activity, but the mechanisms and factors controlling this fractionation are still incompletely understood. This study provides a reaction transport model approach to evaluate the effects of the most important processes and factors on carbon isotope distribution with the goal to better understand carbon isotope distribution in modern sediment porewaters and in the geological record. Our model results show that kinetic fractionation during methanogenesis, both through the acetoclastic and autotrophic pathways, results in a nearly symmetrical distribution of δ13C values in DIC and CH4 with respect to the isotope value of buried organic matter. An increased fractionation factor during methanogenesis leads to a larger difference between δ13CDIC and δ13CCH4. Near the sulphate methane transition zone, DIC is more depleted in 13C due to diffusive mixing with DIC produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulphate reduction. The model also shows that an upward decrease in δ13CCH4 near the SMT can only be caused by equilibrium fractionation during AOM including a backward "leakage" of carbon from DIC to CH4 through the enzymatic pathway. However, this effect of reversibility has no influence on the DIC pool as long as methane is completely consumed at the SMT. Only a release of methane at the sediment-water interface, due to a fraction of the methane escaping re-oxidation, results in a small shift towards more positive δ13CDIC values. Methane escape at the SMT is possible if either the methane flux is too high to be entirely oxidized by AOM, or if bubbles of methane gas by-pass the sulphate reduction zone and escape episodically into the water column

  12. Is my C isotope excursion global, local, or both? Insights from the Mg and Ca isotopic composition of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Husson, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The C isotopic composition of ancient limestones and dolomites is a widely used proxy for the global geochemical cycles of carbon and oxygen in the ocean-atmosphere system and a critical tool for chemostratigraphy in Precambrian rocks. Although relatively robust to diagenesis, the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates can be reset when conditions favor high water-to-rock ratios or fluids with high C concentrations and distinct isotopic compositions. Authigenic carbonates and different pools of primary carbonate (e.g. calcite vs. aragonite) may also bias the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates if they are both abundant and isotopically distinct. New approaches to quantifying contributions from diagenesis, authigenesis, and mixing of primary carbonates to the C isotopic composition of bulk sedimentary carbonates are needed. Here we present preliminary Mg and Ca isotope data sets of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates, both modern and ancient. We show that recrystallization, dolomitization, and authigenesis produce Mg and Ca isotope fingerprints that may be used to identify and characterize these processes in ancient carbonate sediments.

  13. Oxygen isotope composition of modern pedogenic carbonate from the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breecker, D.; Sharp, Z.; Newell, D.; Jessup, M.; Cottle, J.

    2007-12-01

    Oxygen-isotope paleoelevation estimates of large plateaus provide important geodynamic constraints on the teconic evolution of orogenic systems as well as offering insight into the dynamic feedbacks between surface uplift and regional- to global-scale climate systems. If the isotopic lapse rate (δ18O vs elevation) is known, then the oxygen isotope composition of ancient meteoric water can be used to estimate paleoelevation. The oxygen isotope composition of pedogenic carbonate preserved in paleosols has been used as a proxy for the oxygen isotope composition of soil water in order to reconstruct paleoelevation in a number of settings. Isotopic equilibrium between carbonate and water is assumed in order to calculate the δ18O value of soil water from measured δ18O values of pedogenic carbonate (δ18Opc). Uncertainties surrounding the temperature of isotopic equilibrium and the degree of evaporation of soil water limit the precision of elevation estimates from pedogenic carbonate. In this study, measurements of the oxygen isotope composition of pedogenic carbonate forming in modern soils from the Mt. Everest Region of Tibet are compared with modern meteoric water δ18O values (δ18Omw) to calibrate δ18Opc as a proxy for elevation. Pedogenic carbonate samples coating the underside of clasts were collected along depth profiles in soils at different elevations ranging from 3750 - 5200m on the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Incipient soils developing in the lowest and presumably youngest river terraces were chosen for δ18Opc measurements because these are the most likely to have formed under the influence of modern precipitation. The oxygen isotope composition of modern spring and stream waters along the Bhote Kosi and Arun River were also measured in this study and agree well with previously published elevation- δ18Omw relationships for the Himalayas. Average δ18Opc values below 50 cm in the modern soils were used to calculate equilibrium δ18Omw values

  14. Isotopic Composition of Organic and Inorganic Carbon in Desert Biological Soil Crust Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Hartnett, H.; Anbar, A.; Beraldi, H.; Garcia-Pichel, F.

    2006-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are microbial communities that colonize soil surfaces in many arid regions. BSCs are important sources for fixed carbon and nitrogen in these ecosystems, and they greatly influence the structure, function, and appearance of desert soils. Biological activity of BSCs occurs during pulses of hydration requiring desert crusts to tolerate extremes in UV radiation, temperature, and desiccation. These characteristics make desert crusts unique systems that have received little consideration in the study of biogeochemical processes in extreme environments. This project investigates the impact of BSCs on carbon dynamics within desert soils. Soil cores ranging in depth from 8 to 12 cm were taken in March, 2006 from deserts near Moab, Utah. Two major BSC classes were identified: lichen-dominated (dark and pinnacled) soil crusts and cyanobacteria-dominated (light and flat) soil crusts. These two surface morphologies are related to the different biological communities. Carbon content and stable carbon isotopic composition were determined for the bulk carbon pool, as well as for the organic and inorganic carbon fractions of the soils. Expectedly, there was a net decrease in organic carbon content with depth (0.39-0.27 percent). Stable carbon isotope values for the organic fraction ranged from -5.8 per mil to -24.0 per mil (Avg: -14.4 per mil, S.D: 6.42 per mil). Stable carbon isotope values for the inorganic fraction ranged from 0.3 per mil to -3.6 per mil (Avg: -2.4 per mil, S.D.: 1.05 per mil). The variation in the isotopic composition of the organic carbon was due to a strong depletion below the surface soil value occurring between 3 and 5 cm depth, with an enrichment above the original surface value at depths below 6 to 10 cm. These data suggest that within desert soil crust systems the carbon isotopic signal is complex with both a clear biological imprint (lighter organic carbon) as well as evidence for some mechanism that results in

  15. Factors that control the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in an anoxic marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alperin, M. J.; Blair, Neal E.; Albert, D. B.; Hoehler, T. M.; Martens, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in anoxic marine sediment is controlled by four factors: (1) the pathway of methane formation, (2) the isotopic composition of the methanogenic precursors, (3) the isotope fractionation factors for methane production, and (4) the isotope fractionation associated with methane oxidation. The importance of each factor was evaluated by monitoring stable carbon isotope ratios in methane produced by a sediment microcosm. Methane did not accumulate during the initial 42-day period when sediment contained sulfate, indicating little methane production from 'noncompetitive' substrates. Following sulfate depletion, methane accumulation proceeded in three distinct phases. First, CO2 reduction was the dominant methanogenic pathway and the isotopic composition of the methane produced ranged from -80 to -94 per thousand. The acetate concentration increased during this phase, suggesting that acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria were unable to keep pace with acetate production. Second, acetate fermentation became the dominant methanogenic pathway as bacteria responded to elevated acetate concentrations. The methane produced during this phase was progressively enriched in C-13, reaching a maximum delta(C-13) value of -42 per thousand. Third, the acetate pool experienced a precipitous decline from greater than 5 mM to less than 20 micro-M and methane production was again dominated by CO2 reduction. The delta(C-13) of methane produced during this final phase ranged from -46 to -58 per thousand. Methane oxidation concurrent with methane production was detected throughout the period of methane accumulation, at rates equivalent to 1 to 8 percent of the gross methane production rate. Thus methane oxidation was too slow to have significantly modified the isotopic signature of methane. A comparison of microcosm and field data suggests that similar microbial interactions may control seasonal variability in the isotopic composition of methane

  16. Carbon isotope composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids from Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, G.; Blair, N.; Des Marais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon isotopic compositions have been measured for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids from the Murchison meteorite, a C2 carbonaceous chondrite which fell in Australia in 1969. With few exceptions, notably benzene, the volatile products are substantially isotopically heavier than their terrestrial counterparts, signifying their extraterrestrial origin. For both classes of compounds, the ratio of C-13 to C-12 decreases with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic ratio than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with the kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues from lower ones. The results suggest the possibility that the production mechanisms for hydrocarbons and carboxylic acids may be similar, and impose constraints on the identity of the reactant species.

  17. Global synchronous changes in the carbon isotopic composition of carbonate sediments unrelated to changes in the global carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Peter K.

    2008-01-01

    The carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition of bulk carbonate sediments deposited off the margins of four carbonate platforms/ramp systems (Bahamas, Maldives, Queensland Plateau, and Great Australian Bight) show synchronous changes over the past 0 to 10 million years. However, these variations are different from the established global pattern in the δ13C measured in the open oceans over the same time period. For example, from 10 Ma to the present, the δ13C of open oceanic carbonate has decreased, whereas platform margin sediments analyzed here show an increase. It is suggested that the δ13C patterns in the marginal platform deposits are produced through admixing of aragonite-rich sediments, which have relatively positive δ13C values, with pelagic materials, which have lower δ13C values. As the more isotopically positive shallow-water carbonate sediments are only produced when the platforms are flooded, there is a connection between changes in global sea level and the δ13C of sediments in marginal settings. These data indicate that globally synchronous changes in δ13C can take place that are completely unrelated to variations in the global carbon cycle. Fluctuations in the δ13C of carbonate sediments measured during previous geological periods may also be subject to similar processes, and global synchroniety of δ13C can no longer necessarily be considered an indicator that such changes are related to, or caused by, variations in the burial of organic carbon. Inferences regarding the interpretation of changes in the cycling of organic carbon derived from δ13C records should be reconsidered in light of the findings presented here. PMID:18772393

  18. New approach to global barium cycle understanding: barium isotopic composition of marine carbonates and seawater.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretet, Chloé; Nägler, Thomas F.; Reynaud, Stéphanie; de Lange, Gert J.; Turpin, Mélanie; Immenhauser, Adrian; Böttcher, Michael E.; Samankassou, Elias

    2013-04-01

    In this communication we present the Ba isotope fractionation (delta137/134Ba) study on marine carbonates and seawater, initiated to gain a first order view of the marine Ba isotope cycle. A special focus is the question whether the nutrient type distribution of Ba in the water column, as well as different Ba sources, are reflected in Ba isotope ratios of carbonate archives. The approach ultimately aims to provide an improved Ba based paleonutrient proxy. The data set is composed of carbonates (micrites and limestone standard), coral skeleton and seawater (IAPSO standard and Mediterranean seawater). Part of the corals were cultured in monitored environments (CSM, Monaco) others originate from natural environments (shallow and warm water corals from the Bahamas/Florida and cold water corals from the Norwegian shelf). The analytical procedure includes the application of a 130Ba/135Ba double spike, a cation exchange column followed by isotope measurements on a Nu Instruments Multicollector ICP-MS. The Ba fractionation of the samples is compared to a Ba nitrate standard solution and a standard natural limestone BSC-CRM 393 (0.05 ± 0.04 ‰, 2SEM). No isotopic fractionation has been observed in the limestone standard and micrites (N=8) (-0.01 ± 0.04 ‰, 2SEM) compared to the Ba nitrate standard. On the contrary, coral skeletons show a significant positive fractionation (mean = 0.4 ± 0.05 ‰, 2 SEM). No significant difference was found between different cultured coral species. Thus no species-specific fractionation is identified within the same environmental conditions. Diagenetic influence on Ba isotopic composition was further tested on 5 natural samples with varying calcite to aragonite ratios (0 to 0.3). No significant effect was observed. Moreover, the Ba isotope composition seems independant from the Ba concentration in the studied coral skeleton, within our measurement resolution. Seawater isotopic composition (-0.05 ± 0.07 ‰, 2SD) is lighter than coral

  19. Assessment of the clumped isotope composition of fossil bone carbonate as a recorder of subsurface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Marina B.; Passey, Benjamin H.

    2014-09-01

    Bone is susceptible to early diagenesis, and its carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions have been suggested to reflect conditions in the soil environment and shallow subsurface during fossilization. This implies open-system recrystallization involving mass exchange of carbon and oxygen among bioapatite, soil water, and DIC. Such recrystallization would also redistribute isotopic clumping (including 13C-18O bonds), leading to the possibility that the carbonate clumped isotope compositions of fossil bone record ground temperature during early diagenesis. We assess this possibility by studying Quaternary mammalian fossil bone from subtropical to polar latitudes: if recrystallization is early and pervasive, clumped isotope derived temperatures, T(Δ47), should closely mirror latitudinal gradients in ground temperature. Excluding results from a mummified specimen yielding T(Δ47) = 38 °C (that is, indistinguishable from mammalian body temperature), we find that T(Δ47) values are intermediate between mammalian body temperature and ground temperature, suggesting partial recrystallization of bone carbonate. XRD analyses show that the nature and extent of diagenesis varies among the samples and does not relate in a straightforward manner to T(Δ47). No clear correlation exists between T(Δ47) and mean annual temperature or mean warm season temperature. Furthermore, bone tends to retain the 18O-enriched signature of body water, suggesting incomplete oxygen isotope exchange with meteoric waters. Incomplete carbon and oxygen isotope exchange between bone carbonate and soil waters is also indicated for a set of late Miocene bone-enamel pairs from a sequence of stacked paleosols in northern China. Analysis of bone as old as Early Cretaceous shows that bone carbonate is susceptible to later diagenesis at elevated burial temperatures, although T(Δ47) does not closely conform to maximum burial temperature, again suggesting partial recrystallization, or recrystallization during

  20. The carbon isotopic compositions of individual compounds from ancient and modern depositional environments

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, K.H.

    1991-01-01

    This work examines factors influencing the isotopic compositions of individual compounds and, consequently, that of preserved sedimentary organic matter. Specifically, isotope effects associated with reactions resulting in the production and degradation of organic matter in the water column and reactions affecting preservation during diagenesis are considered in three projects. The first documents the preservation of the isotopic compositions of hydrocarbons altered by diagenetic reaction. Isotopic compositions of structurally-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the Messel Shale show little variation with increased unsaturation. The influence of environmental conditions on the isotopic composition of sedimentary organic carbon is documented by a comparison of the {delta}{sup 13}C of hydrocarbons in the marine Julia Creek Oil Shale and the lacustrine Condor Oil Shale. A model is proposed for identifying relative degrees of oxygenation and productivity within a paleoenvironment based on the observed {sup 13}C contents of biomarkers. Effects of processes proposed in the environmental model are documented by an examination of hydrocarbons from the waters and sediments of the Black Sea and of the Cariaco Trench. Sources of individual compounds are identified by comparison of their {sup 13}C content with that predicted for autotrophic biomass calculated from the concentration and {sup 13}C content of CO{sub 2}(aq) in the surface waters.

  1. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  2. Oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of gases respired by humans

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, S.; Zeiri, L. )

    1988-03-01

    Oxygen-isotope fractionation associated with respiration in human individuals at rest is linearly related to the fraction of the O{sub 2} utilized in the respiration process. The slope of this relationship is affected by a history of smoking, by vigorous exercise, and by the N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} ratio of the inhaled gas. For patients who suffer anemia-related diseases, the slope of this relationship is directly proportional to their level of hemoglobin. These results introduce a new approach for studying the mechanisms of O{sub 2} consumption in human respiration and how they are affected by related diseases.

  3. Effects of diagenesis on strontium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen concentration and isotopic composition of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Bruce K.; Deniro, Michael J.; Schoeninger, Margaret J.; De Paolo, Donald J.; Hare, P. E.

    1986-09-01

    Paleodietary analysis based on variations in the trace element and stable isotopic composition of inorganic and organic phases in fossil bone depends on the assumption that measured values reflect in vivo values. To test for postmortem alteration, we measured 87Sr /86Sr , 13C /12C , 18O /16O and 15N /14N ratios and Sr concentrations in modern and prehistoric (610 to 5470 yr old) bones of animals with marine or terrestrial diets from Greenland. Bones from modern terrestrial feeders have substantially lower Sr concentrations and more radiogenic 87Sr /86Sr ratios than those from modern marine feeders. This contrast was not preserved in the prehistoric samples, which showed almost complete overlap for both Sr concentration and isotopic composition in bones from the two types of animals. Leaching experiments, X-ray diffraction analysis and infrared spectroscopy indicate that alteration of the Sr concentration and isotopic composition in prehistoric bone probably results from nearly complete exchange with groundwater. Oxygen isotope ratios in fossil apatite carbonate also failed to preserve the original discrimination between modern terrestrial and marine feeders. The C isotope ratio of apatite carbonate did not discriminate between animals with marine or terrestrial diets in the modern samples. Even so, the ranges of apatite δ 13C values in prehistoric bone are more scattered than in modern samples for both groups, suggesting alteration had occurred. δ 13C and δ 15N values of collagen in modern bone are distinctly different for the two feeding types, and this distinction is preserved in most of the prehistoric samples. Our results suggest that postmortem alteration of dietary tracers in the inorganic phases of bone may be a problem at all archaeological sites and must be evaluated in each case. While collagen analyzed in this study was resistant to alteration, evaluation of the possibility of diagenetic alteration of its isotopic composition in bones from other

  4. Effect of photosynthetic light dosage on carbon isotope composition in the coral skeleton: Long-term culture of Porites spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omata, Tamano; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sato, Takanori; Minoshima, Kayo; Nomaru, Eriko; Murakami, Akio; Murayama, Shohei; Kawahata, Hodaka; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2008-06-01

    Whereas the oxygen isotope ratio of the coral skeleton is used for reconstruction of past information on seawater, the carbon isotope ratio is considered a proxy for physiological processes, principally photosynthesis and respiration. However, the fractionation of carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonate such as coral skeleton is still unclear. We conducted a long-term culture experiment of Porites spp. corals at different light dosages (light intensity, 100, 300, or 500 μmol m-2 s-1; daily light period, 10 or 12 h) at 25 ± 0.6°C to examine the contribution of photosynthetic activity to skeletal carbon isotope composition. Corals were grown in sand-filtered seawater and not fed; thus, they subsisted from photosynthesis of symbiotic algae. As the daily dose of photosynthetically active radiation increased, the rate of annual extension also increased. Mean isotope compositions shifted; the carbon isotope compositions (δ13C) became heavier and the oxygen isotope compositions (δ18O) became lighter at higher radiation dose. Skeletal δ18O decrease coincided with increasing skeletal growth rate, indicating the influence of so-called kinetic isotope effects. The observed δ13C increase should be subject to both kinetic and metabolic isotope effects, with the latter reflecting skeletal δ13C enrichment due to photosynthesis by symbiotic algae. Using a vector approach in the δ13C-δ18O plane, we discriminated between kinetic and metabolic isotope effects on δ13C. The calculated δ13C changes from metabolic isotope effects were light dose dependent. The δ13C fractionation curve related to metabolic isotope effects is very similar to the photosynthesis-irradiance curve, indicating the direct contribution of photosynthetic activity to metabolic isotope effects. In contrast, δ13C fractionation related to kinetic isotope effects gradually increased as the growth rate increased. Our experiment demonstrated that the kinetic and metabolic isotope effects in coral skeleton

  5. Carbon isotopic composition of deep carbon gases in an ombrogenous peatland, northwestern Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Aravena, R. . Center for Groundwater Research and Wetlands Research Center); Warner, B.G. . Wetlands Research Center and Dept. of Geography); Charman, D.J. . Dept. of Geographical Sciences); Belyea, L.R. . School of Biological Sciences); Mathur, S.P. ); Dinel, H. )

    1993-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating and carbon isotope analyses of deep peat and gases in a small ombrogenous peatland in northwestern Ontario reveals the presence of old gases at depth that are 1000-2000 yr younger than the enclosing peat. The authors suggest that the most likely explanation to account for this age discrepancy is the downward movement by advection of younger dissolved organic carbon for use by fermentation and methanogens bacteria. This study identifies a potentially large supply of old carbon gases in peatlands that should be considered in global carbon models of the terrestrial biosphere.

  6. Temperature and Oxygen Isotope Composition of The Ediacaran Ocean: Constraints From Clumped Isotope Carbonate Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacie, M.; Eiler, J. M.; Fike, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    The temperature and chemical variations of the early oceans on Earth are highly debated, particularly for periods associated with significant evolutionary change and/or extinction. The temperature of past oceans has been estimated based on conventional carbonate-water and/or silicate-water stable oxygen isotope thermometry. Precambrian carbonates and silicates both exhibit a long-term secular trend of increasing δ18O values with decreasing age. This trend has been used to support two opposite - though related - interpretations: the Earth's oceans gradually cooled over the course of the Proterozoic eon, from a maximum of ~ 60-90°C at ~ 2.5Ga (and were, on average, relatively warm during much of the Paleozoic era) [1]. This interpretation has been supported by Si-isotope proxies and the thermal tolerances of proteins in various classes of microbial organisms [2-3]. Alternatively, the δ18O value of the oceans has gradually increased through time [4-5], and mean Earth surface temperatures varied over a narrow range similar to modern conditions. In other terms, one either assumes an ocean of constant δ18O and infers that climate varied dramatically, or vise versa. Finally, it is possible that post- depositional processes (e.g., diagenesis, burial metamorphism, weathering) has modified the δ18O values of all or most Precambrian sedimentary carbonates and silicates, overprinting any paleoclimatic variations. Carbonate 'clumped isotope' thermometry provides a new way to independently test these hypotheses because it allows one to determine the apparent growth temperatures of carbonate minerals based on their abundances of 13C-18O bonds, as reflected by the 'Δ47' value of CO2 extracted by phosphoric acid digestion [6]. This method is thermodynamically based and independent of the δ18O of water from which the carbonate grew. We will report the initial results of measurements of 'Δ47 for a suite of carbonates from the Sultanate of Oman. This Ediacaran age (~ 635 to

  7. Microscale determination of the spectral characteristics and carbon-isotopic compositions of porphyrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, B. N.; Hayes, J. M.; Boreham, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Molar extinction coefficients for band III of Ni porphyrins are calculated from results of spectrophotometric and manometric analyses of individual etioporphyrins, DPEP, cyclic, and diDPEP porphyrins known to initially be pure from mass spectrometry, 1H NMR, and analytical HPLC studies. A method for determining carbon-isotopic compositions and purity of micromolar quantities of individual porphyrins using combined spectrophotometric and manometric techniques is presented.

  8. Carbon isotope composition of carbonaceous matter from the precambrian of the witwatersrand system.

    PubMed

    Hoefs, J; Schidlowski, M

    1967-03-01

    Polymerized hydrocarbons occurring in the gold-uranium conglomerates of the Witwatersrand System (South Africa) show deltaC(13) values between -22.4 and -32.8 per mille, their isotopic composition thus falling into the range of sedimentary organic carbon. Accordingly, organic derivation of the material seems very probable. This conclusion is consistent with a model of the existence of organic evolution and biologic activity in times certainly older than 2.15 x 10(9) years.

  9. The Carbon Isotope Composition of the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.; Gharib Nezhad, E.; Ayres, T. R.

    2016-08-01

    We have reanalyzed infrared CO absorption line data of the solar photosphere. We obtain d18O = -51 ± 11‰l VSMOW, consistent with the inferred Genesis value. For carbon we find d13C = -48 ± 7‰l VPDB, lighter than previously reported.

  10. Variable Carbon Isotopes in ALH84001 Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2002-12-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains a small amount of carbonate that was deposited from aqueous fluids on the Martian surface approximately 3.9 Ga.. McKay et al. (1996) proposed evidence for the existence of life preserved within the carbonate grains. In order to determine the nature of the ancient Martian aqueous system we have combined previously collected oxygen isotopic data with new carbon isotopic measurements performed on the Cameca 6f ion microprobe at Arizona State University. Isotopic measurements were made at high mass resolution with a spot size of 10 microns. The measured carbon isotopic values range from 29.2‰ to 64.5‰ (PDB) with an average uncertainty of +/-1.6‰ (1σ ). These data agree very well with previous acid dissolution and stepped combustion experiments which range from a δ13C of +32‰ to +41‰ . As observed with the oxygen isotopic data, the carbon isotopic composition is correlated with the chemical composition of the carbonates. This allows us to establish that the earliest (Ca-rich) carbonates had the lightest carbon isotopic composition while the latest forming (Mg-rich) carbonates had the heaviest carbon isotopic composition. The large range of carbon isotopic compositions measured in this study cannot be explained by previously proposed models. Temperature change or a Rayleigh distillation process caused by progressive carbonate precipitation are insufficient to create the observed carbon isotopic compositions. Furthermore, processes such as evaporation or photosynthesis will not produce large carbon isotopic variations due to rapid isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere. We propose two possible models for the formation of the ALH84001 carbonates consistent with the isotopic data collected thus far. Carbonates could have formed from an evolving system where the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates reflects a mixing between magmatic hydrothermal fluids and fluids in equilibrium with an isotopically

  11. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Eder, W.; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, K-U.; Hayes, J. M.; DesMarais, D. J.; Cady, S. L.; Hope, J. M.; Summons, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a study of lipid biomarker composition and carbon isotopic fractionation in cultured Aquificales and natural analogues from Yellowstone National Park. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Stable isotope composition of calcite fossils and bulk carbonate as a proxy for the reconstruction of Jurassic marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabas, A. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in global ocean productivity may be studied by means of carbon isotope analyses of marine carbonates. The analyses of the isotopic composition of carbonate oxygen are a basis for seawater temperature reconstructions, which are indicative of environmental and climatic changes. In this study we use carbon and oxygen isotope composition for the evaluation of the environmental changes in the Pieniny Klippen Basin (PKB) during the Jurassic. PKB is a narrow and long structure separating the Outer and Central Carpathians. The sample set includes the stratigraphically well-dated bulk carbonates and calcite fossils from several outcrops in Polish, Slovakian and Ukrainian parts of the PKB. Sample screening for the state of preservation was conducted using cathodoluminescence microscopy and optical emission spectrometry method. The aims of the project are: (i) to reconstruct the evolution of sea water temperatures using the oxygen isotope composition and Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of the belemnite rostra; (ii) to trace the secular changes in the carbonate carbon isotope composition in order to present temporal variations in δ13C values of Jurassic bulk carbonates and belemnite rostra; (iii) to compare the obtained δ13C curves with the previously reported records of the isotope composition of carbonate carbon. Preliminary results of the study show that: (i) a negative excursion of the bulk carbonate δ13C curve during the Toarcian may correspond to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event; (ii) high Middle Oxfordian δ13C values of bulk carbonate and calcite fossils correspond to the global positive isotope excursion in carbonate carbon; (iii) for Upper Jurassic belemnite δ18O values range from -0.8 to 0.4 ‰VPDB what implies temperatures of 13 ± 2°C.

  13. Re-calculating the pH record from boron isotopic composition of biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, G.; Gaillardet, J.; Louvat, P.

    2010-12-01

    The boron isotopic composition of marine carbonates (δ11Bcarb, ‰) has been proposed as a seawater paleo-acidity proxy (Hemming and Hanson, 1992; Vengosh et al., 1991). This proxy has been extensively used to reconstruct seawater paleo-pH and eventually atmospheric pCO2 during recent times or over short time-scales. However, it requires the knowledge of seawater δ11B value. Boron has a residence time of 10-20 My in seawater, longer than the mixing time of the ocean. The boron isotopic composition of seawater (δ11Bsw) is thus homogeneous in the modern ocean, yet it is not known in the past even though reconstruction and modeling have been attempted that rely on many hypotheses (Lemarchand et al., 2002; Pearson and Palmer, 2000). The boron isotopic composition of Cenozoic evaporites has been recently reconstructed using the direct record of Cenozoic evaporites (Paris et al., 2010). This reconstruction suggests that δ11Bsw has significantly changed along the last 40 Ma, in agreement with other parameters of the oceanic chemical composition. The δ11Bsw change amplitude appears to be stronger than suggested by models. In this presentation, we explore the consequences of this reconstruction on paleo-pH calculation for the late Cenozoic from published boron isotope record in biogenic carbonates (Pearson and Palmer, 2000; Pearson et al., 2009; Seki et al., 2010; Spivack et al., 1993). It points out the inconsistency between different dataset, due to the techniques used for boron isotopic measurement. In conclusion, we suggest that the seawater pH variations are not known with a sufficient precision over the last 35 My and that seawater surface pH could have likely remained constant. Hemming, N.G., and Hanson, G.N. (1992), Boron isotopic composition and concentration in modern marine carbonates: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, v. 56, p. 537-543. Lemarchand, D., et al. (2002), Boron isotope systematics in large rivers: implications for the marine boron budget and

  14. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  15. Skeletal and isotopic composition and paleoclimatic significance of late Pleistocene carbonates, Ross Sea, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Taviani, M. ); Reid, D.E.; Anderson, J.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Carbonates cover an extensive area of the northwestern Ross Sea continental shelf. Radiocarbon dates yield late Pleistocene (stage 3) ages for these deposits, hence the carbonates appear to be correlative with widespread tills and glacial marine deposits in the region. Four carbonate facies are recognized on the basis of skeletal composition: a barnacle/foraminifer facies, a muddy bryozoan facies, a bryozoan/barnacle/pelecypod/foraminifer facies, and a planktonic foraminiferal facies. These deposits occur on the shelf and upper slope, while carbonate turbidities derived from them occur on the adjacent continental slope and rise. Compositional analyses of Ross Sea carbonates lend support to previously recognized criteria for identifying cold water carbonates. These include: (1) the presence of an associated ice-rafted component (including dropstones); (2) a dominance of calcite relative to other carbonate minerals (the remaining fraction consists solely of aragonite); (3) allochems that are entirely skeletal; and (4) heavy oxygen isotopic compositions (in the range of +3.0 to +5.1% PDB).

  16. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of hopanoids in seep carbonates from the South China Sea continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Hongxiang; Sun, Yongge; Mao, Shengyi; Zhu, Xiaowei; Wu, Nengyou

    2014-10-01

    The lipid biomarkers of hopanoids in cold seep carbonates from the South China Sea continental slope were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-isotope ratio-mass spectrometer (GC-ir-MS). The distribution of hopanes/hopenes shows a preference for the ‘biological’ 17β(H), 21β(H)-over the ‘geological’ 17α(H), 21β(H)-configuration. This interpretation is in agreement with the strong odd-even preference of long-chain n-alkanes in those samples, suggesting that the ββ hopanes may be the early diagenetic products of biohopanoids and the αβ, βα configurations of hopanes were mainly derived from allochthonous sources contributing to the organic matter of the carbonates. In terms of hopanoid acids, the C30 to C33 17β(H), 21β(H)-hopanoid acids were detected with C32 17β(H), 21β(H)-hopanoid acid being the most abundant. However, there is a significant difference in stable carbon isotopic compostions of the C32 17β(H), 21β(H)-hopanoic acid among samples (-30.7‰ to -69.8‰). The δ13C values match well with the carbon isotopic compositions of SRB-derived iso-/anteiso-C15:0 fatty acids in the samples, which strongly depend on the carbon utilization types by microbe. The most abundant compound of hopanols detected in the samples, C30-17β(H), 21β(H)-hopanol, may be a good indicator of diagenetic product of type I methanotrophs. The molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of hopanoids demonstrate clearly that there is a combination contribution of both SRB and type I or type X methanotrophs to the source organism in the seep carbonates from the South China Sea continental slope.

  17. Recent planktic foraminifers in the Fram Strait (Arctic Ocean): carbon and oxygen stable isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pados, T.; Spielhagen, R. F.; Bauch, D.; Meyer, H.; Segl, M.

    2012-12-01

    In paleoceanographic reconstructions the carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of fossil foraminifers refer to, e.g., paleoproductivity and stratification, while oxygen isotopic (δ18O) records provide information about variations in sea surface temperatures and salinities in the past. However, for a correct interpretation of the fossil data it is important to improve our understanding of the correlation between recent oceanic variability and the composition of shells of living calcareous microorganisms. For this, the upper water column and sediment surface in the Fram Strait (Arctic Ocean, 78°50'N, 5°W-8°E) were sampled for planktic foraminifer species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sin.) and Turborotalita quinqueloba with a large-diameter multinet and a multicorer, respectively. The δ13C and δ18O values of the shells are compared to the stable isotope composition of the ambient water and to equilibrium calcite values to define the preferred calcification depths of the foraminifers and to determine the factors controlling the isotopic signature of these calcareous microorganisms. The study area was chosen because of its high oceanographic variability: in the eastern Fram Strait the northward flowing West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) carries Atlantic Water, with a thin mixed layer on top, while in the west the upper 200 m consists of cold, low-saline Arctic outflow waters of the East Greenland Current (EGC) and warmer, saline waters of Atlantic origin underneath. Despite this variable oceanographic regime along the studied transect, the stable carbon isotope ratios of the shells do not show major differences according to their horizontal but to their vertical distribution: the δ13C values of N. pachyderma (sin.) from plankton tow samples vary roughly between -1 and -0.1‰ depending on the water depth, while the δ18O values of the tests differ more between the stations.

  18. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    "Clumped-isotope" thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope "clumps"). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two

  19. Stable isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate in soils of Minusinsk Hollow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'chuk, Jessica; Krechetov, Pavel; Budantseva, Nadine; Chizhova, Julia; Vasil'chuk, Yurij

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the research is to characterize the isotopic composition of carbonate neoformations in soils and estimate its correlation with isotopic composition of water and parent material. The study site is located in the Minusinsk Hollow that is situated among Kuznetsk Alatau and Sayan Mountains. Three key-sites with in different parts of hollow, under mainly steppe vegetation with calciphilic grasses and diverse parent material were studied including: 1) Kazanovka Khakass state national reserve in foothills of Kuznetsk Alatau 2) Hankul salt lake that is considered as natural monument 3) region of Sayanogorsk aluminum smelter on a left bank of the Yenisei river. The samples of pedogenic and lithogenic carbonates as well as water samples were analyzed using the Delta-V mass spectrometer with a standard option of a gas bench according to standard methods. Carbonate coatings (also called pendants or cutans) is one of the most common types of carbonate neoformations occurring in the region. Fine coatings' layers one over another usually can be found on the bottom sides of rubble and gravel inside the soil profile colour varies from white to brownish and yellowish (probably depending on the impurities of organic matter). In Petric Calcisols, Chernozems and Kastanozems δ18O values of coatings vary in a rather small range from ‑ 8.9 to ‑ 10.1 ‰ PDB. This probably shows that their forming took place approximately in the same climatic conditions. While δ18O values of carbonate parent rocks are close to them and are vary from ‑ 11.1 to ‑ 11.9 ‰ PDB. Also, δ13C values of coatings strongly decrease from inner (older) to outer (younger) layers, that can indicate differences connected with the diffusion of organic material. River waters' δ18O values also show a small range from ‑ 16.62 to ‑ 17.66‰ SMOW, while salt lakes' waters due to the fractionation evaporation effects demonstrate much heavier values from ‑ 4.73 to ‑ 9.22‰ SMOW. The

  20. Stable isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate in soils of Minusinsk Hollow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'chuk, Jessica; Krechetov, Pavel; Budantseva, Nadine; Chizhova, Julia; Vasil'chuk, Yurij

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the research is to characterize the isotopic composition of carbonate neoformations in soils and estimate its correlation with isotopic composition of water and parent material. The study site is located in the Minusinsk Hollow that is situated among Kuznetsk Alatau and Sayan Mountains. Three key-sites with in different parts of hollow, under mainly steppe vegetation with calciphilic grasses and diverse parent material were studied including: 1) Kazanovka Khakass state national reserve in foothills of Kuznetsk Alatau 2) Hankul salt lake that is considered as natural monument 3) region of Sayanogorsk aluminum smelter on a left bank of the Yenisei river. The samples of pedogenic and lithogenic carbonates as well as water samples were analyzed using the Delta-V mass spectrometer with a standard option of a gas bench according to standard methods. Carbonate coatings (also called pendants or cutans) is one of the most common types of carbonate neoformations occurring in the region. Fine coatings' layers one over another usually can be found on the bottom sides of rubble and gravel inside the soil profile colour varies from white to brownish and yellowish (probably depending on the impurities of organic matter). In Petric Calcisols, Chernozems and Kastanozems δ18O values of coatings vary in a rather small range from - 8.9 to - 10.1 ‰ PDB. This probably shows that their forming took place approximately in the same climatic conditions. While δ18O values of carbonate parent rocks are close to them and are vary from - 11.1 to - 11.9 ‰ PDB. Also, δ13C values of coatings strongly decrease from inner (older) to outer (younger) layers, that can indicate differences connected with the diffusion of organic material. River waters' δ18O values also show a small range from - 16.62 to - 17.66‰ SMOW, while salt lakes' waters due to the fractionation evaporation effects demonstrate much heavier values from - 4.73 to - 9.22‰ SMOW. The groundwater shows δ18O

  1. Temporal Variability in Carbon Isotope Composition of Leaf-Respired Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, M. M.; Hanson, D. T.; Bickford, C. P.; McDowell, N. G.

    2005-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of leaf-respired CO2 (δ13CRl) has enormous potential to allow partitioning of ecosystem respiration into various components, to provide information on key physiological processes, and to trace carbon fluxes through plants and ecosystems. However, difficulties in measuring and understanding variation in δ13CRl have limited its application. We coupled an open gas exchange system (LI-6400, LiCor) to a tunable diode laser (TGA100A, Campbell Scientific) enabling measurement of leaf respiratory CO2 fluxes and δ13CRl every three minutes, with a precision of at least ±0.3 per mil. We also measured oxygen consumption rates, allowing calculation of the respiratory quotient ( RQ) and indicating likely respiratory substrates. Castor bean ( Ricinus communis) plants grown at high and low light were placed in the dark after different lengths of time exposed to sunlight and variation in δ13CRl measured to test the patterns in variation in δ13CRl predicted by existing biochemical models. CO2 respired by leaves previously exposed to high cumulative incident irradiance was up to 11 per mil more enriched than phloem sap sugars for the first 10 to 15 minutes after plants had been moved into the dark . This enrichment rapidly decreased, so that by 30 minutes in the dark δ13CRl was 5 per mil more enriched than phloem sap sugars. CO2 production rates were also initially very high and rapidly decreased. RQ for plants grown in high light varied between 0.8 and 1.2, indicating that carbohydrates and/or organic acids were the respiratory substrates. δ13CRl measured 30 to 80 minutes after plants had been moved into the dark increased with increasing δ13C of phloem sap sugars. The RQ values of plants grown at low light suggested that the respiratory substrates were fatty acids or amino acids ( RQ of around 0.6), or lipids ( RQ less than 0.4). δ13CRl values were enriched by either 4 per mil ( RQ = 0.3) or 12 per mil ( RQ = 0.5) compared to phloem

  2. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of alkyl porphyrins from the Triassic Serpiano oil shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicarelli, M. I.; Hayes, J. M.; Popp, B. N.; Eckardt, C. B.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of seven of the most abundant alkylporphyrins from the Serpiano oil shale (marine, Triassic) were determined. For the C31 and C32 butanoporphyrins, values of delta 13CPDB and delta 15NAIR averaged -24.0% and -3.1%. In contrast, the C31 and C32 methylpropanoporphyrins, DPEP, and a C30 13-nor etioporphyrin had delta 13C and delta 15N values averaging -27.5 and -3.3%, respectively. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic values for kerogen averaged -30.8 and -0.9, whereas those for total extract averaged -31.6, and -4.0%. The butanoporphyrins apparently derive from a biological source different from that giving rise to the other porphyrins, their 13C enrichment not being related to carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying diagenetic reactions. The delta 15N values for all the porphyrins indicate that the depletion of 15N observed in the kerogen is of primary origin. Consistent with the very high abundance of hopanoids and methyl hopanoids in the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction, it is suggested that cyanobacterial fixation of N2 may have been the main cause of 15N depletion.

  3. [Humus composition and stable carbon isotope natural abundance in paddy soil under long-term fertilization].

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Yang, Lin-Zhang; Ci, En; Wang, Yan; Yin, Shi-Xue; Shen, Ming-Xing

    2008-09-01

    Soil samples were collected from an experimental paddy field with long-term (26 years) fertilization in Taihu Lake region of Jiangsu Province to study the effects of different fertilization on the organic carbon distribution and stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in the soil profile, and on the humus composition. The results showed that long-term fertilization increased the organic carbon content in top soil significantly, and there was a significantly negative exponential correlation between soil organic carbon content and soil depth (P < 0.01). The organic carbon content in 10-30 cm soil layer under chemical fertilizations and in 20-40 cm soil layer under organic fertilizations was relatively stable. Soil delta 13C increased gradually with soil depth, its variation range being from -24% per thousand to -28 per thousand, and had a significantly negative linear correlation with soil organic carbon content (P < 0.05). In 0-20 cm soil layer, the delta 13C in treatments organic manure (M), M + NP, M + NPK, M + straw (R) + N, and R + N decreased significantly; while in 30-50 cm soil layer, the delta 13C in all organic fertilization treatments except R + N increased significantly. Tightly combined humus (humin) was the main humus composition in the soil, occupying 50% or more, and the rest were loosely and stably combined humus. Long-term fertilization increased the content of loosely combined humus and the ratio of humic acid (HA) to fulvic acid (FA).

  4. Environmental inputs that can influence carbon isotopic compositions of hot spring biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donatelli, J. L.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    The carbon isotopic compositions of hydrothermal biofilms are influenced by microbial carbon cycling, and can be correlated with the presence or absence of specific genes in environmental genomic analyses (Havig et al., 2011, JGR). Additional isotopic data on potential environmental sources of carbon will enable further tests of the specific pathways of carbon assimilation and cycling throughout hydrothermal ecosystems. Hot springs at Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are often located in open meadows or forested areas with varying amounts of vegetation and exposed soil surrounding the pools. These pools are open systems which have the potential to accumulate allochthonous materials via physical and biogenic processes. These inputs may affect the δ13C signatures of the hot spring waters and the biofilms associated with them. In the YNP hot springs we have studied since 2003, biofilms range in δ13C from -1.2 to -30.7%. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in coexisting fluids ranges from 4.3 to -3.9%. The heaviest biofilms typically show minimal isotopic fractionation from the DIC in coexisting fluids. DIC values are strongly influenced by inputs from magma degassing, water-rock reactions in the hydrothermal system, and the atmosphere. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) values for the coexisting fluids range from -16.5 to -26.8%, which are within the range of biofilm δ13C values. DOC values will also be affected by diverse processes as precipitation infiltrates, reacts, and eventually returns to the surface as hydrothermal fluids, but may also be influenced by biologically derived inputs from the local environments where hot springs occur. In an effort to characterize the environmental context of hot springs, we have collected isotopic data on lodgepole pine needles, grasses, soils, insects and bison feces. Of these, the δ13C data for bison feces (-27.7 to -29.6%) are lighter than any of the DOC data. Pine needles (-26.3 to -29.1%) and soils (-24.8 to -27.1%) overlap with

  5. Factors controlling the temporal variability of ecosystem respiration and its carbon isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbinder, J.; Griffis, T. J.; Baker, J. M.; Erickson, M.; Billmark, K.; Smith, J.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem respiration (FR ) is the major pathway for carbon loss from terrestrial ecosystems. Stable carbon isotope analyses have been used to improve our understanding of the processes controlling ecosystem respiration. In particular, 13CO2 has been used to partition the autotrophic (Fa) and heterotrophic (Fh) contributions to FR. Further, there has been some concern in the literature regarding the temporal variability of the isotopic composition of ecosystem respiration (δR) and its potential influence on ecosystem flux partitioning based on isotope methods. In this study, we used an automated chamber and tunable diode laser system to measure soil respiration (FRs) and its isotopic composition (δRs) in an agricultural ecosystem under a C3/C4 crop rotation. Further, we used the same chamber-TDL system in a climate controlled greenhouse facility with C3/C4 treatments to examine the main factors causing variability in δRs and δR. The chamber data revealed strong diurnal patterns in the isotopic composition of Fh in the agricultural soil plots before crop emergence and in the greenhouse experiments involving bare soils. The diurnal pattern consisted of a sharp enrichment of up to 6‰ from 0700 to 1200 hr followed by a gradual depletion throughout the afternoon and evening. The diurnal signals of FR and soil temperature closely resembled the diurnal signal of δh, but consistently lagged δh by 3 to 4 hours. During peak corn growth, diurnal variation in δRs was strongly influenced by the isotopic composition of root respiration (δas), which enriched nighttime δRs by as much as 7‰ and daytime δRs by as much as 3‰. Chamber and flux-gradient data also indicated considerable seasonal variation in δR during corn growing seasons, ranging from -25‰ at the time of planting to -11‰ during peak growth. Less variation in δR was observed during soybean seasons, with values ranging from -26 to -21‰. Major shifts in δR during corn seasons were consistently

  6. Interpreting bryophyte stable carbon isotope composition: Plants as temporal and spatial climate recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royles, Jessica; Horwath, Aline B.; Griffiths, Howard

    2014-04-01

    are unable to control tissue water content although physiological adaptations allow growth in a wide range of habitats. Carbon isotope signals in two mosses (Syntrichia ruralis and Chorisodontium aciphyllum) and two liverworts (Conocephalum conicum and Marchantia polymorpha), whether instantaneous (real time, Δ13C), or organic matter (as δ13COM), provide an assimilation-weighted summary of bryophyte environmental adaptations. In mosses, δ13COM is within the measured range of Δ13C values, which suggests that other proxies, such as compound-specific organic signals, will be representative of historical photosynthetic and growth conditions. The liverworts were photosynthetically active over a wider range of relative water contents (RWC) than the mosses. There was a consistent 5‰ offset between Δ13C values in C. conicum and M. polymorpha, suggestive of greater diffusion limitation in the latter. Analysis of a C. aciphyllum moss-peat core showed the isotopic composition over the past 200 years reflects recent anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Once corrected for source-CO2 inputs, the seasonally integrated Δ13COM between 1350 and 2000 A.D. varied by 1.5‰ compared with potential range of the 12‰ measured experimentally, demonstrating the relatively narrow range of conditions under which the majority of net assimilation takes place. Carbon isotope discrimination also varies spatially, with a 4‰ shift in epiphytic bryophyte organic matter found between lowland Amazonia and upper montane tropical cloud forest in the Peruvian Andes, associated with increased diffusion limitation.

  7. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  8. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth.

    PubMed

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth's interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ(13)C ≈ -5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼-40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ(13)C distributions to the observed low δ(13)C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe-C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe-Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in (13)C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe-C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ(13)C values. The sharp contrast in the δ(13)C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5-3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ(13)C values and that an average δ(13)C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼-5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ(13)C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion-differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth.

  9. Carbon-bearing iron phases and the carbon isotope composition of the deep Earth

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Juske; Polyakov, Veniamin B.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon budget and dynamics of the Earth’s interior, including the core, are currently very poorly understood. Diamond-bearing, mantle-derived rocks show a very well defined peak at δ13C ≈ −5 ± 3‰ with a very broad distribution to lower values (∼−40‰). The processes that have produced the wide δ13C distributions to the observed low δ13C values in the deep Earth have been extensively debated, but few viable models have been proposed. Here, we present a model for understanding carbon isotope distributions within the deep Earth, involving Fe−C phases (Fe carbides and C dissolved in Fe−Ni metal). Our theoretical calculations show that Fe and Si carbides can be significantly depleted in 13C relative to other C-bearing materials even at mantle temperatures. Thus, the redox freezing and melting cycles of lithosphere via subduction upwelling in the deep Earth that involve the Fe−C phases can readily produce diamond with the observed low δ13C values. The sharp contrast in the δ13C distributions of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds may reflect differences in their carbon cycles, controlled by the evolution of geodynamical processes around 2.5–3 Ga. Our model also predicts that the core contains C with low δ13C values and that an average δ13C value of the bulk Earth could be much lower than ∼−5‰, consistent with those of chondrites and other planetary body. The heterogeneous and depleted δ13C values of the deep Earth have implications, not only for its accretion−differentiation history but also for carbon isotope biosignatures for early life on the Earth. PMID:25512520

  10. Origin of particulate organic carbon in the marine atmosphere as indicated by it stable carbon isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Chesselet, R.; Fontugne, M.; Buat-Menard, P.; Ezat, U.; Lambert, C.E.

    1981-04-01

    Organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition were determined in samples of atmospheric particulate matter collected in 1979 at remote marine locations (Enewetak atoll, Sargasso Sea) during the SEAREX (Sea-Air Exchange) program field experiments. Atmospheric Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) concentrations were found to be in the range of 0.3 to 1.2 mg. m/sup -3/, in agreement with previous literature data. The major mass of POC was found on the smallest particles (r<0.5 mm). The /sup 13/C//sup 12/C of the small particles is close to the one expected (d/sup 13/C = 26 +- 2/sup 0///sub infinity/) for atmospheric POC of continental origin. For all the samples analysed so far, it appears that more than 80% of atmospheric POC over remote marine areas is of continental origin. This can be explained either by long-range transport of small sized continental organic aserosols or by the production of POC in the marine atmosphere from a vapor phase organic carbon pool of continental origin. The POC in the large size fraction of marine aerosols (<20% of the total concentration) is likely to have a direct marine origin since its carbon isotopic composition is close to the expected value (d/sup 13/C = -21 +- 2/sup 0///sub 00/) for POC associated with sea-salt droplets transported to the marine atmosphere.

  11. Selective recharge and isotopic composition of shallow groundwater within temperate, epigenic carbonate aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, Lee J.

    2013-05-01

    This paper considers the variation of δ18O and δ2H (VSMOW) in precipitation and shallow groundwater from carbonate aquifers that lend insight into the source and timing of recharge within temperate, epigenic karst. The shallow groundwater collected during 2010 and 2011 at Stream Cave (SC) and Natural Bridge Caverns (NBC) represent one input to and the primary output from the Redmond Creek karst aquifer in the Cumberland Plateau of southeast Kentucky, respectively. These data are compared with the isotopic composition of concurrent samples of precipitation from the same watershed that covers some 1900 ha. Values of δ18O and δ2H at SC and NBC are statistically similar and cluster at the midpoint of the local meteoric water line. These values remain surprisingly constant despite seasonal changes in temperature regimens and discharge. Samples in 2012 from regional springs that include Redmond Creek are more depleted in the heavier isotope and similarly stable despite coming from aquifers of a range of sizes and physical characteristics. Applying a Priestly-Taylor model for daily values of potential evapotranspiration, only 43% of the 1.10 m of precipitation in the 2010-2011 dataset remains as potential recharge, primarily during cooler months with lower solar insolation. Weighting δ18O and δ2H values of precipitation by potential recharge creates a better match with the isotopic composition of shallow groundwater than by weighting by precipitation amount. The isotopic composition and deuterium excess of precipitation samples are directly and inversely proportional to temperature, respectively. Deuterium excess in this study and displays intra- and inter-annual variation that ranges from a minimum of +11.1‰ to a maximum of +29.5‰ that demonstrate the higher-than-average deuterium excess in greater Appalachia and the shifting latitude of moisture sources, including a significant winter component of re-evaporated, continental moisture.

  12. Stable isotope composition of land snail body water and its relation to environmental waters and shell carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfriend, G.A.; Magaritz, M.; Gat, J.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Day-to-day and within-day (diel) variations in {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O of the body water of the land snail, Theba pisana, were studied at a site in the southern coastal plain of Israel. Three phases of variation, which relate to isotopic changes in atmospheric water vapor, were distinguished. The isotopic variations can be explained by isotopic equilibration with atmospheric water vapor and/or uptake of dew derived therefrom. During the winter, when the snails are active, there is only very minor enrichment in {sup 18}O relative to equilibrium with water vapor or dew, apparently as a result of metabolic activity. But this enrichment becomes pronounced after long periods of inactivity. Within-day variation in body water isotopic composition is minor on non-rain days. Shell carbonate is enriched in {sup 18}O by ca. 1-2% relative to equilibrium with body water. In most regions, the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor (or dew) is a direct function of that of rain. Because the isotopic composition of snail body water is related to that of atmospheric water vapor and the isotopic composition of shell carbonate in turn is related to that of body water, land snail shell carbonate {sup 18}O should provide a reliable indication of rainfall {sup 18}O. However, local environmental conditions and the ecological properties of the snail species must be taken into account.

  13. Effects of Land Use on Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition and Concentration of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) in Southeastern US Piedmont Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon isotopic composition (delta 13C) and concentrations of DOC and DIC were measured in stream water samples collected monthly in 15 headwater streams from an area with extensive poultry and cattle production and a rapidly growing human population. Linear regression te...

  14. Unsaturated zone carbon dioxide flux, mixing, and isotopic composition at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, C. H.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.; Haase, K.; Moreo, M. T.; Walvoord, M. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of tritium, radiocarbon, and volatile organic compounds at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site, adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, have stimulated research on factors affecting transport of these contaminants. This research includes an examination of unsaturated zone carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, mixing, and isotopic composition, which can help in understanding these factors. In late April 2015 we collected 76 soil-gas samples in multi-layer foil bags from existing 1.5-m deep tubes, both inside and outside the low-level waste area, as well as from two 110-m-deep multilevel gas-sampling boreholes and a distant background site. These samples were analyzed for carbon dioxide concentration and isotopic composition by direct injection into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. Graphical analysis of results indicates mixing of CO2 characteristic of the root zone (δ13C -18 ‰ VPDB), deep soil gas of the capillary fringe (-20‰), and CO2 produced by microbial respiration of organic matter disposed in the waste area trenches (-28‰). Land-surface boundary conditions are being constrained by the application of a novel non-dispersive infrared sensor and traditional concentration and flux measurements, including discrete CO2 flux data using a gas chamber method to complement continuous data from surface- and tower-based CO2 sensors. These results shed light on radionuclide and VOC mobilization and transport mechanisms from this and similar waste disposal facilities.

  15. The carbon-isotopic composition of Proterozoic carbonates: Riphean successions from northwestern Siberia (Anabar Massif, Turukhansk Uplift)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.; Kaufman, A. J.; Semikhatov, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Thick carbonate-dominated successions in northwestern Siberia document secular variations in the C-isotopic composition of seawater through Mesoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic (Early to early Late Riphean) time. Mesoproterozoic dolomites of the Billyakh Group, Anabar Massif, have delta 13C values that fall between 0 and -1.9 permil versus PDB, with values in the upper part of the succession (Yusmastakh Formation) consistently higher than those of the lower (Ust'-Il'ya and Kotuikan formations). Consistent with available biostratigraphic and radiometric data, delta 13C values for Billyakh carbonates compare closely with those characterizing early Mesoproterozoic carbonates (about 1600-1200 Ma) worldwide. In contrast, late Mesoproterozoic to early Neoproterozoic limestones and dolomites in the Turukhansk Uplift exhibit moderate levels of secular variation. Only the lowermost carbonates in the Turukhansk succession (Linok Formation) have delta 13C values that approximate Billyakh values. Higher in the Turukhansk succession, delta 13C values vary from -2.7 to +4.6 permil (with outliers as low as -5.0 permil interpreted as diagentically altered). Again, consistent with paleontological and radiometric data, these values compare well with isotopic values from 1200 to 850 Ma successions elsewhere. Five sections measured in different parts of the Turukhansk basin show nearly identical patterns of variation, confirming that carbonate delta 13C correlates primarily with time and not facies. The Siberian sections illustrate the potential of integrated biostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic data in the intra- and interbasinal correlation of Mesoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic rocks.

  16. Carbon isotopes and lignin composition of POC in a small river in Bekanbeushi Moor, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Seiya; Aramaki, Takafumi; Seki, Osamu; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    Carbon isotope and lignin phenol compositions were investigated to assess particulate organic carbon (POC) in a small river from the Bekanbeushi Moor in the eastern part of Hokkaido, Japan. Suspended solids were collected 5 times at a fixed station during July 2004-April 2008. The δ 13C values of the riverine POC are almost constant: -29.1‰ to -28.7‰. In contrast, the POC shows wide variations in Δ 14C values from -103‰ during the snowmelt event to +9 ± 16‰ during summer and winter. The cinnamyl over vanillyl phenol ( C/ V) ratios indicate a predominance of nonwoody materials and no seasonal variation, suggesting that the wetland river transports older POC from the riverbank during the spring snowmelt. The river also transports newly produced and stored soil organic matter as riverine POC from the low moor in times of low flow conditions.

  17. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of the Gulf of Mexico deep-water masses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, J. G.; Herguera, J. C.; Ferreira-Bartrina, V.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides new data for the establishment of a carbon biogeochemical dynamics baseline in the deep Gulf of Mexico (GM) based on carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon. Water samples from 40 deep-water stations south of 25˚N were collected during XIXIMI-2 cruise, July 2011, aboard BO/Justo Sierra. Vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were further measured in each station. In the Stable Isotopes Laboratory at CICESE we determined the carbon isotopic composition of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CDIC). Remarkably, density, DO and δ13CCID profiles showed a clear difference between the Loop current and the deep-waters of the GM south of 25˚N. We found the following average δ13CCID values in the Loop current and in the deep-waters of the Gulf: subtropical underwater (SUW): 0.73±0.06‰ and 0.86±0.04‰; 18 degree water (18W): 0.76 ± 0.08‰ and 0.58± 0.06‰; North Atlantic central water (NACW): 0.77 ± 0.05‰ and 0.71 ± 0.09‰; South Atlantic central water (SACW): 0.80 ± 0.08‰ and 0.77 ± 0.07‰; Antartic intermediate water (AAIW): 1.00 ± 0.06‰ and 0.90 ± 0.08‰; North Atlantic deep water (NADW): 1.03 ± 0.06‰ and 1.01 ± 0.10‰. We will discuss how the biological component, δ13CCID-BIO, of subsurface water masses match very closely the apparent oxygen utilization relation described by Kroopnick, 1985, with the exception of SUW, and as a consequence the 18W is probably the water mass most affected by organic carbon remineralization processes in the GM south of 25˚N. We further show how these waters seem to store a larger proportion of anthropogenic carbon than the deeper water masses.

  19. Unusual carbon isotope compositions of biomarker hydrocarbons in a Permian tasmanite

    SciTech Connect

    Simoneit, B.R.T. ); Schoell, M.; Dias, R.F. ); De Aquino Neto, F.R. )

    1993-09-01

    The Permian oil shale sample of this study is from a deposit in Tasmania in which the only recognizable structures are large, thick-walled, unicellular specimens of the green algae Tasmanites. The fossils are so densely packed that this shale is termed tasmanite. The carbon isotopic composition of bulk kerogen carbon ([sigma]C[sup 13]C[sub org] = [minus]16.6[per thousand], vs. PDB) is unusually enriched in [sup 13]C compared to marine Permian organic carbon ([minus]25 to [minus]30[per thousand]). This [sup 13]C enrichment suggests specific environmental conditions (CO[sub 2] draw down) and/or physiological specialties (cell size and growth rate) of Tasmanites which, in modern environments, are known to cause [sup 13]C enrichment in marine phytoplankton. Isotope signatures of extractable organic species, unlike in normal immature oil shales, are considerably enriched in [sup 13]C compared to the kerogen. The isotopic similarity of all the cyclic terpanes in the sample, together with their occurrence in the free lipids and kerogen, suggests that they have a common origin and are biosynthesis products of the marine unicellular green algae Tasmanites. The tetracyclic terpanes, therefore, are not des-A-oleananes derived from land plants but are possibly monoaromatic des-A-gammaceranes or other des-A-triterpenoids derived from marine sources. The unusual enrichment in [sup 13]C in the cyclic hydrocarbons is hypothesized to result from the special growth conditions of the algae. Isoprenoids and n-alkanes are also likely biosynthesis products of Tasmanites, possibly during the spore formation stage when physiological and environmental conditions were different than during planktonic biosynthesis.

  20. Pyrogenic carbon from tropical savanna burning: production and stable isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, G.; Wynn, J. G.; Wurster, C. M.; Goodrick, I.; Nelson, P. N.; Bird, M. I.

    2014-10-01

    Widespread burning of mixed tree-grass ecosystems represents the major natural locus of pyrogenic carbon (PyC) production. PyC is a significant, pervasive, and yet poorly understood "slow-cycling" form of carbon present in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, soils and sediments. We conducted sixteen experimental burns on a rainfall transect in northern Australian savannas with C4 grasses ranging from 35 to 99% of total biomass. Residues from each fire were partitioned into PyC and further into recalcitrant (HyPyC) components, with each of these also partitioned into proximal (> 125 μm) and distal (< 125 μm) fluxes. The median [range] PyC production across all burns was 16.0 [11.5]% of total carbon exposed (TCE), with HyPyC accounting for 2.5 [4.9]% of TCE. Both PyC and HyPyC were dominantly partitioned into the proximal flux, likely to remain (initially) close to the site of production. Production of HyPyC was strongly related to fire residence time, with shorter duration fires resulting in higher HyPyC yields. The carbon isotope (δ13C) compositions of PyC and HyPyC were generally lower by 1-3‰ relative to the original biomass, with marked depletion up to 7 ‰ for grasslands dominated by C4 biomass. δ13C values of CO2 produced by combustion was computed by mass balance and ranged from ~0.4 to 1.3‰. The depletion of 13C in PyC and HyPyC relative to the original biomass has significant implications for the interpretation of δ13C values of savanna soil organic carbon and of ancient PyC preserved in the geologic record, and for global 13C isotopic disequilibria calculations.

  1. Pyrogenic carbon from tropical savanna burning: production and stable isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, G.; Wynn, J. G.; Wurster, C. M.; Goodrick, I.; Nelson, P. N.; Bird, M. I.

    2015-03-01

    Widespread burning of mixed tree-grass ecosystems represents the major natural locus of pyrogenic carbon (PyC) production. PyC is a significant, pervasive and yet poorly understood "slow-cycling" form of carbon present in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, soils and sediments. We conducted 16 experimental burns on a rainfall transect through northern Australian savannas with C4 grasses ranging from 35 to 99% of total biomass. Residues from each fire were partitioned into PyC and further into recalcitrant (HyPyC) components, with each of these fluxes also partitioned into proximal components (>125 μm), likely to remain close to the site of burning, and distal components (<125 μm), likely to be transported from the site of burning. The median (range) PyC production across all burns was 16.0 (11.5) % of total carbon exposed (TCE), with HyPyC accounting for 2.5 (4.9) % of TCE. Both PyC and HyPyC were dominantly partitioned into the proximal flux. Production of HyPyC was strongly related to fire residence time, with shorter duration fires resulting in higher HyPyC yields. The carbon isotope (δ13C) compositions of PyC and HyPyC were generally lower by 1-3‰ relative to the original biomass, with marked depletion up to 7‰ for grasslands dominated by C4 biomass. δ13C values of CO2 produced by combustion were computed by mass balance and ranged from ~0.4 to 1.3‰. The depletion of 13C in PyC and HyPyC relative to the original biomass has significant implications for the interpretation of δ13C values of savanna soil organic carbon and of ancient PyC preserved in the geologic record, as well as for global 13C isotopic disequilibria calculations.

  2. The carbon isotopic composition of catalytic gas: A comparative analysis with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.; Elrod, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Tee idea that natural gas is the thermal product of organic decomposition has persisted for over half a century. Crude oil is thought to be an important source of gas, cracking to wet gas above 150 C, and dry gas above 200 C. But there is little evidence to support this view. For example, crude oil is proving to be more stable than previously thought and projected to remain intact over geologic time at typical reservoir temperature. Moreover, when oil does crack, the products do not resemble natural gas. Oil to gas could be catalytic, however, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sediments. This would explain the low temperatures at which natural gas forms, and the high amounts of methane. This idea gained support recently when the natural progression of oil to dry gas was duplicated in the laboratory catalytically. The authors report here the isotopic composition of catalytic gas generated from crude oil and pure hydrocarbons between 150 and 200 C. {delta}{sup 13}C for C{sub 1} through C{sub 5} was linear with 1/n (n = carbon number) in accordance with theory and typically seen in natural gases. Over extended reaction, isobutane and isopentane remained lighter than their respective normal isomers and the isotopic differentials were constant as all isomers became heavier over time. Catalytic methane, initially {minus}51.87{per_thousand} (oil = {minus}22.5{per_thousand}), progressed to a final composition of {minus}26.94{per_thousand}, similar to the maturity trend seen in natural gases: {minus}50{per_thousand} to {minus}20{per_thousand}. Catalytic gas is thus identical to natural gas in molecular and isotopic composition adding further support to the view that catalysis by transition metals may be a significant source of natural gas.

  3. [Investigations on Sulfur and Carbon Isotopic Compositions of Potential Polluted Sources in Atmospheric PM₂.₅ in Nanjing Region].

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Guo, Zhao-bing; Jiang, Wen-juan; Rui, Mao-ling; Zeng, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Potential pollution sources of atmospheric PM₂.₅ in Nanjing region were collected, and sulfur and carbon isotopic compositions were determined by EA-IRMS synchronously. The results showed that δ³⁴S and δ¹³C values ranged from 1.8‰-3.7‰ and -25.50‰- -23.57‰ in coal soot particles; 4.6‰-9.7‰ and -26.32‰- -23.57‰ in vehicle exhaust; 5.2‰-9.9‰ and -19.30‰- -30.42‰ in straw soot particles, respectively. Besides, the δ¹³C value of dust was -13.45‰. It can be observed that sulfur isotopic compositions in coal soot were lower, while the carbon isotopic composition in dust was higher. Comparing with δ³⁴S and δ¹³C values in domestic and foreign polluted sources, we found that sulfur and carbon isotopes in atmospheric PM₂.₅ in Nanjing region presented an obvious regional characteristics. Therefore, the source spectrum of sulfur and carbon isotopic compositions in Nanjing region might provide an insight into source apportionment of atmospheric PM₂.₅. PMID:27078936

  4. [Investigations on Sulfur and Carbon Isotopic Compositions of Potential Polluted Sources in Atmospheric PM₂.₅ in Nanjing Region].

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Guo, Zhao-bing; Jiang, Wen-juan; Rui, Mao-ling; Zeng, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Potential pollution sources of atmospheric PM₂.₅ in Nanjing region were collected, and sulfur and carbon isotopic compositions were determined by EA-IRMS synchronously. The results showed that δ³⁴S and δ¹³C values ranged from 1.8‰-3.7‰ and -25.50‰- -23.57‰ in coal soot particles; 4.6‰-9.7‰ and -26.32‰- -23.57‰ in vehicle exhaust; 5.2‰-9.9‰ and -19.30‰- -30.42‰ in straw soot particles, respectively. Besides, the δ¹³C value of dust was -13.45‰. It can be observed that sulfur isotopic compositions in coal soot were lower, while the carbon isotopic composition in dust was higher. Comparing with δ³⁴S and δ¹³C values in domestic and foreign polluted sources, we found that sulfur and carbon isotopes in atmospheric PM₂.₅ in Nanjing region presented an obvious regional characteristics. Therefore, the source spectrum of sulfur and carbon isotopic compositions in Nanjing region might provide an insight into source apportionment of atmospheric PM₂.₅.

  5. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic acids in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-10-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual organic acids were determined in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou. The δ 13C values of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 20-C 28) varied from -34.1‰ to -32.4‰ and tended to be heavier in summer and lighter in winter. These δ 13C values indicate that high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids were derived mainly from emission by C 3 plants. Reduced biological synthesis of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids in winter may be the reason for the light carbon isotopic composition. The δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 10-C 18) changed from -31.7‰ to -30.3‰ and exhibited a reverse seasonal trend, i.e., heavier in winter and lighter in summer. Slightly heavier δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids than those of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids suggested that they may be emitted from blended sources, e.g., anthropogenic sources and vegetation waxes. Lighter δ 13C values in summer may be attributed to relatively low anthropogenic sources and high botanic sources in summer. Dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids have been proposed as secondary products from photochemical degradation. The average δ 13C values of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids were heavier, and ranged from -25.2‰ to -22.9‰ and from -30.0‰ to -27.6‰, respectively. Both dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids displayed the same temporal variations in the δ 13C values, i.e., negative δ 13C in the summer samples and positive in the winter samples, which may be controlled by photochemical reactions; they are generally severe in winter in Guangzhou under the monsoon weather system. The heaviest δ 13C values were observed in dicarboxylic acids, indicating that dicarboxylic acids were formed by fast and more complete oxidation reactions. These results indicate that the stable carbon isotopic composition of organic acids may provide important information about sources and

  6. Factors controlling carbon isotopic composition of land snail shells estimated from lab culturing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Naizhong; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of land snail shell carbonate is widely applied in reconstructing the C3/C4 vegetation distribution of paleo-environment, which is considered to reflect variations of some environmental parameters [1][2][3]. Land snail shell carbon has three potential sources: diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested carbonate (limestone) [4]. However, their relative contributions to shell carbonate have not been understood well yet [4][5][6][7][8]. More researches are necessary before we could apply this tool in paleo-environment reconstruction, especially inter-lab culturing experiment. A kind of land snail species, Acusta despecta sieboldiana, was collected at Yokohama, Japan and cultured under suitable environment to lay eggs. The second generations were growing up from eggs to adults around 6-12 months at the temperature of 20°, 25° and 30°, respectively. All of the snails at 25° and 30° and most of those at 20° were fed by cabbage (C3 plant) during their life span while others were fed by corn (C4 plant). To investigate the effect of ingested carbonate, some of them were fed by Ca3(PO4)2 powder while others were fed by CaCO3 powder. δ13C of shells were analyzed by an Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (Thermo Finnigan MAT 253); δ13C of food and snail tissue were measured by a Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (Picarro G1121-i). At the same time, δ13C of eggshell and new born snails were analyzed by a Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GasBench II). We confirmed that diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested limestone could be important sources controlling shell δ13C values. And the temperature could affect shell carbonate δ13C values, too. A simple but credible frame was raised to discuss the mechanism of how each possible source and environmental parameter could affect shell carbonate δ13C values based on previous works [4][6][8] and this study. According to this frame and some reasonable assumptions, we have estimated the

  7. Bulk carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen stable isotope composition of recent resins from amber-producing Hymenaea.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, Arie; Yakir, Dan; Langenheim, Jean H

    2005-01-01

    Resins of Hymenaea, an angiosperm tree genus known to be a copious resin producer and a major source of amber since the Oligo-Miocene, were collected from a wide range of tropical environments from Latin America and Africa, and analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen stable isotope composition. The average value for delta13C in the resins was found to be -27.0+/-1.3 per thousand, which is very similar to the values reported for resins in other studies. Delta18O values for the Hymenaea resins averaged +11.2+/-1.6 per thousand, or about 20 per thousand more depleted than normal plant cellulose. DeltaD values of the resins ranged from -196 to -319 per thousand, with an average of -243+/-30 per thousand. Rough estimates suggest a fractionation of -200 to -210 per thousand between the resins and the environmental water. This value is similar to the -200 per thousand value observed for the fractionation between other plant lipids and environmental water. The present study suggests that the stable isotope composition of fossil resins (amber) has the potential to provide information on ancient environmental waters.

  8. Constraints on Phanerozoic paleotemperature and seawater oxygen isotope evolution from the carbonate clumped isotope compositions of Late Paleozoic marine fossils (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, G. A.; Passey, B. H.; Grossman, E. L.; Pérez-Huerta, A.; Shenton, B.; Yancey, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    A long-standing geoscience controversy has been the interpretation of the observed several per mil increase in the oxygen isotope compositions of marine calcites over the Phanerozoic Eon. Explanations for this trend have included decreasing seawater paleotemperatures, increasing seawater oxygen isotope values, and post-depositional calcite alteration. Carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometry is a useful geochemical tool to test these hypotheses because of its lack of dependence on the bulk isotopic composition of the water from which carbonate precipitated. This technique is increasingly applied to ancient marine invertebrate shells, which can be screened for diagenesis using chemical and microstructural approaches. After several years of clumped isotope analysis of these marine carbonates in a handful of laboratories, a long-term temperature and isotopic trend is emerging, with the results pointing to relatively invariant seawater δ18O and generally decreasing seawater temperatures through the Phanerozoic. Uncertainties remain, however, including the effects of reordering of primary clumped isotope compositions via solid-state diffusion of C and O through the mineral lattice at elevated burial temperatures over hundred million year timescales. To develop a quantitative understanding of such reordering, we present data from laboratory heating experiments of late Paleozoic brachiopod calcite. When combined with kinetic models of the reordering reaction, the results of these experiments suggest that burial temperatures less than ~120 °C allow for preservation of primary brachiopod clumped isotope compositions over geological timescales. Analyses of well-preserved Carboniferous and Permian brachiopods reinforce these results by showing that shells with apparent clumped isotope temperatures of ~150 °C are associated with deep sedimentary burial (>5 km), whereas those with putatively primary paleotemperatures in the 10-30 °C range experienced no more than ~1.5 km

  9. The concentration and isotopic composition of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robert, F.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Stepwise pyrolysis was used to extract H2, N2 and C from powdered meteorites and from meteorite residues resulting from partial dissolution in aqueous HF or from reaction with HF-HCl solutions. Concentrations and isotopic compositions were determined for the cases of the carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil, Murray, Murchison, Renazzo and Cold Bokkeveld. Acidification of the meteorites removed the organic sources of H2, so that H2 in the HF-HCl acid residues came mostly from the insoluble organic matter making up 70-80% of the total carbon in carbonaceous meteorites. Good correlation is found between delta-D and the concentration of H2 in the acid residues, but no correlation exists between the delta-D, delta-C-13 and delta-N-15 in them. A model is proposed for both the high delta-D values and the relationship between those values and the H2 concentration.

  10. Temporal variations in the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane emitted from Minnesota peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Cheryl A.; Dise, Nancy B.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1992-09-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition of methane (δ13C) emitted from two peatland sites in the Marcell Experimental Forest in northern Minnesota was investigated during the snow-free season of 1989-1990. A seasonal range in δ13C values of 13‰ was seen for a forested bog with heavier (13C enriched) methane emitted during the wanner summer months. This shift was correlated with water table level suggesting control by microbial oxidation. Methane from a nearby poor fen transitional to bog dominated by Carex oligosperma showed a similar temporal trend but with a much smaller range of 5‰ during the same time period and with no water table level correlation. The methane emitted from the fen was consistently heavier than that emitted by the bog.

  11. The effects of early diagenesis on the chemical and stable carbon isotopic composition of wood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of modern and ancient buried wood show that there is a linear correlation between carbohydrate content and the stable carbon isotope composition as carbohydrates are preferentially degraded during early diagenesis. As the carbohydrate content decreases, the ??13C value of the degraded wood decreases 1 to 2 per mil, approaching the value of the residual lignin. These results indicate that carbohydrate degradation products are lost and not incorporated into the aromatic structure as lignin is selectively preserved during early diagenesis of wood. These results also indicate that attempts to quantify terrestrial inputs to modern sedimentary organic matter based on ??13C values should consider the possibility of a 1 to 2 per mil decrease in the ??13C value of degraded wood. ?? 1987.

  12. Carbon Isotope Composition of Caribbean Sea Surface Waters: Response to the Uptake of Anthropogenic CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, D. E.; Thunell, R.; Wejnert, K. E.; Astor, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The burning of fossil fuels and deforestation have significantly increased atmospheric CO2 levels, from ~280 ppm prior to the industrial revolution to the present value of ~390 ppm. Suess (1955) was the first to show that the carbon isotopic composition of the atmosphere is changing in response to the anthropogenic input of radiocarbon-dead, 13C depleted CO2 from fossil fuel combustion. While biological processes may be the primary mechanism controlling the δ13C of marine carbon, air-sea gas exchange should allow for the transfer of the so-called 13C Suess effect (Keeling, 1979) from the atmosphere to the surface ocean. The first measurements of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon of ocean surface waters were made in 1970 (Kroopnick, 1974) and serve as a baseline for assessing how the carbon isotopic composition of the oceans have changed in response to the invasion of fossil fuel CO2 over the last 40 years. However, in order to gain a longer and more complete picture of the marine δ13C Suess effect, we must rely on indirect measures of changes in surface water δ13C, most notably those preserved in carbonate secreting marine organisms. The Cariaco Basin is one of the rare locations where one can directly compare sediment records with modern instrumental data. Here we report a high resolution planktonic foraminiferal δ13C record from the basin for the last 300 years that clearly resolves the timing and magnitude of the marine 13C Suess effect associated with the oceanic uptake of anthropogenically derived CO2. Cariaco Basin sediment trap and upper-most box core sediment δ13C match both the trend and magnitude of observed δ13C changes in atmospheric CO2 over the last 15 years. The longer sediment record suggests the marine Suess effect to be -0.75 % from pre-industrial values, with most of the change occurring since 1950, coincident with the rapid rise in atmospheric CO2 noted in ice core and instrumental data. If the current anthropogenic CO2 emission

  13. Correction of ground-water chemistry and carbon isotopic composition for effects of CO2 outgassing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, F.J.; Fisher, D.W.; Plummer, L.N.

    1978-01-01

    Direct Pco2 measurements on water samples from several CO2-charged warm springs are significantly higher than Pco2 values calculated from field pH and alkalinity (and other constituents). In addition, calcite saturation indices calculated from field pH and solution composition indicated supersaturation in samples which, on the basis of hydrogeologic concepts, should be near saturation or undersaturated. We attribute these discrepancies to uncertainties in field pH, resulting from CO2 outgassing during pH measurement. Because samples for direct Pco2 measurement can be taken with minimal disturbance to the water chemistry, we have used the measured Pco2 to back calculate an estimate of the field pH and the carbon isotopic composition of the water before outgassing. By reconstructing water chemistry in this way, we find generally consistent grouping of ??13C, pH, and degree of calcite saturation in samples taken from the same source at different times, an observation which we expect based on our understanding of the hydrogeology and geochemistry of the ground-water systems. This suggests that for very careful geochemical work, particularly on ground-waters much above ambient temperature, Pco2 measurements may provide more information on the system and a better estimate of its state of saturation with respect to carbonate minerals than can field measurements of pH. ?? 1978.

  14. Precise determination of U isotopic compositions in low concentration carbonate samples by MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruo-Mei; You, Chen-Feng

    2013-03-30

    We developed a fast and simple analytical procedure for precise determination of U isotopic compositions in low concentration natural samples. The main advantage of the new method is that it requires only 12ng U and can obtain all U isotopic ratios without using spike. Five carbonate reference materials (JCp-1, RKM-4, RKM-5, GBW04412 and GBW04413) and 3 international standards with different matrices (IAPSO, IRMM-3184 and CRM-U010) were analyzed for ((234)U/(238)U) and (238)U/(235)U ratios by MC-ICPMS. Using our method, the results for these standards are in close agreement with the certified values, 1.144 ± 0.004, 0.966 ± 0.004 and 0.990 ± 0.003 for ((234)U/(238)U) and 137.72 ± 0.13, 137.64 ± 0.15 and 98.63 ± 0.04 for (238)U/(235)U, in IAPSO, IRMM-3184 and CRM-U010, respectively. The long-term reproducibility of ((234)U/(238)U) and (238)U/(235)U is 0.970 ± 0.002 and 137.56 ± 0.09; 1.144 ± 0.004 and 137.72 ± 0.13, respectively, for in-house U solution and IAPSO. The new ((234)U/(238)U) results for carbonates show much better precision than previous studies and also reflect their age variability. The obtained (238)U/(235)U ratios, representing the first measurements in these carbonate specimens, are rather constant. The method described here requires only 12 ng of U for analysis and can be completed in 5.2 min. The approach provides a fast method to measure ((234)U/(238)U) and (238)U/(235)U ratios in sample matrices commonly encountered in studies of chemical weathering, oceanography and paleoclimatology. PMID:23598194

  15. The Hydrological Cycle on Mars as Inferred from the Multi O-isotopic Composition of Carbonates in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Niles, P. B.; Chong, K.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate minerals provide valuable record of the atmosphere in which they are formed. This work utilizes C and O triple isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals found in ALH84001 to explore the interaction between atmosphere-hydrosphere and lithosphere. The origin of carbonates found in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 (<1%) is heavily debated with low temperature aqueous precipitation, biogenic production, evaporative processes, high temperature reactions, and impact induced melting and reprecipitation are all candidate processes. These carbonates are heterogeneous chemically (Mg, Ca and Fe-Mn rich) and isotopically (δ13CPDB = +27 to 46 %; δ18OVSMOW = +9.5 to 20.6%) on micrometer scales. Our stepped phosphoric acid dissolution experiments released CO2 from multiple phases of Martian carbonate in the rock (12h acid digestion at 25o C for Ca rich phase and 3h acid digestion at 150oC for Mg rich phase). Both Ca and Mg rich phases showed 0.7% excess 17O (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52δ18O) in contrast to terrestrial carbonate minerals formed by surficial weathering of the meteorite with no oxygen isotopic anomaly Δ17O ≈ 0 (one hour acid digestion at 25o C). The newly identified Ca-rich carbonate phase is 18O enriched (δ18O = +25%) in contrast to all of the other Ca-rich carbonates previously described. It also contains excess 17O (Δ17O = 0.7%) indicating incorporation of oxygen from an atmospheric source of Martian origin. These oxygen isotope characteristics differentiate this phase from the more commonly described carbonate globules or rosettes and suggest formation from separate aqueous event. This is confirmed by the carbon isotope composition of this new carbonate phase (δ13C= +20%) which differs from the other Martian carbonates in the meteorite and from terrestrial sources. This difference may be an evidence of the long term evolution of carbon isotopes in the atmosphere of Mars. The discovery of highly enriched (O isotopes) Ca-rich phase of Martian

  16. [Isotope compositions of elemental carbon in the smoke and ash from crop straw combustion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Li, Jiu-Hai; Xu, Hui; Wu, Dan; Liu, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Six genotypes of straws for rice, maize and wheat, respectively, were combusted under flaming and smoldering conditions, and the isotope compositions for elemental carbon ( EC) in the straw smoke and ash were investigated with an isotopic mass spectrometer. The results showed that the mean delta 13C values for EC in the flaming and smoldering smoke of rice straw were - 28. 3 per thousand and - 28.7 per thousand, with depletions of 2.7 per thousand and 3. 0 per thousand relative to that of total carbon (TC) in the straw, respectively. The mean delta 13C values for EC in the flaming and smoldering smoke of wheat straw were -28.5 per thousand and - 28. 0 per thousand, with a depletion of 0. 1 per thousand and enrichment of 0. 4 per thousand comparing to TC in the straw, respectively. The average values in two types of maize straw smoke were -17.2 per thousand and - 13. 6 per thousand,with a depletion of 3.4 per thousand and an enrichment of 0. 2 per thousand relative to TC in the straw, respectively. The mean delta 13C ratios for EC in the flaming and smoldering ash of rice straw were -27. 5 per thousand and -27. 3 per thousand, with depletions of 1.8 per thousand and 1. 6 per thousand comparing with TC in the straw, respectively. In the flaming and smoldering ash of wheat straw, the mean ratios were -27.4 per thousand and -26.0 per thousand, with enrichments of 0. 9 per thousand and 2. 4 per thousand relative to TC in the straw, respectively. In the two types of ash for maize straw, the average delta13 C values for EC were - 15. 0 per thousand and - 14. 8 per thousand,which were 1. 2 per thousand and 1.0 per thousand lighter than those of the straw TC. In general, evident isotope fractionations occur between EC in both smoke and ash and TC in the corresponding straws, especially for rice and maize straws. The isotopic ratios may be useful in identifying and estimating the contribution of EC from straw combustion to ambient aerosol.

  17. Isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen of suprabenthic fauna in the NW Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurell, T.; Fanelli, E.; Cartes, J. E.

    Stable isotope (δ 13C and δ 15N) analyses were performed on suprabenthic fauna collected in the western Mediterranean (NW Balearic Islands), at depths ranging between 350 and 780 m. Samples were collected seasonally at bi-monthly intervals during six cruises performed between August 2003 and June 2004, using a Macer-GIROQ suprabenthic sledge (0.5 mm mesh size). Twenty-four separate species (5 mysids, 12 amphipods, 2 cumaceans, 2 isopods, 1 euphausiid, 1 decapod and 1 fish) and bulk copepods were analyzed on a seasonal basis for stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ 15N) ranged from 2.3‰ (the amphipod Lepechinella manco in September 2003) to 13.0‰ (the amphipod Rhachotropis caeca in August 2003). δ 13C values ranged from - 24.2 (the cumacean Campylaspis sulcata in June 2004) to - 16.1 (the amphipod Bruzelia typica in November 2006). Both δ 13C and δ 15N values suggest that there are three trophic levels within the suprabenthic community. However, considering the bathymetric range of the species, the results suggest that the deepest assemblage supported only two trophic levels. The stable isotope ratios of suprabenthic fauna displayed a continuum of values and confirmed a wide spectrum of feeding types (from filter-feeders to predators). In general, and in spite of the poor knowledge about diets available for most suprabenthic species, higher δ 15N were found for carnivorous amphipods (e.g. Rhachotropis spp., Nicippe tumida) consuming copepods. Low overlap for δ 13C and δ 15N values was observed, though δ 15N values where less variable than δ 13C, which suggests high resource partitioning in this assemblage. Seasonal variations in isotopic composition for both δ 13C and δ 15N were low (less than 1‰ and 3‰, respectively) and variable depending on species. Low correlations between δ 13C and δ 15N of suprabenthic fauna were found for all periods studied, though increasing from February 2004 to June 2004 (after the

  18. Bulk and stable isotopic compositions of carbonate minerals in Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001: no proof of high formation temperature.

    PubMed

    Treiman, A H; Romanek, C S

    1998-07-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at >650 degrees C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH84001. PMID:11543073

  19. Bulk and Stable Isotopic Compositions of Carbonate Minerals in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001: No Proof of High Formation Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at greater than 650 C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH 84001.

  20. Origin of sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite (Brazil): constraints from carbon isotopes and inclusion compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, A. R.; Kohn, S. C.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smith, C. B.; Araujo, D.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Forty-one diamonds sourced from the Juina-5 kimberlite pipe in Southern Brazil, which contain optically identifiable inclusions, have been studied using an integrated approach. The diamonds contain <20 ppm nitrogen (N) that is fully aggregated as B centres. Internal structures in several diamonds revealed using cathodoluminescence (CL) are unlike those normally observed in lithospheric samples. The majority of the diamonds are composed of isotopically light carbon, and the collection has a unimodal distribution heavily skewed towards δ13C ~ -25 ‰. Individual diamonds can display large carbon isotope heterogeneity of up to ~15 ‰ and predominantly have isotopically lighter cores displaying blue CL, and heavier rims with green CL. The light carbon isotopic compositions are interpreted as evidence of diamond growth from abiotic organic carbon added to the oceanic crust during hydrothermal alteration. The bulk isotopic composition of the oceanic crust, carbonates plus organics, is equal to the composition of mantle carbon (-5 ‰), and we suggest that recycling/mixing of subducted material will replenish this reservoir over geological time. Several exposed, syngenetic inclusions have bulk compositions consistent with former eclogitic magnesium silicate perovskite, calcium silicate perovskite and NAL or CF phases that have re-equilibrated during their exhumation to the surface. There are multiple occurrences of majoritic garnet with pyroxene exsolution, coesite with and without kyanite exsolution, clinopyroxene, Fe or Fe-carbide and sulphide minerals alongside single occurrences of olivine and ferropericlase. As a group, the inclusions have eclogitic affinity and provide evidence for diamond formation at pressures extending to Earth's deep transition zone and possibly the lower mantle. It is observed that the major element composition of inclusions and isotopic compositions of host Juina-5 diamonds are not correlated. The diamond and inclusion compositions are

  1. Springtime carbon emission episodes at the Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-11-01

    In order to investigate the emission of carbonaceous aerosols at the Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected during spring of 2007 and 2008 and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during pollen emission episodes (range: -26.2‰ to -23.5‰, avg. -25.2 ± 0.9‰), approaching those of the airborne pollen (-28.0‰) collected at the Gosan site. Based on a carbon isotope mass balance equation, we found that ~42% of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollen from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. A negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC was obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollen and then transported to the Gosan site. Thermal evolution patterns of organic carbon during the pollen episodes were characterized by high OC evolution in the OC2 temperature step (450 °C). Since thermal evolution patterns of organic aerosols are highly influenced by their molecular weight, they can be used as additional information on the formation of secondary organic aerosols and the effect of aging of organic aerosols during the long-range atmospheric transport and sources of organic aerosols.

  2. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of bacterial methane in a shallow freshwater lake

    SciTech Connect

    Woltemate, I.; Whiticar, M.J.; Schoell, M.

    1984-09-01

    Anoxic sediments from freshwater environments such as bogs, swamps, and lakes undergoing early diagenesis are frequently characterized by the formation of biogenic methane. Freshwater biogenic methanes exhibit carbon and hydrogen isotopic values strongly depleted in C-13 and deuterium relative to the respective values for carbon dioxide and formation water. The percentages of methane generated by fermentation and carbon dioxide reduction can be estimated by comparison of hydrogen isotopes in the formation water and methane. On the basis of these hydrogen isotope data, about 75% of the methane formation in Wurmsee comes from acetate reduction. Fermentation is thus the dominant although not exclusive process. Carbon dioxide reduction contributed the balance of the bacterial methane generated. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  3. Variability in magnesium, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, and trace element contents of brachiopod shells: implications for paleoceanographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, Claire; Saulnier, Ségolène; Vigier, Nathalie; Schumacher, Aimryc; Chaussidon, Marc; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium content in the ocean is ≈ 1290 ppm and is one of the most abundant elements. It is involved in the carbon cycle via the dissolution and precipitation of carbonates, especially Mg-rich carbonates as dolomites. The Mg/Ca ratio of the ocean is believed to have changed through time. The causes of these variations, i.e. hydrothermal activity change or enhanced precipitation of dolomite, could be constrained using the magnesium isotope composition (δ26Mg) of carbonates. Brachiopods, as marine environmental proxies, have the advantage to occur worldwide in a depth range from intertidal to abyssal, and have been found in the geological record since the Cambrian. Moreover, as their shell is in low-Mg calcite, they are quite resistant to diagenetic processes. Here we report δ26Mg, δ18O, δ13C values along with trace element contents of one modern brachiopod specimen (Terebratalia transversa) and one fossil specimen (Terebratula scillae, 2.3 Ma). We combined δ26Mg values with oxygen and carbon isotope compositions and trace element contents to look for possible shell geochemical heterogeneities in order to investigate the processes that control the Mg isotope composition of brachiopod shells. We also evaluate the potential of brachiopods as a proxy of past seawater δ26Mg values. The two investigated brachiopod shells present the same range of δ26Mg variation (up to 2 ‰)). This variation cannot be ascribed to changes in environmental parameters, i.e. temperature or pH. As previously observed, the primary layer of calcite shows the largest degree of oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibrium relative to seawater. In contrast, the δ26Mg value of this layer is comparable to that of the secondary calcite layer value. In both T. scillae and T. transversa, negative trends are observable between magnesium isotopic compositions and oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions. These trends, combined to linear relationships between δ26Mg values and REE contents, are best

  4. [Dissolved inorganic carbon and its carbon isotope composition in cascade reservoir of the Maotiao River during summer and autumn].

    PubMed

    Li, Gan-rong; Liu, Cong-qiang; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Bao-li; Li, Jun; Li, Si-liang; Liu, Xiao-long; Wang, Fu-shun

    2009-10-15

    Water samples along water column in the front of dams and samples at 0.5 m below surface water from tributary rivers were collected in July and October, 2007. The water chemistry, concentrations of dissolve inorganic carbon and its carbon isotopic compositions were determined, in order to investigate the geochemical behavior of carbon in the Maotiao River. This study aimed to understand the variations of the concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and delta13 C(DIC) during its transport along the cascade reservoirs and river system. The results showed that DIC concentrations in summer were lower than that in autumn. In summer, the DIC concentrations were 1.35-2.84 mmol/L, with an average value of 2.12 mmol/L; and in autumn they fell into 2.03-3.98 mmol/L, with an average value of 2.67 mmol/L. The delta13 CD1 in surface water along Maotiao River ranged from -10.3% per hundred to -5.1% per hundred in summer, with a value of -8.6% per hundred in average, and in autumn, delta3 C(DIC) became more negative, and had a range from -13.0% per hundred to -6.9% per hundred, with an average value of -9.0% per hundred. Generally, DIC in surface water showed a trend to decrease from the upper reaches to lower reaches along Maotiao River, and t3 Cc1 gradually becam me more negative downstream. On the water column, DIC concentrations were higher in hypolimnion, while a delta13 C(DIC) had a reverse trend with higher values occurred in epilimnion. The results indicated that the hydrochemistry of river could be significantly changed by river damming processes. As for carbon, reservoir should be an important place for the transformation among the different carbon species.

  5. Factors controlling shell carbon isotopic composition of land snail Acusta despecta sieboldiana estimated from laboratory culturing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Yamada, K.; Suzuki, N.; Yoshida, N.

    2014-10-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of land snail shell carbonate derives from three potential sources: diet, atmospheric CO2, and ingested carbonate (limestone). However, their relative contributions remain unclear. Under various environmental conditions, we cultured one land snail subspecies, Acusta despecta sieboldiana, collected from Yokohama, Japan, and confirmed that all of these sources affect shell carbonate δ13C values. Herein, we consider the influences of metabolic rates and temperature on the carbon isotopic composition of the shell carbonate. Based on results obtained from previous works and this study, a simple but credible framework is presented to illustrate how each source and environmental parameter affects shell carbonate δ13C values. According to this framework and some reasonable assumptions, we estimated the contributions of different carbon sources for each snail individual: for cabbage-fed (C3 plant) groups, the contributions of diet, atmospheric CO2, and ingested limestone vary in the ranges of 66-80, 16-24, and 0-13%, respectively. For corn-fed (C4 plant) groups, because of the possible food stress (less ability to consume C4 plants), the values vary in the ranges of 56-64, 18-20, and 16-26%, respectively. Moreover, according to the literature and our observations, the subspecies we cultured in this study show preferences towards different plant species for food. Therefore, we suggest that the potential food preference should be considered adequately for some species in paleoenvironment studies. Finally, we inferred that only the isotopic exchange of the calcite-HCO3--aragonite equilibrium during egg laying and hatching of our cultured snails controls carbon isotope fractionation.

  6. Factors controlling shell carbon isotopic composition of land snail Acusta despecta sieboldiana estimated from lab culturing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Yamada, K.; Suzuki, N.; Yoshida, N.

    2014-05-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of land snail shell carbonate derives from three potential sources: diet, atmospheric CO2, and ingested carbonate (limestone). However, their relative contributions remain unclear. Under various environmental conditions, we cultured one land snail species, Acusta despecta sieboldiana collected from Yokohama, Japan, and confirmed that all of these sources affect shell carbonate δ13C values. Herein, we consider the influences of metabolic rates and temperature on the carbon isotopic composition of the shell carbonate. Based on previous works and on results obtained in this study, a simple but credible framework is presented for discussion of how each source and environmental parameter can affect shell carbonate δ13C values. According to this framework and some reasonable assumptions, we have estimated the contributions of different carbon sources for each snail individual: for cabbage (C3 plant) fed groups, the contributions of diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested limestone respectively vary as 66-80%, 16-24%, and 0-13%. For corn (C4 plant) fed groups, because of the possible food stress (lower consumption ability of C4 plant), the values vary respectively as 56-64%, 18-20%, and 16-26%. Moreover, we present new evidence that snails have discrimination to choose C3 and C4 plants as food. Therefore, we suggest that food preferences must be considered adequately when applying δ13C in paleo-environment studies. Finally, we inferred that, during egg laying and hatching of our cultured snails, carbon isotope fractionation is controlled only by the isotopic exchange of the calcite-HCO3--aragonite equilibrium.

  7. [Study on the content and carbon isotopic composition of water dissolved inorganic carbon from rivers around Xi'an City].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Li, Xiang-Zhong; Liu, Wei-Guo

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the content and isotopic compositions of water dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from four typical rivers (Chanhe, Bahe, Laohe and Heihe) around Xi'an City were studied to trace the possible sources of DIC. The results of this study showed that the content of DIC in the four rivers varied from 0.34 to 5.66 mmol x L(-1) with an average value of 1.23 mmol x L(-1). In general, the content of DIC increased from the headstream to the river mouth. The delta13C(DIC) of four rivers ranged from -13.3 per thousand to -7.2 per thousand, with an average value of -10.1 per thousand. The delta13C(DIC) values of river water were all negative (average value of -12.6 per thousand) at the headstream of four rivers, but the delta13C(DIC) values of downstream water were more positive (with an average value of -9.4 per thousand). In addition, delta13C(DIC) of river water showed relatively negative values (the average value of delta13C(DIC) was -10.5 per thousand) near the estuary of the rivers. The variation of the DIC content and its carbon isotope suggested that the DIC sources of the rivers varied from the headstream to the river mouth. The negative delta13C(DIC) value indicated that the DIC may originate from the soil CO2 at the headstream of the rivers. On the other hand, the delta13C(DIC) values of river water at the middle and lower reaches of rivers were more positive, and it showed that soil CO2 produced by respiration of the C4 plants (like corn) and soil carbonates with positive delta13C values may be imported into river water. Meanwhile, the input of pollutants with low delta13C(DIC) values may result in a decrease of delta13C(DIC) values in the rivers. The study indicated that the DIC content and carbon isotope may be used to trace the sources of DIC in rivers around Xi'an City. Our study may provide some basic information for tracing the sources of DIC of rivers in the small watershed area in the Loess Plateau of China.

  8. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Scott, F.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2003-02-28

    Pearson, S.F., D.J. Levey, C.H. Greenberg, and C.M. del Rio. 2003. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird. Oecologia. 135:516-523. The use of stable isotopes to infer diet requires quantifying the relationship between diet and tissues and, in particular, knowing of how quickly isotopes turnover in different tissues and how isotopic concentrations of different food components change (discriminate) when incorporated into consumer tissues. We used feeding trials with wild-caught yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata) to determine d15N and d13C turnover rates for blood, d15N and d13C diet-tissue discrimination factors, and diet-tissue relationships for blood and feathers. After 3 weeks on a common diet, 36 warblers were assigned to one of four diets differing in the relative proportion of fruit and insects. Plasma half-life estimates ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 days for d13C and from 0.5 to 1.7 days for d15N. Half-life did not differ among diets. Whole blood half-life for d13C ranged from 3.9 to 6.1 days. Yellow-rumped warbler tissues were enriched relative to diet by 1.7.3.6% for nitrogen isotopes and by 1.2 to 4.3% for carbon isotopes, depending on tissue and diet. Consistent with previous studies, feathers were the most enriched and whole blood and plasma were the least enriched or, in the case of carbon, slightly depleted relative to diet. In general, tissues were more enriched relative to diet for birds with high percentages of insects. For all tissues, carbon and nitrogen isotope discrimination factors increased with carbon and nitrogen concentrations of diets. The isotopic signature of plasma increased linearly with the sum of the isotopic signature of the diet and the discrimination factor. Because the isotopic signature of tissues depends on both elemental concentration and isotopic signature of the diet, attempts to reconstruct diet from stable isotope signatures

  9. Isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in some Apollo 14 and 15 lunar samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Irving; Hardcastle, Kenneth G.; Gleason, Jim D.

    1974-01-01

    Isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in some Apollo 14 and 15 lunar samples was determined by use of a newly constructed combustion line that yields low blanks for CO2 and H2. The results from combustion of fines and breccia from Apollo 14 lunar samples and of fines, breccia, and basalt from Apollo 15 were compared with data obtained by heating samples in vacuo to over 1,350°C. The two techniques gave similar results. Total carbon in the fines ranged from 51 to 110 p/m with a C13 of +12 to -8 per mil (parts per thousand) PDB. The breccias contain 22 to 50p/mcarbon with a C13 of -21 to -25 per mil. The crystalline rock (sample 15555) has a carbon content of about 7 p/m and a C13 of -28 per mil. The total hydrogen in the fines ranges from 66 to 120 p/m with a (D/H) X 10-6 of 39 to 90. The breccias contain 8 to 38p/mH2 with a (D/H) X 10-6 of 103 to 144. The crystalline rock contains about 2 p/m H2 with a (D/H) X 10-6 of about 140. Arguments are presented to show that the contamination by earth materials is not as serious a problem as has been proposed by previous authors.

  10. The Ice Man's diet as reflected by the stable nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of his hair.

    PubMed

    Macko, S A; Lubec, G; Teschler-Nicola, M; Andrusevich, V; Engel, M H

    1999-03-01

    Establishing the diets of ancient human populations is an integral component of most archaeological studies. Stable isotope analysis of well-preserved bone collagen is the most direct approach for a general assessment of paleodiet. However, this method has been limited by the scarcity of well-preserved skeletal materials for this type of destructive analysis. Hair is preserved in many burials, but is often overlooked as an alternative material for isotopic analysis. Here we report that the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values for the hair of the 5200 year-old Ice Man indicates a primarily vegetarian diet, in agreement with his dental wear pattern. Whereas previous investigations have focused on bone collagen, the stable isotope composition of hair may prove to be a more reliable proxy for paleodiet reconstruction, particularly when skeletal remains are not well preserved and additional archaeological artifacts are unavailable.

  11. The Influence of pH on the Oxygen Isotope Composition of Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. D.; Watkins, J. M.; Ryerson, F. J.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation between calcium carbonate and water is temperature-dependent and can therefore be used as a paleothermometer. Although oxygen isotope fractionation is expected from principles of equilibrium isotopic partitioning, the temperature-dependence remains uncertain because other factors, such as slow exchange between dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species and water, can obscure the temperature signal. Oxygen isotopic equilibrium between aqueous solution and calcium carbonate includes two distinct equilibria: equilibrium of the DIC species in solution (i.e., CO2(aq), H2CO3, HCO3-, and CO32-) with water, and equilibrium between the dissolved inorganic carbon with the precipitated carbonate. To isolate kinetic isotope effects that arise at the mineral-solution interface, isotopic equilibrium among DIC species must be maintained. This can be accomplished by dissolving the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) into the solution, thereby reducing the time required for isotopic equilibration between DIC species by approximately two orders of magnitude between pH 7.7 and 9.3. We conduct calcite growth experiments aimed specifically at measuring the pH-dependence of kinetic oxygen isotope effects during precipitation of calcite. We precipitated calcite from aqueous solution at a constant pH and controlled supersaturation over the pH range 7.7-9.3. For each experiment, a gas mixture of N2 and CO2 is constantly bubbled through a beaker containing ~1300 mL of solution (30 mM CaCl2 + 5 mM NH4Cl + 0.1 mM SrCl2). As CO2 from the gas dissolves into solution, calcite crystals grow on the beaker walls. The pH of the solution is maintained by use of an autotitrator with NaOH as the titrant. We control the temperature, pH, the pCO2 of the gas inflow, and the gas inflow rate, and monitor the total alkalinity, the pCO2 of the gas outflow, and the amount of NaOH added. A constant crystal growth rate of ~1.6 mmol/m2/hr is maintained over all experiments. We will present

  12. Isotopic compositions of carbonates and organic carbon from upper Proterozoic successions in Namibia: stratigraphic variation and the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.; Knoll, A. H.; Germs, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The carbon isotope geochemistry of carbonates and organic carbon in the late Proterozoic Damara Supergroup of Namibia, including the Nama, Witvlei, and Gariep groups on the Kalahari Craton and the Mulden and Otavi groups on the Congo Craton, has been investigated as an extension of previous studies of secular variations in the isotopic composition of late Proterozoic seawater. Subsamples of microspar and dolomicrospar were determined, through petrographic and cathodoluminescence examination, to represent the "least-altered" portions of the rock. Carbon-isotopic abundances in these phases are nearly equal to those in total carbonate, suggesting that 13C abundances of late Proterozoic fine-grained carbonates have not been significantly altered by meteoric diagenesis, although 18O abundances often differ significantly. Reduced and variable carbon-isotopic differences between carbonates and organic carbon in these sediments indicate that isotopic compositions of organic carbon have been altered significantly by thermal and deformational processes, likely associated with the Pan-African Orogeny. Distinctive stratigraphic patterns of secular variation, similar to those noted in other, widely separated late Proterozoic basins, are found in carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Nama and Otavi groups. For example, in Nama Group carbonates delta 13C values rise dramatically from -4 to +5% within a short stratigraphic interval. This excursion suggests correlation with similar excursions noted in Ediacaran-aged successions of Siberia, India, and China. Enrichment of 13C (delta 13C> +5%) in Otavi Group carbonates reflects those in Upper Riphean successions of the Akademikerbreen Group, Svalbard, its correlatives in East Greenland, and the Shaler Group, northwest Canada. The widespread distribution of successions with comparable isotopic signatures supports hypotheses that variations in delta 13C reflect global changes in the isotopic composition of late

  13. Isotopic compositions of carbonates and organic carbon from upper Proterozoic successions in Namibia: stratigraphic variation and the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A J; Hayes, J M; Knoll, A H; Germs, G J

    1991-01-01

    The carbon isotope geochemistry of carbonates and organic carbon in the late Proterozoic Damara Supergroup of Namibia, including the Nama, Witvlei, and Gariep groups on the Kalahari Craton and the Mulden and Otavi groups on the Congo Craton, has been investigated as an extension of previous studies of secular variations in the isotopic composition of late Proterozoic seawater. Subsamples of microspar and dolomicrospar were determined, through petrographic and cathodoluminescence examination, to represent the "least-altered" portions of the rock. Carbon-isotopic abundances in these phases are nearly equal to those in total carbonate, suggesting that 13C abundances of late Proterozoic fine-grained carbonates have not been significantly altered by meteoric diagenesis, although 18O abundances often differ significantly. Reduced and variable carbon-isotopic differences between carbonates and organic carbon in these sediments indicate that isotopic compositions of organic carbon have been altered significantly by thermal and deformational processes, likely associated with the Pan-African Orogeny. Distinctive stratigraphic patterns of secular variation, similar to those noted in other, widely separated late Proterozoic basins, are found in carbon-isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Nama and Otavi groups. For example, in Nama Group carbonates delta 13C values rise dramatically from -4 to +5% within a short stratigraphic interval. This excursion suggests correlation with similar excursions noted in Ediacaran-aged successions of Siberia, India, and China. Enrichment of 13C (delta 13C> +5%) in Otavi Group carbonates reflects those in Upper Riphean successions of the Akademikerbreen Group, Svalbard, its correlatives in East Greenland, and the Shaler Group, northwest Canada. The widespread distribution of successions with comparable isotopic signatures supports hypotheses that variations in delta 13C reflect global changes in the isotopic composition of late

  14. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    model, data on isotope composition of carbon of carbonate and organic substance in rocks are used and its ability to explain several known natural regularities and empirical correlations. The model is used for analysis of some key stages of evolution of photosynthesis.

  15. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    model, data on isotope composition of carbon of carbonate and organic substance in rocks are used and its ability to explain several known natural regularities and empirical correlations. The model is used for analysis of some key stages of evolution of photosynthesis. PMID:20583589

  16. A high resolution record of atmospheric carbon dioxide and its stable carbon isotopic composition from the penultimate glacial maximum to the glacial inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, R.; Schmitt, J.; Köhler, P.; Joos, F.; Fischer, H.

    2013-04-01

    The reconstruction of the stable carbon isotope evolution in atmospheric CO2 (δ13Catm), as archived in Antarctic ice cores, bears the potential to disentangle the contributions of the different carbon cycle fluxes causing past CO2 variations. Here we present a highly resolved record of δ13Catm before, during and after the Marine Isotope Stage 5.5 (155 000 to 105 000 yr BP). The record was derived with a well established sublimation method using ice from the EPICA Dome C (EDC) and the Talos Dome ice cores in East Antarctica. We find an 0.4‰ offset between the mean δ13Catm level in the Penultimate (~140 000 yr BP) and Last Glacial Maximum (~22 000 yr BP), which can be explained by either (i) changes in the isotopic composition or (ii) intensity of the carbon input fluxes to the combined ocean/atmosphere carbon reservoir or (iii) by long-term peat buildup. Our isotopic data suggest that the carbon cycle evolution along Termination II and the subsequent interglacial was controlled by essentially the same processes as during the last 24 000 yr, but with different phasing and magnitudes. Furthermore, a 5000 yr lag in the CO2 decline relative to EDC temperatures is confirmed during the glacial inception at the end of MIS 5.5 (120 000 yr BP). Based on our isotopic data this lag can be explained by terrestrial carbon release and carbonate compensation.

  17. Landscape variability of the stable carbon isotope composition of soil CO2 concentrations and flux in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros-Iregui, Diego; Liang, Liyin; Risk, David

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotopes are commonly used to understand how physical and biological processes mediate the exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Numerous studies have described fundamental relationships between environmental variables, the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of recently assimilated sugars in plants, litter, soil carbon, or recently respired CO2. However, studies that examine the landscape scale variability of the 13C content of forest soils are lacking. We report on measurements of the carbon isotopic composition of soil CO2 concentrations (δ13CC) and flux (δ13CJ) across a subalpine forest of the northern Rocky Mountains of Montana, United States. Our analysis demonstrates that soil moisture and the lateral redistribution of soil water are strong predictors of the spatial variability of both δ13CC and δ13CJ at the watershed scale. Our analysis suggests that there are concomitant yet independent effects of soil water on physical (i.e., soil gas diffusivity) and biological (i.e., photosynthetic activity) processes that mediate the 13C composition of forest soils. We show systematic spatial variability in the δ13C of forest soils at the landscape scale that can be useful to accurately predict and model land-atmosphere CO2 exchange over complex terrain.

  18. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (Gamma 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAS) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SO...

  19. Alteration of the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition in the Martian Surface Rocks Due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. K.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Mahaffy, P.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    C-13/C-12 and N-15/N-14 isotopic ratios are pivotal for our understanding of the Martian carbon cycle, history of the Martian atmospheric escape, and origin of the organic compounds on Mars. Here we demonstrate that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of the surface rocks on Mars can be significantly altered by the continuous exposure of Martian surface to cosmic rays. Cosmic rays can effectively produce C-13 and N-15 isotopes via spallation nuclear reactions on oxygen atoms in various Martian rocks. We calculate that in the top meter of the Martian rocks, the rates of production of both C-13 and N-15 due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) exposure can vary within 1.5-6 atoms/cm3/s depending on rocks' depth and chemical composition. We also find that the average solar cosmic rays can produce carbon and nitrogen isotopes at a rate comparable to GCRs in the top 5-10 cm of the Martian rocks. We demonstrate that if the total carbon content in a surface Martian rock is <10 ppm, then the "light," potentially "biological" C-13/C-12 ratio would be effectively erased by cosmic rays over 3.5 billion years of exposure. We found that for the rocks with relatively short exposure ages (e.g., 100 million years), cosmogenic changes in N-15/N-14 ratio are still very significant. We also show that a short exposure to cosmic rays of Allan Hills 84001 while on Mars can explain its high-temperature heavy nitrogen isotopic composition (N-15/N-14). Applications to Martian meteorites and the current Mars Science Laboratory mission are discussed.

  20. Alkane distribution and carbon isotope composition in fossil leaves: An interpretation of plant physiology in the geologic past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The relative chain-length distribution and carbon-isotope composition of n-alkanes extracted from sedimentary rocks are important geochemical tools for investigating past terrestrial ecosystems. Alkanes preserved in ancient sediments are assumed to be contemporaneous, derived from the same ecosystem, and integrated from the biomass present on the landscape at the time of deposition. Further, there is an underlying assumption that ancient plants exhibited the same metabolic and physiological responses to climate conditions that are observed for modern plants. Interpretations of alkane abundances and isotopic signatures are complicated by the strong influence of phylogenetic affiliation and ecological factors, such as canopy structure. A better understanding of how ecosystem and taxa influence alkane properties, including homologue abundance patterns and leaf-lipid carbon isotope fractionation would help strengthen paleoecological interpretations based on these widely employed plant biomarkers. In this study, we analyze the alkane chain-length distribution and carbon-isotope composition of phytoleim and alkanes (d13Cleaf and d13Clipid) extracted from a selection of Cretaceous and Paleocene fossil leaves from the Guaduas and Cerrejon Formations of Colombia. These data were compared with data for the same families in a modern analogue biome. Photosynthetic and biosynthetic fractionation (∆leaf and elipid) values determined from the fossil material indicate carbon metabolism patterns were similar to modern plants. Fossil data were incorporated in a biomass-weighted mixing model to represent the expected lipid complement of sediment arising from this ecosystem and compared with alkane measurements from the rock matrix. Modeled and observed isotopic and abundance patterns match well for alkane homologs most abundant in plants (i.e., n-C27 to n-C33). The model illustrates the importance of understanding biases in litter flux and taphonomic pressures inherent in the

  1. Genetic architecture of carbon isotope composition and growth in Eucalyptus across multiple environments.

    PubMed

    Bartholomé, Jérôme; Mabiala, André; Savelli, Bruno; Bert, Didier; Brendel, Oliver; Plomion, Christophe; Gion, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    In the context of climate change, the water-use efficiency (WUE) of highly productive tree varieties, such as eucalypts, has become a major issue for breeding programmes. This study set out to dissect the genetic architecture of carbon isotope composition (δ(13) C), a proxy of WUE, across several environments. A family of Eucalyptus urophylla × E. grandis was planted in three trials and phenotyped for δ(13) C and growth traits. High-resolution genetic maps enabled us to target genomic regions underlying δ(13) C quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on the E. grandis genome. Of the 15 QTLs identified for δ(13) C, nine were stable across the environments and three displayed significant QTL-by-environment interaction, suggesting medium to high genetic determinism for this trait. Only one colocalization was found between growth and δ(13) C. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis suggested candidate genes related to foliar δ(13) C, including two involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. This study provides the first report of the genetic architecture of δ(13) C and its relation to growth in Eucalyptus. The low correlations found between the two traits at phenotypic and genetic levels suggest the possibility of improving the WUE of Eucalyptus varieties without having an impact on breeding for growth.

  2. Springtime carbon episodes at Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-05-01

    In order to investigate the carbon episodes at Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia during spring of 2007 and 2008, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The carbon episodes at the Gosan site were categorized as long-range transported anthropogenic pollutant (LTP) from Asian continent, Asian dust (AD) accompanying with LTP, and local pollen episodes. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during the pollen episodes (range: -26.2 ‰ to -23.5 ‰, avg.: -25.2 ± 0.9 ‰), followed by the LTP episodes (range: -23.5 ‰ to -23.0 ‰, avg.: -23.3 ± 0.3 ‰) and the AD episodes (range: -23.3 to -20.4 %, avg.: -21.8 ± 2.0 ‰). The δ13CTC of the airborne pollens (-28.0 ‰) collected at the Gosan site showed value similar to that of tangerine fruit (-28.1 ‰) produced from Jeju Island. Based on the carbon isotope mass balance equation and the TN and TC regression approach, we found that ∼40-45 % of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollens from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. The δ13C of citric acid in the airborne pollens (-26.3 ‰) collected at the Gosan site was similar to that in tangerine fruit (-27.4 ‰). The negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC were obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollens and then transported to the Gosan site. Based on the thermal evolution pattern of organic aerosols during the carbon episodes, we found that organic aerosols originated from East China are more volatile on heating and are more likely to form pyrolized organic carbon than the pollen-enriched organic aerosols and organic

  3. Unexpected variations in the triple oxygen isotope composition of stratospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wiegel, Aaron A; Cole, Amanda S; Hoag, Katherine J; Atlas, Elliot L; Schauffler, Sue M; Boering, Kristie A

    2013-10-29

    We report observations of stratospheric CO2 that reveal surprisingly large anomalous enrichments in (17)O that vary systematically with latitude, altitude, and season. The triple isotope slopes reached 1.95 ± 0.05(1σ) in the middle stratosphere and 2.22 ± 0.07 in the Arctic vortex versus 1.71 ± 0.03 from previous observations and a remarkable factor of 4 larger than the mass-dependent value of 0.52. Kinetics modeling of laboratory measurements of photochemical ozone-CO2 isotope exchange demonstrates that non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation alone quantitatively account for the (17)O anomaly in CO2 in the laboratory, resolving long-standing discrepancies between models and laboratory measurements. Model sensitivities to hypothetical mass-dependent isotope effects in reactions involving O3, O((1)D), or CO2 and to an empirically derived temperature dependence of the anomalous kinetic isotope effects in ozone formation then provide a conceptual framework for understanding the differences in the isotopic composition and the triple isotope slopes between the laboratory and the stratosphere and between different regions of the stratosphere. This understanding in turn provides a firmer foundation for the diverse biogeochemical and paleoclimate applications of (17)O anomalies in tropospheric CO2, O2, mineral sulfates, and fossil bones and teeth, which all derive from stratospheric CO2. PMID:23940331

  4. Unexpected variations in the triple oxygen isotope composition of stratospheric carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegel, Aaron A.; Cole, Amanda S.; Hoag, Katherine J.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2013-10-01

    We report observations of stratospheric CO2 that reveal surprisingly large anomalous enrichments in 17O that vary systematically with latitude, altitude, and season. The triple isotope slopes reached 1.95 ± 0.05(1σ) in the middle stratosphere and 2.22 ± 0.07 in the Arctic vortex versus 1.71 ± 0.03 from previous observations and a remarkable factor of 4 larger than the mass-dependent value of 0.52. Kinetics modeling of laboratory measurements of photochemical ozone-CO2 isotope exchange demonstrates that non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation alone quantitatively account for the 17O anomaly in CO2 in the laboratory, resolving long-standing discrepancies between models and laboratory measurements. Model sensitivities to hypothetical mass-dependent isotope effects in reactions involving O3, O(1D), or CO2 and to an empirically derived temperature dependence of the anomalous kinetic isotope effects in ozone formation then provide a conceptual framework for understanding the differences in the isotopic composition and the triple isotope slopes between the laboratory and the stratosphere and between different regions of the stratosphere. This understanding in turn provides a firmer foundation for the diverse biogeochemical and paleoclimate applications of 17O anomalies in tropospheric CO2, O2, mineral sulfates, and fossil bones and teeth, which all derive from stratospheric CO2.

  5. Carbon and Noble Gas Isotope Banks in Two-Phase Flow: Changes in Gas Composition During Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Larson, T.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In conjunction with the rise of unconventional oil and gas production, there has been a recent rise in interest in noble gas and carbon isotope changes that can occur during the migration of natural gas. Natural gas geochemistry studies use bulk hydrocarbon composition, carbon isotopes, and noble gas isotopes to determine the migration history of gases from source to reservoir, and to trace fugitive gas leaks from reservoirs to shallow groundwater. We present theoretical and experimental work, which helps to explain trends observed in gas composition in various migration scenarios. Noble gases are used as tracers for subsurface fluid flow due to distinct initial compositions in air-saturated water and natural gases. Numerous field studies have observed enrichments and depletions of noble gases after gas-water interaction. A theoretical two-phase gas displacement model shows that differences in noble gas solubility will cause volatile gas components will become enriched at the front of gas plumes, leaving the surrounding residual water stripped of dissolved gases. Changes in hydrocarbon gas composition are controlled by gas solubility in both formation water and residual oil. In addition to model results, we present results from a series of two-phase flow experiments. These results demonstrate the formation of a noble gas isotope banks ahead of a main CO2 gas plume. Additionally, we show that migrating hydrocarbon gas plumes can sweep biogenic methane from groundwater, significantly altering the isotope ratio of the gas itself. Results from multicomponent, two-phase flow experiments qualitatively agree with the theoretical model, and previous field studies. These experimentally verified models for gas composition changes can be used to aid source identification of subsurface gases.

  6. Stable isotopic compositions of carbon in vegetation and soil organic matter along the bioclimatic transect, North Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovda, Irina; Morgun, Evgeny; Golubeva, Natalia

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotopic composition of carbon in plant species and soil organic matter was investigated along the bioclimatic transect in the North Caucasus. The aim of this research was to find the possible shift of stable isotopic composition of carbon reflecting the gradual successive changes of landscapes connected with the changes of climatic conditions (temperature, precipitation, air humidity) at a various absolute heights above sea level i.e. along the vertical zonation. The study site was located in the North Caucasus near Arkhiz, Big Zelentchuk valley (43o33-40'N; 41o16-27'E). Soil and vegetation samples were collected along Precaucasus and Caucasus slopes at an absolute heights interval of 1280 - 2065 m. Soils are formed at eluvo-deluvium of noncarbonated silicate massive rocks under warm temperate climate with MAT 4-5oC and MAP ~ 860 mm and more. Samples of vegetation (whole grasses and tree leaves) represented several altitudinal vegetation belts including forest and subalpine belts with coniferous (pine, spruce, fir), mixed coniferous-deciduous (fir + beech), broad-leaved (beech, maple), small-leaved (birch, aspen) forests, elfin birch wood and subalpine meadows. Stable isotope composition of carbon was determined using IRMS Finnigan Delta V+. Stable isotopic composition of vegetal species ranges from -33.04 to -27.29 o/oo with the general trend of lighter δ13С with the decreasing of absolute heights. The most heavier δ13С = ~ -27o/oo were found in subalpine meadow plants, while at a smaller altitudes in the forest belt δ13С shifts to ~ 30-31, and up to ~ - 32-33o/oo. More clear regularities were found for vegetation specimens grouped into three categories such as "trees", "grasses" and "litter". δ13С of each category clearly shifts to the lighter values with the decrease of absolute heights i.e from subalpine meadows to spruce-broad-leaved forests. δ13С shift is about 2,49o/oo for trees, 1,75-4,92 o/oo for grasses and ~ 1,8 o/oo for the litter. The

  7. Abnormal composition of carbon isotopes in underground alkaline waters of Kuzbass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsev, S. L.; Lepokurova, O. E.; Ponomarchuk, V. A.; Domrocheva, E. V.; Sizikov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    The first data on abnormally high δ13C values in hydrocarbonates (HCO 3 - ) dissolved in underground waters of coal deposits of Kuzbass (up to +30.9‰) are reported. It is shown that such an unusual isotope composition of waters results from the long, strictly directed interaction in the water-rock-gas-organic material system occurring under the conditions of hindered water exchange. Extensive fractionation of C isotopes is the result of the evolution of the water-rock-gas-coal system after penetration of infiltration waters into the coal deposits and their long interaction with all these components, rather than metamorphism of organic material upon its transformation into coal. With respect to such an approach, the isotope composition of dissolved C may indicate the duration of the evolution in the water-rock-gas-organic material system.

  8. Abnormal composition of carbon isotopes in underground alkaline waters of Kuzbass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsev, S. L.; Lepokurova, O. E.; Ponomarchuk, V. A.; Domrocheva, E. V.; Sizikov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    The first data on abnormally high δ13C values in hydrocarbonates (HCO3 - ) dissolved in underground waters of coal deposits of Kuzbass (up to +30.9‰) are reported. It is shown that such an unusual isotope composition of waters results from the long, strictly directed interaction in the water-rock-gas-organic material system occurring under the conditions of hindered water exchange. Extensive fractionation of C isotopes is the result of the evolution of the water-rock-gas-coal system after penetration of infiltration waters into the coal deposits and their long interaction with all these components, rather than metamorphism of organic material upon its transformation into coal. With respect to such an approach, the isotope composition of dissolved C may indicate the duration of the evolution in the water-rock-gas-organic material system.

  9. Variability in the carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids in plant proteins from different sources: 1 Leaves.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Anthony H; Kruger, Nicholas J; Hedges, Robert E M; McCullagh, James S O

    2016-05-01

    The natural carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids from plant leaf proteins has been measured to establish potential sources of variability. The plant leaves studied, taken from a range of plant groups (forbs, trees, grasses, and freshwater aquatic plants), showed no significant influence of either season or environment (water and light availability) on their Δδ(13)C values. Plant groups did, however, differ in carbon isotope composition, although no consistent differences were identified at the species level. A discriminant analysis model was constructed which allowed leaves from (1) nettles, (2) Pooideae, (3) other Poales, (4) trees and (5) freshwater higher plants to be distinguished from each other on the basis of their natural abundance (13)C/(12)C ratios of individual amino acids. Differences in carbon isotope composition are known to be retained, to some extent, in the tissues of their consumers, and hence an understanding of compound-specific variation in (13)C/(12)C fractional abundance in plants has the potential to provide dietary insights of value in archaeological and ecological studies.

  10. Variability in the carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids in plant proteins from different sources: 1 Leaves.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Anthony H; Kruger, Nicholas J; Hedges, Robert E M; McCullagh, James S O

    2016-05-01

    The natural carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids from plant leaf proteins has been measured to establish potential sources of variability. The plant leaves studied, taken from a range of plant groups (forbs, trees, grasses, and freshwater aquatic plants), showed no significant influence of either season or environment (water and light availability) on their Δδ(13)C values. Plant groups did, however, differ in carbon isotope composition, although no consistent differences were identified at the species level. A discriminant analysis model was constructed which allowed leaves from (1) nettles, (2) Pooideae, (3) other Poales, (4) trees and (5) freshwater higher plants to be distinguished from each other on the basis of their natural abundance (13)C/(12)C ratios of individual amino acids. Differences in carbon isotope composition are known to be retained, to some extent, in the tissues of their consumers, and hence an understanding of compound-specific variation in (13)C/(12)C fractional abundance in plants has the potential to provide dietary insights of value in archaeological and ecological studies. PMID:26948983

  11. Carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of core catcher samples from the ICDP deep drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecke, Andreas; Wissel, Holger; Mayr*, Christoph; Oehlerich, Markus; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    The ICDP project PASADO aims to develop a detailed paleoclimatic record for the southern part of the South American continent from sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike (51°58'S, 70°23'W), situated in the Patagonian steppe east of the Andean cordillera and north of the Street of Magellan. The precursor project SALSA recovered the Holocene and Late Glacial sediment infill of Laguna Potrok Aike and developed the environmental history of the semi-arid Patagonian steppe by a consequent interdisciplinary multi-proxy approach (e.g. Haberzettl et al., 2007). From September to November 2008 the ICDP deep drilling took place and successfully recovered in total 510 m of sediments from two sites resulting in a composite depth of 106 m for the selected main study Site 2. A preliminary age model places the record within the last 50.000 years. During the drilling campaign, the core catcher content of each drilled core run (3 m) was taken as separate sample to be shared and distributed between involved laboratories long before the main sampling party. A total of 70 core catcher samples describe the sediments of Site 2 and will form the base for more detailed investigations on the palaeoclimatic history of Patagonia. We here report on the organic carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of bulk sediment and plant debris of the core catcher samples. Similar investigations were performed for Holocene and Late Glacial sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike revealing insights into the organic matter dynamics of the lake and its catchment as well as into climatically induced hydrological variations with related lake level fluctuations (Mayr et al., 2009). The carbon and nitrogen content of the core catcher fine sediment fraction (<200 µm) is low to very low (around 1 % and 0.1 %, respectively) and requires particular attention in isotope analysis. The carbon isotope composition shows comparably little variation around a value of -26.0 per mil. The positive values of the Holocene and the Late

  12. The formation of weathering products on the LEW 85320 ordinary chondrite - Evidence from carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions and implications for carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Monica M.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of nesquehonite recovered from the surface of the LEW 85320 H5 ordinary chondrite shows that the delta C-13 and delta O-18 values of the two generations of bicarbonate (Antarctic and Texas) are different: delta C-13 = + 7.9 per mil and + 4.2 per mil; delta O-18 = + 17.9 per mil and + 12.1 per mil, respectively. Carbon isotopic compositions are consistent with equilibrium formation from atmospheric carbon dioxide at - 2 + or - 4 C (Antarctic) and + 16 + or - 4 C (Texas). Oxygen isotopic data imply that the water required for nesquehonite precipitation was derived from atmospheric water vapor or glacial meltwater which had locally exchanged with silicates, either in the meteorite or in underlying bedrock. Although carbonates with similar delta C-13 values have been identified in the SNC meteorites EETA 79001 and Nakhla, petrographic and temperature constraints argue against their simply being terrestrial weathering products.

  13. Carbon isotope techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, D.C. ); Fry, B. )

    1991-01-01

    This book is a hands-on introduction to using carbon isotope tracers in experimental biology and ecology. It is a bench-top reference with protocols for the study of plants, animals, and soils. The {sup 11}C, {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, and {sup 14}C carbon isotopes are considered and standard techniques are described by established authors. The compilation includes the following features: specific, well-established, user-oriented techniques; carbon cycles in plants, animals, soils, air, and water; isotopes in ecological research; examples and sample calculations.

  14. Wich Parameter of the Carbonate System Influences the Boron Isotopic Composition and the Boron Calcium Ratio in Foraminiferal Tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, K.; Nehrke, G.; Horn, I.; Langer, G.; Misra, S.; Bijma, J.

    2013-12-01

    We performed culture experiments with the benthic symbiont bearing foraminifer Amphistegina lessonii in order to determine which parameter of the marine carbonate system influences the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) and the boron calcium ratio (B/Ca) in the test. A. lessonii grew for two months in treatments of culture media with decoupled pH-carbonate chemistry. We measured δ11B and B/Ca simultaneously on single tests using a recently new developed mass spectrometric technique. Our results show a clear pH dependence on δ11B. The B/Ca in the shell show a positive correlation with aqueous B(OH)4-/HCO3-.

  15. Carbonate clumped isotope compositions of modern marine mollusk and brachiopod shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, Gregory A.; Passey, Benjamin H.; Wanamaker, Alan D.; Grossman, Ethan L.; Ambrose, William G.; Carroll, Michael L.

    2013-04-01

    We present an empirical calibration of the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer based on mollusk and brachiopod shells from natural and controlled environments spanning water temperatures of -1.0 to 29.5 °C. The clumped isotope data (Δ47) are normalized to CO2 gases with equilibrium distributions of clumped isotopologues at high temperature (1000 °C) and low temperature (27 or 30 °C), and thus the calibration is unique in being directly referenced to a carbon dioxide equilibrium reference frame (Dennis et al., 2011, Defining an absolute reference frame for clumped isotope studies of CO2, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 75, 7117-7131). The shell clumped isotope data define the following relation as a function of temperature (in kelvin): Δ47=0.0327×106/T2+0.3286(r2=0.84). The temperature sensitivity (slope) of this relation is lower than those based on corals, fish otoliths, foraminifera, and coccoliths, but is similar to theoretical predictions for calcite based on lattice dynamics calculations. We find no convincing methodological or biological explanations for the difference in temperature sensitivity between this calibration and the previous calibrations, and suggest that the discrepancy might represent real but unknown differences in mineral-DIC clumped isotope fractionation between mollusks/brachiopods and other taxa. Nevertheless, revised analytical methods similar to those used in this study are now in wide use, and it will be important to develop calibrations for other taxonomic groups using these updated methods, with analyses directly referenced to the carbon dioxide equilibrium reference frame.

  16. Oxygen isotopic composition of fruit carbonate in Lithospermeae and its potential for paleoclimate research in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovoytov, Konstantin; Riehl, Simone; Hilger, Hartmut H.; Schumacher, Erich

    2010-04-01

    Calcareous pericarps of the tribe Lithospermeae (fam. Boraginaceae) are a common component of archaeobotanical macroremain assemblages in the Mediterranean region. In this study, the relationship between oxygen isotopic composition of fruit biogenic carbonate and climatic conditions was examined. δ18O and δ13C values of biogenic carbonate were measured in modern Lithospermeae fruits from seven Eurasian sites (Berlin, Kirchentellinsfurt, Göttingen, Athens, Ankara, Tbilisi, and Almaty) and in fossil fruits from three archaeological sites in the eastern Mediterranean (Troy, Kumtepe, and Hirbet ez-Zeraqon). Additionally, three 14C measurements were performed on ancient fruit carbonate from Hirbet ez-Zeraqon. The δ18O and δ13C values varied from - 9 to 5‰ PDB and between - 35 and - 7‰ PDB respectively. In modern fruits, δ18O of biogenic carbonate was correlated to local summer precipitation amounts (inversely proportional) and summer air temperatures (proportional). In fossil fruits, the δ18O values of carbonate from Troy and Kumtepe were significantly lower than that from Hirbet ez-Zeraqon (ca. - 5 vs. 2‰ PDB respectively). The vertical distribution of stable isotopic values and 14C dates in cultural layers of Hirbet ez-Zeraqon indicate that fruit biogenic carbonate can persist in sediment without appreciable diagenetic alteration. These findings suggest that biogenic carbonate of Lithospermeae fruits can be useful as a paleoclimate proxy at least in the Mediterranean.

  17. Contribution of Organic Material to the Stable Isotope Composition of Some Terrestrial Carbonates as Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bissada, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the isotopic geochemistry of terrestrial carbonate formation is essential to understanding the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, hydrosphere, and potential biosphere. Carbonate minerals, in particular, are important secondary minerals for interpreting past aqueous environments, as illustrated by the carbonates present in ALH84001 [1]. Models for the history of Mars suggest that the planet was warmer, wetter, and possessed a greater atmospheric pressure within the first billion years as compared to present conditions [2],[3],[4], and likely had an active hydrologic cycle. Morse and Marion [5] point out that associated with this hydrologic cycle would be the active chemical weathering of silicate minerals and thus consumption of atmospheric CO2 and deposition of carbonate and silica. It is during this warmer and wetter period of Martian history that surface and/or near-surface conditions would be most favorable for harboring possible microbiological life. Carbonates within ALH84001 offer evidence that fluids were present at 3.9 Gy on Mars [6]. A more through understanding of the effects of aqueous weathering and the potential contribution of organic compounds on the isotopic composition of Martian carbonate minerals can be gained by studying some terrestrial occurrences of carbonate rocks.

  18. Carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in lunar fines 15012 and 15013 - Abundances, distributions and isotopic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Lawless, J.; Romiez, M.; Kaplan, I. R.; Petrowski, C.; Sakai, H.; Smith, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lunar fines 15012,16 and 15013,3 were analyzed by stepwise pyrolysis and acid hydrolysis as well as complete combustion in oxygen to determine carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. In addition, hydrogen was analysed during pyrolysis as well as during hydrolysis. By comparison of the distribution frequencies of C, N, S, H2 and Fe with He-4, considered to have arisen from solar wind contribution, it is concluded that nitrogen and hydrogen have largely a solar origin. Carbon has a significant solar contribution, and metallic iron may have resulted from solar wind interaction with ferrous minerals on the lunar surface. Sulfur probably has a predominantly lunar origin. There is no direct evidence for meteorotic contribution to these samples. Solar wind interaction also has a marked effect on the stable isotope distribution of C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, and S-34/S-32. In all cases, the heavy isotope was most enriched in the smallest grain-size fraction.

  19. Compositional and stable carbon isotopic fractionation during non-autocatalytic thermochemical sulfate reduction by gaseous hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, Xinyu; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ma, Qisheng; Tang, Yongchun

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of autocatalysis during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by gaseous hydrocarbons was investigated by examination of previously reported laboratory and field data. This reaction was found to be a kinetically controlled non-autocatalytic process, and the apparent lack of autocatalysis is thought to be due to the absence of the required intermediate species. Kinetic parameters for chemical and carbon isotopic fractionations of gaseous hydrocarbons affected by TSR were calculated and found to be consistent with experimentally derived values for TSR involving long-chain hydrocarbons. Model predictions based on these kinetic values indicate that TSR by gaseous hydrocarbon requires high-temperature conditions. The oxidation of C2–5 hydrocarbons by sulfate reduction is accompanied by carbon isotopic fractionation with the residual C2–5 hydrocarbons becoming more enriched in 13C. Kinetic parameters were calculated for the stable carbon isotopic fractionation of gaseous hydrocarbons that have experienced TSR. Model predictions based on these kinetics indicate that it may be difficult to distinguish the effects of TSR from those of thermal maturation at lower levels of hydrocarbon oxidation; however, unusually heavy δ13C2+ values (>−10‰) can be diagnostic of high levels of conversion (>50%). Stoichiometric and stable carbon isotopic data show that methane is stable under the investigated reaction conditions and is likely a product of TSR by other gaseous hydrocarbons rather than a significant reactant. These results indicate that the overall TSR reaction mechanism for oxidation of organic substrates containing long-chain hydrocarbons involves three distinct phases as follows: (1) an initial slow and non-autocatalytic stage characterized by the reduction of reactive sulfate by long-chain saturated hydrocarbons; (2) a second autocatalytic reaction phase dominated by reactions involving reduced sulfur species and partially oxidized hydrocarbons; (3

  20. Stable carbon isotopic composition of the wine and CO2 bubbles of sparkling wines: detecting C4 sugar additions.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Luiz A; Moreira, Marcelo Z; Ometto, Jean P H B; Alcarde, André R; Rizzon, Luiz A; Stange, Erik; Ehleringer, James R

    2003-04-23

    Sparkling wines have become a popular beverage in recent years, and the production of these wines is subject to adulteration during fermentation. This study investigated the stable carbon isotopic composition (expressed as delta(13)C) of the wine and of the CO(2) bubbles produced during the second fermentation for a number of sparkling wines produced in different countries around the world. Carbon isotope ratio analyses were used to estimate the addition of sugar obtained from C(4) plants (sugar cane or corn). The average delta(13)C values of the Brazilian brut, demi-sec, and doux sparkling wines were -20.5 +/- 1.2 per thousand (n = 18), -18.1 +/- 1.3 per thousand (n = 9), and -15.8 per thousand (n = 1), respectively. These values were statistically heavier (more positive carbon isotope ratio values) than the average delta(13)C of sparkling wines produced in other parts of South America (Argentina and Chile, -26.1 +/- 1.6 per thousand, n = 5) and Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, and Spain, -25.5 +/- 1.2 per thousand, n = 12), but not statistically different from sparkling wines produced in the United States or Australia. The most likely explanation for differences in the carbon isotope ratios of wines from these different regions is the addition of C(4) sugar during the production of some sparkling wines from Australia, Brazil, and the United States. The isotopic composition of the CO(2) bubbles (delta(13)C-CO(2)) followed similar trends. The average delta(13)C-CO(2) of most of the Brazilian and Argentine sparkling wines was -10.8 +/- 1.2 per thousand (n = 23), indicating that the likely source of carbon for the second fermentation was sugar cane. Conversely, the average delta(13)C-CO(2) of most of the sparkling wines produced in Chile and Europe was -22.0 +/- 1.2 per thousand (n = 13), suggesting that a different sugar (most likely sugar beet) was most used in the second fermentation. It was concluded that in many cases, the carbon isotope ratios of

  1. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Blank, J G; Delaney, J R; Des Marais, D J

    1993-02-01

    The abundance and 13C/12C ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 degrees C and 600-650 degrees C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at approximately 1200 degrees C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at approximately 1200 degrees C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta 13C values of -4.8 to -9.3%, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta 13C values of -6.1 to -9.2%. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta 13C ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta 13C values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  2. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, Jennifer G.; Delaney, John R.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    The abundance and C-13/C-12 ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 C and 600-650 C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at about 1200 C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at about 1200 C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -4.8 to -9.3 per mil, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -6.1 to -9.2 per mil. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta C-13 ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta C-13 values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  3. Hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic compounds in plants reflect the plant's carbon metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. A.; Kahmen, A.; Werner, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The main factors controlling δ2H of plant organic compounds are generally assumed to be the plant's source water and the evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water. Hydrogen isotope analyses of plant compounds from sediments or tree rings are therefore mainly applied to assess hydrological conditions at different spatial and temporal scales. However, the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of plant organic compounds (ɛbio) also accounts for a large part of the variability observed in the δ2H values. Nevertheless, only few studies have directly addressed the physiological basis of this variability and even fewer studies have thus explored possible applications of hydrogen isotope variability in plant organic compounds for plant physiological research. Here we show two datasets indicating that the plant's carbon metabolism can have a substantial influence on δ2H values of n-alkanes and cellulose. First, we performed a controlled experiment where we forced plants into heterotrophic and autotrophic C-metabolism by growing them under four different light treatments. Second, we assessed the δ2H values of different parasitic heterotrophic plants and their autotrophic host plants. Our two datasets show a systematic shift in ɛbio of up to 80 ‰ depending on the plant's carbon metabolism (heterotrophic or autotrophic). Differences in n-alkane and cellulose δ2H values in plants with autotrophic vs. heterotrophic metabolisms can be explained by different NADPH pools that are used by the plants to build their compounds either with assimilates that originate directly from photosynthesis or from stored carbohydrates. Our results have significant implications for the calibration and interpretation of geological records. More importantly, as the δ2H values reflect the plant's carbon metabolism involved during the tissue formation, our findings highlight the potential of δ2H values as new tool for studying plant and ecosystem carbon

  4. A reconstruction of atmospheric carbon dioxide and its stable carbon isotopic composition from the penultimate glacial maximum to the last glacial inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, R.; Schmitt, J.; Köhler, P.; Joos, F.; Fischer, H.

    2013-11-01

    The reconstruction of the stable carbon isotope evolution in atmospheric CO2 (δ13Catm), as archived in Antarctic ice cores, bears the potential to disentangle the contributions of the different carbon cycle fluxes causing past CO2 variations. Here we present a new record of δ13Catm before, during and after the Marine Isotope Stage 5.5 (155 000 to 105 000 yr BP). The dataset is archived on the data repository PANGEA® (www.pangea.de) under 10.1594/PANGAEA.817041. The record was derived with a well established sublimation method using ice from the EPICA Dome C (EDC) and the Talos Dome ice cores in East Antarctica. We find a 0.4‰ shift to heavier values between the mean δ13Catm level in the Penultimate (~ 140 000 yr BP) and Last Glacial Maximum (~ 22 000 yr BP), which can be explained by either (i) changes in the isotopic composition or (ii) intensity of the carbon input fluxes to the combined ocean/atmosphere carbon reservoir or (iii) by long-term peat buildup. Our isotopic data suggest that the carbon cycle evolution along Termination II and the subsequent interglacial was controlled by essentially the same processes as during the last 24 000 yr, but with different phasing and magnitudes. Furthermore, a 5000 yr lag in the CO2 decline relative to EDC temperatures is confirmed during the glacial inception at the end of MIS5.5 (120 000 yr BP). Based on our isotopic data this lag can be explained by terrestrial carbon release and carbonate compensation.

  5. Abundance, distribution, and isotopic composition of particulate black carbon in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weifeng; Guo, Laodong

    2014-11-01

    There exists increasing evidence supporting the important role of black carbon in global carbon cycles. Particulate black carbon (PBC) is allochthonous and has distinct reactivities compared to the bulk particulate organic carbon (tot-POC) in marine environments. However, the abundance, geochemical behavior of PBC and its importance in oceanic carbon budget remain poorly understood. Here we report the abundance, distribution, and stable isotopic signatures of BC derived from the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO-375) method (BCCTO) in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results show that BCCTO abundance decreased from shelf to basin, and more than a half of riverine BCCTO could be removed over the shelf. Moreover, BCCTO is much more refractory compared to the tot-POC and has δ13C values lower than those of BC-excluded POC. These results highlight the significance of PBC in marine carbon cycles and potentially suggest the need for a new end-member term in quantifying POC sources in the ocean.

  6. Soils at the hyperarid margin: The isotopic composition of soil carbonate from the Atacama Desert, Northern Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quade, Jay; Rech, Jason A.; Latorre, Claudio; Betancourt, Julio L.; Gleeson, Erin; Kalin, Mary T.K.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of exceptionally sparse plant cover (0–20%) and rainfall (2–114 mm/yr) on the stable carbon and oxygen composition of soil carbonate along elevation transects in what is among the driest places on the planet, the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. δ13C and δ18O values of carbonates from the Atacama are the highest of any desert in the world. δ13C (VPDB) values from soil carbonate range from -8.2% at the wettest sites to +7.9% at the driest. We measured plant composition and modeled respiration rates required to form these carbonate isotopic values using a modified version of the soil diffusion model of [Cerling (1984) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.71, 229–240], in which we assumed an exponential form of the soil CO2 production function, and relatively shallow (20–30 cm) average production depths. Overall, we find that respiration rates are the main predictor of the δ13C value of soil carbonate in the Atacama, whereas the fraction C3 to C4 biomass at individual sites has a subordinate influence. The high average δ13C value (+4.1%) of carbonate from the driest study sites indicates it formed&mdahs;perhaps abiotically—in the presence of pure atmospheric CO2. δ18O (VPDB) values from soil carbonate range from -5.9% at the wettest sites to +7.3% at the driest and show much less regular variation with elevation change than δ13C values. δ18O values for soil carbonate predicted from local temperature and δ18O values of rainfall values suggest that extreme (>80% in some cases) soil dewatering by evaporation occurs at most sites prior to carbonate formation. The effects of evaporation compromise the use of δ18O values from ancient soil carbonate to reconstruct paleoelevation in such arid settings.

  7. Origin of epigenetic calcite in coal from Antarctica and Ohio based on isotope compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faure, G.; Botoman, G.

    1984-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium of calcite cleats in coal seams of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and Tuscarawas County, Ohio, contain a record of the conditions a the time of their formation. The Antarctic calcites (?? 18O(SMOW) = +9.14 to +11.82%0) were deposited from waters enriched in 16O whose isotopic composition was consistent with that of meteoric precipitation at low temperature and high latitude. The carbon of the calcite cleats (?? 13C(PDB) = -15.6 to -16.9%0) was derived in part from the coal (?? 13C(PDB) = -23.5 to -26.7%0) as carbon dioxide and by oxidation of methane or other hydrocarbon gases. The strontium ( 87Sr 86Sr = 0.71318-0.72392) originated primarily from altered feldspar grains in the sandstones of the Beacon Supergroup. Calcite cleats in the Kittaning No. 6 coal seam of Ohio (?? 18O(SMOW) = +26.04 to +27.79%0) were deposited from waters that had previously exchanged oxygen, possibly with marine carbonate at depth. The carbon (?? 13C(PDB) = 0.9 to +2.4%0) is enriched in 13C even though that cleats were deposited in coal that is highly enriched in 12C and apparently originated from marine carbonates. Strontium in the cleats ( Sr 87 0.71182-0.71260) is not of marine origin but contains varying amounts of radiogenic 87Sr presumably derived from detrital Rb-bearing minerals in the adjacent sedimentary rocks. The results of this study suggest that calcite cleats in coal of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, were deposited after the start of glaciation in Cenozoic time and that those in Ohio precipitated from formation waters derived from the underlying marine carbonate rocks, probably in the recent geologic past. ?? 1984.

  8. Higher peroxidase activity, leaf nutrient contents and carbon isotope composition changes in Arabidopsis thaliana are related to rutin stress.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2014-09-15

    Rutin, a plant secondary metabolite that is used in cosmetics and food additive and has known medicinal properties, protects plants from UV-B radiation and diseases. Rutin has been suggested to have potential in weed management, but its mode of action at physiological level is unknown. Here, we report the biochemical, physiological and oxidative response of Arabidopsis thaliana to rutin at micromolar concentrations. It was found that fresh weight; leaf mineral contents (nitrogen, sodium, potassium, copper and aluminum) were decreased following 1 week exposure to rutin. Arabidopsis roots generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species after rutin treatment, consequently increasing membrane lipid peroxidation, decreasing leaf Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) contents and losing root viability. Carbon isotope composition in A. thaliana leaves was less negative after rutin application than the control. Carbon isotope discrimination values were decreased following rutin treatment, with the highest reduction compared to the control at 750μM rutin. Rutin also inhibited the ratio of CO2 from leaf to air (ci/ca) at all concentrations. Total protein contents in A. thaliana leaves were decreased following rutin treatment. It was concluded carbon isotope discrimination coincided with protein degradation, increase lipid peroxidation and a decrease in ci/ca values may be the primary action site of rutin. The present results suggest that rutin possesses allelopathic potential and could be used as a candidate to develop environment friendly natural herbicide.

  9. Isotopic composition and speciation of sedimentary nitrogen and carbon in the Okinawa Trough over the past 30 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Hsiao, Silver Sung-Yun; Ding, Xiao-Dong; Li, Dawei; Chang, Yuan-Pin; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2015-10-01

    Total organic carbon to total nitrogen ratios (C/N) and their isotopic compositions (δ13CTOC and δ15NTN) are oft-applied proxies to discern terrigenous from marine-sourced organics and to unravel ancient environmental information. In high depositional Asian marginal seas, the inclusion of N-bearing minerals in the bulk sediment dilutes or masks signals sought after in δ15N and δ13C analyses, thus leading to incorrect and even contradictory interpretations. We used KOH-KOBr to separate operationally defined total organic matter into oxidizable (labile) and residual fractions for content and isotope measurements. In a sediment core in the Okinawa Trough, significant amounts of carbon and nitrogen existed in the residual phase, in which the C/N ratio was ~9, resembling most documented sedimentary bulk C/N ratios in the China marginal seas. The residual carbon, which was included in operationally defined total organic carbon (TOC), displayed a δ13C range (-22.7 to -18.9‰, mean -20.7‰) similar to the oft-used marine end-member. After removing the interference from the residual fraction, we found that the temporal pattern of δ13CLOC (LOC denotes labile organic carbon) was more variable. The residual nitrogen content was associated with illite, suggesting a terrestrial origin. Additionally, δ15N in the residual fraction likely reflected the climatic controls (e.g., precipitation) on lithogenic source materials. Further studies are required to explore the controlling factors for carbon and nitrogen isotopic speciation and to retrieve the information locked in the residual fraction.

  10. Quantification of Aridity Changes During the Late Holocene From the Carbon Isotope Composition of Fossil Charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voltas, J.; Ferrio, P.; Espinar, C.

    2006-12-01

    Climate dynamics during the Holocene can be characterized by a variety of proxies that provide information at a different scale and accuracy. In seasonally dry climates, the carbon isotope composition of tree-rings has been related to variables such as rainfall or evaporative demand. Extensive tree-ring records, however, are not always available owing to factors such as human-induced deforestation or harsh conditions for most long-lived trees to thrive. An illustrative example concerns the Mediterranean region. In this work, we aim to show that the original climate signal of wood δ13C is preserved in fossil charcoal (recovered from archaeological sites), and thus can be used to quantify past changes in water availability. We present two case studies on climate reconstruction at the temporal and spatial dimensions from Eastern Spain. We first describe, for a restricted area, the evolution of aridity during the last 4000 years using charcoals ranging from the Bronze Age (ca. 2100 BCE) to the Modern Age (XVIII ca. CE) (1). Further, we characterize, for a larger region, the transition between Bronze and Iron Ages, the so called Cold Iron Age Epoch (ca. 700-500 BCE), using remains from a set of contemporary sites (2). Climatic inferences were obtained after calibration of quantitative models predicting rainfall from wood δ13C. For case (1), charcoals of Mediterranean trees (Aleppo pine, several oaks, mastic) were analysed for δ13C. We found similar trends for the time course of changes in this parameter regardless of the species. Estimated rainfall in the past was 25% to 40% higher than present, with phases of greater water availability (1500-900 BCE; 300 BCE-300 CE) alternating with drier periods (900-300 BCE; 900-1100 CE). For case (2), we combined data from Aleppo pine and Holm oak, which exhibit differential responses to changes in climate seasonality, to provide information on intra-annual rainfall dynamics. The divergence in δ13C between pines and oaks can be

  11. New insights into the carbon isotope composition of speleothem calcite from vegetation, soil, and subsurface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K.; FENG, W.; Breecker, D. O.; Banner, J. L.; Guilfoyle, A.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide new insights into the interpretation of speleothem (cave calcite deposit) δ13C values. We studied two caves in central Texas, which have been actively monitored for over 12 years. We compared δ13C values of soil CO2 (δ13Cs), cave drip water (δ13CDIC), and modern cave calcite (δ13Ccc). Measured average δ13C values of soil CO2 were -13.9 ± 1.4‰ under mixed, shallowly-rooted C3-C4 grasses and were -18.3 ± 0.7‰ under deeply-rooted ashe juniper trees (C3). The δ13CDIC value of minimally-degassed drip water in Natural Bridge Caverns was -10.7 ± 0.3‰. The carbon isotope composition of CO2 in equilibrium with this measured drip water is -18.1 ± 0.3‰. The agreement between juniper soil CO2 and drip water (within ~0.2‰) suggests that the δ13C value of drip water (δ13CDIC) that initially enters the cave is controlled by deeply-rooted plants and may be minimally influenced by host-rock dissolution and/or prior calcite precipitation (PCP). At Inner Space Caverns, δ13CDIC values varied with vegetation above the drip site, distance from the cave entrance, and distance along in-cave flow paths. Whereas CO2 derived from deeply-rooted plants defines the baseline for drip water δ13CDIC entering the caves, kinetic effects associated with the degassing of CO2 and simultaneous precipitation of calcite account for seasonal variability in δ13CDIC and δ13Ccc. We documented increases in δ13CDIC at a rate of up to 0.47‰/hour during the season of peak degassing (winter), suggesting that δ13CDIC variations may be controlled by total elapsed time of CO2 degassing from drip water (exposure time, Texp). We also observed seasonal shifts in the δ13C values of modern calcite grown on glass substrates that are correlated with shifts in drip water δ13CDIC values and drip-rate. We evaluated a 10-year record of modern calcite samples and contrasted the magnitude of variability between calcite precipitated under varying pCO2

  12. Chemical and Strontium, Oxygen, and Carbon Isotopic Compositions of Carbonates from the Lesser Himalaya: Implications to the Strontium Isotope Composition of the Source Waters of the Ganga, Ghaghara, and the Indus Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sunil K.; Trivedi, J. R.; Pande, K.; Ramesh, R.; Krishnaswami, S.

    1998-03-01

    Samples of Precambrian carbonate (mostly dolomite) outcrops collected across the Lesser Himalaya have been analysed for their mineralogy, chemical composition, and isotope ratios of Sr, O, and C to assess the extent of their preservation and their role in contributing to the high radiogenic strontium isotope composition of the source waters of the Ganga, Ghaghara, and the Indus. Their Sr concentrations range from 20 to 363 ppm, δ 18O PDB -1.4 to -12.8‰ and Mn 11-2036 ppm. The petrography of the samples, their low Sr concentrations, and wide range of δ 18O values are suggestive of their postdepositional alteration. The 87Sr/ 86Sr of the bulk samples and their carbonate fractions are similar to one another with values ranging from 0.7064 to 0.8935 and are generally more radiogenic than that of contemporaneous seawater. Comparison of the 87Sr/ 86Sr and Sr/Ca ratios among the carbonates and silicates from the Lesser Himalaya and the source waters of the Ganga, Ghaghara, and the Indus shows that the values for the source waters overlap with those of the silicates but are much higher than those in carbonates. An upper limit of carbonate Sr in the various source waters is calculated to be between 6% and 43%, assuming that all the Ca in the rivers is of carbonate origin. The results show that on the average, weathering of the Precambrian carbonates is unlikely to be a major contributor to the highly radiogenic strontium isotope composition of these source waters; however, they can be a dominant supplier of radiogenic Sr to some rivers on a regional scale. The silicate Sr component in some of the source waters of the Ganga (Bhagirathi, Bhilangna, Alaknanda, and Ganga), Ghaghara (Kali and Sarju), and the Indus (Sutlej) was calculated from the Ca/Na, Sr/Na ratios, and strontium isotope compositions of these rivers and the silicate endmember. These calculations suggest that 33-89% of Sr in the Bhagirathi, Bhilangna, Alaknanda, Ganga, and Sarju rivers is of silicate origin

  13. Carbon-13 isotope composition of the mean CO2 source in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Jasek, Alina; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2014-05-01

    Quantification of carbon emissions in urbanized areas constitutes an important part of the current research on the global carbon cycle. As the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide can serve as a fingerprint of its origin, systematic observations of δ13CO2 and/or Δ14CO2, combined with atmospheric CO2mixing ratio measurements can be used to better constrain the urban sources of this gas. Nowadays, high precision optical analysers based on absorption of laser radiation in the cavity allow a real-time monitoring of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its 13CO2/12CO2 ratio, thus enabling better quantification of the contribution of different anthropogenic and natural sources of this gas to the local atmospheric CO2load. Here we present results of a 2-year study aimed at quantifying carbon isotopic signature of the mean CO2 source and its seasonal variability in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland. The Picarro G2101-i CRDS isotopic analyser system for CO2and 13CO2/12CO2 mixing ratio measurements has been installed at the AGH University of Science and Technology campus in July 2011. Air inlet was located at the top of a 20m tower mounted on the roof of the faculty building (ca. 42m a.g.l.), close to the city centre. While temporal resolution of the analyser is equal 1s, a 2-minute moving average was used for calculations of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratio to reduce measurement uncertainty. The measurements were calibrated against 2 NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) primary standard tanks for CO2 mixing ratio and 1 JRAC (Jena Reference Air Cylinder) isotope primary standard for δ13C. A Keeling approach based on two-component mass and isotope balance was used to derive daily mean isotopic signatures of local CO2 from individual measurements of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratios. The record covers a 2-year period, from July 2011 to July 2013. It shows a clear seasonal pattern, with less negative and less variable δ13CO2 values

  14. Effect of forest and savanna vegetation on the carbon-isotope composition of sediments from the Sanaga River, Cameroon

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, M.I.; Chivas, A.R.; Giresse, P.

    1994-12-01

    The carbon-isotope composition {delta}{sup 13}C values of around -22{per_thousand}. After the river passes through extensively forested regions, the {delta}{sup 13}C values of the sediments closest to the mouth of the river decrease to -25{per_thousand}. Samples collected from rivers with entirely forested catchment had low {delta}{sup 13}C values (from -27 to -29{per_thousand}) consistent with a pure C{sub 3} vegetation source. The downriver carbon-isotope trends are consistent with the hypothesis that observed variations are due to changes in the relative proportions of C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} carbon in the sediments, which are derived from terrestrial vegetation in the river catchment. Some sediments from the Mbam River, the principal tributary of the Sanaga River, have extremely high {delta}{sup 13}C values (up to -16.7{per_thousand}). These high values may be the result of severe erosion in the densely populated and intensively farmed Bamileke region in the headwaters of the Mbam. An underrepresentation of C{sub 4{minus}}derived carbon in the upper reaches of the Sanaga is possibly due to the damming of the Djerem River at Mbakaou. Since the dam was constructed <25 yr ago, this suggests that the {delta}{sup 13}C value of river sediments responds rapidly to changes in the basin. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Precipitation source inferred from stable isotopic composition of Pleistocene groundwater and carbonate deposits in the western desert of Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Sultan, M.; Sturchio, N.; Hassan, F. A.; Abdel, M.; Hamdan, R.; Mahmood, A. M.; Alfy, Z. E.; Stein, T.; Environmental Research; Univ. Coll. London; Cairo Univ.; Ain Shams Univ.; Egyptian Geological survey and Mining Authority; Washington Univ.

    1997-01-01

    An Atlantic source of precipitation can be inferred from stable isotopic data (H and O) for fossil groundwaters and uranium-series-dated carbonate spring deposits from oases in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the context of available stable isotopic data for fossil groundwaters throughout North Africa, the observed isotopic depletions ({delta}D -72 to -81{per_thousand}; {delta}{sup 18}O -10.6 to -11.5{per_thousand}) of fossil ({ge}32,000 yr B.P.) groundwaters from the Nubian aquifer are best explained by progressive condensation of water vapor from paleowesterly wet oceanic air masses that traveled across North Africa and operated at least as far back as 450,000 yr before the present. The values of {delta}{sup 18}O (17.1 to 25.9{per_thousand}) for 45,000- to >450,000-yr-old tufas and vein-filling calcite deposits from the Kharga and Farafra Oases are consistent with deposition from groundwaters having oxygen isotopic compositions similar to those of fossil groundwaters sampled recently at these locations.

  16. {Stable isotope probing of the physical and biological controls that influence the fate and isotopic composition of carbon derived from the terrestrial methane sink }

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxfield, P. J.; Hornibrook, E. R. C.; Dildar, N.; Evershed, R. P.

    2009-04-01

    Methane oxidizing bacteria (Methanotrophs) occur in every soil order, and are an important sink for atmospheric CH4 in well aerated soils. The quantity of C cycled via methanotrophic bacteria in soils is globally significant (Le Mer et al., 2001) yet the fate of methane derived carbon remains largely unknown and unquantified. There is generally good agreement regarding the magnitude of the soil CH4 sink determined by methane flux measurements and process modeling. More poorly characterised aspects of the soil CH4 sink include: (i) the physical and biological controls that influence the mechanism of CH4 oxidation in soils; (ii) the fate of oxidized CH4 carbon; (iii) the proportion of C from CH4 oxidation that is sequestered as organic C or released as CO2 (iv) the magnitude of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) associated with high affinity methanotrophy in soils and the potential influence on the stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CH4. This research combines multiple stable isotope analytical approaches to investigate the magnitude, mechanism and pathways of the terrestrial methane sink. Principally 13CH4 stable isotope labeling techniques (Stable isotope probing; SIP) have been used to characterize and quantify methanotrophic populations in a range of different soils (Maxfield et al., 2006). Following 13CH4-incubations soil cores were removed for compound-specific C isotope analyses. Identification and quantification of methanotrophs was effectively achieved via the analysis of 13C-labelled phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) to link bacterial structure and function. It was also possible to identify the predominant controls influencing the active methanotrophic populations in both grassland and woodland soils (Maxfield et al., 2008). SIP can be combined with further isotopic analyses to facilitate a broader study of methanotroph C uptake and CH4 derived C sequestration. As SIP facilitates taxonomic assignments of the soil microorganisms involved in CH4 C

  17. Evolution of the stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, S.; Schmitt, J.; Bereiter, B.; Schneider, R.; Fischer, H.

    2016-03-01

    We present new δ13C measurements of atmospheric CO2 covering the last glacial/interglacial cycle, complementing previous records covering Terminations I and II. Most prominent in the new record is a significant depletion in δ13C(atm) of 0.5‰ occurring during marine isotope stage (MIS) 4, followed by an enrichment of the same magnitude at the beginning of MIS 3. Such a significant excursion in the record is otherwise only observed at glacial terminations, suggesting that similar processes were at play, such as changing sea surface temperatures, changes in marine biological export in the Southern Ocean (SO) due to variations in aeolian iron fluxes, changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, upwelling of deep water in the SO, and long-term trends in terrestrial carbon storage. Based on previous modeling studies, we propose constraints on some of these processes during specific time intervals. The decrease in δ13C(atm) at the end of MIS 4 starting approximately 64 kyr B.P. was accompanied by increasing [CO2]. This period is also marked by a decrease in aeolian iron flux to the SO, followed by an increase in SO upwelling during Heinrich event 6, indicating that it is likely that a large amount of δ13C-depleted carbon was transferred to the deep oceans previously, i.e., at the onset of MIS 4. Apart from the upwelling event at the end of MIS 4 (and potentially smaller events during Heinrich events in MIS 3), upwelling of deep water in the SO remained reduced until the last glacial termination, whereupon a second pulse of isotopically light carbon was released into the atmosphere.

  18. Climate controls on the carbon isotopic composition of soil organic matter and its regional variability in grasslands and savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, J. M.; Still, C. J.; Cerling, T. E.; Sheldon, N. D.

    2013-12-01

    Future environmental changes driven by anthropogenic CO2 emissions are of increasing importance to human society. Among those changes, the balance between economically and ecologically important C3 and C4 vegetation is of particular significance. There is considerable disagreement in recent predictions of changing distribution of grasses due to anthropogenic climate change because increasing temperature and atmospheric pCO2 have opposing effects on the relative productivity of C3 vegetation. In order to forecast future changes to vegetation composition in grasslands, we must first better constrain the modern relationship between climate and the distribution of C3 and C4 grasses. Due to the isotopic differences between the two photosynthetic pathways, the carbon isotopic composition of soil organic matter (δ13Corg) is a proxy for the relative abundance and productivity of overlying C3 and C4 vegetation. Here, we have compiled an extensive dataset through literature review of δ13Corg to determine the relationships between the distribution of C3 and C4 vegetation in grasslands with climate. We find that the best predictor of δ13Corg variation is growing season average air temperature, and that there are unique relationships between growing season average temperature and δ13Corg for different regions of the world, including North America, South America and Australia. These results imply that the response of C4 grasses to anthropogenic climate warming may not be uniform across different species and grassland communities. We also use this dataset to create an 'isoscape', or a predictive spatial model for the isotopic composition of soil organic carbon for temperate grasslands and savannas worldwide.

  19. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  20. Carbon-isotope composition of Lower Cretaceous fossil wood: Ocean-atmosphere chemistry and relation to sea-level change

    SciTech Connect

    Groecke, D.R.; Hesselbo, S.P.; Jenkyns, H.C.

    1999-02-01

    The carbon-isotope composition of fossil wood fragments, collected through a biostratigraphically well-constructed Aptian (Lower Cretaceous) shallow-marine siliciclastic succession on the Isle of Wight, southern Britain, shows distinct variations with time. The results indicate that the stratigraphic signature of {delta}{sup 13}C{sub wood} through the Aptian was influenced primarily by fluctuations in the isotopic composition of CO{sub 2} in the global ocean-atmosphere system, as registered in marine carbonates elsewhere, and was not governed by local paleoenvironmental and/or paleoecological factors. Negative and positive excursions in {delta}{sup 13}C{sub wood} through the lower Aptian occur in phase with inferred transgressions and regressions, respectively -- a pattern that contrasts with that observed in many previous studies for different time intervals. The relationship between {delta}{sup 13}C variations and relative sea-level change is tentatively interpreted as a response to various climatic and eustatic factors, relating to rapid sea-floor spreading, thermal uplift of ocean floor, emplacement of plateaus, volcanic CO{sub 2} emissions, weathering, and sedimentary rate.

  1. Radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope compositions of chemically fractionated soil organic matter in a temperate-zone forest.

    PubMed

    Koarashi, Jun; Iida, Takao; Asano, Tomohiro

    2005-01-01

    To better understand the role of soil organic matter in terrestrial carbon cycle, carbon isotope compositions in soil samples from a temperate-zone forest were measured for bulk, acid-insoluble and base-insoluble organic matter fractions separated by a chemical fractionation method. The measurements also made it possible to estimate indirectly radiocarbon ((14)C) abundances of acid- and base-soluble organic matter fractions, through a mass balance of carbon among the fractions. The depth profiles of (14)C abundances showed that (1) bomb-derived (14)C has penetrated the first 16cm mineral soil at least; (2) Delta(14)C values of acid-soluble organic matter fraction are considerably higher than those of other fractions; and (3) a significant amount of the bomb-derived (14)C has been preserved as the base-soluble organic matter around litter-mineral soil boundary. In contrast, no or little bomb-derived (14)C was observed for the base-insoluble fraction in all sampling depths, indicating that this recalcitrant fraction, accounting for approximately 15% of total carbon in this temperate-zone forest soil, plays a role as a long-term sink in the carbon cycle. These results suggest that bulk soil organic matter cannot provide a representative indicator as a source or a sink of carbon in soil, particularly on annual to decadal timescales. PMID:15603904

  2. An episode of widespread ocean anoxia during the latest Ediacaran Period revealed by light U isotope compositions in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of ocean redox chemistry during the Ediacaran Period is important for understanding the causal relationship between environmental oxygen levels and early metazoan evolution. Geochemical data (e.g., high Mo and U concentrations and/or heavy Mo and U isotope compositions from sedimentary rocks) provide evidence of extensive ocean oxygenation shortly after the Marinoan glaciation at ca. 632 Ma [1], during the late Ediacaran Period at ca. 560-551 Ma [2], and multiple times during the early Cambrian Period [3, 4]. These episodes of oxygenation may have been separated by intervals of less oxygenated conditions [1, 2]. However, the global redox state of the ocean during the terminal Ediacaran period (ca. 551-541 Ma) is poorly constrained. We address this knowledge gap by measuring carbonate U isotope compositions (δ238U) - a novel global ocean redox proxy - of the Gaojiashan Member of the late Ediacaran Dengying Formation (ca. 551-541 Ma) in South China. An abrupt negative shift in δ238U from values scattering around -0.45‰ to values averaging -0.95‰ (±0.20‰, 2sd) was observed in the middle Gaojiashan Member, suggesting a globally widespread expansion of ocean anoxia during the terminal Ediacaran Period. The negative δ238U shift coincides with the onset of a pronounced positive carbon isotope excursion (from 0‰ to +6‰), suggesting that ocean anoxia is the major driving force behind enhanced organic carbon burial that led to the carbon isotope excursion. The widespread anoxia recorded by the Gaojiashan Member is bracketed by known intervals of extensive ocean oxygenation, thus indicating that the Precambrian-Phanerozoic transition was characterized by oscillating ocean redox conditions. The Ediacara biota (ca. 541 Ma) [5] disappeared shortly after the widespread ocean anoxia, suggesting that an expansion of ocean anoxia may have triggerred the onset of a mass extinction in the latest Ediacaran time. References: [1] Sahoo, et al. (2012), Nature

  3. Emission rate, isotopic composition and origin(s) of magmatic carbon dioxide at Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.

    2012-12-01

    (iii) other Javanese volcanoes whose lavas do not contain calc-silicate xenoliths emit CO2 with identical δ13C values of -4‰. Based on the above observations and on typical arc-type isotopic ratios for water, sulphur and nitrogen in Merapi magmatic gases [2], I rather propose that 80% of CO2 emitted by the volcano ultimately derives from a subducted sediment contribution, in agreement with Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data for bulk lavas [9]. The CO2/HCl ratio of Merapi magmatic gases, normalized to the bulk mass fraction of outgassed Cl inferred from analysis of melt inclusions in clinopyroxene and the matrix glasses, points to a maximum CO2 content of ~1 wt% in the undegassed magma [3], 0.8 wt% of which derived from subducted carbon. [1] Allard, 1980, C.R. Acad Sciences Paris; [2] Allard, 1986, Ph.D thesis, Paris 7 Univ.; [3] Allard et al., 1995, and submitted (JVGR, 2012); [4] Toutain et al., Bull. Volcanol. 2009; [5] Clocchiatti et al., 1982, C.R. Acad. Sciences Paris; [6] Chadwick et al., 2007, J. Petrol.; [7] Deegan et al., 2010, J. Petrol.; [8] Troll et al., 2012, Geophys. Res. Lett.; [9] Gertisser and Keller, 2003, J. Petrol..

  4. Stable carbon isotopic composition of methane from some natural and anthropogenic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.M.; Engelkemeir, A.

    1988-01-20

    The results of delta/sup 13/C measurements of several types of major sources of methane are as follows: rice paddies, -67%; the peat bogs of the Lake Agassiz region of northern Minnesota, -67 +- 5%; swamps of the Florida Everglades, -55 +- 3% and biomass burning, -24 to -32%. In addition, results are presented of a study of the delta/sup 13/C of CH/sub 4/ released from a slough, compared to the CH/sub 4/ in the bottom sediment. These isotopic values are used, together with previously published data, to make up a tentative budget of the fluxes of the major sources for atmospheric methane with an averge isotopic composition matching the measured value for atmospheric CH/sub 4/, taking into account the fractionation effect of the sink processes. This budget requires the existence of a significant flux from an anthropogenic source of heavy CH/sub 4/, calculated to be 45 +- 15 Tg yr/sup -1/ if attributed to CH/sub 4/ from biomass burning, with deltaC = -25%. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  5. Carbon isotope composition of ambient CO2 and recycling: a matrix simulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    da Silveira Lobo Sternberg, Leonel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between isotopic composition and concentration of ambient CO2 in a canopy and its associated convective boundary layer was modeled. The model divides the canopy and convective boundary layer into several layers. Photosynthesis, respiration, and exchange between each layer can be simulated by matrix equations. This simulation can be used to calculate recycling; defined here as the amount of respired CO2 re-fixed by photosynthesis relative to the total amount of respired CO2. At steady state the matrix equations can be solved for the canopy and convective boundary layer CO2 concentration and isotopic profile, which can be used to calculate a theoretical recycling index according to a previously developed equation. There is complete agreement between simulated and theoretical recycling indices for different exchange scenarios. Recycling indices from a simulation of gas exchange between a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the troposphere also agreed with a more generalized form of the theoretical recycling equation developed here.

  6. Sources of Variation in the Carbon Isotopic Composition of Root Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Y.; Pendall, E.

    2008-12-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is comprised of CO2 from root respiration, rhizosphere microbes and heterotrophic respiration from soil organic matter. Isotopic approaches at partitioning autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration require determining source signatures. The signature of root tissue has been commonly used as the root end-member. However, this signature corresponds to all cellular constituents, which are not expected to be part of root respiration. Also, there is some evidence of fractionation during dark respiration so that the use of dried bulk roots may not accurately represent respired CO2. Incubation of excised roots and subsequent isotope analysis offers a simple alternative that can be of use for experimental purposes. To assess the applicability of this approach we measured respiration rates and 13C signatures of the respiration of excised roots from an ongoing field experiment studying the effects of warming and elevated CO2 concentrations and their interactions on soil organic matter dynamics. The experiment uses Free-Air CO2 enrichment and generates continuous labeling with 13C depleted CO2 in the elevated CO2 treatments. Roots were collected from two different depths in the spring and summer seasons and isotopic analyses of respiration and whole tissue were performed. Analyses to date have found no differences in the respiration rates of roots from any treatment at any date. d13C (delta Carbon 13) values of respiration were lower under elevated CO2 and there was no effect of warming or root depth. There was a greater difference between the respiration signatures of roots from elevated CO2 and ambient CO2 in the samples collected in the summer than in the samples collected in the spring because values in the ambient CO2 treatment were higher in the summer. d13C values became significantly more positive with time since collection in all treatments. We hypothesize that root metabolism immediately after excision utilizes labile C (sugars and starch) that

  7. Reconstruction of the paleotemperature and precipitation in the Pleistocene according to the isotope composition of humus and carbonates in loess on the Russian Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryskov, Ya. G.; Velichko, A. A.; Nikolaev, V. I.; Oleinik, S. A.; Timireva, S. N.; Nechaev, V. P.; Panin, P. G.; Morozova, T. D.

    2008-09-01

    The isotope composition of carbon and oxygen in humus and carbonates has been studied in the Pleistocene loess and soil of the Russian Plain in order to reconstruct the paleoclimatic parameters during the time of their formation. It is established that most of the buried soils were formed upon the mean annual temperature exceeding the modern temperature by 1-2°C. The climate aridity (the portion of C4 plants in the ecosystem) varied from 0 to 25%. It is shown that the isotope composition of carbon and oxygen in the humus and carbonates may be a reliable indicator of the paleoclimate (i.e., the paleotemperature, paleoprecipitation, and aridity dynamics). An isotope procedure of culling soil samples unsuitable for paleoclimatic reconstruction is proposed.

  8. Oxygen isotope partitioning between phosphate and carbonate in mammalian apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel Bryant, J.; Koch, Paul L.; Froelich, Philip N.; Showers, William J.; Genna, Bernard J.

    1996-12-01

    The oxygen isotope compositions of phosphate and structural carbonate in mammalian enamel and bone apatite are linked to that of body water at constant body temperature near 37°C, but the isotope systematics of oxygen in structural carbonate are not well understood. Using coupled measurements of the oxygen isotope composition of structural carbonate and phosphate from horse tooth enamel, the apparent oxygen isotope fractionation factor between structural carbonate and body water is estimated to be 1.0263 ± 0.0014. These estimates provide a quantitative basis for using the oxygen isotope composition of structural carbonate in mammalian biogenic apatite for ecological, climatological, and physiological reconstruction.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of particulate organic matter in four large river systems across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, C.; Silva, S.R.; Kelly, V.J.

    2001-01-01

    Riverine particulate organic matter (POM) samples were collected bi-weekly to monthly from 40 sites in the Mississippi, Colorado, Rio Grande, and Columbia River Basins (USA) in 1996-97 and analysed for carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic compositions. These isotopic compositions and C : N ratios were used to identify four endmember sources of POM: Plankton, fresh terrestrial plant material, aquatic plants, and soil organic material. This large-scale study also incorporated ancillary chemical and hydrologic data to refine and extend the interpretations of POM sources beyond the source characterizations that could be done solely with isotopic and elemental ratios. The ancillary data were especially useful for differentiating between seasonal changes in POM source materials and the effects of local nutrient sources and in-stream biogeochemical processes. Average values of ??13 C and C : N for all four river systems suggested that plankton is the dominant source of POM in these rivers, with higher percentages of plankton downstream of reservoirs. Although the temporal patterns in some rivers are complex, the low ??13C and C : N values in spring and summer probably indicate plankton blooms, whereas relatively elevated values in fall and winter are consistent with greater proportions of decaying aquatic vegetation and/or terrestrial material. Seasonal shifts in the ??13C of POM when the C : N remains relatively constant probably indicate changes in the relative rates of photosynthesis and respiration. Periodic inputs of plant detritus are suggested by C : N ratios >15, principally on the Columbia and Ohio Rivers. The ??15N and ??13C also reflect the importance of internal and external sources of dissolved carbon and nitrogen, and the degree of in-stream processing. Elevated ??15N values at some sites probably reflect inputs from sewage and/or animal waste. This information on the spatial and temporal variation in sources of POM in four major river systems should prove

  10. Cretaceous shales from the western interior of North America: sulfur/carbon ratios and sulfur-isotope composition.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gautier, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Sulphur/carbon ratios in cores of selected Cretaceous marine shales average 0.67, a value greater than that observed in recent marine sediments and much higher than global values calculated for the Cretaceous. This may be ascribed to generally low levels of bioturbation and enhanced efficiency of sulphate reduction due to low oxygen levels in Cretaceous seaways. Isotopic compositions of pyrite sulphur vary systematically with level of oxygenation of the depositional environment and therefore with organic carbon abundance and type of organic matter. Samples with >4% organic carbon are extremely depleted in 34S (mean delta 34S -31per mille) and contain hydrogen-rich organic matter. Samples containing <1.5% organic carbon display relatively 'heavy' but wide-ranging delta 34S values (-34.6 to +16.8per mille) and contain hydrogen-poor organic matter. Samples with intermediate amounts of organic carbon have average delta 34S of -25.9per mille and contain both types of organic matter. Relations between the nature of these shales, and their sedimentation rate and depositional environment are discussed.-L.C.H.

  11. Assessing the stable carbon isotopic composition of intercellular CO2 in a CAM plant using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nogués, Salvador; Aranjuelo, Iker; Pardo, Antoni; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquim

    2008-04-01

    Most of the literature focused on internal CO(2) (Ci) determinations in plants has used indirect methods based on gas-exchange estimations. We have developed a new method based on the capture of internal air gas samples and their analysis by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). This method provided a direct measure of intercellular CO(2) concentrations combined with stable carbon isotopic composition in O. ficus-indica plants. Plants were grown at both ambient and elevated CO(2) concentration. During the day period, when the stomata are closed, the Ci was high and was very (13)C-enriched in both ambient and elevated CO(2)-grown plants, reflecting Rubisco's fractionation (this plant enzyme has been shown to discriminate by 29 per thousand, in vitro, against (13)CO(2)). Other enzyme fractionations involved in C metabolism in plants, such as carbonic anhydrase, could also be playing an important role in the diurnal delta(13)C enrichment of the Ci. During the night, when stomata are open, Ci concentrations were higher in elevated (and the corresponding delta(13)C values were more (13)C-depleted) than in ambient CO(2)-grown plants.

  12. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gelwicks, J T; Risatti, J B; Hayes, J M

    1994-02-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems.

  13. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Risatti, J. B.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems.

  14. Carbon isotope compositions of terrestrial C3 plants as indicators of (paleo)ecology and (paleo)climate.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Matthew J

    2010-11-16

    A broad compilation of modern carbon isotope compositions in all C3 plant types shows a monotonic increase in δ(13)C with decreasing mean annual precipitation (MAP) that differs from previous models. Corrections for temperature, altitude, or latitude are smaller than previously estimated. As corrected for altitude, latitude, and the δ(13)C of atmospheric CO(2), these data permit refined interpretation of MAP, paleodiet, and paleoecology of ecosystems dominated by C3 plants, either prior to 7-8 million years ago (Ma), or more recently at mid- to high latitudes. Twenty-nine published paleontological studies suggest preservational or scientific bias toward dry ecosystems, although wet ecosystems are also represented. Unambiguous isotopic evidence for C4 plants is lacking prior to 7-8 Ma, and hominid ecosystems at 4.4 Ma show no isotopic evidence for dense forests. Consideration of global plant biomass indicates that average δ(13)C of C3 plants is commonly overestimated by approximately 2‰.

  15. Carbon isotope composition of individual amino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M.H.; Macko, S.A.; Silter, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    A SIGNIFICANT parties of prebiotic organic matter on the early Earth may have been introduced by carbonaceous asteroids and comets.{sup 1} The distribution and stable-isotope composition of individual organic compounds in carbonaceous meteorites, which are thought to be derived from asteroidal parent bodies, may therefore provide important information concerning mechanistic pathways for prebiotic synthesis{sup 2} and the composition of organic matter on Earth before living systems developed.{sup 3} Previous studies{sup 11,12} have shown that meteorite amino acids are enriched in {sup 13}C relatives to their terrestrial counterparts, but individual species were not distinguished. Here we report the {sup 13}C contents of individual amino acids in the Murchison meteorite. The amino acids are enriched in {sup 13}C, indicating an extraterrestrial origin. Alanine is not racemic, and the {sup 13}C enrichment of its D- and L-enantiomers implies that the excess of the L-enantiomer is indigenous rather than terrestrial contamination, suggesting that optically active materials were present in the early Solar System before life began. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  17. Source characterization using compound composition and stable carbon isotope ratio of PAHs in sediments from lakes, harbor, and shipping waterway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkoo; Kennicutt, Mahlon C; Qian, Yaorong

    2008-01-25

    Molecular compositions and compound specific stable carbon isotope ratios of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) isolated from sediments were used to characterize possible sources of contamination at an urban lake, a harbor, a shipping waterway, and a relatively undisturbed remote lake in the northwest United States. Total PAH concentrations in urban lake sediments ranged from 66.0 to 16,500 microg g(-1) dry wt. with an average of 2600 microg g(-1), which is approximately 50, 100, and 400 times higher on average than PAH in harbor (48 microg g(-1) on average), shipping waterway (26 microg g(-1)), and remote lake (7 microg g(-1)) sediments, respectively. The PAH distribution patterns, methyl phenanthrene/phenanthrene ratios, and a pyrogenic index at the sites suggest a pyrogenic origin for PAHs. Source characterization using principal component analysis and various molecular indices including C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes, C3-dibenzothiophenes/C3-phenanthrenes, and C2-chrysenes/C2-phenanthrenes ratios, was able to differentiate PAH deposited in sediments from the four sites. The uniqueness of the source of the sediment PAHs from urban lake was also illustrated by compound specific stable carbon isotope analysis. It was concluded that urban lake sediments are accumulating PAH from sources that are unique from contamination detected at nearby sites in the same watershed. PMID:17950432

  18. A balloon measurement of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon and nitrogen. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumberge, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon, and nitrogen were measured at energies near 300 MeV amu, using a balloon-borne instrument at an atmospheric depth of approximately 5 g/sq cm. The calibrations of the detectors comprising the instrument are described. The saturation properties of the cesium iodide scintillators used for measurement of particle energy are studied in the context of analyzing the data for mass. The achieved rms mass resolution varies from approximately 0.3 amu at boron to approximately 0.5 amu at nitrogen, consistent with a theoretical analysis of the contributing factors. Corrected for detector interactions and the effects of the residual atmosphere the results are B-10/B=0.33 (+0.17, -0.11), C-13/C=0.06 (+0.13, -0.11), and N-15/N=0.42 (+0.19, -0.17). A model of galactic propagation and solar modulation is described. Assuming a cosmic ray source composition of solar-like isotopic abundances, the model predicts abundances near Earth consistent with the measurements.

  19. Tracking Transport and Transformation of Aerosols using C and O-triple Isotopic Composition of Carbonates: CSI La Jolla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Shaheen, R.; Chong, K.; Hill, A.; Wong, J.; Zhang, Z.; Dominguez, G.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols affect climate in numerous ways, including change in the earth's energy balance by absorbing and scattering solar radiations, alteration of the hydrological cycle by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, change in biogeochemical cycles by providing nutrients. Another significant process is the effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere by providing surfaces for heterogeneous chemical reactions. Fine particles of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5μm (PM2.5) also impinge upon human health by admission to the respiratory system causing a range of cardiopulmonary diseases. Both climate and public health aspects depend on their physical and chemical properties, therefore, understanding physico-chemical and photochemical transformations on aerosol surfaces is important for predicting their effects on climate change, atmospheric chemistry and human health. Here we present initial findings on the processes occurring on aerosol surfaces using isotopes to delineate day and night time chemistry, thus resolving photochemistry effects, and to identify their sources by way of the carbon isotopes. Aerosols were collected on filter papers for 12h during the day and at night time from June-Dec. 2011in La Jolla, CA., using high volume, multi stage cascade impactors. CO2 released after treating these filter papers with 100% phosphoric acid at 27oC was collected, purified chromatographically and analyzed for both C and O isotopes. Our data indicate that both C and O isotopes can be used to distinguish between heterogeneous and photochemical transformations. Aerosol carbonates collected during the day time were depleted in δ13Cday = -23 to -28‰ and δ18Oday = +3 to +10‰ and were isotopically distinct from the carbonates collected at night time δ13Cnight = 0 to -12‰, δ18Onightnight = +23 to +32‰. Higher chloride concentration in the samples collected at night time indicated the transport of marine air masses whereas higher nitrate and sulfate concentration

  20. Organismal versus Environmental Control of the Carbon Isotope Composition of Dicot Angiosperm Pollen: Implications for Paleoenvironmental Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. P.; Schubert, B.; Foelber, K.; Jahren, H.

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence and diagenetic resilience of palynomorphs in Proterozoic and Phanerozoic sediments has led researchers to investigate its potential as an environmental proxy based on its stable isotope composition. Towards this, Loader and Hemming (2001), noted that the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of modern Pinus sylvestris pollen exine correlates with the developmental period temperature (°C) of the pollen (R2=0.68), implying that the δ13C of gymnosperm pollen could be quantitatively utilized as a paleotemperature proxy. However, the majority of pollen-producing organisms during the last ~120 million years have been angiosperms, which are subject to complex internal signaling for reproduction, in addition to environmental triggers. Because these internal signals control the relative proportion of lipids, long-chain fatty acids, and polysaccharides within pollen grains, we hypothesized that the δ13C variability in pollen (δ13Cpollen) from several plants subject to the same external environmental parameters is of the same magnitude as the amount attributed to the environment for gymnosperms. Within growth chambers, the test organism (Brassica rapa) was cultivated under constant light, water, pCO2, and nutrient supply, but exhibited average δ13Cpollen variability = 4.35% within any chamber (n = 6 to 8 plants per chamber). Field experiments were also conducted in which the pollen from the test organism (Hibiscus spp.) was sampled from several botanical gardens within the state of Hawaii. Pollen collected from any one botanical garden exhibited an average δ13Cpollen variability = 4.5% (up to 5 plants per garden). Upon comparing chambers operating at different temperatures (17°C to 32°C), we discovered no correlation (R2=0.01) between the developmental period temperature (°C) and the δ13C of B. rapa pollen; similarly, no correlation was found between the δ13C of Hibiscus pollen and its developmental period temperature (°C) (R2=0.12). This work

  1. Assessment of grain-scale homogeneity and equilibration of carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of minerals in carbonate-bearing metamorphic rocks by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, John M.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Kita, Noriko T.; Valley, John W.

    2010-11-01

    Nineteen samples of metamorphosed carbonate-bearing rocks were analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios by ion microprobe with a ˜5-15 μm spot, three from a regional terrain and 16 from five different contact aureoles. Contact metamorphic rocks further represent four groups: calc-silicate marble and hornfels (6), brucite marble (2), samples that contain a reaction front (4), and samples with a pervasive distribution of reactants and products of a decarbonation reaction (4). The average spot-to-spot reproducibility of standard calcite analyses is ±0.37‰ (2 standard deviations, SD) for δ 18O and ±0.71‰ for δ 13C. Ten or more measurements of a mineral in a sample that has uniform isotope composition within error of measurement can routinely return a weighted mean with a 95% confidence interval of 0.09-0.16‰ for δ 18O and 0.10-0.29‰ for δ 13C. Using a difference of >6SD as the criterion, only four of 19 analyzed samples exhibit significant intracrystalline and/or intercrystalline inhomogeneity in δ 13C at the 100-500 μm scale, with differences within individual grains up to 3.7‰. Measurements are consistent with carbon isotope exchange equilibrium between calcite and dolomite in five of six analyzed samples at the same scale. Because of relatively slow carbon isotope diffusion in calcite and dolomite, differences in δ 13C can survive intracrystalline homogenization by diffusion during cooling after peak metamorphism and likely represent the effects of prograde decarbonation and infiltration. All but 2 of 11 analyzed samples exhibit intracrystalline differences in δ 18O (up to 9.4‰), intercrystalline inhomogeneity in δ 18O (up to 12.5‰), and/or disequilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations among calcite-dolomite, calcite-quartz, and calcite-forsterite pairs at the 100-500 μm scale. Inhomogeneities in δ 18O and δ 13C are poorly correlated with only a single mineral (dolomite) in a single sample exhibiting both. Because of relatively

  2. The Carbon and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Methane Released from Natural Wetlands and Ruminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansdown, John Malcolm

    The delta^{13} {rm C} of CH_4 emitted from the tropical Amazon river floodplain, temperate peat bogs in Washington and Minnesota, and the arctic Alaskan tundra was -59, -73, -66, and -65perthous, respectively. The deltaD of CH_4 from these sites was -294, -308, -339, and -391perthous, respectively, and a linear relationship was observed between the deltaD of CH_4 and soil water. A ^{13} C balance between CH_4, CO _2 and soil organic matter indicated a higher percentage of CH_4 production via methyl conversion at the Amazon floodplain than at the other wetland sites and that the anoxic CO _2 flux was 1.5 to 2.0 times the CH _4 flux. The ^{13} C balance provided greater constraint on the anoxic CO_2 flux than calculations based on soil water gradients. An in situ value of 0.774 for the hydrogen kinetic isotope effect during microbial CH _4 oxidation was estimated from the increase in the delta^{13} {rm C} and deltaD of CH_4 in flux samples from the Amazon site. The average delta^{13 }{rm C} of CH_4 released from an acidic peat bog in Washington state (pH = 3.5) was -73perthous, lower than previously measured at freshwater wetland sites. Soil incubations with ^{14 }C-labeled CO_2 and acetate substrates showed that CO_2 reduction accounted for essentially all methane production in the bog. An in situ value of 0.933 for the carbon kinetic isotope effect for CO_2 reduction was calculated from the delta^{13 }{rm C} of the CH_4 flux and soil water CO_2.. The delta^{13} {rm C} and deltaD of CH_4 emitted from ruminants was measured and averaged -63 and -404perthous, respectively. CO _2 reduction accounted for ~70% of rumen CH_4 production based on the change in the delta ^{13}{rm C} and deltaD of rumen CH_4 vs. time during normal conditions and after the addition of deuterated water to the rumen. These results contrast the dogma in the literature that CO_2 reduction accounts for essentially all CH _4 production in the rumen. A global budget for the deltaD of CH_4 was

  3. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelwicks, J.T.; Risatti, J.B.; Hayes, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30??C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken into account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate ??? total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 ?? 0.9% to - 57.2 ?? 2.3z%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 ?? 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring. ?? 1989.

  4. Similar glacial and Holocene deep water circulation inferred from southeast Pacific benthic foraminiferal carbon isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Katsumi; Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean

    1999-04-01

    We present Holocene and last glacial maximum (LGM) oxygen and carbon isotope measurements on Planulina wuellerstorfi in six southeast Pacific cores. Sedimentation rates are low in this part of the ocean, and measurements were made on individual foraminiferal shells in order to identify the Holocene and glacial individuals on the basis of their extreme δ18O. The new δ13C data were combined with previous P. wuellerstorfi data for interpretation of global thermohaline circulation. Data from the Southern Ocean were examined closely for regional coherency and a few anomalous δ13C values suspected of having productivity overprint were removed. The resulting global δ13C distributions and gradients indicate that the deep water circulation was similar during the Holocene and LGM. This interpretation brings δ13C data to a better agreement with Cd/Ca data and marks a sharp contrast with a widely held view based on δ13C measurements that the glacial Southern Ocean was the terminus of the thermohaline circulation. The proposed presence of glacial North Atlantic Deep Water does not necessarily contradict the postulated presence of Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water.

  5. Effect of Salinity on the Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition of Microbial Mats and Associated Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Parenteau, M. N.; Kubo, M. D.; Des Marais, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Modern microbial mats are commonly used as analogs for understanding early ecosystem evolution. A primary feature of benthic ecosystems is the fixation of CO2 in the photic zone and transfer and/or mineralization of organic carbon through a diverse tropic structure. Generally, the resulting δ13C values for organic matter relative to DIC is small which indicates that these mats are CO2-limited. Microcoleus mat flux measurements indicate that small amounts of CO2 fixed during the day are lost to the overlying water at night as C13-enriched DIC (Des Marais and Canfield 1994). This loss results in depletion in mat organic matter and is thought to occur as a result of remineralized DIC fixation by chemo- and/or photoautotrophs. We have examined the fate of fixed carbon in hypersaline mats by analysis of the stable C-isotopes of bulk organic carbon and lipid compounds in a laminated-Microcoleus mat (90 ‰, pH 8.6) and in a gypsum-endoevaporitic, Halothece mat (163‰, pH 7.4). In the surface photic zone of Microcoleus mat, the δ13C TOC was -10.0 ‰ with membrane fatty acids (i-15, n-16, n-18, cy-19) ranging from -17.2 to -18.0‰. Cyanobacterial alkanes were similarly depleted (n-17 = -19.5‰). Eurkaryotic sterols and bacterial hopanoids were somewhat enriched with δ13C values ~-15‰. For Microcoleus mat, little variation occurred over 70 mm of core depth. The TOC and FA values for surface, endoevaporitic Halothece mat were generally similar to those of Microcoleus. However, below the surface gypsum crust, discrimination increased. Mass balance calculations for surface FA = -18.5‰ while the FA from layers below the crust = -25.2‰. The δ13C values for cyanobacterial alkanes (~-20‰) were similar from all layers while hopanoids from below crust were slightly depleted relative to those from surface. An apparent increased discrimination during fixation of remineralized DIC presumably by anoxygenic phototrophs present below the surface gypsum crust (Jahnke et al

  6. Leaf wax composition and carbon isotopes vary among major conifer groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Leslie, Andrew B.; Wing, Scott L.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf waxes (e.g. n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids) and their carbon isotopes (δ13C) are commonly used to track past changes in the carbon cycle, water availability, and plant ecophysiology. Previous studies indicated that conifers have lower n-alkane concentrations than angiosperms and that 13C fractionation during n-alkane synthesis (εn-alkane) is smaller than in angiosperms. These prior studies, however, sampled a limited phylogenetic and geographic subset of conifers, leaving out many important subtropical and Southern Hemisphere groups that were once widespread and common components of fossil assemblages. To expand on previous work, we collected 43 conifer species (and Ginkgo biloba) from the University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley, sampling all extant conifer families and almost two-thirds of extant genera. We find that Pinaceae, including many North American species used in previous studies, have very low or no n-alkanes. However, other conifer groups have significant concentrations of n-alkanes, especially Southern Hemisphere Araucariaceae and Podocarpaceae (monkey puzzles, Norfolk Island pines, and yellowwoods), and many species of Cupressaceae (junipers and relatives). Within the Cupressaceae, we find total n-alkane concentrations are high in subfamilies Cupressoideae and Callitroideae, but significantly lower in the early diverging taxodioid lineages (including bald cypress and redwood). Individual n-alkane chain lengths have a weak phylogenetic signal, except for n-C29 alkane, but when combined using average chain length (ACL), a strong phylogenetic signal emerges. The strong phylogenetic signal in ACL, observed in the context of a common growth environment for all plants we sampled, suggests that ACL is strongly influenced by factors other than climate. An analysis of εn-alkane indicates a strong phylogenetic signal in which the smallest biosynthetic fractionation occurs in Pinaceae and the largest in Taxaceae (yews and relatives). The

  7. Attempts to comprehend Martian surface processes through interpretation of the oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Grady, Monica M.

    1992-01-01

    The SNC meteorites are known to contain trace quantities of a variety of secondary minerals such as carbonates, sulfates, and aluminosilicates. Since these constituents are thought to be mostly preterrestrial in origin, their study has the potential to provide rigorous constraints on the nature of martian weathering processes. However, this line of investigation is potentially complicated by the presence within the meteorite samples of any additional weathering products produced by terrestrial processes. Examination of such terrestrial components is important since weathering processes that affect meteorite samples following their fall to Earth might have some bearing on the nature of analogous processes at the surface of Mars. It is obviously necessary to try and distinguish which secondary components in SNC meteorites are terrestrial in origin from those that are preterrestrial. Herein consideration is made of the stable isotopic compositions of weathering products in two SNC meteorites: EET A79001 (a sample collected from Antarctica) and Nakhla (a fall from Egypt, 1911).

  8. Carbon isotopic composition of bacterial methane in a soil incubation experiment: Contributions of acetate and CO 2/H 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Atsuko; Wada, Eitaro

    1993-08-01

    Anaerobic incubations of paddy soil collected from Konosu, Japan, were carried out for 10 weeks to clarify the general principles that govern the variation of carbon isotopic composition of bacterial methane from freshwater areas. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of CH 4, CO 2, and acetate produced in the incubated system were measured. The δ13C value of biogenic CH 4 was highly variable ranging from -60 to -33%., corresponding to changes in its formation pathways: acetate fermentation and CO 2/H 2reduction. Acetate accumulated only during the first week. After it became depleted, acetate production completely limited CH 4 production. The δ13C value of the methyl carbon of acetate, which was accumulated with addition of inhibitor for methanogenesis, ranged from -43 to -30%.. The δ13C value of methane from acetate was estimated to be -43 to -30%., after acetate depletion. The δ13C value of CH 4 from CO 2/H 2 reduction was estimated to be -77 to -60%.. An enrichment in 13C of CO 2 localized around the site of methanogenesis was suggested. CO 2 produced in situ during methanogenesis (e.g., CO 2 from carboxyl group of acetate) was possibly utilized as well. Using the above δ13C values of two endmembers of CH 4, the change of acetate contribution for CH 4 production was calculated: less than 12% until week 1, 65 to 100% at weeks 1 to 3, 16 to 28% at weeks 3 to 5, and 35 to 40% after week 5. Variability of CH 4δ13C resulted from the difference in contribution of each biological process. Also, the δ13C value of CH 4 was a useful indicator for assessing the contribution of each process to methane production in sulfate depleted freshwater areas.

  9. Different carbon reservoirs of auriferous fluids in African Archean and Proterozoic gold deposits? Constraints from stable carbon isotopic compositions of quartz-hosted CO2-rich fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüders, Volker; Klemd, Reiner; Oberthür, Thomas; Plessen, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon (and when present, nitrogen) isotope ratios of fluid inclusions in quartz from selected gold deposits in Ghana and Zimbabwe have been analyzed using a crushing device interfaced to an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) in order to constrain possible sources of the auriferous fluids. The study revealed a striking difference in stable carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in quartz-hosted fluid inclusions from Archean and Paleoproterozoic orogenic gold deposits and points to diverse sources of CO2 in the studied deposits. Whether this finding can be generalized for other Archean and Proterozoic orogenic gold deposits worldwide remains open. However, a significant CO2 contribution by mantle degassing can be ruled out for every deposit studied. Devolatilization of greenstone belt rocks is the most likely source for CO2 in some Archean Au deposits in Zimbabwe, whereas CO2 in Proterozoic vein-type Au deposits in the West African Craton is most likely derived from Corg-bearing metasedimentary rocks. The δ13CCO2 values of high-density CO2-rich, water-poor inclusions hosted in quartz pebbles from the world-class Au-bearing conglomerate deposits at Tarkwa (Ghana) differ considerably from the δ13CCO2 values of similar high-density CO2-rich inclusions in vein quartz from the giant Ashanti deposit (Ghana) and disprove the idea of derivation of the Tarkwaian quartz (and gold?) from an older equivalent to the Ashanti vein-type gold deposit.

  10. Tracing the Carbon Cycle in a Small Boreal Catchment of a Groundwater Dominated River Using the Isotopic Composition of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinikoski, P. I. A.; Karhu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the carbon cycle in river systems is particularly important in fragile catchments with agriculture, urbanization, water purification facilities and other possible contamination sources. The isotopic composition and concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) has been used to determine carbon sinks and sources in river systems. The Vantaanjoki River, in southern Finland, is located in one of the most densely populated areas in Finland. Previous studies have shown the river having a considerable amount of groundwater - surface water interaction which leads to local groundwater being vulnerable to any contaminants released into the river. The catchment of the river has six water purification facilities, and during times of high discharge some of the waste water is released into the river without treatment. Other possible sources of contamination are urban areas, agriculture and a saw mill. In this study the isotopic composition of DIC was studied, along with the concentration of DIC in the river water, to determine the major influences in carbon balance in the river water, to see if human induced changes in the environment are affecting the carbon cycle. The highest δ13CDIC values were found in the summer, and the lowest ones in the spring. Locations of the water purification facilities or fields along the flow path did not show on the δ13CDIC values, nor in the DIC contents of the water. Similar trends in δ13CDIC values related to the variations between warm and cold seasons have been reported in other studies as well and are likely due to organic material forming and decaying in and around the river channel.

  11. Oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of limestones and dolomites, bikini and eniwetok atolls.

    PubMed

    Gross, M G; Tracey, J I

    1966-03-01

    Aragonitic, unconsolidated sediments from the borings on the Eniwetok and Bikini atolls are isotopically identical with unaltered skeletal fragments, whereas the recrystallized limestones exhibit isotopic variations resulting from alteration in meteoric waters during periods of emergence. Dolomites and associated calcites are enriched in O(18), perhaps because of interaction with hypersaline brines.

  12. Stable isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group, northwestern Australia.

    PubMed

    Buick, R; Des Marais, D J; Knoll, A H

    1995-06-20

    Marine carbonate rocks from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group of northwestern Australia show little deviation (+/-1.3%) in whole-rock delta 13C(carb)-values about a mean of -0.5%. This narrow range persists despite close sampling (every 10-20 m) through long sections (up to 2500 m) that are geographically widespread (up to 250 km apart), over many depositional environments (supralittoral to outer shelf), sediment sources (stromatolitic bioherms to detrital calcilutites) and rock types (pure limestones to dolomitic shales). The only major excursions from the norm seem related to unusual environmental or post-depositional processes, as they are correlated with large enrichments (to -3%) or depletions (to -16%) in 18O. Relatively heavy delta 13C-values, up to +2.5%, occur in a single bed of brecciated ferruginous dolostone at a single locality; these abnormal values may result from local evaporitic conditions. Limey and shaley nodular dolostones have delta 13C-values as low as -4.3%, probably caused by remineralization of organic matter during late and patchy dolomitization. Most notably, sharp negative excursions in delta 13C, up to -8.4%, occur in bleached kerogen-free rocks with mineral assemblages of dolomite + quartz + calcite +/- tremolite + talc, reflecting isotopic re-equilibration in thick metamorphic aureoles around dolerite intrusions. General environmental variations are minor, with delta 13C-values of peritidal facies tending to be slightly positive whereas those of subtidal facies are slightly negative. There are no strong secular trends, but subtle fluctuations within the range -2 to +l% can be correlated along the northwestern margin of the basin. This resembles the pattern seen in other Mesoproterozoic successions, but is markedly unlike the heavy background (> +5%) and extreme variations (up to l0%) in delta 13C evident in Neoproterozoic successions of similar thickness and environmental setting. Hence, in contrast to the Neoproterozoic, the global

  13. Stable isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group, northwestern Australia.

    PubMed

    Buick, R; Des Marais, D J; Knoll, A H

    1995-06-20

    Marine carbonate rocks from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group of northwestern Australia show little deviation (+/-1.3%) in whole-rock delta 13C(carb)-values about a mean of -0.5%. This narrow range persists despite close sampling (every 10-20 m) through long sections (up to 2500 m) that are geographically widespread (up to 250 km apart), over many depositional environments (supralittoral to outer shelf), sediment sources (stromatolitic bioherms to detrital calcilutites) and rock types (pure limestones to dolomitic shales). The only major excursions from the norm seem related to unusual environmental or post-depositional processes, as they are correlated with large enrichments (to -3%) or depletions (to -16%) in 18O. Relatively heavy delta 13C-values, up to +2.5%, occur in a single bed of brecciated ferruginous dolostone at a single locality; these abnormal values may result from local evaporitic conditions. Limey and shaley nodular dolostones have delta 13C-values as low as -4.3%, probably caused by remineralization of organic matter during late and patchy dolomitization. Most notably, sharp negative excursions in delta 13C, up to -8.4%, occur in bleached kerogen-free rocks with mineral assemblages of dolomite + quartz + calcite +/- tremolite + talc, reflecting isotopic re-equilibration in thick metamorphic aureoles around dolerite intrusions. General environmental variations are minor, with delta 13C-values of peritidal facies tending to be slightly positive whereas those of subtidal facies are slightly negative. There are no strong secular trends, but subtle fluctuations within the range -2 to +l% can be correlated along the northwestern margin of the basin. This resembles the pattern seen in other Mesoproterozoic successions, but is markedly unlike the heavy background (> +5%) and extreme variations (up to l0%) in delta 13C evident in Neoproterozoic successions of similar thickness and environmental setting. Hence, in contrast to the Neoproterozoic, the global

  14. Stable isotopic compositions of carbonates from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group, northwestern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buick, R.; Des Marais, D. J.; Knoll, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    Marine carbonate rocks from the Mesoproterozoic Bangemall Group of northwestern Australia show little deviation (+/-1.3%) in whole-rock delta 13C(carb)-values about a mean of -0.5%. This narrow range persists despite close sampling (every 10-20 m) through long sections (up to 2500 m) that are geographically widespread (up to 250 km apart), over many depositional environments (supralittoral to outer shelf), sediment sources (stromatolitic bioherms to detrital calcilutites) and rock types (pure limestones to dolomitic shales). The only major excursions from the norm seem related to unusual environmental or post-depositional processes, as they are correlated with large enrichments (to -3%) or depletions (to -16%) in 18O. Relatively heavy delta 13C-values, up to +2.5%, occur in a single bed of brecciated ferruginous dolostone at a single locality; these abnormal values may result from local evaporitic conditions. Limey and shaley nodular dolostones have delta 13C-values as low as -4.3%, probably caused by remineralization of organic matter during late and patchy dolomitization. Most notably, sharp negative excursions in delta 13C, up to -8.4%, occur in bleached kerogen-free rocks with mineral assemblages of dolomite + quartz + calcite +/- tremolite + talc, reflecting isotopic re-equilibration in thick metamorphic aureoles around dolerite intrusions. General environmental variations are minor, with delta 13C-values of peritidal facies tending to be slightly positive whereas those of subtidal facies are slightly negative. There are no strong secular trends, but subtle fluctuations within the range -2 to +l% can be correlated along the northwestern margin of the basin. This resembles the pattern seen in other Mesoproterozoic successions, but is markedly unlike the heavy background (> +5%) and extreme variations (up to l0%) in delta 13C evident in Neoproterozoic successions of similar thickness and environmental setting. Hence, in contrast to the Neoproterozoic, the global

  15. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Edger, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Hayes, John M.; DesMarais, David J.; Cady, Sherry; Hope, Janet M.; Summons, Roger E.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic microbial communities associated with the siliceous vent walls and outflow channel of Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, have been examined for lipid biomarkers and carbon isotopic signatures. These data were compared with that obtained from representatives of three Aquificales genera. Thermocrinis ruber. "Thermocrinis sp. HI", Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, Aquifex pyrophilus and Aquifex aeolicus all contained phospholipids composed not only of the usual ester-linked fatty acids, but also ether-linked alkyls. The fatty acids of all cultured organisms were dominated by a very distinct pattern of n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21 compounds. The alkyl glycerol ethers were present primarily as CIS() monoethers with the expection of the Aquifex spp. in which dialkyl glycerol ethers with a boarder carbon-number distribution were also present. These Aquificales biomarker lipids were the major constituents in the lipid extracts of the Octopus Spring microbial samples. Two natural samples, a microbial biofilm growing in association with deposition of amorphous silica on the vent walls at 92 C, and the well-known 'pink-streamers community' (PSC), siliceous filaments of a microbial consortia growing in the upper outflow channel at 87 C were analyzed. Both the biofilm and PSC samples contained mono and dialkyl glycerol ethers with a prevalence of C-18 and C-20 alkyls. Phospholipid fatty acids were comprised of both the characteristic Aquificales n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21, and in addition, a series of iso-branched fatty acids from i-C-15:0 to i-C-21:0, With i-C-17:0 dominant in the PSC and i-C-19:0 in the biofilm, suggesting the presence of two major bacterial groups. Bacteriohopanepolyols were absent and the minute quantities of archaeol detected showed that Archaea were only minor constituents. Carbon isotopic compositions of the PSC yielded information about community structure and likely physiology. Biomass was C-13-depleted (10.9%) relative to available

  16. Isotopic composition of carbon dioxide from a boreal forest fire: Inferring carbon loss from measurements and modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuur, E.A.G.; Trumbore, S.E.; Mack, M.C.; Harden, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Fire is an important pathway for carbon (C) loss from boreal forest ecosystems and has a strong effect on ecosystem C balance. Fires can range widely in severity, defined as the amount of vegetation and forest floor consumed by fire, depending on local fuel and climatic conditions. Here we explore a novel method for estimating fire severity and loss of C from fire using the atmosphere to integrate ecosystem heterogeneity at the watershed scale. We measured the ??13C and ??14C isotopic values of CO2 emitted from an experimental forest fire at the Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW), near Fairbanks, Alaska. We used inverse modeling combined with dual isotope near measurements of C contained in aboveground black spruce biomass and soil organic horizons to estimate the amount of C released by this fire. The experimental burn was a medium to severe intensity fire that released, on average, about 2.5 kg Cm-2, more than half of the C contained in vegetation and soil organic horizon pools. For vegetation, the model predicted that approximately 70-75% of pools such as needles, fine branches, and bark were consumed by fire, whereas only 20-30% of pools such as coarse branches and cones were consumed. The fire was predicted to have almost completely consumed surface soil organic horizons and burned about half of the deepest humic horizon. The ability to estimate the amount of biomass combusted and C emission from fires at the watershed scale provides an extensive approach that can complement more limited intensive ground-based measurements.

  17. Reliability of stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of pedogenic needle fibre calcite as environmental indicators: examples from Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Millière, Laure; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Bindschedler, Saskia; Cailleau, Guillaume; Verrecchia, Eric P

    2011-09-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope analyses were conducted on pedogenic needle fibre calcite (NFC) from seven sites in areas with roughly similar temperate climates in Western Europe, including the Swiss Jura Mountains, eastern and southern France, northern Wales, and north-eastern Spain. The δ(13)C values (-12.5 to-6.8 ‰ Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB)) record the predominant C(3) vegetation cover at the sites. A good correlation was found between mean monthly climatic parameters (air temperature, number of frost days, humidity, and precipitation) and δ(18)O values (-7.8 to-3.4‰ VPDB) of all the NFC. Similar seasonal variations of δ(18)O values for monthly NFC samples from the Swiss sites and those of mean monthly δ(18)O values of local precipitation and meteorological data point out precipitation and preferential growth/or recrystallisation of the pedogenic needle calcite during dry seasons. These covariations indicate the potential of stable isotope compositions of preserved NFC in fossil soil horizons as a promising tool for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions.

  18. Carbon and oxygen isotope composition of Sphagnum cellulose and their dependence on temperature and precipitation in a Scandinavian mire (Kiruna, northern Sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecke, Andreas; Wissel, Holger; Vos, Heinz; Barnekow, Lena; Hicks, Sheila

    2010-05-01

    The peat profile investigated was retrieved from a site close to the city Kiruna located in Northern Sweden at the northern limit for Picea at 67°59'N and 20°19'E. The site is a mixed mire consisting of bog and fen vegetation with ombrogenic peat formed in the hummocks. A peat monolith was cut from the mire surface in 2003 and sampled continuously at varying depth intervals to provide near-annual resolution in the upper part in accordance with the radiocarbon chronology. Sphagnum tissue was hand picked from the bulk material and separate branch and stem samples were prepared. Cellulose extraction followed a sodium chlorite bleaching protocol and was completed by an additional copper-complex treatment to exclude minerogenic contamination (Wissel et al., 2008). Carbon isotope values were corrected for changes of the atmospheric carbon dioxide isotope composition during the last century. The detailed chronologies of carbon and oxygen isotope composition of cellulose cover the period back to AD 1720 with a time resolution of 1 to 8 years. The content of extracted cellulose in branches and stems varied from 10 to 20 %. Overall isotope variations amounted to several per mil for both carbon and oxygen. We found the isotope composition of the different morphological units of the Sphagnum moss to be considerably offset. On average, branches were enriched by 2.1 per mil in carbon and by 1.2 per mil in oxygen compared to stems. Explanations for these isotopic differences include plant physiological as well as environmental reasons. The evaluation of the climatic impact on the cellulose isotope records was based on monthly temperatures from Tornedalen (Klingbjer and Moberg, 2003) and on monthly precipitation from Kiruna. To enable direct correlation analysis, the instrumental records were averaged to match the temporal resolution of the proxy time series. April temperature had the strongest effect on the carbon isotope composition of cellulose and could explain about one

  19. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of particulate organic matter in four large river systems across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Carol; Silva, Steven R.; Kelly, Valerie J.

    2001-05-01

    Riverine particulate organic matter (POM) samples were collected bi-weekly to monthly from 40 sites in the Mississippi, Colorado, Rio Grande, and Columbia River Basins (USA) in 1996-97 and analysed for carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic compositions. These isotopic compositions and C : N ratios were used to identify four endmember sources of POM: plankton, fresh terrestrial plant material, aquatic plants, and soil organic material. This large-scale study also incorporated ancillary chemical and hydrologic data to refine and extend the interpretations of POM sources beyond the source characterizations that could be done solely with isotopic and elemental ratios. The ancillary data were especially useful for differentiating between seasonal changes in POM source materials and the effects of local nutrient sources and in-stream biogeochemical processes.Average values of 13C and C : N for all four river systems suggested that plankton is the dominant source of POM in these rivers, with higher percentages of plankton downstream of reservoirs. Although the temporal patterns in some rivers are complex, the low 13C and C : N values in spring and summer probably indicate plankton blooms, whereas relatively elevated values in fall and winter are consistent with greater proportions of decaying aquatic vegetation and/or terrestrial material. Seasonal shifts in the 13C of POM when the C : N remains relatively constant probably indicate changes in the relative rates of photosynthesis and respiration. Periodic inputs of plant detritus are suggested by C : N ratios >15, principally on the Columbia and Ohio Rivers. The 15N and 13C also reflect the importance of internal and external sources of dissolved carbon and nitrogen, and the degree of in-stream processing. Elevated 15N values at some sites probably reflect inputs from sewage and/or animal waste. This information on the spatial and temporal variation in sources of POM in four major river systems should prove useful in future

  20. Problem of soot aggregates separation and purification for Carbon isotopic composition analyses - burning experiment and real black layers from speleothems examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hercman, Helena; Zawidzki, Pawel; Majewska, Agata

    2015-04-01

    Burning products are often used as an indicator of fire or prehistoric men activities. When it consists of macroscopically visible black layer it may be studied by different methods. When it is dispersed within sediment it is necessary to apply method for burning product separation. Soot aggregates as a result of incomplete combustion of organic materials are most reliable indication of burning. Size of soot particles is too small to observe by optical microscopy. There are two main advantages of application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for investigations of samples formed as a result of organic materials (like wood) combustion. First, it makes possible to investigate not only morphology but also its interior structure. The carbon layers arrangement is characteristic for particles obtained from combustion processes, and it directly confirm that these particles were formed that way. And second, analysis of chemical composition using of EDS spectroscopy in transmission microscope are precise and it spatial resolution is about a few nanometers. Burning chamber for wood burning experiments was constructed. It allows wood burning with controlling of burning temperature, carbon isotopic composition in carbon dioxide of burning atmosphere and carbon dioxide originated during burning. Burning products are collected on the plates with controlling of plates material, temperature and distance from flame. Two types of samples were studied. The first type of samples consisted the products of recent wood burning. The second type of samples consisted of black layers collected from speleothems. Soot aggregates were chemically separated from other burning products collected on plates. Process of chemical separation and purity of soot material were tested by TEM observations. Isotopic carbon composition at each step of soot separation as well as original wood fragments was analysed at the Isotopic Laboratory for Dating and Palaeoenvironment Studies, Polish Academy of

  1. The pool of organic carbon and its isotopic composition in cryomorphic quasi-gley chernozems of the Trans-Baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybenov, Yu. B.; Chimitdorzhieva, G. D.; Egorova, R. A.; Gongal'skii, K. B.

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-gley chernozems of the Trans-Baikal region are characterized by the clearly pronounced anisotropy of their properties related to carbon sequestration processes. The main carbon pool is concentrated in the humus horizon; the organic carbon content sharply decreases down the soil profile. The pool of organic carbon in the cryogenic fissures is two to three times higher than its pool in the enclosing soil horizons. The analysis of stable carbon isotopes in the plants and soils attests to the predominance of C3 plants. The composition of stable carbon isotopes is clearly differentiated in the soil profile with an increase in the portion of heavy isotopes in the deep horizons. In the humus pockets and cryogenic fissures, the increase in the portion of heavy carbon isotopes with the depth is weaker, which attests to a lower degree of the organic matter transformation. It is probable that the organic matter in the fissures is younger than the organic matter in the enclosing soil mass and derives from the upper humus horizon. The organic matter in the cryogenic fissures preserves the evolutionary properties of humus from the upper horizons.

  2. Organic and inorganic components of aerosols over the central Himalayas: winter and summer variations in stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Prashant; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Joshi, H; Naja, M

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol samples were collected from a high elevation mountain site, Nainital, in India (1958 m asl) during September 2006 to June 2007 and were analyzed for water-soluble inorganic species, total carbon, nitrogen, and their isotopic composition (δ(13)C and δ(15)N, respectively). The chemical and isotopic composition of aerosols revealed significant anthropogenic influence over this remote free-troposphere site. The amount of total carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic composition suggest a considerable contribution of biomass burning to the aerosols during winter. On the other hand, fossil fuel combustion sources are found to be dominant during summer. The carbon aerosol in winter is characterized by greater isotope ratios (av. -24.0‰), mostly originated from biomass burning of C4 plants. On the contrary, the aerosols in summer showed smaller δ(13)C values (-26.0‰), indicating that they are originated from vascular plants (mostly of C3 plants). The secondary ions (i.e., SO4 (2-), NH4 (+), and NO3 (-)) were abundant due to the atmospheric reactions during long-range transport in both seasons. The water-soluble organic and inorganic compositions revealed that they are aged in winter but comparatively fresh in summer. This study validates that the pollutants generated from far distant sources could reach high altitudes over the Himalayan region under favorable meteorological conditions.

  3. Intraspecific variations in carbon-isotope and oxygen-isotope compositions of a brachiopod Basiliola lucida collected off Okinawa-jima, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideko; Asami, Ryuji; Abe, Osamu; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Keiichi; Iryu, Yasufumi

    2013-08-01

    This study presents intraspecific variations in carbon-isotope (δ13C) and oxygen-isotope (δ18O) compositions of nine specimens of a subtropical brachiopod, Basiliola lucida, collected west of Okinawa-jima, Ryukyu Islands, southwestern Japan. The δ13C values of samples collected along the maximum growth axis (ontogenetic samples) from two modern and seven older (pre-1945 cal AD) shells show no seasonal changes. The modern shells, which were collected from comparable depths, have similar δ13C values that fall within the range of calcite precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater (equilibrium calcite) (δ13CEC values), and their mean δ13C values are ˜1.1-1.6‰ less than those from the older shells. This decrease in δ13C values is similar in magnitude to the decreases in atmospheric CO2 and the oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon at the sea surface in recent years (13C Suess effect), suggesting that the effect can even be detected at water depths of 200-300 m in the subtropical northwestern Pacific Ocean. The δ18O values fluctuate within a narrow range (0.26-0.41‰) with no seasonal changes, and they exhibit small (0.14-0.51‰) offsets from those of equilibrium calcite (δ18OEC values). A statistically significant negative linear relationship is established between seawater temperature and mean δ18O values of the nine shells, but the slope (-0.31‰/°C) is steeper than those of equilibrium calcite (-0.23‰/°C) and other calcareous organisms (-0.15‰ to -0.26‰/°C). The cross-plots of the δ13C and δ18O values suggest that the degree of the vital effect varies among individuals in this species. The δ13C and δ18O values of B. lucida are potentially useful for reconstructing the δ13C and δ18O evolution of ancient oceans, because both values show small intraspecific variations, the former is identical to the δ13CEC values, and the latter shows small within-shell variations and small, nearly constant offsets from the δ18OEC values.

  4. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  5. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-10-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. 38 references.

  6. Stable isotopic compositions of elemental carbon in PM1.1 in north suburb of Nanjing Region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhaobing; Jiang, Wenjuan; Chen, Shanli; Sun, Deling; Shi, Lei; Zeng, Gang; Rui, Maoling

    2016-02-01

    Stable isotopic compositions (δ13C) of elemental carbon (EC) in PM1.1 in north suburb of Nanjing region were determined in order to quantitatively evaluate the carbon sources of atmospheric fine particles during different seasons. Besides, δ13C values from potential sources such as coal combustion, vehicle exhaust, biomass burning, and dust were synchronously measured. The results showed that the average δ13C values of EC in PM1.1 in winter and summer were - 23.89 ± 1.6‰ and - 24.76 ± 0.9‰, respectively. Comparing with δ13C values from potential sources, we concluded that the main sources of EC in PM1.1 were from the emission of coal combustion and vehicle exhaust. The higher δ13C values in winter than those in summer were chiefly attributed to the more coal consumption. Combining with the concentrations of SO42 - and K+ in PM1.1, the high δ13C values of EC on 24 December and 27 December 2013 were ascribed to extra input of corn straw burning in addition to coal combustion and vehicle exhaust.

  7. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ(13)C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19-C36), fatty acids (C8-C32) and n-alcohols (C16-C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ(13)C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from -34.1 to -24.7% and -26.9 to -24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  8. Iron isotope composition of particles produced by UV-femtosecond laser ablation of natural oxides, sulfides, and carbonates.

    PubMed

    d'Abzac, Francois-Xavier; Beard, Brian L; Czaja, Andrew D; Konishi, Hiromi; Schauer, James J; Johnson, Clark M

    2013-12-17

    The need for femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) systems coupled to MC-ICP-MS to accurately perform in situ stable isotope analyses remains an open question, because of the lack of knowledge concerning ablation-related isotopic fractionation in this regime. We report the first iron isotope analysis of size-resolved, laser-induced particles of natural magnetite, siderite, pyrrhotite, and pyrite, collected through cascade impaction, followed by analysis by solution nebulization MC-ICP-MS, as well as imaging using electron microscopy. Iron mass distributions are independent of mineralogy, and particle morphology includes both spheres and agglomerates for all ablated phases. X-ray spectroscopy shows elemental fractionation in siderite (C-rich agglomerates) and pyrrhotite/pyrite (S-rich spheres). We find an increase in (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratios of +2‰, +1.2‰, and +0.8‰ with increasing particle size for magnetite, siderite, and pyrrhotite, respectively. Fe isotope differences in size-sorted aerosols from pyrite ablation are not analytically resolvable. Experimental data are discussed using models of particles generation by Hergenröder and elemental/isotopic fractionation by Richter. We interpret the isotopic fractionation to be related to the iron condensation time scale, dependent on its saturation in the gas phase, as a function of mineral composition. Despite the isotopic variations across aerosol size fractions, total aerosol composition, as calculated from mass balance, confirms that fs-LA produces a stoichiometric sampling in terms of isotopic composition. Specifically, both elemental and isotopic fractionation are produced by particle generation processes and not by femtosecond laser-matter interactions. These results provide critical insights into the analytical requirements for laser-ablation-based stable isotope measurements of high-precision and accuracy in geological samples, including the importance of quantitative aerosol transport to the ICP. PMID

  9. Source characterization of sedimentary organic matter using molecular and stable carbon isotopic composition of n-alkanes and fatty acids in sediment core from Lake Dianchi, China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jidun; Wu, Fengchang; Xiong, Yongqiang; Li, Fasheng; Du, Xiaoming; An, Da; Wang, Lifang

    2014-03-01

    The distribution and compound-specific carbon isotope ratios of n-alkanes and fatty acids in a sediment core (63 cm) collected from Lake Dianchi were examined to investigate organic matter sources in the eutrophic lake. Fatty acids included free and bound fatty acids. The carbon isotope compositions of individual n-alkanes and fatty acids from Lake Dianchi sediments were determined using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). The δ(13)C values of individual n-alkanes (C16-C31) varied between -24.1‰ and -35.6‰, suggesting a dominance of (13)C-depleted n-alkanes that originated from C3 plants and lacustrine algae. Fatty acids from the sediment extracts were analyzed for their abundances and carbon isotopic compositions. Molecular and isotopic evidence indicates that most of the short-chain fatty acids from Lake Dianchi sediment extracts are sourced from intense microbial recycling and resynthesis of organic matter. Long-chain free fatty acids are mainly derived from terrestrial sources. However, long-chain bound fatty acids are sourced from a combination of terrestrial organic matter, bacteria and algae, with the contribution from algal sources higher in the hypereutrophic stage.

  10. Hydrogen and Carbon Stable Isotopic Compositions and Concentrations of Methane in Cave Air of Cueva de Villa Luz, Tabasco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, K.; Rosales Lagarde, L.; Sauer, P. E.; Schimmelmann, A.; Lennon, J. T.; Boston, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Cueva de Villa Luz (CVL) is a unique biogeochemical environment where microbial consortia are supported by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) leading to sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) which is thought to have generated the porosity and permeability of several petroleum reservoirs. Possible sources of the sulfur (S) include the Chichón Volcano and petroleum basins in the area. A better understanding of the source of the H2S in CVL may help predict where else SAS may have occurred. Analysis of methane (CH4) in CVL may provide a proxy to assess the source of S entering CVL. We obtained 13 air samples in 1-L Tedlar® bags from varying locations in CVL to assess the role of CH4 in sulfide-rich karst systems. CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured by gas-chromatography. The stable isotopic ratios of carbon and hydrogen were measured on a stable isotope-ratio mass-spectrometer. CH4 in the air of CVL ranged from 1.88 ± 0.10 ppmv to 3.7 ± 0.2 ppmv. CO2 concentrations ranged from 400 ± 20 ppmv to 920 ± 50 ppmv. For comparison, the CH4 and CO2 concentrations in the outside atmosphere were 1.96 ± 0.10 ppmv and 430 ± 20 ppmv respectively. CH4 and CO2 were positively correlated in CVL (R2 = 0.91, CH4 = [0.0035 ± 0.0007] CO2 + [0.4 ± 0.4], p >0.01). The highest concentrations were near springs. Keeling-style analysis showed that the CH4 samples from CVL plot along a two-end member mixing model and suggest that CH4 is outgassing from spring water with isotopic compositions δ13CCH4 = -24 ± 3 ‰ and δ2HCH4 = -40 ± 40 ‰. CO2 did not plot along a two end member mixing model. The proposed δ13C of CH4 entering from springs does not closely match the δ13CCH4 values from hydrocarbon basins in the area. This is likely due to oxidative loss of CH4 as it ascends to CVL which may be partly driven by anaerobic methanotrophy coupled to sulfate reduction. Analysis of the spring water chemistry coupled to biogeochemical modeling may help quantify the amount of

  11. Carbon, nitrogen, magnesium, silicon, and titanium isotopic compositions of single interstellar silicon carbide grains from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Peter; Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst; Ireland, Trevor; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    Seven hundred and twenty SiC grains from the Murchison CM2 chondrite, ranging in size from 1 to 10 micrometers, were analyzed by ion microprobe mass spectrometry for their C-isotopic compositions. Subsets of the grains were also analyzed for N (450 grains), Si (183 grains), Mg (179 grains), and Ti (28 grains) isotopes. These results are compared with previous measurements on 41 larger SiC grains (up to 15 x 26 micrometers) from a different sample of Murchison analyzed by Virag et al. (1992) and Ireland, Zinner, & Amari (1991a). All grains of the present study are isotopically anomalous with C-12/C-13 ratios ranging from 0.022 to 28.4 x solar, N-14/N-15 ratios from 0.046 to 30 x solar, Si-29/Si-28 from 0.54 to 1.20 x solar, Si-30/Si-28 from 0.42 to 1.14 x solar, Ti-49/Ti-48 from 0.96 to 1.95 x solar, and Ti-50/Ti-48 from 0.94 to 1.39 x solar. Many grains have large Mg-26 excesses from the decay of Al-26 with inferred Al-26/Al-27 ratios ranging up to 0.61, or 12,200 x the ratio of 5 x 10(exp -5) inferred for the early solar system. Several groups can be distinguished among the SiC grains. Most of the grains have C-13 and N-14 excesses, and their Si isotopic compositions (mostly excesses in Si-29 and Si-30) plot close to a slope 1.34 line on a Delta Si-29/Si-28 versus Delta Si-30/Si-28 three-isotope plot. Grains with small C-12/C-13 ratios (less than 10) tend to have smaller or no N-14 excesses and high Al-26/Al-27 ratios (up to 0.01). Grains with C-12/C-13 greater than 150 fall into two groups: grains X have N-15 excesses and Si-29 and Si-30 deficits and the highest (0.1 to 0.6) Al-26/Al-27 ratios; grains Y have N-14 excesses and plot on a slope 0.35 line on a Si three-isotope plot. In addition, large SiC grains of the Virag et al. (1992) study fall into three-distinct clusters according to their C-, Si-, and Ti-isotopic compositions. The isotopic diversity of the grains and the clustering of their isotopic compositions imply distinct and multiple stellar sources

  12. Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, Stephen C; Keeling, Ralph F

    2012-01-03

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

  13. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of intact polar lipids reveal complex carbon flow patterns among hydrocarbon degrading microbial communities at the Chapopote asphalt volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubotz, Florence; Lipp, Julius S.; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Seepage of asphalt forms the basis of a cold seep system at 3000 m water depth at the Chapopote Knoll in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Anaerobic microbial communities are stimulated in the oil-impregnated sediments as evidenced by the presence of intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs) derived from archaea and Bacteria at depths up to 7 m below the seafloor. Detailed investigation of stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13C) of alkyl and acyl moieties derived from a range of IPL precursors with distinct polar head groups resolved the complexity of carbon metabolisms and utilization of diverse carbon sources by uncultured microbial communities. In surface sediments most of the polar lipid-derived fatty acids with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG) head groups could be tentatively assigned to autotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, with a relatively small proportion involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Derivatives of phosphatidyl-( N)-methylethanolamine (PME) were abundant and could be predominantly assigned to heterotrophic oil-degrading bacteria. Archaeal IPLs with phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic glyceroldibiphytanylglyceroltetraethers (GDGTs) were assigned to methanotrophic archaea of the ANME-2 and ANME-1 cluster, respectively, whereas δ 13C values of phosphate-based archaeols and mixed phosphate-based and diglycosidic GDGTs point to methanogenic archaea. At a 7 m deep sulfate-methane transition zone that is linked to the upward movement of gas-laden petroleum, a distinct increase in abundance of archaeal IPLs such as phosphate-based hydroxyarchaeols and diglycosidic archaeol and GDGTs is observed; their δ 13C values are consistent with their origin from both methanotrophic and methanogenic archaea. This study reveals previously hidden, highly complex patterns in the carbon-flow of versatile microbial communities involved in the degradation of heavy oil including hydrocarbon gases

  14. Determination of Cr isotopic composition in low-level carbonates by MC-ICP-MS: a sensitive proxy for redox changes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, Pierre; Parkinson, Ian; James, Rachael; Karjalainen, Anne-Mari; Fehr, Manuela; Fairchild, Ian

    2010-05-01

    Geochemical data suggest that atmospheric oxygen increased during two major steps: the Great oxidation event (~2.4 Ga) and the Neoproterozoic (~1Ga-545Ma). The O2 concentration in the atmosphere is strongly linked to the redox condition of the oceans. Therefore the study of redox sensitive elements in marine sediments can be used to evaluate the evolution of O2 concentrations in the atmosphere. Chromium is a redox sensitive element which significantly fractionates its isotopes during the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) (Ellis et al., 2002). Thus, Cr isotopes can be used to assess redox changes in the past oceans. Chromium isotopic compositions in sedimentary rocks (BIFs) have been used to determine the evolution of the O2 concentration in the atmosphere during the Proterozoic (Frei et al., 2009). We have developed a chemical procedure for the purification of Cr in carbonates by using a single cation column to separate the Cr from the matrix, Fe, Ti and V. Cr isotopic compositions are determined used a 50Cr-54Cr double spike method and analysed on a ThermoFisher Neptune MC-ICP-MS using HR and MR in order to be able to discriminate Ar interferences. Standards and samples are analysed as 50ppb Cr solutions and yield an external reproducibility 50 and 70ppm. This new method allowed us to analyse samples with a Cr concentrations as low as 1ppm. We have analysed a suite of Neoproterozoic carbonates from Australia, but also modern ooids and oolithic limestones through the Phanerozoic. The Cr isotopic data for carbonates record a range of δ53Cr between -0.1 and +1.7. This range indicates that some of these carbonates clearly reflect oxidising conditions in the ocean. By comparison, the Neoproterozoic samples have Cr isotopic compositions close to the continental crust value (-0.1 to 0.1), indicating the Neoproterozoic samples reflect deposition under more reducing conditions These data suggests that the redox condition during the deposition of shallow-water carbonates

  15. Characterization of n-alkanes and their carbon isotopic composition in sediments from a small catchment of the Dianchi watershed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Jixiang; Gao, Wenjing; Huang, Changchun; Xie, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The biomarker composition and stable carbon isotope values of organic matter (OM) in sediment cores from Shuanglong catchment of the Dianchi watershed show an unimodal n-alkane distribution ranging from C15-C33 with a strong predominance of odd-numbered n-alkanes, maximizing at n-C27, n-C29 and n-C31. Organic carbon to nitrogen (OC/N) ratio indicates a strong terrestrial influence on the OM. The values of δ(13)C27, δ(13)C29 and δ(13)C31 of n-alkanes range from -36.1‰ to -26.1‰, -34.1‰ to -30.1‰ and -33.8‰ to -28.7‰, respectively, suggesting a mainly C3 land plants origin. The carbon preference index (CPI25-31), odd-even preference (OEP27-31), average chain length (ACL25-33), pristine/phytane (pr/ph), Paq, (C27+C29)/2C31, nC16-23/nC24-33 and 3C17/(C21+C23+C25) values are also consistent with the predominance of C3 land plant-derived OM. Different sources of OM are reflected by the peak of n-C15, ascribed to a contribution by aquatic algae and photosynthetic bacteria. Eutrophication seems to be enhanced by both autochthonous (weak) and allochthonous (strong) contributions of OM. A major factor affecting the OM accumulation in the catchment and OM transportation to the Dianchi Lake may be increased by human activities from 1871 to 2011. PMID:24630457

  16. Characterization of n-alkanes and their carbon isotopic composition in sediments from a small catchment of the Dianchi watershed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Jixiang; Gao, Wenjing; Huang, Changchun; Xie, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The biomarker composition and stable carbon isotope values of organic matter (OM) in sediment cores from Shuanglong catchment of the Dianchi watershed show an unimodal n-alkane distribution ranging from C15-C33 with a strong predominance of odd-numbered n-alkanes, maximizing at n-C27, n-C29 and n-C31. Organic carbon to nitrogen (OC/N) ratio indicates a strong terrestrial influence on the OM. The values of δ(13)C27, δ(13)C29 and δ(13)C31 of n-alkanes range from -36.1‰ to -26.1‰, -34.1‰ to -30.1‰ and -33.8‰ to -28.7‰, respectively, suggesting a mainly C3 land plants origin. The carbon preference index (CPI25-31), odd-even preference (OEP27-31), average chain length (ACL25-33), pristine/phytane (pr/ph), Paq, (C27+C29)/2C31, nC16-23/nC24-33 and 3C17/(C21+C23+C25) values are also consistent with the predominance of C3 land plant-derived OM. Different sources of OM are reflected by the peak of n-C15, ascribed to a contribution by aquatic algae and photosynthetic bacteria. Eutrophication seems to be enhanced by both autochthonous (weak) and allochthonous (strong) contributions of OM. A major factor affecting the OM accumulation in the catchment and OM transportation to the Dianchi Lake may be increased by human activities from 1871 to 2011.

  17. Molecular isotopic engineering (MIE): industrial manufacture of naproxen of predetermined stable carbon-isotopic compositions for authenticity and security protection and intellectual property considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, J. P.; Farina, P.; Pearson, A.; Mezes, P. S.; Sabatelli, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular Isotopic Engineering (MIE) is the directed stable-isotopic synthesis of chemical products for reasons of product identification and of product security, and also for intellectual property considerations. We report here a generally excellent correspondence between the observed and predicted stable carbon-isotopic (δ13C) results for a successful directed synthesis of racemic mixture from its immediate precursors. The observed results are readily explained by the laws of mass balance and isotope mass balance. Oxygen- and hydrogen isotopic results which require an additional assessment of the effects of O and H exchange, presumably due to interaction with water in the reaction solution, are addressed elsewhere. A previous, cooperative study with the US FDA-DPA showed that individual manufacturers of naproxen could readily be differentiated by their stable-isotopic provenance (δ13C, δ18O, and δD ref. 1). We suggest that MIE can be readily employed in the bio/pharmaceutical industry without alteration of present manufacturing processes other than isotopically selecting and/or monitoring reactants and products.

  18. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  19. Sulfur isotopic composition of cenozoic seawater sulfate

    PubMed

    Paytan; Kastner; Campbell; Thiemens

    1998-11-20

    A continuous seawater sulfate sulfur isotope curve for the Cenozoic with a resolution of approximately 1 million years was generated using marine barite. The sulfur isotopic composition decreased from 19 to 17 per mil between 65 and 55 million years ago, increased abruptly from 17 to 22 per mil between 55 and 45 million years ago, remained nearly constant from 35 to approximately 2 million years ago, and has decreased by 0.8 per mil during the past 2 million years. A comparison between seawater sulfate and marine carbonate carbon isotope records reveals no clear systematic coupling between the sulfur and carbon cycles over one to several millions of years, indicating that changes in the burial rate of pyrite sulfur and organic carbon did not singularly control the atmospheric oxygen content over short time intervals in the Cenozoic. This finding has implications for the modeling of controls on atmospheric oxygen concentration.

  20. Does photosynthesis affect grassland soil-respired CO2 and its carbon isotope composition on a diurnal timescale?

    PubMed Central

    Bahn, Michael; Schmitt, Michael; Siegwolf, Rolf; Richter, Andreas; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Summary Soil respiration is the largest flux of carbon (C) from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. Here, we tested the hypothesis that photosynthesis affects the diurnal pattern of grassland soil-respired CO2 and its C isotope composition (δ13CSR). A combined shading and pulse-labelling experiment was carried out in a mountain grassland. δ13CSR was monitored at a high time resolution with a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer. In unlabelled plots a diurnal pattern of δ13CSR was observed, which was not explained by soil temperature, moisture or flux rates and contained a component that was also independent of assimilate supply. In labelled plots δ13CSR reflected a rapid transfer and respiratory use of freshly plant-assimilated C and a diurnal shift in the predominant respiratory C source from recent (i.e. at least 1 d old) to fresh (i.e. photoassimilates produced on the same day). We conclude that in grasslands the plant-derived substrates used for soil respiratory processes vary during the day, and that photosynthesis provides an important and immediate C source. These findings indicate a tight coupling in the plant–soil system and the importance of plant metabolism for soil CO2 fluxes. PMID:19220762

  1. Intra-specific association between carbon isotope composition and productivity in woody plants: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fardusi, Most Jannatul; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Comas, Carles; Voltas, Jordi; Resco de Dios, Víctor; Serrano, Luis

    2016-10-01

    The study of intra-specific variations in growth and plant physiological response to drought is crucial to understand the potential for plant adaptation to global change. Carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) in plant tissues offers an integrated measure of intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi). The intra-specific association between δ(13)C and productivity has been extensively studied in herbaceous crops, but species-specific information on woody plants is still limited and has so far provided contradictory results. In this work we explored the general patterns of the relationship between δ(13)C and growth traits (height, diameter and biomass) using a meta-analysis. We compiled information from 49 articles, including 176 studies performed on 34 species from 16 genera. We found a positive global intra-specific correlation between δ(13)C and growth (Gr=0.28, P<0.0001), stronger for biomass than for height, and non-significant for diameter. The extent of this intra-specific association increased from Mediterranean to subtropical, temperate and boreal biomes, i.e. from water-limited to energy-limited environments. Conifers and shrubs, but not broadleaves, showed consistent positive intra-specific correlations. The meta-analysis also revealed that the relationship between δ(13)C and growth is better characterized at juvenile stages, under near-optimal and controlled conditions, and by analyzing δ(13)C in leaves rather than in wood. PMID:27593469

  2. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-06-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to ‑24.7% and ‑26.9 to ‑24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China.

  3. Measurement and interpretation of the oxygen isotope composition of carbon dioxide respired by leaves in the dark.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Farquhar, Graham D; Wong, S Chin; Stuart-Williams, Hilary

    2004-10-01

    We measured the oxygen isotope composition (delta(18)O) of CO(2) respired by Ricinus communis leaves in the dark. Experiments were conducted at low CO(2) partial pressure and at normal atmospheric CO(2) partial pressure. Across both experiments, the delta(18)O of dark-respired CO(2) (delta(R)) ranged from 44 per thousand to 324 per thousand (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water scale). This seemingly implausible range of values reflects the large flux of CO(2) that diffuses into leaves, equilibrates with leaf water via the catalytic activity of carbonic anhydrase, then diffuses out of the leaf, leaving the net CO(2) efflux rate unaltered. The impact of this process on delta(R) is modulated by the delta(18)O difference between CO(2) inside the leaf and in the air, and by variation in the CO(2) partial pressure inside the leaf relative to that in the air. We developed theoretical equations to calculate delta(18)O of CO(2) in leaf chloroplasts (delta(c)), the assumed location of carbonic anhydrase activity, during dark respiration. Their application led to sensible estimates of delta(c), suggesting that the theory adequately accounted for the labeling of CO(2) by leaf water in excess of that expected from the net CO(2) efflux. The delta(c) values were strongly correlated with delta(18)O of water at the evaporative sites within leaves. We estimated that approximately 80% of CO(2) in chloroplasts had completely exchanged oxygen atoms with chloroplast water during dark respiration, whereas approximately 100% had exchanged during photosynthesis. Incorporation of the delta(18)O of leaf dark respiration into ecosystem and global scale models of C(18)OO dynamics could affect model outputs and their interpretation.

  4. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to −24.7% and −26.9 to −24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  5. Martian carbonates in ALH 84001: Textural, elemental, and stable isotopic compositional evidence on their formation. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanek, C. S.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Socki, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Martian orthopyroxenite ALH 84001 is unusual compared to other martian meteorites in its abundance of Mg-Fe-Ca carbonites. Becasue textural evidence indicates that these carbonates are undoubtedly of martian origin, we have undertaken stable isotopic studies to elucidate their origin by evaluating whether they represent primordial martian C that was outgassing from the mantle of Mars, or volatile additions to the ALH 84001 protolith that equilibrated with the martian atmosphere. If precipitation occurred in a closed system then the isotopic results are compatible with the observed chemical zonation. A unique temperature of formation can be calculated using the difference in C-13 and O-18 between the Fe and Mg carbonates, assuming that precipitation occurred at a constant temperature. Precipitation of approximately one-half of the CO2 reservoir at 320 C can account for the observed values, with the original CO2 reservoir having a delta C-13 of approximately 45% and delta O-18 of approximately 22%. If carbonate precipitated in equilibrium with a large isotopically homogeneous CO2 reservoir (open system), isotopic differences must be attributed to a change in temperature of at least several hundreds of degrees. This temperature change is compatible with a calculated range of temperatures based on carbonate geothermometry. Clearly, carbonate in ALH 84001 is in delta O-18 disequilibrium with orthopyroxene groundmass. Most likely, the carbonate precipitated from a fluid that equilibrated with the martian atmosphere. The deposits or fluids in equilibrium with these deposits were remobilized in the crust producing the carbonate in ALH 84001. This observation establishes a link for the first time between the atmospheric and lithospheric C and O pools that reside on Mars.

  6. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B.; Dai, M.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.; Chen, H.; Xu, L.

    2010-04-01

    Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized by a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N), stable carbon isotopic (δ 13C) composition, as well as molecular-level analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC) content was 1.61±1.20% in the upper reach down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from -25.11‰ to -21.28‰ across the studied area, with a trend of enrichment seaward. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio from 10.9±1.3 in the Lingdingyang Bay surface sediments to 6.5±0.09 in the outer shelf surface sediments. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC)-1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments, suggesting that the relative abundance of total carbohydrate was fairly constant in TOC. Total neutral sugars as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose) yielded between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC)-1 in the same sediments, suggesting that a significant amount of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. The bulk organic matter properties, isotopic composition and C/N ratios, combined with molecular-level carbohydrate compositions were used to assess the sources and accumulation of terrestrial organic matter in the Pearl River Estuary and the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf. Results showed a mixture of terrestrial riverine organic carbon with in situ phytoplankton organic carbon in the areas studied. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 57±13% for Lingdingyang Bay, 19±2% for the inner shelf

  7. Chemical characterization and stable carbon isotopic composition of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons issued from combustion of 10 Mediterranean woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, A.; Le Ménach, K.; Flaud, P.-M.; Marchand, N.; Budzinski, H.; Villenave, E.

    2012-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from particulate matter emitted during wood combustion and to determine, for the first time, the isotopic signature of PAHs from nine wood species and Moroccan coal from the Mediterranean Basin. In order to differentiate sources of particulate-PAHs, molecular and isotopic measurements of PAHs were performed on the set of wood samples for a large panel of compounds. Molecular profiles and diagnostic ratios were measured by gas chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and molecular isotopic compositions (δ13C) of particulate-PAHs were determined by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). Wood species present similar molecular profiles with benz(a)anthracene and chrysene as dominant PAHs, whereas levels of concentrations range from 1.8 to 11.4 mg g-1 OC (sum of PAHs). Diagnostic ratios are consistent with reference ratios from literature but are not sufficient to differentiate the different species of woods. Concerning isotopic methodology, PAH molecular isotopic compositions are specific for each species and contrary to molecular fingerprints, significant variations of δ13C are observed for the panel of PAHs. This work allows differentiating wood combustion from others origins of particulate matter (vehicular exhaust) using isotopic measurements (with δ13CPAH = -28.7 to -26.6‰) but also confirms the necessity to investigate source characterisation at the emission in order to help and complete source assessment models. These first results on woodburnings will be useful for the isotopic approach of source tracking.

  8. Chemical characterization and stable carbon isotopic composition of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons issued from combustion of 10 Mediterranean woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, A.; Le Ménach, K.; Flaud, P.-M.; Marchand, N.; Budzinski, H.; Villenave, E.

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from particulate matter emitted during wood combustion and to determine, for the first time, the isotopic signature of PAHs from nine wood species and Moroccan coal from the Mediterranean Basin. In order to differentiate sources of particulate-PAHs, molecular and isotopic measurements of PAHs were performed on the set of wood samples for a large panel of compounds. Molecular profiles and diagnostic ratios were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and molecular isotopic compositions (δ13C) of particulate-PAHs were determined by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). Wood species present similar molecular profiles with benz(a)anthracene and chrysene as dominant PAHs, whereas levels of concentrations range from 1.8 to 11.4 mg g-1 OC (sum of PAHs). Diagnostic ratios are consistent with reference ratios from literature but are not sufficient to differentiate the species of woods. Concerning isotopic methodology, PAH molecular isotopic compositions are specific for each species and contrary to molecular fingerprints, significant variations of δ13C are observed for the panel of PAHs. This work allows differentiating wood combustion (with δ13CPAH = -28.7 to -26.6‰) from others origins of particulate matter (like vehicular exhaust) using isotopic measurements but also confirms the necessity to investigate source characterisation at the emission in order to help and complete source assessment models. These first results on woodburnings will be useful for the isotopic approach to source tracking.

  9. Modelling carbon isotopes of carbonates in cave drip water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohlmeister, J.; Scholz, D.; Kromer, B.; Mangini, A.

    2011-09-01

    C isotopes in cave drip water are affected by both the C isotope composition of soil air and host rock carbonate. Furthermore, the C isotope composition of cave drip water strongly depends on the calcite dissolution system, i.e., open, closed and intermediate conditions. Here, we present a calcite dissolution model, which calculates the 14C activity and δ 13C value of the dissolved inorganic carbon of the drip water. The model is based on the chemical equations describing calcite dissolution ( H2O+CaCO+CO⇔Ca+2HCO3-). The most important improvement, relative to previous models, is the combination of the open and closed system conditions in order to simulate the C isotope composition during intermediate states of calcite dissolution and the application to carbon isotope measurements on cave drip waters from Grotta di Ernesto, Italy. The major changes in the C isotope composition of the drip water occur in response to variations in the open-closed system ratio. Additionally, the 14C activity and the δ 13C value of the drip water depend on changes in the partial pressure of soil CO 2. Radiocarbon and δ 13C values of the Grotta di Ernesto drip water are well reproduced by the model.

  10. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of aquatic and terrestrial plants of the San Francisco Bay estuarine system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Harris, D.

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of seasonal variability in the C-N stable isotope ratios of plants collected across the habitat mosaic of San Francisco Bay, its marshes, and its tributary river system. Analyses of 868 plant samples were binned into 10 groups (e.g., terrestrial riparian, freshwater phytoplankton, salt marsh) to determine whether C-N isotopes can be used as biomarkers for tracing the origins of organic matter in this river-marsh-estuary complex. Variability of ??13C and ??15N was high (???5-10???) within each plant group, and we identified three modes of variability: (1) between species and their microhabitats, (2) over annual cycles of plant growth and senescence, and (3) between living and decomposing biomass. These modes of within-group variability obscure any source-specific isotopic signatures, confounding the application of C-N isotopes for identifying the origins of organic matter. A second confounding factor was large dissimilarity between the ??13C-??15N of primary producers and the organic-matter pools in the seston and sediments. Both confounding factors impede the application of C-N isotopes to reveal the food supply to primary consumers in ecosystems supporting diverse autotrophs and where the isotopic composition of organic matter has been transformed and become distinct from that of its parent plant sources. Our results support the advice of others: variability of C-N stable isotopes within all organic-matter pools is high and must be considered in applications of these isotopes to trace trophic linkages from primary producers to primary consumers. Isotope-based approaches are perhaps most powerful when used to complement other tools, such as molecular biomarkers, bioassays, direct measures of production, and compilations of organic-matter budgets.

  11. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B.; Dai, M.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.; Chen, H.; Xu, L.

    2010-10-01

    Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized using a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N) ratio, bulk stable organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13C), and carbohydrate composition analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC) content was 1.21±0.45% in the upper reach, down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from -25.1‰ to -21.3‰ in Lingdingyang Bay and the South China Sea shelf, with a trend of enrichment seawards. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio offshore. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC)-1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments. Total neutral sugars, as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose), were between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC)-1 in the same sediments, suggesting that significant amounts of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 78±11% for Lingdingyang Bay, 34±4% for the inner shelf, and 5.5±1% for the outer shelf. The molecular composition of the carbohydrate in the surface sediments also suggested that the inner estuary was rich in terrestrially derived carbohydrates but that their contribution decreased offshore. A relatively high abundance of deoxyhexoses in the estuary and shelf indicated a considerable bacterial source of these carbohydrates, implying that sediment organic matter had undergone extensive degradation and/or transformation during transport. Sediment budget based on calculated regional accumulation rates

  12. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of total carbon, dicarboxylic acids and glyoxylic acid in the tropical Indian aerosols: Implications for sources and photochemical processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Swaminathan, T.; Tachibana, Eri

    2011-09-01

    The tropical Indian aerosols (PM10) collected on day- and nighttime bases in winter and summer, 2007 from Chennai (13.04°N; 80.17°E) were studied for stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of total carbon (TC), individual dicarboxylic acids (C2-C9) and glyoxylic acid (ωC2). δ13C values of TC ranged from -23.9‰ to -25.9‰ (-25.0 ± 0.6‰; n = 49). Oxalic (C2) (-17.1 ± 2.5‰), malonic (C3) (-20.8 ± 1.8‰), succinic (C4) (-22.5 ± 1.5‰) and adipic (C6) (-20.6 ± 4.1‰) acids and ωC2 acid (-22.4 ± 5.5‰) were found to be more enriched with 13C compared to TC. In contrast, suberic (C8) (-29.4 ± 1.8‰), phthalic (Ph) (-30.1 ± 3.5‰) and azelaic (C9) (-28.4 ± 5.8‰) acids showed smaller δ13C values than TC. Based on comparisons of δ13C values of TC in Chennai aerosols to those (-24.7 ± 2.2‰) found in unburned cow-dung samples collected from Chennai and isotopic signatures of the particles emitted from point sources, we found that biofuel/biomass burning are the major sources of carbonaceous aerosols in South and Southeast Asia. The decrease in δ13C values of C9 diacid by about 5‰ from winter to summer suggests that tropical plant emissions also significantly contribute to organic aerosol in this region. Significant increase in δ13C values from C4 to C2 diacids in Chennai aerosols could be attributed for their photochemical processing in the tropical atmosphere during long-range transport from source regions.

  13. Preservation and detection of microstructural and taxonomic correlations in the carbon isotopic compositions of individual Precambrian microfossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, Kenneth H.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Schopf, J. William; Lepot, Kevin; Kitajima, Kouki; Valley, John W.

    2013-03-01

    Here we present techniques for, and new data from, in situ carbon isotope (δ13C) analysis of Precambrian permineralized microscopic fossils with a reproducibility of 1-2‰ using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Individual microfossils, selected for their excellent preservation, were analyzed in petrographic thin sections of stromatolitic cherts from the Proterozoic Gunflint (˜1880 Ma), Bitter Springs (˜830 Ma), Min'yar (˜740 Ma), and Chichkan (˜775 Ma) Formations. The range of δ13C values (-34.6‰ to -22.1‰ VPDB) among the 46 individuals analyzed falls within that expected for photoautotrophic carbon fixation by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO), consistent with morphology-based taxonomic assignments for these specimens. Microfossils classified as cyanobacteria from the Gunflint, Bitter Springs, and Min'yar Formations (for which published carbonate carbon isotope data can be used to estimate the δ13C of the original dissolved inorganic carbon substrate) exhibit a consistent ˜19‰ total fractionation (δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon - δ13C of biomass) similar to that observed in living cyanobacteria, over a wide range of δ13Ccarb values (-2.9‰ to 3.4‰). In stromatolitic chert of the Min'yar Formation, morphologically diverse microfossils preserved in a ˜1 mm2 part of a microbial mat exhibit systematic isotopic differences among and within taxa that correlate with their morphologically inferred biological affinities and suggest that isotopic signatures of their original biosynthetic processes (e.g., lipid and peptidoglycan synthesis) are preserved. Isotopic offsets consistent with the different RuBisCO-based fractionations typical of cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes are documented by the differing δ13C values of a colonial cyanobacterium (-22.6 ± 0.5‰) and a phytoplanktonic protistan acritarch (-28.9 ± 1.0‰) situated <1 cm apart in the stromatolitic Chichkan chert. These findings show for the first time the

  14. Measurements of the stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the Northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas during summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M. P.; Achterberg, E. P.; Griffiths, A. M.; McDonald, A.; Boyce, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in samples collected during two cruises in the Northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas from June to August 2012. One cruise was part of the UK Ocean Acidification research programme, and the other was a repeat hydrographic transect of the Extended Ellett Line. In combination with measurements made of various other variables on these and other cruises, these data can be used to constrain the anthropogenic component of DIC in the interior ocean, and also assist in determining the influence of biological carbon uptake on surface ocean carbonate chemistry. The measurements have been processed, quality-controlled and submitted to an in-preparation global compilation of seawater δ13CDIC data, and are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre. The observed δ13CDIC values fall in a range from -0.58 to +2.37‰, relative to the Vienna Peedee Belemnite standard. From duplicate samples collected during both cruises, the precision for the 552 results is 0.07‰, which is similar to other published studies of this kind. Data doi:10.5285/09760a3a-c2b5-250b-e053-6c86abc037c0 (Northeastern Atlantic), doi:10.5285/09511dd0-51db-0e21-e053-6c86abc09b95 (Nordic Seas).

  15. The stable isotopic compositions of indigenous carbon-bearing components in EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that the most likely source of SNC meteorites is Mars. An oblique impact on Mars, or vaporization of permafrost, by an impactor seem to be the most likely ejection mechanisms capable of accelerating material to the 5 km/s velocity needed to overcome the gravitational field of Mars. These ejection mechanisms involve a large shock event in the SNC class, the shergottites EETA 79001 and ALHA 77055 are the most likely shocked samples, in which whole rock pressures of 35 to 45 GPa have been estimated. Martian weathering products have also been identified in EETA 79001. Here, the author started a series of analyses of EETA 79001 using a high-sensitivity static mass spectrometer capable of measuring sub-nanogram quantities of carbon. Recent measurements of lithology C confirm that the shock-implanted atmospheric CO2 is released during the 1100 to 1200 C step.

  16. Lipid Biomarkers and Carbon Isotopic Composition from Authigenic Carbonates and Seep Sediments from the US Mid-Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P.; Prouty, N.; Demopoulos, A. W.; Roark, B.; Coykendall, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by Archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria, is common in continental margin sediment and can result in authigenic carbonate precipitation. A lipid biomarker study was undertaken in Mid-Atlantic submarine canyons, focusing specifically on Baltimore and Norfolk canyons, to determine biomarker variability of carbonate rock and the associated sediment in cold seep communities dominated by chemosynthetic mussels, Bathymodiolus childressi. Preliminary 16S metagenomic results confirm the presence of free-living sulfur-reducing bacteria and methantrophic endosymbiotic bacteria in the mussels. Depleted d13C values in both the mussel tissue (-63 ‰) and authigenic carbonates (-48 ‰) support methanotrophy as the dominant nutritional pathway and AOM as the main driver of carbonate precipitation. In addition, paired 14C and 230Th dates are highly discordant, reflecting dilution of the 14C pool with fossil hydrocarbon derived carbon. Seep and canyon sediment, as well as authigenic carbonates, were collected and analyzed for a suite of biomarkers, including sterols, alcohols, alkanes and fatty acids, as well as δ13C values of select biomarkers, to elucidate pathways of organic matter cycling. A comparison of terrestrial biomarker signatures (e.g., n-alkane carbon preference index and C23 / (C23 + C29) values, HMW n-alkanes and C29 sterols) suggests that terrestrial inputs dominate the submarine canyon surface sediment, whereas seep sediment is predominantly marine autochthonous (i.e., cholesterol and 5α-cholestanol). Lipid biomarker profiles (e.g., n-alkanes in the C15 to C33 range) from authigenic carbonates mirror those found in the seep sediment, suggesting that the organisms mediating carbonate precipitation on the seafloor are characteristic of the assemblages present in the sediment at these sites. With widespread methane leakage recently discovered along the Atlantic Margin, the presence of AOM-mediated carbonate

  17. Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient

    PubMed Central

    Ricalde, M. Fernanda; Durán, Rafael; Dupuy, Juan Manuel; Simá, J. Luis; Us-Santamaría, Roberth; Santiago, Louis S.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is characterized by extreme variability within and between taxa and its sensitivity to environmental variation. In this study, we determined seasonal fluctuations in CAM photosynthesis with measurements of nocturnal tissue acidification and carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of bulk tissue and extracted sugars in three plant communities along a precipitation gradient (500, 700, and 1,000 mm year−1) on the Yucatan Peninsula. We also related the degree of CAM to light habitat and relative abundance of species in the three sites. For all species, the greatest tissue acid accumulation occurred during the rainy season. In the 500 mm site, tissue acidification was greater for the species growing at 30% of daily total photon flux density (PFD) than species growing at 80% PFD. Whereas in the two wetter sites, the species growing at 80% total PFD had greater tissue acidification. All species had values of bulk tissue δ13C less negative than −20‰, indicating strong CAM activity. The bulk tissue δ13C values in plants from the 500 mm site were 2‰ less negative than in plants from the wetter sites, and the only species growing in the three communities, Acanthocereus tetragonus (Cactaceae), showed a significant negative relationship between both bulk tissue and sugar δ13C values and annual rainfall, consistent with greater CO2 assimilation through the CAM pathway with decreasing water availability. Overall, variation in the use of CAM photosynthesis was related to water and light availability and CAM appeared to be more ecologically important in the tropical dry forests than in the coastal dune. PMID:20652592

  18. Modern climate and vegetation variability recorded in organic compounds and carbon isotopic compositions in the Dianchi watershed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meina; Wang, Yanhua; Yang, Hao; Xie, Biao; Niu, Xiaoyin

    2015-09-01

    The aliphatic hydrocarbons distribution and compound-specific characteristics of carbon isotopic compositions in the sediments from the small catchment (197 km(2)) of the Dianchi watershed were investigated for identification of modern climate and vegetation variations in the study area. Results show that a regular bimodal n-alkanes distribution ranged from nC16 to nC33, with strong dominance at nC17 for short-chain n-alkanes and nC31 for long-chain n-alkanes. Mass chromatogram of total fatty acids also indicates corresponding mixed contribution of algae, hydrophilous non-emergent (C4 plants) and terrestrial plants (C3 plants) to sedimentary organic matter (OM). At the depth of -24 to -25 cm (early 1970s), nC31/nC17 and terrestrial to aquatic ratio of hydrocarbons (TAR) values decrease, suggesting a shift of OM origins from C3 terrestrial plants to algae-derived C4 plants. The highest water stage in 1971 was found to be recorded in the particle size (<4 μm). For long-chain alkanes, the values of δ (13)Corg and δ (13)Cn-alkanes varied from -26.9 to -22.4 and -33.4 to -27.9 ‰, respectively. Population growth and economic development led to a demand for abundant habitable and cultivable land. Due to unreasonable land expansion, the primordial forest sporadically distributed. A mixture of C3 and C4 plants probably replaced C3 plants as the sources of OM in the past 10 years. The changes of land-use types and severe drought resulted in the excessive OM inputs to the watershed.

  19. Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, M Fernanda; Andrade, José Luis; Durán, Rafael; Dupuy, Juan Manuel; Simá, J Luis; Us-Santamaría, Roberth; Santiago, Louis S

    2010-12-01

    Expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is characterized by extreme variability within and between taxa and its sensitivity to environmental variation. In this study, we determined seasonal fluctuations in CAM photosynthesis with measurements of nocturnal tissue acidification and carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) of bulk tissue and extracted sugars in three plant communities along a precipitation gradient (500, 700, and 1,000 mm year(-1)) on the Yucatan Peninsula. We also related the degree of CAM to light habitat and relative abundance of species in the three sites. For all species, the greatest tissue acid accumulation occurred during the rainy season. In the 500 mm site, tissue acidification was greater for the species growing at 30% of daily total photon flux density (PFD) than species growing at 80% PFD. Whereas in the two wetter sites, the species growing at 80% total PFD had greater tissue acidification. All species had values of bulk tissue δ(13)C less negative than -20‰, indicating strong CAM activity. The bulk tissue δ(13)C values in plants from the 500 mm site were 2‰ less negative than in plants from the wetter sites, and the only species growing in the three communities, Acanthocereus tetragonus (Cactaceae), showed a significant negative relationship between both bulk tissue and sugar δ(13)C values and annual rainfall, consistent with greater CO(2) assimilation through the CAM pathway with decreasing water availability. Overall, variation in the use of CAM photosynthesis was related to water and light availability and CAM appeared to be more ecologically important in the tropical dry forests than in the coastal dune. PMID:20652592

  20. Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, M Fernanda; Andrade, José Luis; Durán, Rafael; Dupuy, Juan Manuel; Simá, J Luis; Us-Santamaría, Roberth; Santiago, Louis S

    2010-12-01

    Expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is characterized by extreme variability within and between taxa and its sensitivity to environmental variation. In this study, we determined seasonal fluctuations in CAM photosynthesis with measurements of nocturnal tissue acidification and carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) of bulk tissue and extracted sugars in three plant communities along a precipitation gradient (500, 700, and 1,000 mm year(-1)) on the Yucatan Peninsula. We also related the degree of CAM to light habitat and relative abundance of species in the three sites. For all species, the greatest tissue acid accumulation occurred during the rainy season. In the 500 mm site, tissue acidification was greater for the species growing at 30% of daily total photon flux density (PFD) than species growing at 80% PFD. Whereas in the two wetter sites, the species growing at 80% total PFD had greater tissue acidification. All species had values of bulk tissue δ(13)C less negative than -20‰, indicating strong CAM activity. The bulk tissue δ(13)C values in plants from the 500 mm site were 2‰ less negative than in plants from the wetter sites, and the only species growing in the three communities, Acanthocereus tetragonus (Cactaceae), showed a significant negative relationship between both bulk tissue and sugar δ(13)C values and annual rainfall, consistent with greater CO(2) assimilation through the CAM pathway with decreasing water availability. Overall, variation in the use of CAM photosynthesis was related to water and light availability and CAM appeared to be more ecologically important in the tropical dry forests than in the coastal dune.

  1. Modern climate and vegetation variability recorded in organic compounds and carbon isotopic compositions in the Dianchi watershed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meina; Wang, Yanhua; Yang, Hao; Xie, Biao; Niu, Xiaoyin

    2015-09-01

    The aliphatic hydrocarbons distribution and compound-specific characteristics of carbon isotopic compositions in the sediments from the small catchment (197 km(2)) of the Dianchi watershed were investigated for identification of modern climate and vegetation variations in the study area. Results show that a regular bimodal n-alkanes distribution ranged from nC16 to nC33, with strong dominance at nC17 for short-chain n-alkanes and nC31 for long-chain n-alkanes. Mass chromatogram of total fatty acids also indicates corresponding mixed contribution of algae, hydrophilous non-emergent (C4 plants) and terrestrial plants (C3 plants) to sedimentary organic matter (OM). At the depth of -24 to -25 cm (early 1970s), nC31/nC17 and terrestrial to aquatic ratio of hydrocarbons (TAR) values decrease, suggesting a shift of OM origins from C3 terrestrial plants to algae-derived C4 plants. The highest water stage in 1971 was found to be recorded in the particle size (<4 μm). For long-chain alkanes, the values of δ (13)Corg and δ (13)Cn-alkanes varied from -26.9 to -22.4 and -33.4 to -27.9 ‰, respectively. Population growth and economic development led to a demand for abundant habitable and cultivable land. Due to unreasonable land expansion, the primordial forest sporadically distributed. A mixture of C3 and C4 plants probably replaced C3 plants as the sources of OM in the past 10 years. The changes of land-use types and severe drought resulted in the excessive OM inputs to the watershed. PMID:25976326

  2. NanoSIMS Determination of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Presolar Graphites from the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadermann, F. J.; Croat, T. K.; Bernatowicz, T.

    2004-01-01

    Graphite from the Murchison density separate KFC1 (2.15 - 2.20 g/cu cm) has previously been studied by combined SEM/EDX and ion microprobe analysis. These studies found several distinct morphological types of graphites and C isotopic compositions that vary over more than 3 orders of magnitude, clearly establishing their presolar origin. Subsequent TEM measurements of a subset of these particles found abundant embedded crystals of metal (Zr, Mo, Ti, Ru) carbides which were incorporated during the growth of the graphites. A new TEM study of a large set of KFC1 graphites led to the discovery of another type of presolar material, Ru-Fe metal. Here we report results of the C and O isotopic measurements in the same graphite sections, which makes it possible for the first time to directly correlate isotopic and TEM data of KFC1 grains.

  3. [Composition and seasonal variations of carbon isotopes in aerosols of Lhasa, Tibet].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shi-chang; Shen, Cheng-de; Cong, Zhi-yuan; Liu, Ke-xin; Liu, Li-chao

    2010-05-01

    A total of 30 samples of total suspended particles were collected at an urban site in western of Lhasa city, Tibet from August 2006 to July 2007 for investigating carbonaceous aerosol features. 14C was taken as a reference to quantitatively distinguish the fossil and biogenic-derived origins along with the characteristics of seasonal variations of all carbonaceous materials in Lhasa are discussed. The results showed that the f(c) values in Lhasa ranged from 0.357 to 0.702, with an average of 0.493, which is higher than Beijing and Tokyo, but are far lower than that of remote/rural regions such as Launceston, indicating a major biogenic influence in Lhasa. Values of f(c) displayed clear seasonal variations with higher mean value in winter, a decreasing trend in spring, while relatively lower values in summer and autumn. Higher f(C) values in winter demonstrate that carbonaceous aerosol is mainly dominated by wood burning and incineration of agricultural wastes during the winter. The lower f(c) values in summer and autumn might be caused by increased diesel engines, motor vehicles emissions, which are related to the tourism in Lhasa. delta13C values ranged from -26.40% per hundred to approximately -25.10% per hundred, with an average of -25.8% per hundred, and showed no clear seasonal variation. The relative higher values in summer reflected the increment of fossil carbon emissions. 13C(TC) values are relatively homogeneous at -25.8% per hundred, considering the characteristics of seasonal variations of f(c) values, it can be concluded that carbonaceous aerosol of Lhasa was mainly influenced by a constant mixing of several pollution sources such as motor vehicles and wood burning emissions. PMID:20623843

  4. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry in continental tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Katharine W.; Lechler, Alex R.

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the thermal history of minerals and fluids in continental environments is a cornerstone of tectonics research. Paleotemperature constraints from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry have provided important tests of geodynamic, structural, topographic and basin evolution models. The thermometer is based on the 13C-18O bond ordering in carbonates (mass-47 anomaly, Δ47) and provides estimates of the carbonate formation temperature independent of the δ18O value of the water from which the carbonate grew; Δ47 is measured simultaneously with conventional measurements of carbonate δ13C and δ18O values, which together constrain the isotopic composition of the parent water. Depending on the geologic setting of carbonate growth, this information can help constrain paleoenvironmental conditions or basin temperatures and fluid sources. This review examines how clumped isotope thermometry can shed new light on problems in continental tectonics, focusing on paleoaltimetry, basin evolution and structural diagenesis applications. Paleoaltimetry is inherently difficult, and the precision in carbonate growth temperature estimates is at the limit of what is useful for quantitative paleoelevation reconstruction. Nevertheless, clumped isotope analyses have enabled workers to address previously intractable problems and in many settings offer the best chance of understanding topographic change from the geologic record. The portion of the shallow crust residing at temperatures up to ca. 200 °C is important as host to economic resources and records of tectonics and climate, and clumped isotope thermometry is one of the few proxies that can access this critical range with sensitivity to temperature alone. Only a handful of studies to date have used clumped isotopes to investigate diagenesis and other sub-surface processes using carbonate crystallization temperatures or the sensitivity of Δ47 values to a sample's thermal history. However, the thermometer is

  5. Clumped isotope thermometry of cryogenic cave carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Affek, Hagit P.; Zhang, Yi Ge; Dublyansky, Yuri; Spötl, Christoph; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.

    2014-02-01

    ) leads to an enrichment in 13C and 18O in DIC and depletion in Δ47. Oxygen isotope exchange between DIC and water drives δ18O and Δ47 back towards equilibrium (Mühlinghaus et al., 2009; Affek, 2013). The progressive precipitation of carbonate minerals further leads to δ13C and δ18O values higher than at equilibrium (Scholz et al., 2009; Dreybrodt and Scholz, 2011).The influence of carbonate precipitation conditions on the isotopic ratios of CCCcoarse is not well known. The isotope exchange reaction between water and DIC at the freezing point is much slower (τex ˜ 126,000 s) than chemical reactions and the process of carbonate mineral precipitation (τp ˜ 2000 s; Dreybrodt and Scholz, 2011). Thus, isotopic values reflecting disequilibrium induced by CO2 escape from the pool water take a long time to return to isotopic equilibrium (3 * τex ˜ 4.4 d) and are therefore expected to be recorded in the carbonate minerals.The aims of this study is to test the applicability of the clumped isotope thermometry (Ghosh et al., 2006; Eiler, 2007, 2011) to CCCcoarse precipitated in ice-covered pools. Furthermore, the known CCCcoarse formation temperature (˜0 °C) can be used together with clumped isotope analyses to assess potential disequilibrium effects in order to improve our understanding of the mode of CCCcoarse formation. This is essential in order to extract the potential information of the CCCcoarse stable isotopic composition, e.g., for calculation of the water δ18O value during carbonate formation.

  6. Assessing the Origins of Aliphatic Amines in the Murchison Meteorite from their Compound-Specific Carbon Isotopic Ratios and Enantiomeric Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aponte, Jose; Dworkin, Jason; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2014-01-01

    The study of meteoritic organic compounds provides a unique window into the chemical inventory of the early Solar System and prebiotic chemistry that may have been important for the origin of life on Earth. Multiple families of organic compounds have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite, which is one of the most thoroughly studied carbonaceous chondrites. The amino acids extracted from Murchison have been extensively analyzed, including measurements of non-terrestrial stable isotopic ratios and discoveries of L-enantiomeric excesses for alpha-dialkyl amino acids, notably isovaline. However, although the isotopic signatures of bulk amine-containing fractions have been measured, the isotopic ratios and enantiomeric composition of individual aliphatic amines, compounds that are chemically related to amino acids, remain unknown. Here, we report a novel method for the extraction, separation, identification and quantitation of aliphatic monoamines extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Our results show a complete suite of structural isomers, with a larger concentration of methylamine and ethylamine and decreasing amine concentrations with increasing carbon number. The carbon isotopic compositions of fourteen meteoritic aliphatic monoamines were measured, with delta C-13 values ranging from +21% to +129%, showing a decrease in C-13 with increasing carbon number, a relationship that may be consistent with the chain elongation mechanism under kinetic control previously proposed for meteoritic amino acids. We also found the enantiomeric composition of sec-butylamine, a structural analog to isovaline, was racemic within error, while the isovaline extracted from the same Murchison piece showed an L-enantiomeric excess of 9.7; this result suggested that processes leading to enantiomeric excess in the amino acid did not affect the amine. We used these collective data to assess the primordial synthetic origins of these meteoritic aliphatic amines and their potential

  7. Assessing the origins of aliphatic amines in the Murchison meteorite from their compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios and enantiomeric composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte, José C.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2014-09-01

    The study of meteoritic organic compounds provides a unique window into the chemical inventory of the early Solar System and prebiotic chemistry that may have been important for the origin of life on Earth. Multiple families of organic compounds have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite, which is one of the most thoroughly studied carbonaceous chondrites. The amino acids extracted from Murchison have been extensively analyzed, including measurements of non-terrestrial stable isotopic ratios and discoveries of L-enantiomeric excesses for α-dialkyl amino acids, notably isovaline. However, although the isotopic signatures of bulk amine-containing fractions have been measured, the isotopic ratios and enantiomeric composition of individual aliphatic amines, compounds that are structurally related to amino acids, remain unknown. Here, we report a novel method for the extraction, separation, identification and quantitation of aliphatic monoamines extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Our results show a complete suite of structural isomers, with a larger concentration of methylamine and ethylamine and decreasing amine concentrations with increasing carbon number. The carbon isotopic compositions of fourteen meteoritic aliphatic monoamines were measured, with δ13C values ranging from +21‰ to +129‰, showing a decrease in 13C with increasing carbon number, a relationship that may be consistent with the chain elongation mechanism under kinetic control previously proposed for meteoritic amino acids. We also found the enantiomeric composition of sec-butylamine, a structural analog to isovaline, was racemic within error, while the isovaline extracted from the same Murchison piece showed an L-enantiomeric excess of 9.7%; this result suggested that processes leading to enantiomeric excess in the amino acid did not affect the amine. We used these collective data to assess the primordial synthetic origins of these meteoritic aliphatic amines and their potential linkage

  8. A First Look at Graphite Grains from Orgueil: Morphology, Carbon, Nitrogen and Neon Isotopic Compositions of Individual, Chemically Separated Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdivtseva, O.; Zinner, E.; Meshik, A. P.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Walker, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    Presolar graphite in Murchison has been extensively studied. It is characterized by a unique Ne isotopic composition, known as the Ne-E(L) component. According to studies by Huss and Lewis, the concentration of Ne-E(L) in Orgueil is about one order of magnitude higher than in Murchison, when normalized to the matrix. This could be due to a higher presolar graphite abundance in Orgueil, or due to a higher Ne-E concentrations per grain. The Ne isotopic compositions in individual presolar graphite grains from Murchison have been measured before. It was shown, that a third of the grains have detectable excesses in 22Ne, characteristic of the Ne-E(L) component. One grain in a hundred had a Ne-22 concentration two orders of magnitude higher than blank.

  9. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  10. Clumped isotopes in soil carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, J.; Eiler, J. M.; Daeron, M.

    2011-12-01

    We are monitoring soil temperature and measuring clumped isotopes from modern soil carbonate in North and South America, Hawaii, and Tibet. Clumped isotopes from 50-200 cm soil depth show a strong and systematic bias toward formation in the warmest summer months. For example, soil carbonate as these depths exceed local mean annual temperature by 10-15°C in soils from India and Tibet. Clumped isotope temperatures from modern carbonate increase very regularly (r2 = 0.90) with elevation gain from lowland India to Tibet. Here carbonate forms largely in May-June, just prior to the arrival of the soil-cooling monsoon rains. In this regard, clumped isotopes hold great promise as a paleoaltimeter on the plateau. The question is whether these patterns from a monsoonal climate can be generalized (and they probably can't be) to other climate regimes when soil carbonate forms at a different time of year than the pre-monsoon. For example, in winter-dominated rainfall regimes soil carbonate may form as soils dewater in the spring and soil temperature is closer to mean annual temperature. These are open questions. Diurnal temperature information is also archived in the upper 30 cm of soils. Modern carbonate in Tibet appears to form in very late morning through afternoon, when the surface soil is warmest. Shade and aspect also strongly influence measured soil and clumped isotope temperatures. Both variables will have to be controlled for to correctly interpret clumped isotopes from the paleosol record. Clumped isotope values correlate with δ13C values in soil carbonate from shallowly buried (<1 km) paleosols from Nepal and Pakistan. This makes sense since δ13C values in the sub-tropics are determined the fraction of tree (C3) to grass (C4) cover, and soils under tree-covered areas are cooler. Finally, clumped isotopes from carbonates are reset to higher temperatures at burial depths roughly >2-3 km or >50-75°C. This was reproduced from paleosol and lake carbonates from three

  11. Carbon Isotope Composition as an Indicator of DOC Sources to a Stream During Events in a Temperate Forested Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, D. H.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Aiken, G. R.; Shanley, J. B.; Kendall, C.; Boyer, E. W.

    2006-12-01

    Increased DOC flux in streams and rivers is commonly observed during high runoff regimes, however DOC concentrations alone do not provide information about multiple sources or pathways of DOC to streams. In an effort to gain this information, we measured DOC concentrations and stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C-DOC) on samples collected at high-frequency during events at Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, USA. During snowmelt and storm events, peaks in stream DOC concentration (up to 10.5 mg/L) were coincident with peaks in flow. Stream water δ13C-DOC measurements ranged between -23.7‰ and - 28.9‰ and indicated changing sources of DOC during events; the highest δ13C-DOC values occurred consistently at the lowest flows, and the lowest δ13C-DOC values occurred with peaks in discharge. Water samples collected from shallow wells and stacked soil lysimeters showed the highest DOC concentrations in the most shallow (<0.5 m) lysimeter waters, and the lowest concentrations in the deeper (>1.5 m) well waters. Wells and lysimeters exhibited a range of δ13C-DOC values similar to those observed in the stream; however, samples collected from shallow horizons at nested wells and lysimeters consistently showed lower δ13C-DOC values than those from greater depths. Maple leaf litter collected from across the watershed provided an end-member of fresh organic material, with average δ13C composition of -31.3±0.7‰ (n=57), which is lower than the lowest measured DOC values in any of the stream, well, or lysimeter waters. A subset of stream waters were fractionated onto XAD4 and XAD8 resins; the hydrophobic acid fraction (XAD8) had consistently lower δ13C values than the transphilic acid fraction (XAD4), and both of these were lower than those of the bulk DOC. Samples with lower δ13C-DOC values also exhibited higher SUVA-254 values, i.e. greater aromaticity. Thus, lower δ13C-DOC values are interpreted as an indicator of relatively "fresh", more aromatic

  12. He, Ar, N and C isotope compositions in Tatun Volcanic Group (TVG), Taiwan: Evidence for an important contribution of pelagic carbonates in the magmatic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulleau, Emilie; Sano, Yuji; Takahata, Naoto; Yang, Frank T.; Takahashi, Hiroshi A.

    2015-09-01

    The Tatun Volcanic Group (TVG), Northeastern Taiwan, is considered to be the extension of the Ryukyu arc, and belongs to the post-collisional collapse Okinawa Trough. Strong hydrothermal activity is concentrated along the Chinshan fault, and Da-you-keng (DYK) represents the main fumarolic area where the most primitive isotopic and chemical composition is observed. In this study, we present chemical and He, Ar, C and N isotopic compositions of fumaroles, bubbling gas and water from hot springs sampled in 2012 and 2013. High 3He/4He ratios from DYK fumaroles (≈ 6.5 Ra) show a typical arc-like setting, whereas other sampling areas show a strong dependence of 3He/4He and CH4/3He ratios with the distance from the main active hydrothermal area (DYK). This could mean strong crustal contamination and thermal decomposition of organic matter from local sediments. Carbon isotope compositions of DYK range from - 6.67‰ to - 5.85‰, and indicate that carbon contribution comes mainly from pelagic carbonates from the slab (limestone, mantle and sediment contributions are 63%, 19% and 18%, respectively). This is consistent with the negative δ15N values (- 1.4 ± 0.5‰) observed for DYK, implying a strong nitrogen-mantle contribution, and an absence of contribution from nitrogen-pelagic carbonates. These results have important consequences related to the Ryukyu subducted slab. In fact, the Ryukyu margin presents little in off scraping the sedimentary cover to the subducting plate that does not permit any nitrogen contribution in magma from TVG.

  13. Carbon Isotopic Composition of CO2, Evolved During Perchlorate-Induced Reactions in Mars Analog Materials: Interpreting SAM/MSL Rocknest Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Bower, H.; Buch, A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D.; Jones, J. H.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.; Sutter, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover Curiosity made its first solid sample evolved gas analysis of unconsolidated material at aeolian bedform Rocknest in Gale Crater. The magnitude of O2 evolved in each run as well as the chlorinated hydrocarbons detected by SAM gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer (GCMS) [1] suggest a chlorinated oxidant such as perchlorate in Rocknest materials [2]. Perchlorate induced combustion of organics present in the sample would contribute to the CO2 volatile inventory, possibly overlapping with CO2 from inorganic sources. The resulting carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 sent to the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) for analysis would represent mixed sources. This work was undertaken to better understand a) how well the carbon isotopic composition ( 13C) of CO2 from partially combusted products represents their source and b) how the 13C of combusted products can be deconvolved from other carbon sources such as thermal decomposition of carbonate.

  14. Carbon and oxygen isotope composition of Pb-, Cu- and Bi-carbonates of the Schwarzwald mining district: Carbon sources, first data on bismutite and the discovery of an oxidation zone formed by ascending thermal water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haßler, Kathrin; Taubald, Heinrich; Markl, Gregor

    2014-05-01

    The carbon and oxygen isotope composition of cerussite, bismutite, malachite and azurite samples from the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany, was analyzed in order to evaluate carbon sources and conditions of formation. We deliberately chose samples showing various textures and coming from deposits at various altitudes and geological settings. δ13C values vary from +1.0‰ to -21.0‰ VPDB, cerussite, bismutite, malachite and azurite δ18O values show a variation from +11.2‰ to +17.9‰, +16.8‰ to +21.0‰, +23.0‰ to +28.1‰ and +26.3‰ to +30.2‰ VSMOW2, respectively. In accordance with earlier studies, the δ13C values indicate carbon partially derived from biogenic (vegetation-respired or from heterotrophic degradation of organic matter) soil CO2 combined with carbon from an isotopically heavier reservoir (e.g. atmospheric CO2, carbonate rocks, hydrothermal calcite from the ore vein) in varying proportions.

  15. Trophic Relationships and Habitat Preferences of Delphinids from the Southeastern Brazilian Coast Determined by Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Composition

    PubMed Central

    Bisi, Tatiana Lemos; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Lailson-Brito, José; Lepoint, Gilles; Azevedo, Alexandre de Freitas; Flach, Leonardo; Malm, Olaf; Das, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the foraging habitats of delphinids in southeastern Brazil, we analyzed stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in muscle samples of the following 10 delphinid species: Sotalia guianensis, Stenella frontalis, Tursiops truncatus, Steno bredanensis, Pseudorca crassidens, Delphinus sp., Lagenodelphis hosei, Stenella attenuata, Stenella longirostris and Grampus griseus. We also compared the δ13C and δ15N values among four populations of S. guianensis. Variation in carbon isotope results from coast to ocean indicated that there was a significant decrease in δ13C values from estuarine dolphins to oceanic species. S. guianensis from Guanabara Bay had the highest mean δ13C value, while oceanic species showed significantly lower δ13C values. The highest δ15N values were observed for P. crassidens and T. truncatus, suggesting that these species occupy the highest trophic position among the delphinids studied here. The oceanic species S. attenuata, G. griseus and L. hosei had the lowest δ15N values. Stable isotope analysis showed that the three populations of S. guianensis in coastal bays had different δ13C values, but similar δ15N results. Guiana dolphins from Sepetiba and Ilha Grande bays had different foraging habitat, with specimens from Ilha Grande showing more negative δ13C values. This study provides further information on the feeding ecology of delphinids occurring in southeastern Brazil, with evidence of distinctive foraging habitats and the occupation of different ecological niches by these species in the study area. PMID:24358155

  16. Tracing the source of Beijing soil organic carbon: a carbon isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingjun; Strauss, Harald; Chen, Tong-Bin; Zhu, Guangxu; Yang, Jun; Yang, Junxing; Lei, Mei; Zhou, Xiaoyong; Peters, Marc; Xie, Yunfeng; Zhang, Hanzhi; Wei, Rongfei; Wang, Chunyu

    2013-05-01

    Bulk soil organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition characterize its sources and fate, identify the anthropogenic input of organic carbon into the soil, and trace soil carbon turnover. Coal and/or coal combustion products represent the prime anthropogenic input of organic carbon into three soil profiles located in the vicinity of a steel company. Three profiles positioned away from any direct industrial contribution display vertical pattern in soil organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition that resemble more commonly observed downward gradients in soil carbon chemistry and indicate microbial soil carbon turnover. Two additional profiles located outside of the immediate industrial area display vertical carbon isotope profiles between typical of those from industrial and non-industrial areas. Eight soil profiles and their vertical distribution of bulk organic carbon isotopic composition and concentration collected in the Beijing area reveal and distinguish both anthropogenic and natural contributions of carbon to these soils.

  17. Sedimentary process control on carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter in an ancient shallow-water shelf succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. J.; Leng, M. J.; Macquaker, J. H. S.; Hawkins, K.

    2012-11-01

    Source and delivery mechanisms of organic matter are rarely considered when interpreting changing δ13C through sedimentary successions even though isotope excursions are widely used to identify and correlate global perturbations in the carbon cycle. Combining detailed sedimentology and geochemistry we demonstrate how organic carbon abundance and δ13C values from sedimentary organic matter from Carboniferous-aged mudstones are influenced by the proportion of terrestrial versus water column-derived organic matter. Silt-bearing clay-rich shelf mudstones that were deposited by erosive density flows are characterized by 1.8-2.4% organic carbon and highδ13C values (averaging -22.9 ± 0.3‰, n = 12). Typically these mudstones contain significant volumes of terrestrial plant-derived material. In contrast, clay-rich lenticular mudstones, with a marine macrofauna, are the products of the transport of mud fragments, eroded from pre-existing water-rich shelfal muds, when shorelines were distant and biological productivity in the water column was high. Higher organic carbon (2.1-5.2%) and lowerδ13C values (averaging -24.3 ± 0.5‰, n = 11) characterize these mudstones and are interpreted to reflect a greater contribution by (isotopically more negative) amorphous organic matter derived from marine algae. Differences in δ13C between terrestrial and marine organic matter allow the changing proportions from different sources to be tracked through this succession. Combining δ13C values with zirconium (measured from whole rock), here used as a proxy for detrital silt input, provides a novel approach to distinguishing mudstone provenance and ultimately using δ13C to identify oil-prone organic matter in potential source rocks. These results have important implications for using bulk organic matter to identify and characterize global C-isotope excursions.

  18. Measurements of the stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas during summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M. P.; Achterberg, E. P.; Griffiths, A. M.; McDonald, A.; Boyce, A. J.

    2015-06-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in seawater was measured in a batch process for 552 samples collected during two cruises in the northeastern Atlantic and Nordic Seas from June to August 2012. One cruise was part of the UK Ocean Acidification research programme, and the other was a repeat hydrographic transect of the Extended Ellett Line. In combination with measurements made of other variables on these and other cruises, these data can be used to constrain the anthropogenic component of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the interior ocean, and to help to determine the influence of biological carbon uptake on surface ocean carbonate chemistry. The measurements have been processed, quality-controlled and submitted to an in-preparation global compilation of seawater δ13CDIC data, and are available from the British Oceanographic Data Centre. The observed δ13CDIC values fall in a range from -0.58 to +2.37 ‰, relative to the Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite standard. The mean of the absolute differences between samples collected in duplicate in the same container type during both cruises and measured consecutively is 0.10 ‰, which corresponds to a 1σ uncertainty of 0.09 ‰, and which is within the range reported by other published studies of this kind. A crossover analysis was performed with nearby historical δ13CDIC data, indicating that any systematic offsets between our measurements and previously published results are negligible. Data doi:10.5285/09760a3a-c2b5-250b-e053-6c86abc037c0 (northeastern Atlantic), doi:10.5285/09511dd0-51db-0e21-e053-6c86abc09b95 (Nordic Seas).

  19. A carbon isotope mass balance for an anoxic marine sediment: Isotopic signatures of diagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehme, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    A carbon isotope mass balance was determined for the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC to constrain the carbon budgets published previously. The diffusive, ebullitive and burial fluxes of sigma CO2 and CH4, as well as the carbon isotope signatures of these fluxes, were measured. The flux-weighted isotopic signature of the remineralized carbon (-18.9 plus or minus 2.7 per mil) agreed with the isotopic composition of the remineralized organic carbon determined from the particulate organic carbon (POC) delta(C-13) profiles (-19.2 plus or minus 0.2), verifying the flux and isotopic signature estimates. The measured delta(C-13) values of the sigma CO2 and CH4 diffusive fluxes were significantly different from those calculated from porewater gradients. The differences appear to be influenced by methane oxidation at the sediment-water interface, although other potential processes cannot be excluded. The isotope mass balance provides important information concerning the locations of potential diagenetic isotope effects. Specifically, the absence of downcore change in the delta(C-13) value of the POC fraction and the identical isotopic composition of the POC and the products of remineralization indicate that no isotopic fractionation is expressed during the initial breakdown of the POC, despite its isotopically heterogeneous composition.

  20. Seasonal Effects on the Carbon Stable Isotope Compositions of Natural gas Subjected to Microbial Oxidation in Soils Near Leaking oil Wells in Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkadakskiy, S. V.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Mendoza, C.; Szatkowski, B.

    2003-12-01

    The molecular and carbon stable isotope compositions of leaking natural gas in the unsaturated zone near oil wells in Saskatchewan have been monitored for 12 to 20 months. Leaking gas originates in the Upper Cretaceous Colorado Group shales and is a mixture of bacteriogenic and incipient theromgenic gas that consists of more than 99 percent methane, 2400 ppm ethane, and lesser propane, butane, and pentane. Long term monitoring of soil gas concentrations and stable isotopic compositions demonstrates that microbial oxidation reduces hydrocarbon gas concentrations at the soil surface to less than 1000 ppm and results in the production of large volumes of carbon dioxide with significantly depleted in 13C carbon stable isotope signature. Rapidly dropping natural gas concentrations, rising carbon dioxide concentrations, and elevated carbon, nitrogen, and sulphur soil contents at depths of 100 to 150 cm indicate that microbial oxidation is confined to a relatively narrow zone around the well bore. The δ 13C of light hydrocarbon gases and carbon dioxide collected from a soil gas probe installed at 100 cm depth and 50 cm distance from well bore exhibit significant seasonal variance. Hydrocarbon gases generally have lowerδ 13C during the summer and higher δ 13C during the winter whereas CO2 exhibits the opposite trend. Kinetic fractionation factor associated with the microbial oxidation of methane estimated from carbon isotope measurements of CH4 and CO2 varies from 8 per mil during the summer to 28 per mil during the winter. Soil temperatures at 100 cm depth vary from 1.7° C in March to 17.3\\deg C in late August and exhibit significant negative correlation (R2 = 0.89) with the estimated kinetic fractionation factor. The negative correlation likely reflects higher methane consumption rates during the summer and lower rates during the winter. Lower oxidation rates in the winter may be related to environmental stress associated with the formation of a several tens of

  1. Estimation of the efficiency of hydrocarbon mineralization in soil by measuring CO2-emission and variations in the isotope composition of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, Ekaterina; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2010-05-01

    Estimation of the efficiency of hydrocarbon mineralization in soil by measuring CO2-emission and variations in the isotope composition of carbon dioxide E. Dubrovskaya1, O. Turkovskaya1, A. Tiunov2, N. Pozdnyakova1, A. Muratova1 1 - Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, RAS, Saratov, 2 - A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, RAS, Moscow, Russian Federation Hydrocarbon mineralization in soil undergoing phytoremediation was investigated in a laboratory experiment by estimating the variation in the 13С/12С ratio in the respired СО2. Hexadecane (HD) was used as a model hydrocarbon pollutant. The polluted soil was planted with winter rye (Secale cereale) inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense strain SR80, which combines the abilities to promote plant growth and to degrade oil hydrocarbon. Each vegetated treatment was accompanied with a corresponding nonvegetated one, and uncontaminated treatments were used as controls. Emission of carbon dioxide, its isotopic composition, and the residual concentration of HD in the soil were examined after two and four weeks. At the beginning of the experiment, the CO2-emission level was higher in the uncontaminated than in the contaminated soil. After two weeks, the quantity of emitted carbon dioxide decreased by about three times and did not change significantly in all uncontaminated treatments. The presence of HD in the soil initially increased CO2 emission, but later the respiration was reduced. During the first two weeks, nonvegetated soil had the highest CO2-emission level. Subsequently, the maximum increase in respiration was recorded in the vegetated contaminated treatments. The isotope composition of plant material determines the isotope composition of soil. The soil used in our experiment had an isotopic signature typical of soils formed by C3 plants (δ13C,-22.4‰). Generally, there was no significant fractionation of the carbon isotopes of the substrates metabolized by the

  2. Growth factor controls on the distribution and carbon isotope composition of n-alkanes in leaf wax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, C.; Xie, S.; Huang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Cuticular wax plays pivotal physiological and ecological roles in the interactions between plants and the environments in which they grow. Plant-derived long-chain alkanes are more resistant to decay than other biochemical polymers. n-Alkane distributions (Carbon Preference Index (CPI) values and Average Chain Length (ACL) values) and carbon isotopic values are used widely in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. However, there is little information available on how growth stages of the plant might influence the abundance of n-alkanes in the natural environment. In this study, we analyzed n-alkane distributions and carbon isotope data from two tree species (Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl. and Liquidambar formosana Hance) collected monthly from 2009 to 2011 in Nanwang Shan, Wuhan, Hubei Province. CPI values for n-alkanes from C. camphora remained stable in autumn and winter but fluctuated dramatically during spring and autumn each year. Positive correlations between CPI values and the relative content of (C27+C29) were observed in both sun and shade leaves of C. camphora from April to July. In L. formosana, CPI values decreased gradually from April to December. A similar trend was observed in all three years suggesting that growth stages rather than temperature or relative humidity affected the CPI values on a seasonal timescale. In the samples of L. formosana ACL values were negatively correlated with CPI values in the growing season (from April to July) and positively correlated with CPI values in the other seasons. The δ13C values of C29 and C31 n-alkanes displayed more negative carbon isotopic values in autumn and winter compared with leaves sampled at the start of the growing season from both trees. The δ13C values of C29 and C31 n-alkanes of L. formosana decreased from April to December. These results demonstrate the importance of elucidating the growing factors that influence the distribution and δ13C values of alkanes in modern leaves prior to using CPI

  3. Evolution of stable carbon isotope compositions for methane and carbon dioxide in freshwater wetlands and other anaerobic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hornibrook, E.R.C.; Longstaffe, F.J.; Fyfe, W.S.

    2000-03-01

    Two types of distribution for {alpha}{sub c} values are observed in anaerobic environments when {delta}{sup 13}C-{Sigma}CO{sub 2} and {delta}{sub 13}C-CH{sub 4} values are measured across gradients of depth or age of organic debris. The type-I distribution involves a systematic increase in {alpha}{sub c} values with depth as a result of decreasing {delta}{sup 13}C-CH{sub 4} and increasing {delta}{sup 13}C-{Sigma}CO{sub 2} values. This behavior corresponds to a progressive increase in the prevalence of methanogenesis by the CO{sub 2} reduction pathway relative to acetate fermentation. Utilization of autotrophically formed acetate by methanogens would also cause an increase in {alpha}{sub c} values. The type-II distribution occurs when both {delta}{sup 13}C-CH{sub 4} and {delta}{sup 13}C-{Sigma}CO{sub 2} values decrease with depth, resulting in approximately constant {alpha}{sub c} values. This condition corresponds with a strong dependence of methanogens on porewater {Sigma}CO{sub 2} as a carbon source by way of either the CO{sub 2} reduction pathway or utilization of autotrophically formed acetate. Freshwater wetlands possess both types of {alpha}{sub c} value distribution. Defining the type of {alpha}{sub c} distributions in different wetlands could reduce uncertainty in estimating the {delta}{sup 13}C value of CH{sub 4} emissions. Hence, the prevalence of type-I vs. type-II {alpha}{sub c} distributions in wetlands may have practical importance for the refinement of global CH{sub 4} budgets that rely on {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios for mass balance.

  4. Origin of petroporphyrins. 2. Evidence from stable carbon isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, C. J.; Fookes, C. J.; Popp, B. N.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Compared with the carbon-13 isotopic composition of the ubiquitous C32DPEP (DPEP, deoxophylloerythroetioporphyrin) the heavy but equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for the porphyrin structures 15(2)-methyl-15,17-ethano-17-nor-H-C30DPEP and 15,17-butano-, 13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propano-, and 13(1)-methyl-13,15-ethano-13(2),17-propanoporphyrin suggests a common precursor, presumably chlorophyll c, for these petroporphyrins isolated from the marine Julia Creek oil shale and the lacustrine Condor oil shale. Similarly, the heavy but variable carbon-13 isotopic composition of 7-nor-H-C31DPEP compared with C32DPEP is consistent with an origin from both chlorophyll b and chlorophyll c3. The equivalent carbon-13 isotopic composition for 13(2)-methyl-C33DPEP compared with C32DPEP suggests a common origin resulting from a weighted average of chlorophyll inputs.

  5. Carbonate Ion Effects on Coccolith Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziveri, P.; Probert, I.; Stoll, H. M.

    2006-12-01

    The stable oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of biogenic calcite constitutes one of the primary tools used in paleoceanographic reconstructions. The δ18O of shells of ocean floor microfossils and corals reflects the composition of the paleo-seawater as they use the oxygen to build up their calcite and aragonite shells. The δ13C is used to reconstruct variations in the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in the ocean, which is controlled by biological productivity through the removal of isotopically light carbon in organic matter. To be effective and sensitive tools for understanding photic zone processes it is first necessary to understand the various biological fractionations associated with carbonate precipitation. To date, isotopic fractionation models are mainly based on foraminifera and corals but not on coccoliths, tiny plates produced by coccolithophore algae, which are often the most dominant carbonate contributors to pelagic sediments. As photosynthetic organisms, their chemistry can provide a sensitive tool for understanding photic zone processes. Coccoliths may be the most important carbonate phase for geochemical analysis in sediments where foraminifera are less common and/or core material is limited, such as in subpolar regions and for Early Cenozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Here we report experimental results on a common living coccolithophore species showing that the 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios decrease with the increase of HCO^{3-} (CO32-). The selected species are among the heaviest calcifying extant coccolithophores and are major contributors to present coccolith carbonate export production. Because coccolithophores are photosynthetic organisms that calcify intracellularly in specialized vesicles, the challenge lies in ascertaining how kinetic and thermodynamic processes of isotopic fractionation are linked to cellular carbon "transport" and carbonate precipitation. This is a daunting challenge since studies have not

  6. Global simulation of the carbon isotope exchange of terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Terao, Y.; Mukai, H.

    2009-12-01

    There remain large uncertainties in our quantification of global carbon cycle, which has close interactions with the climate system and is subject to human-induced global environmental change. Information on carbon isotopes is expected to reduce the uncertainty by providing additional constraints on net atmosphere-ecosystem exchange. This study attempted to simulate the dynamics of carbon isotopes at the global scale, using a process-based terrestrial ecosystem model: Vegetation Integrative SImulator for Trace gases (VISIT). The base-model of carbon cycle (Sim-CYCLE, Ito 2003) has already considered stable carbon isotope composition (13C/12C), and here radioactive carbon isotope (14C) was included. The isotope ratios characterize various aspects of terrestrial carbon cycle, which is difficult to be constrained by sole mass balance. For example, isotopic discrimination by photosynthetic assimilation is closely related with leaf stomatal conductance and composition of C3 and C4 plant in grasslands. Isotopic disequilibrium represents mean residence time of terrestrial carbon pools. In this study, global simulations (spatial resolution 0.5-deg, time-step 1-month) were conducted during the period 1901 to 2100 on the basis of observed and projected atmospheric CO2, climate, and land-use conditions. As anthropogenic CO2 accumulates in the atmosphere, heavier stable carbon isotope (13C) was diluted, while radioactive carbon isotope (14C) is strongly affected by atomic bomb experiments mainly in the 1950s and 1960s. The model simulated the decadal change in carbon isotope compositions. Leaf carbon with shorter mean residence time responded rapidly to the atmospheric change, while plant stems and soil humus showed substantial time-lag, leading to large isotopic disequilibrium. In the future, the isotopic disequilibrium was estimated to augment, due to accelerated rate of anthropogenic CO2 accumulation. Spatial distribution of stable isotope composition (12C/13C, or d13C) was

  7. C-O isotopic composition of Devono-Carboniferous carbonates of Belgium and Ireland: evidence of basinal anoxia and global change

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, P.A.; Lohmann, K.C.; Hurley, N.F.

    1985-01-01

    Geochemical studies of Phanerozoic marine sediments have portrayed a dynamic ocean subject to episodes of rapid chemical change. The Devono-Carboniferous transition is the most dramatic of such episodes. It is marked by perturbations in delta/sup 13/C, delta/sup 18/O, delta/sup 34/S, /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr trends and global disruption of biostratigraphic continuity with major extinctions of shallow-water benthos and widespread deposition of organic-rich black shales. In order to clarify the temporal relationships of marine isotopic variations to sedimentologic and faunal breaks, this study documents the fine scale secular isotopic variation of Devono-Carboniferous marine carbonates. Detailed conodont stratigraphy of the Devono-Carboniferous section of the Dinant Basin of south-central Belgium and the lower Carboniferous section of west-central Ireland provided the stratigraphic base for this carbon and oxygen isotopic study. Marine components, cements, micrites and biogenic grains were analyzed along with diagenetic phases to estimate primary marine carbonate isotopic compositions. Results indicate that delta/sup 13/C of upper Devonian (Frasnian) carbonates decreased from +5.5 to +2.0 per thousand PDB before increasing sharply on the verge of the Famennian to +4.0 per thousand PDB, while the delta/sup 18/O composition decreased from -4.0 to -6.0 per thousand PDB. An enrichment in /sup 13/C and /sup 18/O in marine carbonates occurred in the early Carboniferous amounting to a delta/sup 13/C change of +2.5 to 4.0 per thousand and a delta/sup 18/O shift from -6.0 to 2 per thousand PDB. Importantly, data from Canadian Devonian reefs and from the lower Carboniferous of North America indicate that this change occurred on a global scale. The Frasnian-Famennian carbon kick corresponds to the maximum Devonian transgression in western Europe, and a black shale event, which probably reflects the establishment of anoxic conditions.

  8. Late Permian Forest Composition And Climate Revealed From High-Resolution Carbon Isotopes In Fossil Tree Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbranson, E.; Isbell, J. L.; Taylor, E. L.; Ryberg, P. E.; Taylor, T. N.

    2012-12-01

    Late Permian forests from Antarctica are one of a few examples of polar forest biomes in Earth history. We present a paleoforestry and geochemical study of three contemporaneous Late Permian fossil forests and geochemical analysis of fossil wood specimens from the Permian-Triassic contact in Antarctica. Late Permian paleoforestry analysis suggests that these forests responded to disturbance in exactly the opposite manner as compared to modern boreal forests, with forest thinning and loss of understory vegetation occurring towards areas of disturbance. New high-resolution carbon isotope data from 6 permineralized stumps, 32 tree rings studied in total, indicate that these forests were mixed evergreen and deciduous, but dominated by deciduous trees. Moreover, intra-tree ring and ring-to-ring variation of δ13C values suggest that the Late Permian polar climate maintained wet winters, with precipitation in the austral winter being a factor of three greater than the austral summer. Such seasonality in precipitation implies the development of a temperate-like climate at polar latitudes following the demise of the late Paleozoic ice age. High-resolution carbon isotopes in tree rings in a stratigraphic succession of Late Permian fossil wood to fossil wood at the Permian-Triassic contact indicates that Antarctica experienced a change in precipitation patterns around the time of the Permian-Triassic boundary, marked by intervals of pronounced drying juxtaposed against wetter conditions.

  9. An isotopic study of biogeochemical relationships between carbonates and organic carbon in the Greenhorn Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Popp, Brian N.; Takigiku, Ray; Johnson, Marcus W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of total carbonate, inoceramid carbonate, micritic carbonate, secondary cements, total organic carbon, and geoporphyrins have been measured in 76 different beds within a 17-m interval of a core through the Greenhorn Formation, an interbedded limestone and calcareous shale unit of Cretaceous age from the Western Interior Seaway of North America. Results are considered in terms of variations in the processes of primary production and in secondary processes. It is shown that the porphyrin isotopic record reflects primary isotopic variations more closely than the TOC isotopic record and that, in these sediments, TOC is enriched in C-13 relative to its primary precursor by 0.6 to 2.8 percent. This enrichment is attributed to isotope effects within the consumer foodweb and is associated with respiratory heterotrophy. Variation in this secondary enrichment are correlated with variations in the isotopic composition of marine carbonate.

  10. Carbon isotopes in biological carbonates: Respiration and photosynthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Burdett, J.; Whelan, J.F.; Paull, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    Respired carbon dioxide is an important constituent in the carbonates of most air breathing animals but is much less important in the carbonates of most aquatic animals. This difference is illustrated using carbon isotope data from freshwater and terrestrial snails, ahermatypic corals, and chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic pelecypods. Literature data from fish otoliths and bird and mammal shell and bone carbonates are also considered. Environmental CO2/O2 ratios appear to be the major controlling variable. Atmospheric CO2/O2 ratios are about thirty times lower than in most natural waters, hence air breathing animals absorb less environmental CO2 in the course of obtaining O2. Tissue CO2 therefore, does not isotopically equilibrate with environmental CO2 as thoroughly in air breathers as in aquatic animals, and this is reflected in skeletal carbonates. Animals having efficient oxygen transport systems, such as vertebrates, also accumulate more respired CO2 in their tissues. Photosynthetic corals calcify mainly during the daytime when photosynthetic CO2 uptake is several times faster than respiratory CO2 release. Photosynthesis, therefore, affects skeletal ??13C more strongly than does respiration. Corals also illustrate how "metabolic" effects on skeletal isotopic composition can be estimated, despite the presence of much larger "kinetic" isotope effects. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of PM2.5 at a periurban Mt. Taehwa near Seoul and over the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIM, S.; Joo, T.; Lee, M.; Czimczik, C. I.; Holden, S. R.; Mouteva, G.; Santos, G.; Xu, X.; Kim, S.; Cho, G.; Park, J.; Shin, B.; Ryoo, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Fine particular matter (PM2.5) is a major contributor to poor air quality in East Asia, with detrimental effects on air quality and climate. The elemental and isotopic composition of PM2.5 is powerful proxy for identifying emission sources, understanding atmospheric processing, and mitigating emissions of PM2.5. Here, we present a time-series of the elemental and isotopic composition of PM2.5 in East Asia, sampled at a periurban site (Mt. Taehwa, South Korea, August - October 2014) and over the Yellow Sea (onboard RV Gisang 1, November 2014). We measured the radiocarbon (14C) content of total carbon (TC) and elemental carbon (EC) with accelerator mass spectrometry and the carbon and nitrogen elemental and stable isotopic composition of bulk PM2.5 with isotope ratio mass spectrometry. At Mt. Taehwa, EC was depleted in 14C (fM-EC=0.224±0.071 (ave±SD, n=6)). The bulk PM2.5 was enriched in 14C above natural levels (fM-TC=1.19±0.47, n=9), with a δ13C of -25.6±0.5 (n=7), and a δ15N of 14.6±3.8 (n=4), and was strongly enriched in nitrogen (C:N=2.8±1.4, n=16). Over the Yellow Sea, bulk PM2.5 was depleted in 14C (fM-TC=0.57±0.07, n=5), with a δ13C of -24.2±0.8 (n=3), and a δ15N of 5.2±4.3 (n=3); EC was too small for 14C analysis. Our results confirm that periurban Mt. Taehwa site is exposed to combustion plumes of fossil fuels, especially from on-road sources. PM2.5 over the Yellow Sea turned out to be a mixture of fossil and biogenic emissions and experience more intense atmospheric processes. This isotope-based source apportionment of PM2.5 is a first step to characterize major sources of aerosols at Taehwa Research Forest, which was established to examine interactions of megacity and biogenic emissions and their impact on air quality.

  12. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  13. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Cao, F.; Lee, M.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C of particle-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly higher than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors, associated with isotope fractionation during atmospheric oxidation. 13C is consistently more enriched for oxalic acid (C2), glyoxylic acid, pyruvic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal compared to other organic compounds identified, which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during aqueous-phase processing and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after clouds or wet aerosols evaporation δ13C of C2 is positively correlated with C2 and organic carbon ratio, indicating that a photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation process during long-range transport. The 13C results also suggest that aqueous-phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is major formation process of oxalic acid production via the major intermediates glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photo-chemically aged in this region.

  14. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: Implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Cao, Fang; Lee, Meehye

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls, and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C values of particle phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly larger than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors. The values are consistently less negative in oxalic acid (C2, average -14.1‰), glyoxylic acid (-13.8‰), pyruvic acid (-19.4‰), glyoxal (-13.5‰), and methylglyoxal (-18.6‰) compared to other organic species (e.g., palmitic acid, -26.3‰), which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during atmospheric oxidation of pre-aged precursors (e.g., isoprene) and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after the evaporation of clouds or wet aerosols. The δ13C values of C2 is positively correlated with C2 to organic carbon ratio, indicating that photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation during long-range atmospheric transport. The isotopic results also suggest that aqueous phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a major formation process of oxalic acid via the intermediates such as glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photochemically aged in the western North Pacific rim.

  15. Carbon isotope fractionation during microbial methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, James F.; Fritz, Peter

    1981-09-01

    Methane, a common trace constituent of groundwaters, occasionally makes up more than 20% of the total carbon in groundwaters1,2. In aerobic environments CH4-rich waters can enable microbial food chain supporting a mixed culture of bacteria with methane oxidation as the primary energy source to develop3. Such processes may influence the isotopic composition of the residual methane and because 13C/12C analyses have been used to characterize the genesis of methanes found in different environments, an understanding of the magnitude of such effects is necessary. In addition, carbon dioxide produced by the methane-utilizing bacteria can be added to the inorganic carbon pool of affected groundwaters. We found carbon dioxide experimentally produced by methane-utilizing bacteria to be enriched in 12C by 5.0-29.6‰, relative to the residual methane. Where methane-bearing groundwaters discharged into aerobic environments microbial methane oxidation occurred, with the residual methane becoming progressively enriched in 13C. Various models have been proposed to explain the 13C/12C and 14C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of groundwaters in terms of additions or losses during flow in the subsurface4,5. The knowledge of both stable carbon isotope ratios in various pools and the magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation during various processes allows geochemists to use the 13C/12C ratio of the DIC along with water chemistry to estimate corrected 14C groundwater ages4,5. We show here that a knowledge of the carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during microbial methane-utilization could modify such models for application to groundwaters affected by microbial methane oxidation.

  16. The Sources of Carbon and Nitrogen in Mountain Lakes and the Role of Human Activity in Their Modification Determined by Tracking Stable Isotope Composition.

    PubMed

    Gąsiorowski, Michał; Sienkiewicz, Elwira

    2013-04-01

    We studied the isotopic composition of organic matter in the sediments of eight mountain lakes located in the Tatra Mountains (Western Carpathians, Poland). The sediments of the lakes were fine and course detritus gyttja, mud, and sand. The total organic carbon content varied from 0.5 to 53 %. The C/N ratio indicated that in-lake primary production is the major source of the organic matter in the lakes located above the treeline, whereas terrestrial plant fragments are the major organic compounds in the sediments of dystrophic forest lakes. We also found that a clear trend of isotopic curves toward lower values of δ (13)C and δ (15)N (both ~3 ‰) began in the 1960s. This trend is a sign of the deposition of greater amounts of NO x from the combustion of fossil fuels, mainly by vehicle engines. The combustion of fossil fuels in electric plants and other factories had a smaller influence on the isotopic composition. This trend has been weaker since the 1990s. Animal and human wastes from pastures and tourism had a surprisingly minor effect on lake environments. These data are contrary to previous data regarding lake biota and suggest the high sensitivity of living organisms to organic pollution. PMID:23576824

  17. The Sources of Carbon and Nitrogen in Mountain Lakes and the Role of Human Activity in Their Modification Determined by Tracking Stable Isotope Composition.

    PubMed

    Gąsiorowski, Michał; Sienkiewicz, Elwira

    2013-04-01

    We studied the isotopic composition of organic matter in the sediments of eight mountain lakes located in the Tatra Mountains (Western Carpathians, Poland). The sediments of the lakes were fine and course detritus gyttja, mud, and sand. The total organic carbon content varied from 0.5 to 53 %. The C/N ratio indicated that in-lake primary production is the major source of the organic matter in the lakes located above the treeline, whereas terrestrial plant fragments are the major organic compounds in the sediments of dystrophic forest lakes. We also found that a clear trend of isotopic curves toward lower values of δ (13)C and δ (15)N (both ~3 ‰) began in the 1960s. This trend is a sign of the deposition of greater amounts of NO x from the combustion of fossil fuels, mainly by vehicle engines. The combustion of fossil fuels in electric plants and other factories had a smaller influence on the isotopic composition. This trend has been weaker since the 1990s. Animal and human wastes from pastures and tourism had a surprisingly minor effect on lake environments. These data are contrary to previous data regarding lake biota and suggest the high sensitivity of living organisms to organic pollution.

  18. Deciphering Carbon Isotope Excursions in Separated Biogenic and Diagenetic Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Minoletti, F.; Hesselbo, S.; Jenkyns, H.; Rickaby, R.; Diester-Haass, L.; Delsate, D.

    2008-12-01

    shift in the bulk carbonate record. Contrasts in the amplitude of the carbon-isotope excursion at the single-species level compared to inorganic calcite and organic subtrate, should improve our understanding of the evolution of the water column composition through these major C-cycling perturbation events, and how marine calcifiers have fedback during such events, and eventually contribute for better understanding ocean-climate dynamics through time and into the future. Minoletti, F., Hermoso, M. and Gressier, V. (accepted). Separation of sedimentary micron-sized particles for palaeoceanography and calcareous nannoplankton biogeochemistry. Nature protocols.

  19. Mass transfer and carbon isotope evolution in natural water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Plummer, L.N.; Pearson, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical treatment of the evolution of the carbon isotopes C13 and C14 in natural waters and in precipitates which derive from such waters. The effects of an arbitrary number of sources (such as dissolution of carbonate minerals and oxidation of organic material) and sinks (such as mineral precipitation, CO2 degassing and production of methane), and of equilibrium fractionation between solid, gas and aqueous phases are considered. The results are expressed as equations relating changes in isotopic composition to changes in conventional carbonate chemistry. One implication of the equations is that the isotopic composition of an aqueous phase may approach a limiting value whenever there are simultaneous inputs and outputs of carbonate. In order to unambiguously interpret isotopic data from carbonate precipitates and identify reactants and products in reacting natural waters, it is essential that isotopic changes are determined chiefly by reactant and product stoichiometry, independent of reaction path. We demonstrate that this is so by means of quantitative examples. The evolution equations are applied to: 1. (1) carbon-14 dating of groundwaters; 2. (2) interpretation of the isotopic composition of carbonate precipitates, carbonate cements and diagenetically altered carbonates; and 3. (3) the identification of chemical reaction stoichiometry. These applications are illustrated by examples which show the variation of ??C13 in solutions and in precipitates formed under a variety of conditions involving incongruent dissolution, CO2 degassing, methane production and mineral precipitation. ?? 1978.

  20. Using the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) to examine questions in ethnoprimatology.

    PubMed

    Loudon, James E; Grobler, J Paul; Sponheimer, Matt; Moyer, Kimberly; Lorenz, Joseph G; Turner, Trudy R

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to understand how humans impact the dietary patterns of eight free-ranging vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) groups in South Africa using stable isotope analysis. Vervets are omnivores that exploit a wide range of habitats including those that have been anthropogenically-disturbed. As humans encroach upon nonhuman primate landscapes, human-nonhuman primate interconnections become increasingly common, which has led to the rise of the field of ethnoprimatology. To date, many ethnoprimatological studies have examined human-nonhuman primate associations largely in qualitative terms. By using stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis, we use quantitative data to understand the degree to which humans impact vervet monkey dietary patterns. Based on initial behavioral observations we placed the eight groups into three categories of anthropogenic disturbance (low, mid, and high). Using δ13C and δ15N values we estimated the degree to which each group and each anthropogenically-disturbed category was consuming C4 plants (primarily sugar cane, corn, or processed foods incorporating these crops). δ13C values were significantly different between groups and categories of anthropogenic-disturbance. δ15N values were significantly different at the group level. The two vervet groups with the highest consumption of C4 plants inhabited small nature reserves, appeared to interact with humans only sporadically, and were initially placed in the mid level of anthropogenic-disturbance. However, further behavioral observations revealed that the high δ13C values exhibited by these groups were linked to previously unseen raiding of C4 crops. By revealing these cryptic feeding patterns, this study illustrates the utility of stable isotopes analysis for some ethnoprimatological questions. PMID:25010211

  1. Using the Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Compositions of Vervet Monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) to Examine Questions in Ethnoprimatology

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, James E.; Grobler, J. Paul; Sponheimer, Matt; Moyer, Kimberly; Lorenz, Joseph G.; Turner, Trudy R.

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to understand how humans impact the dietary patterns of eight free-ranging vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) groups in South Africa using stable isotope analysis. Vervets are omnivores that exploit a wide range of habitats including those that have been anthropogenically-disturbed. As humans encroach upon nonhuman primate landscapes, human-nonhuman primate interconnections become increasingly common, which has led to the rise of the field of ethnoprimatology. To date, many ethnoprimatological studies have examined human-nonhuman primate associations largely in qualitative terms. By using stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis, we use quantitative data to understand the degree to which humans impact vervet monkey dietary patterns. Based on initial behavioral observations we placed the eight groups into three categories of anthropogenic disturbance (low, mid, and high). Using δ13C and δ15N values we estimated the degree to which each group and each anthropogenically-disturbed category was consuming C4 plants (primarily sugar cane, corn, or processed foods incorporating these crops). δ13C values were significantly different between groups and categories of anthropogenic-disturbance. δ15N values were significantly different at the group level. The two vervet groups with the highest consumption of C4 plants inhabited small nature reserves, appeared to interact with humans only sporadically, and were initially placed in the mid level of anthropogenic-disturbance. However, further behavioral observations revealed that the high δ13C values exhibited by these groups were linked to previously unseen raiding of C4 crops. By revealing these cryptic feeding patterns, this study illustrates the utility of stable isotopes analysis for some ethnoprimatological questions. PMID:25010211

  2. Using the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) to examine questions in ethnoprimatology.

    PubMed

    Loudon, James E; Grobler, J Paul; Sponheimer, Matt; Moyer, Kimberly; Lorenz, Joseph G; Turner, Trudy R

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to understand how humans impact the dietary patterns of eight free-ranging vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) groups in South Africa using stable isotope analysis. Vervets are omnivores that exploit a wide range of habitats including those that have been anthropogenically-disturbed. As humans encroach upon nonhuman primate landscapes, human-nonhuman primate interconnections become increasingly common, which has led to the rise of the field of ethnoprimatology. To date, many ethnoprimatological studies have examined human-nonhuman primate associations largely in qualitative terms. By using stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis, we use quantitative data to understand the degree to which humans impact vervet monkey dietary patterns. Based on initial behavioral observations we placed the eight groups into three categories of anthropogenic disturbance (low, mid, and high). Using δ13C and δ15N values we estimated the degree to which each group and each anthropogenically-disturbed category was consuming C4 plants (primarily sugar cane, corn, or processed foods incorporating these crops). δ13C values were significantly different between groups and categories of anthropogenic-disturbance. δ15N values were significantly different at the group level. The two vervet groups with the highest consumption of C4 plants inhabited small nature reserves, appeared to interact with humans only sporadically, and were initially placed in the mid level of anthropogenic-disturbance. However, further behavioral observations revealed that the high δ13C values exhibited by these groups were linked to previously unseen raiding of C4 crops. By revealing these cryptic feeding patterns, this study illustrates the utility of stable isotopes analysis for some ethnoprimatological questions.

  3. The Oxidant Budget of Dissolved Organic Carbon Driven Isotope Excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, T. F.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope values, falling below the mantle average of about -5 per mil, in carbonate phases of Ediacaran age sedimentary rocks are widely regarded as reflecting negative excursions in the carbon isotopic composition of seawater lasting millions of years. These isotopic signals form the basis of chemostratigraphic correlations between Ediacaran aged sections in different parts of the world, and have been used to track the oxidation of the biosphere. However, these isotopic values are difficult to accommodate within limits prescribed by the current understanding of the carbon cycle, and a hypothetical Precambrian ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool 100 to 1000 times the size of the modern provides a potential source of depleted carbon not considered in Phanerozoic carbon cycle budgets. We present box model results that show the remineralization of such a DOC pool to drive an isotope excursion of the magnitude observed in the geological record exhausts global budgets of free oxygen and sulfate in 800 k.y. These results are incompatible with the estimated duration of late Ediacaran isotope excursions of more than 10 m.y., as well as geochemical and biological indicators that oceanic sulfate and oxygen levels were maintained or even increased at the same time. Therefore the carbon isotope record is probably not a useful tool for monitoring oxygen levels in the atmosphere and ocean. Covariation between the carbon and oxygen isotope records is often observed during negative excursions and is indicative of local processes or diagenetic overprinting.

  4. Carbon and Sulfur Isotopic Composition of Yellowknife Bay Sediments: Measurements by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Steele, A.; Ming, D. W.; McAdam, A. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Archer, P. D.; Brunner, A. E.; Grotzinger,J. P.; Jones, J. H.; Leshin, L. A.; Miller, K.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Niles, P. B.; Owen, T. C.; Summons, R. E.; Sutter, B.; Webster, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater in Au-gust 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instru-ment suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) “Curiosity” rover has analyzed solid samples from the martian regolith in three locations, beginning with a scoop of aeolian deposits from the Rocknest (RN) sand shadow. Curiosity subsequently traveled to Yellowknife Bay, where SAM analyzed samples from two separate holes drilled into the Sheepbed Mudstone, designated John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). Evolved gas analysis (EGA) of all samples revealed the presence of H2O as well as O-, C- and S-bearing phas-es, in most cases at abundances below the detection limit of the CheMin instrument. In the absence of definitive mineralogical identification by CheMin, SAM EGA data can help provide clues to the mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases through examination of tem-peratures at which gases are evolved from solid sam-ples. In addition, the isotopic composition of these gas-es may be used to identify possible formation scenarios and relationships between phases. Here we report C and S isotope ratios for CO2 and SO2 evolved from the JK and CB mudstone samples as measured with SAM’s quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and draw com-parisons to RN.

  5. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada - An alkaline, meromictic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the distribution and isotopic composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases at the Big Soda Lake, Nevada, has shown that while neither ethylene nor propylene were found in the lake, ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth. It is concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column, and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in delta C-13/CH4/ and CH4/(C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sedimeents are probably due to bacterial processes, which may include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis, and C2-to-C4 alkane production by microorganisms.

  6. By-products of the serpentinization process on the Oman ophiolite : chemical and isotopic composition of carbonate deposits in alkaline springs, and associated secondary phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissmann, O.; Martinez, I.; Deville, E.; Beaumont, V.; Pillot, D.; Prinzhofer, A.; Vacquand, C.; Chaduteau, C.; Agrinier, P.; Guyot, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The isotopic compositions (d13C, d18O) of natural carbonates produced by the alteration of basic and ultrabasic rocks on the Oman ophiolite have been measured in order to better understand their formation mechanisms. Fossil carbonates developed on altered peridotitic samples, mostly found in fractures, and contemporary carbonates were studied. The samples bear a large range of d13C. Those collected in veins are magnesian (magnesite, dolomite) and have a carbon signature reflecting mixing of processes and important fractionation (-11‰ to 8‰). Their association with talc and lizardite suggests they are by-products of a serpentinization process, that must have occurred as a carbon-rich fluid was circulating at depth. On the other hand, the carbonates are mostly calcic when formed in alkaline springs, most of which are located in the vicinity of lithological discontinuities such as the peridotite-gabbro contact (Moho). Aragonite forms a few meters below the surface of the ponds in Mg-poor water, and is systematically associated with brucite (Mg(OH)2). This suggests most of the Mg dissolved at depth has reprecipitated during the fluid's ascension through fractures or faults as carbonates and serpentine. Further up, on the surface waters of the ponds (depleted in Mg and D.I.C.), thin calcite films precipitate and reach extremely negative d13C values (-28‰), which could reflect either a biological carbon source, or kinetic fractionation from pumping atmospheric CO2. Their formation represent an efficient and natural process for carbon dioxide mineral sequestration. The d18O signature from all samples confirm the minerals crystallized from a low-temperature fluid. The hyperalkaline conditions (pH between 11 and 12) allowing for these fast precipitation kinetics are generated by the serpentinization process occurring at depth, as indicated by the measured associated H2-rich gas flows (over 50%) seeping out to the surface.

  7. Within-shell variations in carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of two modern brachiopods from a subtropical shelf environment off Amami-o-shima, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Asami, Ryuji; Iryu, Yasufumi

    2010-10-01

    This study examines the fidelity of carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope compositions of two modern brachiopod species (Kikaithyris hanzawai and Basiliola lucida) to use as proxies of δ13C values of total dissolved inorganic carbon and temperature and/or δ18O values of seawater, respectively. Well-preserved shells of K. hanzawai and living individuals of B. lucida were collected from a subtropical shelf environment off Amami-o-shima, southwestern Japan. Some portions of the shells are in isotopic equilibrium with the ambient seawater, while other portions are not. The degree of disequilibrium differs between the two species and between different portions of each shell. Statistically significant positive correlations are recognized between the δ13C and δ18O values of these samples, which can be ascribed to a kinetic fractionation effect. Far from the posterior shell edge and along the axis of shell growth, the δ18O values of the secondary shell layer of K. hanzawai mostly fall within the expected range of equilibrium calcite. The δ13C values from the inner surface of the secondary shell layer in both species are relatively constant and are equivalent to or very close to equilibrium calcite. Therefore, these portions of the shells are most suitable for collecting reliable environmental proxy data. Although the δ13C and δ18O values of modern brachiopod shells are predominantly controlled by a kinetic fractionation effect, the appropriate selection of species and shell portions that reflect the isotopic composition of ambient seawater can facilitate the reconstruction of secular variations in oceanic δ13C or δ18O values.

  8. Asynchronous evolution of the isotopic composition and amount of precipitation in north China during the Holocene revealed by a record of compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotopes of long-chain n-alkanes from an alpine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhiguo; Jia, Guodong; Li, Yunxia; Chen, Jianhui; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Both the timing of the maximum East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) intensity in monsoonal China and the environmental significance of the Chinese stalagmite oxygen isotopic record (δ18O) have been debated. Here, we present a ca. 120-year-resolution compound-specific carbon (δ13C) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of terrestrial long-chain n-alkanes extracted from a well-dated sediment core from an alpine lake in north China. Our δ13C data, together with previously reported pollen data from a parallel core, demonstrate a humid mid-Holocene from ca. 8-5 ka BP. Assuming that the climatic humidity of north China is an indicator of the EASM intensity, then the maximum EASM intensity occurred in the mid-Holocene. Our δD data reveal a similar long-term trend to the δ18O record from nearby Lianhua Cave, indicating that the synchronous δD and δ18O records faithfully record the δD and δ18O of precipitation, respectively. The most negative δD and δ18O values occur in the early-mid Holocene, from ca. 11-5 ka BP. This contrast in the timing of isotopic variations demonstrates a complex relationship between the isotopic composition of precipitation and precipitation amount, or EASM intensity. Further comparisons indicate a possible linkage between the precipitation amount in north China and the west-east thermal gradient in the equatorial Pacific. In addition, the temperature of the moisture source area may play an important role in determining the isotopic composition of precipitation in monsoonal China.

  9. BOREAS TE-5 Leaf Carbon Isotope Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. This documentation describes leaf carbon isotope data that were collected in 1993 and 1994 at the NSA and SSA OJP sites, the SSA OBS site, and the NSA UBS site. In addition, leaf carbon isotope data were collected in 1994 only at the NSA and SSA OA sites. These data was collected to provide seasonal integrated physiological information for 10 to 15 common species at these 6 BOREAS sites. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Eder, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Hayes, John M.; Cady, Sherry L.; DesMarais, David J.; Hope, Janet M.; Summons, Roger E.

    2001-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic microbial communities associated with the siliceous vent walls and outflow channel of Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, have been examined for lipid biomarker and carbon isotopic signatures. These data were compared with that obtained from representatives of three Aquificales genera. Thermocrinis ruber, Thermocrinis sp. HI, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus, Aquifex pyrophilus and Aquifex aeolicus all contained phospholipids composed not only of the usual ester-linked fatty acids, but also ether-linked alkyl moieties. The fatty acids of all cultured organisms were dominated by very distinct pattern of n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21 compounds. The alkyl glycerol ethers were present primarily as C-18:0 monoethers with the exception of the Aquifex spp. in which dialkyl glycerol ethers with a boarder carbon-number distribution were also present. These Aquificales biomarker lipids were the major constituents in the lipid extracts of the Octopus Spring microbial samples. Two natural samples, a microbial biofilm growing in association with deposition of amorphous silica on the vent walls at 92 C, and the well-known "pink-streamer community" (PSC), siliceous filaments of a microbial consortia growing in the outflow channel at 87 C were analyzed. Both the biofilm and PSC samples contained mono- and dialkyl glycerol ethers with a prevalence of C-18 and C-20 alkyls. Phospholipid fatty acids were comprised of both the characteristic. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Chemical and stable carbon isotopic composition of PM2.5 from on-road vehicle emissions in the PRD region and implications for vehicle emission control policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, S.; Bi, X.; Chan, L. Y.; He, J.; Wang, B.; Wang, X.; Peng, P.; Sheng, G.; Fu, J.

    2015-03-01

    Vehicle emissions are a major source of urban air pollution. In recent decade, the Chinese government has introduced a range of policies to reduce vehicle emissions. In order to understand the chemical characteristics of PM2.5 from on-road vehicle emissions in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region and to evaluate the effectiveness of control policies on vehicle emissions, the emission factors of PM2.5 mass, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water-soluble inorganic ions (WSII), metal elements, organic compounds and stable carbon isotopic composition were measured in the Zhujiang tunnel of Guangzhou, in the PRD region of China in 2013. Emission factors of PM2.5 mass, OC, EC and WSOC were 92.4, 16.7, 16.4 and 1.31 mg vehicle-1 km-1 respectively. Emission factors of WSII were 0.016 (F-) ~ 4.17 (Cl-) mg vehicle-1 km-1, contributing about 9.8% to the PM2.5 emissions. The sum of 27 measured metal elements accounted for 15.2% of PM2.5 emissions. Fe was the most abundant metal element, with an emission factor of 3.91 mg vehicle-1 km-1. Emission factors of organic compounds including n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hopanes and steranes were 91.9, 5.02, 32.0 and 7.59 μg vehicle-1 km-1, respectively. Stable carbon isotopic composition δ13C value was -25.0‰ on average. An isotopic fractionation of 3.2‰ was found during fuel combustion. Compared to a previous study in Zhujiang tunnel in 2004, emission factors of PM2.5mass, EC, OC, WSII except Cl- and organic compounds decreased by 16.0 ~ 93.4%, which could be attributed to emission control policy from 2004 to 2013. However, emission factors of most of the metal elements increased significantly, which could be partially attributed to the changes in motor oil additives and vehicle conditions. There are no mandatory national standards to limit metal content from vehicle emissions, which should be a concern of the government. A snapshot of the 2013 characteristic

  12. Chemical and stable carbon isotopic composition of PM2.5 from on-road vehicle emissions in the PRD region and implication for vehicle emission control policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, S.; Bi, X.; Chan, L. Y.; He, J.; Wang, B.; Wang, X.; Sheng, G.; Fu, J.

    2014-11-01

    Vehicle emission is a major source of urban air pollution. In recent decade, the Chinese government has introduced a range of policies to reduce the vehicle emission. In order to understand the chemical characteristics of PM2.5 from on-road vehicle emission in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region and to evaluate the effectiveness of control policies on vehicles emission, the emission factors of PM2.5 mass, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water-soluble inorganic ions (WSII), metal elements, organic compounds and stable carbon isotopic composition were measured in the Zhujiang Tunnel of Guangzhou, the PRD region of China in 2013. Emission factors of PM2.5 mass, OC, EC, and WSOC were 92.4, 16.7, 16.4, and 1.31 mg vehicle-1 km-1 respectively. Emission factors of WSII were 0.016 (F-) ~4.17 (Cl-) mg vehicle-1 km-1, totally contributing about 9.8% to the PM2.5 emissions. The sum of 27 measured metal elements accounted for 15.2% of the PM2.5 emissions. Fe was the most abundant metal element, with an emission factor of 3.91 mg vehicle-1 km-1. Emission factors of organic compounds including n-alkanes, PAHs, hopanes, and steranes were 91.9, 5.02, 32.0 and 7.59 μg vehicle-1 km-1, respectively. Stable carbon isotopic composition δ13C value was measured and it was -25.0‰ on average. An isotopic fractionation of 3.2‰ was found during fuel combustion. Compared with a previous study in Zhujiang Tunnel in year 2004, emission factors of PM2.5 mass, EC, OC, WSII except Cl-, and organic compounds decreased by 16.0-93.4%, which could be attributed to emission control policy from 2004 to 2013. However, emission factors of most of the metal elements increased significantly, which could be partially attributed to the changes in motor oil additives and vehicle condition. There are no mandatory national standards to limit metal content from vehicle emission, which should be a concern of the government. A snapshot of the 2013 characteristic

  13. Large regional-scale variation in C3/C4 distribution pattern of Inner Mongolia steppe is revealed by grazer wool carbon isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerswald, K.; Wittmer, M. H. O. M.; Männel, T. T.; Bai, Y. F.; Schäufele, R.; Schnyder, H.

    2009-05-01

    This work explored the spatial variation of C3/C4 distribution in the Inner Mongolia, P. R. China, steppe by geostatistical analysis of carbon isotope data of vegetation and sheep wool. Standing community biomass (n=118) and sheep wool (n=146) were sampled in a ~0.2 Mio km2 area. Samples from ten consecutive years (1998-2007) were obtained. Community biomass samples represented the carbon isotopic composition of standing vegetation on about 1000 m2 ("community-scale"), whereas the spatio-temporal scale of wool reflected the isotope composition of the entire area grazed by the herd during a 1-yr period (~5-10 km2, "farm-scale"). Pair wise sampling of wool and vegetation revealed a 13C-enrichment of 2.7±0.7‰ (95% confidence interval) in wool relative to vegetation, but this shift exhibited no apparent relationships with environmental parameters or stocking rate. The proportion of C4 plants in above-ground biomass (PC4, %) was estimated with a two-member mixing model of 13C discrimination by C3 and C4 vegetation (13Δ3 and 13Δ4, respectively), in accounting for the effects of changing 13C in atmospheric CO2 on sample isotope composition, and of altitude and aridity on 13Δ3. PC4 averaged 19%, but the variation was enormous: full-scale (0% to 100%) at community-scale, and 0% to 85% at farm-scale. The farm-scale variation of PC4 exhibited a clear regional pattern over a range of ~250 km. Importantly PC4 was significantly higher above the 22°C isotherm of the warmest month, which was obtained from annual high-resolution maps and averaged over the different sampling years. This is consistent with predictions from C3/C4 crossover temperature of quantum yield or light use efficiency in C3 and C4 plants. Still, temperature gradients accounted for only 10% of the farm-scale variation of PC4, indicating that additional factors control PC4 on this scale.

  14. Large regional-scale variation in C3/C4 distribution pattern of Inner Mongolia steppe is revealed by grazer wool carbon isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerswald, K.; Wittmer, M. H. O. M.; Männel, T. T.; Bai, Y. F.; Schäufele, R.; Schnyder, H.

    2009-01-01

    This work explored the spatial variation of C3/C4 distribution in the Inner Mongolia, China, steppe by geostatistical analysis of carbon isotope data of vegetation and sheep wool. Standing community biomass (n=118) and sheep wool (n=146) were sampled in a ~0.2 Mio km2 area. Samples from ten consecutive years (1998-2007) were obtained. Community biomass samples represented the carbon isotopic composition of standing vegetation on about 1000 m2 ("community-scale"), whereas the spatio-temporal scale of wool reflected the isotope composition of the entire area grazed by the herd during a 1-yr period (~5-10 km2, "farm-scale"). Pair wise sampling of wool and vegetation revealed a 13C-enrichment of 2.7‰ in wool relative to vegetation, but this shift exhibited no apparent relationships with environmental parameters or stocking rate. The proportion of C4 plants in above-ground biomass (PC4, %) was estimated with a two-member mixing model of C3 and C4 13C discrimination (13Δ3 and 13Δ4, respectively), in accounting for the effects of changing 13C in atmospheric CO2 on sample isotope composition, and of altitude and aridity on 13Δ3. PC4 averaged 19%, but the variation was enormous: full-scale (0% to 100%) at community-scale, and 0% to 85% at farm-scale. The farm-scale variation of PC4 exhibited a clear regional pattern over a range of ~250 km. Importantly PC4 was significantly higher above and lower below the 22°C isotherm of the warmest month, which was averaged from high-resolution maps of the sample years. This is consistent with predictions from C3/C4 crossover temperature of quantum yield in C3 and C4 plants. Still, temperature gradients accounted for only 10% of the farm-scale variation of PC4, indicating that additional factors control PC4 on this scale.

  15. Effect of Feeding On The Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Composition In The Tissues and Skeleton of The Zooxanthellate Coral Stylophora Pistillata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud-Vaganay, S.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.; Sambrotto, R.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Jaubert, J.

    and J.-P. Gattuso4 1Centre Scientifique de Monaco, Avenue Saint Martin, MC-98000, Principality of Monaco 2Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, 61 Rt. 9W/ P.O. Box 1000, Palisades, NY 10964 U.S.A 3Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Laboratoire mixte CNRS- CEA, F-91180 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France 4Observatoire Océanologique, Laboratoire d'Océanographie, CNRS-UPMC, BP 28, F- 06234 Villefranche-sur-mer Cedex, France The effect of feeding on the carbon isotopic composition of zooxanthellae, animal tissue and skeleton was investigated in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Two sets of corals were grown with filtered seawater under controlled conditions. One group of colonies was fed with Artemia nauplii and compared to a control group that was starved. Fed corals exhibited higher concentrations of chlorophyll protein calcification rates than starved colonies. The net photosynthetic rate was higher in starved than in fed corals, whereas dark respiration was not significantly different. The average ? C value of Artemia nauplii used for feeding was -12. ? C was 13 13 significantly heavier in zooxanthellae than in animal tissues, for both fed (-10.1vs. -11.7) and starved colonies (-10.9vs. -13.2). Isotopic data reflected the incorporation of Artemia carbon into the coral tissue in that the ? C was 13 significantly heavier in fed than in starved colonies (-11.7 to -13.2 respectively), although there was no difference in the ? C of the zooxanthellae fraction. Skeletal 13 ? C was similar in fed and starved colonies (mean = -4.6). Skeletal ? O 13 18 composition was, however, significantly different between the two treatments (-4.24 to -4.05 for fed and starved colonies respectively). These data are used to establish a conceptual model of the carbon flow between the various compartments of a symbiotic coral.

  16. Carbon isotopic composition of forest soil respiration in the decade following bark beetle and stem girdling disturbances in the Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Gregory E; Chan, Allison M; Trahan, Nicole A; Moore, David J P; Bowling, David R

    2016-07-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks are widespread in western North American forests, reducing primary productivity and transpiration, leading to forest mortality across large areas and altering ecosystem carbon cycling. Here the carbon isotope composition (δ(13) C) of soil respiration (δJ ) was monitored in the decade after disturbance for forests affected naturally by mountain pine beetle infestation and artificially by stem girdling. The seasonal mean δJ changed along both chronosequences. We found (a) enrichment of δJ relative to controls (<1 ‰) in near-surface soils in the first 2 years after disturbance; (b) depletion (1‰ or no change) during years 3-7; and (c) a second period of enrichment (1-2‰) in years 8-10. Results were consistent with isotopic patterns associated with the gradual death and decomposition of rhizosphere organisms, fine roots, conifer needles and woody roots and debris over the course of a decade after mortality. Finally, δJ was progressively more (13) C-depleted deeper in the soil than near the surface, while the bulk soil followed the well-established pattern of (13) C-enrichment at depth. Overall, differences in δJ between mortality classes (<1‰) and soil depths (<3‰) were smaller than variability within a class or depth over a season (up to 6‰). PMID:26824577

  17. Carbon isotopic composition of forest soil respiration in the decade following bark beetle and stem girdling disturbances in the Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Gregory E; Chan, Allison M; Trahan, Nicole A; Moore, David J P; Bowling, David R

    2016-07-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks are widespread in western North American forests, reducing primary productivity and transpiration, leading to forest mortality across large areas and altering ecosystem carbon cycling. Here the carbon isotope composition (δ(13) C) of soil respiration (δJ ) was monitored in the decade after disturbance for forests affected naturally by mountain pine beetle infestation and artificially by stem girdling. The seasonal mean δJ changed along both chronosequences. We found (a) enrichment of δJ relative to controls (<1 ‰) in near-surface soils in the first 2 years after disturbance; (b) depletion (1‰ or no change) during years 3-7; and (c) a second period of enrichment (1-2‰) in years 8-10. Results were consistent with isotopic patterns associated with the gradual death and decomposition of rhizosphere organisms, fine roots, conifer needles and woody roots and debris over the course of a decade after mortality. Finally, δJ was progressively more (13) C-depleted deeper in the soil than near the surface, while the bulk soil followed the well-established pattern of (13) C-enrichment at depth. Overall, differences in δJ between mortality classes (<1‰) and soil depths (<3‰) were smaller than variability within a class or depth over a season (up to 6‰).

  18. Effects of sources and diagenesis on the isotopic and chemical composition of carbon and sulfur in cretaceous shales

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, S.G.; Kyser, T.K. )

    1990-10-01

    The Cretaceous Lea Park Formation of south-central Saskatchewan contains organic matter from marine and terrestrial sources in proportions that vary as a result of deposition during the Campanian Claggett transgressive-regressive cycle in the Western Interior seaway of North America. The relative proportions of organic matter from these sources were determined using a terrestrial index (TI) that compares n-alkanes considered to be of terrestrial origin, n-C{sub 25} to n-C{sub 29}, to those considered to be of marine origin, n-C{sub 15} to n-C{sub 22}. The C isotopic composition of Cretaceous marine organic matter is found to be near {minus}32{per thousand} while terrestrial organic matter is near {minus}24{per thousand}. The lower {delta}{sup 13}C values of marine organic matter from the Lea Park Formation, as compared with those of Recent marine organic matter, are similar to the relation observed in other Cretaceous rocks; {delta}{sup 13}C values of terrestrial organic matter, however, are similar to those of the present. Pyrite formation in the Lea Park mudstones was limited by the availability of metabolizable organic matter, with the great amount of pyrite typically associated with organic matter having the lowest TI values. {delta}{sup 34}Spy values range nearly 30{per thousand} and vary directly with the composition of associated organic matter. Variations in the supply of metabolizable organic matter were more important than differences in sedimentation rate in producing the range of {delta}{sup 34}Spy values. {Delta}{sup 34}S values vary with the composition of organic matter and become larger when associated with more metabolizable organic matter.

  19. Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in aerosols from Sapporo, Japan: Implications for photochemical aging during long-range atmospheric transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Shankar G.; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2008-07-01

    Molecular and stable carbon isotopic (δ13C value) compositions of dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, and dicarbonyls in aerosol samples (i.e., total suspended particles) collected in Sapporo, northern Japan during spring and summer were determined to better understand the photochemical aging of organic aerosols during long-range transport from East Asia and Siberia. Their molecular distributions were characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic (C3) or occasionally succinic (C4) acids. Concentrations of total diacids ranged from 106-787 ng m-3 with ketoacids (13-81 ng m-3) and dicarbonyls (2.6-28 ng m-3) being less abundant. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) comprised 23-69% of aerosol organic carbon (OC). OC to elemental carbon (EC) ratios were high (3.6-19, mean: 8.7). The ratios of C3/C4 and WSOC/OC did not show significant diurnal changes, suggesting that the Sapporo aerosols were not seriously affected by local photochemical processes and instead they were already aged. δ13C values of the dominant diacids (C2 - C4) ranged from -14.0 to -25.3‰. Largest δ13C values (-14.0 to -22.4‰, mean: -18.8‰) were obtained for C2, whereas smallest values (-25.1 to -31.4‰, mean: -28.1‰) were for azelaic acid (C9). In general, δ13C values of C2 - C4 diacids became less negative with aerosol aging (i.e., WSOC/OC), presumably due to isotopic fractionation during photochemical degradation of diacids. By comparing the δ13C values of diacids in the Sapporo aerosols with different air mass source regions, we suggest that although initial δ13C values of diacids depend on their precursor sources, the enrichment in 13C can be ascribed to aerosol photochemical aging.

  20. The Strontium Isotope Composition of Fossil Hackberry Seed Carbonate and Tooth Enamel as a Potential Record of Soil Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. J.; Stern, L. A.; Banner, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    The Edwards Plateau in central Texas has experienced significant soil erosion since the Last Glacial Maximum. In contrast to the thin soils that mantle the Cretaceous limestone bedrock of the modern Edwards Plateau, Quaternary fossils of burrowing mammals contained within several central Texas cave deposits suggest soil cover was much thicker in the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene. As the landscape is denuded, the Cretaceous limestone bedrock is exhumed and becomes a more important source of exchangeable Sr to the soils. Therefore, the Sr isotope composition of the soil and organisms deriving nutrients from the soil, such as plants and herbivores, should become more like the Sr isotope composition of the bedrock as erosion continues. Because the marine limestone bedrock has a lower 87Sr/86Sr value than the soil, the exchangeable soil Sr should evolve to lower 87Sr/86Sr values through time resulting in a decrease in the 87Sr/86Sr of plants and animals deriving nutrients from the soil. In order to test this hypothesis, terrestrial fossils from an extensively dated Quaternary deposit within Hall's Cave, Kerr County, Texas were analyzed by TIMS for 87Sr/86Sr. The materials analyzed include aragonitic fossil hackberry seeds and rodent tooth enamel. Results indicate an overall decrease in the 87Sr/86Sr of fossil hackberry seed aragonite and rodent tooth enamel over the last 16,000 years, with the highest rate of decrease in the 87Sr/86Sr of fossil hackberry seeds (0.70982 to 0.70841) occurring between approximately 16,000 and 10,000 Y.B.P. This decrease in the 87Sr/86Sr is interpreted as evidence for an increase in the proportion of bedrock-derived Sr to the soils, corresponding to a general decrease in soil thickness. An increase in aridity or an increase in the seasonality of precipitation during this time could account for the post-glacial soil erosion in central Texas. This study suggests that the 87Sr/86Sr of fossils may be a useful proxy for paleo soil depth

  1. Stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon compositions in the Neoproterozoic of South Gabon (Schisto-Calcaire Subgroup, Nyanga Basin): Are cap carbonates and lithoherms recording a particular destabilization event after the Marinoan glaciation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préat, Alain; Prian, Jean-Pierre; Thiéblemont, Denis; Obame, Rolf Mabicka; Delpomdor, Franck

    2011-06-01

    Geologic evidence of tropical sea level glaciation in the Neoproterozoic remains a matter of debate in the Snowball Earth hypothesis. The Niari Tillite Formation and the cap carbonates record the late Neoproterozoic Marinoan glaciation in South Gabon. These cap carbonates are located at the base of the Schisto-Calcaire Subgroup a predominantly carbonate succession that rests with sharp contact on top of the Niari Tillite. Integrating sedimentological and stable isotope data, a consistent sequence of precipitation events is proposed, with strongly negative δ 13C values pointing to a particular event in the cap carbonates (average δ 13C value = -3.2‰ V-PDB) and in a further newly defined lithohermal unit (average δ 13C value = -4.6‰ V-PDB). Subsequent shallow evaporitive platform carbonates display carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions indicative of relatively unaltered seawater values. Strongly negative δ 18O values in the lithoherms and replacement of aragonite fans by equigranular calcite suggest flushing of meteoric water derived from glacial meltwater.

  2. A deep-time CO2 barometer based on triple oxygen isotope compositions of dinosaurian eggshell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Passey, B. H.; Montanari, S.; Levin, N.; Li, S.

    2013-12-01

    Photochemical reactions in the stratosphere lead to mass independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes: oxygen exchange among O2, O3, and CO2 produces 17O-enriched O3 and CO2, and 17O-depleted O2. This effect increases with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration, and thus the 17O anomaly of O2, Δ17O (O2), is reflective of pCO2. Animals incorporate this signal into body water via respiration, and minerals such as bioapatite and eggshell calcite forming in equilibrium with body water can preserve the signal for millions of years. We contribute to the development of this new pCO2 barometer by developing analytical methods for high-precision triple oxygen isotope analysis of carbonates, by developing an ecophysiological model of body water triple oxygen isotopes, and by applying the method to eggshell from modern birds and late Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) dinosaur eggshells. Our findings include the following: (1) If animal ecophysiology and climatic context are perfectly known, the sensitivity of Δ17O (body water) to atmospheric CO2 is on the order of 0.01 ‰ per 100 ppm CO2; our analytical precision is ~ 0.01 ‰, thus ultimately permitting sub -100 ppm - level pCO2 reconstructions. (2) However, the effect of ecophysiology and climate can lead to a range in Δ17O (body water) of about 0.15 ‰ for animals living under the same Δ17O (O2); this prediction, confirmed by analyses of eggshells and body water of modern birds, translates to an apparent pCO2 range of about 1500 ppm. (3) Animals that are highly dependent on unevaporated free surface water ('drinking water') and live in humid climates have Δ17O (body water) signals that mimic low pCO2, whereas animals that consume primarily evaporated water (e.g., leaf water) and living in arid environments have Δ17O (body water) signals that mimic high pCO2. (4) There is an upper limit to this 'evaporation / aridity' effect mimicking high pCO2, so Δ17O (fossil eggshell) can be modeled assuming such upper

  3. The Effects of Trimethylamine and Organic Matter Additions on the Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition of Methane Produced in Hypersaline Microbial Mat Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Nicholson, B. E.; Beaudoin, C. S.; Detweiler, A. M.; Bebout, B.

    2014-12-01

    Methane production has been observed in a number of hypersaline environments, and it is generally thought that this methane is produced through the use of non-competitive substrates, such as the methylamines, methanol and dimethylsulfide. The stable carbon isotopic composition of the produced methane has suggested that the methanogens are operating under conditions of substrate limitation. We investigated substrate limitation in gypsum-hosted endoevaporite and soft mat hypersaline environments by the additions of trimethylamine, a non-competitive substrate for methanogenesis, and dried microbial mat, a source of natural organic matter. The δ13C values of the methane produced after amendments were compared to those in unamended control vials. At all hypersaline sites investigated, the δ13C values of the methane produced in the amended vials were statistically lower (by 10 to 71 ‰) than the unamended controls, supporting the hypothesis of substrate limitation at these sites. When substrates were added to the incubation vials, the methanogens within the vials fractionated carbon isotopes to a greater degree, resulting in the production of more 13C-depleted methane. Trimethylamine-amended samples produced lower methane δ13C values than the mat-amended samples. This difference in the δ13C values between the two types of amendments could be due to differences in isotope fractionation associated with the dominant methane production pathway (or substrate used) within the vials, with trimethylamine being the main substrate used in the trimethylamine-amended vials. We hypothesize that increased natural organic matter in the mat-amended vials would increase fermentation rates, leading to higher H2 concentrations and increased CO2/H2 methanogenesis.

  4. A Methodology for Absolute Isotope Composition Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. J.; Lee, D.; Liang, W.

    2007-12-01

    Double spike technique was a well defined method for isotope composition measurement by TIMS of samples which have natural mass fractionation effect, but it is still a problem to define the isotope composition for double spike itself. In this study, we modified the old double spike technique and found that we could use the modified technique to solve the ¡§true¡¨ isotope composition of double spike itself. According the true isotope composition of double spike, we can measure the absolute isotope composition if the sample has natural fractionation effect. A new vector analytical method has been developed in order to obtain the true isotopic composition of a 42Ca-48Ca double spike, and this is achieved by using two different sample-spike mixtures combined with the double spike and the natural Ca data. Because the natural sample, the two mixtures, and the spike should all lie on a single mixing line, we are able to constrain the true isotopic composition of our double spike using this new approach. This method not only can be used in Ca system but also in Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Mo, Ba and Pb systems. The absolute double spike isotopic ratio is important, which can save a lot of time to check different reference standards. Especially for Pb, radiogenic isotope system, the decay systems embodied in three of four naturally occurring isotopes induce difficult to obtain true isotopic ratios for absolute dating.

  5. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  6. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  7. Vertical distributions of bound saturated fatty acids and compound-specific stable carbon isotope compositions in sediments of two lakes in China: implication for the influence of eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifang; Xiong, Yongqiang; Wu, Fengchang; Li, Qiuhua; Lin, Tian; Giesy, John P

    2014-11-01

    Lakes Dianchi (DC) and Bosten (BST) were determined to be at different stages of eutrophication, by use of total organic carbon content, bulk carbon isotopic composition, bulk nitrogen isotopic composition, and bound saturated fatty acid (BSFA) concentrations in sediment cores. A rapid increase in the supply of organic matter (OM) to DC began after the 1950s, while the environment and trophic status of BST remained constant as indicated by characteristics of OM input to sediments. The BSFA ratios of nC14 + nC16 + nC18/nC24 + nC26 + nC28 increase upward from 7 to 13 in the DC core, which are significantly greater than those from BST (2 to 3). This result is consistent with algae or bacteria being the dominant contribution of the OM increase induced by eutrophication in DC. The positive shift of nC16 compound-specific δ (13)C in the upper section might be an indicator of excess algal productivity, which was observed in the two lakes. The positive shifts of compound-specific δ (13)C of other BSFAs were also observed in the upper section of the core only from DC. The observed trends of compound-specific δ(13)C of BSFA originated from different sources became more consistent, which reflected the intensified eutrophication had profoundly affected production and preservation of OM in DC. The results observed for BST indicated that accumulation of algae did not affect the entire aquatic ecosystem until now.

  8. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  9. Effects of mistletoe removal on growth, N and C reserves, and carbon and oxygen isotope composition in Scots pine hosts.

    PubMed

    Yan, Cai-Feng; Gessler, Arthur; Rigling, Andreas; Dobbertin, Matthias; Han, Xing-Guo; Li, Mai-He

    2016-05-01

    Most mistletoes are xylem-tapping hemiparasites, which derive their resources from the host's xylem solution. Thus, they affect the host's water relations and resource balance. To understand the physiological mechanisms underlying the mistletoe-host relationship, we experimentally removed Viscum album ssp. austriacum (Wiesb.) Vollmann from adult Pinus sylvestris L. host trees growing in a Swiss dry valley. We analyzed the effects of mistletoe removal over time on host tree growth and on concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) and nitrogen (N) in needles, fine roots and sapwood. In addition, we assessed the δ(13)C and δ(18)O in host tree rings. After mistletoe removal, δ(13)C did not change in newly produced tree rings compared with tree rings in control trees (still infected with mistletoe), but δ(18)O values increased. This pattern might be interpreted as a decrease in assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (gs), but in our study, it most likely points to an inadequacy of the dual isotope approach. Instead, we interpret the unchanged δ(13)C in tree rings upon mistletoe removal as a balanced increase in A and gs that resulted in a constant intrinsic water use efficiency (defined as A/gs). Needle area-based concentrations of N, soluble sugars and NSC, as well as needle length, single needle area, tree ring width and shoot growth, were significantly higher in trees from which mistletoe was removed than in control trees. This finding suggests that mistletoe removal results in increased N availability and carbon gain, which in turn leads to increased growth rates of the hosts. Hence, in areas where mistletoe is common and the population is large, mistletoe management (e.g., removal) may be needed to improve the host vigor, growth rate and productivity, especially for relatively small trees and crop trees in xeric growth conditions. PMID:27083524

  10. Carbon and hydrogen isotope composition of plant biomarkers as proxies for precipitation changes across Heinrich Events in the subtropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, T. E.; Freeman, K.; Brenner, M.; Diefendorf, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Tulane is a relatively deep (~23 m) solution lake in south-central Florida. Its depth and location on a structural high, the Lake Wales Ridge, enabled continuous lacustrine sediment accumulation over the past >60,000 years. Pollen in the lake sediments indicate repeated major shifts in the vegetation community, with six peaks in Pinus (pine) abundance that coincide with the most intense cold phases of Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles and the Heinrich events that terminate them. Alternating with Pinus peaks are zones with high relative percentages of Quercus (oak), Ambrosia (ragweed), Lyonia (staggerbush) and Ceratiola (rosemary) pollen, genera that today occupy the most xeric sites on the Florida landscape. This suggests the pollen record indicates the Pinus phases, and therefore Heinrich Events, were wetter than the intervening Quercus phases. To test the connection between Heinrich Events and precipitation in Florida, we analyzed the carbon (δ13C) and hydrogen (δD) isotope signatures of plant biomarkers extracted from the Lake Tulane sediment core as proxies of paleohydrology. The δ13C of plant biomarkers, such as n-alkanes and terpenoids, are determined, in part, by changes in water-use efficiency (WUE = Assimilation/Transpiration) in plant communities, which changes in response to shifts in mean annual precipitation. Plant δ13C values can, therefore, provide a rough indication of precipitation changes when other factors, such as plant community, are relatively stable throughout time. Paleohydrology is also recorded in the δD of plant leaf waxes, which are strongly controlled by precipitation δD. In this region, precipitation δD is negatively correlated with rainfall amount (i.e. the "amount" effect) and positively correlated with aridity. Thus, the δ13C and δD signatures of molecular plant biomarkers provide relative indicators of precipitation change, and when combined, provide a test of our hypothesis that vegetation changes in this region are driven

  11. Carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions of late Pleistocene mammal teeth from dolines of Ajoie (Northwestern Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, Laureline; Tütken, Thomas; Becker, Damien

    2014-09-01

    Fossils of megaherbivores from eight late Pleistocene 14C- and OSL-dated doline infillings of Ajoie (NW Switzerland) were discovered along the Transjurane highway in the Swiss Jura. Carbon and oxygen analyses of enamel were performed on forty-six teeth of large mammals (Equus germanicus, Mammuthus primigenius, Coelodonta antiquitatis, and Bison priscus), coming from one doline in Boncourt (~ 80 ka, marine oxygen isotope stage MIS5a) and seven in Courtedoux (51-27 ka, late MIS3), in order to reconstruct the paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental conditions of the region. Similar enamel δ13C values for both periods, ranging from - 14.5 to - 9.2‰, indicate that the megaherbivores lived in a C3 plant-dominated environment. Enamel δ18OPO4 values range from 10.9 to 16.3‰ with a mean of 13.5 ± 1.0‰ (n = 46). Mean air temperatures (MATs) were inferred using species-specific δ18OPO4-δ18OH2O-calibrations for modern mammals and a present-day precipitation δ18OH2O-MAT relation for Switzerland. Similar average MATs of 6.6 ± 3.6°C for the deposits dated to ~ 80 ka and 6.5 ± 3.3°C for those dated to the interval 51-27 ka were estimated. This suggests that these mammals in the Ajoie area lived in mild periods of the late Pleistocene with MATs only about 2.5°C lower than modern-day temperatures.

  12. Diurnal and seasonal variation in the carbon isotope composition of leaf dark-respired CO(2) in velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina).

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Resco, Víctor; Williams, David G

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated diurnal and seasonal patterns of carbon isotope composition of leaf dark-respired CO(2) (delta(13)C(l)) in the C(3) perennial shrub velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina) across flood plain and upland savanna ecosystems in the south-western USA. delta(13)C(l) of darkened leaves increased to maximum values late during daytime periods and declined gradually over night-time periods to minimum values at pre-dawn. The magnitude of the diurnal shift in delta(13)C(l) was strongly influenced by seasonal and habitat-related differences in soil water availability and leaf surface vapour pressure deficit. delta(13)C(l) and the cumulative flux-weighted delta(13)C value of photosynthates were positively correlated, suggesting that progressive (13)C enrichment of the CO(2) evolved by darkened leaves during the daytime mainly resulted from short-term changes in photosynthetic (13)C discrimination and associated shifts in the delta(13)C signature of primary respiratory substrates. The (13)C enrichment of dark-respired CO(2) relative to photosynthates across habitats and seasons was 4 to 6 per thousand at the end of the daytime period (1800 h), but progressively declined to 0 per thousand by pre-dawn (0300 h). The origin of night-time and daytime variations in delta(13)C(l) is discussed in terms of the carbon source(s) feeding respiration and the drought-induced changes in carbon metabolism.

  13. Indications for the past redox environments in deep groundwaters from the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in fracture calcite, Olkiluoto, SW Finland.

    PubMed

    Sahlstedt, Elina; Karhu, Juha A; Pitkanen, Petteri

    2010-09-01

    In paleohydrogeological studies, the geochemical and isotope geochemical composition of fracture calcites can be utilised to gain information about the evolution of the composition of deep groundwaters in crystalline bedrock. The aim of our study was to investigate the latest hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwaters in the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto, which is the planned site for deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Samples were collected from drill cores intercepting water-conducting fractures at the upper ~500 m of the bedrock. The latest fracture calcite generations were identified using optical microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur as thin ~10-200 μm crusts or small euhedral crystals on open fracture surfaces. These latest calcite fillings were carefully sampled and analysed for the isotopic composition on carbon and oxygen. In addition, fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures were determined on selected calcite samples. Fluid inclusion data indicated a low temperature of formation for the latest fracture calcite fillings. The δ(18)O values of calcite in these fracture fillings vary only slightly, from-7.3 to-11.5 ‰ (Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite, VPDB), whereas the δ(13)C values fluctuate widely, from-30 to+31 ‰ (VPDB). The δ(13)C values of latest calcite fillings show a systematic pattern with depth, with high and variable δ(13)C values below 50 m. The high δ(13)C values indicate active methanogenesis during the formation of the latest calcite fillings. In contrast, the present-day methanic redox environment is restricted to depths below 200-300 m. It is possible that the shift in the redox environment at Olkiluoto has occurred during infiltration of SO2-(4)-rich marine waters, the latest of such events being the infiltration of brackish waters of the Littorina Sea stage of the Baltic Sea at ~8000-3000 BP. PMID:20665300

  14. Indications for the past redox environments in deep groundwaters from the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in fracture calcite, Olkiluoto, SW Finland.

    PubMed

    Sahlstedt, Elina; Karhu, Juha A; Pitkanen, Petteri

    2010-09-01

    In paleohydrogeological studies, the geochemical and isotope geochemical composition of fracture calcites can be utilised to gain information about the evolution of the composition of deep groundwaters in crystalline bedrock. The aim of our study was to investigate the latest hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwaters in the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto, which is the planned site for deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Samples were collected from drill cores intercepting water-conducting fractures at the upper ~500 m of the bedrock. The latest fracture calcite generations were identified using optical microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur as thin ~10-200 μm crusts or small euhedral crystals on open fracture surfaces. These latest calcite fillings were carefully sampled and analysed for the isotopic composition on carbon and oxygen. In addition, fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures were determined on selected calcite samples. Fluid inclusion data indicated a low temperature of formation for the latest fracture calcite fillings. The δ(18)O values of calcite in these fracture fillings vary only slightly, from-7.3 to-11.5 ‰ (Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite, VPDB), whereas the δ(13)C values fluctuate widely, from-30 to+31 ‰ (VPDB). The δ(13)C values of latest calcite fillings show a systematic pattern with depth, with high and variable δ(13)C values below 50 m. The high δ(13)C values indicate active methanogenesis during the formation of the latest calcite fillings. In contrast, the present-day methanic redox environment is restricted to depths below 200-300 m. It is possible that the shift in the redox environment at Olkiluoto has occurred during infiltration of SO2-(4)-rich marine waters, the latest of such events being the infiltration of brackish waters of the Littorina Sea stage of the Baltic Sea at ~8000-3000 BP.

  15. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium carbonate minerals produced by reaction of H2O-CO2 with ultramafic rocks occur in a wide range of paragenetic and tectonic settings and can thus provide insights into a variety of geologic processes, including (1) deposition of ore-grade, massive-vein cryptocrystalline magnesite; (2) formation of hydrous magnesium carbonates in weathering environments; and (3) metamorphic carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks. However, the application of traditional geochemical and isotopic methods to infer temperatures of mineralization, the nature of mineralizing fluids, and the mechanisms controlling the transformation of dissolved CO2 into magnesium carbonates in these settings is difficult because the fluids are usually not preserved. Clumped-isotope compositions of magnesium carbonates provide a means to determine primary mineralization or (re)equilibration temperature, which permits the reconstruction of geologic processes that govern magnesium carbonate formation. We first provide an evaluation of the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates using synthetic magnesite and hydromagnesite, along with natural metamorphic magnesite and low-temperature hydromagnesite precipitated within a mine adit. We show that the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates is virtually indistinguishable from other carbonate acid fractionation corrections given current mass spectrometer resolution and error. In addition, we employ carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry on natural magnesium carbonates from various geologic environments and tectonic settings. Cryptocrystalline magnesite vein deposits from California (Red Mountain magnesite mine), Austria (Kraubath locality), Turkey (Tutluca mine, Eskişehir district) and Iran (Derakht-Senjed deposit) exhibit broadly uniform Δ47 compositions that yield apparent clumped-isotope temperatures that average 23.7 ± 5.0 °C. Based on oxygen isotope thermometry, these clumped-isotope temperatures suggest

  16. Changes in soil C-isotopic composition in an agroecosystem under Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) treatment during a crop rotation period.

    PubMed

    Giesemann, Anette

    2005-01-01

    FACE (Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment) has been used since 1999 to evaluate the effects of future atmospheric CO(2) concentrations on an arable crop agroecosystem. The experiment conducted at the Institute of Agroecology at the Federal Research Centre in Braunschweig consists of a typical local crop rotation of winter barley, a cover crop, sugar beet and winter wheat. The atmospheric CO2 concentration of ambient air is about 375 ppm with a delta13C value of -7 to -9 per thousand, and 550 ppm (delta13C value = -20.2 per thousand) during daylight hours in the rings fumigated with additional CO2. Thus, the surplus C can be traced in the agricultural system. Over the course of the first experimental period (3-year crop rotation period), the C-isotopic composition and the C concentration in soil were monitored monthly. Plant samples were analysed according to the relevant developmental stages of the crop under cultivation. A 13C depletion was observed in plant parts, as well as in soil samples from the FACE rings under CO2 enrichment, indicating that labelled C has reached both respective ecosystem compartments. Albeit farming management practice (especially ploughing) leads to a mixing of 'old' and 'new' C compounds throughout all soil horizons down to the end of the ploughing layer and resulted in a heterogeneous distribution of newly formed C compounds in the soil, isotope analysis of soil C reflected where the surplus C went.

  17. An interannual assessment of the relationship between the stable carbon isotopic composition of ecosystem respiration and climate in a high-elevation subalpine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros-Iregui, Diego A.; Hu, Jia; Burns, Sean P.; Bowling, David R.; Monson, Russell K.

    2011-06-01

    We measured the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of ecosystem respiration (δ13CR) in a subalpine forest across four growing seasons to examine whether patterns in δ13CR were consistent with those expected based on leaf-level gas-exchange theory, and in agreement with past studies of the relation between δ13CR and climate conducted across broad geographic regions. Conventional trends (i.e., less negative δ13CR with increased vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and air temperature (TAIR), and decreased soil moisture (θ)) were observed when we focused on the driest portions of average-wetness years and when δ13CR was positively correlated with nighttime ecosystem respiration (RE). Nonconventional trends (i.e., more negative δ13CR with decreased θ, and increased VPD and TAIR) were observed under specific climatic conditions (e.g., late snowmelt; extreme TAIR late in the growing season), and when δ13CR was negatively correlated with RE. These nonconventional trends were independently corroborated using δ13C of extracted sugars from needles of dominant tree species at the site. Our results clearly demonstrate that the commonly reported relations between δ13CR and climate may break down depending on the interactions among environmental conditions. Efforts to model and predict the variability of δ13CR under changing climatic variables must characterize and parameterize the effects of unique combinations of weather conditions and variable hydrologic regimes, in combination with the susceptibility of photosynthetic isotope discrimination to extreme air temperatures.

  18. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of saturated fatty acids within one sedimentary profile in the Shenhu, northern South China Sea: Source implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Mao, Shengyi; Wu, Nengyou; Sun, Yongge; Guan, Hongxiang

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions of saturated fatty acids (SaFAs) in one 300 cm long sedimentary profile, which was named as Site4B in Shenhu, northern South China Sea. The concentrations of total SaFAs in sediments ranged from 1.80 to 10.16 μg/g (μg FA/g dry sediment) and showed an even-over-odd predominance in the carbon chain of C12 to C32, mostly with n-C16 and n-C18 being the two major components. The short-chain fatty acids (ScFAs; n-C12 to n-C18) mainly from marine microorganisms had average δ13C values of -26.7‰ to -28.2‰, whereas some terrigenous-sourced long-chain fatty acids (LcFAs; n-C21 to n-C32) had average δ13C values of -29.6‰ to -34.1‰. The other LcFAs (n-C24 & n-C26 ∼ n-C28; average δ13C values are -26.1‰ to -28.0‰) as well as n-C19 and n-C20 SaFAs (average δ13C values are -29.1‰ and -29.3‰, respectively) showed a mixed signal of carbon isotope compositions. The relative bioproductivity calculation (marine vs. terrigenous) demonstrated that most of organic carbon accumulation throughout the sedimentary profile was contributed by marine organism. The high marine productivity in Shenhu, South China Sea may be related to the hydrocarbon seepage which evidenced by diapiric structures. Interestingly, there is a sever fluctuation of terrigenous inputs around the depth of 97 cm below the seafloor (bsf), probably resulting from the influence of the Dansgaard-Oeschger events and the Younger Dryas event as revealed by 14C age measurements.

  19. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2012-10-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  20. Reprint of "Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-06-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  1. Quantitative analysis of intraspecific variations in the carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the modern cool-temperate brachiopod Terebratulina crossei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideko; Asami, Ryuji; Otake, Tsuguo; Abe, Osamu; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Iryu, Yasufumi

    2015-12-01

    This study unravels intraspecific variations in the carbon isotope (δ13C) and oxygen isotope (δ18O) compositions of shells of the modern cool-temperate brachiopod Terebratulina crossei collected at a water depth of 70 m in Otsuchi Bay, northeastern Honshu, Japan. Brachiopod shells have been used as proxies of the δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CDIC) and seawater temperature/δ18O (δ18OSW) values to reconstruct the evolution of Phanerozoic oceans. To identify more reliable shell portions as the proxies, we conducted a rigorous time-series comparison of δ13C and δ18O values between the brachiopod shells and calcite precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater (equilibrium calcite) (δ13CEC and δ18OEC values, respectively). Samples were collected from the outer and inner surfaces of the secondary shell layer along the maximum growth axis (ontogenetic-series and inner-series samples, respectively). The ontogenetic-series δ13C values, which showed regular annual and irregular non-annual cycles, partly fell in but were mostly less than the range of the δ13CEC values. The δ13C cycles were often associated with one or two minor negative peaks. The peaks were likely resulted from an increased incorporation of respiration-derived 12C due to elevated metabolic activity during spawning. The ontogenetic-series δ18O values showed distinct seasonal variations and were mostly within the range of δ18OEC values. The amplitude of the δ18O profiles was relatively large during the younger fast-growth stage, and decreased during the senescent slow-growth stage. The inner-series δ13C and δ18O values of individual shells varied within narrow ranges. The inner-series δ13C values were close to the minimum δ13CEC values. The inner-series δ18O values were in the upper range of the δ18OEC values. Kinetic isotope fractionation effects were evident, but its degree varied among different shells. We identified the shell portions reliably

  2. Isotopic anomalies from neutron reactions during explosive carbon burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Schramm, D. N.; Wefel, J. P.; Blake, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The heavy isotopic anomalies observed recently in the fractionation and unknown nuclear inclusions from the Allende meteorite are explained by neutron reactions during the explosive carbon burning (ECB). This model produces heavy anomalies in the same zone where Al-26 and O-16 are produced, thus reducing the number of source zones required for the isotopic anomalies. Unlike the classical r-process, the ECB n-process avoids the problem with the Sr anomaly and may resolve the problem of conflicting time scales between Al-26 and the r-process isotopes I-129 and Pu-244. Experimental studies of Zr and Ce isotopic composition are proposed to test this model.

  3. Influence of Land Use on the Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition and Concentration of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in Georgia Piedmont Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams are the dominant land-water interface across much of the landscape and provide many important ecological services. Cycling and transport of various carbon fractions, which serve as important food sources for downstream aquatic ecosystems, are among the important...

  4. Grosnaja ABCs: Magnesium isotope compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Srinivasan, G.; Ulyanov, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Three CAI's from the Grosnaja CV3 chondrite were analyzed for their magnesium isotopic compositions by the ion microprobe. The selected CAI's represent three distinct types: GR4(compact Type A), GR7(Type B) and GR2(Type C). Petrographic studies indicate that all three Grosnaja inclusions were subjected to secondary alterations. The Type A CAI GR4 is primarily composed of melilite with spinel and pyroxene occurring as minor phases. The rim of the inclusion does not exhibit distinct layered structure and secondary alteration products (garnet, Fe-rich olivine and Na-rich plagioclase) are present in some localized areas near the rim region. The average major element compositions of different mineral phases in GR4 are given. Preliminary REE data suggest a depletion of HREE relative to LREE by about a factor of 3 without any clear indication of interelement fractionation. The CAI GR7 has textural and minerological characteristics similar to Type B inclusions. The REE data show a pattern that is similar to Group 6 with enrichment in Eu and Yb. In addition, a depletion of HREE compared to LREE is also evident in this object. Melilite composition shows a broad range of akermanite content (Ak(sub 15-55)). Detailed petrographic study is in progress. GR2 is a anorthite-rich Type C inclusion with large plagioclase laths intergrown with Ti-rich pyroxene. The average plagioclase composition is close to pure anorthite (An99).

  5. Ferromanganese crusts as archives of deep water Cd isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; SchöNbäChler, M.; RehkäMper, M.; Nielsen, S. G.; Williams, H.; Halliday, A. N.; Xue, Z.; Hein, J. R.

    2010-04-01

    The geochemistry of Cd in seawater has attracted significant attention owing to the nutrient-like properties of this element. Recent culturing studies have demonstrated that Cd is a biologically important trace metal that plays a role in the sequestration of inorganic carbon. This conclusion is supported by recent isotope data for Cd dissolved in seawater and incorporated in cultured phytoplankton. These results show that plankton features isotopically light Cd while Cd-depleted surface waters typically exhibit complimentary heavy Cd isotope compositions. Seawater samples from below 900 m depth display a uniform and intermediate isotope composition of ɛ114/110Cd = +3.3 ± 0.5. This study investigates whether ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts are robust archives of deep water Cd isotope compositions. To this end, Cd isotope data were obtained for the recent growth surfaces of 15 Fe-Mn crusts from the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Southern oceans and two USGS Fe-Mn reference nodules using double spike multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The Fe-Mn crusts yield a mean ɛ114/110Cd of +3.2 ± 0.4 (2 SE, n = 14). Data for all but one of the samples are identical, within the analytical uncertainty of ±1.1ɛ114/110Cd (2 SD), to the mean deep water Cd isotope value. This indicates that Fe-Mn crusts record seawater Cd isotope compositions without significant isotope fractionation. A single sample from the Southern Ocean exhibits a light Cd isotope composition of ɛ114/110Cd = 0.2 ± 1.1. The origin of this signature is unclear, but it may reflect variations in deep water Cd isotope compositions related to differences in surface water Cd utilization or long-term changes in seawater ɛ114/110Cd. The results suggest that time series analyses of Fe-Mn crusts may be utilized to study changes in marine Cd utilization.

  6. Carbonate clumped isotope bond reordering and geospeedometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Henkes, Gregory A.

    2012-10-01

    short-lived hydrothermal event (Bristow et al., 2011, Nature v. 474, p. 68-71). Most of the uncertainty in these estimates relates to uncertainty in Arrhenius parameters for different calcites. Thus, while the carbonate clumped isotope geospeedometer shows promise for recording cooling rates in settings and lithologies where other geospeedometers may not be applicable, the uncertainty in cooling rate will be large without independent knowledge of the reordering kinetics of each study material. Thus the full potential of the method will only be realized if reordering kinetics can be accurately determined for each study material, or predicted on the basis of mineral composition, texture, or other observable parameters.

  7. Tracing the Fate of Enhanced Organic Carbon Production during a Southern Ocean Fe Fertilization Experiment using Natural Variations in Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopic Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Altabet, M.A.

    2005-02-05

    This project focused on the N and C natural stable isotope response during SOFeX--a purposeful iron (Fe) addition experiment in the Fe limited Southern Ocean. One purpose of the study was to determine if relief of phytoplankton Fe stress would increase productivity sufficiently to enhance C export from surface to deep waters. We proposed that N and C stable isotopes would be useful for tracing this export. Iron was added to waters north and south of the Antarctic Polar Front in waters to the southwest of New Zealand. While both sites have high-nutrient, low chlorophyll conditions (HNLC) typical of Fe limitation, [SiO4] a required nutrient for diatoms was low at the northerly site and high at the southern location. The most extensive coverage occurred at the southern site. Here, FeSO4 was added four different times over an {approx}two week period. We found that: (1) Particulate organic nitrogen and carbon in the mixed layer increased by a factor of 2-3 in response to the Fe addition in the southern patch. (2) PN accumulation and NO3- drawdown were both 1-2 {micro}M during the occupation of the bloom, suggesting retention of particulates within the mixed layer of the southern patch. (3) {sub 15}N of PN and of NO{sub 3}{sup -} increased by 1-2{per_thousand} as [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] decreased, and there is a clear contrast between in- and out-patch stations with respect to particulate {sub 15}N. The isotopic fractionation factor for NO{sub 3}{sup -} was near 5-6{per_thousand} and appears to have been unaffected by Fe fertilization. In contrast, there was little change in {delta}{sup 13}C. (4) The > 54 {micro}m size fraction was typically lighter than the 1-54 {micro}m size fraction by about 0.5 {per_thousand} in {delta}{sup 13}C. In the south patch, this difference increased as the bloom progressed, and with increasing PN concentration. This result may have been caused by large chain-forming diatoms responded to the Fe addition and were likely isotopically lighter than

  8. A process-based model for non-equilibrium clumped isotope effects in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; Hunt, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The equilibrium clumped isotope composition of carbonate minerals is independent of the composition of the aqueous solution. However, many carbonate minerals grow at rates that place them in a non-equilibrium regime with respect to carbon and oxygen isotopes with unknown consequences for clumped isotopes. We develop a process-based model that allows one to calculate the oxygen, carbon, and clumped isotope composition of calcite as a function of temperature, crystal growth rate, and solution pH. In the model, carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation occurs through the mass-dependent attachment/detachment kinetics of the isotopologues of HCO-3 and CO2-3 to and from the calcite surface, which in turn, influence the clumped isotope composition of calcite. At experimental and biogenic growth rates, the mineral is expected to inherit a clumped isotopic composition that is similar to that of the DIC pool, which helps to explain (1) why different organisms share the same clumped isotope versus temperature calibration curves, (2) why many inorganic calibration curves are slightly different from one another, and (3) why foraminifera, coccoliths, and deep sea corals can have near-equilibrium clumped isotope compositions but far-from-equilibrium carbon and oxygen isotope compositions. Some aspects of the model can be generalized to other mineral systems and should serve as a useful reference in future efforts to quantify kinetic clumped isotope effects.

  9. The carbon isotopic composition of soil respiration in the decade following disturbance by bark beetle or stem girdling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A.; Maurer, G. E.; Bowling, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Recent outbreaks of mountain pine beetle have caused large-scale tree mortality in western North America, which can lead to fundamental changes in carbon cycling. When a tree is infested, the flow of photosynthate is disrupted. This causes the roots and their symbionts to die, eliminating the autotrophic component of soil respiration. Mycorrhizal fungi are enriched in 13C compared to plant tissues. As the dead fungal biomass is consumed by soil heterotrophs, the δ13C of CO2 in heterotrophic soil respiration may become more enriched as the fungal biomass is consumed. We investigated this response by measuring soil respiration in chronosequences of stem-girdled plots at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site, and beetle-killed plots at the Fraser Experimental Forest, both in Colorado. Stem girdling was used to simulate beetle attack because it kills trees by a similar mechanism. Plots at Niwot Ridge included live trees and 7 years of girdled plots extending back to 2002. Plots at Fraser included live trees and three age classes of beetle-killed trees, within a similar chronosequence. We used manual soil-gas sampling at three depths, during the summers of 2011 and 2012, to determine if there is an isotopic effect associated with disturbance. Consistent with our expectations, in 2011, we found an enrichment in δ13C of approximately 1‰ in the two years following girdling which was absent in subsequent years. Although this pattern was also evident in 2012, the enrichment in δ13C during the same time period was about half that in 2011. At both Niwot and Fraser, in 2011, seasonal mean δ13C decreased by about 1‰ at all depths 3-4 years after disturbance, but returned to values close to control plots in the following 4-6 years. While we found a similar pattern at Fraser in 2012, we measured an enrichment of 1-1.5‰ at the OA interface at Niwot 8-10 years after disturbance, which was not found in 2011. It is possible this is due to the decomposition of woody biomass. At both

  10. An improved methodology to predict the stable carbon isotopic composition of terrestrial vegetation using remote sensing derived datasets and a novel application to wildlife tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, R. L.; Still, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    The C3:C4 composition of vegetation is required for a diverse set of carbon cycle research, including studies that use global atmospheric CO2 and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) data, as well as for ecological applications like tracing animal movements over large scales. Here, we present the results of an improved methodology to predict δ13C values of terrestrial vegetation on a continental scale using a combination of remote sensing and other spatially explicit datasets. The approach is based on two characteristics of C4 photosynthesis: (1) the near-universal restriction of C4 photosynthesis to an herbaceous growth form, and (2) the different performance of C3 and C4 plants in various temperature and radiation regimes. MODIS-derived data, in combination with a 1-km resolution land-cover map, provide detailed information on growth-form composition (percent herbaceous and percent woody) for each grid cell. Precipitation and temperature variations are derived from station data climatologies to determine which grid cells favor C4 over C3 photosynthesis. The distribution of herbaceous crops is generated for each photosynthetic pathway from a global dataset of 18 major crops. Integrating these datasets produces a continuous map of the percentage cover of C3 and C4 vegetation, and these values are used to estimate the δ13C of vegetation. We present the δ13C "isoscape" for the continent of Africa; δ13C vegetation values vary significantly with latitude, altitude, and dominant vegetation type. As a novel case study, we apply the Africa δ13C isoscape to constrain the movement and migration of several African bird species whose feather δ13C is known. Our results suggest that continental-scale isoscapes have the potential to improve our understanding of bird migration.

  11. Nocturnal and seasonal patterns of carbon isotope composition of leaf dark-respired carbon dioxide differ among dominant species in a semiarid savanna.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Resco, Víctor; Williams, David G

    2010-10-01

    The C isotope composition of leaf dark-respired CO(2) (δ(13)C(l)) integrates short-term metabolic responses to environmental change and is potentially recorded in the isotopic signature of ecosystem-level respiration. Species differences in photosynthetic pathway, resource acquisition and allocation patterns, and associated isotopic fractionations at metabolic branch points can influence δ(13)C(l), and differences are likely to be modified by seasonal variation in drought intensity. We measured δ(13)C(l) in two deep-rooted C(3) trees (Prosopis velutina and Celtis reticulata), and two relatively shallow-rooted perennial herbs (a C(3) dicot Viguiera dentata and a C(4) grass Sporobolus wrightii) in a floodplain savanna ecosystem in southeastern Arizona, USA during the dry pre-monsoon and wet monsoon seasons. δ(13)C(l) decreased during the nighttime and reached minimum values at pre-dawn in all species. The magnitude of nocturnal shift in δ(13)C(l) differed among species and between pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons. During the pre-monsoon season, the magnitude of the nocturnal shift in δ(13)C(l) in the deep-rooted C(3) trees P. velutina (2.8 ± 0.4‰) and C. reticulata (2.9 ± 0.2‰) was greater than in the C(3) herb V. dentata (1.8 ± 0.4‰) and C(4) grass S. wrightii (2.2 ± 0.4‰). The nocturnal shift in δ(13)C(l) in V. dentata and S. wrightii increased to 3.2 ± 0.1‰ and 4.6 ± 0.6‰, respectively, during the monsoon season, but in C(3) trees did not change significantly from pre-monsoon values. Cumulative daytime net CO(2) uptake was positively correlated with the magnitude of the nocturnal decline in δ(13)C(l) across all species, suggesting that nocturnal δ(13)C(l) may be controlled by (13)C/(12)C fractionations associated with C substrate availability and C metabolite partitioning. Nocturnal patterns of δ(13)C(l) in dominant plant species in the semiarid savanna apparently have predictable responses to seasonal changes in water

  12. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada: An alkaline, meromictic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Des Marais, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution and isotopic composition (??13C) of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases were studied in Big Soda Lake (depth = 64 m), an alkaline, meromictic lake with permanently anoxic bottom waters. Methane increased with depth in the anoxic mixolimnion (depth = 20-35 m), reached uniform concentrations (55 ??M/l) in the monimolimnion (35-64 m) and again increased with depth in monimolimnion bottom sediments (>400 ??M/kg below 1 m sub-bottom depth). The ??13C[CH4] values in bottom sediment below 1 m sub-bottom depth (<-70 per mil) increased with vertical distance up the core (??13C[CH4] = -55 per mil at sediment surface). Monimolimnion ??13C[CH4] values (-55 to -61 per mil) were greater than most ??13C[CH4] values found in the anoxic mixolimnion (92% of samples had ??13C[CH4] values between -20 and -48 per mil). No significant concentrations of ethylene or propylene were found in the lake. However ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth, with respective maximum concentrations of 260, 80, 23 and 22 nM/l encountered between 50-60 m depth. Concentrations of ethane, propane and butanes decreased with depth in the bottom sediments. Ratios of CH4 [C2H6 + C3H8] were high (250-620) in the anoxic mixolimnion, decreased to ~161 in the monimolimnion and increased with depth in the sediment to values as high as 1736. We concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in ??13C[CH4] and CH4 (C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sediments are probably caused by bacteria] processes. These might include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis and C2 to C4 alkane production by microorganisms. ?? 1983.

  13. Further carbon isotope measurements of LEW 88516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    Douglas et al. have previously analyzed the carbon content and isotopic composition of a crushed sample (sub-sample 13) of the shergottite, LEW 88516. The powder, which was from a relatively large portion of the meteorite in order to obtain a representative sample, was distributed amongst the scientific community. However, it is probable that the preparation procedure was not optimized for the purposes of carbon measurements. Indeed, it was found that LEW 88516,13 contained over 1200 ppm carbon, a concentration which is greater than that present in any other SNC meteorite. That a close relative, ALH A77005, contains only 141 ppm carbon seems to implicate the preparation procedure as being responsible for the apparently high carbon content of LEW 88516. However, it may also be the nature of the fine powder which has resulted in contamination. The observation of high carbon content in LEW 88516,13 highlights the extreme difficulty of trying to obtain representative samples of whole meteorites for this kind of investigation. Presented herein are some further measurements of LEW 88516 which should serve to clarify some of the issues raised by the previous investigation.

  14. Microscale carbon isotope variability in ALH84001 carbonates and a discussion of possible formation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2005-06-01

    The carbonates in martian meteorite ALH84001 preserve a record of aqueous processes on Mars at 3.9 Ga, and have been suggested to contain signatures of ancient martian life. The conditions of the carbonate formation environment are critical for understanding possible evidence for life on Mars, the history of water on Mars, and the evolution of the martian atmosphere. Despite numerous studies of petrographic relationships, microscale oxygen isotope compositions, microscale chemical compositions, and other minerals associated with the carbonates, formation models remain relatively unconstrained. Microscale carbon isotope analyses of ALH84001 carbonates reveal variable δ 13C values ranging from +27 to +64 ‰. The isotopic compositions are correlated with chemical composition and extent of crystallization such that the Mg-poor, early-formed carbonates are relatively 13C depleted and the Mg-rich, later forming carbonates, are 13C enriched. These data are inconsistent with many of the previously proposed environments for carbonate formation, and a new set of hypotheses are proposed. Specifically, two new models that account for the data involve low temperature (<100°C) aqueous processes: (1) the carbonates formed during mixing of two fluids derived from separate chemical and isotopic reservoirs; or (2) the carbonates formed from high pH fluids that are exposed to a CO 2-rich atmosphere and precipitate carbonate, similar to high pH springs on Earth.

  15. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  16. Automated determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aqueous samples: RSIL lab codes 1851 and 1852

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, Kinga M.; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab codes 1851 and 1852 are to determine the total carbon mass and the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) for total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, lab code 1851) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC, lab code 1852) in aqueous samples. The analysis procedure is automated according to a method that utilizes a total carbon analyzer as a peripheral sample preparation device for analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas by a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The carbon analyzer produces CO2 and determines the carbon mass in parts per million (ppm) of DIC and DOC in each sample separately, and the CF-IRMS determines the carbon isotope ratio of the produced CO2. This configuration provides a fully automated analysis of total carbon mass and δ13C with no operator intervention, additional sample preparation, or other manual analysis. To determine the DIC, the carbon analyzer transfers a specified sample volume to a heated (70 °C) reaction vessel with a preprogrammed volume of 10% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which allows the carbonate and bicarbonate species in the sample to dissociate to CO2. The CO2 from the reacted sample is subsequently purged with a flow of helium gas that sweeps the CO2 through an infrared CO2 detector and quantifies the CO2. The CO2 is then carried through a high-temperature (650 °C) scrubber reactor, a series of water traps, and ultimately to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. For the analysis of total dissolved organic carbon, the carbon analyzer performs a second step on the sample in the heated reaction vessel during which a preprogrammed volume of sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) is added, and the hydroxyl radicals oxidize the organics to CO2. Samples containing 2 ppm to 30,000 ppm of carbon are analyzed. The precision of the carbon isotope analysis is within 0.3 per mill for DIC, and within 0.5 per mill for DOC.

  17. PHOTOCHEMICALLY-INDUCED ALTERATION OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS (DELTA C-13) IN TERRIGENOUS DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of riverine waters to natural sunlight initiated alterations in stable carbon isotope ratios (delta C-13) of the associated dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Water samples were collected from two compositionally distinct coastal river systems in the southeastern United Sta...

  18. Diurnal variations of organic molecular tracers and stable carbon isotopic composition in atmospheric aerosols over Mt. Tai in the North China Plain: an influence of biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, P. Q.; Kawamura, K.; Chen, J.; Li, J.; Sun, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Tachibana, E.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Okuzawa, K.; Tanimoto, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Wang, Z. F.

    2012-09-01

    OC in the Mt. Tai aerosols was due to biomass burning in early June, followed by the contribution of isoprene SOC (mean 4.3%). In contrast, isoprene SOC was the main contributor (6.6%) to OC, and only 3.0% of the OC was due to biomass burning in late June. In early June, δ13C of TC (-26.6 to -23.2‰, mean -25.0‰) were lower than those (-23.9 to -21.9‰, mean -22.9‰) in late June. In addition, a strong anti-correlation was found between levoglucosan and δ13C values. This study demonstrates that crop-residue burning activities can significantly enhance the organic aerosol loading and alter the organic composition and stable carbon isotopic composition of aerosol particles in the troposphere over the North China Plain.

  19. Diurnal variations of organic molecular tracers and stable carbon isotopic compositions in atmospheric aerosols over Mt. Tai in North China Plain: an influence of biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, P. Q.; Kawamura, K.; Chen, J.; Li, J.; Sun, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Tachibana, E.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Okuzawa, K.; Tanimoto, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Wang, Z. F.

    2012-04-01

    aerosols was due to biomass burning in early June, followed by the contribution of isoprene SOC (mean 4.3%). In contrast, isoprene SOC was the main contributor (6.6%) to OC, and only 3.0% of the OC was due to biomass burning in late June. In early June, δ13C of TC (-26.6‰ to -23.2‰, mean -25.0‰) were lower than those (-23.9‰ to -21.9‰, mean -22.9‰) in late June. In addition, a strong anti-correlation was found between levoglucosan and δ13C values. This study demonstrates that crop-residue burning activities can significantly enhance the organic aerosol loading and alter the organic molecular compositions and stable carbon isotopic compositions of aerosol particles in the troposphere over North China Plain.

  20. Isotopic compositions of the elements, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; De Laeter, J. R.; De Bievre, P.; Hidaka, H.; Peiser, H.S.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Taylor, P.D.P.

    2005-01-01

    The Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry completed its last review of the isotopic compositions of the elements as determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry in 2001. That review involved a critical evaluation of the published literature, element by element, and forms the basis of the table of the isotopic compositions of the elements (TICE) presented here. For each element, TICE includes evaluated data from the "best measurement" of the isotope abundances in a single sample, along with a set of representative isotope abundances and uncertainties that accommodate known variations in normal terrestrial materials. The representative isotope abundances and uncertainties generally are consistent with the standard atomic weight of the element A r(E) and its uncertainty U[Ar(E)] recommended by CAWIA in 2001. ?? 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  2. The origin and isotopic composition of dissolved sulfide in groundwater from carbonate aquifers in Florida and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, R.O.; Back, W.; Hanshaw, B.B.; Rightmire, C.T.; Pearson, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    The ??34S values of dissolved sulfide and the sulfur isotope fractionations between dissolved sulfide and sulfate species in Floridan ground water generally correlate with dissolved sulfate concentrations which are related to flow patterns and residence time within the aquifer. The dissolved sulfide derives from the slow in situ biogenic reduction of sulfate dissolved from sedimentary gypsum in the aquifer. In areas where the water is oldest, the dissolved sulfide has apparently attained isotopic equilibrium with the dissolved sulfate (??34S = 65 per mil) at the temperature (28??C) of the system. This approach to equilibrium reflects an extremely slow reduction rate of the dissolved sulfate by bacteria; this slow rate probably results from very low concentrations of organic matter in the aquifer. In the reducing part of the Edwards aquifer, Texas, there is a general down-gradient increase in both dissolved sulfide and sulfate concentrations, but neither the ??34S values of sulfide nor the sulfide-sulfate isotope fractionation correlates with the ground-water flow pattern. The dissolved sulfide species appear to be derived primarily from biogenic reduction of sulfate ions whose source is gypsum dissolution although upgradient diffusion of H2S gas from deeper oil field brines may be important in places. The sulfur isotope fractionation for sulfide-sulfate (about 38 per mil) is similar to that observed for modern oceanic sediments and probably reflects moderate sulfate reduction in the reducing part of the aquifer owing to the higher temperature and significant amount of organic matter present; contributions of isotopically heavy H2S from oil field brines are also possible. ?? 1981.

  3. Stable Carbon Isotope Composition and Stomatal Density of the Conifer Genus Frenelopsis: Effect of pCO2, Species and Soil Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucour, A.; Gomez, B.; Thevenard, F.; Sheppard, S.

    2004-05-01

    Experimental studies indicate that some modern conifers adjust their stomatal numbers in response to variations of atmospheric pCO2, suggesting that fossil conifer leaves may provide a proxy of pCO2. The stable carbon isotope composition of plants provides an additional constraint on the conditions during plant growth as it is known to vary, for a single species, with the δ 13C of the source CO2, and environmental factors such as soil salinity and water content. Our objectives were to document the variation of the stable carbon isotope composition of the fossil Coniferale Frenelopsis through the Cretaceous and to decipher the effect of pCO2, environmental and genetic factors on the fossil record. The leaf cuticles of Frenelopsis present a large variation in δ 13C values from 27 ‰ for F. ugnaensis growing on freshwater lake shores to 21 ‰ for species growing on brackish to marine environments. The species growing on freshwater lake shore presents an increase in 13C through the Barremian that is consistent with an increase in aridity. It presents a low stomatal density (SD) and index (SI: stomates over stomates plus epidermal cells). Comparison of the SD and SI within a single population shows that the variability in SD essentially reflects that of the cellular size and growth rate. The δ 13C values of species growing in brackish to marine environment are all similar but higher than freshwater ones in the late Albian. They decrease in the Cenomanian, with a much larger intra-population variability. This shift can be related to a switch from marine to brackish conditions as well as to more global change. SD and SI are higher for the late Albian-Cenomanian cuticles and appear not sensitive to the environmental change (presumably a switch from marine to more brackish conditions) recorded in the δ 13C. The large variability in both SD and SI within the studied populations in the marine-brackish environment appears to be related to change in the stomates over

  4. The origin of the Maozu carbonate-hosted Pb-Zn deposit, southwest China: Constrained by C-O-S-Pb isotopic compositions and Sm-Nd isotopic age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiaxi; Huang, Zhilong; Yan, Zaifei

    2013-09-01

    The Maozu Pb-Zn deposit, located on the western margin of the Yangtze Block, southwest China, is a typical carbonate-hosted deposit in the Sichuan-Yunnan-Guizhou Pb-Zn metallogenic province with Pb + Zn reserves of about 2.0 million tonnes grading 4.15 wt.% Pb and 7.25 wt.% Zn. Its ore bodies are hosted in Sinian (635-541 Ma) Dengying Formation dolostone and show stratiform, vein and irregular textures. Ores are composed of sphalerite, galena, pyrite, calcite, dolomite, quartz and fluorite with massive, banded, disseminated and veined structures. The C-O-Sm-Nd isotopic compositions of hydrothermal calcites and S-Pb isotopic compositions of sulfides were analyzed to constrain the origin of the Maozu deposit. δ13CPDB and δ18OSMOW values of hydrothermal calcites range from -3.7‰ to -2.0‰ and +13.8‰ to +17.5‰, respectively, and plot near the marine carbonate rocks field in a plot of δ13CPDB vs. δ18OSMOW, with a negative correlation. It suggests that CO2 in the hydrothermal fluids was mainly originated from marine carbonate rocks, with limited influence from sedimentary organic matter. δ34SCDT values of sulfides range from +9.9‰ to +19.2‰, similar to that of Cambrian to Triassic seawater sulfate (+15‰ to +35‰) and evaporate (+15‰ to +30‰) in the Cambrian to Triassic sedimentary strata. It suggests that reduced sulfur was derived from evaporate in sedimentary strata by thermo chemical sulfate reduction. Sulfides have low radiogenic Pb isotope compositions (206Pb/204Pb = 18.129-18.375, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.640-15.686 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.220-38.577) that plot in the field between upper crust and the orogenic belt evolution curve in the plot of 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb, and similar to that of age corrected Proterozoic basement rocks (Dongchuan and Kunyang Groups). This indicates that ore-forming metals were mainly derived from basement rocks. Hydrothermal calcite yields a Sm-Nd isotopic age of 196 ± 13 Ma, possibly reflecting the timing of Pb

  5. Seasonal variability of soil CO2 flux and its carbon isotope composition in Krakow urban area, Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Jasek, Alina; Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Smula, Ewa; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2014-06-01

    As urban atmosphere is depleted of (13)CO2, its imprint should be detectable in the local vegetation and therefore in its CO2 respiratory emissions. This work was aimed at characterising strength and isotope signature of CO2 fluxes from soil in urban areas with varying distances from anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The soil CO2 flux and its δ(13)C isotope signature were measured using a chamber method on a monthly basis from July 2009 to May 2012 within the metropolitan area of Krakow, Southern Poland, at two locations representing different levels of anthropogenic influence: a lawn adjacent to a busy street (A) and an urban meadow (B). The small-scale spatial variability of the soil CO2 flux was also investigated at site B. Site B revealed significantly higher summer CO2 fluxes (by approximately 46 %) than site A, but no significant differences were found between their δ(13)CO2 signatures.

  6. Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Futo, Kiyoto; Oliver, Thomas A.; Marshall, Brian D.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values

  7. Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.

    SciTech Connect

    James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

    2007-08-07

    Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values

  8. Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and its relationship to the carbon isotope signals of stem, soil and ecosystem respiration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingate, L.; Ogée, J.; Burlett, R.; Bosc, A.; Devaux, M.; Grace, J.; Loustau, D.; Gessler, A.

    2010-12-01

    Photosynthetic carbon (C) isotope discrimination labels photosynthates (δA) and atmospheric CO2 (δa) with variable C isotope compositions during fluctuating environmental conditions. In this context, the C isotope composition of respired CO2 within ecosystems is often hypothesized to vary temporally with photosynthetic discrimination. We investigated the relationship between photosynthetic discrimination and the C isotope signals from stem (δW), soil (δS) and ecosystem (δE) respired CO2 to environmental fluctuations, using novel tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer instrumentation in a mature maritime pine forest. Broad seasonal changes in photosynthetic discrimination were reflected in δW, δS and δE. However, respired CO2 signals had smaller short-term variations than photosynthetic discrimination and were offset and delayed by 2-10 d, indicating fractionation and isotopic mixing in a large C pool. Variations in δS did not follow photosynthetic discrimination at all times, especially during rainy periods and when there is a strong demand for C allocation above ground. It is likely that future isotope-enabled vegetation models will need to develop transfer functions that can account for these phenomena in order to interpret and predict the isotopic impact of biosphere gas exchange on the C isotope composition of atmospheric CO2. L. Wingate, J. Ogée, R. Burlett, A. Bosc, M. Devaux, J. Grace, D. Loustau and A. Gessler. Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and its relationship to the carbon isotope signals of stem, soil and ecosystem respiration. New Phytologist, doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03384.x

  9. Carbon isotopic compositions of organic matter across continental Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary sections: Implications for paleoenvironment after the K-T impact event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maruoka, T.; Koeberl, C.; Bohor, B.F.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the environmental perturbation induced by the impact event that marks the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary, concentrations and isotopic compositions of bulk organic carbon were determined in sedimentary rocks that span the terrestrial K-T boundary at Dogie Creek, Montana, and Brownie Butte, Wyoming in the Western Interior of the United States. The boundary clays at both sites are not bounded by coals. Although coals consist mainly of organic matter derived from plant tissue, siliceous sedimentary rocks, such as shale and clay, may contain organic matter derived from microbiota as well as plants. Coals record ??13C values of plant-derived organic matter, reflecting the ??13C value of atmospheric CO2, whereas siliceous sedimentary rocks record the ??13C values of organic matter derived from plants and microbiota. The microbiota ??13C value reflects not only the ??13C value of atmospheric CO2, but also biological productivity. Therefore, the siliceous rocks from these sites yields information that differs from that obtained previously from coal beds. Across the freshwater K-T boundary at Brownie Butte, the ??13C values decrease by 2.6??? (from - 26.15??? below the boundary clay to - 28.78??? above the boundary clay), similar to the trend in carbonate at marine K-T sites. This means that the organic ??13C values reflect the variation of ??13C of atmospheric CO2, which is in equilibrium with carbon isotopes at the ocean surface. Although a decrease in ??13C values is observed across the K-T boundary at Dogie Creek (from - 25.32??? below the boundary clay to - 26.11??? above the boundary clay), the degree of ??13C-decrease at Dogie Creek is smaller than that at Brownie Butte and that for marine carbonate. About 2??? decrease in ??13C of atmospheric CO2 was expected from the ??13C variation of marine carbonate at the K-T boundary. This ??13C-decrease of atmospheric CO2 should affect the ??13C values of organic matter derived from plant tissue. As such a

  10. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of Plant Wax n-Alkanes: A Tool for Characterizing Soil Provenance in Forensic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, N.; Wagner, T.; Jones, M.

    2009-04-01

    Forensic science is an integrative discipline that requires material evidence from diverse sources. Geochemical evidence derived from inorganic and organic substances is becoming increasingly popular among law enforcement agencies in industrialized countries. Previous investigations indicate that the relative distributions of individual plant-derived biomarkers found in soils are linked to the biomarker patterns found in the overlying vegetation. However, identification of soil provenance based on the distribution of plant-derived biomarkers for forensic purposes is inhibited by the fact that a significant number of terrestrial plant species have overlapping biomarker distributions. In order to enhance the resolving power of plant-derived biomarker signal, we propose to enhance the molecular approach by adding a stable isotope component, i.e. the delta13C/deltaD values of individual biomarkers. The first objective of this project is to determine the delta13C/deltaD signatures of n-alkanes derived from various higher plant types commonly growing in the UK. The second objective is to investigate whether the same species/plant types differ isotopically between two locations affected by different weather patterns in the UK: a relatively warmer and drier Norwich, Norfolk and a cooler and wetter Newcastle-upon-Tyne in NE England. The n-C29 alkane data from 14 tree species sampled during July 2007 and August 2008 in Newcastle show a clear negative trend between delta13C and deltaD values. When these data are plotted against each other, the six deciduous angiosperms (delta13C: c. -39 to -35 per mil; deltaD: c. -155 to -130 per mil) are completely separated from four evergreen angiosperms (delta13C: c. -33 to -28 per mil; deltaD: c. -195 to -165 per mil). The four gymnosperm species data plot between those of the deciduous and evergreen angiosperms. Because all 14 species in Newcastle experience the same environmental conditions, we suggest that the observed isotopic

  11. Carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C and (14)C activity) of plant samples in the vicinity of the Slovene nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Martina; Vreča, Polona; Krajcar Bronić, Ines

    2012-08-01

    δ(13)C values of various plants (apples, wheat, and maize) collected in the vicinity of the Krško Nuclear Power Plant (Slovenia) during 2008 and 2009 were determined. By measuring dried samples and their carbonized counterparts we showed that no significant isotopic fractionation occurs during the carbonization phase of the sample preparation process in the laboratory. The measured δ(13)C values of the plants were used for δ(13)C correction of their measured (14)C activities.

  12. Isotopic composition of carbonate-bound organic nitrogen in deep-sea scleractinian corals: A new window into past biogeochemical change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingchen T.; Prokopenko, Maria G.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Adkins, Jess F.; Robinson, Laura F.; Ren, Haojia; Oleynik, Sergey; Williams, Branwen; Haug, Gerald H.

    2014-08-01

    Over the last two decades, the skeletal remains of deep-sea corals have arisen as a geochemical archive of Pleistocene oceanographic change. Here we report the exploration of the isotopic composition of the carbonate-bound organic nitrogen (hereafter, CB-δ15N) in the deep-sea scleractinian coral Desmophyllum dianthus as a possible tool for reconstructing past changes in the ocean nitrogen cycle. The measurement protocol is adapted from a high-sensitivity method for foraminifera shell-bound δ15N. We explored the variability of CB-δ15N within specimens, among corals collected at different depths in a given ocean region, and among different ocean regions. Modern D. dianthus CB-δ15N is strongly correlated with the δ15N of N export as estimated from sediment traps, shallow subsurface nitrate, and surface sediments, suggesting that CB-δ15N is a reliable proxy for δ15N of N export. D. dianthus CB-δ15N is consistently 8-9‰ higher than δ15N of N export, indicating that D. dianthus acquires its nutrition primarily from suspended particulate organic matter (POM) that derives from sinking POM, not directly from sinking POM.

  13. Carbon Isotope Composition of Carbohydrates and Polyols in Leaf and Phloem Sap of Phaseolus vulgaris L. Influences Predictions of Plant Water Use Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Smith, Millicent; Wild, Birgit; Richter, Andreas; Simonin, Kevin; Merchant, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The use of carbon isotope abundance (δ(13)C) to assess plant carbon acquisition and water use has significant potential for use in crop management and plant improvement programs. Utilizing Phaseolus vulgaris L. as a model system, this study demonstrates the occurrence and sensitivity of carbon isotope fractionation during the onset of abiotic stresses between leaf and phloem carbon pools. In addition to gas exchange data, compound-specific measures of carbon isotope abundance and concentrations of soluble components of phloem sap were compared with major carbohydrate and sugar alcohol pools in leaf tissue. Differences in both δ(13)C and concentration of metabolites were found in leaf and phloem tissues, the magnitude of which responded to changing environmental conditions. These changes have inplications for the modeling of leaf-level gas exchange based upon δ(13)C natural abundance. Estimates of δ(13)C of low molecular weight carbohydrates and polyols increased the precision of predictions of water use efficiency compared with those based on bulk soluble carbon. The use of this technique requires consideration of the dynamics of the δ(13)C pool under investigation. Understanding the dynamics of changes in δ(13)C during movement and incorporation into heterotrophic tissues is vital for the continued development of tools that provide information on plant physiological performance relating to water use. PMID:27335348

  14. Isotopic compositions of cometary matter returned by Stardust.

    PubMed

    McKeegan, Kevin D; Aléon, Jerome; Bradley, John; Brownlee, Donald; Busemann, Henner; Butterworth, Anna; Chaussidon, Marc; Fallon, Stewart; Floss, Christine; Gilmour, Jamie; Gounelle, Matthieu; Graham, Giles; Guan, Yunbin; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hutcheon, Ian D; Huth, Joachim; Ishii, Hope; Ito, Motoo; Jacobsen, Stein B; Kearsley, Anton; Leshin, Laurie A; Liu, Ming-Chang; Lyon, Ian; Marhas, Kuljeet; Marty, Bernard; Matrajt, Graciela; Meibom, Anders; Messenger, Scott; Mostefaoui, Smail; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Nittler, Larry; Palma, Russ; Pepin, Robert O; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A; Robert, François; Schlutter, Dennis; Snead, Christopher J; Stadermann, Frank J; Stroud, Rhonda; Tsou, Peter; Westphal, Andrew; Young, Edward D; Ziegler, Karen; Zimmermann, Laurent; Zinner, Ernst

    2006-12-15

    Hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotopic compositions are heterogeneous among comet 81P/Wild 2 particle fragments; however, extreme isotopic anomalies are rare, indicating that the comet is not a pristine aggregate of presolar materials. Nonterrestrial nitrogen and neon isotope ratios suggest that indigenous organic matter and highly volatile materials were successfully collected. Except for a single (17)O-enriched circumstellar stardust grain, silicate and oxide minerals have oxygen isotopic compositions consistent with solar system origin. One refractory grain is (16)O-enriched, like refractory inclusions in meteorites, suggesting that Wild 2 contains material formed at high temperature in the inner solar system and transported to the Kuiper belt before comet accretion.

  15. Isotopic compositions of cometary matter returned by Stardust.

    PubMed

    McKeegan, Kevin D; Aléon, Jerome; Bradley, John; Brownlee, Donald; Busemann, Henner; Butterworth, Anna; Chaussidon, Marc; Fallon, Stewart; Floss, Christine; Gilmour, Jamie; Gounelle, Matthieu; Graham, Giles; Guan, Yunbin; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hutcheon, Ian D; Huth, Joachim; Ishii, Hope; Ito, Motoo; Jacobsen, Stein B; Kearsley, Anton; Leshin, Laurie A; Liu, Ming-Chang; Lyon, Ian; Marhas, Kuljeet; Marty, Bernard; Matrajt, Graciela; Meibom, Anders; Messenger, Scott; Mostefaoui, Smail; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Nittler, Larry; Palma, Russ; Pepin, Robert O; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A; Robert, François; Schlutter, Dennis; Snead, Christopher J; Stadermann, Frank J; Stroud, Rhonda; Tsou, Peter; Westphal, Andrew; Young, Edward D; Ziegler, Karen; Zimmermann, Laurent; Zinner, Ernst

    2006-12-15

    Hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen isotopic compositions are heterogeneous among comet 81P/Wild 2 particle fragments; however, extreme isotopic anomalies are rare, indicating that the comet is not a pristine aggregate of presolar materials. Nonterrestrial nitrogen and neon isotope ratios suggest that indigenous organic matter and highly volatile materials were successfully collected. Except for a single (17)O-enriched circumstellar stardust grain, silicate and oxide minerals have oxygen isotopic compositions consistent with solar system origin. One refractory grain is (16)O-enriched, like refractory inclusions in meteorites, suggesting that Wild 2 contains material formed at high temperature in the inner solar system and transported to the Kuiper belt before comet accretion. PMID:17170292

  16. Export of inorganic carbon from two Southeast Asian mangrove forests to adjacent estuaries as estimated by the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Toshihiro; Tsuboi, Yoshie; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Koike, Isao

    2009-03-01

    The influence of mangrove forests on the dynamics of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in tropical estuaries was estimated quantitatively using newly developed isotope (δ13C) mass balance models that take into account both the input of DIC and the air-water exchange of CO2. To this aim, the concentration and δ13C of DIC were determined across the salinity gradient of two river estuaries facing the Andaman Sea. The longitudinal distribution of DIC could be explained by conservative mixing of the river water and seawater DIC in the low-discharge period (March 2006), while a net accumulation of DIC up to 190 μmol L-1 was observed in the high-discharge period (December 2006). δ13CDIC values were generally lower than expected for the mixing of the river water and seawater DIC, due to the 13C-depleted DIC inputs from the riverside mangroves. The concentration of mangrove-derived DIC in the estuarine waters was estimated by the proposed models to be as much as 856 μmol L-1, and was higher during the low-discharge period. This suggested that the mangroves exported much higher levels of DIC to the estuaries than indicated by the net accumulation of DIC. Our results confirm that mangroves function as an effective CO2 pump that takes CO2 from the atmosphere and releases it into estuarine waters. This study illustrates that δ13CDIC is a sensitive and quantitative indicator for DIC emission to the sea from coastal wetlands including mangroves.

  17. Environmental controls on the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem-respired CO2 in contrasting forest ecosystems in Canada and the USA.

    PubMed

    Alstad, Karrin P; Lai, Chun-Ta; Flanagan, Lawrence B; Ehleringer, James R

    2007-10-01

    We compared the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem-respired CO2 (delta13C(R)) from 11 forest ecosystems in Canada and the USA and examined differences among forest delta13C(R) responses to seasonal variations in environmental conditions from May to October 2004. Our experimental approach was based on the assumption that variation in delta13C(R) is a good proxy for short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination and associated shifts in the integrated ecosystem-level intercellular to ambient CO2 ratio (c(i)/c(a)). We compared delta13C(R) responses for three functional groups: deciduous, boreal and coastal forests. The delta13C(R) values were well predicted for each group and the highest R2 values determined for the coastal, deciduous and boreal groups were 0.81, 0.80 and 0.56, respectively. Consistent with previous studies, the highest correlations between delta13C(R) and changes in environmental conditions were achieved when the environmental variables were averaged for 2, 3 or 4 days before delta13C(R) sample collection. The relationships between delta13C(R) and environmental conditions were consistent with leaf-level responses, and were most apparent within functional groups, providing support for our approach. However, there were differences among groups in the strength or significance, or both, of the relationships between delta13C(R) and some environmental factors. For example, vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and soil temperature were significant determinants of variation in delta13C(R) in the boreal group, whereas photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) was not; however, in the coastal group, variation in delta13C(R) was strongly correlated with changes in PPF, and there was no significant relationship with VPD. At a single site, comparisons between our delta13C(R) measurements in 2004 and published values suggested the potential application of delta13C(R) measurements to assess year-to-year variation in ecosystem physiological responses to changing

  18. Environmental controls on the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem-respired CO2 in contrasting forest ecosystems in Canada and the USA.

    PubMed

    Alstad, Karrin P; Lai, Chun-Ta; Flanagan, Lawrence B; Ehleringer, James R

    2007-10-01

    We compared the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem-respired CO2 (delta13C(R)) from 11 forest ecosystems in Canada and the USA and examined differences among forest delta13C(R) responses to seasonal variations in environmental conditions from May to October 2004. Our experimental approach was based on the assumption that variation in delta13C(R) is a good proxy for short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination and associated shifts in the integrated ecosystem-level intercellular to ambient CO2 ratio (c(i)/c(a)). We compared delta13C(R) responses for three functional groups: deciduous, boreal and coastal forests. The delta13C(R) values were well predicted for each group and the highest R2 values determined for the coastal, deciduous and boreal groups were 0.81, 0.80 and 0.56, respectively. Consistent with previous studies, the highest correlations between delta13C(R) and changes in environmental conditions were achieved when the environmental variables were averaged for 2, 3 or 4 days before delta13C(R) sample collection. The relationships between delta13C(R) and environmental conditions were consistent with leaf-level responses, and were most apparent within functional groups, providing support for our approach. However, there were differences among groups in the strength or significance, or both, of the relationships between delta13C(R) and some environmental factors. For example, vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and soil temperature were significant determinants of variation in delta13C(R) in the boreal group, whereas photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) was not; however, in the coastal group, variation in delta13C(R) was strongly correlated with changes in PPF, and there was no significant relationship with VPD. At a single site, comparisons between our delta13C(R) measurements in 2004 and published values suggested the potential application of delta13C(R) measurements to assess year-to-year variation in ecosystem physiological responses to changing

  19. Stable isotope composition of human fingernails from Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Grolmusová, Zuzana; Rapčanová, Anna; Michalko, Juraj; Čech, Peter; Veis, Pavel

    2014-10-15

    Stable isotope composition of human fingernails has proven to be useful for documenting human dietary information and geographical patterns in archeological, forensic, anthropological and biological studies. Therefore, it is of interest to detect all factors influencing the stable isotopic composition in the certain regions in the world. Carbon and nitrogen isotope data of human fingernail keratin from 52 individuals from Slovakia were reported in this study. The online combustion and continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer Delta V Advantage was used for δ(13)C and δ(15)N analysis of fingernail keratin samples from 24 vegetarian and 28 omnivorous individuals. A group of people with frequent meat consumption showed enrichment in (13)C and (15)N isotopes in fingernails. A similar trend was observed with increasing seafood in an individual's diet. Moreover a significant difference was revealed between smokers and nonsmokers for both δ(13)C and δ(15)N values. These data were compared to previously published δ(13)C and δ(15)N fingernail values from across the globe. This study brings new information on the stable isotope signature of individuals from Slovakia and characterizes the Central European region for the first time. The stable isotope composition of fingernails is influenced by the frequency of meat and seafood consumption as well as smoking.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Carbon Isotope Fractionation in CAM Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Deleens, Eliane; Treichel, Isabel; O'Leary, Marion H.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17°C nights, 23°C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is −4‰ (that is, malate is enriched in 13C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0‰ at 27°C/33°C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. PMID:16664371

  1. Seasonal, daily and diurnal variations in the stable carbon isotope composition of carbon dioxide respired by tree trunks in a deciduous oak forest.

    PubMed

    Maunoury, Florence; Berveiller, Daniel; Lelarge, Caroline; Pontailler, Jean-Yves; Vanbostal, Laurent; Damesin, Claire

    2007-03-01

    The stable C isotope composition (delta13C) of CO2 respired by trunks was examined in a mature temperate deciduous oak forest (Quercus petraea). Month-to-month, day-to-day and diurnal, measurements were made to determine the range of variations at different temporal scales. Trunk growth and respiration rates were assessed. Phloem tissue was sampled and was analysed for total organic matter and soluble sugar 13C composition. The CO2 respired by trunk was always enriched in 13C relative to the total organic matter, sometimes by as much as 5 per thousand. The delta13C of respired CO2 exhibited a large seasonal variation (3.3 per thousand), with a relative maximum at the beginning of the growth period. The lowest values occurred in summer when the respiration rates were maximal. After the cessation of radial trunk growth, the respired CO2 delta13C values showed a progressive increase, which was linked to a parallel increase in soluble sugar content in the phloem tissue (R=0.95; P<0.01). At the same time, the respiration rates declined. This limited use of the substrate pool might allow the discrimination during respiration to be more strongly expressed. The late-season increase in CO2 delta13C might also be linked to a shift from recently assimilated C to reserves. At the seasonal scale, CO2 delta13C was negatively correlated with air temperature (R=-0.80; P<0.01). The diurnal variation sometimes reached 3 per thousand, but the range and the pattern depended on the period within the growing season. Contrary to expectations, diurnal variations were maximal in winter and spring when the leaves were missing or not totally functional. By contrast to the seasonal scale, these diurnal variations were not related to air temperature or sugar content. Our study shows that seasonal and diurnal variations of respired 13C exhibited a similar large range but were probably explained by different mechanisms.

  2. Differences in isotopic composition of carbonaceous components in enstatite chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.; Carr, R. H.; Poths, J.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1988-02-01

    Carbon stable isotopic composition of the major carbonaceous component in enstatite chondrites varies with petrologic type. Investigation of a suite of HF/HCl-resistant residues has shown that this variation is due to an inherent difference in delta(C-13) of the carbon, and is not a result of the presence of small amounts of isotopically anomalous carbon-bearing components. These latter do occur in type EH3 and EH4 chondrites, in concentrations similar to those found in C1 and C2 carbonaceous chondrites. Combustion of the major carbon component (apparently elemental carbon, not necessarily graphite) occurs at relatively higher temperatures in enstatite chondrites of increasing petrologic type. This is considered to reflect an increase in crystallinity or ordering of the carbonaceous component, and is a measure of the degree of thermal processing to which the meteorites have been subjected during accretion and/or metamorphism.

  3. Calcium isotopic compositions of mid-ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Zhang, Z.; Sun, W.; Wang, G. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Earth's mantle has heterogeneous calcium isotopic compositions. But the reason why mantle has its heterogeneity remains uncertain. In general, δ44/40Ca values of mantle xenolith samples have a variation of >0.45‰. While ultramafic rocks, especially dunites, have higher δ44/40Ca values than volcanic rocks, and there is a positive correlation between δ44/40Ca and Ca/Mg. These phenomena imply that the heterogeneity of Ca isotopic compositions of mantle xenolith samples might result from different degrees of melt extraction, as indicated by large Ca isotopic fractionation between co-existing clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. However, because ancient marine carbonate has its own unique calcium isotopic characteristics, recycling of even a small amount of ancient marine carbonates into the mantle could also cause the heterogeneity of Ca isotopes in Earth's mantle. This could be the reason why oceanic island basalts (OIB) have lighter Ca isotopic compositions than the mantle xenolith. Thus, the lighter Ca isotopic compositions in the mantle source cannot only be ascribed to magmatic processes. Therefore, it is more important to know calcium isotopic characteristics during partial melting and oceanic crust contamination.Mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are formed from the partial melts of the upper mantle and are rarely affected by crustal contamination. Different types of MORB, including D-MORB, N-MORB and E-MORB, have experienced different degrees of partial melting and contamination of enriched end-members. Here we report calcium isotopic characteristic of different types of MORB, we believe it will be very helpful to understand the behaviors of Ca isotopes during partial melting and it is possible to provide further information to discover the reason why calcium isotopic compositions is heterogeneous in Earth's mantle. This work was supported by Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41373007, No. 41490632 and No. 91328204

  4. Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Leaves of C3 Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon isotope composition is regarded as a powerful tool in understanding carbon cycling, both as a tracer and as a process recorder. However, accurate predictions of, for example, partitioning the net carbon flux into its components or obtaining climate information from tree rings, requires a good understanding of plant metabolism and related isotopic fractionations. Mechanistic models have concentrated largely on photosynthetic pathways and their isotopic composition. This cannot be said for respiratory processes. The mechanistic models of leaf isotope discrimination hence do not describe dawn, dusk and night very realistically or not at all. A new steady-state approach of the carbon isotope distribution in glucose potentially addresses the time of twilight and night (Tcherkez et al. 2004). Here, a new model of 13C discrimination in leaves of C3 plants is presented. The model is based on the steady-state approach of Tcherkez et al. (2004) but with much reduced complexity while retaining its general characteristics. In addition, the model introduces some new concepts such as a day-length dependent starch synthesis, night-length dependent starch degradation, energy-driven biosynthesis rates, and continuous leaf discrimination calculation for the whole diel cycle. It is therefore well adapted for biosphere-atmosphere exchange studies. The model predicts enriched sucrose and starch pools in the leaf compared to assimilated CO2. Biosynthesis on the other hand acts as the sink of the remaining, depleted carbon. The model calculates slightly different absolute starch compositions from the Tcherkez et al. (2004) model but this depends on chosen fractionation factors. The greatest difference between the two models is during dawn, dusk and night. For example, while Tcherkez et al. has changing phloem sucrose isotope composition during night, the model here predicts constant sucrose export composition. Observations seem to support rather constant phloem isotope composition

  5. The clumped isotopic record of Neoproterozoic carbonates, Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, K. D.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Osburn, M. R.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Huqf Supergroup of the Sultanate of Oman records several important events in latest Precambrian time, including two glaciations in the Abu Mahara Group (ca. 725 - <645 Ma), the enigmatic Shuram carbon isotope excursion in the Nafun Group (ca. <645-547 Ma), and the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary in the Ara Group (ca. 547-540 Ma). This interval contains several extreme isotopic excursions, hypothesized to record perturbations of the surficial Earth carbon cycle or post-depositional diagenetic processes. Rigorous interpretation of these records requires a more thorough assessment of diagenetic processes. To better understand the significance and cause of these large amplitude isotopic excursions, we employed carbonate clumped isotope thermometry. This method allows us to estimate the absolute temperature of carbonate precipitation, including recrystallization, based on the temperature dependent abundance of carbonate ions containing both 13C and 18O. These estimates are accompanied by a measurement of carbonate δ18O, which in conjunction with temperature, can be used to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the fluid from which the carbonate precipitated. We analyzed stratigraphically constrained samples from a range of paleoenvironments with differing burial histories (1 - >10km maximum burial depth) to constrain the temperature and fluid composition of recrystallization. Clumped isotope temperatures from Huqf Supergroup samples range from 35-175°C. The isotopic composition of the fluid these rocks equilibrated with ranges from -3.7 to 15.7% VSMOW. This large range in temperature and fluid composition separates into distinct populations that differ systematically with independent constraints on petrography, stratigraphy and burial history. The data indicate the Abu Mahara, Nafun and Ara groups have unique diagenetic histories. In central Oman, the post-glacial Abu Mahara cap dolostone shows high temperature, rock buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 176°C; δ18

  6. Martian carbon dioxide: Clues from isotopes in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, H. R.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Jull, A. J. T.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Attempts to unravel the origin and evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere on Mars from isotopic data have been hampered by the impreciseness of the measurements made by the Viking Lander and by Earth-based telescopes. The SNC meteorites which are possibly pieces of the Martian surface offer a unique opportunity to obtain more precise estimates of the planet's volatile inventory and isotopic composition. Recently, we reported results on oxygen isotopes of water extracted by pyrolysis from samples of Shergotty, Zagami, Nakhla, Chassigny, Lafayette, and EETA-79001. Now we describe complementary results on the stable isotopic composition of carbon dioxide extracted simultaneously from those same samples. We will also report on C-14 abundances obtained by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for some of these CO2 samples.

  7. Interpreting the Ca isotope record of marine biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Neil G.; De La Rocha, Christina L.; Tipper, Edward T.; Tripati, Aradhna; Galy, Albert; Bickle, Michael J.

    2007-08-01

    An 18 million year record of the Ca isotopic composition (δ 44/42Ca) of planktonic foraminiferans from ODP site 925, in the Atlantic, on the Ceara Rise, provides the opportunity for critical analysis of Ca isotope-based reconstructions of the Ca cycle. δ 44/42Ca in this record averages +0.37 ± 0.05 (1 σ SD) and ranges from +0.21‰ to +0.52‰. The record is a good match to previously published Neogene Ca isotope records based on foraminiferans, but is not similar to the record based on bulk carbonates, which has values that are as much as 0.25‰ lower. Bulk carbonate and planktonic foraminiferans from core tops differ slightly in their δ 44/42Ca (i.e., by 0.06 ± 0.06‰ ( n = 5)), while the difference between bulk carbonate and foraminiferan values further back in time is markedly larger, leaving open the question of the cause of the difference. Modeling the global Ca cycle from downcore variations in δ 44/42Ca by assuming fixed values for the isotopic composition of weathering inputs (δ 44/42Ca w) and for isotope fractionation associated with the production of carbonate sediments (Δ sed) results in unrealistically large variations in the total mass of Ca 2+ in the oceans over the Neogene. Alternatively, variations of ±0.05‰ in the Ca isotope composition of weathering inputs or in the extent of fractionation of Ca isotopes during calcareous sediment formation could entirely account for variations in the Ca isotopic composition of marine carbonates. Ca isotope fractionation during continental weathering, such as has been recently observed, could easily result in variations in δ 44/42Ca w of a few tenths of permil. Likewise a difference in the fractionation factors associated with aragonite versus calcite formation could drive shifts in Δ sed of tenths of permil with shifts in the relative output of calcite and aragonite from the ocean. Until better constraints on variations in δ 44/42Ca w and Δ sed have been established, modeling the Ca 2+ content

  8. The effects of biomanipulation on the biogeochemistry, carbon isotopic composition and pelagic food web relations of a shallow turf lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontes, B. M.; Pel, R.; Ibelings, B. W.; Boschker, H. T. S.; Middelburg, J. J.; van Donk, E.

    2005-08-01

    The effects of fish removal on the biogeochemistry and lower-trophic level food web relations were studied in a shallow eutrophied turf lake. Biomanipulation led to an increase in transparency and macrophyte biomass and decrease in phytoplankton abundance, but zooplankton numbers did not increase. Moreover, fish removal resulted in high pH, high O2, low CO2, and more negative δ13CDIC values than expected, which is proposed to be the likely result of chemical enhanced diffusion with large negative fractionation (-13). By combining fluorescence activated cell sorting and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) of fatty acids we were able to obtain group specific δ13C signatures and to trace possible shifts in δ13C resulting from fish removal. Fractionation values of green algae (20) and diatoms (22) were uniform and independent of treatment, while fractionation factors of filamentous cyanobacteria were variable between the treatments that differed in CO2 availability. 13C-labeling of the phytoplankton groups showed that biomanipulation led to increased growth rates of green algae and diatoms at the expense of cyanobacteria. Finally, the primary consumer Chydorus appeared to prefer cyanobacteria, whilst Asplanchna grazed predominantly upon eukaryotes.

  9. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Engle, Glen B.

    1993-01-01

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  10. The Stable Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakir, D.

    2003-12-01

    When a bean leaf was sealed in a closed chamber under a lamp (Rooney, 1988), in two hours the atmospheric CO2 in the microcosm reached an isotopic steady state with a 13C abundance astonishingly similar to the global mean value of atmospheric CO2 at that time (-7.5‰ in the δ13C notation introduced below). Almost concurrently, another research group sealed a suspension of asparagus cells in a different type of microcosm in which within about two hours the atmospheric O2 reached an isotopic steady state with 18O enrichment relative to water in the microcosm that was, too, remarkably similar to the global-scale offset between atmospheric O2 and mean ocean water (21‰ versus 23.5‰ in the δ18O notation introduced below; Guy et al., 1987). These classic experiments capture some of the foundations underlying the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 and O2. First, in both cases the biological system rapidly imposed a unique isotopic value on the microcosms' atmosphere via their massive photosynthetic and respiratory exchange of CO2 and O2. Second, in both cases the biological system acted on materials with isotopic signals previously formed by the global carbon and hydrological cycles. That is, the bean leaf introduced its previously formed organic matter (the source of the CO2 respired into microcosm's atmosphere), and the asparagus cells were introduced complete with local tap water (from which photosynthesis released molecular oxygen). Therefore, while the isotopic composition of the biological system used was slave to long-term processes, intense metabolic processes centered on few specific enzymes (Yakir, 2002) dictated the short-term atmospheric composition.In a similar vein, on geological timescales of millions of years, the atmosphere and its isotopic composition are integral parts of essentially a single dynamic ocean-atmosphere-biosphere system. This dynamic system exchanges material, such as carbon and oxygen, with the sediments and the lithosphere via

  11. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  12. Oxygen isotope fractionation in double carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Böttcher, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations in double carbonates of different crystal structures were calculated by the increment method. Synthesis experiments were performed at 60 °C and 100 °C to determine oxygen and carbon isotope fractionations involving PbMg[CO3]2. The calculations suggest that the double carbonates of calcite structure are systematically enriched in (18)O relative to those of aragonite and mixture structures. Internally consistent oxygen isotope fractionation factors are obtained for these minerals with respect to quartz, calcite and water at a temperature range of 0-1200 °C. The calculated fractionation factors for double carbonate-water systems are generally consistent with the data available from laboratory experiments. The experimentally determined fractionation factors for PbMg[CO3]2, BaMg[CO3]2 and CaMg[CO3]2 against H2O not only fall between fractionation factors involving pure carbonate end-members but are also close to the calculated fractionation factors. In contrast, experimentally determined carbon isotope fractionation factors between PbMg[CO3]2 and CO2 are much closer to theoretical predictions for the cerussite-CO2 system than for the magnesite-CO2 system, similar to the fractionation behavior for BaMg[CO3]2. Therefore, the combined theoretical and experimental results provide insights into the effects of crystal structure and exchange kinetics on oxygen isotope partitioning in double carbonates.

  13. Determination of multiple organic matter sources in aerosol PM10 from Wrocław, Poland using molecular and stable carbon isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górka, Maciej; Rybicki, Maciej; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Marynowski, Leszek

    2014-06-01

    The natural and anthropogenic contributions of hydrocarbon groups (aliphatic and aromatic), as well as total organic carbon, in atmospheric PM10 dust (particulate matter <10 μm) collected from Wrocław (SW Poland) were assessed using combined molecular (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry - GC-MS) and stable carbon isotopic (isotope-ratio mass spectrometry - IR-MS) analyses. The PM10 samples were taken in the seasonal sampling program in 2007, and represent air pollution from all months of the year. The δ13C values of the total carbon varied seasonally from -27.6 to -25.3‰. The isotopic mass balance calculations confirmed greater coal burning input, reaching 70.5%, in the heating season and dominant transported sources 47.5% in the vegetative season. The data obtained for the aliphatic fractions: carbon preference index (CPI), carbon number maximum (Cmax), wax n-alkane contents (%WNA), and δ13C values of the aliphatic fractions (-36.6 to -29.4‰), indicated a dominant anthropogenic origin (gasoline/diesel/coal combustion) and a lesser biogenic input (biomass burning and natural organic matter). Petroleum and coal combustion emissions were confirmed by the presence of hopanes and moretanes. The molecular analysis of the concentrations and diagnostic ratios of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the δ13C values of the aromatic fractions (-35.4 to -26.8‰) indicated that the main PAH sources were also collectively from combustion of liquid fuels and coal. Based on PAH discrimination diagrams it is also clear that the main organic carbon source is derived from coal, biomass and petroleum combustion in both seasons. However, taking into account the PAH concentrations during the vegetative and heating seasons, coal and biomass burning seem to be their major source. Additionally, the polar organic compounds (mainly levoglucosan) confirmed a significant contribution from biomass burning to the total anthropogenic input. The general conclusion derived

  14. High Resolution Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Laminations in Pedogenic Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breecker, D.; Sharp, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in pedogenic carbonate from buried soils provide a proxy for low-resolution Quaternary climate and environmental conditions. Samples of carbonate are taken from clast rinds, nodules or filaments in calcic soils. Most clast rinds exhibit micro-laminations that may preserve isotopic ratios of formation. The techniques typically utilized to sample pedogenic carbonate, however, are too coarse to sample individual laminations and likely result in time averages and therefore limit temporal resolution. We investigated the heterogeneity of both carbon and oxygen isotopes ratios in clast rinds at a 100 μm scale using a rapid CO2 laser extraction technique (Sharp and Cerling, 1996). A single 20 msec burst at low power releases CO2 from polished carbonate slabs and the CO2 is then analyzed using continuous flow GC-IRMS. Analyses take less than 5 minutes with a reproducibility of better than ±0.3‰ (δ13C) and ±0.4‰ (δ18O). We have made a two dimensional map of a thick carbonate rind on a limestone clast from a stage V soil to explore the potential for preservation of isotopic ratios in well developed soils and plan to analyze additional rinds from less well developed calcic horizons for comparison. The isotopic map reveals heterogeneities in δ13C of up to 4‰ at a sub-millimeter scale, possibly corresponding to 30% changes in the fraction of C4 plants. Also imaged are abrupt changes in δ13C of approximately 2‰ across sub-100 μm scale boundaries. One well-defined carbon isotope boundary is sub parallel to, but crosses, the lamination boundaries. Oxygen isotope compositions do not change systematically across the same boundary and generally appear more random. These observations are most easily explained by alteration of initial isotopic compositions. Alteration may preferentially affect oxygen isotope ratios leaving carbon isotope distributions relatively intact. It is also possible that both carbon and oxygen isotopes

  15. Isotopic Compositions of Evaporative Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Lauder, A. M.; Kopec, B. G.; Dade, W. B.; Virginia, R. A.; Posmentier, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic fluxes of evaporation from a water surface are typically computed using a one-dimensional model, originally conceptualized by Craig and Gordon (1965) and further developed and adapted to different natural settings (such as transpiration, open surface evaporation, etc.) by various investigators. These models have two distinguishing characteristics. First, there exists a laminar layer where molecular diffusion away from the water-air interface causes kinetic isotopic fractionation. The magnitude of this fractionation is controlled by the diffusion/transport coefficient of each vapor isotopologue in air and their concentration gradients, the latter being controlled by relative humidity, isotopic ratios of ambient air, and turbulent conditions (such as wind and surface roughness). Second, the horizontal variations are ignored. In particular, the effect of horizontal advection on isotopic variations in the ambient air is not considered. The research reported here addresses the effects of relinquishing the simplifying assumptions in both of these areas. We developed a model, in which the simplification of a purely laminar layer is dropped. Instead, we express the vertical transport coefficient as the sum of the molecular diffusivity, that differs for each water isotopologue, and the turbulent diffusivity that increases linearly with height but does not vary among water isotopologues. With this model, the kinetic isotopic effect reduces with height in the vicinity of the water surface, and the net isotopic fractionation through the boundary layer can be integrated. The advantage of this conceptualization is that the magnitude of kinetic isotopic fractionation can be assessed directly with changing environmental conditions, such as humidity and wind speed, rather than approximated by discontinuous empirical functions of the environmental conditions, as in the conventional models mentioned above. To address the effect of lateral heterogeneity, we expanded the

  16. Carbon isotopes in xenoliths from the Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii, and the generation of isotopic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Pineau, F. ); Mathez, E.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The isotopic composition of carbon has been determined in a suite of xenoliths from lava of the 1800-1801 Kaupulehu eruption of Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii. Several lithologies are represented in the suite, including websterite, dunite, wehrlite, pyroxenite, and gabbro. In addition, there are composite xenoliths in which contacts between lithologies are preserved. Most of the xenoliths represent deformed cumulates. The contact relations in the composite samples indicate that the lithologies originated from the same source region, which, based on pressures determined from fluid inclusions, is estimated to be at a depth of {approx}20 km, or near the crust-mantle boundary. The observations and isotopic results demonstrate that isotopic variability can be generated by multistage fractionation processes such as degassing of CO{sub 2} from magma and precipitation of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids to form graphitic compounds. Such processes operated over regions the scales of which were determined by style and intensity of deformation and by lithology.

  17. Effects of Air Pollutants on the Composition of Stable Carbon Isotopes, δ13C, of Leaves and Wood, and on Leaf Injury 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bjorn; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    1988-01-01

    Air pollutants are known to cause visible leaf injury as well as impairment of photosynthetic CO2 fixation. Here we evaluate whether the effects on photosynthesis are large enough to cause changes in the relative composition of stable carbon isotopes, δ13C, of plant tissue samples, and, if so, how the changes relate to visual leaf injury. For that purpose, several woody and herbaceous plant species were exposed to SO2 + O3 and SO2 + O3 + NO2 for one month (8 hours per day, 5 days per week). At the end of the fumigations, the plants were evaluated for visual leaf lesions, and δ13C of leaf tissue was determined. Woody plants generally showed less visual leaf injury and smaller effects on δ13C of pollutant exposure than did herbaceous plants. If δ13C was affected by pollutants, it became, with few exceptions, less negative. The data from the fumigation experiments were consistent with δ13C analyses of whole wood of annual growth rings from two conifer tree species, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Pinus strobus. These trees had been exposed until 1977 to exhaust gases from a gas plant at Lacq, France. Wood of both conifer species formed in the polluted air of 1972 to 1976 had less negative δ13C values than had wood formed in the much cleaner air in 1982 to 1986. No similar, time-dependent differences in δ13C of wood were observed in trees which had been continuously growing in clean air. Our δ13C data from both relatively short-term artificial exposures and long-term natural exposure are consistent with greater stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in polluted air than in clean air. PMID:16666270

  18. Multiproxy Holocene paleoclimate records from the southern Peruvian Andes - what new can we learn from the stable carbon isotope composition of high altitude organic matter deposits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Engel, Zbyněk

    2015-04-01

    Interpretation of the Central Andean paleoclimate over the last millennia still represents a research challenge demanding deeper studies [1,2]. Several high-resolution paleoclimate proxies for the last 10,000 years have been developed for the northern hemisphere. However, similar proxies are very limited for South America, particularly for high altitudes where, for example, tree-ring chronologies are not available and instrumental records are very limited. Consequently, our knowledge of high altitude climate changes in arid regions of the Peruvian Andes mainly relies on ice-core and lake deposit studies. In our study, we used a new alternative proxy for interpretation of palaeoclimate conditions based on a peat core taken from the Carhuasanta Valley at the foot of Nevado Mismi in the southern Peruvian Andes (15° 30'S, 71° 43'W, 4809m a.s.l.). The stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of Distichia peat reflects mainly the relative variation of the mean air temperature during subsequent growing seasons [3], and allows reconstructions of palaeotemperature changes. In contrast, peat organic carbon concentration (C % wt) records mainly wetness in the valley, directly corresponding to the changes in runoff in the upper part of the catchment. The most prominent climate changes recorded in the peat over last 4ka occurred between 3040 and 2750 cal. yrs BP. The initial warming turned to a very rapid cooling to temperatures at least 2° C lower than the mean for the Late Holocene. Initially drier conditions within this event turned to a short wet phase after 2780 cal. yrs BP, when the temperature increased again. This event coincides with significant changes in peat and ice core records in the Central Andes that match the timing of the global climate event around 2.8 cal. ka BP. Climatic conditions in the study area became relatively dry and stable after the event for about 800 years. Highly variable temperatures and humidity prevailed during the last 2000 years, when

  19. A Holocene record of endogenic iron and manganese precipitation, isotopic composition of endogenic carbonate, and vegetation history in a lake-fen complex in northwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, Walter E.; Doner, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    percent in the LSL-B core and 15.5 percent in the LSF-10 core. Values of delta18O in mollusk (Pisidium) and ostracode shells increase by only about 20 per mil from the bottom to the top of the LSL-B core (about 12600-2200 calendar years). The remarkably constant oxygen-isotope composition throughout the Holocene suggests that environmental conditions affecting values of delta18O (temperature, salinity, composition of the water, composition of precipitation) did not change greatly. Values of delta13C in carbonate shells generally decreased by about 2 per mil from 9000 calendar years to 6000 calendar years, but they did not increase in organic carbon. This mid-Holocene increase in delta13C in shells but not in organic carbon is likely due to an increase in residence time. A late Pleistocene forest dominated by spruce was replaced in the early Holocene by a pine forest. The pine forest migrated east during the middle Holocene and was replaced by an open sagebrush-oak savanna. The western migration of forests into northwestern Minnesota is marked first by a hardwood forest and finally a pine forest.

  20. Magnesium Isotopic Composition of Subducting Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Teng, F. Z.; Plank, T. A.; Huang, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Subducted marine sediments have recently been called upon to explain the heterogeneous Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg, ‰) found in mantle wehrlites (-0.39 to +0.09 [1]) in the context of a homogeneous mantle (-0.25 ± 0.07 [2]). However, no systematic measurements of δ26Mg on marine sediments are currently available to provide direct support to this model. To characterize the Mg inputs to global subduction zones, we measured δ26Mg data for a total of 90 marine sediments collected from 12 drill sites outboard of the world's major subduction zones. These sediments span a 1.73‰ range in δ26Mg. The detritus-dominated sediments have δ26Mg (-0.59 to +0.53) comparable to those of weathered materials on continents (e.g. -0.52 to +0.92 [3]), while the calcareous oozes yield δ26Mg (as light as -1.20) more similar to the seawater value (-0.83 [4]). The negative correlation between δ26Mg and CaO/Al2O3 in these sediments indicates the primary control of mineralogy over the Mg isotopic distribution among different sediment types, as carbonates are enriched in light Mg isotopes (-5.10 to -0.40 [5]) whereas clay-rich weathering residues generally have heavier δ26Mg (e.g. up to +0.65 in saprolite [6]). In addition, chemical weathering and grain-size sorting drive sediments to a heavier δ26Mg, as indicated by the broad positive trends between δ26Mg with CIA (Chemical Index of Alteration [7]) and Al2O3/SiO2, respectively. Collectively, the arc systems sampled in this study represent ~30% of global arc length and the extrapolated global Mg flux of subducting marine sediments accounts for ~9% of the yearly Mg riverine input with a flux-weighted average δ26Mg at -0.26. Subduction of these heterogeneous sediments may not cause significant mantle heterogeneity on a global scale, but the highly variable Mg fluxes and δ26Mg of sediments delivered to different trenches are capable of producing local mantle variations. Volcanic rocks sourced from these mantle domains are thus

  1. Evolution of chemical and isotopic composition of inorganic carbon in a complex semi-arid zone environment: Consequences for groundwater dating using radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Hollins, S. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Baker, A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating groundwater age is important for any groundwater resource assessment and radiocarbon (14C) dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can provide this information. In semi-arid zone (i.e. water-limited environments), there are a multitude of reasons why 14C dating of groundwater and traditional correction models may not be directly transferable. Some include; (1) the complex hydrological responses of these systems that lead to a mixture of different ages in the aquifer(s), (2) the varied sources, origins and ages of organic matter in the unsaturated zone and (3) high evaporation rates. These all influence the evolution of DIC and are not easily accounted for in traditional correction models. In this study, we determined carbon isotope data for; DIC in water, carbonate minerals in the sediments, sediment organic matter, soil gas CO2 from the unsaturated zone, and vegetation samples. The samples were collected after an extended drought, and again after a flood event, to capture the evolution of DIC after varying hydrological regimes. A graphical method (Han et al., 2012) was applied for interpretation of the carbon geochemical and isotopic data. Simple forward mass-balance modelling was carried out on key geochemical processes involving carbon and agreed well with observed data. High values of DIC and δ13CDIC, and low 14CDIC could not be explained by a simple carbonate mineral-CO2 gas dissolution process. Instead it is suggested that during extended drought, water-sediment interaction leads to ion exchange processes within the top ∼10-20 m of the aquifer which promotes greater calcite dissolution in saline groundwater. This process was found to contribute more than half of the DIC, which is from a mostly 'dead' carbon source. DIC is also influenced by carbon exchange between DIC in water and carbonate minerals found in the top 2 m of the unsaturated zone. This process occurs because of repeated dissolution/precipitation of carbonate that is dependent on

  2. Comprehensive study of carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions, trace element abundances, and cathodoluminescence intensities of calcite in the Murchison CM chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Sugiura, Naoji; Marrocchi, Yves; Takahata, Naoto; Hoppe, Peter; Shirai, Kotaro; Sano, Yuji; Hiyagon, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    We have performed in situ analyses of C and O isotopic compositions, trace element concentrations, and cathodoluminescence (CL) intensities on calcite in Murchison, a weakly altered CM chondrite. We found that the trace element (Mg, Mn, and Fe) concentrations are heterogeneous within single calcite grains. Grain to grain heterogeneity is even more pronounced. The analyzed calcite grains can be separated into two distinct types with respect to their C isotopic ratios, trace element concentrations, and CL characteristics: Calcite grains with higher δ13CPDB values (∼75‰) have low trace element concentrations and uniformly dark CL, while grains with lower δ13C values (∼35‰) have higher trace element concentrations and CL zoning. In contrast to the C isotopic ratios, O isotopic ratios are similar for both types of calcites (δ18OSMOW ∼ 34‰). The O isotopic ratios, trace element concentrations, and CL characteristics provide no evidence for C-isotope evolution in fluids from a single C reservoir by Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation (i.e., removal of C-bearing gaseous species). Also, it seems difficult to explain the O and C isotopic compositions of the two types of calcites by their formation at different temperatures from a single fluid. Instead, the δ13C variation suggests the presence of at least two C reservoirs with different isotopic ratios in the aqueous fluids from which the calcites precipitated. The C reservoirs with lower δ13C values are likely to be organic matter. The same holds for the C reservoirs with higher δ13C values which might have significant contributions from the 13C-enriched grains identified in meteoritic insoluble organic matter. Thermodynamic calculations show that calcite with lower Fe concentrations formed under more reduced conditions than calcite with higher Fe concentrations. If this is the case, the 13C-rich organic grains may have been destroyed and dissolved in the fluids under more reduced conditions than other

  3. Identification and carbon isotope composition of a novel branched GDGT isomer in lake sediments: Evidence for lacustrine branched GDGT production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Yuki; De Jonge, Cindy; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Schubert, Carsten J.; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Niemann, Helge

    2015-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are bacterial membrane lipids that occur ubiquitously in soils and lacustrine sediments and have great potential as proxy indicators for paleotemperature and pH reconstructions. Initially, brGDGTs in lakes were thought to originate from soils of the watershed. The composition of the lacustrine brGDGT pool, however, often differs substantially from that in catchment soils, complicating the application of the brGDGT paleothermometer to lake sediments. This suggests that terrigenous brGDGT signals in lacustrine sedimentary archives may be affected by aquatic in situ production. In sediments of a Swiss mountain lake, we detected a novel hexamethylated brGDGT, which elutes between the known 5- and 6-methyl brGDGT isomers during HPLC-MS analysis. This novel isomer accounted for 8.5% of the total brGDGTs. Most remarkably, this brGDGT was not detected in soils collected from the catchment of the lake, providing circumstantial evidence for an in situ brGDGT source in the lake's water column or sediments. Isolation of the compound by preparative HPLC and subsequent GC-MS analysis of the alkyl chains revealed that the novel brGDGT comprises two structural isomers. One possesses a 5,13,16- and a 6,13,16-trimethyloctacosanyl moiety and constitutes 84% of the new brGDGT; the second contains a 13,16-dimethyloctacosanyl and a 5,13,16,23-tetramethyloctacosanyl moiety. The δ13C values of both the alkyl chains derived from the novel brGDGT (-46‰) and all other major brGDGTs (-43‰ to -44‰) were significantly lower than those of brGDGT-derived alkanes in catchment soils (-27‰ to -28‰) further attesting to in situ production of brGDGTs in the studied lake.

  4. Diel variations in carbon isotopic composition and concentration of organic acids and their impact on plant dark respiration in different species.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, M M; Wegener, F; Werner, R A; Werner, C

    2016-09-01

    Leaf respiration in the dark and its C isotopic composition (δ(13) CR ) contain information about internal metabolic processes and respiratory substrates. δ(13) CR is known to be less negative compared to potential respiratory substrates, in particular shortly after darkening during light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR). This phenomenon might be driven by respiration of accumulated (13) C-enriched organic acids, however, studies simultaneously measuring δ(13) CR during LEDR and potential respiratory substrates are rare. We determined δ(13) CR and respiration rates (R) during LEDR, as well as δ(13) C and concentrations of potential respiratory substrates using compound-specific isotope analyses. The measurements were conducted throughout the diel cycle in several plant species under different environmental conditions. δ(13) CR and R patterns during LEDR were strongly species-specific and showed an initial peak, which was followed by a progressive decrease in both values. The species-specific differences in δ(13) CR and R during LEDR may be partially explained by the isotopic composition of organic acids (e.g., oxalate, isocitrate, quinate, shikimate, malate), which were (13) C-enriched compared to other respiratory substrates (e.g., sugars and amino acids). However, the diel variations in both δ(13) C and concentrations of the organic acids were generally low. Thus, additional factors such as the heterogeneous isotope distribution in organic acids and the relative contribution of the organic acids to respiration are required to explain the strong (13) C enrichment in leaf dark-respired CO2 .

  5. Stable isotopic composition of bottled mineral waters from Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bădăluţă, Carmen; Nagavciuc, Viorica; Perșoiu, Aurel

    2015-04-01

    Romania has a high potential of mineral waters resources, featuring one of the largest mineral resources at European and global level. In the last decade, due to increased in consumption of bottled water, numerous brands have appeared on the market, with equally numerous and variable sources of provenance. In this study we have analyzed the isotopic composition of bottled mineral waters from Romania in order to determine their source and authenticity. We have analysed 32 carbonated and 24 non-carbonated mineral waters from Romania. and the results were analysed in comparison with stable isotope data from precipitation and river waters. Generally, the isotopic values of the mineral waters follow those in precipitation; however, differences occur in former volcanic regions (due to deep circulation of meteoric waters and increased exchange with host rock and volcanic CO2), as well as in mountainous regions, where high-altitude recharge occurs.

  6. Gluconeogenesis from labeled carbon: estimating isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, J.K.

    1986-03-01

    To estimate the rate of gluconeogenesis from steady-state incorporation of labeled 3-carbon precursors into glucose, isotope dilution must be considered so that the rate of labeling of glucose can be quantitatively converted to the rate of gluconeogenesis. An expression for the value of this isotope dilution can be derived using mathematical techniques and a model of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The present investigation employs a more complex model than that used in previous studies. This model includes the following pathways that may affect the correction for isotope dilution: 1) flux of 3-carbon precursor to the oxaloacetate pool via acetyl-CoA and the TCA cycle; 2) flux of 4- or 5-carbon compounds into the TCA cycle; 3) reversible flux between oxaloacetate (OAA) and pyruvate and between OAA and fumarate; 4) incomplete equilibrium between OAA pools; and 5) isotope dilution of 3-carbon tracers between the experimentally measured pool and the precursor for the TCA-cycle OAA pool. Experimental tests are outlined which investigators can use to determine whether these pathways are significant in a specific steady-state system. The study indicated that flux through these five pathways can significantly affect the correction for isotope dilution. To correct for the effects of these pathways an alternative method for calculating isotope dilution is proposed using citrate to relate the specific activities of acetyl-CoA and OAA.

  7. Pressure-dependent isotopic composition of iron alloys.

    PubMed

    Shahar, A; Schauble, E A; Caracas, R; Gleason, A E; Reagan, M M; Xiao, Y; Shu, J; Mao, W

    2016-04-29

    Our current understanding of Earth's core formation is limited by the fact that this profound event is far removed from us physically and temporally. The composition of the iron metal in the core was a result of the conditions of its formation, which has important implications for our planet's geochemical evolution and physical history. We present experimental and theoretical evidence for the effect of pressure on iron isotopic composition, which we found to vary according to the alloy tested (FeO, FeH(x), or Fe3C versus pure Fe). These results suggest that hydrogen or carbon is not the major light-element component in the core. The pressure dependence of iron isotopic composition provides an independent constraint on Earth's core composition. PMID:27126042

  8. Pressure-dependent isotopic composition of iron alloys.

    PubMed

    Shahar, A; Schauble, E A; Caracas, R; Gleason, A E; Reagan, M M; Xiao, Y; Shu, J; Mao, W

    2016-04-29

    Our current understanding of Earth's core formation is limited by the fact that this profound event is far removed from us physically and temporally. The composition of the iron metal in the core was a result of the conditions of its formation, which has important implications for our planet's geochemical evolution and physical history. We present experimental and theoretical evidence for the effect of pressure on iron isotopic composition, which we found to vary according to the alloy tested (FeO, FeH(x), or Fe3C versus pure Fe). These results suggest that hydrogen or carbon is not the major light-element component in the core. The pressure dependence of iron isotopic composition provides an independent constraint on Earth's core composition.

  9. Pressure-dependent isotopic composition of iron alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, A.; Schauble, E. A.; Caracas, R.; Gleason, A. E.; Reagan, M. M.; Xiao, Y.; Shu, J.; Mao, W.

    2016-04-01

    Our current understanding of Earth’s core formation is limited by the fact that this profound event is far removed from us physically and temporally. The composition of the iron metal in the core was a result of the conditions of its formation, which has important implications for our planet’s geochemical evolution and physical history. We present experimental and theoretical evidence for the effect of pressure on iron isotopic composition, which we found to vary according to the alloy tested (FeO, FeHx, or Fe3C versus pure Fe). These results suggest that hydrogen or carbon is not the major light-element component in the core. The pressure dependence of iron isotopic composition provides an independent constraint on Earth’s core composition.

  10. Nucleosynthesis and the Isotopic Composition of Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Various components have been isolated from carbonaceous meteorites with an isotopically anomalous elemental composition. Several of these are generally thought to represent stardust containing a nucleosynthetic record of their birthsites. This paper discusses the expected isotopic composition of stardust based upon astronomical observations and theoretical studies of their birthsites: red giants and supergiants, planetary nebulae, C-rich Wolf-Rayet stars, novae and supernovae. Analyzing the stardust budget, it is concluded that about 15% of the elements will be locked up in stardust components in the interstellar medium. This stardust will be isotopically heterogenous on an individual grain basis by factors ranging from 2 to several orders of magnitude. Since comets may have preserved a relatively unprocessed record of the stardust entering the solar nebula, isotopic studies of returned comet samples may provide valuable information on the nucleosynthetic processes taking place in the interiors of stars and the elemental evolution of the Milky Way.

  11. Iron isotope composition of some Archean and Proterozoic iron formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planavsky, Noah; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Bekker, Andrey; Hofmann, Axel; Little, Crispin T. S.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2012-03-01

    Fe isotopes can provide new insight into redox-dependent biogeochemical processes. Precambrian iron formations (IF) are deserving targets for Fe isotope studies because they are composed predominantly of authigenic Fe phases and record a period of unprecedented iron deposition in Earth's history. We present Fe isotope data for bulk samples from 24 Archean and Proterozoic IF and eight Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich deposits. These data reveal that many Archean and early Paleoproterozoic iron formations were a sink for isotopically heavy Fe, in contrast to later Proterozoic and Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich rocks. The positive δ56Fe values in IF are best explained by delivery of particulate ferric oxides formed in the water column to the sediment-water interface. Because IF are a net sink for isotopically heavy Fe, there must be a corresponding pool of isotopically light Fe in the sedimentary record. Earlier work suggested that Archean pyritic black shales were an important part of this light sink before 2.35 billion years ago (Ga). It is therefore likely that the persistently and anomalously low δ56Fe values in shales are linked with the deposition of isotopically heavy Fe in IF in the deeper parts of basins. IF deposition produced a residual isotopically light dissolved Fe pool that was captured by pyritic Fe in shales. Local dissimilatory Fe reduction in porewater and associated diagenetic reactions resulting in pyrite and carbonate precipitation may have further enhanced Fe isotope heterogeneity in marine sediments, and an 'iron shuttle' may have transported isotopically light Fe from shelf sediments to the basin. Nevertheless, water-column processing of hydrothermally delivered Fe likely had the strongest influence on the bulk iron isotope composition of Archean and Paleoproterozoic iron formations and other marine sediments.

  12. Constraining paleotemperature and water isotope signals at Lake Bonneville using carbonate clumped isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mering, J. A.; Oviatt, C. G.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Canet, J.; Tripati, A.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Bonneville was the largest pluvial system in the Great Basin during the Last Glacial Maximum (23-19 ka BP), reaching nearly 50,000 square kilometers at its high stand. Carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometry provides a new avenue to evaluate lake and atmospheric conditions by constraining the temperature and oxygen isotope ratios of lake water. Here, we present estimates of lake temperature, the oxygen isotope composition of paleowater, and Mean Annual Air Temperature (MAAT) from LGM paleoshoreline sites in Utah and Eastern Nevada. Multiple phases of ancient carbonate were evaluated, including endogenic carbonate from the ubiquitous Bonneville marl stratigraphic unit, and aragonitic shells of two species of aquatic gastropods (genera Pyrgulopsis and Stagnicola) collected from littoral deposits adjacent to the marl. These phases should record surface water conditions. Preliminary results indicate that paleotemperature estimates from gastropods and marl are similar at any given site. However, the latitudinal water isotope gradient reconstructed using marls is steeper than that reconstructed from gastropods, indicating that perhaps carbonate precipitation in marl is more evaporation-driven than shell growth of aquatic snails. Comparison with recent climate data, and clumped isotope measurements of modern samples from the Great Salt Lake, supports moderate temperature change in the Great Basin from the Last Glacial Maximum to present.

  13. Site-Specific Carbon Isotopes in Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural organic molecules exhibit a wide range of internal site-specific isotope variation (i.e., molecules with same isotopic substitution type but different site). Such variations are generally unconstrained by bulk isotopic measurements. If known, site-specific variations might constrain temperatures of equilibrium, mechanisms of formation or consumption reactions, and possibly other details. For example, lipids can exhibit carbon isotope differences of up to 30‰ between adjacent carbon sites as a result of fractionations arising during decarboxylation of pyruvate and other steps in lipid biosynthesis(1). We present a method for site-specific carbon isotope analysis of propane, based on high-resolution, multi-collector gas source mass spectrometry, using a novel prototype instrument - the Thermo MAT 253 Ultra. This machine has an inlet system and electron bombardment ion source resembling those in conventional stable isotope gas source mass spectrometers, and the energy filter, magnet, and detector array resembling those in multi-collector ICPMS and TIMS. The detector array has 7 detector positions, 6 of which are movable, and each of which can collect ions with either a faraday cup (read through amplifiers ranging from 107-1012 ohms) or an SEM. High mass resolving power (up to 27,000, MRP = M/dM definition) is achieved through a narrow entrance slit, adjustable from 250 to 5 μm. Such resolution can cleanly separate isobaric interferences between isotopologues of organic molecules having the same cardinal mass (e.g., 13CH3 and 12CH2D). We use this technology to analyze the isotopologues and fragments of propane, and use such data to solve for the site-specific carbon isotope fractionation. By measuring isotopologues of both the one-carbon (13CH3) and the two-carbon (13C12CH4) fragment ion, we can solve for both bulk δ13C and the difference in δ13C between the terminal and central carbon position. We tested this method by analyzing mixtures between natural

  14. Stable isotope compositions of carbonate and inclusion-hosted water of speleothems from the last interglacial - spatial patterns of climate fluctuations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demény, Attila; Kern, Zoltán; Czuppon, György; Németh, Alexandra; Leél-Őssy, Szabolcs; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Vennemann, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Studies on the last interglacial (LIG) can provide information on how our environment behaved in a period of slightly higher global temperatures at about 120 ka compared to the current climate conditions. This paper presents complex stable H-C-O isotope records obtained for carbonate and fluid inclusion hosted water of U-Th dated stalagmites from the Baradla Cave system in Central Europe. Comparing C and O isotope data with records reported for other speleothem (cave-hosted carbonate) deposits from Europe revealed the complex behavior of these climate proxies, with a concerted relative increase in 18O of carbonates from 128 to 120 ka and synchronized shifts in the opposite direction after 119 ka. The hydrogen isotope analyses of inclusion-hosted water extracted from the BAR-II stalagmite also correspond to the regional climate proxy records, with meaningful deviations from global temperature trends. Beside the well known 120 ka climate optimum and the subsequent cooling starting at about 118 ka, the δD values show a negative peak at about 124-125 ka that does not appear in the C-O isotope data. This negative peak fits well to temperature and humidity changes inferred from proxy records from the northern Atlantic to the eastern Mediterranean. Spatial distributions of these variables show, that while the northern Atlantic ocean experienced a cold phase (possibly also dry in NW Europe), the Mediterranean region was characterized by warm, humid conditions and enhanced seasonality, most probably related to a freshwater flux to the North Atlantic and consequent large-scale heat and moisture transport changes affecting the Mediterranean. The combined interpretation of H-C-O isotope data revealed that the Alpine and Mediterranean regions behaved differently again during Greenland Stadial 26 (GS26, ~119 to 115.5 ka). While the Alpine records fluctuated in close agreement with the Central Greenland ice core δ18O data, the BAR-II stalagmite and southern European records

  15. Stable carbon isotope ratios of rock varnish organic matter: a new paleoenvironmental indicator.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Deniro, M J

    1985-03-22

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of organic matter in rock varnishes of Holocene age from western North America and the Middle East show a strong association with the environment. This isotopic variability reflects the abundance of plants with different photosynthetic pathways in adjacent vegetation. Analyses of different layers of varnish on late Pleistocene desert landforms indicate that the carbon isotopic composition of varnish organic matter is a paleoenvironmental indicator. PMID:17777781

  16. Stable carbon isotope ratios of rock varnish organic matter: a new paleoenvironmental indicator.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Deniro, M J

    1985-03-22

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of organic matter in rock varnishes of Holocene age from western North America and the Middle East show a strong association with the environment. This isotopic variability reflects the abundance of plants with different photosynthetic pathways in adjacent vegetation. Analyses of different layers of varnish on late Pleistocene desert landforms indicate that the carbon isotopic composition of varnish organic matter is a paleoenvironmental indicator.

  17. Chromium Isotopes in Marine Carbonates - an Indicator for Climatic Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.

    2010-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes experience an increased interest as a tracer of Cr (VI) reduction in groundwater and thus showed their potential as a monitor of remediation of anthropogenic and natural contamination in water (Berna et al., 2009; Izbicki et al., 2008). Chromium stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments (BIFs and Fe-cherts) have recently also been used as a tracer for Earth's atmospheric oxygenation through time (Frei et al., 2009). We have applied the Cr isotope system to organic-rich carbonates from a late Ediacaran succession in Uruguay (Polanco Formation), from which we have previously analyzed BIFs with extremely fractionated (δ53Cr up to 5.0 ‰) Cr isotope signatures that are part of an underlying deep water clastic sediment (shale-dominated) sequence (Yerbal Formation) deposited in a glacio-marine environment (Gaucher et al.,2004). δ53Cr values of organic rich carbonates correlate with positive and negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13C PDB between -3 and +3 ‰) and with systematic changes in strontium isotope compositions, commonly interpreted as to reflect fluctuations in organic (photosynthetic algae) production related to fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen and weathering intensities, respectively. Slightly positively fractioned δ53Cr values (up to +0.25‰), paralleling positive (δ13C PDB and 87Sr/86Sr ratio excursions would thereby trace elevated atmospheric oxygen levels/pulses possibly related to glacier retreat/melting stages that caused bioproductivity to increase. While the causal link between these multiple isotopic tracers and the mechanisms of Cr stripping into carbonates has to be further investigated in detail, the first indications from this study point to a potentially promising use of stable Cr isotopes in organic-rich carbonates to monitor fluctuations of atmospheric oxygen, particularly over the Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic ice age periods. E.C. Berna et al. (2010) Cr stable isotopes as indicators of Cr

  18. Controls on the stable isotope compositions of travertine from hyperalkaline springs in Oman: Insights from clumped isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, E. S.; Guo, W.; Paukert, A. N.; Matter, J. M.; Mervine, E. M.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2016-11-01

    Carbonate formation at hyperalkaline springs is typical of serpentinization in peridotite massifs worldwide. These travertines have long been known to exhibit large variations in their carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, extending from apparent equilibrium values to highly depleted values. However, the exact causes of these variations are not well constrained. We analyzed a suite of well-characterized fresh carbonate precipitates and travertines associated with hyperalkaline springs in the peridotite section of the Samail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman, and found their clumped isotope compositions vary systematically with formation environments. Based on these findings, we identified four main processes controlling the stable isotope compositions of these carbonates. These include hydroxylation of CO2, partial isotope equilibration of dissolved inorganic carbon, mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end-members, and post-depositional recrystallization. Most notably, in fresh crystalline films on the surface of hyperalkaline springs and in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools, we observed large enrichments in Δ47 (up to ∼0.2‰ above expected equilibrium values) which accompany depletions in δ18O and δ13C, yielding about 0.01‰ increase in Δ47 and 1.1‰ decrease in δ13C for every 1‰ decrease in δ18O, relative to expected equilibrium values. This disequilibrium trend, also reflected in preserved travertines ranging in age from modern to ∼40,000 years old, is interpreted to arise mainly from the isotope effects associated with the hydroxylation of CO2 in high-pH fluids and agrees with our first-order theoretical estimation. In addition, in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools and in subsamples of one preserved travertine terrace, we observed additional enrichments in Δ47 at intermediate δ13C and δ18O, consistent with mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end

  19. Copper isotopic composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Huang, Jian; Liu, Jingao; Wörner, Gerhard; Yang, Wei; Tang, Yan-Jie; Chen, Yi; Tang, Limei; Zheng, Jianping; Li, Shuguang

    2015-10-01

    Copper isotopes have been successfully applied to many fields in geochemistry, and in particular, as a strongly chalcophile element, the isotope systematics of Cu can be potentially applied as a proxy for crust-mantle and core-mantle differentiation processes. However, to date, the Cu isotopic composition of distinct silicate reservoirs in the Earth, as well as the behaviour of Cu isotopes during igneous processes and slab dehydration are not well constrained. To address these issues, here we report high-precision (±0.05‰; 2SD) Cu isotope data for 132 terrestrial samples including 28 cratonic peridotites, 19 orogenic peridotites, 70 basalts (MORBs, OIBs, arc basalts and continental basalts) and 15 subduction-related andesites/dacites sourced worldwide. The peridotites are classified into metasomatized and non-metasomatized groups, based upon their rare earth element (REE) patterns and the presence or lack of minerals diagnostic of metasomatism (e.g., phlogopite). The metasomatized peridotites span a wide range of δ65Cu values from -0.64 to +1.82‰, in sharp contrast to the non-metasomatized peridotites that exhibit a narrow range of δ65Cu from -0.15 to +0.18‰ with an average of + 0.03 ± 0.24 ‰ (2SD). Comparison between these two groups of peridotites demonstrates that metasomatism significantly fractionates Cu isotopes with sulfide breakdown and precipitation potentially shifting Cu isotopes towards light and heavy values, respectively. MORBs and OIBs have homogeneous Cu isotopic compositions (+ 0.09 ± 0.13 ‰; 2SD), which are indistinguishable from those of the non-metasomatized peridotites within uncertainty. This suggests that Cu isotope fractionation during mantle partial melting is limited, even if sulfides are a residual phase. Compared with MORBs and OIBs, arc and continental basalts are more heterogeneous in Cu isotopic composition. In particular, basalts that were collected from a traverse across the Kamchatka arc over a distance of 200 to 400

  20. Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  1. Carbon and Carbon Isotope Cycling in the Western Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, Jacoba; Thomas, Helmuth

    2016-04-01

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are having drastic effects on the global oceans. The Arctic Ocean is particularly susceptible to change as warming, sea-ice loss and a weak buffering capacity all influence this complicated semi-enclosed sea. In order to investigate the inorganic carbon system in the Canadian Arctic, water samples were collected in the Beaufort Sea, on the Alaskan shelf, at the Mackenzie river delta, and in Amundsen Gulf during the summer of 2014 and were analyzed for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), DI13C and 18O isotopes. Carbon isotopes are used to investigate the role of biological production on the uptake and transfer of inorganic carbon to depth. A preferential uptake of the lighter 12C relative to the heavier 13C isotope during biological production leads to a fractionation of the 13C/12C isotopes in both the organic matter and the water column. This results in an enrichment of DI13C in the high productivity surface waters and a depletion of DI13C at depth. Physical processes including freshwater input, brine rejection, and water mass mixing are investigated through the measurement of oxygen isotopes. Differences in the carbon system across the study area due to both biological and physical processes are assessed using depth profiles of DI13C and related carbon system parameters.

  2. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of ambient aerosols collected from Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim, an outflow region of Asian dusts and pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Bhagawati; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Zhu, Chunmao

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios were measured for total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN), respectively, in aerosol (TSP) samples collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, an outflow region of Asian pollutants, during 2009-2010. The averaged δ13C and δ15N ratios are -22.2‰ and +12.5‰, respectively. The δ13C values are similar in both spring (-22.5‰) and winter (-22.5‰), suggesting the similar sources and/or source regions. We found that δ13C from Okinawa aerosols are ca. 2‰ higher than those reported from Chinese megacities probably due to photochemical aging of organic aerosols. A strong correlation (r = 0.81) was found between nss-Ca and TSP, suggesting that springtime aerosols are influenced from Asian dusts. However, carbonates in the Asian dusts were titrated with acidic species such as sulfuric acid and oxalic acid during atmospheric transport although two samples suggested the presence of remaining carbonate. No correlations were found between δ13C and tracer compounds (levoglucosan, elemental carbon, oxalic acid, and Na+). During winter and spring, coal burning is significant source in China. Based on isotopic mass balance, contribution of coal burning origin particles to total aerosol carbon was estimated as ca. 97% in winter, which is probably associated with the high emissions in China. Contribution of NO3- to TN was on average 45% whereas that of NH4+ was 18%. These results suggest that vehicular exhaust is an important source of TN in Okinawa aerosols. Concentration of water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is higher in summer, suggesting that WSON is more emitted from the ocean in warmer season whereas inorganic nitrogen is more emitted in winter and spring from pollution sources in the Asian continent.

  3. Carbon isotope systematics of individual hydrocarbons in hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough, Northeastern Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoneit, B.R.T.; Schoell, M.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7%, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.We submitted individual aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of hydrothermal petroleum from Escanaba Trough to compound specific isotope analysis to trace their origins. The carbon isotope compositions of the alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (means -27.5 and -24.7 per mill, respectively) reflect a primarily terrestrial organic matter source.

  4. Development of a Field-Deployable Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Feng; Baer, Douglas

    2010-05-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, whose atmospheric surface mixing ratio has almost doubled compared with preindustrial values. Methane can be produced by biogenic processes, thermogenic processes or biomass, with different isotopic signatures. As a key molecule involved in the radiative forcing in the atmosphere, methane is thus one of the most important molecules linking the biosphere and atmosphere. Therefore precise measurements of mixing ratios and isotopic compositions will help scientists to better understand methane sources and sinks. To date, high precision isotope measurements have been exclusively performed with conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which involves intensive labor and is not readily field deployable. Optical studies using infrared laser spectroscopy have also been reported to measure the isotopic ratios. However, the precision of optical-based analyses, to date, is typically unsatisfactory without pre-concentration procedures. We present characterization of the performance of a portable Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer (MCIA), based on cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy technique, that provides in-situ measurements of the carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C or del_13C) and methane mixing ratio (CH4). The sample is introduced to the analyzer directly without any requirement for pretreatment or preconcentration. A typical precision of less than 1 per mill (< 0.1%) with a 10-ppm methane sample can be achieved in a measurement time of less than 100 seconds. The MCIA can report carbon isotope ratio and concentration measurements over a very wide range of methane concentrations. Results of laboratory tests and field measurements will be presented.

  5. Constraints on Early Triassic carbon cycle dynamics from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K. M.; Yu, M.; Payne, J.

    2010-12-01

    Marine anoxia and euxinia are widely cited as a leading cause of the end-Permian mass extinction and a factor limiting recovery during the Early Triassic. Middle Triassic diversification coincided with the waning of anoxia and stabilization of the global carbon cycle, suggesting that environment-ecosystem linkages were important to biological recovery. However, the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena remain poorly constrained. Here we employ a carbon isotope approach to examine the nature of the carbon cycle from Late Permian to Middle Triassic time. We measured the carbon isotopic composition of carbonates (δ13Ccarb) and organic matter (δ13Corg) from an exceptionally preserved carbonate platform in the Nanpanjiang Basin of south China. The δ13Ccarb of limestones from 5 stratigraphic sections spanning a paleoenvironmental gradient in south China records multiple large isotope excursions characteristic of the Lower Triassic. Previous modeling suggests that the carbon isotope record is best explained by multiple pulses carbon release to the ocean-atmosphere system. Addition of Δ13C values (δ13Ccarb - δ13Corg) for this interval allows us to evaluate whether the carbon cycle perturbations are indeed due to changes in atmospheric CO2 or from changing sources of organic matter input or fluctuating redox state of the oceans during this interval.

  6. Isoscapes of carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions in tracing authenticity and geographical origin of Italian extra-virgin olive oils.

    PubMed

    Chiocchini, Francesca; Portarena, Silvia; Ciolfi, Marco; Brugnoli, Enrico; Lauteri, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The authentication and verification of the geographical origin of food commodities are important topics in the food sector. This study shows the spatial variability in δ(13)C and δ(18)O of 387 samples of Italian extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) collected from 2009 to 2011. EVOOs' δ(13)C and δ(18)O values were related to GIS (Geographic Information System) layers of source water δ(18)O and climate data (mean monthly temperature and precipitation, altitude, xerothermic index) to evaluate the impact of the most significant large-scale drivers for the isotopic composition of Italian EVOOs. A geospatial model of δ(18)O and δ(13)C was developed for the authentication and verification of the geographical origin of EVOOs. The geospatial model identified EVOOs from four distinct areas: north, south-central Tyrrhenian, central Adriatic and islands, highlighting the zonation of the expected isotopic signatures. This geospatial approach can be used to define a protocol for analyzing the isotopic composition of EVOOs in order to certify their origin and prevent food fraud. Limits and perspectives of the model are discussed.

  7. Isoscapes of carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions in tracing authenticity and geographical origin of Italian extra-virgin olive oils.

    PubMed

    Chiocchini, Francesca; Portarena, Silvia; Ciolfi, Marco; Brugnoli, Enrico; Lauteri, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The authentication and verification of the geographical origin of food commodities are important topics in the food sector. This study shows the spatial variability in δ(13)C and δ(18)O of 387 samples of Italian extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) collected from 2009 to 2011. EVOOs' δ(13)C and δ(18)O values were related to GIS (Geographic Information System) layers of source water δ(18)O and climate data (mean monthly temperature and precipitation, altitude, xerothermic index) to evaluate the impact of the most significant large-scale drivers for the isotopic composition of Italian EVOOs. A geospatial model of δ(18)O and δ(13)C was developed for the authentication and verification of the geographical origin of EVOOs. The geospatial model identified EVOOs from four distinct areas: north, south-central Tyrrhenian, central Adriatic and islands, highlighting the zonation of the expected isotopic signatures. This geospatial approach can be used to define a protocol for analyzing the isotopic composition of EVOOs in order to certify their origin and prevent food fraud. Limits and perspectives of the model are discussed. PMID:26920297

  8. Carbon Isotope Fractionation In Biotic Vs. Abiotic Anaerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrehiwet, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are thought to play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of Fe, and nutrient elements such as C and P, in the anaerobic subsurface. The consumption of organic carbon sources (including contaminants) by these bacteria can significantly fractionate substrate C isotopes, however the effects of solution composition, electron acceptor, or electron donor on C isotopic fractionation by DMRB is at present poorly quantified. We have conducted experiments to compare the effects of bicarbonate (δ13C = -3‰) and phosphate buffers on carbon isotope fractionation by Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200R. The effects of dissolved carbonate and phosphate on δ13C values of dissolved inorganic C evolved during microbial reduction of ferric citrate (δ 13Cinitial = -25‰) were examined using sodium lactate (δ13Cinitial = -25‰) as electron donor under strict anaerobic conditions at neutral pH and 30°C, under dark and (fluorescent) light conditions. Our results suggest that bicarbonate may enhance the rate of Fe(III) reduction by S. putrefaciens, in comparison with media containing phosphate buffer but no added bicarbonate. Compared with phosphate buffered experiments, the presence of dissolved bicarbonate also resulted in a greater degree of C isotopic fractionation (ɛ=2-3‰ and ɛ=5-7‰, respectively). The effect of light on microbial Fe(III) reduction was negligible, however sterile controls showed a minor but significant quantity of carbon dioxide production in liquid media, most likely from photochemical decomposition of citrate. The abiotic experiments also showed measurable carbon isotope fractionation between the carbon dioxide produced and the organic carbon substrate which will be discussed.

  9. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991; and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S.

    1994-10-01

    This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1{sup 0} by 1{sup 0} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5% over 1990 levels to 6188 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement with two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these emissions has been re-examined. The emissions of the last two decades are approximately 1{per_thousand} lighter than previously reported (Tans, 1981). This lightening of the emissions signature is due to fossil fuel gases and liquids, including a revision of their {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic signature and an increased production rate.

  10. Impact of deficit irrigation on water use efficiency and carbon isotope composition (delta13C) of field-grown grapevines under Mediterranean climate.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Claudia R; Maroco, João P; dos Santos, Tiago P; Rodrigues, M Lucília; Lopes, Carlos M; Pereira, João S; Chaves, M Manuela

    2005-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of deficit irrigation on intrinsic water use efficiency (A/g(s)) and carbon isotope composition (delta13C) of two grapevine cultivars (Moscatel and Castelão), growing in a commercial vineyard in SW Portugal. The study was done in two consecutive years (2001 and 2002). The treatments were full irrigation (FI), corresponding to 100% of crop evapotranspiration (ETc), rain-fed (no irrigation, NI), and two types of deficit irrigation (50% ETc): (i) by supplying the water either to one side of the root system or to the other, which is partial rootzone drying (PRD), or (ii) dividing the same amount of water by the two sides of the root system, the normal deficit irrigation (DI). The water supplied to the PRD treatment alternated sides approximately every 15 d. The values of predawn leaf water potential (Psi(pd)) and the cumulative integral of Psi(pd) (S(Psi)) during the season were lower in 2001 than in the 2002 growing season. Whereas differences in Psi(pd) and S(Psi) between PRD and DI were not significantly different in 2001, in 2002 (a dryer year) both cultivars showed lower values of S(Psi) in the PRD treatment as compared with the DI treatment. This suggests that partial rootzone drying may have a positive effect on water use under dryer conditions, either as a result of better stomatal control and/or reduced vigour. The effects of the water treatments on delta13C were more pronounced in whole grape berries and pulp than in leaves. The delta13C of pulp showed the best correlation with intrinsic water use efficiency (A/g(s)) as well as with S(Psi). In spite of the better water status observed in PRD compared with DI in the two cultivars in 2002, no statistical differences between the two treatments were observed in A/g(s) and delta13C. On the other hand, they showed a higher delta13C compared with FI. In conclusion, it is apparent that the response to deficit irrigation varies with the environmental conditions

  11. Diel variations in carbon isotopic composition and concentration of organic acids and their impact on plant dark respiration in different species.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, M M; Wegener, F; Werner, R A; Werner, C

    2016-09-01

    Leaf respiration in the dark and its C isotopic composition (δ(13) CR ) contain information about internal metabolic processes and respiratory substrates. δ(13) CR is known to be less negative compared to potential respiratory substrates, in particular shortly after darkening during light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR). This phenomenon might be driven by respiration of accumulated (13) C-enriched organic acids, however, studies simultaneously measuring δ(13) CR during LEDR and potential respiratory substrates are rare. We determined δ(13) CR and respiration rates (R) during LEDR, as well as δ(13) C and concentrations of potential respiratory substrates using compound-specific isotope analyses. The measurements were conducted throughout the diel cycle in several plant species under different environmental conditions. δ(13) CR and R patterns during LEDR were strongly species-specific and showed an initial peak, which was followed by a progressive decrease in both values. The species-specific differences in δ(13) CR and R during LEDR may be partially explained by the isotopic composition of organic acids (e.g., oxalate, isocitrate, quinate, shikimate, malate), which were (13) C-enriched compared to other respiratory substrates (e.g., sugars and amino acids). However, the diel variations in both δ(13) C and concentrations of the organic acids were generally low. Thus, additional factors such as the heterogeneous isotope distribution in organic acids and the relative contribution of the organic acids to respiration are required to explain the strong (13) C enrichment in leaf dark-respired CO2 . PMID:27086877

  12. Calcium isotopic composition of mantle peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Kang, J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Ca isotopes are useful to decipher mantle evolution and the genetic relationship between the Earth and chondrites. It has been observed that Ca isotopes can be fractionated at high temperature [1-2]. However, Ca isotopic composition of the mantle peridotites and fractionation mechanism are still poorly constrained. Here, we report Ca isotope composition of 12 co-existing pyroxene pairs in 10 lherzolites, 1 harzburgite, and 1 wehrlite xenoliths collected from Hainan Island (South Eastern China). Ca isotope data were measured on a Triton-TIMS using the double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The long-term external error is 0.12‰ (2SD) based on repeated analyses of NIST SRM 915a and geostandards. δ44Ca of clinopyroxenes except that from the wehrlite ranges from 0.85‰ to 1.14‰, while opx yields a wide range from 0.98‰ up to 2.16‰. Co-existing pyroxene pairs show large ∆44Caopx-cpx (defined as δ44Caopx-δ44Cacpx) ranging from 0 to 1.23‰, reflecting equilibrium fractionation controlled by variable Ca contents in the opx. Notably, clinopyroxene of wehrlite shows extremely high δ44Ca (3.22‰). δ44Ca of the bulk lherzolites and harzburgites range from 0.86‰ to 1.14‰. This can be explained by extracting melts with slightly light Ca isotopic compositions. Finally, the high δ44Ca of the wehrlite (3.22‰) may reflect metasomatism by melt which has preferentially lost light Ca isotopes due to chemical diffusion during upwelling through the melt channel. [1] Amini et al (2009) GGR 33; [2] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292.

  13. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  14. Impact of flood events on lacustrine carbonate isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Lucas; Plessen, Birgit; Lauterbach, Stefan; Nantke, Carla; Meyer, Hanno; Chapligin, Bernhard; Höllerer, Hannes; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Stable oxygen (δ 18O) and carbon (δ 13C) isotope compositions of lacustrine carbonates are among the most frequently used proxies in palaeolimnological / -environmental studies. Stable isotope analyses are often carried out on bulk carbonate samples, which are prone to contamination with detrital carbonates, transported into the lake by runoff processes and carrying the isotopic signal of catchment rocks, thus hampering the interpretation of the data in terms of past climatic and/or environmental changes. Despite the awareness of a likely detrital bias, the degree of contamination in most cases remains unknown and discrete contaminated samples undetected due to a lack of methods to disentangle endogenic and detrital carbonates in sediment records. To address this issue and provide more comprehensive insights into effects of flood-related detrital input on the bulk carbonate isotopic composition, we conducted stable isotope measurements on sediments trapped on a 3-12 day basis over a three-year period (January 2011 to November 2013) at two locations in pre-Alpine Lake Mondsee, close to the inflow of the main tributary and in the deepest part of the lake basin. Lake Mondsee was chosen for the monitoring since the pelagic sediments are annually laminated consisting of couplets of light calcite layers and dark layers made up by a mixture of detrital clastic and organic matter. Maximum calcite flux rates >1.5 g m2 d-1 were trapped between May and September, indicating the seasonal endogenic precipitation of calcite crystals. The comparison of the δ 18O composition of trapped carbonates, rain and epilimnion lake water revealed equilibrium calcite precipitation, allowing us to infer purely endogenic δ 18O (-9 to -11.3‰ VPDB) and δ 13C values (-6 to -9‰ VPDB) throughout the summer season. The endogenic calcite precipitation was interrupted by 14 peaks in carbonate flux (4 to 175 g m2 d-1) triggered by runoff events of different magnitudes (10-110 m3 s-1 peak

  15. New Carbonate Standard Reference Materials for Boron Isotope Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Christopher, S. J.; Day, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of boron (δ11B) in marine carbonates is well established as a proxy for past ocean pH. Yet, before palaeoceanographic interpretation can be made, rigorous assessment of analytical uncertainty of δ11B data is required; particularly in light of recent interlaboratory comparison studies that reported significant measurement disagreement between laboratories [1]. Well characterised boron standard reference materials (SRMs) in a carbonate matrix are needed to assess the accuracy and precision of carbonate δ11B measurements throughout the entire procedural chemistry; from sample cleaning, to ionic separation of boron from the carbonate matrix, and final δ11B measurement by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To date only two carbonate reference materials exist that have been value-assigned by the boron isotope measurement community [2]; JCp-1 (porites coral) and JCt-1 (Giant Clam) [3]. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will supplement these existing standards with new solution based inorganic carbonate boron SRMs that replicate typical foraminiferal and coral B/Ca ratios and δ11B values. These new SRMs will not only ensure quality control of full procedural chemistry between laboratories, but have the added benefits of being both in abundant supply and free from any restrictions associated with shipment of biogenic samples derived from protected species. Here we present in-house δ11B measurements of these new boron carbonate SRM solutions. These preliminary data will feed into an interlaboratory comparison study to establish certified values for these new NIST SRMs. 1. Foster, G.L., et al., Chemical Geology, 2013. 358(0): p. 1-14. 2. Gutjahr, M., et al., Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses. Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU General Assembly 2014, 2014. 16(EGU2014-5028-1). 3. Inoue, M., et al., Geostandards and

  16. Simultaneous analysis of abundance and isotopic composition of nitrogen, carbon, and noble gases in lunar basalts: Insights into interior and surface processes on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, J.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Anand, M.; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.

    2015-07-01

    Simultaneous static-mode mass spectrometric measurements of nitrogen, carbon, helium, neon, and argon extracted from the same aliquot of sample by high-resolution stepped combustion have been made for a suite of six lunar basalts. Collecting abundance and isotopic data for several elements simultaneously from the same sample aliquot enables more detailed identification of different volatile components present in the basalts by comparing release patterns for volatiles across a range of temperature steps. This approach has yielded new data, from which new insights can be gained regarding the indigenous volatile inventory of the Moon. By taking into account N and C data for mid-temperature steps, unaffected by terrestrial contamination or cosmogenic additions, it is possible to determine the indigenous N and C signatures of the lunar basalts. With an average δ15N value of around +0.35‰, the indigenous N component seen in these samples is similar within error to other (albeit limited in number) isotopic measurements of indigenous lunar N. Average C/N ratios for indigenous volatiles in these six basalt samples are much lower than those of the terrestrial depleted mantle, or bulk silicate Earth, possibly suggesting much less C in the lunar interior, relative to N, than on Earth. Cosmogenic isotopes in these samples are well-correlated with published sample exposure ages, and record the rate of in situ production of spallogenic volatiles within material on the lunar surface.

  17. Coprecipitation and isotopic fractionation of boron in modern biogenic carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A. Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem ); Chivas, A.R.; McCulloch, M.T. ); Kolodny, Y.; Starinsky, A. )

    1991-10-01

    The abundances and isotopic composition of boron in modern, biogenic calcareous skeletons from the Gulf of Elat, Israel, the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and in deep-sea sediments have been examined by negative thermal-ionization mass spectrometry. The selected species (Foraminifera, Pteropoda, corals, Gastropoda, and Pelecypoda) yield large variations in boron concentration that range from 1 ppm in gastropod shells to 80 ppm in corals. The variations of {delta}{sup 11}B may be controlled by isotopic exchange of boron species in which {sup 10}B is preferentially partitioned into the tetrahedral species, and coprecipitation of different proportions of trigonal and tetrahedral species in the calcium carbonates. The B content and {delta}{sup 11}B values of deep-sea sediments, Foraminifera tests, and corals are used to estimate the global oceanic sink of elemental boron by calcium carbonate deposition. As a result of enrichment of B in corals, a substantially higher biogenic sink of 6.4 {plus minus} 0.9 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr is calculated for carbonates. This is only slightly lower than the sink for desorbable B in marine sediments (10 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr) and approximately half that of altered oceanic crust (14 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr). Thus, carbonates are an important sink for B in the oceans being {approximately}2