Science.gov

Sample records for carbon nanotube coated

  1. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  2. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian [Newton, MA; Chen, Jinghua [Chestnut Hill, MA; Huang, Zhongping [Belmont, MA; Wang, Dezhi [Wellesley, MA

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  3. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  4. Superhydrophobic conductive carbon nanotube coatings for steel.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sunny; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2009-04-21

    We report the synthesis of superhydrophobic coatings for steel using carbon nanotube (CNT)-mesh structures. The CNT coating maintains its structural integrity and superhydrophobicity even after exposure to extreme thermal stresses and has excellent thermal and electrical properties. The coating can also be reinforced by optimally impregnating the CNT-mesh structure with cross-linked polymers without significantly compromising on superhydrophobicity and electrical conductivity. These superhydrophobic conductive coatings on steel, which is an important structural material, open up possibilities for many new applications in the areas of heat transfer, solar panels, transport of fluids, nonwetting and nonfouling surfaces, temperature resilient coatings, composites, water-walking robots, and naval applications.

  5. Superconductive niobium films coating carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Cirillo, M.; Behabtu, N.; Young, C. C.; Pasquali, M.; Vecchione, A.; Fittipaldi, R.; Corato, V.

    2014-11-01

    Superconducting niobium (Nb) has been successfully obtained by sputter deposition on carbon nanotube fibers. The transport properties of the niobium coating the fibers are compared to those of niobium thin films deposited on oxidized Si substrates during the same deposition run. For niobium films with thicknesses above 300 nm, the niobium coating the fibers and the thin films show similar normal state and superconducting properties with critical current density, measured at T = 4.2 K, of the order of 105 A cm-2. Thinner niobium layers coating the fibers also show the onset of the superconducting transition in the resistivity versus temperature dependence, but zero resistance is not observed down to T = 1 K. We evidence by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and current-voltage measurements that the granular structure of the samples is the main reason for the lack of true global superconductivity for thicknesses below 300 nm.

  6. Thin Coatings of Polymeric Carbon and Carbon Nanotubes for Corrosion Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Carbon Nanotube Functionalization /Doping Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) A) p-Doping C) Polymer Wrapping Model B) n-Doping Polyethyleneimine ( PEI ) SWCNT Paint...fluorine-containing) groups functions as the barrier layer Multilayer Smart Carbon Nanotube Coating Insoluble polymer layer top coating -PMMA Substrate...Thin Coatings of Polymeric Carbon and Carbon Nanotubes for Corrosion Protection Zafar Iqbal Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science New

  7. Field emission properties of carbon nanotubes coated with boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Park, Noejung; Han, Seungwu; Ihm, Jisoon

    2003-01-01

    Field emission properties of carbon nanotubes coated with a single layer of boron nitride are calculated using the first-principles pseudopotential method. At lower bias voltage, the emission current of the coated nanotube is comparable to that of the bare carbon nanotube and is dominated by the contribution from localized states at the tip of the tube. At higher voltage, newly generated hybridized states between the carbon nanotube tip and the even-membered boron nitride rings contribute significantly to the emission current because they experience a low tunneling barrier compared with the bare carbon nanotube case. Our results suggest that the insulator coating can, besides protecting the nanotube tip from the attack of gas molecules, substantially enhance the field emission current.

  8. Polymer coatings to functionalize carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Rich, S.; Yedji, M.; Amadou, J.; Terwagne, G.; Felten, A.; Avril, L.; Pireaux, J.-J.

    2012-03-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified by plasma polymerization with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and allylamine (AA) as monomers. Conditions of the MMA and AA plasma polymerization processes in a specially designed reactor and the plasma-polymerized MMA and AA coatings were studied. The chemical composition of the surface was analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS); the polymer deposited on the CNTs surface was visualized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), while Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) allowed checking for the chemical structure of deposited plasma polymers (PP). In this work, we show that plasma functionalization creates C=O and C-O-C functional groups, or C-NH2 at the MWCNT surface, as a result of polymer deposited during the MMA or AA plasma treatments, respectively.

  9. Diamond-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Field Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Stevan; Withers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Field-emission cathodes containing arrays of carbon nanotubes coated with diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) are undergoing development. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been shown to perform well as electron field emitters. The idea underlying the present development is that by coating carbon nanotubes with wideband- gap materials like diamond or DLC, one could reduce effective work functions, thereby reducing threshold electric-field levels for field emission of electrons and, hence, improving cathode performance. To demonstrate feasibility, experimental cathodes were fabricated by (1) covering metal bases with carbon nanotubes bound to the bases by an electrically conductive binder and (2) coating the nanotubes, variously, with diamond or DLC by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In tests, the threshold electric-field levels for emission of electrons were reduced by as much as 40 percent, relative to those of uncoated- nanotube cathodes. Coating with diamond or DLC could also make field emission-cathodes operate more stably by helping to prevent evaporation of carbon from nanotubes in the event of overheating of the cathodes. Cathodes of this type are expected to be useful principally as electron sources for cathode-ray tubes and flat-panel displays.

  10. Tungsten disulphide coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    2002-06-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNs), coated with ordered WS 2 mono- or multi-layers, are generated by pyrolysing H 2S/N 2 over MWCNs thinly coated with WO 3. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals the presence of hexagonal WS 2 arrays in the tube surface, consistent with the WS 2 simulated structure.

  11. Carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon-coated conductive Kevlar fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Changsheng; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Yu; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Hwang, Chi-Chau; Tour, James M

    2012-01-01

    Conductive carbon material-coated Kevlar fibers were fabricated through layer-by-layer spray coating. Polyurethane was used as the interlayer between the Kevlar fiber and carbon materials to bind the carbon materials to the Kevlar fiber. Strongly adhering single-walled carbon nanotube coatings yielded a durable conductivity of 65 S/cm without significant mechanical degradation. In addition, the properties remained stable after bending or water washing cycles. The coated fibers were analyzed using scanning electron microcopy and a knot test. The as-produced fiber had a knot efficiency of 23%, which is more than four times higher than that of carbon fibers. The spray-coating of graphene nanoribbons onto Kevlar fibers was also investigated. These flexible coated-Kevlar fibers have the potential to be used for conductive wires in wearable electronics and battery-heated armors.

  12. Pyrolytic Carbon Coatings on Aligned Carbon Nanotube Assemblies and Fabrication of Advanced Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Shaghayegh

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a technique used to create a pyrolytic carbon (PyC) matrix around fibrous preforms in carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. Due to difficulties in producing three-dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT) assemblies, use of nanotubes in CVD fabricated CNT/C composites is limited. This dissertation describes efforts to: 1) Study the microstructure of PyC deposited on CNTs in order to understand the effect of microstructure and morphology of carbon coatings on graphitization behavior of CNT/PyC composites. This understanding helped to suggest a new approach for controlled radial growth of CNTs. 2) Evaluate the properties of CNT/PyC structures as a novel form of CNT assemblies with resilient, anisotropic and tunable properties. PyC was deposited on aligned sheets of nanotubes, drawn from spinnable CNT arras, using CVD of acetylene gas. At longer deposition times, the microstructure of PyC changed from laminar turbostratic carbon to a disordered carbon. For samples with short PyC deposition times (up to 30 minutes), deposited carbon layer rearranged during graphitization treatment and resulted in a crystalline structure where the coating and original tube walls could not be easily differentiated. In contrast, in samples with longer carbon deposition durations, carbon layers close to the surface of the coating remained disordered even after graphitization thermal treatment. Understanding the effect of PyC microstructure transition on graphitization behavior of CNT/PyC composites was used to develop a new method for controlled radial growth of CNTs. Carbon coated aligned CNT sheets were graphitized after each short (20 minutes) carbon deposition cycle. This prevented development of disorder carbon during subsequent PyC deposition cycles. Using cyclic-graphitization method, thick PyC coating layers were successfully graphitized into a crystalline structure that could not be differentiated from the original nanotube walls. This resulted into radial

  13. New solar selective coating based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Thomas; Leupolt, Beate; Mäder, Gerrit; Härtel, Paul; Grählert, Wulf; Althues, Holger; Kaskel, Stefan; Beyer, Eckhard

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be applied to assemble a new type of solar selective coating system for solar thermal applications. In this work the predominant absorption processes occurring by interaction with π-plasmon and Van Hove singularities (VHS) were investigated by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and ellipsometry. Not only optical properties for as deposited SWCNT thin films itself, but also the potential for systematic tailoring will be presented. Besides low cost technologies required, the adjustability of optical properties, as well as their thermal stability render CNT based solar selective coatings as promising alternative to commercially available coating systems.

  14. Laser-surface-alloyed carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yao; Gan Cuihua; Zhang Tainua; Yu Gang; Bai Pucun; Kaplan, Alexander

    2005-06-20

    Carbon-nanotube (CNT)-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings have been fabricated by laser surface alloying. Microstructural observation using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that a large amount of CNTs remained with their original tubular morphology, even though some CNTs reacted with titanium element in the substrate during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the elastic modulus and hardness of the composite coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of CNTs in the starting precursor materials. Therefore, CNT-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite is a promising coating material for high-load-bearing metal implants.

  15. Laser-surface-alloyed carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Gan, Cuihua; Zhang, Tainua; Yu, Gang; Bai, Pucun; Kaplan, Alexander

    2005-06-01

    Carbon-nanotube (CNT)-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings have been fabricated by laser surface alloying. Microstructural observation using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that a large amount of CNTs remained with their original tubular morphology, even though some CNTs reacted with titanium element in the substrate during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the elastic modulus and hardness of the composite coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of CNTs in the starting precursor materials. Therefore, CNT-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite is a promising coating material for high-load-bearing metal implants.

  16. Multilayered Polymer Coated Carbon Nanotubes to Deliver Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Thomas L.; Grimes, Stuart W.; Lewis, Robert L.; Alexis, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Multilayered, multifunctional polymer coatings were grafted onto carbon nanotubes (CNT) using a one-pot, ring-opening polymerization in order to control the release kinetic and therapeutic efficacy of dasatinib. Biocompatible, biodegradable multilayered coatings composed of poly(glycolide) (PGA), and poly(lactide) (PLA) were polymerized directly onto hydroxyl-functionalized CNT surfaces. Sequential addition of monomers into the reaction vessel enabled multilayered coatings of PLA-PGA, or PGA-PLA. Poly(ethylene glycol) capped the polymer chain ends, resulting in a multifunctional amphiphilic coating. Multilayer polymer coatings on CNTs enabled control of anticancer dasatinib’s release kinetics and enhanced the in vitro therapeutic efficacy against U-87 glioblastoma compared to monolayer polymer coatings. PMID:24294824

  17. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  18. Deformation response of conformally coated carbon nanotube forest.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Parisa Pour Shahid Saeed; Maschmann, Matthew R; Baur, Jeffery W; Graham, Samuel; Cola, Baratunde A

    2013-11-29

    The deformation mechanism and mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests conformally coated with alumina using atomic layer deposition (ALD) are investigated using in situ and ex situ micro-indentation. While micro-indentation of a CNT forest coated with a thin discontinuous layer using 20 ALD cycles results in a deformation response similar to the response of uncoated CNT forests, a similar test on a CNT forest coated with a sufficiently thick and continuous layer using 100 ALD cycles causes fracture of both the alumina coatings and the core CNTs. With a 10 nm coating, 4-fold and 14-fold stiffness increases are measured using a flat punch and a Berkovich tip, respectively. Indentation testing with the Berkovich tip also reveals increased recoverability at relatively low strains. The results show that ALD coated CNT forests could be useful for applications that require higher stiffness or recoverability. Also, fracturing of the nanotubes shows that upper limits exist in the loading of conformally coated CNT forests.

  19. Gas Sensors Based on Coated and Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2008-01-01

    Efforts are underway to develop inexpensive, low-power electronic sensors, based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), for measuring part-per-million and part-per-billion of selected gases (small molecules) at room temperature. Chemically unmodified SWCNTs are mostly unresponsive to typical gases that one might wish to detect. However, the electrical resistances of SWCNTs can be made to vary with concentrations of gases of interest by coating or doping the SWCNTs with suitable materials. Accordingly, the basic idea of the present development efforts is to incorporate thus-treated SWCNTs into electronic devices that measure their electrical resistances.

  20. On the nature of interface of carbon nanotube coated carbon fibers with different polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Bedi, Harpreet; Padhee, Srikant S.; Agnihotri, Prabhat K.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigations are carried out to analyse the wetting behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) coated carbon fiber to determine their suitability to process carbon nanotube coated carbon fiber/polymer multiscale composites for structural applications. To overcome the problem of agglomeration, CNTs are grown directly on the surface of carbon fibers as well as fabric using thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique. The term multiscale is used because different reinforcement mechanisms operate at the scale of long fibers and CNTs which are of few micrometers in length. The load carrying capacity of these multiscale composites critically depends on the efficiency and extent of load transfer from low strength matrix to high strength fiber which in turn depends on the interfacial strength between CNT coated carbon fiber and polymer matrix. A systematic analysis of wetting behaviour of CNT coated carbon fiber with epoxy and polyester matrix is carried out in this study. It is shown that CNT coated carbon fibers as well as fabric show better wettability with epoxy matrix as compared to polyester matrix. This results in stronger interface of CNT coated carbon fiber with epoxy as compared to polyester in multiscale composite system. A similar observation is made in nanoindentation testing of single fiber multiscale composites processed with epoxy and polyester matrix. In addition, it is observed that wettability, interfacial strength and average properties of CNT coated carbon fiber/polymer composites are a function of CNT density on the surface of carbon fibers.

  1. Targeting breast cancer with sugar-coated carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenholtz, Cale D; Hadimani, Mallinath; King, S Bruce; Torti, Suzy V; Singh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the use of glucosamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (glyco-MWCNTs) for breast cancer targeting. Materials & methods Two types of glucosamine functionalized MWCNTs were developed (covalently linked glucosamine and non-covalently phospholipid-glucosamine coated) and evaluated for their potential to bind and target breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Results & conclusion Binding of glyco-MWCNTs in breast cancer cells is mediated by specific interaction with glucose transporters. Glyco-MWCNTs prepared by non-covalent coating with phospholipid-glucosamine displayed an extended blood circulation time, delayed urinary clearance, low tissue retention and increased breast cancer tumor accumulation in vivo. These studies lay the foundation for development of a cancer diagnostic agent based upon glyco-MWCNTs with the potential for superior accuracy over current radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26296098

  2. Targeting breast cancer with sugar-coated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fahrenholtz, Cale D; Hadimani, Mallinath; King, S Bruce; Torti, Suzy V; Singh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the use of glucosamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (glyco-MWCNTs) for breast cancer targeting. Two types of glucosamine functionalized MWCNTs were developed (covalently linked glucosamine and non-covalently phospholipid-glucosamine coated) and evaluated for their potential to bind and target breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Binding of glyco-MWCNTs in breast cancer cells is mediated by specific interaction with glucose transporters. Glyco-MWCNTs prepared by non-covalent coating with phospholipid-glucosamine displayed an extended blood circulation time, delayed urinary clearance, low tissue retention and increased breast cancer tumor accumulation in vivo. These studies lay the foundation for development of a cancer diagnostic agent based upon glyco-MWCNTs with the potential for superior accuracy over current radiopharmaceuticals.

  3. TiO2-coated carbon nanotubes: A redshift enhanced photocatalysis at visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Sheng-Yi; Tang, Chiung-Wen; Lin, Yu-Hsien; Kuo, Hsin-Fu; Lai, Yao-Cheng; Tsai, Meng-Yen; Ouyang, Hao; Hsu, Wen-Kuang

    2010-06-01

    Annealing of carbon nanotubes coated with thin and uniform TiO2 results in carbon diffusion into oxygen lattices and doping induced redshift is evident by an efficient photocatalysis at visible light. The underlying mechanism is discussed.

  4. Optically and biologically active mussel protein-coated double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong Chae; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2011-12-02

    A method of dispersing strongly bundled double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) via a homogeneous coating of mussel protein in an aqueous solution is presented. Optical activity, mechanical strength, as well as electrical conductivity coming from the nanotubes and the versatile biological activity from the mussel protein make mussel-coated DWNTs promising as a multifunctional scaffold and for anti-fouling materials.

  5. Polymer Coating of Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Electric Microcables

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Noe T.; Ochmann, Timothy; Kienzle, Nicholas; Ruff, Brad; Haase, Mark R.; Hopkins, Tracy; Pixley, Sarah; Mast, David; Schulz, Mark J.; Shanov, Vesselin

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered the most promising candidates to replace Cu and Al in a large number of electrical, mechanical and thermal applications. Although most CNT industrial applications require macro and micro size CNT fiber assemblies, several techniques to make conducting CNT fibers, threads, yarns and ropes have been reported to this day, and improvement of their electrical and mechanical conductivity continues. Some electrical applications of these CNT conducting fibers require an insulating layer for electrical insulation and protection against mechanical tearing. Ideally, a flexible insulator such as hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) on the CNT fiber can allow fabrication of CNT coils that can be assembled into lightweight, corrosion resistant electrical motors and transformers. HNBR is a largely used commercial polymer that unlike other cable-coating polymers such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), it provides unique continuous and uniform coating on the CNT fibers. The polymer coated/insulated CNT fibers have a 26.54 μm average diameter—which is approximately four times the diameter of a red blood cell—is produced by a simple dip-coating process. Our results confirm that HNBR in solution creates a few microns uniform insulation and mechanical protection over a CNT fiber that is used as the electrically conducting core. PMID:28344254

  6. Liquid Imbibition in Ceramic-Coated Carbon Nanotube Films.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hangbo; Jacob, Christine; Stone, Howard A; Hart, A John

    2016-12-06

    Understanding of the liquid imbibition dynamics in nanoporous materials is important to advances in chemical separations, phase change heat transfer, electrochemical energy storage, and diagnostic assays. We study the liquid imbibition behavior in films of ceramic-coated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The nanoscale porosity of the films is tuned by conformal ceramic coating via atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling stable liquid imbibition and precise measurement of the imbibition dynamics without capillary densification of the CNTs. We show that the imbibition rate decreases as the ceramic coating thickness increases, which effectively changes the CNT-CNT spacing and therefore decreases the permeability. We derive a model, based on Darcy's law, that incorporates an expression for the permeability of nanoscale post arrays, and we show that the model fits the experimental results with high accuracy. The tailorable porosity, along with controllable surface wettability and mechanical stability of coated CNTs, suggest their suitability for application-guided engineering, and for further investigation of imbibition behavior at finer length scales.

  7. Polymer Coating of Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Electric Microcables.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Noe T; Ochmann, Timothy; Kienzle, Nicholas; Ruff, Brad; Haase, Mark R; Hopkins, Tracy; Pixley, Sarah; Mast, David; Schulz, Mark J; Shanov, Vesselin

    2014-11-04

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered the most promising candidates to replace Cu and Al in a large number of electrical, mechanical and thermal applications. Although most CNT industrial applications require macro and micro size CNT fiber assemblies, several techniques to make conducting CNT fibers, threads, yarns and ropes have been reported to this day, and improvement of their electrical and mechanical conductivity continues. Some electrical applications of these CNT conducting fibers require an insulating layer for electrical insulation and protection against mechanical tearing. Ideally, a flexible insulator such as hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) on the CNT fiber can allow fabrication of CNT coils that can be assembled into lightweight, corrosion resistant electrical motors and transformers. HNBR is a largely used commercial polymer that unlike other cable-coating polymers such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), it provides unique continuous and uniform coating on the CNT fibers. The polymer coated/insulated CNT fibers have a 26.54 μm average diameter-which is approximately four times the diameter of a red blood cell-is produced by a simple dip-coating process. Our results confirm that HNBR in solution creates a few microns uniform insulation and mechanical protection over a CNT fiber that is used as the electrically conducting core.

  8. Parametrically Optimized Carbon Nanotube-Coated Cold Cathode Spindt Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xuesong; Cole, Matthew T.; Zhang, Yu; Wu, Jianqiang; Milne, William I.; Yan, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Here, we investigate, through parametrically optimized macroscale simulations, the field electron emission from arrays of carbon nanotube (CNT)-coated Spindts towards the development of an emerging class of novel vacuum electron devices. The present study builds on empirical data gleaned from our recent experimental findings on the room temperature electron emission from large area CNT electron sources. We determine the field emission current of the present microstructures directly using particle in cell (PIC) software and present a new CNT cold cathode array variant which has been geometrically optimized to provide maximal emission current density, with current densities of up to 11.5 A/cm2 at low operational electric fields of 5.0 V/μm. PMID:28336845

  9. Interaction of carbon nanotubes coatings with titanium substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraczek-Szczypta, Aneta; Wedel-Grzenda, Alicja; Benko, Aleksandra; Grzonka, Justyna; Mizera, Jaroslaw

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) after chemical surface functionalization on the interaction with a titanium surface. Two kinds of MWCNTs differing in terms of concentration of functional groups were deposited on the Ti surface using the electrophoretic deposition method (EPD). The study has shown the detailed analysis of the physicochemical properties of this form of carbon nanomaterial and received on their base coatings using various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The adhesion of the MWCNTs coatings to the Ti surface was determined using the shear test method, according to standard ASTM F-1044-05. These results indicated that one type of MWCNTs characterized by a higher concentration of functional groups has better adhesion to the metal surface than the second type. Analysis of the MWCNT-metal interface using Raman spectroscopy and SEM and STEM indicates the presence of phase built of MWCNT and TiO2. This phase could be a type of nanocomposite that affects the improvement of the adhesion of MWCNT to the Ti surface.

  10. The fabrication of carbon-nanotube-coated electrodes and a field-emission-based luminescent device.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sanjay; Yamini Sarada, B; Kar, Kamal K

    2010-02-10

    Tungsten substrates were coated with an Ni or Ni-Co catalyst by the electroless dip coating technique. Various carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method under different growth conditions. It was observed that Ni-and Ni-Co-coated tungsten substrates give very good growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in terms of yield, uniformity and alignment at a growth temperature of 600 degrees C. We fabricated a field-emission-based luminescent light bulb where a tungsten wire coated with carbon nanotubes served as a cathode. Results show lower threshold voltage, better emission stability and higher luminescence for CNT cathodes in comparison with uncoated tungsten cathodes. We found that aligned-coiled carbon nanotubes are superior to straight CNTs in terms of field emission characteristics and luminescence properties.

  11. Parylene coated carbon nanotube actuators for tactile stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubak, Grzegorz; Ansaldo, Alberto; Gendron, David; Brayda, Luca; Ceseracciu, Luca; Ricci, Davide

    2015-04-01

    Ionic liquid/carbon nanotube based actuators have been constantly improved in recent years owing to their suitability for applications related to human-machine interaction and robotics thanks to their light-weight and low voltage operation. However, while great attention has been paid to the development of better electrodes and electrolytes, no adequate efforts were made to develop actuators to be used in direct contact with the human skin. Herein, we present our approach, based on the use of parylene-C coating. Indeed, owning to its physicochemical properties such as high dielectric strength, resistance to solvents, biological and chemical inactivity/inertness, parylene fulfils the requirements for use in biocompatible actuator fabrication. In this paper, we study the influence of the parylene coating on the actuator performance. To do so, we analyzed its mechanical and electrochemical properties. We looked into the role of parylene as a protection layer that can prevent alteration of the actuator performance likely caused by external conditions. In order to complete our study, we designed a haptic device and investigated the generated force, displacement and energy usage.

  12. Zinc Oxide Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Energy Harvesting Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohney, Austin; Stollberg, David

    2012-02-01

    Small scale electrical devices depend on bulky batteries that require recharging or replacement. In biomedical monitoring, where sensors could be implanted inside the body, maintenance of batteries presents a problem. It would be beneficial if small scale devices could generate their own power and alleviate their dependence on batteries. Piezoelectric nanogenerators have proven themselves as a viable means for ambient energy harvesting. Piezoelectric materials, such as zinc oxide (ZnO), produce a voltage difference when subjected to mechanical strain. Manipulation of this voltage can allow for the storage of energy to power small scale devices. The objective of this research is to manufacture a piezo-generator that can transduce mechanical vibrations into electrical energy. Carbon nanotubes, selected for their strong, flexible, and conductive properties, are used as a structural backbone for a ZnO piezoelectric coating and a Ag electrode coating. A Schottky diode interface is used to rectify the current output of the device. The devices yielded an average current output of .79 microAmps. SEM imagining was used to characterize the fabrication process. A Keithley 2700 digital multimeter was used to characterize the current output of the devices.

  13. Chemical sensors using coated or doped carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods for using modified single wall carbon nanotubes ("SWCNTs") to detect presence and/or concentration of a gas component, such as a halogen (e.g., Cl.sub.2), hydrogen halides (e.g., HCl), a hydrocarbon (e.g., C.sub.nH.sub.2n+2), an alcohol, an aldehyde or a ketone, to which an unmodified SWCNT is substantially non-reactive. In a first embodiment, a connected network of SWCNTs is coated with a selected polymer, such as chlorosulfonated polyethylene, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polystyrene and/or polyvinylalcohol, and change in an electrical parameter or response value (e.g., conductance, current, voltage difference or resistance) of the coated versus uncoated SWCNT networks is analyzed. In a second embodiment, the network is doped with a transition element, such as Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os and/or Au, and change in an electrical parameter value is again analyzed. The parameter change value depends monotonically, not necessarily linearly, upon concentration of the gas component. Two general algorithms are presented for estimating concentration value(s), or upper or lower concentration bounds on such values, from measured differences of response values.

  14. Tensile Properties of Polyimide Composites Incorporating Carbon Nanotubes-Grafted and Polyimide-Coated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of polyimide composite bundles incorporating carbon nanotubes-grafted (CNT-grafted) and polyimide-coated (PI-coated) high-tensile-strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB), and high-modulus pitch-based (K13D) carbon fibers were investigated. The CNT were grown on the surface of the carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition. The pyromellitic dianhydride/4,4'-oxydianiline PI nanolayer coating was deposited on the surface of the carbon fiber by high-temperature vapor deposition polymerization. The results clearly demonstrate that CNT grafting and PI coating were effective for improving the Weibull modulus of T1000GB PAN-based and K13D pitch-based carbon fiber bundle composites. In addition, the average tensile strength of the PI-coated T1000GB carbon fiber bundle composites was also higher than that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites, while the average tensile strength of the CNT-grafted T1000GB, K13D, and the PI-coated K13D carbon fiber bundle composites was similar to that of the as-received carbon fiber bundle composites.

  15. Dielectric properties of WS2-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes studied by energy-loss spectroscopic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolojan, Vlad; Silva, S. R. P.; Goringe, Michael J.; Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, Wang K.; Walton, D. R. M.; Kroto, Harold W.

    2005-02-01

    We investigate experimentally the electronic properties of the coating for multiwalled carbon nanotubes covered in tungsten disulfide (WS2) of various thicknesses. Coatings of thicknesses between 2 and 8 monolayers (ML) are analyzed using energy-loss spectroscopic profiling (ELSP), by studying the variations in the plasmon excitations across the coated nanotube, as a function of the coating thickness. We find a change in the ELSP for coatings above 5 ML thickness, which we interpret in terms of a change in its dielectric properties.

  16. Magnetic alignment of Ni-coated single wall carbon nanotubes in heat transfer nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Mark; Hong, Haiping; Li, Chen; Shi, Bo; Peterson, G. P.; Jin, Sungho

    2010-05-01

    Thermal conductivity (TC) of heat transfer nanofluids containing magnetic-metal-coated carbon nanotubes can be significantly enhanced (>60%) by applied magnetic field. In this paper, we report the observed real images of Ni-coated single wall carbon nanotubes in water and oils (polyalphaolefin, polyol ester) under magnetic field by high speed microscopy, and correlate them with TC measurements. Initially, the nanotubes are randomly dispersed in the fluid, however, on longer holding in magnetic field the nanotubes gradually stretch and are finally aligned. The chain length in the images is found to be around 30˜150 μm, which is much longer than the real length of individual nanotubes (5˜40 μm), indicating that nanotubes are aligned and form some chains and clusters. Because of the semicontinuous nature of Ni magnetic nanoparticles, as well as the viscosity resistance of the fluid itself, it takes some time for the Ni-coated nanotubes to respond to the applied magnetic field and align. Time dependent TC experiments indicate that alignment process dominates the TC enhancement rather than microconvection. Finally, scanning electron microscopy images also show that the Ni coated nanotubes are aligned well under the influence of a magnetic field. Transmission electron microscopy images indicate that nickel remains stable and attached onto the nanotubes after the magnetic field exposure and movements.

  17. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of carbon nanotube-coated single-mode optical fiber gratings.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Guillermo E; Jakubinek, Michael B; Simard, Benoit; Oton, Claudio J; Matres, Joaquín; Shao, Li-Yang; Pérez-Millán, Pere; Albert, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube deposition on the cladding of optical fibers has been carried out to fabricate an all-fiber nonlinear device. Two different nanotube deposition techniques were studied. The first consisted of repeatedly immersing the optical fiber into a nanotube supension, increasing the thickness of the coating in each step. The second deposition involved wrapping a thin film of nanotubes around the optical fiber. For both cases, interaction of transmitted light through the fiber core with the external coating was assisted by the cladding mode resonances of a tilted fiber Bragg grating. Ultrafast nonlinear effects of the nanotube-coated fiber were measured by means of a pump-probe pulses experiment. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Chemical Sensing with Polyaniline Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Mengning; Tang, Yifan; Gou, Pingping; Reber, Michael J; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-25

    Single-walled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (SWNT/PAni) nanocomposite with controlled core/shell morphology was synthesized by a noncovalent functionalization approach. Unique electron interactions between the SWNT core and the PAni shell were studied electrochemically and spectroscopically, and superior sensor performance to chemical gases and vapors was demonstrated.

  19. The fabrication of carbon nanotubes reinforced copper coating by a kinetic spray process.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yuming; Kang, Kicheol; Yoon, Sanghoon; Lee, Changhee

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced copper coating was deposited on copper sheet through kinetic spraying process. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure, conductivity, and hardness of the coating was investigated. The incompact MWCNTs reinforced copper coating exhibits a comparable hardness, but higher electrical resistivity than pure copper coating. After heat treatment at 600 degrees C for 2 h, the hardness of copper coatings significantly decreased due to the substantial grain growth. MWCNTs reinforced copper coating showed stable hardness and electrical conductivity against heat treatment owing to the inhibition of CNTs to grain growth and the intimate contact between CNTs and copper matrix.

  20. Coating carbon nanotubes with polymer in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiawei; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Wang, Wenxin; Howdle, Steven M; Poliakoff, Martyn

    2006-04-21

    A facile and efficient method has been developed for coating MWNTs with solvent resistant polymer in scCO2, which permits the selective deposition of high molecular weight fluorinated graft poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride) polymer onto MWNTs in scCO2 under 100-170 bar at 40 degrees C and forms quasi one-dimensional nanostructures with conducting cores and insulating surfaces.

  1. Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu Hun; Oh, Youngseok; Islam, M. F.

    2012-09-01

    Lightweight materials that are both highly compressible and resilient under large cyclic strains can be used in a variety of applications. Carbon nanotubes offer a combination of elasticity, mechanical resilience and low density, and these properties have been exploited in nanotube-based foams and aerogels. However, all nanotube-based foams and aerogels developed so far undergo structural collapse or significant plastic deformation with a reduction in compressive strength when they are subjected to cyclic strain. Here, we show that an inelastic aerogel made of single-walled carbon nanotubes can be transformed into a superelastic material by coating it with between one and five layers of graphene nanoplates. The graphene-coated aerogel exhibits no change in mechanical properties after more than 1 × 106 compressive cycles, and its original shape can be recovered quickly after compression release. Moreover, the coating does not affect the structural integrity of the nanotubes or the compressibility and porosity of the nanotube network. The coating also increases Young's modulus and energy storage modulus by a factor of ~6, and the loss modulus by a factor of ~3. We attribute the superelasticity and complete fatigue resistance to the graphene coating strengthening the existing crosslinking points or `nodes' in the aerogel.

  2. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Coated Carbon Nanotubes: Interlayer Polarization Improved Field Emission.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han-Chen; Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Lin, Wen-Yi; Chu, Yung-Chi; Hsu, Wen-Kuang

    2015-07-08

    Coating of h-BN onto carbon nanotubes induces polarization at interfaces, and charges become localized at N and C atoms. Field emission of coated tubes is found to be highly stable, and current density fluctuates within 4%. Study further reveals that the electric field established between coatings and tubes facilitates charge transfer across interfaces and electrons are emitted through occupied and unoccupied bands of N and B atoms.

  3. Evaluation of a pyroelectric detector with a carbon multiwalled nanotube black coating in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Theocharous, E; Deshpande, R; Dillon, A C; Lehman, J

    2006-02-20

    The performance of a pyroelectric detector with a carbon multiwalled nanotube coating was evaluated in the 0.9-14 microm wavelength range. The relative spectral responsivity of this detector was shown to be flat over most of the wavelength range examined, and the spectral flatness was shown to be comparable to the best infrared black coatings currently available. This finding is promising because black coatings with spectrally flat absorbance profiles are usually associated with the highest absorbance values. The performance of the detector (in terms of noise equivalent power and specific detectivity) was limited by the very thick (250 microm thick) LiNbO3 pyroelectric crystal onto which the coating was deposited. The responsivity of this detector was shown to be linear in the 0.06-2.8 mW radiant power range, and its spatial uniformity was comparable to that of other pyroelectric detectors that use different types of black coating. The carbon nanotube coatings were reported to be much more durable than other infrared black coatings, such as metal blacks, that are commonly used to coat thermal detectors in the infrared. This, in combination with their excellent spectral flatness, suggests that carbon nanotube coatings appear extremely promising for thermal detection applications in the infrared.

  4. Local growth of vertical aligned carbon nanotubes by laserinduced surface modification of coated silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, K.; Böhme, R.; Ruthe, D.; Rudolph, Th; Rauschenbach, B.

    2007-04-01

    The stimulation of carbon nanotubes (CNT) growth in a thermal CVD process using an acetylene/nitrogen gas mixture by KrF-excimer laser exposure of iron nitrate coated silicon is described. At moderate laser fluences of ~1 J/cm2 the growth of nanotube bundles up to 100 μm consisting of vertical aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNT) is observed. AFM measurements show the formation of nanoparticles in the laser-exposed areas. At this catalytic sites the nanotubes grow and sustain one another and forming the well-defined bundles. Via the laser exposure the control of the catalytic sites formation and consequently the nanotube growth and properties can be achieved.

  5. Preparation and properties of in-situ growth of carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shoujie; Li, Hejun; Su, Yangyang; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Leilei

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess excellent mechanical properties for their role playing in reinforcement as imparting strength to brittle hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic coating. However, there are few reports relating to the in-situ grown carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite (CNTs-HA) coating. Here we demonstrate the potential application in reinforcing biomaterials by an attempt to use in-situ grown of CNTs strengthen HA coating, using a combined method composited of injection chemical vapor deposition (ICVD) and pulsed electrodeposition. The microstructure, phases and chemical compositions of CNTs-HA coatings were characterized by various advanced methods. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that CNTs-HA coatings avoided the inhomogeneous dispersion of CNTs inside HA coating. The result show that the interfacial shear strength between CNTs-HA coating and the C/C composite matrix reaches to 12.86±1.43MPa. Potenitodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies show that the content of CNTs affects the corrosion resistance of CNTs-HA coating. Cell culturing and simulated body fluid test elicit the biocompatibility with living cells and bioactivity of CNTs-HA coatings, respectively.

  6. Plasma polymerized thin coating as a protective layer of carbon nanotubes grafted on carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einig, A.; Rumeau, P.; Desrousseaux, S.; Magga, Y.; Bai, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles addition is widely studied to improve properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites. Here, hybrid carbon fiber results from grafting of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) on the carbon fiber for mechanical reinforcement and conductive properties. Both tows and woven fabrics made of the hybrid fibers are added to the matrix for composite processing. However handling hybrid fibers may induce unwilling health risk due to eventual CNT release and a protective layer is required. A thin coating layer is deposited homogeneously by low pressure plasma polymerization of an organic monomer without modifying the morphology and the organization of grafted CNTs. The polymeric layer effect on the electrical behavior of hybrid fiber is assessed by conductivity measurements. Its influence on the mechanical properties is also studied regarding the interface adhesion between fiber and matrix. The protective role of layer is demonstrated by means of friction constraints applied to the hybrid fiber.

  7. Surface coating of carbon nanofibers/nanotubes by electrodeposition for multifunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Xing, H; Sun, L; Song, G; Gou, J; Hao, Y W

    2008-01-16

    Carbon nanomaterials in the form of paper sheets have been used as platforms to achieve multifunctionality. Combined with electrochemical deposition, room temperature synthesis of magnetic Ni coatings on individual carbon nanofibers (CNF) and/or carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been realized through solution penetration and ion diffusion. In addition to significant electrical conductivity improvement, the magnetic responses of the Ni coated carbon nanopaper sheets can be tuned within large ranges in terms of saturation magnetic field, remnant magnetization and coercivity. After being re-suspended in liquids, the magnetized CNFs/CNTs can be aligned with small external magnetic fields.

  8. Pyrolytic-carbon coating in carbon nanotube foams for better performance in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nanfei; Yildiz, Ozkan; Pan, Qin; Zhu, Jiadeng; Zhang, Xiangwu; Bradford, Philip D.; Gao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the wide-spread adoption of supercapacitors has been hindered by their inferior energy density to that of batteries. Here we report the use of our pyrolytic-carbon-coated carbon nanotube foams as lightweight, compressible, porous, and highly conductive current collectors in supercapacitors, which are infiltrated with chemically-reduced graphene oxide and later compressed via mechanical and capillary forces to generate the active electrodes. The pyrolytic carbon coatings, introduced by chemical vapor infiltration, wrap around the CNT junctions and increase the surface roughness. When active materials are infiltrated, the pyrolytic-carbon coatings help prevent the π-stacking, enlarge the accessible surface area, and increase the electrical conductivity of the scaffold. Our best-performing device offers 48% and 57% higher gravimetric energy and power density, 14% and 23% higher volumetric energy and power density, respectively, and two times higher knee frequency, than the device with commercial current collectors, while the "true-performance metrics" are strictly followed in our measurements. We have further clarified the solution resistance, charge transfer resistance/capacitance, double-layer capacitance, and Warburg resistance in our system via comprehensive impedance analysis, which will shed light on the design and optimization of similar systems.

  9. Growth and field emission of carbon nanotubes on electroplated Ni catalyst coated on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaemyung; No, Kwangsoo; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2001-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are grown on Ni catalyst coated on soda-lime glass substrates using chemical vapor deposition of C2H2 gas at 550 °C. Ni film is coated on the surface of Ag film using the electroplating method. Ni was etched by ammonia (NH3) gas in order to form nanometer sized catalytic particles before carbon nanotube growth. Pd film is applied as a gas activator to decrease the growth temperature of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes grown on Ni catalyst particles showed a multiwalled structure with defective graphite sheets at the wall. The turn-on voltage was about 2.8 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 μA/cm2, and the threshold voltage was about 4.0 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 mA/cm2. The Fowler-Nordheim plot showed a good linear fit, indicating that the emission current of carbon nanotubes follows Fowler-Nordheim behavior. The calculated field enhancement factor was 2850.

  10. Pyrolytic deposition of nanostructured titanium carbide coatings on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremlev, K. V.; Ob"edkov, A. M.; Ketkov, S. Yu.; Kaverin, B. S.; Semenov, N. M.; Gusev, S. A.; Tatarskii, D. A.; Yunin, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured titanium carbide coatings have been deposited on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the MOCVD method with bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium dichloride precursor. The obtained TiC/MWCNT hybrid materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is established that a TiC coating deposits onto the MWCNT surface with the formation of a core-shell (MWSNT-TiC) type structure.

  11. Evaluating the Thermal Damage Resistance of Reduced Graphene Oxide/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Lamuel; Feldman, Ari; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Lehman, John; Singh, Gurpreet; National Institute of Standards and Technology Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene are known to exhibit some exceptional thermal (K ~ 2000 to 4400 W.m-1K-1 at 300K) and optical properties. Here, we demonstrate preparation and testing of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and chemically modified graphene-composite spray coatings for use on thermal detectors for high-power lasers. The synthesized nanocomposite material was tested by preparing spray coatings on aluminum test coupons used as a representation of the thermal detector's surface. These coatings were then exposed to increasing laser powers and extended exposure times to quantify their damage threshold and optical absorbance. The graphene/carbon nanotube (prepared at varying mass% of graphene in CNTs) coatings demonstrated significantly higher damage threshold values at 2.5 kW laser power (10.6 μm wavelength) than carbon paint or MWCNTs alone. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of irradiated specimens showed that the composite coating endured high laser-power densities (up to 2 kW.cm-2) without significant visual damage. This research is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation (Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems Division), under grant no. 1335862 to G. Singh.

  12. Comparing graphene, carbon nanotubes, and superfine powdered activated carbon as adsorptive coating materials for microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Ellerie, Jaclyn R; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2013-10-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), nano-graphene platelets (NGPs), and superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) were comparatively evaluated for their applicability as adsorptive coatings on microfiltration membranes. The objective was to determine which materials were capable of contaminant removal while causing minimal flux reduction. Methylene blue and atrazine were the model contaminants. When applied as membrane coatings, MWCNTs had minimal retention capabilities for the model contaminants, and S-PAC had the fastest removal. The membrane coating approach was also compared with a stirred vessel configuration, in which the adsorbent was added to a stirred flask preceding the membrane cell. Direct application of the adsorbent to the membrane constituted a greater initial reduction in permeate concentrations of the model contaminants than with the stirred flask setup. All adsorbents except S-PAC showed flux reductions less than 5% after application as thin-layer membrane coatings, and flux recovery after membrane backwashing was greater than 90% for all materials and masses tested.

  13. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  14. Coating geometry of Ag, Ti, Co, Ni, and Al nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Stranges, F.; Xu, F.

    2015-04-01

    We present a morphology study on laser ablation produced metal nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on carbon nanotube (CNT) substrates. We analyzed the coating geometry and topography by processing AFM and SEM images. Our results show that Ag NPs aggregate together to form large agglomerates, that Ti NPs are well dispersed on the substrate surface forming a quasi-continuous layer, and that Co, Ni, and Al NPs coat quite uniformly CNTs and locally grow in a layer like fashion. We interpret the coating and clustering geometries in terms of cohesion, surface, and interfacial energies and diffusion barriers. Fractal analysis of composites morphology suggests the formation of structures with a smoother topography relative to pure carbon nanotubes for reactive metal nanoparticles.

  15. Characterization and nanomechanical properties of novel dental implant coatings containing copper decorated-carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sasani, N; Vahdati Khaki, J; Mojtaba Zebarjad, S

    2014-09-01

    Fluorapatite-titania coated Ti-based implants are promising for using in dental surgery for restoring teeth. One of the challenges in implantology is to achieve a bioactive coating with appropriate mechanical properties. In this research, simple sol-gel method was developed for synthesis of fluorapatite-titania-carbon nanotube decorated with antibacterial agent. Triethyl phosphate [PO4(C2H5)3], calcium nitrate [Ca(NO3)2] and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) were used as precursors under an ethanol-water based solution for fluorapatite (FA) production. Titanium isopropoxide and isopropanol were used as starting materials for making TiO2 sol-gels. Also, Copper acetate [Cu(C2H3O2)2·H2O] was used as precursor for decoration of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with wet chemical method. The decorated MWCNTs (CNT(Cu)) were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The phase identification of the FA-TiO2-CNT(Cu) coating was carried out by XRD analysis. Morphology of coated samples was investigated by SEM observations. The surface elastic modulus and hardness of coatings were studied using nanoindentation technique. The results indicate that novel dental implant coating containing FA, TiO2 and copper decorated MWCNTs have proper morphological features. The results of nanoindentation test show that incorporation of CNT(Cu) in FA-TiO2 matrix can improve the nanomechanical properties of composite coating.

  16. A highly durable fuel cell electrocatalyst based on double-polymer-coated carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Mohamed R.; Hafez, Inas H.; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    Driven by the demand for the commercialization of fuel cell (FC) technology, we describe the design and fabrication of a highly durable FC electrocatalyst based on double-polymer-coated carbon nanotubes for use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The fabricated electrocatalyst is composed of Pt-deposited polybenzimidazole-coated carbon nanotubes, which are further coated with Nafion. By using this electrocatalyst, a high FC performance with a power density of 375 mW/cm2 (at 70 ˚C, 50% relative humidity using air (cathode)/H2(anode)) was obtained, and a remarkable durability of 500,000 accelerated potential cycles was recorded with only a 5% loss of the initial FC potential and 20% loss of the maximum power density, which were far superior properties compared to those of the membrane electrode assembly prepared using carbon black in place of the carbon nanotubes. The present study indicates that the prepared highly durable fuel cell electrocatalyst is a promising material for the next generation of PEMFCs. PMID:26594045

  17. A highly durable fuel cell electrocatalyst based on double-polymer-coated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Berber, Mohamed R; Hafez, Inas H; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-11-23

    Driven by the demand for the commercialization of fuel cell (FC) technology, we describe the design and fabrication of a highly durable FC electrocatalyst based on double-polymer-coated carbon nanotubes for use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The fabricated electrocatalyst is composed of Pt-deposited polybenzimidazole-coated carbon nanotubes, which are further coated with Nafion. By using this electrocatalyst, a high FC performance with a power density of 375 mW/cm(2) (at 70 ˚C, 50% relative humidity using air (cathode)/H2(anode)) was obtained, and a remarkable durability of 500,000 accelerated potential cycles was recorded with only a 5% loss of the initial FC potential and 20% loss of the maximum power density, which were far superior properties compared to those of the membrane electrode assembly prepared using carbon black in place of the carbon nanotubes. The present study indicates that the prepared highly durable fuel cell electrocatalyst is a promising material for the next generation of PEMFCs.

  18. CO2 sensing at room temperature using carbon nanotubes coated core fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivananju, B. N.; Yamdagni, S.; Fazuldeen, R.; Sarin Kumar, A. K.; Hegde, G. M.; Varma, M. M.; Asokan, S.

    2013-06-01

    The sensing of carbon dioxide (CO2) at room temperature, which has potential applications in environmental monitoring, healthcare, mining, biotechnology, food industry, etc., is a challenge for the scientific community due to the relative inertness of CO2. Here, we propose a novel gas sensor based on clad-etched Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) with polyallylamine-amino-carbon nanotube coated on the surface of the core for detecting the concentrations of CO2 gas at room temperature, in ppm levels over a wide range (1000 ppm-4000 ppm). The limit of detection observed in polyallylamine-amino-carbon nanotube coated core-FBG has been found to be about 75 ppm. In this approach, when CO2 gas molecules interact with the polyallylamine-amino-carbon nanotube coated FBG, the effective refractive index of the fiber core changes, resulting in a shift in Bragg wavelength. The experimental data show a linear response of Bragg wavelength shift for increase in concentration of CO2 gas. Besides being reproducible and repeatable, the technique is fast, compact, and highly sensitive.

  19. Coating individual single-walled carbon nanotubes with nylon 6,10 through emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chiang; Wang, Randy K; Ziegler, Kirk J

    2009-08-01

    Solvent microenvironments are formed around individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by mixing SWNT suspensions with water-immiscible organic solvents. These microenvironments are used to encapsulate the SWNTs with the monomer sebacoyl chloride. Hexamethylene diamine is then injected into the aqueous phase so the formation of nylon 6,10 is restricted to the interface between the microenvironment and water. This emulsion polymerization process results in uniform coatings of nylon 6,10 around individual SWNTs. The nylon-coated SWNTs remain dispersed in the aqueous phase and are highly luminescent at pH values ranging from 3 to 12. This emulsion polymerization method provides a general approach to coat nanotubes with various polymers.

  20. Bump Bonding Using Metal-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, James L.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Liao, Anna; Bronikowski, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Bump bonding hybridization techniques use arrays of indium bumps to electrically and mechanically join two chips together. Surface-tension issues limit bump sizes to roughly as wide as they are high. Pitches are limited to 50 microns with bumps only 8-14 microns high on each wafer. A new process uses oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a metal (indium) in a wicking process using capillary actions to increase the aspect ratio and pitch density of the connections for bump bonding hybridizations. It merges the properties of the CNTs and the metal bumps, providing enhanced material performance parameters. By merging the bumps with narrow and long CNTs oriented in the vertical direction, higher aspect ratios can be obtained if the metal can be made to wick. Possible aspect ratios increase from 1:1 to 20:1 for most applications, and to 100:1 for some applications. Possible pitch density increases of a factor of 10 are possible. Standard capillary theory would not normally allow indium or most other metals to be drawn into the oriented CNTs, because they are non-wetting. However, capillary action can be induced through the ability to fabricate oriented CNT bundles to desired spacings, and the use of deposition techniques and temperature to control the size and mobility of the liquid metal streams and associated reservoirs. This hybridization of two technologies (indium bumps and CNTs) may also provide for some additional benefits such as improved thermal management and possible current density increases.

  1. Durable, Transparent, and Hot Liquid Repelling Superamphiphobic Coatings from Polysiloxane-Modified Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junping; Yu, Bo; Gao, Ziqian; Li, Bucheng; Zhao, Xia

    2017-01-17

    Although encouraging progress in the field of superamphiphobic coatings has been obtained, the superamphiphobic coatings with high durability, transparency, and repellency to hot liquids are very rare. Here, durable, transparent, and hot liquid-repelling superamphiphobic coatings were successfully prepared using polysiloxane-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs@POS) as the templates. The hydrolytic condensation of n-hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTMS) and tetraethoxysilane on the surface of MWCNTs formed MWCNTs@POS, which are highly dispersible in toluene. The superamphiphobic coatings were prepared by spray-coating the homogeneous suspension of MWCNTs@POS in toluene onto glass slides, calcination in air to form the silica nanotubes (SNTs), and then modification with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane in dry toluene. The changes in the surface microstructure, surface chemical composition, and wettability were characterized by various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the microstructures of the SNTs have great influences on superamphiphobicity and transparency of the coatings and can be regulated by the concentration of HDTMS and the diameter of MWCNTs. The SNTs with tunable wall thickness and diameter could be obtained using the method. The superamphiphobic coatings showed high contact angles and low sliding angles for various cool and hot liquids of different surface tensions. The superamphiphobic coatings also exhibited high transparency and comprehensive durability.

  2. Carbon nanotube/polymer composite coated tapered fiber for four wave mixing based wavelength conversion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Omura, Mika; Takiguchi, Masato; Martinez, Amos; Ishigure, Takaaki; Yamashita, Shinji; Kuga, Takahiro

    2013-02-11

    In this paper, we demonstrate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber taper coated with a carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composite. Using this device, four wave mixing (FWM) based wavelength conversion of 10 Gb/s Non-return-to-zero signal is achieved. In addition, we investigate wavelength tuning, two photon absorption and estimate the effective nonlinear coefficient of the CNTs embedded in the tapered fiber to be 1816.8 W(-1)km(-1).

  3. Characteristics of copper meshes coated with carbon nanotubes via electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bu-Jong; Park, Jong-Seol; Hwang, Young-Jin; Park, Jin-Seok

    2016-09-01

    This study demonstrates the characteristics of a hybrid-type transparent electrode for touch screen panels, which was fabricated by coating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on copper (Cu)-meshes. The surface morphologies, visible-range transmittance and reflectance, and chromatic properties, such as yellowness and redness, of the fabricated CNTs-coated Cu mesh electrodes were characterized as functions of their dimensions (line-to-line spacing, line width, and electrode thickness) and compared with those of the Cu-mesh electrodes without coating of CNTs. The experimental results showed that the coating of CNTs substantially reduced the reflectance of the Cu-mesh electrodes and also improved their chromatic properties with their transmittance and sheet resistance only slightly changed, subsequently indicating that the CNTs-coated Cu-mesh electrodes possessed desirable characteristics for touch screen panels.

  4. Improvement in cell proliferation on silicone rubber by carbon nanotube coating.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Makoto; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Totsuka, Yasunori; Watari, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    Silicone rubbers are widely used as tissue implants because of their flexibility and chemical stability. However, they have limited cellular adhesiveness and may cause problems in the long term. In this study, a coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was applied to silicone rubber to improve its cellular adhesiveness. Scanning electron micrograph of this coating revealed that CNTs had formed a densely packed meshwork; the Ra values and protein adsorption capacity were enhanced. Although the contact angle did not change after coating, it decreased after immersion into a culture medium. After cultivation for 6 d, while Saos-2 cells were hardly observed on untreated silicone, the cells proliferated on CNT-coated silicone. Thus, CNT coating might be a simple and effective solution to problems associated with silicone implants.

  5. Carbon nanotube coating silicon doped with Cr as a high capacity anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Tatsumi; Nakasu, Masashi; Yoshio, Masaki; Nishiguchi, Hiroyasu; Takita, Yusaku

    Effects of dopant and coating carbon nanotube on anodic performance of Si were studied for metallic anode Li ion rechargeable battery with large capacity. Although the large Li intercalation capacity higher than 1500 mAh g -1 is exhibited on pure Si, it decreased drastically with increasing cycle number. Increasing the electrical conductivity by doping Cr or B is effective for increasing the initial capacity and the cycle stability of Si for Li intercalation. Coating semiconductive Si with the carbon nanotube by decomposition of hydrocarbon is effective for increasing the cycle stability, though the initial Li intercalation capacity slightly decreased. Conducting binder is also important for increasing the cycle stability and it was found that Li intercalation capacity higher than 1500 mAh g -1 can be sustained by using poly vinyliden fruolide. Consequently, reversible Li intercalation capacity of 1500 mAh g -1 was successfully sustained after 10th cycles of charge and discharge by doping Cr and coating with carbon nanotube.

  6. Transmission electron microscopic observation of cells cultured on multiwalled carbon nanotube-coated sponges.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Eri; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Uo, Motohiro; Ushijima, Natsumi; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Watari, Fumio; Ichinose, Hideki; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2010-01-01

    The cell structure and interface between cultured cells and a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-coated sponge (MWCNT-coated sponge) were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Moreover, the atomic structure of MWCNTs that entered the cells was also examined by means of high-resolution TEM (HRTEM). MWCNTs were observed in the cytoplasm, and a few MWCNTs were recognized in the cell nuclei. Those MWCNTs maintained their structure there. Subcellular organelles did not appear to be different from those on the collagen sponge despite the cellular uptake of MWCNTs.

  7. Effects of silica-coated carbon nanotubes on the curing behavior and properties of epoxy composites

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Ao; Li, Weizhen; Ling, Yang; ...

    2016-02-22

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were coated with silica by a sol–gel method to improve interfacial bonding and dispersion of nanotubes in the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) matrix. TEM and FE-SEM measurements showed that the silica shell was successfully coated on the surface of r-MWCNTs (as-received MWCNTs), and that the dispersion of MWCNT@SiO2 in the epoxy matrix and interfacial adhesion between MWCNTs and epoxy were improved through the silica shell formation. The effects of silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT@SiO2) addition on the curing behavior of epoxy resin, and on the physical and thermomechanical properties of epoxy composites, were studied.more » FT-IR measurements of different blends at different curing times indicated that the curing reaction was accelerated with the presence of MWCNTs and increased with the content of MWCNT@SiO2. DSC results confirmed that the value of activation energy decreased with the introduction of MWCNTs in the order of MWCNT@SiO2 < r-MWCNTs < epoxy. It was found that the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites were significantly enhanced by incorporation of MWCNT@SiO2, relative to composites with r-MWCNTs, while the values of the glass transition temperature slightly increased, and the high electrical resistivity of these composites was retained overall.« less

  8. Effects of silica-coated carbon nanotubes on the curing behavior and properties of epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ao; Li, Weizhen; Ling, Yang; Gan, Wenjun; Brady, Michael A.; Wang, Cheng

    2016-02-22

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were coated with silica by a sol–gel method to improve interfacial bonding and dispersion of nanotubes in the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) matrix. TEM and FE-SEM measurements showed that the silica shell was successfully coated on the surface of r-MWCNTs (as-received MWCNTs), and that the dispersion of MWCNT@SiO2 in the epoxy matrix and interfacial adhesion between MWCNTs and epoxy were improved through the silica shell formation. The effects of silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT@SiO2) addition on the curing behavior of epoxy resin, and on the physical and thermomechanical properties of epoxy composites, were studied. FT-IR measurements of different blends at different curing times indicated that the curing reaction was accelerated with the presence of MWCNTs and increased with the content of MWCNT@SiO2. DSC results confirmed that the value of activation energy decreased with the introduction of MWCNTs in the order of MWCNT@SiO2 < r-MWCNTs < epoxy. It was found that the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites were significantly enhanced by incorporation of MWCNT@SiO2, relative to composites with r-MWCNTs, while the values of the glass transition temperature slightly increased, and the high electrical resistivity of these composites was retained overall.

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with ZnO by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Partha P.; Gilshteyn, Evgenia; Jiang, Hua; Timmermans, Marina; Kaskela, Antti; Tolochko, Oleg V.; Kurochkin, Alexey V.; Karppinen, Maarit; Nisula, Mikko; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Nasibulin, Albert G.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of ZnO deposition on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the help of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was successfully demonstrated. The utilization of pristine SWCNTs as a support resulted in a non-uniform deposition of ZnO in the form of nanoparticles. To achieve uniform ZnO coating, the SWCNTs first needed to be functionalized by treating the samples in a controlled ozone atmosphere. The uniformly ZnO coated SWCNTs were used to fabricate UV sensing devices. An UV irradiation of the ZnO coated samples turned them from hydrophobic to hydrophilic behaviour. Furthermore, thin films of the ZnO coated SWCNTs allowed us switch p-type field effect transistors made of pristine SWCNTs to have ambipolar characteristics.

  10. Damping behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum oxide coatings by nanomechanical dynamic modulus mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balani, Kantesh; Agarwal, Arvind

    2008-09-01

    Nanomechanical dynamic analysis has been utilized to evaluate damping behavior of plasma sprayed carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced Al2O3 ceramic coatings. Addition and dispersion of CNTs in Al2O3 matrix elicited modulus enhancement from 200 to 400 GPa. Tan delta increases from 0.26 for Al2O3 to 0.39 with 8 wt % CNT coating. CNT bending and curling, Al2O3 coating on CNT, interparticle Al2O3 friction, and CNT/splat sliding serve as strong loss mechanisms in imparting enhanced damping to Al2O3 nanocomposites reinforced with CNTs. Damping and fracture toughness of CNT-Al2O3 coating is semiempirically related to the enhancement of storage modulus and tan delta with varying CNT content and degree of dispersion.

  11. Optimal ferromagnetically-coated carbon nanotube tips for ultra-high resolution magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lisunova, Y; Heidler, J; Levkivskyi, I; Gaponenko, I; Weber, A; Caillier, Ch; Heyderman, L J; Kläui, M; Paruch, P

    2013-03-15

    Using single-walled carbon nanotubes homogeneously coated with ferromagnetic metal as ultra-high resolution magnetic force microscopy probes, we investigate the key image formation parameters and their dependence on coating thickness. The crucial step of introducing molecular beam epitaxy for deposition of the magnetic coating allows highly controlled fabrication of tips with small magnetic volume, while retaining high magnetic anisotropy and prolonged lifetime characteristics. Calculating the interaction between the tips and a magnetic sample, including hitherto neglected thermal noise effects, we show that optimal imaging is achieved for a finite, intermediate-thickness magnetic coating, in excellent agreement with experimental observations. With such optimal tips, we demonstrate outstanding resolution, revealing sub-10 nm domains in hard magnetic samples, and non-perturbative imaging of nanoscale spin structures in soft magnetic materials, all at ambient conditions with no special vacuum, temperature or humidity controls.

  12. Synthesis and Photocatalytic Activity of Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles-coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yi; Heo, Sung Hwan; Yoo, Seung Hwa; Ali, Ghafar; Cho, Sung Oh

    2010-03-01

    A simple and straightforward approach to prepare TiO2-coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. Anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) with the average size ~8 nm were coated on CNTs from peroxo titanic acid (PTA) precursor even at low temperature of 100 °C. We demonstrate the effects of CNTs/TiO2 molar ratio on the adsorption capability and photocatalytic efficiency under UV-visible irradiation. The samples showed not only good optical absorption in visible range, but also great adsorption capacity for methyl orange (MO) dye molecules. These properties facilitated the great enhancement of photocatalytic activity of TiO2 NPs-coated CNTs photocatalysts. The TiO2 NPs-coated CNTs exhibited 2.45 times higher photocatalytic activity for MO degradation than that of pure TiO2.

  13. Synthesis and Photocatalytic Activity of Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles-coated Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A simple and straightforward approach to prepare TiO2-coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. Anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) with the average size ~8 nm were coated on CNTs from peroxo titanic acid (PTA) precursor even at low temperature of 100 °C. We demonstrate the effects of CNTs/TiO2 molar ratio on the adsorption capability and photocatalytic efficiency under UV–visible irradiation. The samples showed not only good optical absorption in visible range, but also great adsorption capacity for methyl orange (MO) dye molecules. These properties facilitated the great enhancement of photocatalytic activity of TiO2 NPs-coated CNTs photocatalysts. The TiO2 NPs-coated CNTs exhibited 2.45 times higher photocatalytic activity for MO degradation than that of pure TiO2. PMID:20671780

  14. Carbon nanotube-based coatings to induce flow enhancement in hydrophilic nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemann, Enrique; Walther, J. H.; Zambrano, Harvey A.

    2016-11-01

    With the emergence of the field of nanofluidics, the transport of water in hydrophilic nanopores has attracted intensive research due to its many promising applications. Experiments and simulations have found that flow resistance in hydrophilic nanochannels is much higher than those in macrochannels. Indeed, this might be attributed to significant fluid adsorption on the channel walls and to the effect of the increased surface to volume ratio inherent to the nanoconfinement. Therefore, it is desirable to explore strategies for drag reduction in nanopores. Recently, studies have found that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) feature ultrafast water flow rates which result in flow enhancements of 1 to 5 orders of magnitude compared to Hagen-Poiseuille predictions. In the present study, CNT-based coatings are considered to induce water flow enhancement in silica nanopores with different radius. We conduct atomistic simulations of pressurized water flow inside tubular silica nanopores with and without inner coaxial carbon nanotubes. In particular, we compute water density and velocity profiles, flow enhancement and slip lengths to understand the drag reduction capabilities of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes implemented as coating material in silica nanopores. We wish to thank partial funding from CRHIAM and FONDECYT project 11130559, computational support from DTU and NLHPC (Chile).

  15. A novel processing of carbon nanotubes grown on molecular sieve coated porous ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Sangram; Sarkar, Naboneeta; Park, Jung Gyu; Zhao, Wei; Kim, Sukyoung; Kim, Ik Jin

    2015-08-01

    The present study focuses on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Fe-containing zeolites coated porous ceramics by implementing three different and independent techniques, successively. Direct foaming-derived porous ceramics were subjected to hydrothermal reaction for on-site growth of NaA zeolites within it. The porous ceramics-zeolite composite was subjected to ion-exchange reaction to obtain the catalyst for CNT synthesis. Multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) were grown by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) process using acetylene as carbon source. Microstructural, thermogravimetric and spectroscopic analyses showed distinctive differences in terms of hollow structural feature, yield and crystallinity of the MWCNTs with different reaction temperatures.

  16. Surface modification of polyester fabric with plasma pretreatment and carbon nanotube coating for antistatic property improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. X.; Lv, J. C.; Ren, Y.; Zhi, T.; Chen, J. Y.; Zhou, Q. Q.; Lu, Z. Q.; Gao, D. W.; Jin, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study introduced a green method to prepare antistatic polyester (PET) fabrics by plasma pretreatment and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) coating. The influences of plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters on antistatic property of PET fabrics were investigated. PET fabrics were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases, and then SWCNT coating on the plasma treated PET fabrics was carried out by coating-dry-cure using various coating parameters including different SWCNT concentrations, curing times and curing temperatures. PET fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and volume resistivity. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated PET fabrics revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the PET fiber surface. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics indicated the SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. The plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics exhibited a good antistatic property, which increased and then decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time and output power. The antistatic property of the O2 plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric was better and worse than that of N2 or Ar plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric in the shorter treatment time and the longer treatment time, respectively. In addition, the antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics also increased with the increasing SWCNT concentration, curing time and curing temperature in the range studied. Plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters had signally influence on the antistatic property of plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics. Therefore, adequate parameters should be carefully selected for the optimum antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics.

  17. Multi-Fractal Hierarchy of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hydrophobic Coatings

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Francesco; Castrucci, Paola; Scarselli, Manuela; Nanni, Francesca; Cacciotti, Ilaria; De Crescenzi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A hierarchical structure is an assembly with a multi-scale morphology and with a large and accessible surface area. Recent advances in nanomaterial science have made increasingly possible the design of hierarchical surfaces with specific and tunable properties. Here, we report the fractal analysis of hierarchical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films realized by a simple, rapid, reproducible, and inexpensive filtration process from an aqueous dispersion, then deposited by drytransfer printing method on several substrates, at room temperature. Furthermore, by varying the thickness of carbon nanotube random networks, it is possible tailoring their wettability due to capillary phenomena in the porous films. Moreover, in order to describe the wetting properties of such surfaces, we introduce a two-dimensional extension of the Wenzel-Cassie-Baxter theory. The hierarchical surface roughness of SWCNT coatings coupled with their exceptional and tunable optical and electrical properties provide an ideal hydrophobic composite surface for a new class of optoelectronic and nanofluidic devices. PMID:25716718

  18. Spray-coated carbon nanotube carpets for creeping reduction of conducting polymer based artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simaite, Aiva; Delagarde, Aude; Tondu, Bertrand; Souères, Philippe; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Bergaud, Christian

    2017-01-01

    During cyclic actuation, conducting polymer based artificial muscles are often creeping from the initial movement range. One of the likely reasons of such behaviour is unbalanced charging during conducting polymer oxidation and reduction. To improve the actuation reversibility and subsequently the long time performance of ionic actuators, we suggest using spray-coated carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets on the surface of the conducting polymer electrodes. We show that carbon nanotubes facilitate a conducting polymer redox reaction and improve its reversibility. Consequently, in the long term, charge accumulation in the polymer film is avoided leading to a significantly improved lifetime performance during cycling actuation. To our knowledge, it is the first time a simple solution to an actuator creeping problem has been suggested.

  19. Spray-coated carbon nanotube carpets for creeping reduction of conducting polymer based artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Simaite, Aiva; Delagarde, Aude; Tondu, Bertrand; Souères, Philippe; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Bergaud, Christian

    2017-01-13

    During cyclic actuation, conducting polymer based artificial muscles are often creeping from the initial movement range. One of the likely reasons of such behaviour is unbalanced charging during conducting polymer oxidation and reduction. To improve the actuation reversibility and subsequently the long time performance of ionic actuators, we suggest using spray-coated carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets on the surface of the conducting polymer electrodes. We show that carbon nanotubes facilitate a conducting polymer redox reaction and improve its reversibility. Consequently, in the long term, charge accumulation in the polymer film is avoided leading to a significantly improved lifetime performance during cycling actuation. To our knowledge, it is the first time a simple solution to an actuator creeping problem has been suggested.

  20. Synthesis and enhanced photocatalytic activity of tin oxide nanoparticles coated on multi-walled carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ning; Xu, Jiaoxing; Guan, Lunhui

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles were uniformly deposited on carbon nanotubes. {yields} MWNT@SnO{sub 2} showed excellent photocatalytic activity. {yields} The quenched PL proved the existence of electron transfer between SnO{sub 2} and MWNT. -- Abstract: A nanocomposite of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles coated on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT@SnO{sub 2}) was synthesized and characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen physisorption measurements, photoluminescence. The results show that the SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles with a narrow size of 4 nm are uniformly deposited on MWNT. The photocatalytic activity of the nanocomposite was studied using methyl orange as a model organic pollutant. MWNT@SnO{sub 2} exhibits much higher photocatalytic activity than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} (P-25). The promotion is mainly contributed from electron transfer between SnO{sub 2} and MWNT.

  1. Carbon-coated SnO2 nanotubes: template-engaged synthesis and their application in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Du, Ning; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Jingxue; Qi, Yue; Yang, Deren

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of carbon-coated SnO2 (SnO2-C) nanotubes through a simple glucose hydrothermal and subsequent carbonization approach by using Sn nanorods as sacrificial templates. The as-synthesized SnO2-C nanotubes have been applied as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, which exhibit improved cyclic performance compared to pure SnO2 nanotubes. The hollow nanostructure, together with the carbon matrix which has good buffering effect and high electronic conductivity, can be responsible for the improved cyclic performance.

  2. Mechanical characterization of copper coated carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Maqbool, Adnan; Hussain, M. Asif; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Bakhsh, Nabi; Hussain, Ali; Kim, Myong Ho

    2013-12-15

    In this investigation, carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum composites were prepared by the molecular-level mixing process using copper coated CNTs. The mixing of CNTs was accomplished by ultrasonic mixing and ball milling. Electroless Cu-coated CNTs were used to enhance the interfacial bonding between CNTs and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the homogenous dispersion of Cu-coated CNTs in the composite samples compared with the uncoated CNTs. The samples were pressureless sintered under vacuum followed by hot rolling to promote the uniform microstructure and dispersion of CNTs. In 1.0 wt.% uncoated and Cu-coated CNT/Al composites, compared to pure Al, the microhardness increased by 44% and 103%, respectively. As compared to the pure Al, for 1.0 wt.% uncoated CNT/Al composite, increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength was estimated about 58% and 62%, respectively. However, in case of 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were increased significantly about 121% and 107%, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. Optimizing the plating bath to (1:1) by wt CNTs with Cu, thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm. Cu-coated CNTs developed the stronger interfacial bonding with the Al matrix which resulted in the efficient transfer of load. Highlights: • Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. • Thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm by optimized plating bath. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, microhardness increased by 103%. • Cu-coated CNTs transfer load efficiently with stronger interfacial bonding. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, Y.S and UTS increased by 126% and 105%.

  3. A Comparative Study on AC Conductivity and Dielectric Behavior of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Polyaniline Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Filled High Density Polyethylene-Carbon Black Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Dinesh, P.; Renukappa, N. M.; Siddaramaiah; Lee, J. H.; Jeevananda, T.

    2010-10-04

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on AC conductivity and dielectric behavior of carbon black reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE-CB) and HDPE-CB filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-CB-HDPE) and Polyaniline (PAni) coated MWNTs-CB-HDPE nanocomposites. The electrical properties such as dielectric constant ({epsilon}'), dissipation factor (tan {delta}) and AC conductivity ({sigma}{sub ac}) of nanocomposites have been measured with reference to the weight fraction (0.5 and 1 wt% MWNTs), frequency (75 KHz-30 MHz), temperature (25-90 deg. C) and sea water ageing. The experimental results showed that the increased AC conductivity and dielectric constant of the nanocomposites were influenced by PAni coated MWNTs in HDPE-CB nanocomposites. The value of dielectric constant and tan {delta} decreased with increasing frequency. Further more, above 5 MHz the AC conductivity increases drastically whereas significant effect on tan {delta} was observed in less than 1 MHz.

  4. The partial space qualification of a vertically aligned carbon nanotube coating on aluminium substrates for EO applications.

    PubMed

    Theocharous, Evangelos; Chunnilall, Christopher J; Mole, Ryan; Gibbs, David; Fox, Nigel; Shang, Naigui; Howlett, Guy; Jensen, Ben; Taylor, Rosie; Reveles, Juan R; Harris, Oliver B; Ahmed, Naseer

    2014-03-24

    The fabrication of NanoTube Black, a Vertically Aligned carbon NanoTube Array (VANTA) on aluminium substrates is reported for the first time. The coating on aluminium was realised using a process that employs top down thermal radiation to assist growth, enabling deposition at temperatures below the substrate's melting point. The NanoTube Black coatings were shown to exhibit directional hemispherical reflectance values of typically less than 1% across wavelengths in the 2.5 µm to 15 µm range. VANTA-coated aluminium substrates were subjected to space qualification testing (mass loss, outgassing, shock, vibration and temperature cycling) before their optical properties were re-assessed. Within measurement uncertainty, no changes to hemispherical reflectance were detected, confirming that NanoTube Black coatings on aluminium are good candidates for Earth Observation (EO) applications.

  5. Sol-Gel-Derived Hydroxyapatite-Carbon Nanotube/Titania Coatings on Titanium Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaoli; Lou, Weiwei; Wang, Qi; Ma, Jianfeng; Xu, Haihong; Bai, Qing; Liu, Chuantong; Liu, Jinsong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube/titania (HA-CNT/TiO2) double layer coatings were successfully developed on titanium (Ti) substrates intended for biomedical applications. A TiO2 coating was firstly developed by anodization to improve bonding between HA and Ti, and then the layer of HA and CNTs was coated on the surface by the sol-gel process to improve the biocompatibility and mechanical properties of Ti. The surfaces of double layer coatings were uniform and crack-free with a thickness of about 7 μm. The bonding strength of the HA-CNT/TiO2 coating was higher than that of the pure HA and HA-CNT coatings. Additionally, in vitro cell experiments showed that CNTs promoted the adhesion of preosteoblasts on the HA-CNT/TiO2 double layer coatings. These unique surfaces combined with the osteoconductive properties of HA exhibited the excellent mechanical properties of CNTs. Therefore, the developed HA-CNT/TiO2 coatings on Ti substrates might be a promising material for bone replacement. PMID:22606041

  6. Hydroxyapatite-anatase-carbon nanotube nanocomposite coatings fabricated by electrophoretic codeposition for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bokai; Kwok, Chi Tat

    2011-10-01

    In order to eliminate micro-cracks in the monolithic hydroxyapatite (HA) and composite hydroxyapatite/carbon nanotube (HA/CNT) coatings, novel HA/TiO(2)/CNT nanocomposite coatings on Ti6Al4V were attempted to fabricate by a single-step electrophoretic codeposition process for biomedical applications. The electrophoretically deposited layers with difference contents of HA, TiO(2) (anatase) and CNT nanoparticles were sintered at 800°C for densification with thickness of about 7-10 μm. A dense and crack-free coating was achieved with constituents of 85 wt% HA, 10 wt% TiO(2) and 5 wt% CNT. Open-circuit potential measurements and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests were used to investigate the electrochemical corrosion behavior of the coatings in vitro conditions (Hanks' solution at 37°C). The HA/TiO(2)/CNT coatings possess higher corrosion resistance than that of the Ti6Al4V substrate as reflected by nobler open circuit potential and lower corrosion current density. In addition, the surface hardness and adhesion strength of the HA/TiO(2)/CNT coatings are higher than that of the monolithic HA and HA/CNT coatings without compromising their apatite forming ability. The enhanced properties were attributed to the nanostructure of the coatings with the appropriate TiO(2) and CNT contents for eliminating micro-cracks and micro-pores.

  7. Sol-gel-derived hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube/titania coatings on titanium substrates.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoli; Lou, Weiwei; Wang, Qi; Ma, Jianfeng; Xu, Haihong; Bai, Qing; Liu, Chuantong; Liu, Jinsong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube/titania (HA-CNT/TiO(2)) double layer coatings were successfully developed on titanium (Ti) substrates intended for biomedical applications. A TiO(2) coating was firstly developed by anodization to improve bonding between HA and Ti, and then the layer of HA and CNTs was coated on the surface by the sol-gel process to improve the biocompatibility and mechanical properties of Ti. The surfaces of double layer coatings were uniform and crack-free with a thickness of about 7 μm. The bonding strength of the HA-CNT/TiO(2) coating was higher than that of the pure HA and HA-CNT coatings. Additionally, in vitro cell experiments showed that CNTs promoted the adhesion of preosteoblasts on the HA-CNT/TiO(2) double layer coatings. These unique surfaces combined with the osteoconductive properties of HA exhibited the excellent mechanical properties of CNTs. Therefore, the developed HA-CNT/TiO(2) coatings on Ti substrates might be a promising material for bone replacement.

  8. Progammed synthesis of magnetic mesoporous silica coated carbon nanotubes for organic pollutant adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yue; Zhang, Min; Xia, Peixiong; Wang, Linlin; Zheng, Jing; Li, Weizhen; Xu, Jingli

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic mesoporous silica coated carbon nanotubes were produced from hydrophilic monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes using well controlled programmed synthesis method and were characterized by TEM, XRD, FTIR, TGA, N2 adsorption-desorption and VSM. The well-designed mesoporous magnetic nanotubes had a large specific area, a highly open mesoporous structure and high magnetization. Firstly, SiO2-coated maghemite/CNTs nanoparticles (CNTs/Fe3O4@SiO2 composites) were synthesized by the combination of high temperature decomposition process and an sol-gel method, in which the iron acetylacetonate as well as TEOS acted as the precursor for maghemite and SiO2, respectively. The CNTs/Fe3O4@SiO2 composites revealed a core-shell structure, Then, CNTs/Fe3O4@mSiO2 was obtained by extracting cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) via an ion-exchange procedure. The resulting composites show not only a magnetic response to an externally applied magnetic field, but also can be a good adsorbent for the organic pollutant in the ambient temperature.

  9. Boron Nitride Coated Carbon Nanotube Arrays with Enhanced Compressive Mechanical Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) array is one of the most promising energy dissipating materials due to its excellent temperature invariant mechanical property. However, the CNT arrays with desirable recoverability after compression is still a challenge. Here, we report on the mechanical enhancement of the CNT arrays reinforced by coating with boron nitride (BN) layers. These BN coated CNT (BN/CNT) arrays exhibit excellent compressive strength and recoverability as compared to those of the as-prepared CNT arrays which totally collapsed after compression. In addition, the BN coating also provides better resistance to oxidation due to its intrinsic thermal stability. This work presented here opens a new pathway towards tuning mechanical behavior of any arbitrary CNT arrays for promising potential such as damper, vibration isolator and shock absorber applications.

  10. Roll-to-Roll Production of Spray Coated N-doped Carbon Nanotube Electrodes for Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakaya, Mehmet; Zhu, Jingyi; Raghavendra, Achyut; Podila, Ramakrishna; Parler, Samuel; Kaplan, James; Rao, Apparao; Cornell Dubilier Electronics, Inc. Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Although nanocarbons are being increasingly used in energy storage, there has been a lack of inexpensive, continuous and scalable synthesis methods. Here we present a scalable roll-to-roll spray coating process for synthesizing supercapacitors from randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotubes electrodes on Al foils, which yield high power and energy densities (~ 700 mW/cm3 and 1 mWh/cm3) and cycle stability (>10000 cycles) on par with Li-ion thin film batteries. Our cost analysis shows that the R2R spray coating process can produce supercapacitors with 10 times the energy density of conventional activated carbon devices at ~ 17% lower cost. NSF CMMI SNM Award #1246800.

  11. Infrared Responsivity of a Pyroelectric Detector with a Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharous, E.; Engtrakul, C.; Dillon, A. C.; Lehman, J.

    2008-08-01

    The performance of a 10 mm diameter pyroelectric detector coated with a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was evaluated in the 0.8 to 20 {micro}m wavelength range. The relative spectral responsivity of this detector exhibits significant fluctuations over the wavelength range examined. This is consistent with independent absorbance measurements, which show that SWCNTs exhibit selective absorption bands in the visible and near-infrared. The performance of the detector in terms of noise equivalent power and detectivity in wavelength regions of high coating absorptivity was comparable with gold-black-coated pyroelectric detectors based on 50 {micro}m thick LiTaO{sub 3} crystals. The response of this detector was shown to be nonlinear for DC equivalent photocurrents >10{sup -9} A, and its spatial uniformity of response was comparable with other pyroelectric detectors utilizing gold-black coatings. The nonuniform spectral responsivity exhibited by the SWCNT-coated detector is expected to severely restrict the use of SWCNTs as black coatings for thermal detectors. However, the deposition of SWCNT coatings on a pyroelectric crystal followed by the study of the prominence of the spectral features in the relative spectral responsivity of the resultant pyroelectric detectors is shown to provide an effective method for quantifying the impurity content in SWCNT samples.

  12. Infrared responsivity of a pyroelectric detector with a single-wall carbon nanotube coating.

    PubMed

    Theocharous, E; Engtrakul, C; Dillon, A C; Lehman, J

    2008-08-01

    The performance of a 10 mm diameter pyroelectric detector coated with a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was evaluated in the 0.8 to 20 microm wavelength range. The relative spectral responsivity of this detector exhibits significant fluctuations over the wavelength range examined. This is consistent with independent absorbance measurements, which show that SWCNTs exhibit selective absorption bands in the visible and near-infrared. The performance of the detector in terms of noise equivalent power and detectivity in wavelength regions of high coating absorptivity was comparable with gold-black-coated pyroelectric detectors based on 50 microm thick LiTaO(3) crystals. The response of this detector was shown to be nonlinear for DC equivalent photocurrents >10(-9) A, and its spatial uniformity of response was comparable with other pyroelectric detectors utilizing gold-black coatings. The nonuniform spectral responsivity exhibited by the SWCNT-coated detector is expected to severely restrict the use of SWCNTs as black coatings for thermal detectors. However, the deposition of SWCNT coatings on a pyroelectric crystal followed by the study of the prominence of the spectral features in the relative spectral responsivity of the resultant pyroelectric detectors is shown to provide an effective method for quantifying the impurity content in SWCNT samples.

  13. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Burblies, Niklas; Schulze, Jennifer; Schwarz, Hans-Christoph; Kranz, Katharina; Motz, Damian; Vogt, Carla; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia; Behrens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes.

  14. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Hans-Christoph; Kranz, Katharina; Motz, Damian; Vogt, Carla; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia; Behrens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes. PMID:27385031

  15. Transparent Conductive Coating Based on Carbon Nanotubes Using Electric Field Deposition Method

    SciTech Connect

    Latununuwe, Altje; Hattu, Nikmans; Setiawan, Andhy; Winata, Toto; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Darma, Yudi

    2010-10-24

    The transparent conductive coating based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) had been fabricated using the electric field deposition method. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) results show a quite uniform CNTs on Corning glass substrates. Moreover the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results shows the peak at around 25 deg. which proves the existence of CNT materials. The CNT thin films obtained with different deposition times have different transmittance coefficients at wavelength of 550 nm. I-V measurement results shows higher sheet resistance value which relates with bigger transmittance coefficients and vice versa.

  16. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Nanotube Matrices With Low Emission Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Archana; Prasad, Abhishek; Moscatello, Jason; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Chong M.; Yap, Yoke K.

    2013-01-22

    PMMA-STO-CNT matrices were created by opened-tip vertically-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with conformal coating of strontium titanate and Poly(methyl methacrylate). Emission threshold of 0.8 V/μm was demonstrated, about five-fold lower than that of the as-grown VAMWCNTs. Theoretical simulation and modeling suggest that PMMA-STO-CNT matrices have suppressed screening effects and Coulombs’ repulsion forces between electrons in adjacent CNTs, leading to low emission threshold, high emission density, and prolong emission stability. These findings are important for practical application of VA-MWCNTs in field emission devices.

  17. Evaluation of a cesium iodide photocathode assisted with MgO-coated multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Park, Taehee; Lee, Wonjoo; Park, Eunkyung; Lee, Donghwan; Han, Bongwoo; Han, Sung-Hwan; Yi, Whikun

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports the enhanced photocurrent and relative quantum efficiency of cesium iodide (CsI) films on magnesium oxide (MgO)-coated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a silica substrate, i.e., CsI/MgO/MWCNTs/Si, when illuminating with 147 nm photons under an external electric field. The incorporation of MWCNTs resulted in significant enhancement of the photocurrent by several orders of magnitude compared to that of a conventional CsI. An analysis of the photoelectron energy spectrum attributed the phenomena to the creation of a very high electric field through the MgO/CsI film with the subsequent generation of avalanche secondary electrons.

  18. Effect of an organic molecular coating on control over the conductance of carbon nanotube channel

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrinetskiy, I. I.; Emelianov, A. V.; Nevolin, V. K. Romashkin, A. V.

    2014-12-15

    It is shown that the coating of carbon nanotubes with molecules with a constant dipole moment changes the conductance of the tubes due to a variation in the structure of energy levels that participate in charge transport. The I–V characteristics of the investigated structures exhibit significant dependence of the channel conductance on the gate potential. The observed memory effect of conductance level can be explained by the rearrangement of polar groups and molecules as a whole in an electric field. The higher the dipole moment per unit length and the weaker the intermolecular interaction, the faster the rearrangement process is.

  19. Smart electronic yarns and wearable fabrics for human biomonitoring made by carbon nanotube coating with polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Shim, Bong Sup; Chen, Wei; Doty, Chris; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2008-12-01

    The idea of electronic yarns and textiles has appeared for quite some time, but their properties often do not meet practical expectations. In addition to chemicallmechanical durability and high electrical conductivity, important materials qualifications include weavablity, wearability, light weight, and "smart" functionalities. Here we demonstrate a simple process of transforming general commodity cotton threads into intelligent e-textiles using a polyelectrolyte-based coating with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Efficient charge transport through the network of nanotubes (20 omega/cm) and the possibility to engineer tunneling junctions make them promising materials for many high-knowledge-content garments. Along with integrated humidity sensing, we demonstrate that CNT-cotton threads can be used to detect albumin, the key protein of blood, with high sensitivity and selectivity. Notwithstanding future challenges, these proof-of-concept demonstrations provide a direct pathway for the application of these materials as wearable biomonitoring and telemedicine sensors, which are simple, sensitive, selective, and versatile.

  20. Novel Conductive Coatings of Carbon Nanotubes: A Fundamental Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-29

    naphthalate ) transparent composite film: it gave conductivity of 130/sq with 80% transmittance at 400-700nm wavelength range. In contrast,, current...with metallic SWNT (m-SWNT) coated on PEN (poly-ethylene- naphthalate ) transparent composite film: it gave conductivity of 130fVsq with 80...adhere well to PEN (poly-ethylene- naphthalate ) film surface and it passes tape adhesion test. The m-SWNT, the best one we have scouted, was separated

  1. Final Technical Report CONDUCTIVE COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS USING CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J Glatkowski; Jorma Peltola; Christopher Weeks; Mike Trottier; David Britz

    2007-09-30

    US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a grant for Eikos Inc. to investigate the feasibility of developing and utilizing Transparent Conducting Coatings (TCCs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) for solar cell applications. Conventional solar cells today employ metal oxide based TCCs with both Electrical Resistivity (R) and Optical Transparency (T), commonly referred to as optoelectronic (RT) performance significantly higher than with those possible with CNT based TCCs available today. Transparent metal oxide based coatings are also inherently brittle requiring high temperature in vacuum processing and are thus expensive to manufacture. One such material is indium tin oxide (ITO). Global demand for indium has recently increased rapidly while supply has diminished causing substantial spikes in raw material cost and availability. In contrast, the raw material, carbon, needed for CNT fabrication is abundantly available. Transparent Conducting Coatings based on CNTs can overcome not only cost and availability constraints while also offering the ability to be applied by existing, low cost process technologies under ambient conditions. Processes thus can readily be designed both for rigid and flexible PV technology platforms based on mature spray or dip coatings for silicon based solar cells and continuous roll to roll coating processes for polymer solar applications.

  2. Durable superamphiphobic coatings repelling both cool and hot liquids based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Naihua; Fan, Ling; Li, Lingxiao; Zhang, Junping

    2017-11-01

    Superamphiphobic coatings have wide potential applications in many fields, however, preparation of superamphiphobic coatings with low sliding angles and high durability is very challenging. Here, we report a facile spray-coating method for the preparation of durable superamphiphobic coatings repelling both cool and hot liquids from polyperfluoroalkylsilane-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs@fluoroPOS). The MWCNTs@fluoroPOS suspensions were preparation by hydrolytic condensation of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (PFDTES) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) on the surface of MWCNTs. The suspensions and the superamphiphobic coatings were characterized using a variety of analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmitting electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of the diameter of MWCNTs, and the concentrations of MWCNTs, TEOS and PFDTES on wettability and microstructure of the coatings were also investigated. The coatings show high contact angles and low sliding angles for water and organic liquids of low surface tension such as n-hexadecane, toluene and n-decane. The coatings even exhibit excellent superamphiphobicity for hot water and hot organic liquids up to 80°C, which is seldom achieved according to the previous literatures. Moreover, the coatings feature high mechanical, chemical and environmental durability, and are applicable onto various substrates. The simple method, the high superamphiphobicity to both cool and hot liquids, and the excellent durability of the coatings have paved the way for their practical applications in various fields, e.g., anti-icing, anti-oil climbing and oil transportation, etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards lightweight nanocomposite coatings for corrosion inhibition: Graphene, carbon nanotubes, and nanostructured magnesium as case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Robert Vincent, III

    The field of nanocomposites is a burgeoning area of research due to the interest in the remarkable properties which can be achieved through their use in a variety of applications, including corrosion resistant coatings. Lightweighting is of increasing importance in the world today due to the ever growing push towards energy efficiency and the green movement and in recent years there has been a vast amount of research performed in the area of developing lightweight nanocomposites for corrosion inhibition. Many new composite materials have been developed through the use of newly developed nanomaterials (including carbonaceous and metallic constituents) and their specialized incorporation in the coating matrix materials. We start with a general review on the development of hybrid nanostructured composites for corrosion protection of base metals from a sustainability perspective in Chapter 1. This review demonstrates the ever swelling requirements for a paradigm shift in the way that we protect metals against corrosion due to the costs and environmental concerns that exist with currently used technology. In Chapter 2, we delve into the much required understanding of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide through near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy measurements to elucidate information about the electronic structure upon incorporation of nitrogen within the structure. For successful integration of the carbonaceous nanomaterials into a composite coating, a full swath of knowledge is necessary. Within this work we have shown that upon chemical defunctionalization of graphene oxide to reduced graphene oxide by means of hydrazine treatment, nitrogen is incorporated into the structure in the form of a pyrazole ring. In Chapter 3, we demonstrate that by way of in situ polymerization, graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes can be incorporated within a polymer (polyetherimide, PEI) matrix. Two systems have been developed including graphene and

  4. Carbon nanotube-coating accelerated cell adhesion and proliferation on poly (L-lactide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Eri; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Uo, Motohiro; Takita, Hiroko; Watari, Fumio; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2012-12-01

    The surface of a polylactic acid (PLLA) was coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in order to improve the surface properties. In addition, its surface characteristics and cell culturing properties were examined. Whole surface of PLLA was homogeneously covered by MWCNTs maintained a unique tubular structure. MWCNT-coated PLLA showed remarkable higher wettability than uncoated PLLA. Human osteosarcoma cell line (Saos2) adhered well on the CNT-coated PLLA whereas there are few cells attached on the uncoated PLLA at 2 h after seeding. The number of the cells on uncoated PLLA was still smaller than on the MWCNT-coated PLLA at 1 and 3 days. Moreover, The DNA content in the cells attached to the MWCNT-coated PLLA was significantly higher than that on the uncoated PLLA (p < 0.05) at 1 and 3 days. There was no significant difference between the scaffolds for ALP activity normalized by DNA content at both term (p > 0.1). Therefore MWCNT-coating on PLLA improved the surface wettability and initial cell attachment at early stage.

  5. Enhanced field emission from lanthanum hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Correlation with physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S.; Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Jha, Menaka; Ganguli, A. K.; Schmidt, H.; Schulze, S.; Hietschold, M.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2014-10-28

    Detailed results from field emission studies of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) coated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films, pristine LaB{sub 6} films, and pristine MWCNT films are reported. The films have been synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. An impressive increase in field enhancement factor and temporal stability as well as a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field are observed in LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNTs compared to pristine MWCNT and pristine LaB{sub 6} films. Surface morphology of the films has been examined by scanning electron microscopy. Introduction of LaB{sub 6} nanoparticles on the outer walls of CNTs LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNTs films is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of LaB{sub 6} was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results and further validated by the Raman spectra. Raman spectroscopy also shows 67% increase in defect concentration in MWCNTs upon coating with LaB{sub 6} and an upshift in the 2D band that could be attributed to p-type doping. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal a reduction in the work function of LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNT with respect to its pristine counterpart. The enhanced field emission properties in LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNT films are correlated with a change in microstructure and work function.

  6. Bioinspired and biocompatible carbon nanotube-Ag nanohybrid coatings for robust antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chuanxiong; Yang, Ye; Cheng, Chong; Ma, Lang; Deng, Jie; Wang, Lingren; Zhao, Changsheng

    2017-03-15

    The design of self-sterilizing surfaces with favorable biocompatibility is acknowledged as an effective approach to deal with the bacterial infections of biomedical devices. In this study, we report an intriguing protocol for the large-scale fabrication of self-sterilizing and biocompatible surface film coatings by using polymer shielded silver nanoparticle loaded oxidized carbon nanotube (AgNPs@oCNT) nano-dispersions. To achieve the antibacterial coatings, the bioinspired positively charged and negatively charged AgNPs@oCNTs were alternately deposited onto substrates by spray-coating assisted layer-by-layer assembly. Then the bacterial inhibitory zones, optical density value monitoring, bacterial killing efficiency and adhesion were investigated; and all the results revealed that the AgNPs@oCNTs thin film coatings exhibited robust and long-term antibacterial activity against both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Moreover, due to the shielding effects of polymer layers, the coatings showed extraordinary blood compatibility and limited toxicity against human umbilical vein endothelial cells. It is believed that the proposed large-scale fabrication of bactericidal, blood and cell compatible AgNPs@oCNT based thin film coatings will have great potential to forward novel operational pathogenic inhibition strategies to avoid undesired bacterial contaminations of biomedical implants or biological devices.

  7. Electroless Co-P-Carbon Nanotube composite coating to enhance magnetic properties of grain-oriented electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Vishu; Anderson, Philip; Hall, Jeremy; Robinson, Fiona; Bohm, Siva

    2016-06-01

    The effect of Co-P-CNT coating on the magnetic properties of grain oriented electrical steel was investigated. To analyse the coating, Raman spectroscopy, Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID), single strip testing, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and talysurf surface profilometry were performed. Raman spectra showed the D and G band which corroborates the presence of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) in the coating. The magnetic nature of the coating was confirmed by SQUID results. Power loss results show an improvement ranging 13-15% after coating with Co-P-CNT. The resistivity of the coating was measured to be 104 μΩ cm. Loss separation graphs were plotted before and after coating to study the improvement in power loss. It was found that the coating helps in reducing the hysteresis loss. The thickness of the coating was found to be 414±40 nm. The surface profilometry results showed that the surface roughness improved after coating the sample.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT) and Ni-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (Ni-MWCNT) Repair Patches for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Brienne; Caraccio, Anne; Tate, LaNetra; Jackson, Dionne

    2011-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy and nickel-coated multi-walled carbon nanotube (Ni-MWCNT)/epoxy systems were fabricated into carbon fiber composite repair patches via vacuum resin infusion. Two 4 ply patches were manufactured with fiber orientations of [90/ 90/ 4590] and [0/90/ +45/ -45]. Prior to resin infusion, the MWCNT/Epoxy system and NiMWCNT/ epoxy systems were optimized for dispersion quality. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to determine the presence ofcarbon nanotubes and assess dispersion quality. Decomposition temperatures were determined via thermogravametric analysis (TGA). SEM and TGA were also used to evaluate the composite repair patches.

  9. Carbon nanotube composite coating of neural microelectrodes preferentially improves the multiunit signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranauskas, Gytis; Maggiolini, Emma; Castagnola, Elisa; Ansaldo, Alberto; Mazzoni, Alberto; Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Vato, Alessandro; Ricci, Davide; Panzeri, Stefano; Fadiga, Luciano

    2011-10-01

    Extracellular metal microelectrodes are widely used to record single neuron activity in vivo. However, their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is often far from optimal due to their high impedance value. It has been recently reported that carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings may decrease microelectrode impedance, thus improving their performance. To tease out the different contributions to SNR of CNT-coated microelectrodes we carried out impedance and noise spectroscopy measurements of platinum/tungsten microelectrodes coated with a polypyrrole-CNT composite. Neuronal signals were recorded in vivo from rat cortex by employing tetrodes with two recording sites coated with polypyrrole-CNT and the remaining two left untreated. We found that polypyrrole-CNT coating significantly reduced the microelectrode impedance at all neuronal signal frequencies (from 1 to 10 000 Hz) and induced a significant improvement of the SNR, up to fourfold on average, in the 150-1500 Hz frequency range, largely corresponding to the multiunit frequency band. An equivalent circuit, previously proposed for porous conducting polymer coatings, reproduced the impedance spectra of our coated electrodes but could not explain the frequency dependence of SNR improvement following polypyrrole-CNT coating. This implies that neither the neural signal amplitude, as recorded by a CNT-coated metal microelectrode, nor noise can be fully described by the equivalent circuit model we used here and suggests that a more detailed approach may be needed to better understand the signal propagation at the electrode-solution interface. Finally, the presence of significant noise components that are neither thermal nor electronic makes it difficult to establish a direct relationship between the actual electrode noise and the impedance spectra.

  10. Production and characterization of Ni and Cu composite coatings by electrodeposition reinforced with carbon nanotubes or graphite nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, M. R. Abdul; Pavese, M.; Ambrosio, E. P.; Ugues, D.; Lombardi, M.; Biamino, S.; Badini, C.; Fino, P.

    2013-06-01

    Electrodeposition is well-known as a versatile and economical processing technique to produce metal coatings on conductive substrates. Recently, it has been gaining increasing interest also for the production of tailored composite coatings, containing for instance floropolymers or silicon carbide. A more novel approach concerns the use of carbon nanotubes or even graphene, in the form of graphite nano-platelets. The production of Ni- and Cu-based nanocomposites containing carbon nanoreinforcements was carried out by using standard electrodeposition conditions, but with a particular attention to the dispersion of the nanotubes. The obtained coatings were strong and well adherent to the steel substrate, and presented rather well dispersed carbon nanotubes or graphite nanoplatelets, even if some agglomerates could be present in samples obtained from highly concentrated suspensions. In the case of nickel-based composite coatings, the size of nickel grains was reduced, and pin-on-disc tests demonstrated a significant increase in the life of the coating. In the case of copper-based composite coatings, thermal diffusivity measurements demonstrated that the carbon nanomaterial does not reduce the conductivity of the pure copper coating.

  11. Conductive Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes To Construct Stretchable and Transparent Electrochemical Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zi-He; Liu, Yan-Ling; Chen, Jing-Jing; Cai, Si-Liang; Xu, Jia-Quan; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2017-02-07

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based flexible sensors have been intensively developed for physical sensing. However, great challenges remain in fabricating stretchable CNT films with high electrochemical performance for real-time chemical sensing, due to large sheet resistance of CNT film and further resistance increase caused by separation between each CNT during stretching. Herein, we develop a facile and versatile strategy to construct single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)-based stretchable and transparent electrochemical sensors, by coating and binding each SWNT with conductive polymer. As a polymer with high conductivity, good electrochemical activity, and biocompatibility, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) acting as a superior conductive coating and binder reduces contact resistance and greatly improves the electrochemical performance of SWNTs film. Furthermore, PEDOT protects the SWNTs junctions from separation during stretching, which endows the sensor with highly mechanical compliance and excellent electrochemical performance during big deformation. These unique features allow real-time monitoring of biochemical signals from mechanically stretched cells. This work represents an important step toward construction of a high performance CNTs-based stretchable electrochemical sensor, therefore broadening the way for stretchable sensors in a diversity of biomedical applications.

  12. Chitosan/silica coated carbon nanotubes composite proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai; Gong, Chunli; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Huanli; Cheng, Fan; Wang, Guangjin; Zheng, Genwen; Qin, Caiqin; Wen, Sheng

    2016-01-20

    Silica-coated carbon nanotubes (SCNTs), which were obtained by a simple sol-gel method, were utilized in preparation of chitosan/SCNTs (CS/SCNTs) composite membranes. The thermal and oxidative stability, morphology, mechanical properties, water uptake and proton conductivity of CS/SCNTs composite membranes were investigated. The insulated and hydrophilic silica layer coated on CNTs eliminates the risk of electronic short-circuiting and enhances the interaction between SCNTs and chitosan to ensure the homogenous dispersion of SCNTs, although the water uptake of CS/SCNTs membranes is reduced owing to the decrease of the effective number of the amino functional groups of chitosan. The CS/SCNTs composite membranes are superior to the pure CS membrane in thermal and oxidative stability, mechanical properties and proton conductivity. The results of this study suggest that CS/SCNTs composite membranes exhibit promising potential for practical application in proton exchange membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic response of tapered optical multimode fiber coated with carbon nanotubes for ethanol sensing application.

    PubMed

    Shabaneh, Arafat; Girei, Saad; Arasu, Punitha; Mahdi, Mohd; Rashid, Suraya; Paiman, Suriati; Yaacob, Mohd

    2015-05-04

    Ethanol is a highly combustible chemical universally designed for biomedical applications. In this paper, optical sensing performance of tapered multimode fiber tip coated with carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film towards aqueous ethanol with different concentrations is investigated. The tapered optical multimode fiber tip is coated with CNT using drop-casting technique and is annealed at 70 °C to enhance the binding of the nanomaterial to the silica fiber tip. The optical fiber tip and the CNT sensing layer are micro-characterized using FESEM and Raman spectroscopy techniques. When the developed sensor was exposed to different concentrations of ethanol (5% to 80%), the sensor reflectance reduced proportionally. The developed sensors showed high sensitivity, repeatability and fast responses (<55 s) towards ethanol.

  14. Dynamic Response of Tapered Optical Multimode Fiber Coated with Carbon Nanotubes for Ethanol Sensing Application

    PubMed Central

    Shabaneh, Arafat; Girei, Saad; Arasu, Punitha; Mahdi, Mohd; Rashid, Suraya; Paiman, Suriati; Yaacob, Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a highly combustible chemical universally designed for biomedical applications. In this paper, optical sensing performance of tapered multimode fiber tip coated with carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film towards aqueous ethanol with different concentrations is investigated. The tapered optical multimode fiber tip is coated with CNT using drop-casting technique and is annealed at 70 °C to enhance the binding of the nanomaterial to the silica fiber tip. The optical fiber tip and the CNT sensing layer are micro-characterized using FESEM and Raman spectroscopy techniques. When the developed sensor was exposed to different concentrations of ethanol (5% to 80%), the sensor reflectance reduced proportionally. The developed sensors showed high sensitivity, repeatability and fast responses (<55 s) towards ethanol. PMID:25946634

  15. High Sensitivity Carbon Nanotubes Flow-Rate Sensors and Their Performance Improvement by Coating

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xing; Zhou, Zhaoying; Wang, Dingqu; Liu, Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    A new type of hot-wire flow-rate sensor (HWFS) with a sensing element made of a macro-sized carbon nanotube (CNT) strand is presented in this study. An effective way to improve repeatability of the CNT flow-rate sensor by coating a layer of Al2O3 on the CNT surface is proposed. Experimental results show that due to the large surface-to-volume ratio and thin coated Al2O3 layer, the CNT flow-rate sensor has higher sensitivity and faster response than a conventional platinum (Pt) HWFS. It is also demonstrated that the covered CNT flow-rate sensor has better repeatability than its bare counterpart due to insulation from the surrounding environment. The proposed CNT flow-rate sensor shows application potential for high-sensitivity measurement of flow rate. PMID:22399913

  16. Plasma-Etching of Spray-Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Biointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon Hyub; Lee, Jun-Yong; Min, Nam Ki

    2012-08-01

    We present an effective method for the batch fabrication of miniaturized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film electrodes using oxygen plasma etching. We adopted the approach of spray-coating for good adhesion of the SWCNT film onto a pre-patterned Pt support and used O2 plasma patterning of the coated films to realize efficient biointerfaces between SWCNT surfaces and biomolecules. By these approaches, the SWCNT film can be easily integrated into miniaturized electrode systems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes as biointerfaces, Legionella antibody was selected as analysis model owing to its considerable importance to electrochemical biosensors and was detected using plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes and a 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-benzidine dihydrochloride/horseradish peroxidase (TMB/HRP) catalytic system. The response currents increased with increasing concentration of Legionella antibody. This result indicates that antibodies were effectively immobilized on plasma-etched and activated SWCNT surfaces.

  17. Self-supported supercapacitor membranes: Polypyrrole-coated carbon nanotube networks enabled by pulsed electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yueping; Liu, Jianwei; Yu, Deok Jin; Wicksted, James P.; Kalkan, Kaan; Topal, C. Ozge; Flanders, Bret N.; Wu, Judy; Li, Jun

    Self-supported supercapacitor electrodes with remarkably high specific capacitance have been developed by homogeneously coating polypyrrole (PPy) on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes. Polypyrrole can be deposited around the individual MWCNTs in a uniform manner throughout the MWCNT membrane via a pulsed electrochemical deposition method. This approach optimizes the pseudocapacitance of the membrane. Electrochemical data and Raman spectra indicate that the high specific capacitance is not only due to more uniform PPy coating, but also higher redox activity that is likely associated with a more ordered PPy packing. Such composite membranes can be directly used as supercapacitor electrodes without backing metal films or binders. A remarkable specific capacitance of 427 F g -1 has been achieved using 5-s electrodeposition pulses. This technique provides a viable solution for developing high-performance electrical energy storage devices.

  18. Effect of laser melting on plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Samant, Anoop; Balani, Kantesh; Dahotre, Narendra B.; Agarwal, Arvind

    2009-03-01

    The effect of laser melting on the microstructure and mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide composite coating reinforced with 4 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reported. Laser-melted layer consists of dense, coarse columnar microstructure which is significantly different from plasma-sprayed coating that consists of splats and porosity. CNTs retained their original cylindrical graphitic structure after undergoing laser irradiation. Three dimensional heat flow model has been developed to estimate temperature variation in the laser-melted composite layer. Laser-melted layers show an increase in the microhardness at the expanse of degradation of fracture toughness. Nanoindentation study indicates an increase in the elastic modulus and yield strength of the laser-melted layer which is attributed to dense microstructure with absence of weak-bonding splats and porosity.

  19. Influence of carbon nanotubes coatings onto carbon fiber by oxidative treatments combined with electrophoretic deposition on interfacial properties of carbon fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chao; Jiang, Jianjun; Liu, Fa; Fang, Liangchao; Wang, Junbiao; Li, Dejia; Wu, Jianjun

    2015-12-01

    To improve the interfacial performance of carbon fiber (CF) and epoxy resin, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coatings were utilized to achieve this purpose through coating onto CF by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid combined with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The influence of electrophoretically deposited CNTs coatings on the surface properties of CFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic contact angle analysis. The results indicated that the deposition of carbon nanotubes introduced some polar groups to carbon fiber surfaces, enhanced surface roughness and changed surface morphologies of carbon fibers. Surface wettability of carbon fibers may be significantly improved by increasing surface free energy of the fibers due to the deposition of CNTs. The thickness and density of the coatings increases with the introduction of pretreatment of the CF during the EPD process. Short beam shear test was performed to examine the effect of carbon fiber functionalization on mechanical properties of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites. The interfacial adhesion of CNTs/CF reinforced epoxy composites showed obvious enhancement of interlaminar shear strength by 60.2% and scanning electron microscope photographs showed that the failure mode of composites was changed after the carbon fibers were coated with CNTs.

  20. Evaluating the thermal damage resistance of graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid composite coatings

    PubMed Central

    David, L.; Feldman, A.; Mansfield, E.; Lehman, J.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    We study laser irradiation behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and chemically modified graphene (rGO)-composite spray coatings for use as a thermal absorber material for high-power laser calorimeters. Spray coatings on aluminum test coupon were exposed to increasing laser irradiance for extended exposure times to quantify their damage threshold and optical absorbance. The coatings, prepared at varying mass % of MWCNTs in rGO, demonstrated significantly higher damage threshold values at 2.5 kW laser power at 10.6 μm wavelength than carbon paint or MWCNTs alone. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of irradiated specimens show that the coating prepared at 50% CNT loading endure at least 2 kW.cm−2 for 10 seconds without significant damage. The improved damage resistance is attributed to the unique structure of the composite in which the MWCNTs act as an efficient absorber of laser light while the much larger rGO sheets surrounding them, dissipate the heat over a wider area. PMID:24603681

  1. Evaluating the thermal damage resistance of graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, L.; Feldman, A.; Mansfield, E.; Lehman, J.; Singh, G.

    2014-03-01

    We study laser irradiation behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and chemically modified graphene (rGO)-composite spray coatings for use as a thermal absorber material for high-power laser calorimeters. Spray coatings on aluminum test coupon were exposed to increasing laser irradiance for extended exposure times to quantify their damage threshold and optical absorbance. The coatings, prepared at varying mass % of MWCNTs in rGO, demonstrated significantly higher damage threshold values at 2.5 kW laser power at 10.6 μm wavelength than carbon paint or MWCNTs alone. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of irradiated specimens show that the coating prepared at 50% CNT loading endure at least 2 kW.cm-2 for 10 seconds without significant damage. The improved damage resistance is attributed to the unique structure of the composite in which the MWCNTs act as an efficient absorber of laser light while the much larger rGO sheets surrounding them, dissipate the heat over a wider area.

  2. Carbon nanotube-coated solid-phase microextraction metal fiber based on sol-gel technique.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruifen; Zhu, Fang; Luan, Tiangang; Tong, Yexiang; Liu, Hong; Ouyang, Gangfeng; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2009-05-29

    A novel carbon nanotube (CNT)-coated solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared based on sol-gel technique. Commonly used fragile fused silica fiber was replaced with stainless steel wire, which made the fiber unbreakable. An approach was also proposed for batch producing, and good reproducibilities for fiber to fiber and between fibers were achieved. Experiments showed that the sol-gel-CNT fiber exhibited high thermal stability to resist 350 degrees C and excellent solvent durability in methanol and acetonitrile. Compared to commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber, the sol-gel-CNT fiber represented significantly improved extraction efficiencies for both polar (phenols) and non-polar (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene) compounds. Meanwhile, no replacement effect, low carry-over and wide linear range demonstrated that the newly prepared sol-gel-CNT coating has liquid properties, which allow a relatively easy quantification procedure. Moreover, the characterization of the sol-gel-CNT coating was also evaluated with McReynold probe solutes. The results showed that the coating has better affinity for all the five types of solutes compared to commercial 7microm PDMS fiber, which suggested that the coating has the potential to be developed as GC stationary phase.

  3. Metal coated functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes for composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiang

    This study is considered as a method for producing multifunctional composite materials by using metals coated Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this research, various metals (Ni, Cu, Ag) were successfully deposited onto the surface of SWCNTs. It has been found that homogenous dispersion and dense nucleation sites are the necessary conditions to form uniform coatings on SWCNTs. Functionalization has been applied to achieve considerable improvement in the dispersion of purified SWCNTs and creates more nucleation sites for subsequent metal deposition. A three-step electroless plating approach was used and the coating mechanism is described in the paper. The samples were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Bulk copper/aluminum-SWNT composites were processed by powder metallurgy with wet mixing techniques. Coated SWCNTs were well dispersed in the metal matrix. Cold pressing followed by sintering was applied to control porosity. The relationships between hardness and SWCNTs addition were discussed. Ni-SWCNTs composite coatings were prepared by electro-composite deposition. SWCNTs were suspended in a Ni deposition electrolyte and deposited together with nickel during electrodeposition. SWCNTs concentrations in the coatings were found to be related to the SWCNTs concentration in the solution, current density and agitation rate. The microstructure of the coatings has been examined by electron microscopy. Ni coated SWCNTs were also incorporated into the high temperature Bismaleimide (BMI)/graphite composite to improve Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding and surface conductivity. The vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) was used to process these composites. Surface and volume resistivity and EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites

  4. A label-free cytosensor for the enhanced electrochemical detection of cancer cells using polydopamine-coated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Rui; Zou, Lanfang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-03-21

    An electrochemical, label-free method was developed to detect folate receptor positive tumor cells by specific recognition of a polydopamine-coated carbon nanotubes-folate nanoprobe to cell-surface folate receptors. This strategy offers great promise to extend its application in studying the interaction of ligand and cell-surface receptor.

  5. Ni-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the magnetorheological performance of magnetorheological gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pingan; Yu, Miao; Fu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    As a kind of new Magnetorheological (MR) material, MR Gel (MRG) can be regarded as the analog of MR fluid (MRF), which can overcome the iron particles sedimentation and unstable application of MRF. Normally, the storage modulus of conventional MRG is relatively small, although it has a very high relative MR effect. Therefore, practical engineering application of conventional MRG has been restricted more or less. In this work, an MRG with high magneto-induced shear storage modulus and excellent relative MR effect has been fabricated by incorporating Ni-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-coated MWCNTs). And several polyurethane-based MRG composites with the addition of Ni-coated MWCNTs were prepared. The dynamic mechanical property of those MRG composites with applying magnetic field is researched through an advanced commercial rheometer. The experimental results indicated that the initial storage modulus and magneto-induced modulus in sample 4 (containing 6 wt% of the Ni-coated MWCNTs) were approximately 4.45 and 2.27 times than that in the sample 1 (without Ni-coated MWCNTs). Moreover, the relative MR effect of sample 4 can reach 3427 %. The high modulus of sample 4 can be mainly attributed to the following points. One is the Ni-coated MWCNTs can be aligned along the direction of the magnetic field within the matrix which provided a better reinforcing efficiency. The other is Ni-coated MWCNTs can be made to form a better bonding between the iron particles and the matrix. It is concluded that this study provides a meaningful way to improve the mechanical properties of MRG and expected to promote the application of MRG in practice.

  6. Bimodal Latex Effect on Spin-Coated Thin Conductive Polymer-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Layers.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mohammad-Amin; Larrakoetxea Angoitia, Katalin; van Berkel, Stefan; Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Friedrich, Heiner; Heuts, Johan P A; van der Schoot, Paul; van Herk, Alex M

    2015-11-10

    We synthesize two differently sized poly(methyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl acrylate) latexes by emulsion polymerization and mix these with a sonicated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion, in order to prepare 3% SWCNT composite mixtures. We spin-coat these mixtures at various spin-speed rates and spin times over a glass substrate, producing a thin, transparent, solid, conductive layer. Keeping the amount of SWCNTs constant, we vary the weight fraction of our smaller 30-nm latex particles relative to the larger 70-nm-sized ones. We find a maximum in the electrical conductivity up to 370 S/m as a function of the weight fraction of smaller particles, depending on the overall solid content, the spin speed, and the spin time. This maximum occurs at 3-5% of the smaller latex particles. We also find a more than 2-fold increase in conductivity parallel to the radius of spin-coating than perpendicular to it. Atomic force microscopy points at the existence of lanes of latex particles in the spin-coated thin layer, while large-area transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the SWCNTs are aligned over a grid fixed on the glass substrate during the spin-coating process. We extract the conductivity distribution on the surface of the thin film and translate this into the direction of the SWCNTs in it.

  7. Toxicity analysis of various Pluronic F-68-coated carbon nanotubes on mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Meng-Zhu; Hu, Yu-Lan; Sheng, Xiao-Xia; Lin, Jun; Ling, Daishun; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-04-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have poor colloid stability in biological media and exert cytotoxic effects on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Modification with polymeric surfactant is a widely used strategy to enhance water dispersibility of CNTs. This study investigated the toxic effects of various Pluronic F-68 (PF68)-coated multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) on rat bone marrow-derived MSCs.PF68-coated MWCNTs showed favorable biocompatibility to MSCs that the cell viability, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not altered after 24 h of co-incubation. Nevertheless, significant apoptosis induction and massive ROS release were found following extended exposure (48 and 72 h), and the toxic impact was dependent on the initial surface properties of the encapsulated MWCNTs. All the types of PF68-coated MWCNTs did not affect the cell-surface markers and in vivo biodistribution of MSCs. Our results suggest that proper polymer coating can reduce the acute toxicity of MWCNTs to MSCs but without altering their biological fate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Conductive paper from lignocellulose wood microfibers coated with a nanocomposite of carbon nanotubes and conductive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Mangilal; Xing, Qi; Shim, Bong Sup; Kotov, Nicholas; Varahramyan, Kody; Lvov, Yuri

    2009-05-01

    Composite nanocoating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) and aqueous dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNT-PSS) on lignocellulose wood microfibers has been developed to make conductive microfibers and paper sheets. To construct the multilayers on wood microfibers, cationic poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) has been used in alternate deposition with anionic conductive PEDOT-PSS and solubilized CNT-PSS. Using a Keithley microprobe measurement system, current-voltage measurements have been carried out on single composite microfibers after deposition of each layer to optimize the electrical properties of the coated microfibers. The conductivity of the resultant wood microfibers was in the range of 10-2-2 S cm-1 depending on the architecture of the coated layer. Further, the conductivity of the coated wood microfibers increased up to 20 S cm-1 by sandwiching multilayers of conductive co-polymer PEDOT-PSS with CNT-PSS through a polycation (PEI) interlayer. Moreover, paper hand sheets were manufactured from these coated wood microfibers with conductivity ranging from 1 to 20 S cm-1. A paper composite structure consisting of conductive/dielectric/conductive layers that acts as a capacitor has also been fabricated and is reported.

  9. Conductive paper from lignocellulose wood microfibers coated with a nanocomposite of carbon nanotubes and conductive polymers.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Mangilal; Xing, Qi; Shim, Bong Sup; Kotov, Nicholas; Varahramyan, Kody; Lvov, Yuri

    2009-05-27

    Composite nanocoating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) and aqueous dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNT-PSS) on lignocellulose wood microfibers has been developed to make conductive microfibers and paper sheets. To construct the multilayers on wood microfibers, cationic poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) has been used in alternate deposition with anionic conductive PEDOT-PSS and solubilized CNT-PSS. Using a Keithley microprobe measurement system, current-voltage measurements have been carried out on single composite microfibers after deposition of each layer to optimize the electrical properties of the coated microfibers. The conductivity of the resultant wood microfibers was in the range of 10(-2)-2 S cm(-1) depending on the architecture of the coated layer. Further, the conductivity of the coated wood microfibers increased up to 20 S cm(-1) by sandwiching multilayers of conductive co-polymer PEDOT-PSS with CNT-PSS through a polycation (PEI) interlayer. Moreover, paper hand sheets were manufactured from these coated wood microfibers with conductivity ranging from 1 to 20 S cm(-1). A paper composite structure consisting of conductive/dielectric/conductive layers that acts as a capacitor has also been fabricated and is reported.

  10. Thickness limitations in carbon nanotube reinforced silicon nitride coatings synthesized by vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Eres, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration is a convenient method for synthesizing carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced ceramic coatings. The thickness over which infiltration is relatively uniform is limited by gas phase diffusion in the pore structure. These effects were investigated in two types of silicon nitride matrix composites. With CNTs that were distributed uniformly on the substrate surface dense coatings were limited to thicknesses of several microns. With dual structured CNT arrays produced by photolithography coatings up to 400 gm thick were obtained with minimal residual porosity. Gas transport into these dual structured materials was facilitated by creating micron sized channels between "CNT pillars" (i.e. each pillar consisted of a large number of individual CNTs). The experimental results are consistent with basic comparisons between the rates of gas diffusion and silicon nitride growth in porous structures. This analysis also provides a general insight into optimizing infiltration conditions during the fabrication of thick CNT-reinforced composite coatings. (C) 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Polyurethane foams electrophoretically coated with carbon nanotubes for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zawadzak, Ewelina; Bil, Monika; Ryszkowska, Joanna; Nazhat, Showan N; Cho, Johann; Bretcanu, Oana; Roether, Judith A; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2009-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited on the surfaces of polyurethane (PUR) foams by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The parameters of EPD were optimized in order to obtain homogeneous CNT coatings on PUR foams and adequate infiltration of the three-dimensional (3D) porous network. The microstructure of the composites was investigated by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), revealing that optimal quality of the coatings was achieved by an EPD voltage of 20 V. The thermal properties of the CNT-coated specimens, determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), were correlated to the foam microstructure. In vitro tests in concentrated simulated body fluid (1.5 SBF) were performed to study the influence of the presence of CNTs on the bioactivity of PUR-based scaffolds, assessed by the formation of calcium phosphate (CaP) compounds, e.g. hydroxyapatite (HA), on the foam surfaces. It was observed that CNTs accelerate the precipitation of CaP, which is thought to be due to the presence of more nucleation centres for crystal nucleation and growth, as compared with uncoated foams. Polyurethane foams with CNT coating have the potential to be used as bioactive scaffolds in bone tissue engineering due to their high interconnected porosity, bioactivity and nanostructured surface topography.

  12. Production of carbon nano-tubes via CCVD method and their corrosion protection performance in epoxy based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, M. A.; Ghauri, F. A.; Awan, M. S.; Farooq, A.; Ahmad, R.

    2016-08-01

    Good yield of carbon products was obtained by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique using 100-500mg of ferrocene catalyst at temperature of 900 °C and acetylene flow rate of 150-200cc/min. The effects of amount of ferrocene, temperature and hydrocarbons precursors on the yield of carbon nanomaterial's was calculated and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) andenergy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Good yield of carbon nanomaterials primarily consisted of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanoparticles was obtained. CNTs obtained after purification were dispersed in epoxy resin to produce composite coatings which were coated on stainless steel 316L. The coated stainless steel samples’ corrosion behavior was studied using open circuit potential (OCP), cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Results showed that epoxy coating containing 4 wt. % of CNTs offered improved corrosion resistance to stainless steel.

  13. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating - A molecular dynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  14. Grafting polymer coatings onto the surfaces of carbon nanotube forests and yarns via a photon irradiation process

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Fei; Rujisamphan, N.; Liu Chang; Ismat Shah, S.; Ni Chaoying; Maezono, Yoshinari; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Huynh, Chi P.

    2012-05-21

    Surface activation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as forests and yarns, depolytmerization of candidate polymers, and uniform deposition and re-polymerization onto the activated CNTs are simultaneously achieved by exposing CNTs and polymer targets to light with a narrow wavelength distribution from a vacuum ultraviolet lamp. Both polystyrene and poly (methyl methacrylate) are deposited onto the surface of CNTs in the CNT-forest and yarn in a N{sub 2} environment for 30 min during which the polymer uniformly coats the carbon nanotubes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal that covalent bonding occurs at the CNT-polymer interface.

  15. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Novikov, Serguei; Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-05-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40-60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  16. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ajai Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Novikov, Serguei

    2016-05-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40–60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  17. TiO2-Coated Carbon Nanotube-Silicon Solar Cells with Efficiency of 15%

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Enzheng; Zhang, Luhui; Li, Zhen; Li, Peixu; Shang, Yuanyuan; Jia, Yi; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai; Zhang, Sen; Cao, Anyuan

    2012-01-01

    Combining carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene or conducting polymers with conventional silicon wafers leads to promising solar cell architectures with rapidly improved power conversion efficiency until recently. Here, we report CNT-Si junction solar cells with efficiencies reaching 15% by coating a TiO2 antireflection layer and doping CNTs with oxidative chemicals, under air mass (AM 1.5) illumination at a calibrated intensity of 100 mW/cm2 and an active device area of 15 mm2. The TiO2 layer significantly inhibits light reflectance from the Si surface, resulting in much enhanced short-circuit current (by 30%) and external quantum efficiency. Our method is simple, well-controlled, and very effective in boosting the performance of CNT-Si solar cells. PMID:23181192

  18. Synthesis of ZnO coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Sui, Minghao; Zhang, Lingdian; Sheng, Li; Huang, Shuhang; She, Lei

    2013-05-01

    ZnO coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (ZnO/MWCNTs) were prepared and evaluated for their application potentials as an antimicrobial material for simultaneous concentrating and inactivating pathogenic bacteria. X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) were used to characterize the ZnO/MWCNTs. Escherichia coli (E. coli) was employed as the target bacterium. Comparing with the raw and the purified MWCNTs (r-MWCNTs and p-MWCNTs), which have been reported to possess antibacterial activity towards E. coli, ZnO/MWCNTs exhibited stronger antibacterial ability. The deposited ZnO was suggested to play an important role in the bactericidal action of ZnO/MWCNTs, while, the r-MWCNTs and p-MWCNTs served as more like adsorbing materials for E. coli.

  19. Facile Preparation of Octadecyl Monoliths with Incorporated Carbon Nanotubes and Neutral Monoliths with Coated Carbon Nanotubes Stationary Phases for HPLC of Small and Large Molecules by Hydrophobic and π-π Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mayadunne, Erandi; Rassi, Ziad El

    2014-01-01

    Two approaches for incorporating carbon nanotubes into monolithic columns for HPLC are described in this report. They pertain to the investigation of carbon nanotubes either (i) as entities to modulate solute retention on monolithic columns bearing well defined retentive ligands or (ii) as entities that constitute the stationary phase responsible for solute retention and separation. Approach (i) involved the incorporation of carbon nanotubes into octadecyl monolithic columns while approach (ii) concerns the preparation and evaluation of an ideal monolithic support and coating it with carbon nanotubes to yield a real “carbon nanotube stationary phase” for the HPLC separation of a wide range of solutes. First, an octadecyl monolithic column based on the in situ polymerization of octadecyl acrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate was optimized for use in HPLC separations of small and large solutes (e.g., proteins). To further modulate the retention and separation of proteins, small amounts of carbon nanotubes were incorporated into the octadecyl monolith column. In approach (ii), an inert, relatively polar monolith based on the in situ polymerization of glyceryl monomethacrylate (GMM) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) proved to be the most suitable support for the preparation of “carbon nanotube stationary phase”. This carbon nanotube “coated” monolith proved useful in the HPLC separation of a wide range of small solutes including enantiomers. In approach (ii), a more homogeneous incorporation of carbon nanotubes into the diol monolithic columns (i.e., GMM/EDMA) was achieved when hydroxyl functionalized carbon nanotubes were incorporated into the GMM/EDMA monolithic support. In addition, high power sonication for a short time enhanced further the homogeneity of the monolith incorporated with nanotubes. In all cases, nonpolar and π interactions were responsible for solute retention on the monolith incorporated carbon nanotubes. PMID:25127634

  20. Sol-gel synthesis of tantalum oxide and phosphonic acid-modified carbon nanotubes composite coatings on titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maho, Anthony; Detriche, Simon; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2013-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes used as fillers in composite materials are more and more appreciated for the outstanding range of accessible properties and functionalities they generate in numerous domains of nanotechnologies. In the framework of biological and medical sciences, and particularly for orthopedic applications and devices (prostheses, implants, surgical instruments, …), titanium substrates covered by tantalum oxide/carbon nanotube composite coatings have proved to constitute interesting and successful platforms for the conception of solid and biocompatible biomaterials inducing the osseous regeneration processes (hydroxyapatite growth, osteoblasts attachment). This paper describes an original strategy for the conception of resistant and homogeneous tantalum oxide/carbon nanotubes layers on titanium through the introduction of carbon nanotubes functionalized by phosphonic acid moieties (-P(=O)(OH)2). Strong covalent C-P bonds are specifically inserted on their external sidewalls with a ratio of two phosphonic groups per anchoring point. Experimental results highlight the stronger "tantalum capture agent" effect of phosphonic-modified nanotubes during the sol-gel formation process of the deposits compared to nanotubes bearing oxidized functions (-OH, -C=O, -C(=O)OH). Particular attention is also paid to the relative impact of the rate of functionalization and the dispersion degree of the carbon nanotubes in the coatings, as well as their wrapping level by the tantalum oxide matrix material. The resulting effect on the in vitro growth of hydroxyapatite is also evaluated to confirm the primary osseous bioactivity of those materials. Chemical, structural and morphological features of the different composite deposits described herein are assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electronic microscopies, energy dispersive X-rays analysis (EDX) and peeling tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes impregnated with polyethyleneimine for carbon dioxide capture under the flue gas condition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Sang; Park, Soo-Jin

    2015-03-15

    In this study, silica-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes impregnated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) were prepared via a two-step process: (i) hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and (ii) impregnation of PEI. The adsorption properties of CO{sub 2} were investigated using CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms at 298 K and thermogravimetric analysis under the flue gas condition (15% CO{sub 2}/85% N{sub 2}). The results obtained in this study indicate that CO{sub 2} adsorption increases after impregnation of PEI. The increase in CO{sub 2} capture was attributed to the affinity between CO{sub 2} and the amine groups. CO{sub 2} adsorption–desorption experiments, which were repeated five times, also showed that the prepared adsorbents have excellent regeneration properties. - Graphical abstract: Fabrication and CO{sub 2} adsorption process of the S-MWCNTs impregnated with PEI. - Highlights: • Silica coated-MWCNT impregnated with PEI was synthesized. • Amine groups of PEI gave CO{sub 2} affinity sites on MWCNT surfaces. • The S-MWCNT/PEI(50) exhibited the highest CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity.

  2. Lightweight, Flexible, High-Performance Carbon Nanotube Cables Made by Scalable Flow Coating.

    PubMed

    Mirri, Francesca; Orloff, Nathan D; Forster, Aaron M; Ashkar, Rana; Headrick, Robert J; Bengio, E Amram; Long, Christian J; Choi, April; Luo, Yimin; Walker, Angela R Hight; Butler, Paul; Migler, Kalman B; Pasquali, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    Coaxial cables for data transmission are ubiquitous in telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, and robotics industries. Yet, the metals used to make commercial cables are unsuitably heavy and stiff. These undesirable traits are particularly problematic in aerospace applications, where weight is at a premium and flexibility is necessary to conform with the distributed layout of electronic components in satellites and aircraft. The cable outer conductor (OC) is usually the heaviest component of modern data cables; therefore, exchanging the conventional metallic OC for lower weight materials with comparable transmission characteristics is highly desirable. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed to replace the metal components in coaxial cables; however, signal attenuation was too high in prototypes produced so far. Here, we fabricate the OC of coaxial data cables by directly coating a solution of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (CSA) onto the cable inner dielectric. This coating has an electrical conductivity that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than the best CNT OC reported in the literature to date. This high conductivity makes CNT coaxial cables an attractive alternative to commercial cables with a metal (tin-coated copper) OC, providing comparable cable attenuation and mechanical durability with a 97% lower component mass.

  3. Enhanced Field Emission from a Carbon Nanotube Array Coated with a Hexagonal Boron Nitride Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Li, Zhenjun; He, Feng; Liu, Mingju; Bai, Bing; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Xiaohui; Zhou, Hang; Li, Chi; Dai, Qing

    2015-08-12

    A high-quality field emission electron source made of a highly ordered array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with a thin film of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is fabricated using a simple and scalable method. This method offers the benefit of reproducibility, as well as the simplicity, safety, and low cost inherent in using B(2)O(3) as the boron precursor. Results measured using h-BN-coated CNT arrays are compared with uncoated control arrays. The optimal thickness of the h-BN film is found to be 3 nm. As a result of the incorporation of h-BN, the turn-on field is found to decrease from 4.11 to 1.36 V μm(-1), which can be explained by the significantly lower emission barrier that is achieved due to the negative electron affinity of h-BN. Meanwhile, the total emission current is observed to increase from 1.6 to 3.7 mA, due to a mechanism that limits the self-current of any individual emitting tip. This phenomenon also leads to improved emission stability and uniformity. In addition, the lifetime of the arrays is improved as well. The h-BN-coated CNT array-based field emitters proposed in this work may open new paths for the development of future high-performance vacuum electronic devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Inkjet printed nanohydrogel coated carbon nanotubes electrodes for matrix independent sensing.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Andreas; Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Amstutz, Véronique; Tacchini, Philippe; Girault, Hubert H

    2015-01-20

    Polyacrylamide (PA) based hydrogels are used in several applications including polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sensing devices. Homogeneous and compact PA films can be prepared based on chemical or photopolymerization processes. However, the accurate and reproducible coating of substrates with nanohydrogel patterns is challenging due to the in situ polymerization and deposition requirements. Herein, we report an inkjet printing (IJP) concept with simultaneously performed UV photopolymerization of a specifically prepared acrylamide/N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) containing ink. A prepolymerization step of the hydrogel precursor molecules was implemented in the ink formulation protocol to adjust the viscosity of the ink and to enhance the rate of polymerization during printing. After the optimization of the printing parameters, a nanometer thin PA hydrogel coating with well distributed nanopores was achieved on top of a stand-alone carbon nanotubes (CNTs) pattern. Batches of fully inkjet printed PA/CNT modified electrodes were prepared that showed outstanding improvements for the electrochemical detection of antioxidants in complex matrices such as untreated orange juice and red wine samples thanks to the properties of the PA coating.

  5. Liquid spreading on ceramic-coated carbon nanotube films and patterned microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hangbo; Hart, A. John

    2015-11-01

    We study the capillary-driven liquid spreading behavior on films and microstructures of ceramic-coated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabricated on quartz substrates. The nanoscale porosity and micro-scale dimensions of the CNT structures, which can be precisely varied by the fabrication process, enable quantitative measurements that can be related to analytical models of the spreading behavior. Moreover, the conformal alumina coating by atomic layer deposition (ALD) prevents capillary-induced deformation of the CNTs upon meniscus recession, which has complicated previous studies of this topic. Washburn-like liquid spreading behavior is observed on non-patterned CNT surfaces, and is explained using a scaling model based on the balance of capillary driving force and the viscous drag force. Using these insights, we design patterned surfaces with controllable spreading rates and study the contact line pinning-depinning behavior. The nanoscale porosity, controllable surface chemistry, and mechanical stability of coated CNTs provide significantly enhanced liquid-solid interfacial area compared to solid microstructures. As a result, these surface designs may be useful for applications such as phase-change heat transfer and electrochemical energy storage. Funding for this project is provided by the National Institutes of Health and the MIT Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy supported by the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.

  6. Polypyrrole coated carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor devices with enhanced electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yeling; Shi, Kaiyuan; Zhitomirsky, Igor

    2014-12-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors (ES) are prepared using amaranth as a new redox-active anionic dopant for chemical polymerization of PPy. The use of amaranth allows excellent electrochemical performance of electrodes with high mass loading and high PPy to current collector mass ratio. The specific capacitance of 4.2 F cm-2 is achieved at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1. The analysis of electrochemical testing results provides an insight into the influence of the chemical structure of amaranth on microstructure, electrochemical properties and cycling stability of PPy. New method is introduced for the fabrication of PPy coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). The use of amaranth allows fine microstructure of PPy coatings formed on MWCNT, which are well dispersed in the presence of pyrocatechol violet dispersant. The use of PPy coated MWCNT allows significant improvement in capacitance retention at high charge-discharge rates, compared to pure PPy material, and good cycling stability of individual electrodes and ES cells. The ES cells, based on PPy show specific capacitance of 1.3-1.6 F cm-2 at discharge current densities of 1-33 mA cm-2.

  7. Magnetically anisotropic additive for scalable manufacturing of polymer nanocomposite: iron-coated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Namiko; Manohara, Harish; Platzman, Ellen

    2016-02-01

    Novel nanoparticles additives for polymer nanocomposites were prepared by coating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with ferromagnetic iron (Fe) layers, so that their micro-structures can be bulk-controlled by external magnetic field application. Application of magnetic fields is a promising, scalable method to deliver bulk amount of nanocomposites while maintaining organized nanoparticle assembly throughout the uncured polymer matrix. In this work, Fe layers (˜18 nm thick) were deposited on CNTs (˜38 nm diameter and ˜50 μm length) to form thin films with high aspect ratio, resulting in a dominance of shape anisotropy and thus high coercivity of ˜50-100 Oe. The Fe-coated CNTs were suspended in water and applied with a weak magnetic field of ˜75 G, and yet preliminary magnetic assembly was confirmed. Our results demonstrate that the fabricated Fe-coated CNTs are magnetically anisotropic and effectively respond to magnetic fields that are ˜103 times smaller than other existing work (˜105 G). We anticipate this work will pave the way for effective property enhancement and bulk application of CNT-polymer nanocomposites, through controlled micro-structure and scalable manufacturing.

  8. Lightweight, flexible, high-performance carbon nanotube cables made by scalable flow coating

    DOE PAGES

    Mirri, Francesca; Orloff, Nathan D.; Forser, Aaron M.; ...

    2016-01-21

    Coaxial cables for data transmission are ubiquitous in telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, and robotics industries. Yet, the metals used to make commercial cables are unsuitably heavy and stiff. These undesirable traits are particularly problematic in aerospace applications, where weight is at a premium and flexibility is necessary to conform with the distributed layout of electronic components in satellites and aircraft. The cable outer conductor (OC) is usually the heaviest component of modern data cables; therefore, exchanging the conventional metallic OC for lower weight materials with comparable transmission characteristics is highly desirable. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed to replace themore » metal components in coaxial cables; however, signal attenuation was too high in prototypes produced so far. Here, we fabricate the OC of coaxial data cables by directly coating a solution of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (CSA) onto the cable inner dielectric. This coating has an electrical conductivity that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than the best CNT OC reported in the literature to date. In conclusion, this high conductivity makes CNT coaxial cables an attractive alternative to commercial cables with a metal (tin-coated copper) OC, providing comparable cable attenuation and mechanical durability with a 97% lower component mass.« less

  9. Lightweight, flexible, high-performance carbon nanotube cables made by scalable flow coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mirri, Francesca; Orloff, Nathan D.; Forser, Aaron M.; Ashkar, Rana; Headrick, Robert J.; Bengio, E. Amram; Long, Christian J.; Choi, April; Luo, Yimin; Hight Walker, Angela R.; Butler, Paul; Migler, Kalman B.; Pasquali, Matteo

    2016-01-21

    Coaxial cables for data transmission are ubiquitous in telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, and robotics industries. Yet, the metals used to make commercial cables are unsuitably heavy and stiff. These undesirable traits are particularly problematic in aerospace applications, where weight is at a premium and flexibility is necessary to conform with the distributed layout of electronic components in satellites and aircraft. The cable outer conductor (OC) is usually the heaviest component of modern data cables; therefore, exchanging the conventional metallic OC for lower weight materials with comparable transmission characteristics is highly desirable. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed to replace the metal components in coaxial cables; however, signal attenuation was too high in prototypes produced so far. Here, we fabricate the OC of coaxial data cables by directly coating a solution of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (CSA) onto the cable inner dielectric. This coating has an electrical conductivity that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than the best CNT OC reported in the literature to date. In conclusion, this high conductivity makes CNT coaxial cables an attractive alternative to commercial cables with a metal (tin-coated copper) OC, providing comparable cable attenuation and mechanical durability with a 97% lower component mass.

  10. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of mercury using multi-walled carbon nanotubes film coated glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hongchao

    2003-10-01

    An electrochemical method for the determination of trace levels of mercury based on a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) film coated glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is described. In 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl solution containing 0.02 mol L(-1) KI, Hg(2+) was firstly preconcentrated at the MWNT film and then reduced at -0.60 V. During the anodic potential sweep, reduced mercury was oxidized, and then a sensitive and well-defined stripping peak at about -0.20 V appeared. Under identical conditions, a MWNT film coated GCE greatly enhances the stripping peak current of mercury in contrast to a bare GCE. Low concentrations of I(-) remarkably improve the determining sensitivity, since this increases the accumulation efficiency of Hg(2+) at the MWNT film coated GCE. The stripping peak current is proportional to the concentration of Hg(2+) over the range 8 x 10(-10)-5 x 10(-7) mol L(-1). The lowest detectable concentration of Hg(2+) is 2 x 10(-10) mol L(-1) at 5 min accumulation. The relative standard deviation (RSD) at 1 x 10(-8) mol L(-1) Hg(2+) was about 6% ( n=10). By using this proposed method, Hg(2+) in some water samples was determined, and the results were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The two results are similar, suggesting that the MWNT-film coated GCE has great potential in practical analysis.

  11. Hierarchical Nanotubes Constructed by Carbon-Coated Ultrathin SnS Nanosheets for Fast Capacitive Sodium Storage.

    PubMed

    He, Peilei; Fang, Yongjin; Yu, Xin-Yao; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2017-09-25

    Tin(II) sulfide (SnS) has been an attractive anode material for sodium ion batteries. Herein, an elegant templating method has been developed for the rational design and synthesis of hierarchical SnS nanotubes composed of ultrathin nanosheets. In order to enhance the electrochemical performance, carbon coated hierarchical SnS nanotubes (denoted as SnS@C nanotubes) have also been obtained by simply adding glucose into the reaction system. Benefiting from their unique structural merits, the SnS@C nanotubes exhibit enhanced sodium storage properties in terms of good cycling performance and superior rate capability. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Localized surface plasmon fiber device coated with carbon nanotubes for the specific detection of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, T.; Arif, R.; Neal, R.; Kalli, K.; Kundrát, V.; Rozhin, A.; Culverhouse, P.; Webb, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    We explored the potential of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating working in conjunction with a recently developed localized surface plasmon (LSP) device (based upon a nanostructured thin film consisting of of nano-wires of platinum) with ultra-high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding index. The uncoated LSP sensor's transmission resonances exhibited a refractive index sensitivity of Δλ/Δn ~ -6200nm/RIU and ΔΙ/Δn ~5900dB/RIU, which is the highest reported spectral sensitivity of a fiber optic sensor to bulk index changes within the gas regime. The complete device provides the first demonstration of the chemically specific gas sensing capabilities of CNTs utilizing their optical characteristics. This is proven by investigating the spectral response of the sensor before and after the adhesion of CNTs to alkane gases along with carbon dioxide. The device shows a distinctive spectral response in the presence of gaseous CO2 over and above what is expected from general changes in the bulk refractive index. This fiber device yielded a limit of detection of 150ppm for CO2 at a pressure of one atmosphere. Additionally the adhered CNTs actually reduce sensitivity of the device to changes in bulk refractive index of the surrounding medium. The polarization properties of the LSP sensor resonances are also investigated and it is shown that there is a reduction in the overall azimuthal polarization after the CNTs are applied. These optical devices offer a way of exploiting optically the chemical selectivity of carbon nanotubes, thus providing the potential for real-world applications in gas sensing in many inflammable and explosive environments.

  13. Carbon-coated silicon nanotube arrays on carbon cloth as a hybrid anode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Gu, Lin; Qian, Haolei; Zhao, Ming; Ding, Xi; Peng, Xinsheng; Sha, Jian; Wang, Yewu

    2016-03-01

    Silicon hollow nanostructure has been considered as one of the most promising material for commercial application in lithium-ion batteries due to its significant improvement of cycling stability. The fabricated hybrid structures, carbon-coated silicon nanotube arrays on carbon cloth substrate, with a high surface area and short electron collection pathway have been directly used as anode electrodes without any additional binder. The electrodes exhibit high capacity, excellent rate capability and good cycling stability. The discharge capacity of the hybrid electrode (the deposition time of silicon shell: 5 min) keeps stable, and after 100 cycles, the discharge capacities still remain 3654 mAh g-1 at the rate of 0.5 C.

  14. Lightning Damage of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Laminates with Interlayers Modified by Nickel-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qi; Wan, Guoshun; Xu, Yongzheng; Guo, Yunli; Du, Tianxiang; Yi, Xiaosu; Jia, Yuxi

    2017-02-01

    The numerical model of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with electrically modified interlayers subjected to lightning strike is constructed through finite element simulation, in which both intra-laminar and inter-laminar lightning damages are considered by means of coupled electrical-thermal-pyrolytic analysis method. Then the lightning damage extents including the damage volume and maximum damage depth are investigated. The results reveal that the simulated lightning damages could be qualitatively compared to the experimental counterparts of CFRP laminates with interlayers modified by nickel-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWCNTs). With higher electrical conductivity of modified interlayer and more amount of modified interlayers, both damage volume and maximum damage depth are reduced. This work provides an effective guidance to the anti-lightning optimization of CFRP laminates.

  15. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  16. Coating carbon nanotubes with a polystyrene-based polymer protects against pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background carbon nanotubes (CNT) can have adverse effects on health. Therefore, minimizing the risk associated with CNT exposure is of crucial importance. The aim of this work was to evaluate if coating multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) with polymers could modify their toxicity, thus representing a useful strategy to decrease adverse health effects of CNT. We used industrially-produced MWCNT uncoated (NT1) or coated (50/50 wt%) with acid-based (NT2) or polystyrene-based (NT3) polymer, and exposed murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 cell line) or Balb/c mice by intratracheal administration. Biological experiments were performed both in vitro and in vivo, examining time- and dose-dependent effects of CNT, in terms of cytotoxicity, expression of genes and proteins related to oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue remodeling, cell and lung tissue morphology (optical and transmission electron microscopy), and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid content analysis. Results extensive physico-chemical characterization of MWCNT was performed, and showed, although similar dimensions for the 3 MWCNT, a much smaller specific surface area for NT2 and NT3 as compared to NT1 (54.1, 34 and 227.54 m2/g respectively), along with different surface characteristics. MWCNT-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation were increased by acid-based and decreased by polystyrene-based polymer coating both in vitro in murine macrophages and in vivo in lung of mice monitored for 6 months. Conclusions these results demonstrate that coating CNT with polymers, without affecting their intrinsic structure, may constitute a useful strategy for decreasing CNT toxicity, and may hold promise for improving occupational safety and that of general the user. PMID:21255417

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conductive films fabricated by reductive dissolution and spray coating for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Arias, Ana Claudia; Catheline, Amélie; Ligsay, Kathleen; Kim, Kee-Chan; Fogden, Siân; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio

    2014-12-22

    Solutions of unbundled and unbroken single-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared using a reductive dissolution process. Transparent conductive films spray-coated from these solutions show a nearly twofold improvement in the ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorptivity versus those deposited from conventional aqueous dispersions, due to substantial de-aggregation and sizable nanotube lengths. These transparent electrodes have been utilized to fabricate P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells achieving power conversion efficiencies up to 2.3%, comparable to those of solar cells using indium tin oxide transparent electrodes.

  18. Spray-Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composite Electrodes for Thermal Energy Scavenging Electrochemical Cells.

    PubMed

    Holubowitch, Nicolas E; Landon, James; Lippert, Cameron A; Craddock, John D; Weisenberger, Matthew C; Liu, Kunlei

    2016-08-31

    Spray-coated multiwalled carbon nanotube/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (MWCNT/PVDF) composite electrodes, scCNTs, with varying CNT compositions (2 to 70 wt %) are presented for use in a simple thermal energy-scavenging cell (thermocell) based on the ferro/ferricyanide redox couple. Their utility for direct thermal-to-electrical energy conversion is explored at various temperature differentials and cell orientations. Performance is compared to that of buckypaper, a 100% CNT sheet material used as a benchmark electrode in thermocell research. The 30 to 70 wt % scCNT composites give the highest power output by electrode area-seven times greater than buckypaper at ΔT = 50 °C. CNT utilization is drastically enhanced in our electrodes, reaching 1 W gCNT(-1) compared to 0.036 W gCNT(-1) for buckypaper. Superior performance of our spray-coated electrodes is attributed to both wettability with better use of a large portion of electrochemically active CNTs and minimization of ohmic and thermal contact resistances. Even composites with as low as 2 wt % CNTs are still competitive with prior art. The MWCNT/PVDF composites developed herein are inexpensive, scalable, and serve a general need for CNT electrode optimization in next-generation devices.

  19. Coated or doped carbon nanotube network sensors as affected by environmental parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods for using modified single wall carbon nanotubes ("SWCNTs") to detect presence and/or concentration of a gas component, such as a halogen (e.g., Cl.sub.2), hydrogen halides (e.g., HCl), a hydrocarbon (e.g., C.sub.nH.sub.2n+2), an alcohol, an aldehyde or a ketone, to which an unmodified SWCNT is substantially non-reactive. In a first embodiment, a connected network of SWCNTs is coated with a selected polymer, such as chlorosulfonated polyethylene, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polystyrene and/or polyvinylalcohol, and change in an electrical parameter or response value (e.g., conductance, current, voltage difference or resistance) of the coated versus uncoated SWCNT networks is analyzed. In a second embodiment, the network is doped with a transition element, such as Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os and/or Au, and change in an electrical parameter value is again analyzed. The parameter change value depends monotonically, not necessarily linearly, upon concentration of the gas component. Two general algorithms are presented for estimating concentration value(s), or upper or lower concentration bounds on such values, from measured differences of response values.

  20. Field Emission Lamps Prepared with Dip-Coated and Nickel Electroless Plated Carbon Nanotube Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Pu, N W; Youh, M J; Chung, K J; Liu, Y M; Ger, M D

    2015-07-01

    Fabrication and efficiency enhancement of tubal field emission lamps (FELs) using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as the cathode field emitters were studied. The cathode filaments were prepared by eletrolessly plating a nickel (Ni) film on the cathode made of a 304 stainless steel wire dip-coated with MWNTs. The 304 wire was dip-coated with MWNTs and nano-sized Pd catalyst in a solution, and then eletrolessly plated with Ni to form an MWNT-embedded composite film. The MWNTs embedded in Ni not only had better adhesion but also exhibited a higher FE threshold voltage, which is beneficial to our FEL system and can increase the luminous efficiency of the anode phosphor. Our results show that the FE cathode prepared by dipping three times in a solution containing 400 ppm Pd nano-catalysts and 0.2 wt.% MWNTs and then eletrolessly plating a Ni film at a deposition temperature of 60 °C, pH value of 5, and deposition time of 7 min has the best FE uniformity and efficiency. Its emission current can stay as low as 2.5 mA at a high applied voltage of 7 kV, which conforms to the high-voltage-and-low-current requirement of the P22 phosphor and can therefore maximize the luminous efficiency of our FEL. We found that the MWNT cathodes prepared by this approach are suitable for making high-efficiency FELs.

  1. Very stable electron field emission from strontium titanate coated carbon nanotube matrices with low emission thresholds.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Archana; Prasad, Abhishek; Moscatello, Jason P; Engelhard, Mark; Wang, Chongmin; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-01-22

    Novel PMMA-STO-CNT matrices were created by opened-tip vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with conformal coatings of strontium titanate (STO) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Emission threshold of 0.8 V/μm was demonstrated, about 5-fold lower than that of the as-grown VA-MWCNTs. This was obtained after considering the related band structures under the perspective of work functions and tunneling width as a function of the STO thickness. We showed that there is an optimum thickness of STO coatings to effectively reduce the work function of CNTs and yet minimize the tunneling width for electron emissions. Furthermore, simulation and modeling suggest that PMMA-STO-CNT matrices have suppressed screening effects and Coulombs' repulsion forces between electrons in adjacent CNTs, leading to low emission threshold, high emission density, and prolonged emission stability. These findings are important for practical application of VA-MWCNTs in field emission devices, X-ray generation, and wave amplification.

  2. Preparation and Characteristics of SiOx Coated Carbon Nanotubes with High Surface Area

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Aeran; Lim, Seongyop; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Kyung; Lee, Byungrok; Jung, Doohwan

    2012-01-01

    An easy method to synthesize SiOx coated carbon nanotubes (SiOx-CNT) through thermal decomposition of polycarbomethylsilane adsorbed on the surface of CNTs is reported. Physical properties of SiOx-CNT samples depending on various Si contents and synthesis conditions are examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen isotherm, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Morphology of the SiOx-CNT appears to be perfectly identical to that of the pristine CNT. It is confirmed that SiOx is formed in a thin layer of approximately 1 nm thickness over the surface of CNTs. The specific surface area is significantly increased by the coating, because thin layer of SiOx is highly porous. The surface properties such as porosity and thickness of SiOx layers are found to be controlled by SiOx contents and heat treatment conditions. The preparation method in this study is to provide useful nano-hybrid composite materials with multi-functional surface properties.

  3. Effects of laminin-coated carbon nanotube/chitosan fibers on guided neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Cheng; Hsu, Sung-Hao; Kuo, Wen-Chun; Chang-Chien, Cheng-Lun; Cheng, Henrich; Huang, Yi-You

    2011-10-01

    This study assesses the ability and potential of carbon nanotube (CNT)/chitosan to guide axon re-growth after nerve injuries. The CNT/chitosan fibers were produced via the coagulation and hydrodynamic focusing method. Fiber width and morphology were adjusted using such parameters as syringe pumping rate and the coagulant used. The CNT/chitosan fiber diameters were 50-300 μm for syringe pumping rates of 6-48 mL/h. Polyethylene glycol/NaOH (25%, w/w) solution was a suitable coagulant for forming fibers with small diameters. Physical property tests demonstrate that the CNT/chitosan composites had superior tensile strength and electrical conductivity compared with those of chitosan alone. The MTT and LDH tests reveal that CNT/chitosan composites were not cytotoxic. To improve the neural cell affinity of CNT/chitosan fibers, laminin was incorporated onto fiber surfaces via the oxygen plasma technique; cell adhesion ratio increased significantly from 3.5% to 72.2% with this surface modification. Immunofluorescence staining and SEM imaging indicate that PC12 cells adhered successfully and grew on the laminin (LN)-coated CNT/chitosan films and fibers. Experimental results show that PC12 grown on LN-coated CNT/chitosan fibers in vitro extend longitudinally oriented neurites in a manner similar to that of native peripheral nerves. With the inherent electrical properties of CNTs, oriented CNT/chitosan fibers have a potential for use as nerve conduits in nerve tissue engineering.

  4. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  5. Cellular response of RAW 264.7 to spray-coated multi-walled carbon nanotube films with various surfactants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hailan; Shen, Jianmin; Longhua, Guo; Chen, Yuan; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2011-02-01

    The increasing role of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various biological applications has led to a number of studies on the cytotoxicity of solution-phase CNTs, but few studies are available concerning the cytotoxicity of CNT films. Herein, we studied the potential health effect of CNT films fabricated with three commercial surfactants (sodium cholate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and triton X-100). Multi-walled carbon nanotube-surfactant dispersions were coated onto substrates through air-spray technique. Cellular morphology, MTT assays, as well as the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β of RAW 264.7 cells cultured on the spray-coated CNT films were evaluated for cytotoxicity. It was found that the cytotoxicity of the CNT films was largely dependent on the type of surfactant used and could be significantly reduced by mild washing steps. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Carbon nanotubes are able to penetrate plant seed coat and dramatically affect seed germination and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Khodakovskaya, Mariya; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Mahmood, Meena; Xu, Yang; Li, Zhongrui; Watanabe, Fumiya; Biris, Alexandru S

    2009-10-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were found to penetrate tomato seeds and affect their germination and growth rates. The germination was found to be dramatically higher for seeds that germinated on medium containing CNTs (10-40 mug/mL) compared to control. Analytical methods indicated that the CNTs are able to penetrate the thick seed coat and support water uptake inside seeds, a process which can affect seed germination and growth of tomato seedlings.

  7. Tunable Encapsulation Structure of Block Copolymer Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Youngkyu; Ahn, Suk-Kyun; Zhang, Zhe; Smith, Gregory Scott; Do, Changwoo

    2015-05-15

    The nano-sized and shape-tunable molecular building blocks can provide great opportunities for the fabrication of precisely controlled nanostructures. In this work, we have fabricated a molecular building block of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) coated by PPO-PEO-PPO block copolymers whose encapsulation structure can be controlled via temperature or addition of small molecules. The structure and optical properties of SWNT-block copolymers have been investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The structure of the hydrated block copolymer layer surrounding SWNT can be controlled reversibly by varying temperature as well as by irreversibly adding 5-methylsalicylic acid (5MS). Increasing hydrophobicity of the polymers with temperature and strong tendency of 5MS to interact with both block copolymers and orbitals of the SWNTs are likely to be responsible for the significant structural change of the block copolymer encapsulation layer, from loose corona shell to tightly encapsulating compact shell. These result shows an efficient and simple way to fabricate and manipulate carbon-based nano building blocks in aqueous systems with tunable structure.

  8. Tunable Encapsulation Structure of Block Copolymer Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solution

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Youngkyu; Ahn, Suk-Kyun; Zhang, Zhe; ...

    2015-05-15

    The nano-sized and shape-tunable molecular building blocks can provide great opportunities for the fabrication of precisely controlled nanostructures. In this work, we have fabricated a molecular building block of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) coated by PPO-PEO-PPO block copolymers whose encapsulation structure can be controlled via temperature or addition of small molecules. The structure and optical properties of SWNT-block copolymers have been investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The structure of the hydrated block copolymer layer surrounding SWNT can be controlled reversibly by varying temperature as well asmore » by irreversibly adding 5-methylsalicylic acid (5MS). Increasing hydrophobicity of the polymers with temperature and strong tendency of 5MS to interact with both block copolymers and orbitals of the SWNTs are likely to be responsible for the significant structural change of the block copolymer encapsulation layer, from loose corona shell to tightly encapsulating compact shell. These result shows an efficient and simple way to fabricate and manipulate carbon-based nano building blocks in aqueous systems with tunable structure.« less

  9. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Corrosion and Tribological Properties of Pulse-Electrodeposited Co-W Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward Anand, E.; Natarajan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-Tungsten (Co-W) alloy coatings possessing high hardness and wear/corrosion resistance, due to their ecofriendly processing, have been of interest to the researchers owing to its various industrial applications in automobile, aerospace, and machine parts. This technical paper reports Co-W alloy coatings dispersed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced by pulse electrodeposition from aqueous bath involving cobalt sulfate, sodium tungstate, and citric acid on stainless steel substrate (SS316). Studies on surface morphology through SEM, microhardness by Vickers method, microwear by pin-on-disk method, and corrosion behavior through potentiodynamic polarization method for the Co-W-CNT coatings were reported. Characterization studies were done by SEM and EDX analysis. The results showed that the corrosion and tribological properties of the pulse-electrodeposited Co-W-CNT alloy coatings were greatly influenced by its morphology, microhardness, %W, and MWCNT content in the coatings.

  10. Dual functional nisin-multi-walled carbon nanotubes coated filters for bacterial capture and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiuli; Yang, Liju

    2015-01-01

    Removal of pathogens from water is one way to prevent waterborne illness. In this paper, we developed dual functional carbon nanotube (CNT) modified filters for bacterial capture and inactivation, utilizing multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) to coat on commercially available filters and making use of the exceptional adsorption property of CNTs to adsorb a natural antimicrobial peptide-nisin on it. Two types of MWCNTs with different outer layer diameters were used (MWCNTs1: <8 nm in diameter; MWCNTs2: 10-20 nm in diameter). The thickness of MWCNT layers, surface morphology, and surface hydrophobicity of both types of MWCNT coated filters were characterized. The MWCNT coating on filters significantly increased the surface hydrophobicity. The absorption of nisin and the capture of bacterial pathogens were correlated with increased surface hydrophobicity. The MWCNTs1 and MWCNTs2 filters with 1.5 mg MWCNTs loading captured 2.44 and 3.88 log of cells, respectively, from aqueous solutions containing a total of ~10(6) CFU/mL cells. Nisin deposit at the amount of 0.5 mg on the surfaces of MWCNT filters significantly reduced the viability of captured B. anthracis cells by 95.71-97.19 %, and inhibited the metabolic activities of the captured cells by approximately 98.3 %. The results demonstrated that the MWCNT-nisin filters achieved dual functions in bacterial pathogen capture and inhibition in one single filtration step, which is potentially applicable in removing undesired microorganisms from water sources and inhibiting captured Gram positive bacteria activities.

  11. A Comparative Study on Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement of PMMA-Siloxane-Silica Anticorrosive Coatings.

    PubMed

    Harb, Samarah V; Pulcinelli, Sandra H; Santilli, Celso V; Knowles, Kevin M; Hammer, Peter

    2016-06-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene oxide (GO) have been used to reinforce PMMA-siloxane-silica nanocomposites considered to be promising candidates for environmentally compliant anticorrosive coatings. The organic-inorganic hybrids were prepared by benzoyl peroxide (BPO)-induced polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) covalently bonded through 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPTS) to silica domains formed by hydrolytic condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide nanosheets were dispersed by surfactant addition and in a water/ethanol solution, respectively. These were added to PMMA-siloxane-silica hybrids at a carbon (CNT or GO) to silicon (TEOS and MPTS) molar ratio of 0.05% in two different matrices, both prepared at BPO/MMA molar ratios of 0.01 and 0.05. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed very smooth, homogeneous, and defect-free surfaces of approximately 3-7 μm thick coatings deposited onto A1020 carbon steel by dip coating. Mechanical testing and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed that both additives CNT and GO improved the scratch resistance, adhesion, wear resistance, and thermal stability of PMMA-siloxane-silica coatings. Results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5% NaCl solution, discussed in terms of equivalent circuits, showed that the reinforced hybrid coatings act as a very efficient anticorrosive barrier with an impedance modulus up to 1 GΩ cm(2), approximately 5 orders of magnitude higher than that of bare carbon steel. In the case of GO addition, the high corrosion resistance was maintained for more than 6 months in saline medium. These results suggest that both carbon nanostructures can be used as structural reinforcement agents, improving the thermal and mechanical resistance of high performance anticorrosive PMMA-siloxane-silica coatings and thus extending their application range to abrasive environments.

  12. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the 'liquid biopsy' was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ∼100% sensitivity, ∼91% specificity and ∼96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ∼91% sensitivity, ∼82% specificity and ∼86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ∼1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays.

  13. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the ‘liquid biopsy’ was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ~100% sensitivity, ~91% specificity and ~96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ~91% sensitivity, ~82% specificity and ~86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ~1—17 cells per 5 µl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays. PMID:26901310

  14. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N.; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the ‘liquid biopsy’ was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ˜100% sensitivity, ˜91% specificity and ˜96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ˜91% sensitivity, ˜82% specificity and ˜86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ˜1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays.

  15. Surfactant effect on functionalized carbon nanotube coated snowman-like particles and their electro-responsive characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ke; Liu, Ying Dan; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2012-10-15

    The core–shell structured snowman-like (SL) microparticles coated by functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) were prepared in the presence of different surfactants including cationic surfactant-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and anionic surfactant-sodium lauryl sulfate (SDS). The effect of surfactants on adsorption onto SL particles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and conductivity. The cationic surfactant is found to be more effective than anionic surfactant for helping nanotube adsorbed onto microparticle due to the presence of electrostatic interaction between the functionalized MWNT and the surfactant. Furthermore, the MWNT/SL particles dispersed in silicone oil exhibited a typical fibril structure of the electrorheological characteristics under an applied electric field observed by an optical microscope (OM), in which the state of nanotubes wrapped on the particles strongly affects their electro-responsive characteristics.

  16. New catalyst supports prepared by surface modification of graphene- and carbon nanotube structures with nitrogen containing carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Eun-Jin; Hempelmann, Rolf; Nica, Valentin; Radev, Ivan; Natter, Harald

    2017-02-01

    We present a new and facile method for preparation of nitrogen containing carbon coatings (NCC) on the surface of graphene- and carbon nanotubes (CNT), which has an increased electronic conductivity. The modified carbon system can be used as catalyst support for electrocatalytic applications, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The surface modification is performed by impregnating carbon structures with a nitrogen containing ionic liquid (IL) with a defined C:N ratio, followed by a thermal treatment under ambient conditions. We investigate the influence of the main experimental parameters (IL amount, temperature, substrate morphology) on the formation of the NCC. Additionally, the structure and the chemical composition of the resulting products are analyzed by electron microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM), energy disperse X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and hot extraction analysis. The modified surface has a nitrogen content of 29 wt% which decreases strongly at temperatures above 600 °C. The new catalyst supports are used for the preparation of PEMFC anodes which are characterized by polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Compared to unmodified graphene and CNT samples the electronic conductivity of the modified systems is increased by a factor of 2 and shows improved mass transport properties.

  17. Extraction of ochratoxin A in red wine with dopamine-coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hong; Zhang, Bo; Bai, Xiao-Lin; Zhao, Yan; Xiao, Meng-Wei; Liao, Xun

    2017-08-07

    A new, rapid, green, and cost-effective magnetic solid-phase extraction of ochratoxin A from red wine samples was developed using polydopamine-coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the absorbent. The polydopamine-coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes were fabricated with magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes and dopamine by an in situ oxidative self-polymerization approach. Transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry were used to characterize the absorbents. Ochratoxin A was quantified with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection, with excitation and emission wavelengths of 338 and 455 nm, respectively. The conditions affecting the magnetic solid-phase extraction procedure, such as pH, extraction solution, extraction time, absorbent amount, desorption solution and desorption time were investigated to obtain the optimal extraction conditions. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction recovery was 91.8-104.5% for ochratoxin A. A linear calibration curve was obtained in the range of 0.1-2.0 ng/mL. The limit of detection was 0.07 ng/mL, and the limit of quantitation was 0.21 ng/mL. The recoveries of ochratoxin A for spiked red wine sample ranged from 95.65 to 100.65% with relative standard deviation less than 8%. The polydopamine-coated magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes showed a high affinity toward ochratoxin A, allowing selective extraction and quantification of ochratoxin A from complex sample matrixes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Mechanical and in vitro biological performances of hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube composite coatings deposited on Ti by aerosol deposition.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Lee, Jung-Min; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Lee, Byoung-Kuk; Shin, Du-Sik; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2009-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-carbon nanotube (CNT) composite coatings on Ti plate, produced by aerosol deposition using HA-CNT powders, were developed for biomedical applications. For the deposition process HA-CNT powder mixtures with CNT contents of 1 and 3 wt.% were used. Dense coatings with a thickness of 5 microm were fabricated, irrespective of the content of CNTs. No pores or microcracks were observed in the coatings. The coatings had good adhesion to the substrate, exhibiting a high adhesion strength, ranging from 27.3 to 29.0 MPa. Microstructural observation using field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that CNTs with a typical tubular structure were found in the HA-CNT composite coatings. Nanoindentation tests revealed that the mechanical properties, such as the hardness and elastic modulus, were significantly improved by the addition of the CNTs to the HA coating. In addition, the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells grown on the HA-CNT composite coatings were higher than those on the bare Ti and pure HA coating. The ALP activity of the composite coatings considerably improved as the CNT content increased. These results suggest that CNTs would be an effective reinforcing agent to enhance both the mechanical and biological performances of HA coatings.

  19. Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong; Cao, Juexian

    2012-12-15

    The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

  20. Synergistic Ultrathin Functional Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotube Interlayer for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Hyun; Seo, Jihoon; Choi, Junghyun; Shin, Donghyeok; Carter, Marcus; Jeon, Yeryung; Wang, Chengwei; Hu, Liangbing; Paik, Ungyu

    2016-08-10

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have been intensively investigated as a next-generation rechargeable battery due to their high energy density of 2600 W·h kg(-1) and low cost. However, the systemic issues of Li-S batteries, such as the polysulfide shuttling effect and low Coulombic efficiency, hinder the practical use in commercial rechargeable batteries. The introduction of a conductive interlayer between the sulfur cathode and separator is a promising approach that has shown the dramatic improvements in Li-S batteries. The previous interlayer work mainly focused on the physical confinement of polysulfides within the cathode part, without considering the further entrapment of the dissolved polysulfides. Here, we designed an ultrathin poly(acrylic acid) coated single-walled carbon nanotube (PAA-SWNT) film as a synergic functional interlayer to address the issues mentioned above. The designed interlayer not only lowers the charge transfer resistance by the support of the upper current collector but also localizes the dissolved polysulfides within the cathode part by the aid of a physical blocking and chemical bonding. With the synergic combination of PAA and SWNT, the sulfur cathode with a PAA-SWNT interlayer maintained higher capacity retention over 200 cycles and achieved better rate retention than the sulfur cathode with a SWNT interlayer. The proposed approach of combining a functional polymer and conductive support material can provide an optimiztic strategy to overcome the fundamental challenges underlying in Li-S batteries.

  1. Greener corona discharge for enhanced wind generation with a simple dip-coated carbon nanotube decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yishan; Li, Jun; Ye, Jianchun; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Huili; Huang, Sumei; Zhao, Ran; Ou-Yang, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Corona discharge-induced wind (CDIW) has been widely utilized in production lines in the food and semiconductor industries and in indoor devices such as electrostatic precipitators. Some ozone is inevitably emitted, posing serious health risks to respiratory system and lung function of a human being. In this work, a greener corona discharge with enhanced wind generation for a needle-to-cylinder discharge structure is demonstrated using a simple dip-coating method to attach carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to the discharge electrode of a stainless steel needle. Compared with a conventional discharge electrode without CNT decoration, the velocity of the CDIW is greatly enhanced, the onset voltage is lowered, the energy conversion efficiency is greatly improved and the concentration of generated ozone is much reduced, making this easy method of CNT decoration a promising candidate for greener corona discharge systems. In addition, several impact factors for improved performance are discussed mathematically and phenomenologically, providing an insight into the corona discharge and wind generation.

  2. Propagation characteristics of shock waves from a plane carbon-nanotube-coated optoacoustic transducer in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Baek, Yonggeun; Ha, Kanglyeol; Kim, Moojoon; Kim, Jungsoon; Kim, Duckjong; Kang, Hyun Wook; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-07-01

    An optoacoustic transducer made of light-absorbing and elastomeric materials can generate high-pressure wide-band ultrasound waves in water when it is illuminated by a pulse laser. To generate such waves with high efficiency, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) are widely used as the light-absorbing and elastomeric materials, respectively. It was previously reported that an optoacoustic concave transducer made of these materials can produce strong shock waves, namely, blast waves, within its focal zone. In this study, we have shown that these waves can also be generated by a plane optoacoustic transducer fabricated by coating CNTs-PDMS on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plate. Some propagation characteristics of the blast wave generated were measured and compared with the calculated results. It was found that the propagation speed and attenuation of the wave are different from those of usual sounds. From the comparison of the measured and the calculated acoustic fields, it is assumed that every point on the transducer surface produces almost the same blast wave.

  3. Detection of organophosphorous pesticides in soil samples with multiwalled carbon nanotubes coating SPME fiber.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xilan; Li, Ying; Jing, Ruijun; Jiang, Xiaoying; Tian, Mengkui

    2014-12-01

    A headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) technique using stainless steel fiber coated with 20 μm multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and gas chromatography with thermionic specific detector (GC-TSD) was developed to determine organophosphorous pesticides (OPPs) in soil. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as extraction time and temperature, ionic strength, the volume of water added to the soil, sample solution volume to headspace volume ratio, desorption time, and desorption temperature were investigated and optimized. Compared to commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, 7 μm) fiber, the PDMS fiber was better to be corrected as phorate, whereas the MWCNTs fiber gave slightly better results for methyl parathion, chlorpyrifos and parathion. The optimized SPME method was applied to analyze OPPs in spiked soil samples. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) for the four pesticides were <0.216 ng g(-1), and their calibration curves were all linear (r (2) ≥ 0.9908) in the range from 1 to 200 ng g(-1). The precision (RSD, n = 6) for peak areas was 6.5 %-8.8 %. The recovery of the OPPs spiked real soil samples at 50 and 150 ng g(-1) ranged from 89.7 % to 102.9 % and 94.3 % to 118.1 %, respectively.

  4. Enzyme precipitate coating of pyranose oxidase on carbon nanotubes and their electrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Hong, Sung-Gil; Wee, Youngho; Hu, Shuozhen; Kwon, Yongchai; Ha, Su; Kim, Jungbae

    2017-01-15

    Pyranose oxidase (POx), which doesn't have electrically non-conductive glycosylation moiety, was immobilized on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via three different preparation methods: covalent attachment (CA), enzyme coating (EC) and enzyme precipitate coating (EPC). CA, EC and EPC of POx on CNTs were used to fabricate enzymatic electrodes for enzyme-based biosensors and biofuel cells. Improved enzyme loading of EPC resulted in 6.5 and 4.5 times higher activity per weight of CNTs than those of CA and EC, respectively. After 34 days at room temperature, EPC retained 65% of initial activity, while CA and EC maintained 9.2% and 26% of their initial activities, respectively. These results indicate that precipitation and crosslinking steps of EPC have an important role in maintaining enzyme activity. To demonstrate the feasibility of POx-based biosensors and biofuel cells, the enzyme electrodes were prepared using CA, EC, and EPC samples. In the case of biosensor, the sensitivities of the CA, EC, and EPC electrodes without BQ were measured to be 0.27, 0.76 and 3.7mA/M/cm(2), while CA, EC and EPC electrode with BQ showed 25, 25, and 60mA/M/cm(2) of sensitivities, respectively. The maximum power densities of biofuel cells using CA, EC and EPC electrodes without BQ were 41, 47 and 53µW/cm(2), while CA, EC and EPC electrodes with BQ showed 260, 330 and 500µW/cm(2), respectively. The POx immobilization and stabilization via the EPC approach can lead us to develop continuous glucose monitoring biosensors and high performing biofuel cells.

  5. Superhydrophobic and conductive properties of carbon nanotubes/polybenzoxazine nanocomposites coated ramie fabric prepared by solution-immersion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Yan, Hongqiang; Fang, Zhengping; E, Yuping; Wu, Tao; Chen, Fei

    2014-08-01

    Nanocomposites coating consisting of pristine multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and polybenzoxazine has been constructed onto ramie fabric through solution-immersion process. The adsorbed nanocomposites coating is a hierarchical three-dimensional interpenetrating network structure, and the surface coverage and density increase substantially with increasing repeated immersing cycles. Measurements of the superhydrophobicity and conductivity for the coated ramie fabrics show that the highest water contact angle reaches 152°, the lowest water sliding angle reaches 3°, and the corresponding sheet resistance is 3410 Ω sq-1, which shows strong dependency on the number of repeated immersing cycles and concentration of MWNTs suspension. This work provides a facile pathway to design and fabricate nanocomposites coated natural cellulosic fabric for superhydrophobic and conductive applications.

  6. Optical properties of spray coated layers with carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenc, Zofia; Krzeminski, Jakub; Wroblewski, Grzegorz; Salbut, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes as well as graphene are allotropic forms of carbon. Graphene is a two dimensional (2D) form of atomic-scale, hexagonal lattice, while carbon nanotube is a cylindrical nanostructure composed of a rolled sheet of graphene lattice at specific and discrete angles. Both of discussed materials have a high potential for modern engineering, especially in organic and printed electronics. High transparency in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum and low electrical resistance are desirable features in various applications and may be fulfilled with studied carbon nanomaterials. They have chances to become an important technological improvement in customers electronic devices by applying them to electrodes production in flexible screens and light sources. Graphene end carbon nanotubes are conceptually similar. However, characteristic properties of these two substances are different. In the article authors present the results of the transmission in visible electromagnetic spectrum characteristics of different samples. This parameter and the resistance of electrodes are tested, analysed and compared. Characteristics of optical transmittance against resistance with the optimal point of that relationship are presented in paper. Moreover, dependency of graphene nanoplatelets agglomerates arrangement against type of nano-fillers is shown. Two groups of tested inks contain graphene nanoplatelets with different fillers diameters. The third group contains carbon nanotubes. Described parameters are important for production process and results of analysis can be used by technologists working with elastic electronics.

  7. High Critical Field Superconductivity in FeSe0.1 Te0.9 Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Cornell, Nicholas; Huang, Jijie; Salamon, Myron; Zakhidov, Anvar; Anvar Zakhidov; Haiyan Wang Team; Utd; Tamu Afosr Team

    2015-03-01

    Thin films of FeSe0.1Te0.9, grown on SrTi03, have been shown to possess an increased critical temperature, field, and current relative to both bulk samples of FeSe0.1Te0.9 and thin films of the related compound FeSe0.5Te0.5. Empirical measurement of FeSe0.1Te0.9 thin films reveal a zero temperature Hc2(0) ~ 45T. Carbon nanotubes are a promising lightweight flexible material for superconducting applications and have proven a robust substrate when conformally coated by superconducting MgB2. Thin film coatings of FeSe0.1Te0.9 have been deposited via pulsed laser deposition on dry- drawn multiwall carbon nanotube sheets drawn from CVD grown forests. While true zero resistance isn't achieved due to inter-connectivity issues or junction effects in multiwall CNT case, clear superconducting transitions with R reaching zero can be seen on other single wall CNT, and non-oriented carbon nanotube substrates. Properties of these superconducting FeSe0.1Te0.9@SWCNT thin films are discussed.

  8. Evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/carbon nanotube neural electrode coatings for stimulation in the dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Catt, Kasey; Rost, Erika; Albrecht, Ingrid N.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Du, Zhanhong; Kozai, Takashi D.Y.; Luo, Xiliang; Weber, Douglas J.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Objective The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is an attractive target for implanting neural electrode arrays that restore sensory function or provide therapy via stimulation. However, penetrating microelectrodes designed for these applications are small and deliver low currents. For long-term performance of microstimulation devices, novel coating materials are needed in part to decrease impedance values at the electrode-tissue interface and to increase charge storage capacity. Approach Conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on the electrode surface and doped with the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. Electrode characteristics and the tissue reaction around neural electrodes as the result of stimulation, coating and drug release were characterized. Hematoxylin and eosin staining along with antibodies recognizing Iba1 (microglia/macrophages), NF200 (neuronal axons), NeuN (neurons), vimentin (fibroblasts), caspase-3 (cell death) and L1 (neural cell adhesion molecule) were used. Quantitative image analyses were performed using MATLAB. Main Results Our results indicate that coated microelectrodes have lower in vitro and in vivo impedance values. Significantly less neuronal death/damage was observed with coated electrodes as compared to non-coated controls. The inflammatory response with the PEDOT/CNT-coated electrodes was also reduced. Significance This study is the first to report on the utility of these coatings in stimulation applications. Our results indicate PEDOT/CNT coatings may be valuable additions to implantable electrodes used as therapeutic modalities. PMID:25485675

  9. Evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/carbon nanotube neural electrode coatings for stimulation in the dorsal root ganglion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Catt, Kasey; Rost, Erika; Albrecht, Ingrid N.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Du, Zhanhong; Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Luo, Xiliang; Weber, Douglas J.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The dorsal root ganglion is an attractive target for implanting neural electrode arrays that restore sensory function or provide therapy via stimulation. However, penetrating microelectrodes designed for these applications are small and deliver low currents. For long-term performance of microstimulation devices, novel coating materials are needed in part to decrease impedance values at the electrode-tissue interface and to increase charge storage capacity. Approach. Conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on the electrode surface and doped with the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. Electrode characteristics and the tissue reaction around neural electrodes as a result of stimulation, coating and drug release were characterized. Hematoxylin and eosin staining along with antibodies recognizing Iba1 (microglia/macrophages), NF200 (neuronal axons), NeuN (neurons), vimentin (fibroblasts), caspase-3 (cell death) and L1 (neural cell adhesion molecule) were used. Quantitative image analyses were performed using MATLAB. Main results. Our results indicate that coated microelectrodes have lower in vitro and in vivo impedance values. Significantly less neuronal death/damage was observed with coated electrodes as compared to non-coated controls. The inflammatory response with the PEDOT/CNT-coated electrodes was also reduced. Significance. This study is the first to report on the utility of these coatings in stimulation applications. Our results indicate PEDOT/CNT coatings may be valuable additions to implantable electrodes used as therapeutic modalities.

  10. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Coatings as Used in Strain Sensors for Composite Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steve; Snyder, Sarah; Hatfield, Walt; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of cryogenic fuel tanks, crew habitats and other components for future spacecraft will focus on the usc of lightweight carbon fiber composite materials. A critical issue in the design and optimization of such tanks and structures will bc in structural health monitoring, however, current strain sensors have limitations. In this study, a novel carbon nanotube thin film was applied to carbon fiber composites for structural monitoring. Applying a load using a 3-point bend test to simulate bowing of a tank wall, induced significant increases in the film's electrical resistance at small deflections. Upon release of the load, the resistance returned to its approximate start value and was reproducible over multiple tests. The results show that a carbon nanotube thin film has great potential for the health monitoring of composite structures.

  12. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  13. Improving Formate and Methanol Fuels: Catalytic Activity of Single Pd Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The oxidations of formate and methanol on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes decorated with palladium nanoparticles were studied at both the single-nanotube and ensemble levels. Significant voltammetric differences were seen. Pd oxide formation as a competitive reaction with formate or methanol oxidation is significantly inhibited at high overpotentials under the high mass transport conditions associated with single-particle materials in comparison with that seen with ensembles, where slower diffusion prevails. Higher electro-oxidation efficiency for the organic fuels is achieved. PMID:27761299

  14. Electrochemical detection of uric acid using ruthenium-dioxide-coated carbon nanotube directly grown onto Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Yi-Ting; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lin, Chung-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) directly grown onto a Si substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition were used in uric acid (UA) detection. The process is simple and formation is easy without the need for additional chemical treatments. However, CNTs lack selectivity and sensitivity to UA. To enhance the electrochemical analysis, ruthenium oxide was used as a catalytic mediator in the modification of electrodes. The electrochemical results show that RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs can strengthen the UA signal. The peak currents of RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs linearly increase with increasing UA concentration, meaning that they can work as electrodes for UA detection. The lowest detection limit and highest sensitivity were 55 nM and 4.36 µA/µM, respectively. Moreover, the characteristics of RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs were examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Sensitive and high-fidelity electrochemical immunoassay using carbon nanotubes coated with enzymes and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Piao, Yunxian; Jin, Zongwen; Lee, Dohoon; Lee, Hye-Jin; Na, Hyon-Bin; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Oh, Min-Kyu; Kim, Jungbae; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2011-03-15

    We demonstrate a highly sensitive electrochemical immunosensor based on the combined use of substrate recycling and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with tyrosinase (TYR) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNP). Both TYR and MNP were immobilized on the surface of CNTs by covalent attachment, followed by additional cross-linking via glutaraldehyde treatment to construct multi-layered cross-linked TYR-MNP aggregates (M-EC-CNT). Magnetically capturable, highly active and stable M-EC-CNT were further conjugated with primary antibody against a target analyte of hIgG, and used for a sandwich-type immunoassay with a secondary antibody conjugated with alkaline phosphatase (ALP). In the presence of a target analyte, a sensing assembly of M-EC-CNT and ALP-conjugated antibody was attracted onto a gold electrode using a magnet. On an electrode, ALP-catalyzed hydrolysis of phenyl phosphate generated phenol, and successive TYR-catalyzed oxidation of phenol produced electrochemically measurable o-quinone that was converted to catechol in a scheme of substrate recycling. Combination of highly active M-EC-CNT and substrate recycling for the detection of hIgG resulted in a sensitivity of 27.6 nA ng(-1) mL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.19 ng mL(-1) (1.2 pM), respectively, representing better performance than any other electrochemical immunosensors relying on the substrate recycling with the TYR-ALP combination. The present immunosensing system also displayed a long-term stability by showing a negligible loss of electrochemical detection signal even after reagents were stored in an aqueous buffer at 4°C for more than 6 months. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chungui; Ji, Lijun; Liu, Huiju; Hu, Guangjun; Zhang, Shimin; Yang, Mingshu; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2004-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups can extend the nanotube chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized carbon nanotubes containing highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface via the reaction between toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and carboxylated carbon nanotubes. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The content of isocyanate groups were determined by chemical titration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  17. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Chungui; Ji Lijun; Liu Huiju; Hu Guangjun; Zhang Shimin; Yang Mingshu . E-mail: yms@iccas.ac.cn; Yang Zhenzhong . E-mail: yangzz@iccas.ac.cn

    2004-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups can extend the nanotube chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized carbon nanotubes containing highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface via the reaction between toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and carboxylated carbon nanotubes. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The content of isocyanate groups were determined by chemical titration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  18. Synergistic effects of zirconia-coated carbon nanotube on crystalline structure of polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites: electrical properties and flame-retardant behavior.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kaushik; Kang, Dong Jin; Zhang, Zhen Xiu; Kim, Jin Kuk

    2010-03-02

    Pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and zirconia-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ZrO(2)/MWNTs) by isothermal hydrolysis and the traditional chemical precipitation method have been dispersed into polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) copolymer by solution mixing in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The effect of ZrO(2)-coated MWNTs on morphological properties, electrical properties, and flame-retardant behavior has been studied in comparison with virgin PVDF and PVDF/MWNTs nanocomposites. Due to the improved dispersion of the coated nanotubes, the incorporation of 3 wt % of ZrO(2)-coated MWNTs leads to an increase of the thermal stability and dielectric properties and a decrease of the peak heat-release rate.

  19. Separation of total lipids on human lipoproteins using surfactant-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes as pseudostationary phase in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Su, Mei-Yu; Chen, Yen-Yi; Yang, Jian-Ying; Lin, You-Sian; Lin, Yang-Wei; Liu, Mine-Yine

    2014-04-01

    Surfactant-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as pseudostationary phase (PSP) in CE to investigate the total lipids of high-density lipoproteins and low-density lipoproteins. To optimize the CE conditions, several experimental factors including carbon nanotube concentration, bile salt concentration, sodium phosphate (PB) concentration, organic modifier concentration and buffer pH value have been examined. In addition, the CE capillary temperature and applied voltage have also been examined. The optimal separation buffer selected was a mixture of 3.2 mg/L MWNT, 50 mM bile salt, 10 mM PB, 20% 1-propanol, pH 9.5. The optimal capillary temperature and applied voltage selected were 50°C and 20 kV, respectively. Phosphatidyl choline (PC) has been used as a model analyte and investigated by the optimal CE method. The linear range for PC was 0.1-3 mg/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9934, and the concentration LOD was 0.055 mg/mL. The optimal CE method has been used to characterize the total lipids of high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein. At absorbance 200 nm, one major peak and two or three minor peaks showed for the total lipids of lipoproteins within 13 minutes. Resolutions of the total lipids were enhanced using surfactant-coated MWNTs as PSPs in the CE separation buffer. However, resolutions of the total lipids were not enhanced using surfactant-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes as PSPs in the CE separation buffer. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Visibility and oxidation stability of hybrid-type copper mesh electrodes with combined nickel-carbon nanotube coating.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bu-Jong; Hwang, Young-Jin; Park, Jin-Seok

    2017-04-21

    Hybrid-type transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) were fabricated by coating copper (Cu) meshes with carbon nanotube (CNT) via electrophoretic deposition, and with nickel (Ni) via electroplating. For the fabricated electrodes, the effects of the coating with CNT and Ni on their transmittance and reflectance in the visible-light range, electrical sheet resistance, and chromatic parameters (e.g., redness and yellowness) were characterized. Also, an oxidation stability test was performed by exposing the electrodes to air for 20 d at 85 °C and 85% temperature and humidity conditions, respectively. It was discovered that the CNT coating considerably reduced the reflectance of the Cu meshes, and that the Ni coating effectively protected the Cu meshes against oxidation. Furthermore, after the coating with CNT, both the redness and yellowness of the Cu mesh regardless of the Ni coating approached almost zero, indicating a natural color. The experiment results confirmed that the hybrid-type Cu meshes with combined Ni-CNT coating improved characteristics in terms of reflectance, sheet resistance, oxidation stability, and color, superior to those of the primitive Cu mesh, and also simultaneously satisfied most of the requirements for TCEs.

  1. Preparation of the Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes/Nickel Composite Coating with Superior Wear and Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuewu; Gu, Yang; Shi, Tian; Peng, Dai; Tang, Mingkai; Zhang, Qiaoxin; Huang, Xingjiu

    2015-12-01

    The multi-walled carbon nanotubes/nickel (MWCNTs/Ni) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Cu substrate by electro-deposition method in the electrolyte with well-dispersed MWCNTs. Surface morphologies of the composite coatings with protrusion structures were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer were used to characterize the phase structures, functional groups, and elements distribution of the coatings as well as the incorporated MWCNTs. In addition, the effect of MWCNTs percentage on thickness, hardness, wear, and corrosion resistance of the coatings was also investigated. Results indicated that the incorporation of MWCNTs positively affected the hardness of coatings for their strengthening skeletons effect. Meanwhile, the coating with the MWCNTs concentration of 0.2 g/L could achieve the lowest friction coefficient, wear rate as well as the mass loss in the tribological test by a ball-on-disk tribometer. And also, the optimal corrosion resistance with the highest corrosion potential ( E corr) and the lowest corrosion current density ( I corr) of the composite coating was finally proved after the potentiodynamic polarization evaluation, which could promote the potential applications in preparing the functional nanocomposite materials.

  2. Visibility and oxidation stability of hybrid-type copper mesh electrodes with combined nickel–carbon nanotube coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bu-Jong; Hwang, Young-Jin; Park, Jin-Seok

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid-type transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) were fabricated by coating copper (Cu) meshes with carbon nanotube (CNT) via electrophoretic deposition, and with nickel (Ni) via electroplating. For the fabricated electrodes, the effects of the coating with CNT and Ni on their transmittance and reflectance in the visible-light range, electrical sheet resistance, and chromatic parameters (e.g., redness and yellowness) were characterized. Also, an oxidation stability test was performed by exposing the electrodes to air for 20 d at 85 °C and 85% temperature and humidity conditions, respectively. It was discovered that the CNT coating considerably reduced the reflectance of the Cu meshes, and that the Ni coating effectively protected the Cu meshes against oxidation. Furthermore, after the coating with CNT, both the redness and yellowness of the Cu mesh regardless of the Ni coating approached almost zero, indicating a natural color. The experiment results confirmed that the hybrid-type Cu meshes with combined Ni-CNT coating improved characteristics in terms of reflectance, sheet resistance, oxidation stability, and color, superior to those of the primitive Cu mesh, and also simultaneously satisfied most of the requirements for TCEs.

  3. Metal sulfide coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by an in situ method and their optical limiting properties.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Xia; Cao, Wei-Man; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Miao-Miao; Qian, Shi-Xiong; Jia, Neng-Qin; Yang, Hong; Yang, Shi-Ping

    2009-05-13

    A metal sulfide such as ZnS, CdS, Ag(2)S or PbS was coated on the sidewall of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by an in situ wet chemical synthesis approach via noncovalent functionalization of MWCNTs with a polyelectrolyte (polyethylenimine or poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)) without causing significant electronic and structural modification of the carbon nanotubes. Extensive characterizations of the fabricated nanocomposites have been performed using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform IR spectra, UV-vis spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The coating layers were composed of metal sulfide nanoparticles with a mean size of less than 10 nm. The optical limiting property measurements for some metal sulfide coated MWCNTs were carried out by the open-aperture z-scan technique. The results demonstrate that the samples suspended in water showed optical limiting behavior better than that of purified MWCNTs.

  4. Long-term release of antibiotics by carbon nanotube-coated titanium alloy surfaces diminish biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Akinoglu, Eser M; Wirtz, Dieter C; Hoerauf, Achim; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Jepsen, Søren; Haddouti, El-Mustapha; Limmer, Andreas; Giersig, Michael

    2017-01-20

    Bacterial biofilms cause a considerable amount of prosthetic joint infections every year, resulting in morbidity and expensive revision surgery. To address this problem, surface modifications of implant materials such as carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings have been investigated in the past years. CNTs are biologically compatible and can be utilized as drug delivery systems. In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coated TiAl6V4 titanium alloy discs were fabricated and impregnated with Rifampicin, and tested for their ability to prevent biofilm formation over a period of ten days. Agar plate-based assays were employed to assess the antimicrobial activity of these surfaces against Staphylococcus epidermidis. It was shown that vertically aligned MWCNTs were more stable against attrition on rough surfaces than on polished TiAl6V4 surfaces. Discs with coated surfaces caused a significant inhibition of biofilm formation for up to five days. Therefore, MWCNT-modified surfaces may be effective against pathogenic biofilm formation on endoprostheses.

  5. Structure, wettability and photocatalytic activity of CO(2) laser sintered TiO(2)/multi-walled carbon nanotube coatings.

    PubMed

    Castro, M R S; Sam, E D; Veith, M; Oliveira, P W

    2008-03-12

    Nanocomposites of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared and deposited by sol-gel spin coating on borosilicate substrates and sintered in air at 300 °C for 15 min. Further irradiation of the films with different CO(2) laser intensities (4.3-17 W m(-2)) was carried out in order to crystallize TiO(2) in the anatase form while preserving the MWNT's structure. The laser irradiation changed the crystal structure of the coatings and also affected the wettability and photocatalytic activity of the films. The anatase phase was only observed when a minimum laser intensity of 12.5 W m(-2) was used. The contact angle decreased with the enhancement of the laser intensity. The photocatalytic activity of the films was determined from the degradation of a stearic acid layer deposited on the films. It was observed that the addition of carbon nanotubes themselves increases the photocatalytic activity of TiO(2) films. This efficiency is even improved when high CO(2) laser intensities are used during the sintering of the coatings.

  6. Multifunctional, biocompatible and pH-responsive carbon nanotube- and graphene oxide/tectomer hybrid composites and coatings.

    PubMed

    Garriga, Rosa; Jurewicz, Izabela; Seyedin, Shayan; Bardi, Niki; Totti, Stella; Matta-Domjan, Brigitta; Velliou, Eirini G; Alkhorayef, Mohammed A; Cebolla, Vicente L; Razal, Joselito M; Dalton, Alan B; Muñoz, Edgar

    2017-02-10

    Here we present a route for non-covalent functionalization of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide with novel two-dimensional peptide assemblies. We show that self-assembled amino-terminated biantennary and tetraantennary oligoglycine peptides (referred to as tectomers) effectively coat carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and also strongly interact with graphene oxide due to electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding as the driving force, respectively. The resulting hybrids can be made into free-standing conducting composites or applied in the form of thin, pH-switchable bioadhesive coatings onto graphene oxide fibers. Monitoring of cell viability of pancreatic cell lines, seeded on those CNT hybrids, show that they can be used as two- and three-dimensional scaffolds to tissue engineer tumour models for studying ex vivo the tumour development and response to treatment. This highly versatile method in producing pH-responsive hybrids and coatings offers an attractive platform for a variety of biomedical applications and for the development of functional materials such as smart textiles, sensors and bioelectronic devices.

  7. Titanium dioxide-coated carbon nanotube network filter for rapid and effective arsenic sorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Zuo, Kuichang; Vecitis, Chad D

    2014-12-02

    In this study, a TiO2-coated carbon nanotube (CNT) network filter was prepared via a simple filtration–steam hydrolysis method and evaluated with respect to aqueous arsenic removal. The TiO2 coating was 5.5 ± 2.7 nm thick, completely covered the CNT network surface, and had a specific surface area of 196 m(2) g(–1), which was ∼2-fold greater than that of the CNT network. The TiO2–CNT As sorption kinetics increased with both increasing flow rate and cell potential, with increasing flow rate having a significantly stronger effect. At 6 mL min(–1) in the absence of potential and in recirculation mode, the first-order As sorption rate constants were 4.3 and 4.4 s(–1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The TiO2–CNT electro-assisted equilibrium sorption capacities at a cell potential of 2 V for effluent [As] = 10 ppb in single-pass mode were 1.8 and 1.3 mg g(–1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The enhanced TiO2–CNT filter As sorption kinetics and capacity result from increased mass transport due to internal convection and pore radius range, improved sorption site accessibility due to porosity and TiO2 dispersion, and reduced TiO2 negative surface charge due to anodic capacitance. Groundwater samples containing 44 ppb As were treated by single-pass filtration, and 12,500 bed volumes (residence time of 4.5 s; 127 L m(–2) h(–1); 5.8 mg m(–2) h(–1)) were filtered prior to the effluent As level reaching >10 ppb. A spent TiO2 filter was successfully regenerated by 5 mM NaOH for both As(III) and As(V).

  8. Deposition of nanocrystalline nonstoichiometric chromium oxide coatings on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by chromium acetylacetonate vapor pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremlev, K. V.; Ob'edkov, A. M.; Ketkov, S. Yu.; Kaverin, B. S.; Semenov, N. M.; Gusev, S. A.; Andreev, P. V.

    2017-04-01

    Nanocrystalline coatings of nonstoichiometric chromium oxide have been obtained for the first time on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the method of metalorganic chemical-vapor deposition using chromium acetylacetonate as a precursor. The new hybrid nanomaterial (Cr2O2.4/MWCNT) has been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. It is established that oxidation of the hybrid nanomaterial in air under soft conditions (at 380°C) leads to the formation of nanocrystalline chromium oxide (Cr2O3) on the surface of MWCNTs.

  9. Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion Batteries: A XANES Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jigang; Hu, Yongfeng; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Chong M.; Zuin, Lucia

    2014-03-11

    The chemical bonding nature and its evolution upon electrochemical cycling in amorphous Si coated-carbon nanotube (Si-CNT) anode has been investigated using comprehensive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) at Si L- and K-edges along with C and O K-edges. The Si nanolayer on CNT is found to be anchored to CNT via Si-O-C bonding. This bond weakens upon electrochemical cycling accompanied with generation of Li2CO3 on the surface of Si-CNT. Those findings are crucial in designing further improved Si-C composite anode for lithium ion battery.

  10. Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) coated titanium oxide nanotube arrays with enhanced photo-electrochemical performance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingxuan; Fang, Yalin; Kong, Yuanyuan; Sun, Shanfu; Yu, Zhishui; Umar, Ahmad

    2016-08-09

    Herein, we report the successful formation of graphitic carbon nitride coated titanium oxide nanotube array thin films (g-C3N4/TiO2) via the facile thermal treatment of anodized Ti sheets over melamine. The proportion of C3N4 and TiO2 in the composite can be adjusted by changing the initial addition mass of melamine. The as-prepared samples are characterized by several techniques in order to understand the morphological, structural, compositional and optical properties. UV-vis absorption studies exhibit a remarkable red shift for the g-C3N4/TiO2 thin films as compared to the pristine TiO2 nanotubes. Importantly, the prepared composites exhibit an enhanced photocurrent and photo-potential under both UV-vis and visible light irradiation. Moreover, the observed maximum photo-conversion efficiency of the prepared composites is 1.59 times higher than that of the pristine TiO2 nanotubes. The optical and electrochemical impedance spectra analysis reveals that the better photo-electrochemical performance of the g-C3N4/TiO2 nanotubes is mainly due to the wider light absorption and reduced impedance compared to the bare TiO2 nanotube electrode. The presented work demonstrates a facile and simple method to fabricate g-C3N4/TiO2 nanotubes and clearly revealed that the introduction of g-C3N4 is a new and innovative approach to improve the photocurrent and photo-potential efficiencies of TiO2.

  11. Effects of polymer coating on the adsorption of gas molecules on carbon nanotube networks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sanghun; Lee, Hyeong Rag; Yun, Yong Ju; Ji, Seungmuk; Yoo, Kwonjae; Yun, Wan Soo; Koo, Ja-Yong; Ha, Dong Han

    2007-08-27

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with polymers such as polyethyleneimine or nafion was found to not change the adsorption properties of gas molecules on CNTs, although functionalization can remarkably enhance the sensitivity of gas sensors. Charge transfer between adsorbed molecules and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at defect sites causes a steep and nonlinear conductance change at low gas concentrations, while molecules physically adsorbed on the pristine surfaces result in the linear electrical responses at higher concentrations. In addition, the molecular binding energies at defect sites of SWCNTs were measured to be 0.61 eV for NO{sub 2} and 0.53 eV for NH{sub 3}.

  12. Investigation of Surfactant Type, Dosage and Ultrasonication Temperature Control on Dispersity of Metal-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoning; Li, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We studied the dispersity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) combined with different metal- lic particles (Ni and Fe). An ultrasonic-assisted water-bath dispersion process was used to dis- perse the metal-coated MWNTs in different solutions and the dispersity was measured using an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The dispersity and morphology of the MWNTs were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) together with digital image processing technology. Effects of dispersant type (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), oleic acid, and polymer (TNEDIS)) and surfactant dosage on the dispersity of the metal-coated MWNTs were investigated under controlled and uncontrolled temperatures and results were compared with those from the untreated MWNTs. The results showed that the negative effects of temperature on the ultrasonic dispersion process could be eliminated through a temperature-controlled system. Moreover, the TNEDIS, SDBS, and oleic acid were arranged in the descending order of the dispersion effect degree. The untreated MWNTs, Ni-coated MWNTs, and Fe-coated MWNTs were arranged in the descending degree of dispersity order. Since the metal coating makes the MWNTs harder and more fragile, the metal-coated MWNTs are more likely to fracture during the ultrasonic dispersion process.

  13. Laser-driven coating of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with manganese oxide from metal organic precursors for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Pérez Del Pino, A; György, E; Alshaikh, I; Pantoja-Suárez, F; Andújar, J L; Pascual, E; Amade, R; Bertran-Serra, E

    2017-09-29

    Carbon nanotubes-transition metal oxide systems are intensively studied due to their excellent properties for electrochemical applications. In this work, an innovative procedure is developed for the synthesis of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) coated with transition metal oxide nanostructures. VACNTs are grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and coated with a manganese-based metal organic precursor (MOP) film based on manganese acetate solution. Subsequent UV pulsed laser irradiation induces the effective heating-decomposition of the MOP leading to the crystallization of manganese oxide nanostructures on the VACNT surface. The study of the morphology, structure and composition of the synthesized materials shows the formation of randomly oriented MnO2 crystals, with few nanometers in size, and to their alignment in hundreds of nm long filament-like structures, parallel to the CNT's long axis. Electrochemical measurements reveal a significant increase of the specific capacitance of the MnO2-VACNT system (100 F g(-1)) as compared to the initial VACNT one (21 F g(-1)).

  14. Laser-driven coating of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with manganese oxide from metal organic precursors for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez del Pino, A.; György, E.; Alshaikh, I.; Pantoja-Suárez, F.; Andújar, J. L.; Pascual, E.; Amade, R.; Bertran-Serra, E.

    2017-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes-transition metal oxide systems are intensively studied due to their excellent properties for electrochemical applications. In this work, an innovative procedure is developed for the synthesis of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) coated with transition metal oxide nanostructures. VACNTs are grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and coated with a manganese-based metal organic precursor (MOP) film based on manganese acetate solution. Subsequent UV pulsed laser irradiation induces the effective heating-decomposition of the MOP leading to the crystallization of manganese oxide nanostructures on the VACNT surface. The study of the morphology, structure and composition of the synthesized materials shows the formation of randomly oriented MnO2 crystals, with few nanometers in size, and to their alignment in hundreds of nm long filament-like structures, parallel to the CNT’s long axis. Electrochemical measurements reveal a significant increase of the specific capacitance of the MnO2-VACNT system (100 F g‑1) as compared to the initial VACNT one (21 F g‑1).

  15. Gas sensing properties and p-type response of ALD TiO2 coated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Marichy, Catherine; Donato, Nicola; Latino, Mariangela; Willinger, Marc Georg; Tessonnier, Jean-Philippe; Neri, Giovanni; Pinna, Nicola

    2015-01-16

    Amorphous titanium dioxide-coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and investigated as sensing layers for resistive NO2 and O2 gas sensors. By varying ALD process conditions and CNT structure, heterostructures with different metal oxide grain size, morphology and coating thickness were synthesized. Higher responses were observed with homogeneous and continuous 5.5 nm thick films onto CNTs at an operating temperature of 150 °C, while CNTs decorated with either discontinuous film or TiO2 nanoparticles showed a weak response close to the one of device made of bare CNTs. An unexpected p-type behavior in presence of the target gas was also noticed, independently of the metal oxide morphology and thickness. Based on previous works, hypotheses were made in order to explain the p-type behavior of TiO2/CNT sensors.

  16. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, Guzeliya

    Carbon nanotubes have unique properties that make them attractive for different engineering applications. However, because of their chemical inertness, carbon nanotubes have to be functionalized in order to acquire additional physico-chemical properties. Large multiwalled carbon nanotubes are different from fullerenes and singlewalled nanotubes because the stresses in their walls are almost relaxed while most chemical methods for fullerene functionalization exploit this effect of stressed bonds. The objective of this work is to develop new methods for functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This work is dedicated to study two functionalization methods. The first deals with physico-chemical functionalization by filling the nanotube interior with colloidal suspensions. Irreversible adsorption of functional nanoparticles on the nanotube wall leads to the nanotube functionalization. The second method is purely chemical functionalization, which uses the reaction of cyclopropanation to break pi-bonds in the benzene rings of the nanotubes with formation of new σ-bonds with deprotonated malonate. This so-called Bingel reaction has been used in fullerene chemistry and in this work was applied for the first time to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes. While capillary filling of carbon nanotubes was known long ago, the research community was skeptical about possibility of engulfing nanoparticles into nanotubes by capillary forces. We developed and implemented capillary method to fill nanotubes with different nanoparticles. Using this method, magnetic carbon nanotubes were produced for the first time. Synthesized nanotubes have very high magnetic moment and allow to manipulate them by magnetic field. These magnetic nanotubes have been successfully used in fabrication of carbon nanotube-tipped pipettes for biological probes. The Bingel reaction was studied on three sets of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters: 20nm, 100nm, and 300nm. To estimate the

  17. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Performance of Coated Carbon Nanotubes by Optimizing the Fe3O4 Nanocoating Structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Huang, Gui-Wen; Li, Yuan-Qing; Xiao, Hong-Mei; Feng, Qing-Ping; Hu, Ning; Fu, Shao-Yun

    2017-01-25

    It is well accepted that the microwave absorption performance (MAP) of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be enhanced via coating magnetic nanoparticles on their surfaces. However, it is still unclear if the magnetic coating structure has a significant influence on the microwave absorption behavior. In this work, nano-Fe3O4 compact-coated CNTs (FCCs) and Fe3O4 loose-coated CNTs (FLCs) are prepared using a simple solvothermal method. The MAP of the Fe3O4-coated CNTs is shown to be adjustable via controlling the Fe3O4 nanocoating structure. The results reveal that the overall MAP of coated CNTs strongly depends on the magnetic coating structure. In addition, the FCCs show a much better MAP than the FLCs. It is shown that the microwave absorption difference between the FLCs and FCCs is due to the disparate complementarities between the dielectric loss and the magnetic loss, which are related to the coverage density of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surfaces of CNTs. For FCCs, the mass ratio of CNTs to Fe(3+) is then optimized to maximize the effective complementarities between the dielectric loss and the magnetic loss. Finally, a comparison is made with the literature on Fe3O4-carbon-based composites. The FCCs at the optimized CNT to Fe(3+) ratio in the present work show the most effective specific RLmin (28.7 dB·mm(-1)) and the widest effective bandwidth (RL < -10 dB) (8.3 GHz). The excellent MAP of the as-prepared FCC sample is demonstrated to result from the consequent dielectric relaxation process and the improved magnetic loss. Consequently, the structure-property relationship revealed is significant for the design and preparation of CNT-based materials with effective microwave absorption.

  18. Functionalization and extraction of large fullerenes and carbon-coated metal formed during the synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes by laser oven, direct current arc, and high-pressure carbon monoxide production methods.

    PubMed

    Sadana, Anil K; Liang, Feng; Brinson, Bruce; Arepalli, Sivaram; Farhat, Samir; Hauge, Robert H; Smalley, Richard E; Billups, W E

    2005-03-17

    Large fullerenes and carbon-coated metal nanoparticles that are formed during the synthesis of carbon nanotubes have been functionalized by the addition of alkyl radicals and isolated by extraction into chloroform. The soluble, functionalized fullerenes have been isolated from raw single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) material prepared by laser oven, direct current arc, and high-pressure carbon monoxide production methods. Analyses of the extracted large fullerenes were carried out by thermogravimetric analysis, UV-vis-near-IR, laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Wear Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Aluminum Oxide Coating in Marine and High-Temperature Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Anup Kumar; Agarwal, Arvind

    2011-12-01

    Wear behavior of plasma-sprayed carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced aluminum oxide (Al2O3) composite coatings are investigated at room temperature (298 K), elevated temperature (873 K), and in sea water. Lowest wear volume loss was observed in the sea water as compared to dry sliding at 298 and 873 K. Relative improvement in the wear resistance of Al2O3-8 wt.% CNT coating compared to Al2O3 was 72% at 298 K, 76% at 873 K, and 66% in sea water. The improvement in the wear resistance of Al2O3-CNT coatings is attributed to (i) larger area coverage by protective film on the wear surface at room temperature and in sea water, (ii) higher fracture toughness of Al2O3-CNT coatings due to CNT bridging between splats, and (iii) anti-friction effect of sea water. The average coefficient of friction (COF) was the lowest (0.55) in sea water and the highest (0.83) at 873 K for Al2O3-8 wt.% CNT coating.

  20. Enhanced interfacial strength of carbon nanotube/copper nanocomposites via Ni-coating: Molecular-dynamics insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ke; Li, Li; Hu, Yujin; Wang, Xuelin

    2017-04-01

    The molecular bridging between carbon nanotube (CNT) within the meta matrix is hopeful for enhancing nanocomposite's mechanical performance. One of the main problems for nanocomposites is the inadequate bonding between nonstructural reinforcement and meta matrix. Ni-coating on CNT is an effective method to overcome the drawback of the inadequate strength, but the enhancing mechanism has not well interpreted yet. In this paper, the enhancing mechanism will be interpreted from the molecular-dynamics insights. The pullout process of CNT and Ni-coated CNT against copper matrix is investigated. The effects of geometric parameters, including CNT length and diameter, are taken into considerations and discussed. Results show that the interfacial strength is significantly improved after the Ni-coated CNT, which shows a good agreement with the experimental results available in the open literature. Besides, the sliding mechanism of Ni-coated CNTs against copper matrix is much more like a kind of friction sliding and directly related to the embedded zone. However, the pullout force of the CNT without Ni-coating is nearly proportional to its diameter, but independent of embedded length.

  1. Carbon coated titanium dioxide nanotubes: synthesis, characterization and potential application as sorbents in dispersive micro solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    García-Valverde, M T; Lucena, R; Galán-Cano, F; Cárdenas, S; Valcárcel, M

    2014-05-23

    In this article, carbon coated titanium dioxide nanotubes (c-TNTs) have been synthesized. The synthesis of the bare TNTs (b-TNTs) using anatase as precursor and their coating with a caramel layer have been performed by simple and cheap hydrothermal processes. The final conversion of the caramel layer in a carbon coating has been accomplished by a thermal treatment (600°C) in an inert (Ar) atmosphere. The c-TNTs have been characterized by different techniques including transmission microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetry and Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) adsorption isotherms. The extraction performance of the c-TNTs under a microextraction format has been evaluated and compared with that provided by b-TNTs and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using naproxen and ketoprofen as model analytes. c-TNTs provided better results than the other nanoparticles, especially at low acidic pH values. In addition, c-TNTs presented a better dispersibility than MWCNTs, which is very interesting for their use in dispersive micro-solid phase extraction. Finally, a microextraction format, adapted to low sample volumes, has been proposed and applied for the determination of naproxen and ketoprofen in saliva and urine samples by liquid chromatography with UV detection. The results indicate that this approach is promising for the analysis of biological samples. In fact, the recoveries were in the range between 96% and 119% while the precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was better than 8.5% and 26.3% for urine and saliva, respectively. The detection limits were in the range 34.1-40.8μg/L for saliva samples and 81.1-110μg/L for urine samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide hybrid and nanohydroxyapatite composite: A novel coating to prevent dentin erosion.

    PubMed

    Nahorny, Sídnei; Zanin, Hudson; Christino, Vinie Abreu; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Lobo, Anderson Oliveira; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva

    2017-10-01

    To date is emergent the development of novel coatings to protect erosion, especially to preventive dentistry and restorative dentistry. Here, for the first time we report the effectiveness of multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide hybrid carbon-base material (MWCNTO-GO) combined with nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) as a protective coating for dentin erosion. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), scanning electron (SEM), and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy were used to investigated the coatings and the effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (APF) treatment on bovine teeth root dentin before and after erosion. The electrochemical corrosion performance of the coating was evaluated. Raman spectra identified that: (i) the phosphate (ν1PO4(3-)) content of dentin was not significantly affected by the treatments and (ii) the carbonate (ν1CO3(2-)) content in dentin increased when nHAp was used. However, the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO composite exposited lower levels of organic matrix (CH bonds) after erosion compared to other treatments. Interesting, SEM micrographs identified that the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO formed layers after erosive cycling when associate with APF treatment, indicating a possible chemical bond among them. Treatments of root dentin with nHAp, MWCNTO-GO, APF_MWCNTO-GO, and APF_nHAp/MWCNTO-GO increased the carbonate content, carbonate/phosphate ratio, and organic matrix band area after erosion. The potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plot showed that nHAp, MWCNT-GO and nHAp/MWCNT-GO composites acted as protective agents against corrosion process. Clearly, the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO composite was stable after erosive cycling and a thin and acid-resistant film was formed when associated to APF treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  4. Lipid Bilayers Covalently Anchored to Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-01-01

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules. PMID:22568448

  5. Lipid bilayers covalently anchored to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-05-29

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules.

  6. Immobilization of ruthenium phthalocyanine on silica-coated multi-wall partially oriented carbon nanotubes: Electrochemical detection of fenitrothion pesticide

    SciTech Connect

    Canevari, Thiago C.; Prado, Thiago M.; Cincotto, Fernando H.; Machado, Sergio A.S.

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Hybrid material, SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs containing ruthenium phthalocyanine (RuPc) synthesized in situ. • Silica containing multi-walled carbon nanotube partially oriented. • Determination of pesticide fenitrothion in orange juice. - Abstract: This paper reports on the determination of the pesticide fenitrothion using a glassy carbon electrode modified with silica-coated, multi-walled, partially oriented carbon nanotubes, SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs, containing ruthenium phthalocyanine (RuPc) synthesized in situ. The hybrid SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs/RuPc material was characterized by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and differential pulse voltammetry. The modified electrode showed well-defined peaks in the presence of fenitrothion in acetate buffer, pH 4.5, with a sensitivity of 0.0822 μA μM{sup −1} mm{sup −2} and a detection limit of 0.45 ppm. Notably, the modified SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs/RuPc electrodes with did not suffer from significant influences in the presence of other organophosphorus pesticides during the determination of the fenitrothion pesticide. Moreover, this modified electrode showed excellent performance in the determination of fenitrothion in orange juice.

  7. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  8. Interaction between polymer-coated carbon nanotubes with coarse-grained computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Minh D.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2017-10-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics computations were used to study the interaction between two carbon nanotubes (CNTs) stabilized with a polymer in an aqueous solution. The calculated interaction forces quantitatively described the steric effects of the adsorbed polymer on CNT agglomeration. It was found that the repulsive peak depended on the orientation of the CNTs relative to each other. A general equation describing the forces between polymer-stabilized CNTs was established, and its parameters were evaluated based on the results of the simulations. The procedure can be extended to other adsorbed molecules, like surfactants or biomolecules.

  9. Hydration forces between surfaces of surfactant coated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Changwoo; Jang, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Sung-Min

    2013-03-01

    The interaction force between functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) plays an important role in the fabrication of self-assembled and highly ordered SWNT arrays for a wide range of potential applications. Here, we measured interaction force between SWNTs encapsulated with polymerized surfactant monolayer (p-SWNTs). The balance between the repulsion between p-SWNTs and the osmotic pressure exerted by poly(ethylene glycol) in aqueous solution results in two-dimensional hexagonal arrays of p-SWNTs with very small surface to surface distances (<1 nm). The interaction force measured by the osmotic pressure technique shows characteristic decay length of hydration force in its origin.

  10. Unique aggregation of anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) spores by sugar-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifang; Gu, Lingrong; Lin, Yi; Lu, Fushen; Meziani, Mohammed J; Luo, Pengju G; Wang, Wei; Cao, Li; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2006-10-18

    There has been significant interest in the binding of anthrax spores by molecular species, but with only limited success. Proteins and more recently peptides were used. However, despite the known presence of carbohydrates on the spore surface, carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions have hardly been explored likely because of the lack of required specific platform for synthetic carbohydrates. We report the successful use of single-walled carbon nanotubes as a truly unique scaffold for displaying multivalent monosaccharide ligands that bind effectively to anthrax spores with divalent cation mediation to cause significant spore aggregation. The work should have far-reaching implications in development of countermeasure technologies.

  11. Simultaneous electrochemical immunoassay of three liver cancer biomarkers using distinguishable redox probes as signal tags and gold nanoparticles coated carbon nanotubes as signal enhancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Zhong, Zhaoyang; Chai, Yaqin; Song, Zhongju; Zhuo, Ying; Su, Huilan; Liu, Siming; Wang, Dong; Yuan, Ruo

    2012-01-14

    A novel strategy for simultaneous determination of three liver cancer biomarkers based on three redox labels with distinct voltammetric peaks was described. Gold nanoparticles coated carbon nanotubes were used as carriers to immobilize redox probes labeled antibodies and to amplify the signals. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  12. Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In September 2013, EPA announced the availability of the final report, Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments...

  13. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube and Decabromodiphenyl Ether Flame-Retardant Coatings Applied to Upholstery Textiles (Independent Peer Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Independent Peer Review Draft document presents a case study of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs); it focuses on the specific example of MWCNTs as used in flame-retardant coatings applied to upholstery textiles. This case study is organized around the comprehensive envir...

  14. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube and Decabromodiphenyl Ether Flame-Retardant Coatings Applied to Upholstery Textiles (Independent Peer Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Independent Peer Review Draft document presents a case study of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs); it focuses on the specific example of MWCNTs as used in flame-retardant coatings applied to upholstery textiles. This case study is organized around the comprehensive envir...

  15. Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In September 2013, EPA announced the availability of the final report, Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments...

  16. Carbon Nanotubes for Polymer Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anctil, Annick; Dileo, Roberta; Schauerman, Chris; Landi, Brian; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being investigated for optical absorption, exciton dissociation, and carrier transport in polymer photovoltaic devices. In the present work, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by an Alexandrite pulsed laser vaporization reactor at standard conditions and purified based upon our previously reported TOP procedure. The SWNTs were dispersed in polymer composites for pure MEH-PPV, pure P3HT, and [C60]-PCBM-P3HT (1:1 by weight) as a function of nanotube weight loading (0.1 -- 5% w/w). The AM0 current-voltage measurements for structures sandwiched between PEDOT/PSS coated ITO substrates and an evaporated aluminum contact demonstrate the dramatic effect of SWNT content on the short circuit current density, with conversions efficiencies consistently greater than 1%. The temperature coefficient for nanotube-containing polymer photovoltaics has been compared to conventional PCBM-P3HT devices, and the general relationship of increasing efficiency with increasing temperature is observed. However, the necessity to control nanotube percolation to prevent device shunting has led to recent developments which focus on controlling nanotube length through oxidative cutting, the deposition of intrinsic polymer layers, and the use of aligned carbon nanotube arrays for preferential charge transport.

  17. Fabrication of porous carbon nanotube network.

    PubMed

    Su, Jun-Wei; Fu, Shu-Juan; Gwo, Shangjr; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh; Lin, Kuna-Jiuh

    2008-11-21

    We used the spin-coating method combined with ultrasonic atomization as a continuous, one-step process to generate a two-dimensional honeycomb network that was constructed from pure multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  18. Synthesis of zinc oxide particles coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Dielectric properties, electromagnetic interference shielding and microwave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wei-Li; Cao, Mao-Sheng; Wen, Bo; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Cheng, Jin; Yuan, Jie

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: A resistor–capacitor model could well describe the relationships between the structure and the dielectric properties, electromagnetic interference shielding and microwave-absorption of the composites in the frequency range of 2–18 GHz. The resonant behavior associated with the multiwalled carbon nanotubes/zinc oxide (MWCNTs/ZnO) interface greatly broadens the absorption band. Highlights: ► ZnO-immobilized on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs/ZnO) have resonant behavior. ► A resistor–capacitor model describes the relation between the structure and properties. ► The composite with 40 wt% MWCNTs/ZnO has good electromagnetic interference shielding. ► Two different types of absorption peaks are found in the MWCNTs/ZnO composites. ► The existence of MWCNTs/ZnO interface broadens the absorption band. -- Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles were coated on the surfaces of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). High resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the wurtzite ZnO immobilized on the MWCNTs is single-crystalline with a preferential [0 0 0 2] growth direction. A capacitor was generated by the interface of ZnO and MWCNTs, and a resistor–capacitor model could well describe the relationships between the structure and the dielectric properties, electromagnetic interference shielding and microwave-absorption of the composites in the frequency range of 2–18 GHz. The network built by ZnO-immobilized MWCNTs could contribute to the improvement of electrical properties. Resonant peaks associated with the capacitor formed by the interface were observed in the microwave absorption spectra, which suggest that reflection–loss peaks greatly broadens the absorption bandwidth.

  19. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S.; Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Jha, M.; Ganguli, A. K.; Schmidt, H.; Schulze, S.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2014-03-07

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB{sub 6}-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB{sub 6} coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films.

  20. Effects of Al interlayer coating and thermal treatment on electron emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes deposited by electrophoretic method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bu-Jong; Kim, Jong-Pil; Park, Jin-Seok

    2014-01-01

    The effects of aluminum (Al) interlayer coating and thermal post-treatment on the electron emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated. These CNTs were deposited on conical-shaped tungsten (W) substrates using an electrophoretic method. The Al interlayers were coated on the W substrates via magnetron sputtering prior to the deposition of CNTs. Compared with the as-deposited CNTs, the thermally treated CNTs revealed significantly improved electron emission characteristics, such as the decrease of turn-on electric fields and the increase of emission currents. The observations of Raman spectra confirmed that the improved emission characteristics of the thermally treated CNTs were ascribed to their enhanced crystal qualities. The coating of Al interlayers played a role in enhancing the long-term emission stabilities of the CNTs. The thermally treated CNTs with Al interlayers sustained stable emission currents without any significant degradation even after continuous operation of 20 h. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study suggested that the cohesive forces between the CNTs and the underlying substrates were strengthened by the coating of Al interlayers.

  1. Effects of Al interlayer coating and thermal treatment on electron emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes deposited by electrophoretic method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The effects of aluminum (Al) interlayer coating and thermal post-treatment on the electron emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated. These CNTs were deposited on conical-shaped tungsten (W) substrates using an electrophoretic method. The Al interlayers were coated on the W substrates via magnetron sputtering prior to the deposition of CNTs. Compared with the as-deposited CNTs, the thermally treated CNTs revealed significantly improved electron emission characteristics, such as the decrease of turn-on electric fields and the increase of emission currents. The observations of Raman spectra confirmed that the improved emission characteristics of the thermally treated CNTs were ascribed to their enhanced crystal qualities. The coating of Al interlayers played a role in enhancing the long-term emission stabilities of the CNTs. The thermally treated CNTs with Al interlayers sustained stable emission currents without any significant degradation even after continuous operation of 20 h. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study suggested that the cohesive forces between the CNTs and the underlying substrates were strengthened by the coating of Al interlayers. PMID:24959105

  2. Interferometrically-controlled electrical currents in carbon nanotubes coated by platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Marín, E.; Torres-Torres, C.; Mercado-Zúñiga, C.; Vargas-García, J. R.; Trejo-Valdez, M.; Cervantes-Sodi, F.; Torres-Martínez, R.

    2016-11-01

    Described herein is a spatially selective modification in the conductive effects exhibited by multi-wall carbon nanotubes decorated with platinum nanoparticles. The samples were prepared by a chemical vapor deposition processing route. The changes in the conductivity of the samples in thin film form were achieved and explored by a fringe irradiance pattern impinging on the nanohybrid materials. A vectorial two-wave mixing configuration was performed for varying the electrical behavior of the irradiated film. A noticeable reversible modification in the conductivity of the samples was induced by nanosecond pulses at a 532 nm wavelength in our experiments. The rotation of the angle between the planes of polarization of the incident waves allowed us to switch the electrical currents in a circuit with one input and two outputs. The current-conduction terminals were specifically monitored for cases where the incident beams were displaying parallel or mutually orthogonal polarizations. It was considered that functionalization and metallic decoration processes present opposite responsibilities for the evolution of the electrical phenomena in carbon nanotubes. Impedance spectroscopy measurements were undertaken and a strong dependence on electrical frequency that corresponds to an inductive action in the sample was observed. It was highlighted that the manipulation of the vectorial nature of light can be a useful tool for tuning the electrical response in nanosystems. Potential applications for developing photoconductive and filtering functions can be contemplated.

  3. Removal of Trace Arsenic to Meet Drinking Water Standards Using Iron Oxide Coated Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ntim, Susana Addo; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-05-12

    This study presents the removal of trace level arsenic to meet drinking water standards using an iron oxide-multi-walled carbon nanotube (Fe-MWCNT) hybrid as a sorbent. The synthesis was facilitated by the high degree of nanotube functionalization using a microwave assisted process, and a controlled assembly of iron oxide was possible where the MWCNT served as an effective support for the oxide. In the final product, 11 % of the carbon atoms were attached to Fe. The Fe-MWCNT was effective in arsenic removal to below the drinking water standard levels of 10 µg L(-1). The absorption capacity of the composite was 1723 µg g(-1) and 189 µg g(-1) for As(III) and As(V) respectively. The adsorption of As(V) on Fe-MWCNT was faster than that of As(III). The pseudo-second order rate equation was found to effectively describe the kinetics of arsenic adsorption. The adsorption isotherms for As(III) and As(V) fitted both the Langmuir and Freundlich models.

  4. High-Energy Dissipation Performance in Epoxy Coatings by the Synergistic Effect of Carbon Nanotube/Block Copolymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Garate, Hernan; Bianchi, Micaela; Pietrasanta, Lía I; Goyanes, Silvia; D'Accorso, Norma B

    2017-01-11

    Hierarchical assembly of hard/soft nanoparticles holds great potential as reinforcements for polymer nanocomposites with tailored properties. Here, we present a facile strategy to integrate polystyrene-grafted carbon nanotubes (PSgCNT) (0.05-0.3 wt %) and poly(styrene-b-[isoprene-ran-epoxyisoprene]-b-styrene) block copolymer (10 wt %) into epoxy coatings using an ultrasound-assisted noncovalent functionalization process. The method leads to cured nanocomposites with core-shell block copolymer (BCP) nanodomains which are associated with carbon nanotubes (CNT) giving rise to CNT-BCP hybrid structures. Nanocomposite energy dissipation and reduced Young's Modulus (E*) is determined from force-distance curves by atomic force microscopy operating in the PeakForce QNM imaging mode and compared to thermosets modified with BCP and purified carbon nanotubes (pCNT). Remarkably, nanocomposites bearing PSgCNT-BCP conjugates display an increase in energy dissipation of up to 7.1-fold with respect to neat epoxy and 53% more than materials prepared with pCNT and BCP at the same CNT load (0.3 wt %), while reduced Young's Modulus shows no significant change with CNT type and increases up to 25% compared to neat epoxy E* at a CNT load of 0.3 wt %. The energy dissipation performance of nanocomposites is also reflected by the lower wear coefficients of materials with PSgCNT and BCP compared to those with pCNT and BCP, as determined by abrasion tests. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images taken on wear surfaces show that materials incorporating PSgCNT and BCP exhibit much more surface deformation under shear forces in agreement with their higher ability to dissipate more energy before particle release. We propose that the synergistic effect observed in energy dissipation arises from hierarchical assembly of PSgCNT and BCP within the epoxy matrix and provides clues that the CNT-BCP interface has a significant role in the mechanisms of energy dissipation of epoxy coating

  5. Facile synthesis of titania nanoparticles coated carbon nanotubes for selective enrichment of phosphopeptides for mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yinghua; Lu, Jin; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2013-03-30

    In this work, titania nanoparticles coated carbon nanotubes (denoted as CNTs/TiO2 composites) were synthesized through a facile but effective solvothermal reaction using titanium isopropoxide as the titania source, isopropyl alcohol as the solvent and as the basic catalyst in the presence of hydrophilic carbon nanotubes. Characterizations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicate that the CNTs/TiO2 composites consist of CNT core and a rough outer layer formed by titania nanoparticles (5-10nm). Measurements using wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXRD), zeta potential and N2 sorption reveal that the titania shell is formed by anatase titania nanoparticles, and the composites have a high specific surface area of about 104 m(2)/g. By using their high surface area and affinity to phosphopeptides, the CNTs/TiO2 composites were applied to selectively enrich phosphopeptides for mass spectrometry analysis. The high selectivity and capacity of the CNTs/TiO2 composites have been demonstrated by effective enrichment of phosphopeptides from digests of phosphoprotein, protein mixtures of β-casein and bovine serum albumin, human serum and rat brain samples. These results foresee a promising application of the novel CNTs/TiO2 composites in the selective enrichment of phosphopeptides.

  6. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao; Li, Jun

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  7. Investigating the Inter-Tube Conduction Mechanism in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites Prepared with Conductive Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar; Zhou, Jian; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    A well-known strategy to improve the electrical conductivity of polymers is to dope them with high-aspect-ratio and conductive nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, these nanocomposites also exhibit undesirable properties such as damage-sensitive and history-dependent conductivity because their macroscopic electrical conductivity is largely determined by the tunneling effect at the tube/tube interface. To reduce these issues, new nanocomposites have been developed with CNTs that have been coated with a conductive layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS). It has been posited that the insulating region between the CNTs is replaced by a conductive polymer bridge; this has not been proven up to now. We propose here to investigate in-depth how the macroscopic conductivity of these materials is changing when (1) varying the frequency of the electrical loading (impedance spectroscopy), (2) varying the mechanical hydrostatic pressure, and (3) varying the voltage of the electrical loading. The response is systematically compared to the one of conventional carbon nanotube/polycarbonate (CNT/PC) nanocomposites so we can clarify how efficiently the tunneling effect is suppressed from these composites. The objective is to elucidate further the mechanism for conduction in such material formulations.

  8. Investigating the Inter-Tube Conduction Mechanism in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites Prepared with Conductive Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar; Zhou, Jian; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    A well-known strategy to improve the electrical conductivity of polymers is to dope them with high-aspect-ratio and conductive nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, these nanocomposites also exhibit undesirable properties such as damage-sensitive and history-dependent conductivity because their macroscopic electrical conductivity is largely determined by the tunneling effect at the tube/tube interface. To reduce these issues, new nanocomposites have been developed with CNTs that have been coated with a conductive layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS). It has been posited that the insulating region between the CNTs is replaced by a conductive polymer bridge; this has not been proven up to now. We propose here to investigate in-depth how the macroscopic conductivity of these materials is changing when (1) varying the frequency of the electrical loading (impedance spectroscopy), (2) varying the mechanical hydrostatic pressure, and (3) varying the voltage of the electrical loading. The response is systematically compared to the one of conventional carbon nanotube/polycarbonate (CNT/PC) nanocomposites so we can clarify how efficiently the tunneling effect is suppressed from these composites. The objective is to elucidate further the mechanism for conduction in such material formulations.

  9. Carbon-coated Si nanoparticles dispersed in carbon nanotube networks as anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Xue, Leigang; Xu, Guanjie; Li, Ying; Li, Shuli; Fu, Kun; Shi, Quan; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2013-01-01

    Si has the highest theoretical capacity among all known anode materials, but it suffers from the dramatic volume change upon repeated lithiation and delithiation processes. To overcome the severe volume changes, Si nanoparticles were first coated with a polymer-driven carbon layer, and then dispersed in a CNT network. In this unique structure, the carbon layer can improve electric conductivity and buffer the severe volume change, whereas the tangled CNT network is expected to provide additional mechanical strength to maintain the integrity of electrodes, stabilize the electric conductive network for active Si, and eventually lead to better cycling performance. Electrochemical test result indicates the carbon-coated Si nanoparticles dispersed in CNT networks show capacity retention of 70% after 40 cycles, which is much better than the carbon-coated Si nanoparticles without CNTs.

  10. Vertically oriented MoS2 nanoflakes coated on 3D carbon nanotubes for next generation Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mumukshu D; Cha, Eunho; Choudhary, Nitin; Kang, Chiwon; Lee, Wonki; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Choi, Wonbong

    2016-12-09

    The advent of advanced electrode materials has led to performance enhancement of traditional lithium ion batteries (LIBs). We present novel binder-free MoS2 coated three-dimensional carbon nanotubes (3D CNTs) as an anode in LIBs. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that vertically oriented MoS2 nanoflakes are strongly bonded to CNTs, which provide a high surface area and active electrochemical sites, and enhanced ion conductivity at the interface. The electrochemical performance shows a very high areal capacity of ~1.65 mAh cm(-2) with an areal density of ~0.35 mg cm(-2) at 0.5 C rate and coulombic efficiency of ~99% up to 50 cycles. The unique architecture of 3D CNTs-MoS2 is indicative to be a promising anode for next generation Li-ion batteries with high capacity and long cycle life.

  11. Vertically oriented MoS2 nanoflakes coated on 3D carbon nanotubes for next generation Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mumukshu D.; Cha, Eunho; Choudhary, Nitin; Kang, Chiwon; Lee, Wonki; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Choi, Wonbong

    2016-12-01

    The advent of advanced electrode materials has led to performance enhancement of traditional lithium ion batteries (LIBs). We present novel binder-free MoS2 coated three-dimensional carbon nanotubes (3D CNTs) as an anode in LIBs. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that vertically oriented MoS2 nanoflakes are strongly bonded to CNTs, which provide a high surface area and active electrochemical sites, and enhanced ion conductivity at the interface. The electrochemical performance shows a very high areal capacity of ~1.65 mAh cm-2 with an areal density of ~0.35 mg cm-2 at 0.5 C rate and coulombic efficiency of ~99% up to 50 cycles. The unique architecture of 3D CNTs-MoS2 is indicative to be a promising anode for next generation Li-ion batteries with high capacity and long cycle life.

  12. Ultrasensitive dopamine sensor based on novel molecularly imprinted polypyrrole coated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Tao; Yu, Chenfei; Zhou, Xi; Ma, Peipei; Wu, Shishan; Xu, Lina; Shen, Jian

    2014-08-15

    A novel electrochemical sensor using the molecularly imprinted (MIP) oxygen-containing polypyrrole (PPy) decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite was proposed for in vivo detection of dopamine (DA). The prepared sensor exhibits a remarkable sensitivity of (16.18μA/μM) with a linear range of 5.0×10(-11)-5.0×10(-6)M and limit of detection as low as 1.0×10(-11)M in the detection of DA, which might be due to the plenty cavities for binding DA through π-π stacking between aromatic rings and hydrogen bonds between amino groups of DA and oxygen-containing groups of the novel PPy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Poly(methyl methacrylate) and thiophene-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes for volatile organic compound discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muangrat, Worawut; Chodjarusawad, Thanawee; Maolanon, Rungroj; Pratontep, Sirapat; Porntheeraphat, Supanit; Wongwiriyapan, Winadda

    2016-02-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and thiophene-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were fabricated for use in volatile organic compound (VOC) detection. Pristine SWNTs were separately coated with PMMA (PMMA/SWNTs) and thiophene (thiophene/SWNTs) by spin-coating. Pristine SWNTs showed the highest response to methanol, while PMMA/SWNTs enabled 5.4-fold improved dichloromethane detection and thiophene/SWNTs enabled 1.4-fold improved acetone detection compared with pristine SWNTs. The sensor response of PMMA/SWNTs to dichloromethane and that of thiophene/SWNTs to acetone can be attributed to the Hildebrand solubility parameter (HSP). The more similar the HSP, the higher the sensor response. The sensor response of pristine SWNTs to methanol is related to the diffusion coefficient and molecular size. The relationships between the vapor concentration and sensor response of PMMA/SWNTs to dichloromethane and thiophene/SWNTs to acetone are based on Henry’s adsorption isotherm, while that of pristine SWNTs to methanol is based on the Henry-clustering model. Principal component analysis (PCA) results show that dichloromethane, acetone, and methanol were successfully discriminated.

  14. Electron field emission characteristics of different surface morphologies of ZnO nanostructures coated on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuan-Wei; Lian, Huan-Bin; Cai, Jhen-Hong; Wang, Yao-Te; Lee, Kuei-Yi

    2011-12-01

    The optimal carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles with a hexagonal arrangement were synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). To enhance the electron field emission characteristics of the pristine CNTs, the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures coated on CNT bundles using another TCVD technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the ZnO nanostructures were grown onto the CNT surface uniformly, and the surface morphology of ZnO nanostructures varied with the distance between the CNT bundle and the zinc acetate. The results of field emissions showed that the ZnO nanostructures grown onto the CNTs could improve the electron field emission characteristics. The enhancement of field emission characteristics was attributed to the increase of emission sites formed by the nanostructures of ZnO grown onto the CNT surface, and each ZnO nanostructure could be regarded as an individual field emission site. In addition, ZnO-coated CNT bundles exhibited a good emission uniformity and stable current density. These results demonstrated that ZnO-coated CNTs is a promising field emitter material.

  15. Designing of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes dispersions for industrial scale processing and roll-to-roll coating applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Budhadipta; Pasquali, Matteo

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine nanoscale size with high aspect ratio and unique properties, making them ideal candidate materials for high-impact applications. Yet, much as in polymer science and engg, such applications require appropriate fluid based dispersions which can undergo industrial processing that translate the properties of elemental molecules (SWNTs) into macroscopic materials. We report a detailed study on the flow behavior of aqueous SWNT dispersions involving surfactants, its dependence on SWNT & surfactant concentration, and type of surfactant. We also design a SWNT dispersion for use in industrial roll-to-roll (rod based) thin film coating process. Purified, pristine SWNTs were dispersed in water at high concentrations using surfactants and analyzed using rheology and optical microscopy. A SWNT-SDBS-TritonX100 dispersion was found to have the appropriate viscoelastic and shear thinning behavior for rod coating. Rod coating, washing and sulfuric acid treatment resulted in highly uniform thin films of pure SWNT (sheet resistance of 100 and 300 φ/sq for respective transparency of 70% and 90%). The results presented here, both in terms of scientific understanding of how to control fluid and process, and in terms of a scalable technique, paves the way to the deployment of transparent conductive SWNT films in large scale commercial applications.

  16. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  17. SiO2 coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle dispersed multiwalled carbon nanotubes based amperometric glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Baby, Tessy Theres; Ramaprabhu, S

    2010-03-15

    A new type of amperometric glucose biosensor based on silicon dioxide coated magnetic nanoparticle decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2)/MWNTs) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been developed. MWNTs have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapour decomposition (CCVD) of acetylene over rare earth (RE) based AB(3) alloy hydride catalyst. The as-grown MWNTs have been purified and further functionlized. Functionalized MWNTs have been decorated with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles which have been uniformly coated with biocompatible SiO(2) using a simple chemical reduction method. The characterization of magnetic nanoparticle modified MWNTs have been done by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Amperometric biosensor has been fabricated by the deposition of glucose oxidase (GOD) over Nafion-solubilized Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2)/MWNTs electrode. The resultant bioelectrode retains its biocatalytic activity and offers fast and sensitive glucose quantification. The performance of the biosensor has been studied using cyclic voltammetry and amperometry and the results have been discussed. The fabricated glucose biosensor exhibits a linear response from 1 microM to 30 mM with an excellent detection limit of 800 nM indicating the potential applications in food industries. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Highly durable anodes of microbial fuel cells using a reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube-coated scaffold.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hung-Tao; Lee, Hui-Ju; Lee, Chi-Young; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Chang, Hwan-You

    2014-10-01

    Melamine sponges coated with reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (rGO-CNT sponges) through a dip-coating method were fabricated that provide a large electrical conductive surface for Escherichiacoli growth and electron transfer in microbial fuel cell. Four rGO-CNT sponges with different thicknesses and arrangements were tested as an anode in this study. The thinnest one (with a thickness of 1.5mm) exhibited the best performance, providing a maximum current density of 335 A m(-3) and a remarkably durable life time of 20 days at 37 °C. Analyses of bacterial colonisation on the rGO-CNT sponges using FE-SEM and the bacterial metabolic activity using the β-galactosidase assay indicates that the rGO-CNT sponges provide excellent biocompatibility for E. coli proliferation and could help to maintain high bacterial metabolic activity, presumably due to the high mass transfer rate of the porous scaffold. In this regard, the rGO-CNT sponges showed higher durability and performed better electrochemical properties than traditional carbon-based and metal-based anodes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hemotoxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Methven, Laura; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes may enter into the bloodstream and interact with blood components indirectly via translocation following unintended exposure or directly after an intended administration for biomedical purposes. Once introduced into systemic circulation, nanotubes will encounter various proteins, biomolecules or cells which have specific roles in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. It is therefore essential to determine whether those interactions will lead to adverse effects or not. Advances in the understanding of how carbon nanotubes interact with blood proteins, the complement system, red blood cells and the hemostatic system are reviewed in this article. While many studies on carbon nanotube health risk assessment and their biomedical applications have appeared in the last few years, reports on the hemocompatibility of these nanomaterials remain surprisingly limited. Yet, defining the hemotoxicological profile is a mandatory step toward the development of clinically-relevant medications or contrast agents based on carbon nanotubes.

  20. Azide photochemistry for facile modification of graphitic surfaces: preparation of DNA-coated carbon nanotubes for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Minoo J; Yang, Wenrong; Bojarski, Barbara; Gengenbach, Thomas R; Gao, Mei; Zareie, Hadi; McCall, Maxine J

    2012-10-26

    A facile, two-step method for chemically attaching single-stranded DNA to graphitic surfaces, represented here by carbon nanotubes, is reported. In the first step, an azide-containing compound, N-5-azido-nitrobenzoyloxy succinimide (ANB-NOS), is used to form photo-adducts on the graphitic surfaces in a solid-state photochemical reaction, resulting in active ester groups being oriented for the subsequent reactions. In the second step, pre-synthesized DNA strands bearing a terminal amine group are coupled in an aqueous solution with the active esters on the photo-adducts. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by attaching pre-synthesized DNA to surfaces of carbon nanotubes in two platforms-as vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a solid support and as tangled single-walled carbon nanotubes in mats. The reaction products at various stages were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two different assays were used to check that the DNA strands attached to the carbon nanotubes were able to bind their partner strands with complementary base sequences. The first assay, using partner DNA strands tethered to gold nanoparticles, enabled the sites of DNA attachment to the carbon nanotubes to be identified in TEM images. The second assay, using radioactively labelled partner DNA strands, quantified the density of functional DNA strands attached to the carbon nanotubes. The diversity of potential applications for these DNA-modified carbon-nanotube platforms is exemplified here by the successful use of a DNA-modified single-walled carbon-nanotube mat as an electrode for the specific detection of metal ions.

  1. Enhanced electrical conductivity and hardness of silver-nickel composites by silver-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongmok; Sim, Jeonghyun; Kim, Wonyoung; Moon, Chuldong; Cho, Wookdong; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-07-24

    We investigated electrical conductivity and Vickers hardness of Ag- and Ni-based composites prepared by powder metallurgy involving spark plasma sintering. The starting composition was Ag:Ni = 61:39 vol%, which provided an electrical conductivity of 3.30 × 10(5) S cm(-1) and a hardness of 1.27 GPa. The addition of bare multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs, 1.45 vol%) increased hardness (1.31 GPa) but decreased electrical conductivity (2.99 × 10(5) S cm(-1)) and carrier mobility (11 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) due to the formation of Ni3C in the interface between the MWNTs and Ni during spark plasma sintering. The formation of Ni3C was prevented by coating the surface of the nanotubes with Ag (nAgMWNTs), concomitantly increasing electrical conductivity (3.43 × 10(5) S cm(-1)) and hardness (1.37 GPa) of the sintered specimen (Ag:Ni:nAgMWNTs = 59.55:39:1.45 vol%). The electrical contact switching time (133 357) was also increased by 30%, demonstrating excellent feasibility as electrical contact materials for electric power industries.

  2. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  3. Corrosion protection of aluminum bipolar plates with polyaniline coating containing carbon nanotubes in acidic medium inside the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the corrosion resistance of conductive polymer coating (polyaniline) that coated aluminum bipolar plates in acidic environment inside the PEM fuel cell (0.1 M H2SO4) was investigated using electrical conductivity, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the coating morphology. The results show that the addition of CNTs to polyaniline coating enhanced the electrical conductivity and the corrosion resistance of polyaniline polymer. The inhibition efficiency of polyaniline polymer increased with increasing CNTs concentration. The best inhibition was generally obtained at 0.8% CNTs concentration in the acidic medium. This was further confirmed by decreasing the oxygen and water permeability and increasing coating adhesion in the presence of CNTs. EIS measurements indicated that the incorporation of CNTs in coating increased both the charge transfer and pore resistances while reducing the double layer capacitance.

  4. Direct electrochemistry and electrochemical catalysis of myoglobin-TiO2 coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Tian, Dan-Bi; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2008-11-01

    TiO(2) nanoparticles were homogeneously coated on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by hydrothermal deposition, and this nanocomposite might be a promising material for myoglobin (Mb) immobilization in view of its high biocompatibility and large surface. The glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with Mb-TiO(2)/MWCNTs films exhibited a pair of well-defined, stable and nearly reversible cycle voltammetric peaks. The formal potential of Mb in TiO(2)/MWCNTs film was linearly varied in the range of pH 3-10 with a slope of 48.65 mV/pH, indicating that the electron transfer was accompanied by single proton transportation. The electron transfer between Mb and electrode surface, k(s) of 3.08 s(-1), was greatly facilitated in the TiO(2)/MWCNTs film. The electrocatalytic reductions of hydrogen peroxide were also studied, and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is calculated to be 83.10 microM, which shows a large catalytic activity of Mb in the TiO(2)/MWCNTs film to H(2)O(2). The modified GC electrode shows good analytical performance for amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide. The resultant Mb-TiO(2)/MWCNTs modified glassy carbon electrode exhibited fast amperometric response to hydrogen peroxide reduction, long term life and excellent stability. Finally the activity of the sensor for nitric oxide reduction was also investigated.

  5. Drastically Enhancing Moduli of Graphene-Coated Carbon Nanotube Aerogels via Densification While Retaining Temperature Invariant Superelasticity and Ultrahigh Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Michelle N; Kim, Kyu Hun; Islam, Mohammad F

    2017-10-09

    Lightweight open-cell foams that are simultaneously superelastic, possess exceptionally high Young's moduli (Y), exhibit ultrahigh efficiency, and resist fatigue as well as creep are particularly desirable as structural frameworks. Unfortunately, many of these features are orthogonal in foams of metals, ceramics, and polymers, particularly under large temperature variations. In contrast, foams of carbon allotropes including carbon nanotubes and graphene developed over the last few years exhibit these desired properties but have low Y due to low density,  = 0.5-10 mg/mL. Densification of these foams enhances Y although below expectation and also dramatically degrades other properties because of drastic changes in microstructure. We have recently developed size and shape tunable graphene-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) aerogels that display superelasticity at least up to a compressive strain () = 80%, fatigue and creep resistance, and ultrahigh efficiency over -100-500 °C. Unfortunately, Y of these aerogels is only ≈ 0.75 MPa due to low  ≈ 14 mg/mL, limiting their competitiveness as structural foams. We report fabrication of similar aerogels but with  spanning more than an order of magnitude from 16-400 mg/mL through controlled isostatic compression in the presence of a polymer coating circumventing any microstructural changes in stark contrast to other foams of carbon allotropes. The compressive stress () versus  measurements show that the densification of aerogels from  ≈ 16 mg/mL to  ≈ 400 mg/mL dramatically enhances Y from 0.9 MPa to 400 MPa while maintaining superelasticity at least up to  = 10% even at the highest . The storage (E') and loss (E″) moduli measured in the linear regime show ultralow loss coefficient, tan  = E″/E' ≈ 0.02, that remains constant over three decades of frequencies (0.628-628 rad/s), suggesting unusually high frequency-invariant efficiency. Furthermore, these aerogels retain

  6. Filling carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, D.; Stöckli, T.; Bonard, J. M.; Châtelain, A.; de Heer, W. A.

    Filling hollow carbon nanotubes with chosen materials opens new possibilities of generating nearly one-dimensional nanostrutures. One simple approach to fill nanotubes is to use capillarity forces. Here, we have studied the wetting and capillarity by metal salts. First, nanotubes were opened by oxidation in air; subsequently, nanotubes were immersed in molten salts. We have observed a size-dependence filling indicating a lowering of the cavity-salt interface energy with decreasing diameter. By expressing the wetting conditions as a function of polarizabilities, it is possible to predict the threshold diameter for capillary filling of different materials.

  7. Polydopamine Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Versatile Platform with Radionuclide Labeling for Multimodal Tumor Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Chao, Yu; Liu, Jingjing; Huang, Jie; Pan, Jian; Guo, Wanliang; Wu, Jizhi; Sheng, Mao; Yang, Kai; Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique properties have attracted great attention in cancer theranostics. Herein, SWNTs are coated with a shell of polydopamine (PDA), which is further modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG). The PDA shell in the obtained SWNT@PDA-PEG could chelate Mn2+, which together with metallic nanoparticulate impurities anchored on SWNTs offer enhanced both T1 and T2 contrasts under magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Meanwhile, also utilizing the PDA shell, radionuclide 131I could be easily labeled onto SWNT@PDA-PEG, enabling nuclear imaging and radioisotope cancer therapy. As revealed by MR & gamma imaging, efficient tumor accumulation of SWNT@PDA-131I-PEG is observed after systemic administration into mice. By further utilizing the strong near-infarared (NIR) absorbance of SWNTs, NIR-triggered photothermal therapy in combination with 131I-based radioisotope therapy is realized in our animal experiments, in which a remarkable synergistic antitumor therapeutic effect is observed compared to monotherapies. Our work not only presents a new type of theranostic nanoplatform based on SWNTs, but also suggests the promise of PDA coating as a general approach to modify nano-agents and endow them with highly integrated functionalities. PMID:27570554

  8. Electrochemical removal of chromium from aqueous solutions using electrodes of stainless steel nets coated with single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-Xing; Yuan, Dong-Xing; Yan, Jun-Mei; Li, Quan-Long; Ouyang, Tong

    2011-02-15

    An electrochemical technique was adopted to investigate the removal of Cr(VI) species and total chromium (TCr) from aqueous solution at a laboratory scale. The electrodes of stainless steel nets (SSNE) coated with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs@SSNE) were used as both anode and cathode. Three parameters, including solution pH, voltage and electrolyte concentration, were studied to explore the optimal condition of chromium removal. The optimal parameters were found to be pH 4, voltage 2.5 V and electrolyte concentration 10 mg/L. Under these conditions, the Cr(VI) and TCr removal had a high correlation with the amount of SWCNTs coated on the electrodes, with coefficients of the regression equations 0.953 and 0.928, respectively. The mechanism of Cr(VI) removal was also investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study and scanning electron microscope (SEM) picture showed that the process of chromium removal involved the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) on the cathode, and then the adsorption of Cr(III) by SWCNTs on the cathode. The study results indicated that the proposed method provided an interesting means to remove chromium species from aqueous solution, especially Cr(VI) in acidic condition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Polydopamine Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Versatile Platform with Radionuclide Labeling for Multimodal Tumor Imaging and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Chao, Yu; Liu, Jingjing; Huang, Jie; Pan, Jian; Guo, Wanliang; Wu, Jizhi; Sheng, Mao; Yang, Kai; Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique properties have attracted great attention in cancer theranostics. Herein, SWNTs are coated with a shell of polydopamine (PDA), which is further modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG). The PDA shell in the obtained SWNT@PDA-PEG could chelate Mn(2+), which together with metallic nanoparticulate impurities anchored on SWNTs offer enhanced both T1 and T2 contrasts under magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Meanwhile, also utilizing the PDA shell, radionuclide (131)I could be easily labeled onto SWNT@PDA-PEG, enabling nuclear imaging and radioisotope cancer therapy. As revealed by MR & gamma imaging, efficient tumor accumulation of SWNT@PDA-(131)I-PEG is observed after systemic administration into mice. By further utilizing the strong near-infarared (NIR) absorbance of SWNTs, NIR-triggered photothermal therapy in combination with (131)I-based radioisotope therapy is realized in our animal experiments, in which a remarkable synergistic antitumor therapeutic effect is observed compared to monotherapies. Our work not only presents a new type of theranostic nanoplatform based on SWNTs, but also suggests the promise of PDA coating as a general approach to modify nano-agents and endow them with highly integrated functionalities.

  10. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  11. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  12. Carbon nanotube composite coated platinum electrode for detection of Ga(III).

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, A; Khoshfetrat, Seyyed Mehdi; Sharghi, H; Khalifeh, R

    2011-01-15

    This study demonstrates the application of composite multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) polyvinylchloride (MWNT-PVC) based on 7-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzyl)-5,6,7,8,9,10-hexahydro-2H benzo [b][1,4,7,10,13] dioxa triaza cyclopentadecine-3,11(4H,12H)-dione ionophore for gallium sensor. The sensor shows a good Nernstian slope of 19.68 ± 0.40 mV/decade in a wide linear range concentration of 7.9 × 10(-7) to 3.2 × 10(-2)M of Ga(NO(3))(3). The detection limit of this electrode is 5.2 × 10(-7)M of Ga(NO(3))(3). This proposed sensor is applicable in a pH range of 2.7-5.0. It has a short response time of about 10s and has a good selectivity over nineteen various metal ions. The practical analytical utility of this electrode is demonstrated by measurement of Ga(III) in river water. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Determination of cadmium in tobacco by solid surface fluorescence using nylon membranes coated with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Carolina Talio, María; Alesso, Magdalena; Acosta, Mariano; Olsina, Roberto; Fernández, Liliana P

    2013-03-30

    A new methodology based on fluorescent signal enhancement of o-cresolphthalein (o-CPT) for traces of cadmium determination is proposed. The dye was retained on membrane filters in the presence of a micellar surfactant solution of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). All the experimental variables that influence both the preconcentration procedure and the fluorimetric sensitivity were carefully optimized. The calibration graph using zeroth order regression was linear from 6.5 ng L(-1) to 5.65×10(5) ng L(-1), with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.999. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection and quantification were of 2 ng L(-1) and 6.5 ng L(-1). respectively. The proposed method showed good sensitivity and selectivity, with good tolerance to foreign ions, and it was applied to the determination of trace amounts of cadmium in leachate from cigarettes' tobacco samples with satisfactory results. The trueness of the recommended procedure was assessed through parallel analysis of the samples with electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. This methodology represents an innovative and attractive application of membrane filters that enables metal traces determination by solid surface fluorescence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel polydopamine imprinting layers coated magnetic carbon nanotubes for specific separation of lysozyme from egg white.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruixia; Zhang, Lili; Hao, Yi; Cui, Xihui; Liu, Dechun; Zhang, Min; Tang, Yuhai

    2015-11-01

    Novel core-shell nanocomposites, consisting of magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) core surrounded by a thin polydopamine (PDA) imprinting shell for specific recognition of lysozyme (Lyz), were fabricated for the first time. The obtained products were characterized and the results showed that the PDA layer was successfully attached onto the surface of MCNTs and the corresponding thickness of imprinting layer was just about 10nm which could enable the template access the recognition cavities easily. The polymerization conditions and adsorption performance of the resultant nanomaterials were investigated in detail. The results indicated that the obtained imprinted polymers showed fast kinetic and high affinity towards Lyz and could be used to specifically separate Lyz from real egg white. In addition, the prepared materials had excellent stability and no obvious deterioration after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. Easy preparation, rapid separation, high binding capacity, and satisfactory selectivity for the template protein make this polymer attractive in biotechnology and biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanoconfined phosphorus film coating on interconnected carbon nanotubes as ultrastable anodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Liyuan; Li, Nan; Chen, Cheng; Li, Cuiyu; Li, Jing; Lv, Hanming; Kuang, Liyun; Tian, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Elemental phosphorus (P) is extensively explored as promising anode candidates due to its abundance, low-cost and high theoretical specific capacity. However, it is of great challenge for P-based materials as practical high-energy-density and long-cycling anodes for its large volume expansion and low conductibility. Here, we significantly improve both cycling and rate performance of red P by cladding the nanoconfined P film on interconnected multi-walled carbon nanotube networks (P-MWCNTs composite) via facile wet ball-milling. The red P-MWCNTs anode presents a superior high reversible capacity of 1396.6 mAh g-1 on the basis of P-MWCNTs composite weight at 50 mA g-1 with capacity retention reaching at ∼90% over 50 cycles. Even at 1000 mA g-1, it still maintains remarkable specific reversible capacity of 934.0 mAh g-1. This markedly enhanced performance is ascribed to synergistic advantages of this unique structure: Intimate contacts between nanosized red P and entangled MWCNTs not only shorten the transmission routes of ions through MWCNTs toward red P, but also motivate the access with electrolyte to open structures of P film. Besides, the confined nanosized P film moderate volume expansions effectively and the entangled MWCNTs networks acted as conductive channels activate high ionic/electronic conductivity of the whole electrodes.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement. PMID:22655070

  17. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W Ch

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  18. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  19. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tortorich, Ryan P; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-07-29

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  20. Bioactivity and electrochemical behavior of hydroxyapatite-silicon-multi walled carbon nano-tubes composite coatings synthesized by EPD on NiTi alloys in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Khalili, V; Khalil-Allafi, J; Frenzel, J; Eggeler, G

    2017-02-01

    In order to improve the surface bioactivity of NiTi bone implant and corrosion resistance, hydroxyapatite coating with addition of 20wt% silicon, 1wt% multi walled carbon nano-tubes and both of them were deposited on a NiTi substrate using a cathodic electrophoretic method. The apatite formation ability was estimated using immersion test in the simulated body fluid for 10days. The SEM images of the surface of coatings after immersion in simulated body fluid show that the presence of silicon in the hydroxyapatite coatings accelerates in vitro growth of apatite layer on the coatings. The Open-circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were measured to evaluate the electrochemical behavior of the coatings in the simulated body fluid at 37°C. The results indicate that the compact structure of hydroxyapatite-20wt% silicon and hydroxyapatite-20wt% silicon-1wt% multi walled carbon nano-tubes coatings could efficiently increase the corrosion resistance of NiTi substrate.

  1. Carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polydimethylsiloxane, a new coating for 96-blade solid-phase microextraction for determination of phenolic compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Kueseng, Pamornrat; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2013-11-22

    A new thin-film, carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polydimethylsiloxane (MWCNTs-COOH/PDMS) coating was developed for 96-blade solid-phase microextraction (SPME) system followed by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). The method provided good extraction efficiency (64-90%) for three spiked levels, with relative standard deviations (RSD)≤6%, and detection limits between 1 and 2 μg/L for three phenolic compounds. The MWCNTs-COOH/PDMS 96-blade SPME system presents advantages over traditional methods due to its simplicity of use, easy coating preparation, low cost and high sample throughput (2.1 min per sample). The developed coating is reusable for a minimum of 110 extractions with good extraction efficiency. The coating provided higher extraction efficiency (3-8 times greater) than pure PDMS coatings.

  2. Multiwalled carbon nanotube coated polyester fabric as textile based flexible counter electrode for dye sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Arbab, Alvira Ayoub; Sun, Kyung Chul; Sahito, Iftikhar Ali; Qadir, Muhammad Bilal; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2015-05-21

    Textile wearable electronics offers the combined advantages of both electronics and textile characteristics. The essential properties of these flexible electronics such as lightweight, stretchable, and wearable power sources are in strong demand. Here, we have developed a facile route to fabricate multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coated polyester fabric as a flexible counter electrode (CE) for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A variety of MWCNT and enzymes with different structures were used to generate individual enzyme-dispersed MWCNT (E-MWCNT) suspensions by non-covalent functionalization. A highly concentrated colloidal suspension of E-MWCNT was deposited on polyester fabric via a simple tape casting method using an air drying technique. In view of the E-MWCNT coating, the surface structure is represented by topologically randomly assembled tubular graphene units. This surface morphology has a high density of colloidal edge states and oxygen-containing surface groups which execute multiple catalytic sites for iodide reduction. A highly conductive E-MWCNT coated fabric electrode with a surface resistance of 15 Ω sq(-1) demonstrated 5.69% power conversion efficiency (PCE) when used as a flexible CE for DSSCs. High photo voltaic performance of our suggested system of E-MWCNT fabric-based DSSCs is associated with high sheet conductivity, low charge transfer resistance (RCT), and excellent electro catalytic activity (ECA). Such a conductive fabric demonstrated stable conductivity against bending cycles and strong mechanical adhesion of E-MWCNT on polyester fabric. Moreover, the polyester fabric is hydrophobic and, therefore, has good sealing capacity and retains the polymer gel electrolyte without seepage. This facile E-MWCNT fabric CE configuration provides a concrete fundamental background towards the development of textile-integrated solar cells.

  3. Coating carbon nanotubes with humic acid using an eco-friendly mechanochemical method: Application for Cu(II) ions removal from water and aquatic ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Côa, Francine; Strauss, Mathias; Clemente, Zaira; Rodrigues Neto, Laís L; Lopes, Josias R; Alencar, Rafael S; Souza Filho, Antônio G; Alves, Oswaldo L; Castro, Vera Lúcia S S; Barbieri, Edison; Martinez, Diego Stéfani T

    2017-12-31

    In this work, industrial grade multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were coated with humic acid (HA) for the first time by means of a milling process, which can be considered an eco-friendly mechanochemical method to prepare materials and composites. The HA-MWCNT hybrid material was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopies (SEM and STEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), termogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Raman spectroscopy. STEM and AFM images demonstrated that the MWCNTs were efficiently coated by the humic acid, thus leading to an increase of 20% in the oxygen content at the nanotube surface as observed by the XPS data. After the milling process, the carbon nanotubes were shortened as unveiled by SEM images and the values of ID/IG intensity ratio increased due to shortening of the nanotubes and increasing in the number defects at the graphitic structure of carbon nanotubes walls. The analysis of TGA data showed that the quantity of the organic matter of HA on the nanotube surface was 25%. The HA coating was responsible to favor the dispersion of MWCNTs in ultrapure water (i.e. -42mV, zeta-potential value) and to improve their capacity for copper removal. HA-MWCNTs hybrid material adsorbed 2.5 times more Cu(II) ions than oxidized MWCNTs with HNO3, thus evidencing that it is a very efficient adsorbent material for removing copper ions from reconstituted water. The HA-MWCNTs hybrid material did not show acute ecotoxicity to the tested aquatic model organisms (Hydra attenuata, Daphnia magna, and Danio rerio embryos) up to the highest concentration evaluated (10mgL(-1)). The results allowed concluding that the mechanochemical method is effective to coat carbon nanotubes with humic acid, thus generating a functional hybrid material with low aquatic toxicity and great potential to be applied in environmental nanotechnologies such as the removal of heavy metal ions from water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  4. Label-free SERS detection of relevant bioanalytes on silver-coated carbon nanotubes: The case of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanles-Sobrido, Marcos; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Laura; Lorenzo-Abalde, Silvia; González-Fernández, África; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A.; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramón A.; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy can be used for the label-free determination and quantification of relevant small biometabolites that are hard to identify by conventional immunological methods, in the absence of labelling. In this work, detection is based on monitoring the vibrational changes occurring at a specific biointerface (a monoclonal antibody, mAb) supported on silver-coated carbon nanotubes (CNT@Ag). Engineered CNT@Ag play a key role, as they offer a stable substrate to support the biointerface, with a high density of hot spots. Proof of concept is demonstrated through the analysis and quantification of the main cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine. These results open a new avenue toward the generation of portable sensors for fast ultradetection and quantification of relevant metabolites. The use of discrete particles (CNT@Ag@mAb) rather than rough films, or other conventional SERS supports, will also enable a safe remote interrogation of highly toxic sources in environmental problems or in biological fluids.Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy can be used for the label-free determination and quantification of relevant small biometabolites that are hard to identify by conventional immunological methods, in the absence of labelling. In this work, detection is based on monitoring the vibrational changes occurring at a specific biointerface (a monoclonal antibody, mAb) supported on silver-coated carbon nanotubes (CNT@Ag). Engineered CNT@Ag play a key role, as they offer a stable substrate to support the biointerface, with a high density of hot spots. Proof of concept is demonstrated through the analysis and quantification of the main cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine. These results open a new avenue toward the generation of portable sensors for fast ultradetection and quantification of relevant metabolites. The use of discrete particles (CNT@Ag@mAb) rather than rough films, or other conventional SERS supports, will also

  5. Synthesis, characterization of core-shell carbon-coated CaSnO3 nanotubes and their performance as anode of lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Ting; Huang, Wei; Tao, Wei; Heng, Bojun; Chen, Xinqi; Tang, Yiwen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we design a strategy to obtain core-shell carbon-coated CaSnO3 nanotubes (hereafter C-CTO NTs) directly via a facile subsequent solvothermal synthesis using CaSn(OH)6 nanotubes as precursor in a mixed ethanol and water solvent. The mixed solvent not only facilitates the phase transformation of CaSnO3 from CaSn(OH)6 to take place quickly, but also retains the tube-shaped morphology. The uniform decoration of C shell on the surface of CaSnO3 nanotubes (hereafter CTO NTs) was confirmed by EELS (electron energy loss spectroscopy). Moreover we found that the uniform carbon-coating layer on the surface of CTO NTs played roles of a good conductor and a structure buffer to alleviate the strains from the volume variation of CTO NTs cores. So the core-shell structure possesses both the electroactivity of C and the advantages of nanotube structure. When used as an anode for Li ion battery, it shows enhanced cycling performance in term of cycling stability over bare CTO NT electrode and CaSnO3 nanocube (hereafter CTO NC) electrode. To our best knowledge, this is the first attempt to use C-CTO NTs as an anode in Li ion battery.

  6. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  7. Percolation-dominated superhydrophobicity and conductivity for nanocomposite coatings from the mixtures of a commercial aqueous silica sol and functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mao; Guo, Honglei; Liao, Zhangjie; Qi, Ji; Zhou, Zhi; Fang, Zhengping; Shen, Lie

    2012-02-01

    Superhydrophobic conductive nanocomposite coatings are prepared for the first time from the simple mixture of a commercial aqueous silica sol and functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by air-spraying at ambient conditions followed by fluorosilane treatment. The relationship between MWNT content and the structure and properties of the nanocomposite coatings is investigated systematically. An ultra-low threshold (<5 vol.%) for superhydrophobicity is observed, which suggests that MWNTs are superior to any other spherical fillers for the construction of superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings. When the content of nanotubes is below the threshold, the surface roughness mainly caused by the silica nanoparticles is not enough for creating superhydrophobic surfaces. Only above the threshold, the multiscale hierarchical structure is enough for both high water contact angles (>165°) and extremely low sliding angles (<2°). The conductivity is also percolation dominated, while the threshold for conductivity is much higher than that for superhydrophobicity, which can be ascribed to the encapsulated structure and the agglomeration of nanotubes in the composite coatings during air-spraying. Moreover, the aqueous silica sols hold merits of great film-forming capability at relatively low calcination temperatures, and being free of organic solvents.

  8. Epoxy resin reinforced with nanothin polydopamine-coated carbon nanotubes: a study of the interfacial polymer layer thickness

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Yang; Li, Weizhen; Wang, Baoyu; ...

    2016-03-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized by a nanothin poly(dopamine) (PDA) layer were produced by a one-pot, nondestructive approach, with direct polymerization of dopamine on the CNT surface. The thickness of the PDA layer can be well-controlled by the reaction time and the proportion of dopamine, and this thickness is found to be the key factor in controlling the dispersion of CNTs and the extent of the interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy resin. SEM results indicated that the dispersion of CNTs in epoxy was improved significantly by coating a nanothin PDA layer onto the CNT surface. In agreeme nt withmore » this finding, the CNTs functionalized with the thinnest PDA layer provided the best mechanical and thermal properties. This result confirmed that a thinner PDA layer could provide optimized interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy matrix and weaken the self-agglomeration of CNTs, which led to an improved effective stress and heat transfer between the CNTs and the polymer matrix.« less

  9. Epoxy resin reinforced with nanothin polydopamine-coated carbon nanotubes: a study of the interfacial polymer layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Yang; Li, Weizhen; Wang, Baoyu; Gan, Wenjun; Zhu, Chenhui; Brady, Michael A.; Wang, Cheng

    2016-03-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized by a nanothin poly(dopamine) (PDA) layer were produced by a one-pot, nondestructive approach, with direct polymerization of dopamine on the CNT surface. The thickness of the PDA layer can be well-controlled by the reaction time and the proportion of dopamine, and this thickness is found to be the key factor in controlling the dispersion of CNTs and the extent of the interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy resin. SEM results indicated that the dispersion of CNTs in epoxy was improved significantly by coating a nanothin PDA layer onto the CNT surface. In agreeme nt with this finding, the CNTs functionalized with the thinnest PDA layer provided the best mechanical and thermal properties. This result confirmed that a thinner PDA layer could provide optimized interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy matrix and weaken the self-agglomeration of CNTs, which led to an improved effective stress and heat transfer between the CNTs and the polymer matrix.

  10. Silver-coated carbon nanotubes downregulate the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence genes: a potential mechanism for their antimicrobial effect.

    PubMed

    Dosunmu, Ejovwoke; Chaudhari, Atul A; Singh, Shree R; Dennis, Vida A; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver-coated carbon nanotubes (AgCNTs) and their potential mode of action against mucoid and nonmucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated in vitro. The results showed that AgCNTs exhibited antimicrobial activity against both strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations of approximately 8 µg/mL, indicating a high sensitivity of P. aeruginosa to AgCNTs. AgCNTs were also bactericidal against both strains at the same minimum inhibitory concentration. Scanning and transmission electron-microscopy studies further revealed that a majority of the cells treated with AgCNTs transformed from smooth rod-shape morphology to disintegrated cells with broken/damaged membranes, resulting in leakage of cytoplasmic contents to produce ghost cells. The molecular effects of AgCNTs on P. aeruginosa genes involved in virulence and pathogenicity, stress response, and efflux pumps were evaluated for changes in their expression. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that after exposure to AgCNTs, the expression levels of the rpoS, rsmZ, and oprD genes were significantly downregulated in both strains of P. aeruginosa compared to the untreated samples. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of AgCNTs may be attributed to their effect on cell-membrane integrity, downregulation of virulence-gene expression, and induction of general and oxidative stress in P. aeruginosa.

  11. Label-free SERS detection of relevant bioanalytes on silver-coated carbon nanotubes: The case of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Sanles-Sobrido, Marcos; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, Laura; Lorenzo-Abalde, Silvia; González-Fernández, Africa; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramón A; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2009-10-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy can be used for the label-free determination and quantification of relevant small biometabolites that are hard to identify by conventional immunological methods, in the absence of labelling. In this work, detection is based on monitoring the vibrational changes occurring at a specific biointerface (a monoclonal antibody, mAb) supported on silver-coated carbon nanotubes (CNT@Ag). Engineered CNT@Ag play a key role, as they offer a stable substrate to support the biointerface, with a high density of hot spots. Proof of concept is demonstrated through the analysis and quantification of the main cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine. These results open a new avenue toward the generation of portable sensors for fast ultradetection and quantification of relevant metabolites. The use of discrete particles (CNT@Ag@mAb) rather than rough films, or other conventional SERS supports, will also enable a safe remote interrogation of highly toxic sources in environmental problems or in biological fluids.

  12. Noble metal coated single-walled carbon nanotubes for applications in surface enhanced Raman scattering imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Chao; Cheng, Liang; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Liu, Zhuang

    2012-05-02

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique optical properties are interesting nanoprobes widely explored in biomedical imaging and phototherapies. Herein, DNA-functionalized SWNTs are modified with noble metal (Ag or Au) nanoparticles via an in situ solution phase synthesis method comprised of seed attachment, seeded growth, and surface modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), yielding SWNT-Ag-PEG and SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposites stable in physiological environments. With gold or silver nanoparticles decorated on the surface, the SWNT-metal nanocomposites gain an excellent concentration and excitation-source dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Using a near-infrared (NIR) laser as the excitation source, targeted Raman imaging of cancer cells labeled with folic acid (FA) conjugated SWNT-Au nanocomposite (SWNT-Au-PEG-FA) is realized, with images acquired in significantly shortened periods of time as compared to that of using nonenhanced SWNT Raman probes. Owing to the strong surface plasmon resonance absorption contributed by the gold shell, the SWNTs-Au-PEG-FA nanocomposite also offers remarkably improved photothermal cancer cell killing efficacy. This work presents a facile approach to synthesize water-soluble noble metal coated SWNTs with a strong SERS effect suitable for labeling and fast Raman spectroscopic imaging of biological samples, which has been rarely realized before. The SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposite developed here may thus be an interesting optical theranostic probe for cancer imaging and therapy.

  13. All-solid-state flexible supercapacitors based on papers coated with carbon nanotubes and ionic-liquid-based gel electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu Jin; Chung, Haegeun; Han, Chi-Hwan; Kim, Woong

    2012-02-17

    All-solid-state flexible supercapacitors were fabricated using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), regular office papers, and ionic-liquid-based gel electrolytes. Flexible electrodes were made by coating CNTs on office papers by a drop-dry method. The gel electrolyte was prepared by mixing fumed silica nanopowders with ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM][NTf(2)]). This supercapacitor showed high power and energy performance as a solid-state flexible supercapacitor. The specific capacitance of the CNT electrodes was 135 F g(-1) at a current density of 2 A g(-1), when considering the mass of active materials only. The maximum power and energy density of the supercapacitors were 164 kW kg(-1) and 41 Wh kg(-1), respectively. Interestingly, the solid-state supercapacitor with the gel electrolyte showed comparable performance to the supercapacitors with ionic-liquid electrolyte. Moreover, the supercapacitor showed excellent stability and flexibility. The CNT/paper- and gel-based supercapacitors may hold great potential for low-cost and high-performance flexible energy storage applications.

  14. Fabrication of enzyme-based coatings on intact multi-walled carbon nanotubes as highly effective electrodes in biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Chan; Lee, Inseon; Kwon, Seok-Joon; Wee, Youngho; Kwon, Ki Young; Jeon, Chulmin; An, Hyo Jin; Jung, Hee-Tae; Ha, Su; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Kim, Jungbae

    2017-01-01

    CNTs need to be dispersed in aqueous solution for their successful use, and most methods to disperse CNTs rely on tedious and time-consuming acid-based oxidation. Here, we report the simple dispersion of intact multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by adding them directly into an aqueous solution of glucose oxidase (GOx), resulting in simultaneous CNT dispersion and facile enzyme immobilization through sequential enzyme adsorption, precipitation, and crosslinking (EAPC). The EAPC achieved high enzyme loading and stability because of crosslinked enzyme coatings on intact CNTs, while obviating the chemical pretreatment that can seriously damage the electron conductivity of CNTs. EAPC-driven GOx activity was 4.5- and 11-times higher than those of covalently-attached GOx (CA) on acid-treated CNTs and simply-adsorbed GOx (ADS) on intact CNTs, respectively. EAPC showed no decrease of GOx activity for 270 days. EAPC was employed to prepare the enzyme anodes for biofuel cells, and the EAPC anode produced 7.5-times higher power output than the CA anode. Even with a higher amount of bound non-conductive enzymes, the EAPC anode showed 1.7-fold higher electron transfer rate than the CA anode. The EAPC on intact CNTs can improve enzyme loading and stability with key routes of improved electron transfer in various biosensing and bioelectronics devices.

  15. Titanium coated with functionalized carbon nanotubes--a promising novel material for biomedical application as an implantable orthopaedic electronic device.

    PubMed

    Przekora, Agata; Benko, Aleksandra; Nocun, Marek; Wyrwa, Jan; Blazewicz, Marta; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to fabricate titanium (Ti) material coated with functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) that would have potential medical application in orthopaedics as an implantable electronic device. The novel biomedical material (Ti-CNTs-H2O) would possess specific set of properties, such as: electrical conductivity, non-toxicity, and ability to inhibit connective tissue cell growth and proliferation protecting the Ti-CNTs-H2O surface against covering by cells. The novel material was obtained via an electrophoretic deposition of CNTs-H2O on the Ti surface. Then, physicochemical, electrical, and biological properties were evaluated. Electrical property evaluation revealed that a Ti-CNTs-H2O material is highly conductive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that there are mainly COOH groups on the Ti-CNTs-H2O surface that are found to inhibit cell growth. Biological properties were assessed using normal human foetal osteoblast cell line (hFOB 1.19). Conducted cytotoxicity tests and live/dead fluorescent staining demonstrated that Ti-CNTs-H2O does not exert toxic effect on hFOB cells. Moreover, fluorescence laser scanning microscope observation demonstrated that Ti-CNTs-H2O surface retards to a great extent cell proliferation. The study resulted in successful fabrication of highly conductive, non-toxic Ti-CNTs-H2O material that possesses ability to inhibit osteoblast proliferation and thus has a great potential as an orthopaedic implantable electronic device.

  16. Fabrication of enzyme-based coatings on intact multi-walled carbon nanotubes as highly effective electrodes in biofuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung Chan; Lee, Inseon; Kwon, Seok-Joon; Wee, Youngho; Kwon, Ki Young; Jeon, Chulmin; An, Hyo Jin; Jung, Hee-Tae; Ha, Su; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Kim, Jungbae

    2017-01-01

    CNTs need to be dispersed in aqueous solution for their successful use, and most methods to disperse CNTs rely on tedious and time-consuming acid-based oxidation. Here, we report the simple dispersion of intact multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by adding them directly into an aqueous solution of glucose oxidase (GOx), resulting in simultaneous CNT dispersion and facile enzyme immobilization through sequential enzyme adsorption, precipitation, and crosslinking (EAPC). The EAPC achieved high enzyme loading and stability because of crosslinked enzyme coatings on intact CNTs, while obviating the chemical pretreatment that can seriously damage the electron conductivity of CNTs. EAPC-driven GOx activity was 4.5- and 11-times higher than those of covalently-attached GOx (CA) on acid-treated CNTs and simply-adsorbed GOx (ADS) on intact CNTs, respectively. EAPC showed no decrease of GOx activity for 270 days. EAPC was employed to prepare the enzyme anodes for biofuel cells, and the EAPC anode produced 7.5-times higher power output than the CA anode. Even with a higher amount of bound non-conductive enzymes, the EAPC anode showed 1.7-fold higher electron transfer rate than the CA anode. The EAPC on intact CNTs can improve enzyme loading and stability with key routes of improved electron transfer in various biosensing and bioelectronics devices. PMID:28054656

  17. Silver-coated carbon nanotubes downregulate the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence genes: a potential mechanism for their antimicrobial effect

    PubMed Central

    Dosunmu, Ejovwoke; Chaudhari, Atul A; Singh, Shree R; Dennis, Vida A; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver-coated carbon nanotubes (AgCNTs) and their potential mode of action against mucoid and nonmucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated in vitro. The results showed that AgCNTs exhibited antimicrobial activity against both strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations of approximately 8 µg/mL, indicating a high sensitivity of P. aeruginosa to AgCNTs. AgCNTs were also bactericidal against both strains at the same minimum inhibitory concentration. Scanning and transmission electron-microscopy studies further revealed that a majority of the cells treated with AgCNTs transformed from smooth rod-shape morphology to disintegrated cells with broken/damaged membranes, resulting in leakage of cytoplasmic contents to produce ghost cells. The molecular effects of AgCNTs on P. aeruginosa genes involved in virulence and pathogenicity, stress response, and efflux pumps were evaluated for changes in their expression. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that after exposure to AgCNTs, the expression levels of the rpoS, rsmZ, and oprD genes were significantly downregulated in both strains of P. aeruginosa compared to the untreated samples. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of AgCNTs may be attributed to their effect on cell-membrane integrity, downregulation of virulence-gene expression, and induction of general and oxidative stress in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26346483

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of Suspended Carbon Nanotube Devices in Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Artyukhin, A; Stadermann, M; Stroeve, P; Bakajin, O; Noy, A

    2006-10-30

    Suspended carbon nanotube devices are a promising platform for future bio-electronic applications. Suspended carbon nanotube transistors have been previously fabricated in air; however all previous attempts to bring them into liquid failed. We analyze forces acting on the suspended nanotube devices during immersion into liquids and during device operation and show that surface tension forces acting on the suspended nanotubes during transfer into the liquid phase are responsible for the nanotube damage. We have developed a new strategy that circumvents these limitations by coating suspended nanotubes with a rigid inorganic shell in the gas phase. The coating reinforces the nanotubes and allows them to survive transfer through the interface. Subsequent removal of the coating in the solution phase restores pristine suspended nanotubes. We demonstrate that devices fabricated using this technique preserve their original electrical characteristics.

  19. Eco-designed biohybrids based on liposomes, mint-nanosilver and carbon nanotubes for antioxidant and antimicrobial coating.

    PubMed

    Barbinta-Patrascu, Marcela Elisabeta; Ungureanu, Camelia; Iordache, Stefan Marian; Iordache, Ana Maria; Bunghez, Ioana-Raluca; Ghiurea, Marius; Badea, Nicoleta; Fierascu, Radu-Claudiu; Stamatin, Ioan

    2014-06-01

    Noncovalent entities (consisting of liposomes, phyto-nanosilver and carbon nanotubes) with interesting properties were constructed by a "green" bottom-up method. Phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using the Mentha piperita extract combines the benefits of this herb with the interesting properties of silver. The obtained silver-based biohybrids showed antioxidant and antimicrobial properties that have been considerable improved in the presence of carbon nanotubes. Thus the eco-designed bioconstructs consisting of cholesterol-containing liposomes, phytonanosilver and carbon nanotubes exhibited high antioxidant activity (AA=90.8%) and have been shown to be strong biocides offering inhibition zone of 25mm against Escherichia coli and 23mm against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparing hydroxyapatite-silicon composite suspensions with homogeneous distribution of multi-walled carbon nano-tubes for electrophoretic coating of NiTi bone implant and their effect on the surface morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, Vida; Khalil-Allafi, Jafar; Xia, Wei; Parsa, Alireza B.; Frenzel, Jan; Somsen, Christoph; Eggeler, Gunther

    2016-03-01

    Preparing a stable suspension is a main step towards the electrophoretically depositing of homogeneous and dense composite coatings on NiTi for its biomedical application. In the present study, different composite suspensions of hydroxyapatite, silicon and multi-walled carbon nano-tubes were prepared using n-butanol and triethanolamine as media and dispersing agent, respectively. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were first functionalized in the nitric acid vapor for 15 h at 175 °C, and then mixed into suspensions. Thermal desorption spectroscopy profiles indicate the formation of functional groups on multi-walled carbon nano-tubes. An excellent suspension stability can be achieved for different amounts of triethanolamine. The amount of triethanolamine can be increased by adding a second component to a stable hydroxyapatite suspension due to an electrostatic interaction between components in suspension. The stability of composite suspension is less than that of the hydroxyapatite suspension, due to density differences, which under the gravitational force promote the demixing. The scanning electron microscopy images of the coatings surface show that more dense coatings are developed on NiTi substrate using electrophoretic deposition and sintering at 850 °C in the simultaneous presence of silicon and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the hydroxyapatite coatings. The atomic force microscopy results of the coatings surface represent that composite coatings of hydroxyapatite-20 wt.% silicon and hydroxyapatite-20 wt.% silicon-1 wt.% multi-walled carbon nano-tubes with low zeta potential have rougher surfaces.

  1. Underwater Acoustic Carbon Nanotube Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300042 1 of 10 UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC CARBON NANOTUBE THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube underwater acoustic source which acts as a thermophone...development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An

  2. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  3. Application of TiO2 nanoparticles coated multi-wall carbon nanotube to dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Huang, Kuohsiu-David; Hsieh, Tung-Jung; Chien, Shu-Hua

    2010-11-01

    This study uses the sol-gel method to prepare TiO2 nanoparticle, and further applies TiO2 nanoparticle coating on the surface of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT). As a result, TiO2-CNT composite nanoparticles are prepared to serve as photoelectrode material in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). First, after acid treatment of MWCNT is used to remove impurities. Then, the sol-gel method is employed to prepare TiO2-CNT composite nanopowder. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern shows that after the TiO2 in TiO2-CNT composite nanopowder has been thermally treated at 450 degrees C, it can be completely changed to anatase phase. Furthermore, as shown from the SEM image, TiO2 has been successfully coated on CNT. The photoelectrode of DSSC is prepared using the electrophoretic deposition method (EPD) to mix the Degassa P25 TiO2 nanoparticles with TiO2-CNT powder for deposition on the indium tin oxide (ITO) conductive glass. After secondary EPD, a thin film of TiO2/CNTs with thickness 17 microm can be acquired. For the prepared TiO2-CNT composite nanoparticles, since MWCNT can increase the short-circuit current density of DSSC, the light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of DSSC can be effectively increased. Experimental results show that the photoelectric conversion efficiency of DSSC using CNT/TiO2 photoelectrode and N719 dye is increased by 41% from the original 3.45% to 4.87%.

  4. Superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic surfaces from a carbon nanotube based composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Xue-Hu; Zhang, Zhao-Zhu; Yang, Jin; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Wei

    2010-02-01

    A facile method for forming a MWNT-based composite coating with behavior of the superhydrophilic/superhydrophobic transition is demonstrated. The change of the surface microstructure and the surface chemical composition arising from increasing temperatures determines the surface wettability of the resulting composite coating. The coating surface shows the superhydrophobic property at 150, 200, and 360°, and displays superhydrophilic performance at 300°C.

  5. Behaviour of one-step spray-coated carbon nanotube supercapacitor in ambient light harvester circuit with printed organic solar cell and electrochromic display.

    PubMed

    Tuukkanen, Sampo; Välimäki, Marja; Lehtimäki, Suvi; Vuorinen, Tiina; Lupo, Donald

    2016-03-09

    A printed energy harvesting and storage circuit powered by ambient office lighting and its use to power a printed display is reported. The autonomous device is composed of three printed electronic components: an organic photovoltaic module, a carbon-nanotubes-only supercapacitor and an electrochromic display element. Components are fabricated from safe and environmentally friendly materials, and have been fabricated using solution processing methods, which translate into low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing. A supercapacitor made of spray-coated carbon nanotube based ink and aqueous NaCl electrolyte was charged using a printed organic photovoltaic module exposed to office lighting conditions. The supercapacitor charging rate, self-discharge rate and display operation were studied in detail. The supercapacitor self-discharge rate was found to depend on the charging rate. The fully charged supercapacitor was used as a power source to run the electrochromic display over 50 times.

  6. Analysis of five alkaloids using surfactant-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the pseudostationary phase in nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingyi; Li, Geng; Wei, Yingqin; Lu, Heng; Jiang, Chao; Zhou, Xiaoteng; Meng, Fanyun; Cao, Jun; Liu, Jinxin

    2014-05-23

    In this paper, surfactant-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SC-MWNTs) have been proposed as a novel pseudostationary phase (PSP) to enhance the separation of isoquinoline alkaloids in nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE). Several parameters affecting NACE separation were studied including the MWNT concentration, the electrolyte concentration, pH* and the separation voltage. In comparison to conventional NACE, the addition of an MWNT dispersion using surfactant solutions in the electrolyte produced an important enhancement in the resolution due to the π-π interactions between the analytes and the surface of the carbon nanotubes. Using SC-MWNTs (6μgmL(-1)) as a PSP in the background electrolyte (BGE) (i.e., 20mM sodium acetate in methanol-acetonitrile (80:20, v/v)) provided the complete separation of five alkaloids. Finally, the developed method has been successfully applied to the detection and quantification of the tested compounds of Rhizoma Coptidis.

  7. Behaviour of one-step spray-coated carbon nanotube supercapacitor in ambient light harvester circuit with printed organic solar cell and electrochromic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuukkanen, Sampo; Välimäki, Marja; Lehtimäki, Suvi; Vuorinen, Tiina; Lupo, Donald

    2016-03-01

    A printed energy harvesting and storage circuit powered by ambient office lighting and its use to power a printed display is reported. The autonomous device is composed of three printed electronic components: an organic photovoltaic module, a carbon-nanotubes-only supercapacitor and an electrochromic display element. Components are fabricated from safe and environmentally friendly materials, and have been fabricated using solution processing methods, which translate into low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing. A supercapacitor made of spray-coated carbon nanotube based ink and aqueous NaCl electrolyte was charged using a printed organic photovoltaic module exposed to office lighting conditions. The supercapacitor charging rate, self-discharge rate and display operation were studied in detail. The supercapacitor self-discharge rate was found to depend on the charging rate. The fully charged supercapacitor was used as a power source to run the electrochromic display over 50 times.

  8. Behaviour of one-step spray-coated carbon nanotube supercapacitor in ambient light harvester circuit with printed organic solar cell and electrochromic display

    PubMed Central

    Tuukkanen, Sampo; Välimäki, Marja; Lehtimäki, Suvi; Vuorinen, Tiina; Lupo, Donald

    2016-01-01

    A printed energy harvesting and storage circuit powered by ambient office lighting and its use to power a printed display is reported. The autonomous device is composed of three printed electronic components: an organic photovoltaic module, a carbon-nanotubes-only supercapacitor and an electrochromic display element. Components are fabricated from safe and environmentally friendly materials, and have been fabricated using solution processing methods, which translate into low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing. A supercapacitor made of spray-coated carbon nanotube based ink and aqueous NaCl electrolyte was charged using a printed organic photovoltaic module exposed to office lighting conditions. The supercapacitor charging rate, self-discharge rate and display operation were studied in detail. The supercapacitor self-discharge rate was found to depend on the charging rate. The fully charged supercapacitor was used as a power source to run the electrochromic display over 50 times. PMID:26957019

  9. Double-walled carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinquan; Jia, Yi; Shu, Qinke; Gu, Zhiyi; Wang, Kunlin; Zhuang, Daming; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhicheng; Luo, Jianbin; Cao, Anyuan; Wu, Dehai

    2007-08-01

    We directly configured double-walled carbon nanotubes as energy conversion materials to fabricate thin-film solar cells, with nanotubes serving as both photogeneration sites and a charge carriers collecting/transport layer. The solar cells consist of a semitransparent thin film of nanotubes conformally coated on a n-type crystalline silicon substrate to create high-density p-n heterojunctions between nanotubes and n-Si to favor charge separation and extract electrons (through n-Si) and holes (through nanotubes). Initial tests have shown a power conversion efficiency of >1%, proving that DWNTs-on-Si is a potentially suitable configuration for making solar cells. Our devices are distinct from previously reported organic solar cells based on blends of polymers and nanomaterials, where conjugate polymers generate excitons and nanotubes only serve as a transport path.

  10. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M.; Sahu, Rakesh P.; Wallar, Cameron J.; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g-1 and an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm-2 at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1 is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm-2.

  11. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Ahmed M; Sahu, Rakesh P; Wallar, Cameron J; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K

    2017-02-17

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g(-1) and  an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm(-2) at a scan rate of 2 mV s(-1) is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm(-2).

  12. Coating of Ultrathin Polymer Films on Carbon Nanotubes by a Plasma Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    treatment. HRTEM experiments showed that an extremely thin film of the pyrrole layer (2-7 nm) was uniformly deposited on the surfaces of the nanotubes...treatment. The polyacrylic film will react with metallic ions in water. As a result of the high surface-to-volume ratio of these nanostructured clusters...introduced into the reactor chamber. The operating pressure was adjusted by the mass flow controller. Pyrrole was used as the mo- nomer for plasma

  13. Sorting Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by their electronic and atomic structures in liquid phases is reviewed in this chapter. We first introduce the sorting problem, and then provide an overview of several sorting methodologies, following roughly the chronological order of their development over the past 15 years or so. Major methods discussed include ion-exchange chromatography, density-gradient ultracentrifugation, selective extraction in organic solvents, gel chromatography, and aqueous two-phase extraction. A main focus of the review is on the common mechanisms underlining all sorting processes. We propose that differences in solvation among different nanotube species are the ultimate driving force of sorting, and we corroborate this proposal by presenting analysis on how the differences are realized in electronic-structure-based sorting and atomic-structure-based sorting. In the end, we offer some suggestions on future directions that may grow out of carbon nanotube sorting. In particular, the prospect of expanding the function of DNA/carbon nanotube hybrid to control inter-particle interactions both inside and outside the nanotube is discussed.

  14. Copper-philic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgamwar, Sachin U.; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotube is having poor wet-ability with copper metal. Wet-ability of carbon nanotube was improved by exposing and creating more active sites on the surface of carbon nanotube. Carbon nanotubes were subjected to the prolong ultrasonication treatment of 20×103 Hz and 500W, which helped in disentanglement of carbon nanotube agglomerates and in breaking the weak bonds like pentagonal or heptagonal structure on the surface and on the CNT cap. Disentanglement of the carbon nanotube, resulted in exposing the defective sites on the surface and breaking of weak bonds, which assisted in creating the new defects on the surface. This process results in generates more active sites on the surface and it helps in improving the wet-ability of the carbon nanotube in copper.

  15. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation deals with the use of carbon nanotubes as a transport system. Contact, defects, tubular bend, phonons, and mechanical deformations all contribute to reflection within the nanotube wire. Bragg reflection, however, is native to an ideal energy transport system. Transmission resistance depends primarily on the level of energy present. Finally, the details regarding coupling between carbon nanotubes and simple metals are presented.

  16. Carbon nanotube filters.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Srivastava, O N; Talapatra, S; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus ( approximately 25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  17. Carbon nanotube filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  18. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    PubMed

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  19. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m2/gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm3, an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm.

  20. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  1. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotube/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite film dip coated on Ti-6Al-4V by sol-gel method for biomedical applications: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Abrishamchian, Alireza; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Mohammadi, Mohammadreza; Najafi, Farhood

    2013-05-01

    In the present research, the introduction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into the hydroxyapatite (HA) matrix and dip coating of nanocomposite on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) plate was conducted in order to improve the performance of the HA-coated implant via the sol-gel method. The structural characterization and electron microscopy results confirmed well crystallized HA-MWCNT coating and homogenous dispersion of carbon nanotubes in the ceramic matrix at temperatures as low as 500 °C. The evaluation of the mechanical properties of HA and HA/MWCNT composite coatings with different weight percentages of MWCNTs showed that the addition of low concentrations of MWCNTs (0.5 and 1 wt.%) had improved effect on the mechanical properties of nanocomposite coatings. Moreover, this in vitro study ascertained the biocompatibility of the prepared sol-gel-derived HA/MWCNT composite coatings.

  2. Study on Au nanoparticles, TiO2 nanoclusters, and SiO2 nanoshells coated multi-wall carbon nanotubes/silica gel-glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chan; Chen, Wenzhe; Ye, Xiaoyun

    2012-05-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with crystalline Au nanoparticles, TiO2 nanoclusters, and amorphous SiO2 nanoshells, to represent conductors, semiconductors, and insulators, respectively, were embedded in transparent silica gel-glass. The coated MWCNT/silica gel-glasses were prepared by the sol-gel technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV/Vis spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and pore structure measurements were used to investigate the morphology, structure, and texture properties of the coated MWCNT/silica gel-glasses. The hardness and elastic modulus of the silica gel-glasses were characterized using a Nanoindenter and found to depend on the coating materials. Coating the MWCNTs with crystalline Au nanoparticles, TiO2 nanoclusters, and amorphous SiO2 nanoshells leads to an increase in the hardness and elastic modulus, despite the higher specific surface area and pore volume of the coated MWCNT/silica gel-glasses. Consequently, we can conclude that the mechanical properties of coated MWCNT/silica gel-glass might be greatly dependent on the guest MWCNTs rather than the silica gel matrix.

  3. Tantalum oxide/carbon nanotubes composite coatings on titanium, and their functionalization with organophosphonic molecular films: a high quality scaffold for hydroxyapatite growth.

    PubMed

    Maho, A; Linden, S; Arnould, C; Detriche, S; Delhalle, J; Mekhalif, Z

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, titanium is a very commonly used biomaterial for the preparation of orthopedic and dental implants. Its excellent mechanical and biochemical bulk properties are nevertheless counterbalanced by its propensity to long term degradation in physiological conditions and its weak osseointegrative capacities. In this context, surface modifications can significantly hinder titanium weaknesses. The approach considered in this work relies on the preparation of thin composite coatings based on tantalum oxide and carbon nanotubes by sol-gel process. Tantalum is particularly interesting for its high biocompatibility and bioactivity, as well as its strong resistance to bio-corrosion. Carbon nanotubes are exploited to reinforce the compactness and homogeneity of the coatings, and can act as a favorable factor to strengthen the interaction with bone components by biomimicry. The composite layers are further modified with specific organophosphonic acid molecular films, able to chemically bind the tantalum oxide surface and improve the hydroxyapatite formation process. The characteristics and the qualities of these hybrid inorganic/organic coatings are evaluated by XPS, SEM, TEM, peeling tests, contact angle measurements, and electrochemical characterizations (free potential, polarization curves). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  7. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold.

    PubMed

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F A; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G; Brooks, James S

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations.

  8. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations.

  9. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations. PMID:24022336

  10. Production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  11. Simultaneous determination of norepinephrine, uric acid, and ascorbic acid at a screen printed carbon electrode modified with polyacrylic acid-coated multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hung; Liao, Hsiu-Hsien; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2010-06-15

    A screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) modified with polyacrylic acid-coated multi-wall carbon nanotubes (PAA-MWCNTs) has been prepared by the dispersion of MWCNTs in PAA aqueous solution via sonication and the followed drop-coating for the simultaneous determination of norepinephrine (NE), uric acid (UA), and ascorbic acid (AA). The presence of PAA inhibited the adsorption of AA owing to the electrostatic repulsion, but was favorable for the affinity adsorption of NE and UA via the ion exchange and hydrogen bonding mechanisms, respectively. This led to the decrease in the oxidation potential of AA and the significantly enhanced oxidation peak currents of NE and UA at the PAA-MWCNTs/SPCE. By cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry, the oxidation potentials of NE, UA, and AA at the PAA-MWCNTs/SPCE in a ternary mixture were found to be well resolved so that their simultaneous determination could be achieved. Furthermore, the interaction of NE, UA, and AA with PAA accounted for their electrochemical responses at different pH values. Also, the effect of pH revealed that the oxidation of NE, UA, and AA at the PAA-MWCNTs/SPCE all involved the transfer of two electrons. In addition, by differential pulse voltammetry, the linear dependence of peak current on the concentration was obtained in the ranges of 0-10, 0-30, and 100-1000 microM with the lowest detection limits of 0.131, 0.458, and 49.8 microM for NE, UA, and AA, respectively. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Preparation of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) Probes through Polyaniline Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (PANI/MWCNTs) Coating for the Extraction of Palmitic Acid and Oleic Acid in Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Khajeamiri, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    A fiber coating from polyaniline (PANI) was electrochemically prepared and employed for Solid phase micreoextraction (SPME). The PANI film was directly electrodeposited on the platinum wire surface using cyclic voltametry (CV) technique. The same method was applied for the preparation of SPME fiber coated by polyaniline multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PANI/MWCNTs) composite. The concentration of sulfuric acid for electropolymerization was 0.1 M in the presence of 0.045 M aniline in aqueous solution. For the electrodeposition of PANI/MWCNT composite, 4 μg/mL of MWCNTs was dispersed into the solution. Film coating was carried out on the platinum wire by repetitive cycling of potentials between 0 and 1.0 V at the scan rate of 0.05 V/s. The applicability of these coatings were assessed through employing a laboratory-made SPME injecting device and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the extraction of palmitic acid and oleic acid from chloroform. The developed method proved to be simple and easy, offering high reproducibility. Both PANI coated and PANI/CNT coated probes had the ability to concentrate palmitic acid and oleic acid on their coating and produced strong signals in GC-MS chromatograms. In the meantime, PANI/CNT coated SPME probes produced signals which were stronger than those produced by PANI coated SPME probes. The amount of extracted palmitic acid and oleic acid from chloroform by the PANI/MWCNTs coating was about 6 and 12 times higher than the amount extracted by plane PANI SPME fibers respectively. It could be suggested that the composite material with CNTs has both an increased surface area and an elevated absorptive capacity which leads to this overall increase in extracted palmitic acid and oleic acid.

  13. Application Of Metal Coated Carbon Nanotubes To Direct Methanol Fuel Cells And For The Formation Of Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frackowiak, E.; Lota, G.; Lota, K.; Béguin, F.

    2004-09-01

    Homogeneously distributed particles of Pt, Ru or their alloys were electrochemically deposited on catalytic and template multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The catalysts supported on the entangled or straight CNTs network with open mesopores have been tested for the reaction of methanol oxidation (1M) in acidic medium (1M H2SO4) by potentiodynamic and galvanostatic methods. The high current densities (500 mA/g) for methanol oxidation proved that such a composite enables a good accessibility of the reagent molecules to the electrode interface. Contrarily, continuous layers of such metals as nickel, copper and silver were chemically and/or electrochemically deposited on carbon nanotubes. These novel materials of nanometer size can be adapted for some electronic application, e.g. nanowires.

  14. A novel covalent approach to bio-conjugate silver coated single walled carbon nanotubes with antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Atul A; Ashmore, D'andrea; Nath, Subrata Deb; Kate, Kunal; Dennis, Vida; Singh, Shree R; Owen, Don R; Palazzo, Chris; Arnold, Robert D; Miller, Michael E; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2016-07-13

    Due to increasing antibiotic resistance, the use of silver coated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-Ag) and antimicrobial peptides (APs) is becoming popular due to their antimicrobial properties against a wide range of pathogens. However, stability against various conditions and toxicity in human cells are some of the major drawbacks of APs and SWCNTs-Ag, respectively. Therefore, we hypothesized that APs-functionalized SWCNTs-Ag could act synergistically. Various covalent functionalization protocols described previously involve harsh treatment of carbon nanotubes for carboxylation (first step in covalent functionalization) and the non-covalently functionalized SWCNTs are not satisfactory. The present study is the first report wherein SWCNTs-Ag were first carboxylated using Tri sodium citrate (TSC) at 37 °C and then subsequently functionalized covalently with an effective antimicrobial peptide from Therapeutic Inc., TP359 (FSWCNTs-Ag). SWCNTs-Ag were also non covalently functionalized with TP359 by simple mixing (SWCNTs-Ag-M) and both, the FSWCNTs-Ag (covalent) and SWCNTs-Ag-M (non-covalent), were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Ultraviolet visualization (UV-VIS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Further the antibacterial activity of both and TP359 were investigated against two gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) and two gram negative (Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli) pathogens and the cellular toxicity of TP359 and FSWCNTs-Ag was compared with plain SWCNTs-Ag using murine macrophages and lung carcinoma cells. FT-IR analysis revealed that treatment with TSC successfully resulted in carboxylation of SWCNTs-Ag and the peptide was indeed attached to the SWCNTs-Ag evidenced by TEM images. More importantly, the present study results further showed that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of FSWCNTs-Ag were much lower (~7.8-3.9 µg/ml with IC50: ~4-5

  15. Synthesis and characterization of polyamidoamine dendrimer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their application in gene delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bifeng; Cui, Daxiang; Xu, Ping; Ozkan, Cengiz; Feng, Gao; Ozkan, Mihri; Huang, Tuo; Chu, Bingfeng; Li, Qing; He, Rong; Hu, Guohan

    2009-03-01

    With the aim of improving the amount and delivery efficiency of genes taken by carbon nanotubes into human cancer cells, different generations of polyamidoamine dendrimer modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (dMNTs) were fabricated, and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, revealing the presence of dendrimer capped on the surface of carbon nanotubes. The dMNTs fully conjugated with FITC-labeled antisense c-myc oligonucleotides (asODN), those resultant asODN-dMNTs composites were incubated with human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-435 cells, and liver cancer cell line HepG2 cells, and confirmed to enter into tumor cells within 15 min by laser confocal microscopy. These composites inhibited the cell growth in time- and dose-dependent means, and down-regulated the expression of the c-myc gene and C-Myc protein. Compared with the composites of CNT-NH2-asODN and dendrimer-asODN, no. 5 generation of dendrimer-modified MNT-asODN composites exhibit maximal transfection efficiencies and inhibition effects on tumor cells. The intracellular gene transport and uptake via dMNTs should be generic for the mammalian cell lines. The dMNTs have potentials in applications such as gene or drug delivery for cancer therapy and molecular imaging.

  16. Coated capillaries with highly charged polyelectrolytes and carbon nanotubes co-aggregated with sodium dodecyl sulphate for the analysis of sulfonylureas by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    El-Debs, Racha; Nehmé, Reine; Claude, Bérengère; Motteau, Solène; Togola, Anne; Berho, Catherine; Morin, Philippe

    2014-11-07

    Sulfonylureas (SUs) are one of the most widely used herbicides to control weeds in crops. Herein, capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to determine four sulfonylureas in natural waters, namely chlorsulfuron (CS), iodosulfuron methyl (IM), metsulfuron methyl (MSM) and mesosulfuron methyl (MSS). First of all, a bare silica capillary was chosen with 10mM of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bminBF4) as electrophoretic buffer (pH 9.6) containing 2 mg L(-1) of surfactant-coated single-wall carbon nanotubes (SC-SWCNTs). A dramatic deviation in migration times was observed. Therefore, a poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDADMAC) statically coated cationic capillary was used to improve repeatability and to alter the selectivity of the separation. The electroosmotic flow (EOF) measurement revealed that the SC-SWCNTs were strongly adsorbed at the surface of the PDADMAC coating even in the absence of the surfactant-coated nanotubes in the electrolyte buffer. Consequently, a stable strong cathodic EOF and excellent repeatabilities were obtained with relative standard deviations (RSDs) on migration times and on corrected peak areas below 0.9 and 1.5%, respectively. The separation of the SUs was conducted in only 6 min. No regeneration of the coating between analyses was necessary, and high peak efficiencies up to 173,000 theoretical plates were obtained. The bi-layer coating was subsequently used to analyze sulfonylureas in tap water, in several mineral waters as well as in underground waters spiked with SUs and directly injected into the CE capillary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäder, Edith; Liu, Jian-Wen; Hiller, Janett; Lu, Weibang; Li, Qingwen; Zhandarov, Serge; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2015-07-01

    An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test. In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis. The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this, shear sliding along

  18. Spray coating of carbon nanotube on polyethylene terephthalate film for touch panel application.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Yun-Su; Lee, Sung Ho; Song, Kyu Ho; Park, Lee Soon

    2012-07-01

    From a technical perspective, the major limiting factors for the wide adoption of CNT films are the DC conductivity, uniformity of sheet resistance and good adhesion of CNT on film substrate. In this study, the effects of sonificator and process time on the zeta potential and sheet resistance of the CNT-PET film show that although the dispersing power of horn-type sonificator is stronger than that of bath-type, the SWCNT solution obtained with horn-type sonificator agglomerates faster. Likewise, it has been noted that the SWCNT solutions with low enough zeta potentials exhibit higher sheet resistance after making CNT-PET films due to the damage to SWCNTs caused by high dispersion force. Since the spray coating of SWCNT solution gives the SWCNT-SDS composite layer on PET film after drying, the excess SDS should be washed off. The removal of excess SDS was conducted by dipping in the 3 N HNO3 and SOCl2 solution and washing with deionized water followed by heat treatment in a 120 degrees C convection oven for 30 min. The lift-off of SWCNT-SDS composite layer after 40 min dipping in the 3 N HNO3 solution appeared to be due to the continued permeation leading to swelling of the SDS layer by the 3 N HNO3 aqueous solution. It was found that ten times of spray coating cycle gave CNT-PET film the sheet resistance of 310 Ω/[square] and transmittance of 81%. The TSP made with CNT-PET film exhibited a performance equal to the one made with ITO-PET film.

  19. Method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor); Frazier, Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for manufacturing carbon nanotubes, including a step of inducing electrical current through a carbon anode and a carbon cathode under conditions effective to produce the carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon cathode is larger than the carbon anode. Preferably, a welder is used to induce the electrical current via an arc welding process. Preferably, an exhaust hood is placed on the anode, and the process does not require a closed or pressurized chamber. The process provides high-quality, single-walled carbon nanotubes, while eliminating the need for a metal catalyst.

  20. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    We describe current and possible future developments in nanotechnology for biological and medical applications. Nanostructured, composite materials for drug delivery, biosensors, diagnostics and tumor therapy are reviewed as examples, placing special emphasis on silica composites. Carbon nanotubes are discussed as a primary example of emerging nanomaterials for many of the above-mentioned applications. Toxicity effects of this novel nanomaterial are discussed and the need for further study of potential hazards for human health, professionally exposed workers and the environment is motivated.

  2. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  5. RGD-conjugated silica-coated gold nanorods on the surface of carbon nanotubes for targeted photoacoustic imaging of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Can; Bao, Chenchen; Liang, Shujing; Fu, Hualin; Wang, Kan; Deng, Min; Liao, Qiande; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we reported for the first time that RGD-conjugated silica-coated gold nanorods on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes were successfully used for targeted photoacoustic imaging of in vivo gastric cancer cells. A simple strategy was used to attach covalently silica-coated gold nanorods (sGNRs) onto the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) to fabricate a hybrid nanostructure. The cross-linked reaction occurred through the combination of carboxyl groups on the MWNTs and the amino group on the surface of sGNRs modified with a silane coupling agent. RGD peptides were conjugated with the sGNR/MWNT nanostructure; resultant RGD-conjugated sGNR/MWNT probes were investigated for their influences on viability of MGC803 and GES-1 cells. The nude mice models loaded with gastric cancer cells were prepared, the RGD-conjugated sGNR/MWNT probes were injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice models via the tail vein, and the nude mice were observed by an optoacoustic imaging system. Results showed that RGD-conjugated sGNR/MWNT probes showed good water solubility and low cellular toxicity, could target in vivo gastric cancer cells, and obtained strong photoacoustic imaging in the nude model. RGD-conjugated sGNR/MWNT probes will own great potential in applications such as targeted photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy in the near future.

  6. RGD-conjugated silica-coated gold nanorods on the surface of carbon nanotubes for targeted photoacoustic imaging of gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Bao, Chenchen; Liang, Shujing; Fu, Hualin; Wang, Kan; Deng, Min; Liao, Qiande; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-05-01

    Herein, we reported for the first time that RGD-conjugated silica-coated gold nanorods on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes were successfully used for targeted photoacoustic imaging of in vivo gastric cancer cells. A simple strategy was used to attach covalently silica-coated gold nanorods (sGNRs) onto the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) to fabricate a hybrid nanostructure. The cross-linked reaction occurred through the combination of carboxyl groups on the MWNTs and the amino group on the surface of sGNRs modified with a silane coupling agent. RGD peptides were conjugated with the sGNR/MWNT nanostructure; resultant RGD-conjugated sGNR/MWNT probes were investigated for their influences on viability of MGC803 and GES-1 cells. The nude mice models loaded with gastric cancer cells were prepared, the RGD-conjugated sGNR/MWNT probes were injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice models via the tail vein, and the nude mice were observed by an optoacoustic imaging system. Results showed that RGD-conjugated sGNR/MWNT probes showed good water solubility and low cellular toxicity, could target in vivo gastric cancer cells, and obtained strong photoacoustic imaging in the nude model. RGD-conjugated sGNR/MWNT probes will own great potential in applications such as targeted photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy in the near future.

  7. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  8. Fabrication of highly conductive and transparent thin films from single-walled carbon nanotubes using a new non-ionic surfactant via spin coating.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jea Woong; Jung, Jae Woong; Lee, Jea Uk; Jo, Won Ho

    2010-09-28

    Oligothiophene-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) was synthesized and used as a non-ionic and amphiphilic surfactant for fabricating high-quality single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films by a simple spin coating method. The absence of charge repulsion between SWCNT/surfactant complexes successfully leads to formation of a dense network of SWCNTs on the substrate through a single deposition of spin coating. When the SWCNT film was treated with nitric acid and thionyl chloride after washed with dichloromethane and water, a high-performance SWCNT film with the sheet resistance of 59 ohm/sq and the transparency of 71% at 550 nm was successfully obtained. Since the SWCNT film exhibits a high value of σ(dc)/σ(ac) (∼17) and excellent dimensional stability after releasing from the substrate, the film can be used as a transparent electrode in flexible optoelectronic devices.

  9. Carbon nanotube catalysts: recent advances in synthesis, characterization and applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yibo; Miao, Jianwei; Yang, Zhihong; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yanhui

    2015-05-21

    Carbon nanotubes are promising materials for various applications. In recent years, progress in manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes has been made to achieve the control of bulk and surface properties including the wettability, acid-base properties, adsorption, electric conductivity and capacitance. In order to gain the optimal benefit of carbon nanotubes, comprehensive understanding on manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes ought to be systematically developed. This review summarizes methodologies of manufacturing carbon nanotubes via arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition and functionalizing carbon nanotubes through surface oxidation and activation, doping of heteroatoms, halogenation, sulfonation, grafting, polymer coating, noncovalent functionalization and nanoparticle attachment. The characterization techniques detecting the bulk nature and surface properties as well as the effects of various functionalization approaches on modifying the surface properties for specific applications in catalysis including heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis and electrocatalysis are highlighted.

  10. Optoelectronics with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    The carbon nanotube is a promising material for future micro- and nano-scale electronics because of its unique electronic properties, high carrier mobility and extraordinary capacity for high current density. In particular, semiconducting carbon nanotubes are direct bandgap materials with a typical energy gap in the order of 1 eV, which means they emit light in the near-infrared range, making them an attractive option in telecommunications applications. However, there have been few systematic investigations of electrically-induced light emission (i.e. electroluminescence) from carbon nanotubes, and their emission properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, we explore the characteristics of electroluminescence in three different types of carbon-nanotube devices. The first is a single-tube field-effect transistor (CNTFET), whose emission has previously been found to have a very broad spectral shape and low emission efficiency. We analyze the spectral shape in detail, which reveals that a high electric field near metal contacts contributes most to the bias-dependent component of broadening, in addition to smaller contributions from tube nonuniformity, inelastic scattering of phonons, high temperature, etc. In the second part of the study, single-tube light-emitting diodes are constructed by employing a split top-gate scheme. The split gate creates p- and n-doped regions electrostatically, so that electrons and holes combine between the two sections and can decay radiatively. This configuration creates electron-hole pairs under much lower electric fields and gives us a greater control over carrier distribution in the device channel, resulting in much narrower spectral linewidths and an emission intensity several orders of magnitude larger than that of CNTFETs. The much better signal-to-noise also leads to the observation of emission from defect-induced states. Finally, we extend the idea of the single-tube p-n diode and fabricate CNT film diodes from many

  11. A simple preparation of very high methanol tolerant cathode electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cell based on polymer-coated carbon nanotube/platinum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zehui; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The development of a durable and methanol tolerant electrocatalyst with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity is highly important for the cathode side of direct methanol fuel cells. Here, we describe a simple and novel methodology to fabricate a practically applicable electrocatalyst with a high methanol tolerance based on poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole]-wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes, on which Pt nanoparticles have been deposited, then coated with poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA). The polymer coated electrocatalyst showed an ~3.3 times higher oxygen reduction reaction activity compared to that of the commercial CB/Pt and methanol tolerance in the presence of methanol to the electrolyte due to a 50% decreased methanol adsorption on the Pt after coating with the PVPA. Meanwhile, the peroxide generation of the PVPA coated electrocatalyst was as low as 0.8% with 2 M methanol added to the electrolyte, which was much lower than those of the non-PVPA-coated electrocatalyst (7.5%) and conventional CB/Pt (20.5%). Such a high methanol tolerance is very important for the design of a direct methanol fuel cell cathode electrocatalyst with a high performance. PMID:26192397

  12. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    PubMed

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  13. Carbon nanotubes: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongjie

    2002-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are graphene sheets rolled-up into cylinders with diameters as small as one nanometer. Extensive work carried out worldwide in recent years has revealed the intriguing electrical and mechanical properties of these novel molecular scale wires. It is now well established that carbon nanotubes are ideal model systems for studying the physics in one-dimensional solids and have significant potential as building blocks for various practical nanoscale devices. Nanotubes have been shown to be useful for miniaturized electronic, mechanical, electromechanical, chemical and scanning probe devices and materials for macroscopic composites. Progress in nanotube growth has facilitated the fundamental study and applications of nanotubes. Gaining control over challenging nanotube growth issues is critical to the future advancement of nanotube science and technology, and is being actively pursued by researchers.

  14. Half-metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2012-04-17

    Half-metallicity in carbon nanotubes is achieved and controlled by hydrogen adsorption patterns. The edge states in carbon nanotubes are unstable under an electric field due to the spin-conserving electron transfer between the edges, but a large enough transfer barrier between the edge states, obtained by controlling the adsorption patterns, renders the CNTs half-metallic.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Based Flexible Supercapacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Electrochemical double layer capacitors are fabricated using carbon nanotube (CNT)/paper flexible electrodes. An extensive...TERMS Carbon nanotube, supercapacitor, electrochemical double layer capacitor 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18...layer capacitors (Supercapacitors) are expected to play a significant role in future hybrid power systems due to their high specific power, cycle

  16. Carbon nanotubes as liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanju; Kumar, Satish

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the best of known materials with a combination of excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. To fully exploit individual nanotube properties for various applications, the grand challenge is to fabricate macroscopic ordered nanotube assemblies. Liquid-crystalline behavior of the nanotubes provides a unique opportunity toward reaching this challenge. In this Review, the recent developments in this area are critically reviewed by discussing the strategies for fabricating liquid-crystalline phases, addressing the solution properties of liquid-crystalline suspensions, and exploiting the practical techniques of liquid-crystal routes to prepare macroscopic nanotube fibers and films.

  17. Copper-coated Nanotubes at the Single Nanotube Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Deng; Corso, Brad; Gul, O. Tolga; Collins, Philip

    2014-03-01

    High conductivity and high ampacity are both essential specifications for next-generation solid-state electronics. Recently, Subramaniam et. al. reported remarkable increases in copper conductivity and ampacity using a bulk composite of copper and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Here, we describe similar measurements performed with a model system composed of individual single-walled or multi-walled CNTs. Cu electrodeposition upon single CNT devices achieved nanometer-scale coatings that were electrically tested as a function of film thickness and device temperature. We do not observe the same conductivity enhancements reported for bulk Cu-CNT composites, but improvements in ampacity has been observed when compared to pure Cu. The thinnest Cu films have the hightest ampacity, indicating that the CNT core is essential to the enhanced current capacity.

  18. Increased Alignment in Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an array of two or more carbon nanotube (CNT) structures on a coated substrate surface, the structures having substantially the same orientation with respect to a substrate surface. A single electrode, having an associated voltage source with a selected voltage, is connected to a substrate surface after the substrate is coated and before growth of the CNT structures, for a selected voltage application time interval. The CNT structures are then grown on a coated substrate surface with the desired orientation. Optionally, the electrode can be disconnected before the CNT structures are grown.

  19. Carbon nanotube sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liming

    2002-07-01

    Measurement represents one of the oldest methods used by human beings to better understand and control the world. Many measurement systems are primarily physical sensors, which measure time, temperature, weight, distance, and various other physical parameters. The need for cheaper, faster, and more accurate meansurements has been a driving force for the development of new systems and technologies for measurements of materials, both chemical and biological. In fact, chemical and biological sensors (or biosensors) are the evolved products of physical measurement technologies. Chemical sensors are measurement devices that convert a chemical or physical change of a specific analyte into a measurable signal, whose magnitude is normally proportional to the concentration of the analyte. On the other hand, biosensors are a subset of chemical sensors that employ a biological sensing element connected to a transducer to recognize the physiochemical change and to produce the measurable signal from particular analytes, which are not necessary to be biological materials themselves, although sometimes they are. Depending on the basis of the transduction principle, chemical and biological sensors can be classified into three major classes with different transducers: sensors with electrical transducers, sensors with optical transducers, and sensors with other transducers (e.g. mass change). The unique properties of carbon nanotubes have led to their use in areas as diverse as sensors, actuators, field-emitting flat panel displays, energy and gas storages (Dai and Mau, 2001). As we shall see below, the principles for carbon nanotube sensors to detect the nature of gases and to determine their concentrations are based on change in electrical properties induced by charge transfer with the gas molecules (e.g. O2, H2, CO2) or in mass due to physical adsorption. This article provides a status report on the research and development of carbon nanotube sensors.

  20. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale.

  1. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  2. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  4. 106 ASSESSMENT OF ANTI-BACTERIAL EFFECTS OF PEGYLATED SILVER-COATED CARBON NANOTUBES ON CAUSATIVE BACTERIA OF BOVINE INFERTILITY USING BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Chaudhari, A A; Pillai, S; Singh, S R; Willard, S T; Ryan, P L; Feugang, J M

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. are the major causative agents of endometritis and can cause infertility in livestock animals. Antibiotics are commonly used to terminate bacterial infections, but the development of bacterial antibiotic resistance is often encountered. Nanotechnology associated with silver nanoparticles has been highlighted as an alternative anti-bacterial agent, and pegylated silver-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes have high anti-bacterial effects and are non-toxic to human and murine cells in vitro. Here we verified whether a real-time bioluminescence monitoring system could be an alternative tool to assess anti-bacterial effects of nanotubes in a noninvasive approach. Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. were transfected with plasmids containing constructs for luciferase enzyme (LuxCDABE) and substrate (luciferin) to create self-illuminating bioluminescent bacteria. Pathogens were grown in LB broth at 37°C, adjusted to 10(7) cfumL(-1), and placed in 96-well plates for treatments. Pegylated (pSWCNTs-Ag) and non-pegylated (SWCNTs-Ag) nanotubes were prepared and added to culture wells at various concentrations (31.25-125µgmL(-1)). The control group corresponded to bacteria without nanotubes (0µgmL(-1)). Anti-bacterial effects of nanotubes were determined every 10min until 1h, then every 30min up to 6h incubation through optical density (600nm) measurements and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and quantification using an IVIS system. Optical density and BLI data were compared at each time-point using 2-way ANOVA, with P<0.05 set for significance. Bioluminescence signals emitted by both bacteria stains appeared within 10min of incubation. Thereafter, control bacteria showed exponential growth that was detected as early as 25min post-incubation. Bioluminescence imaging revealed dose-dependent anti-bacterial activities of both pSWCNTs-Ag and SWCNTs-Ag on each E. coli and Salmonella sp. (P<0.05). Contrary to BLI, the

  5. Photocatalysis-assisted water filtration: using TiO2-coated vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube array for removal of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Oza, Goldie; Pandey, Sunil; Gupta, Arvind; Shinde, Sachin; Mewada, Ashmi; Jagadale, Pravin; Sharon, Maheshwar; Sharon, Madhuri

    2013-10-01

    A porous ceramic was coated with vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by spray pyrolysis. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were then coated onto this densely aligned MWCNT. The presence of TiO2/MWCNT interfacial arrays was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (SEM-EDAX) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). This is a novel report in which water loaded with a most dreadful enterohemorrhagic pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was filtered through TiO2/MWCNT coated porous ceramic filter and then analysed. Bacterial removal performance was found to be significantly lower in control i.e. plain porous ceramic (P<0.05) as compared to TiO2/MWCNT coated ceramic. The photocatalytic killing rate constant for TiO2-ceramic and MWCNT/TiO2-ceramic under fluorescent light was found be 1.45×10(-2) min(-1) and 2.23×10(-2) min(-1) respectively. Further, when I-V characteristics were performed for TiO2/MWCNT composite, it was corroborated that the current under light irradiation is comparatively higher than that in dark, thus proving it to be photocatalytically efficient system. The enhanced photocatalysis may be a contribution of increased surface area and charge transfer rate as a consequence of aligned MWCNT network. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation of solid-phase microextraction fiber coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes by electrophoretic deposition and its application in extracting phenols from aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanlong; Wang, Xuefeng; Yuan, Dongxing

    2009-02-27

    A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) Pt fiber coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was prepared by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and applied to the determination of phenols in aqueous samples by direct immersion (DI)-SPME-HPLC-UV. The results revealed that EPD was a simple and reproducible technique for the preparation of SPME fibers coated with SWCNTs without the use of adhesive. The obtained SWCNT coating did not swell in organic solvents nor strip off from substrate, and possessed high mechanical strength due to the strong Van der Waals attractions between the surfaces of the SWCNTs. The prepared SPME fiber was conductive since both SWCNT coating and Pt wire were conductive. Using Pt wire as substrate, the fiber was unbreakable. Owing to the presence of oxygenated groups on SWCNTs and the high surface area of SWCNTs, the SWCNT fiber was similar to or superior to commercial PA fiber in extracting the studied phenols from aqueous sample. A durability of more than 80 analyses was achieved for one unique fiber. Under optimized conditions, the detection limits for the phenols varied between 0.9 and 3.8 ng/mL, the precisions were in the range of 0.7-3.2% (n=3), and linear ranges were within 10 and 300 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of spiked seawater and tap water samples with the recoveries from 87.5 to 102.0%.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  8. Titania carbon nanotube composites for enhanced photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios

    Photocatalytic composites have been used for the past few decades in a wide range of applications. The most common application is the purification of air and water by removing toxic compounds. There is limited use however towards biocidal applications. Despite their high efficiency, photocatalytic materials are not comparable to the effectiveness of conventional biocidal compounds such as chlorine and alcoholic disinfectants. On the other hand, nearly a decade ago with the discovery of the carbon nanotubes a new vibrant scientific field emerged. Nanotubes are unique structures of carbon that posse amazing electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. In this research carbon nanotubes are used as photocatalytic enhancers. They were coated with anatase titania to form a composite material. Two different types of nanotubes (metallic versus non-metallic) were used and the photocatalytic activity was measured. The metallic tubes demonstrated exceptional photocatalytic properties, while non-metallic tubes had low photocatalytic efficiency. The reason for that difference was investigated and was the major focus of this research. The research concluded that the reasons for the high efficiency of the carbon nanotubes were (i) the metallic nature of the tubes and (ii) the possible bond between the titania coating and the underlying graphite layers (C-O-Ti). Since both composites had the same indications regarding the C-O-Ti bond, the metallic nature of the carbon nanotubes is believed to be the most dominant factor contributing to the enhancement of the photocatalysis. The composite material may have other potential applications such as for sensing and photovoltaic uses.

  9. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  10. In vivo feasibility test using transparent carbon nanotube-coated polydimethylsiloxane sheet at brain tissue and sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caifeng; Oh, Sangjin; Lee, Hyun Ah; Kang, Jieun; Jeong, Ki-Jae; Kang, Seon Woo; Hwang, Dae Youn; Lee, Jaebeom

    2017-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes, with their unique and outstanding properties, such as strong mechanical strength and high electrical conductivity, have become very popular for the repair of tissues, particularly for those requiring electrical stimuli. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based elastomers have been used in a wide range of biomedical applications because of their optical transparency, physiological inertness, blood compatibility, non-toxicity, and gas permeability. In present study, most of artificial nerve guidance conduits (ANGCs) are not transparent. It is hard to confirm the position of two stumps of damaged nerve during nerve surgery and the conduits must be cut open again to observe regenerative nerves after surgery. Thus, a novel preparation method was utilized to produce a transparent sheet using PDMS and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) via printing transfer method. Characterization of the PDMS/MWNT (PM) sheets revealed their unique physicochemical properties, such as superior mechanical strength, a certain degree of electrical conductivity, and high transparency. Characterization of the in vitro and in vivo usability was evaluated. PM sheets showed high biocompatibility and adhesive ability. In vivo feasibility tests of rat brain tissue and sciatic nerve revealed the high transparency of PM sheets, suggesting that it can be used in the further development of ANGCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1736-1745, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Electrochemical Detection of Anti-Breast-Cancer Agents in Human Serum by Cytochrome P450-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Baj-Rossi, Camilla; De Micheli, Giovanni; Carrara, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    We report on the electrochemical detection of anti-cancer drugs in human serum with sensitivity values in the range of 8–925 nA/μM. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with three different cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4). A model used to effectively describe the cytochrome P450 deposition onto carbon nanotubes was confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations. Voltammetric measurements were performed in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) as well as in human serum, giving well-defined current responses upon addition of increasing concentrations of anti-cancer drugs. The results assert the capability to measure concentration of drugs in the pharmacological ranges in human serum. Another important result is the possibility to detect pairs of drugs present in the same sample, which is highly required in case of therapies with high side-effects risk and in anti-cancer pharmacological treatments based on mixtures of different drugs. Our technology holds potentials for inexpensive multi-panel drug-monitoring in personalized therapy. PMID:22778656

  12. Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the Multiwalled <span class=Carbon Nanotube Case Study Final Report" vspace = "5" hspace="5" align="right" border="1" /> This final report presents a case study of multiwalled carbon nanotube...

  13. Method of making carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei; Liu, Jun

    2006-03-14

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  14. Surfactant-coated graphitized multiwalled carbon nanotubes as the pseudostationary phase in electrokinetic chromatography for the analysis of phytochemical compounds in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wan; Hu, Shuai-Shuai; Ying, Xue-Zhen; Ye, Li-Hong; Cao, Jun

    2015-04-01

    This report describes the use of surfactant-coated graphitized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SC-GMWNTs) as a novel pseudostationary phase in CE with diode array detection for the determination of phenolic acids and tanshinones in herbal and urine samples. Several parameters influencing the separation were studied, such as the concentrations of SDS, GMWNTs, and isopropanol; choice of carbon nanotubes; sodium borate content; and buffer pH. The results revealed that the presence of SC-GMWNTs in buffer enhanced the separation efficiency for the target analytes relative to conventional micelles due to the strong interaction between the surface of the GMWNTs and the target compounds. Under the optimum conditions, the method showed good linearity, with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9950. LODs were in the range of 0.71-3.10 μg/mL. Furthermore, satisfactory separations were achieved with good recovery values in the range of 89.97 and 103.30% when 10 mM borate, 30 mM SDS, 10% isopropanol, and 6 μg/mL SC-GMWNTs were introduced into the buffer solution.

  15. Advanced carbon nanotubes functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setaro, A.

    2017-10-01

    Similar to graphene, carbon nanotubes are materials made of pure carbon in its sp2 form. Their extended conjugated π-network provides them with remarkable quantum optoelectronic properties. Frustratingly, it also brings drawbacks. The π–π stacking interaction makes as-produced tubes bundle together, blurring all their quantum properties. Functionalization aims at modifying and protecting the tubes while hindering π–π stacking. Several functionalization strategies have been developed to circumvent this limitation in order for nanotubes applications to thrive. In this review, we summarize the different approaches established so far, emphasizing the balance between functionalization efficacy and the preservation of the tubes’ properties. Much attention will be given to a functionalization strategy overcoming the covalent–noncovalent dichotomy and to the implementation of two advanced functionalization schemes: (a) conjugation with molecular switches, to yield hybrid nanosystems with chemo-physical properties that can be tuned in a controlled and reversible way, and; (b) plasmonic nanosystems, whose ability to concentrate and enhance the electromagnetic fields can be taken advantage of to enhance the optical response of the tubes.

  16. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  17. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  18. Monodispersed Carbon-Coated Cubic NiP2 Nanoparticles Anchored on Carbon Nanotubes as Ultra-Long-Life Anodes for Reversible Lithium Storage.

    PubMed

    Lou, Peili; Cui, Zhonghui; Jia, Zhiqing; Sun, Jiyang; Tan, Yingbin; Guo, Xiangxin

    2017-03-24

    In search of new electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries, metal phosphides that exhibit desirable properties such as high theoretical capacity, moderate discharge plateau, and relatively low polarization recently have attracted a great deal of attention as anode materials. However, the large volume changes and thus resulting collapse of electrode structure during long-term cycling are still challenges for metal-phosphide-based anodes. Here we report an electrode design strategy to solve these problems. The key to this strategy is to confine the electroactive nanoparticles into flexible conductive hosts (like carbon materials) and meanwhile maintain a monodispersed nature of the electroactive particles within the hosts. Monodispersed carbon-coated cubic NiP2 nanoparticles anchored on carbon nanotubes (NiP2@C-CNTs) as a proof-of-concept were designed and synthesized. Excellent cyclability (more than 1000 cycles) and capacity retention (high capacities of 816 mAh g(-1) after 1200 cycles at 1300 mA g(-1) and 654.5 mAh g(-1) after 1500 cycles at 5000 mA g(-1)) are characterized, which is among the best performance of the NiP2 anodes and even most of the phosphide-based anodes reported so far. The impressive performance is attributed to the superior structure stability and the enhanced reaction kinetics incurred by our design. Furthermore, a full cell consisting of a NiP2@C-CNTs anode and a LiFePO4 cathode is investigated. It delivers an average discharge capacity of 827 mAh g(-1) based on the mass of the NiP2 anode and exhibits a capacity retention of 80.7% over 200 cycles, with an average output of ∼2.32 V. As a proof-of-concept, these results demonstrate the effectiveness of our strategy on improving the electrode performance. We believe that this strategy for construction of high-performance anodes can be extended to other phase-transformation-type materials, which suffer a large volume change upon lithium insertion/extraction.

  19. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  20. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  1. Surface chemistry in the process of coating mesoporous SiO2 onto carbon nanotubes driven by the formation of Si-O-C bonds.

    PubMed

    Paula, Amauri J; Stéfani, Diego; Souza Filho, Antonio G; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Alves, Oswaldo L

    2011-03-07

    The deposition of mesoporous silica (SiO(2)) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has opened up a wide range of assembling possibilities by exploiting the sidewall of CNTs and organosilane chemistry. The resulting systems may be suitable for applications in catalysis, energy conversion, environmental chemistry, and nanomedicine. However, to promote the condensation of silicon monomers on the nanotube without producing segregated particles, (OR)(4-x)SiO(x)(x-) units must undergo nucleophilic substitution by groups localized on the CNT sidewall during the transesterification reaction. In order to achieve this preferential attachment, we have deposited silica on oxidized carbon nanotubes (single-walled and multiwalled) in a sol-gel process that also involved the use of a soft template (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB). In contrast to the simple approach normally used to describe the attachment of inorganic compounds on CNTs, SiO(2) nucleation on the tube is a result of nucleophilic attack mainly by hydroxyl radicals, localized in a very complex surface chemical environment, where various oxygenated groups are covalently bonded to the sidewall and carboxylated carbonaceous fragments (CCFs) are adsorbed on the tubes. Si-O-C covalent bond formation in the SiO(2)-CNT hybrids was observed even after removal of the CCFs with sodium hydroxide. By adding CTAB, and increasing the temperature, time, and initial amount of the catalyst (NH(4)OH) in the synthesis, the SiO(2) coating morphology could be changed from one of nanoparticles to mesoporous shells. Concomitantly, pore ordering was achieved by increasing the amount of CTAB. Furthermore, preferential attachment on the sidewall results mostly in CNTs with uncapped ends, having sites (carboxylic acids) that can be used for further localized reactions.

  2. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single-and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs. PMID:23933617

  3. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V

    2013-12-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs.

  4. Carbon nanotubes as vaccine scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Dao, Tao; Mulvey, Justin J.; Feinberg, Evan; Alidori, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes display characteristics that are potentially useful in their development as scaffolds for vaccine compositions. These features include stability in vivo, lack of intrinsic immunogenicity, low toxicity, and the ability to be appended with multiple copies of antigens. In addition, the particulate nature of carbon nanotubes and their unusual properties of rapid entry into antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, make them especially useful as carriers of antigens. Early attempts demonstrating carbon nanotube-based vaccines can be used in both infectious disease settings and cancer are promising. PMID:23899863

  5. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  6. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  7. Nanostructured Carbon Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    coatings having a low- friction coefficient for a variety of applications, from heavy-load bearings to nanocoatings for MEMS; protective coating for...tribological coatings having a low-friction coefficient for a variety of applications, from heavy- load bearings to nanocoatings for MEMS. Carbon

  8. Construction of a new selective coated disk electrode for Ag (I) based on modified polypyrrole-carbon nanotubes composite with new lariat ether.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, A; Tashkhourian, J; Ahmadpour, S; Mirahmadi, E; Sharghi, H; Khalifeh, R; Shahriyari, M R

    2014-01-01

    A poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) matrix membrane ion-selective electrode for silver (I) ion is fabricated based on modified polypyrrole - multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite with new lariat ether. This sensor has a Nernstian slope of 59.4±0.5mV/decade over a wide linear concentration range of 1.0×10(-7) to 1.0×10(-1)molL(-1) for silver (I) ion. It has a short response time of about 8.0s and can be used for at least 50days. The detection limit is 9.3×10(-8)molL(-1) for silver (I) ion, and the electrode was applicable in the wide pH range of 1.6 -7.7. The electrode shows good selectivity for silver ion against many cations such as Hg (II), which usually imposes serious interference in the determination of silver ion concentration. The use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a polymer matrix improves the linear range and sensitivity of the electrode. In addition by coating the solid contact with a layer of the polypyrrole (Ppy) before coating the membrane on it, not only did it reduce the drift in potential, but a shorter response time was also resulted. The proposed electrode was used as an indicator electrode for potentiometric titration of silver ions with chloride anions and in the titration of mixed halides. This electrode was successfully applied for the determination of silver ions in silver sulphadiazine as a burning cream.

  9. Improving the Sound Pressure Level of Two-Dimensional Audio Actuators by Coating Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Piezoelectric Films.

    PubMed

    Um, Keehong

    2015-10-01

    As devices for amplifying or transforming electronic signals into audible signals through electromechanical operations, acoustic actuators in the form of loudspeakers are usually solid structures in three dimensional space. Recently there has been increasing demand for mobile electronic devices, such as mobile phones, to become smaller, thinner, and lighter. In contrast to a three dimensional audio system with magnets, we have invented a new type of flexible two dimensional device by utilizing the reverse piezoelectric effect in certain piezoelectric materials. Crystalline piezoelectric materials show electromechanical interaction between the mechanical state and the electrically-charged state. The piezoelectric effect is a reversible process in that materials exhibiting the direct piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of electrical charge resulting from an applied mechanical force) also exhibit the reverse piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of a mechanical strain resulting from an applied electrical field). We have adopted the plasma surface treatment in order to put coating materials on the surface of piezoelectric film. We compared two kinds of coating material, indium tin oxide and single-walled carbon nanotube, and found that single-walled carbon nanotube shows better performance. The results showed improvement of output power in a wider range of operating frequency; for the surface resistance of 0.5 kΩ/square, the single-walled CNT shows the range of operating frequency to be 0.75-17.5 kHz, but ITO shows 2.5-13.4 kHz. For the surface resistance of 1 kΩ/square, single-walled CNT shows the range of operating frequency to be 0.81-17 kHz, but ITO shows it cannot generate audible sound.

  10. Ultra strong silicon-coated carbon nanotube nonwoven fabric as a multifunctional lithium-ion battery anode.

    PubMed

    Evanoff, Kara; Benson, Jim; Schauer, Mark; Kovalenko, Igor; Lashmore, David; Ready, W Jud; Yushin, Gleb

    2012-11-27

    Materials that can perform simultaneous functions allow for reductions in the total system mass and volume. Developing technologies to produce flexible batteries with good performance in combination with high specific strength is strongly desired for weight- and power-sensitive applications such as unmanned or aerospace vehicles, high-performance ground vehicles, robotics, and smart textiles. State of the art battery electrode fabrication techniques are not conducive to the development of multifunctional materials due to their inherently low strength and conductivities. Here, we present a scalable method utilizing carbon nanotube (CNT) nonwoven fabric-based technology to develop flexible, electrochemically stable (∼494 mAh·g(-1) for 150 cycles) battery anodes that can be produced on an industrial scale and demonstrate specific strength higher than that of titanium, copper, and even a structural steel. Similar methods can be utilized for the formation of various cathode and anode composites with tunable strength and energy and power densities.

  11. Dual-Layer Oxidation-Protective Plasma-Sprayed SiC-ZrB2/Al2O3-Carbon Nanotube Coating on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariharan, S.; Sengupta, Pradyut; Nisar, Ambreen; Agnihotri, Ankur; Balaji, N.; Aruna, S. T.; Balani, Kantesh

    2016-12-01

    Graphite is used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors because of its outstanding irradiation performance and corrosion resistance. To restrict its high-temperature (>873 K) oxidation, atmospheric-plasma-sprayed SiC-ZrB2-Al2O3-carbon nanotube (CNT) dual-layer coating was deposited on graphite substrate in this work. The effect of each layer was isolated by processing each component of the coating via spark plasma sintering followed by isothermal kinetic studies. Based on isothermal analysis and the presence of high residual thermal stress in the oxide scale, degradation appeared to be more severe in composites reinforced with CNTs. To avoid the complexity of analysis of composites, the high-temperature activation energy for oxidation was calculated for the single-phase materials only, yielding values of 11.8, 20.5, 43.5, and 4.5 kJ/mol for graphite, SiC, ZrB2, and CNT, respectively, with increased thermal stability for ZrB2 and SiC. These results were then used to evaluate the oxidation rate for the composites analytically. This study has broad implications for wider use of dual-layer (SiC-ZrB2/Al2O3) coatings for protecting graphite crucibles even at temperatures above 1073 K.

  12. N-Epoxypropyl poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) covalently and non-covalently coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for PVC reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Fangwei; Qu, Rongjun; Jia, Xinhua; Sun, Changmei; Sun, Hushan; An, Kai; Mu, Yinglei; Ji, Chunnuan; Yin, Ping; Zhang, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA) coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PPTA-MWNTs) showed an enhancement effect on the yield strength and Young's modulus of PVC composite films, but no improvement in toughness. In this paper, MWNTs were covalently and non-covalently coated by N-epoxypropyl PPTA (PPTA-ECH) to prepare PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-NH2-x and PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-x, which were used as additives to reinforce PVC composite films. It was found that the maximum yield strength, Young's modulus, and toughness of PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-NH2-x/PVC composite films increased by 227.84%, 201.56%, and 589.96%, respectively, in comparison to pure PVC, while those of PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-x/PVC composite films increased by 215.08%, 153.13%, and 540.81%, respectively. The maximum yield strength, maximum Young's modulus, and maximum toughness of both PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-NH2-x/PVC and PPTA-ECH-MWNTs-x/PVC showed significant improvement as compared to PPTA-MWNTs/PVC composite film and PPTA-MWNTs-NH2/PVC. This indicates that N-epoxypropyl PPTA covalently and non-covalently coated MWNTs are promising additives for reinforcing PVC.

  13. Dual-Layer Oxidation-Protective Plasma-Sprayed SiC-ZrB2/Al2O3-Carbon Nanotube Coating on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariharan, S.; Sengupta, Pradyut; Nisar, Ambreen; Agnihotri, Ankur; Balaji, N.; Aruna, S. T.; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-02-01

    Graphite is used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors because of its outstanding irradiation performance and corrosion resistance. To restrict its high-temperature (>873 K) oxidation, atmospheric-plasma-sprayed SiC-ZrB2-Al2O3-carbon nanotube (CNT) dual-layer coating was deposited on graphite substrate in this work. The effect of each layer was isolated by processing each component of the coating via spark plasma sintering followed by isothermal kinetic studies. Based on isothermal analysis and the presence of high residual thermal stress in the oxide scale, degradation appeared to be more severe in composites reinforced with CNTs. To avoid the complexity of analysis of composites, the high-temperature activation energy for oxidation was calculated for the single-phase materials only, yielding values of 11.8, 20.5, 43.5, and 4.5 kJ/mol for graphite, SiC, ZrB2, and CNT, respectively, with increased thermal stability for ZrB2 and SiC. These results were then used to evaluate the oxidation rate for the composites analytically. This study has broad implications for wider use of dual-layer (SiC-ZrB2/Al2O3) coatings for protecting graphite crucibles even at temperatures above 1073 K.

  14. Facile modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-polymeric ionic liquids-coated solid-phase microextraction fibers by on-fiber anion exchange.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Bu, Yanan; Luo, Chuannan

    2015-05-08

    In situ anion exchange has been proved to be an efficient method for facile modification of polymeric ionic liquids (PILs)-based stationary phases. In this work, an on-fiber anion exchange process was utilized to tune the extraction performance of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-poly(1-vinyl-3-octylimidazolium bromide) (poly(VOIm(+)Br(-)))-coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. MWCNTs were first coated onto the stainless steel wire through a layer-by-layer fabrication method and then the PILs were coated onto the MWCNTs physically. Anion of the MWCNTs-poly(VOIm(+)Br(-)) fiber was changed into bis(triflroromethanesulfonyl)imide (NTf2(-)) and 2-naphthalene-sulfonate (NapSO3(-)) by on-fiber anion exchange. Coupled to gas chromatography, the MWCNTs-poly(VOIm(+)Br(-)) fiber showed acceptable extraction efficiency for hydrophilic and hydrogen-bonding-donating alcohols, with limits of detection (LODs) in the range of 0.005-0.05μgmL(-1); after the anion exchange with NTf2(-), the obtained MWCNTs-poly(VOIm(+)NTf2(-)) fiber brought wide linear ranges for hydrophobic n-alkanes with correlation coefficient (R) ranging from 0.994 to 0.997; aromatic property of the fiber was enhanced by aromatic NapSO3(-) anions to get sufficient extraction capacity for phthalate esters and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. The MWCNTs-poly(VOIm(+)NapSO3(-)) fiber was finally applied to determine several halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons in groundwater of industrial park.

  15. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  16. 77 FR 39236 - Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... AGENCY Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether... Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether Flame-Retardant Coatings... nanotubes (MWCNT); rather, it aims to identify what is known and unknown about MWCNT to support future...

  17. Oscillating carbon nanotori along carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Hill, James M.

    2007-03-01

    The discovery of carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and C60 fullerenes, has given rise to a number of potential nanoscale devices. One such device is the gigahertz oscillator, comprising an inner shell sliding inside an outer shell of a multiwalled carbon nanotube, and which, at least theoretically, generates oscillatory frequencies in the gigahertz range. Following the concept of these gigahertz oscillators and the recent discovery of “fullerene crop circles,” here we propose the notion of a nanotorus-nanotube oscillator comprising a carbon nanotorus which is sucked by the van der Waals force onto the carbon nanotube, and subsequently oscillates along the nanotube axis due to the equal and opposite pulselike forces acting at either end of the nanotube. Assuming a continuum approach, where the interatomic interactions are replaced by uniform atomic surface densities, and assuming that the geometry of the nanotube and nanotorus is such that the nanotorus always remains symmetrically situated around the nanotube, we present the basic mechanics of such a system, including the determination of the suction and acceptance energies, and the frequency of the resulting oscillatory motion. In contrast to the previously studied gigahertz nanoscale oscillators, here the oscillatory frequencies are shown to be in the megahertz range. Our study, although purely theoretical must necessarily precede any experimental implementation of such oscillatory systems.

  18. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  19. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2017-04-01

    This review focusses on introducing the mechanics in carbon nanotubes (CNT), and the major applications of CNT and its composites in biomedicine. It emphasizes the nanomechanics of these materials by reviewing the widely followed experimental methods, theoretical models, simulations, classification, segregation and applications the aforementioned materials. First, several mechanical properties contributing to the classification of the CNT, for various biomedicine applications, are discussed in detail to provide a cursory glance at the uses of CNT. The mechanics of CNT discussed in this paper include: elasticity, stress, tension, compression, nano-scale mechanics. In addition to these basic properties, a brief introduction about nanoscale composites is given. Second, a brief review on some of the major applications of CNT in biomedicine including drug delivery, therapeutics, diagnostics and regenerative medicine is given.

  20. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  1. Carbon nanotube terahertz detector.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Fujimura, Naoki; Lloyd, J Meagan; Erickson, Kristopher J; Talin, A Alec; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Weilu; Jiang, Qijia; Kawano, Yukio; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François; Kono, Junichiro

    2014-07-09

    Terahertz (THz) technologies are promising for diverse areas such as medicine, bioengineering, astronomy, environmental monitoring, and communications. However, despite decades of worldwide efforts, the THz region of the electromagnetic spectrum still continues to be elusive for solid state technology. Here, we report on the development of a powerless, compact, broadband, flexible, large-area, and polarization-sensitive carbon nanotube THz detector that works at room temperature. The detector is sensitive throughout the entire range of the THz technology gap, with responsivities as high as ∼2.5 V/W and polarization ratios as high as ∼5:1. Complete thermoelectric and opto-thermal characterization together unambiguously reveal the photothermoelectric origin of the THz photosignal, triggered by plasmonic absorption and collective antenna effects, and suggest that judicious design of thermal management and quantum engineering of Seebeck coefficients will lead to further enhancement of device performance.

  2. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  4. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  5. Toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xu, Yuanzhi; Yang, Zhi; Huang, Renhuan; Chen, Jing; Wang, Raorao; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) find their extensive application as a promising material in medicine due to unique characteristics. However, such materials have been accompanied with potentially hazardous effects on human health. The toxicity of CNTs may vary depending on their structural characteristics, surface properties and chemical composition. To gain insight into the toxicity of CNTs in vivo and in vitro, we summarize contributing factors for the toxic effects of CNTs in this review. In addition, we elaborate on the toxic effects and mechanisms in target sites at systemic, organic, cellular, and biomacromolecule levels. Various issues are reported to be effected when exposed to CNTs including (1) blood circulation, (2) lymph circulation, (3) lung, (4) heart, (5) kidney, (6) spleen, (7) bone marrow, and (8) blood brain barrier. Though there have been published reports on the toxic effects of CNTs to date, more studies will still be needed to gain full understanding of their potential toxicity and underlying mechanisms.

  6. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  7. Measurable and Influential Parameters That Influence Corrosion Performance Differences between Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Coating Material Combinations and Model Parent Material Combinations Derived from Epoxy-Amine Matrix Materials.

    PubMed

    Curtzwiler, Greg W; Williams, Eric B; Maples, Austin L; Wand, Steven W; Rawlins, James W

    2017-02-22

    Protective coatings are often erroneously thought of as perfect environmental barriers for metal substrates; however, a host of corrosion inducing environmental contaminants permeate through defect-free coatings. Carbon nanotubes are high aspect ratio nanofillers with unique mechanical, electrical, and polymer interaction properties with well-established yet, for practical reasons, often unrealized potential. The research objective was to quantify and understand the influential effects and relationships between low concentration levels of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) dispersed into epoxy-amine matrix materials and the different water hydrogen bonding interactions on corrosion rates of steel substrates. We hypothesize that when water directly hydrogen bonds with polymer, substrate and/or MWCNTS, the localized water's capacity to transfer environmental contaminants through the coating, i.e., to and from the substrate, diminishes due to a reduced potential to contribute to the formation of water hydration shells and therefore aid in diminishing the corrosion rate. We measured the absolute pre-exposure water content, and monitored to delineate between the ratio and shifting ratio of in situ free versus bound water hydrogen bonding interactions at the coating/air interface using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy in a 5% NaCl fog environment in an attempt to correlate these differences with experimental corrosion rates. Free water content was reduced from ∼20% to <1% of the total water concentration when 1.0 wt % MWCNTs was dispersed into the parent polymer network. Concurrently, the bound water content was measured to shift from ∼2% to >80% with the same MWCNT concentration. The MWCNT bound water resulted in 25% less corrosion for the same steel substrates albeit the measured water vapor diffusivity was the same for each material combination evaluated. Interestingly, the measured pre-exposure bound water content was predictive of which material would corrode slowest and

  8. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  9. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Guosong; Tabakman, Scott M; Welsher, Kevin; Wang, Hailiang; Wang, Xinran; Dai, Hongjie

    2010-11-17

    The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is relatively low, with various quenching effects by metallic species reported in the literature. Here, we report the first case of metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) of surfactant-coated carbon nanotubes on nanostructured gold substrates. The photoluminescence quantum yield of SWNTs is observed to be enhanced more than 10-fold. The dependence of fluorescence enhancement on metal-nanotube distance and on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the gold substrate for various SWNT chiralities is measured to reveal the mechanism of enhancement. Surfactant-coated SWNTs in direct contact with metal exhibit strong MEF without quenching, suggesting a small quenching distance for SWNTs on the order of the van der Waals distance, beyond which the intrinsically fast nonradiative decay rate in nanotubes is little enhanced by metal. The metal enhanced fluorescence of SWNTs is attributed to radiative lifetime shortening through resonance coupling of SWNT emission to the reradiating dipolar plasmonic modes in the metal.

  10. Functional materials based on carbon nanotubes: Carbon nanotube actuators and noncovalent carbon nanotube modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, Leonard S.

    Carbon nanotubes have attractive inherent properties that encourage the development of new functional materials and devices based on them. The use of single wall carbon nanotubes as electromechanical actuators takes advantage of the high mechanical strength, surface area and electrical conductivity intrinsic to these molecules. The work presented here investigates the mechanisms that have been discovered for actuation of carbon nanotube paper: electrostatic, quantum chemical charge injection, pneumatic and viscoelastic. A home-built apparatus for the measurement of actuation strain is developed and utilized in the investigation. An optical fiber switch, the first demonstrated macro-scale device based on the actuation of carbon nanotubes, is described and its performance evaluated. Also presented here is a new general process designed to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes in a non-covalent, non-destructive way. This method can be used to impart new functionalities to carbon nanotube samples for a variety of applications including sensing, solar energy conversion and chemical separation. The process described involves the achievement of large degrees of graphitic surface coverage with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the use of supercritical fluids. These molecules are bifunctional agents that anchor a desired chemical group to the aromatic surface of the carbon nanotubes without adversely disrupting the conjugated backbone that gives rise the attractive electronic and physical properties of the nanotubes. Both the nanotube functionalization work and the actuator work presented here emphasize how an understanding and control of nanoscale structure and phenomena can be of vital importance in achieving desired performance for active materials. Opportunities for new devices with improved function over current state-of-the-art can be envisioned and anticipated based on this understanding and control.

  11. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  12. Ultra High Energy Density Cathodes with Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-10

    energy lithium ion batteries . The use of CNT additives with commercial high capacity lithium rich cathodes was shown to increase areal loadings and...collectors can result in battery energy density increases up to 15% (vs. mesocarbon microbead (MCMB)). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Carbon Nanotubes, CNT...a) Carbon nanotube paper coated with NCA cathode composite for testing as positive electrode in Li-ion battery (b) Comparison of NCA specific

  13. New biosensing platforms based on the layer-by-layer self-assembling of polyelectrolytes on Nafion/carbon nanotubes-coated glassy carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Gustavo A; Miscoria, Silvia A; Desbrieres, Jacques; Barrera, Gustavo D

    2007-01-15

    We are proposing for the first time the use of a Nafion/multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersion deposited on glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) as a new platform for developing enzymatic biosensors based on the self-assembling of a chitosan derivative and different oxidases. The electrodes are obtained by deposition of a layer of Nafion/multi-wall carbon nanotubes dispersion on glassy carbon electrodes, followed by the adsorption of a chitosan derivative as polycation and glucose oxidase, l-aminoacid oxidase or polyphenol oxidase, as polyanions and biorecognition elements. The optimum configuration for glucose biosensors has allowed a highly sensitive (sensitivity=(0.28+/-0.02)muAmM(-1), r=0.997), fast (4s in reaching the maximum response), and highly selective (0% interference of ascorbic acid and uric acid at maximum physiological levels) glucose quantification at 0.700V with detection and quantification limits of 0.035 and 0.107mM, respectively. The repetitivity for 10 measurements was 5.5%, while the reproducibility was 8.4% for eight electrodes. The potentiality of the new platform was clearly demonstrated by using the carbon nanotubes/Nafion layer as a platform for the self-assembling of l-aminoacid oxidase and polyphenol oxidase. Therefore, the platform we are proposing here, that combines the advantages of nanostructured materials with those of the layer-by-layer self-assembling of polyelectrolytes, opens the doors to new and exciting possibilities for the development of enzymatic and affinity biosensors using different transdution modes.

  14. Filling carbon nanotubes with particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byong M; Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H

    2005-05-01

    The filling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with fluorescent particles was studied experimentally and theoretically. The fluorescent signals emitted by the particles were visible through the walls of the nanotubes, and the particles inside the tubes were observable with an electron microscope. Taking advantage of the template-grown carbon nanotubes' transparency to fluorescent light, we measured the filling rate of the tubes with particles at room conditions. Liquids such as ethylene glycol, water, and ethylene glycol/water mixtures, laden with 50 nm diameter fluorescent particles, were brought into contact with 500 nm diameter CNTs. The liquid and the particles' transport were observed, respectively, with optical and fluorescence microscopy. The CNTs were filled controllably with particles by the complementary action of capillary forces and the evaporation of the liquid. The experimental results were compared and favorably agreed with theoretical predictions. This is the first report on fluorescence studies of particle transport in carbon nanotubes.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  16. Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina; Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, it's hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  17. Improvement of thermal contact resistance by carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Helen F.; Cooper, Sarah M.; Meyyappan, M.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2004-01-01

    Interfacial thermal resistance results of various nanotube and nanofiber coatings, prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, are reported at relatively low clamping pressures. The five types of samples examined include multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes growth by CVD, multi-walled nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) and carbon nanofibers of differing aspect ratio grown by PECVD. Of the samples examined, only high aspect ratio nanofibers and thermally grown multi-walled nanotubes show an improvement in thermal contact resistance. The improvement is approximately a 60% lower thermal resistance than a bare Si-Cu interface and is comparable to that attained by commercially available thermal interface materials.

  18. Highly selective and effective solid phase microextraction of benzoic acid esters using ionic liquid functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes-doped polyaniline coating.

    PubMed

    Ai, Youhong; Wu, Mian; Li, Lulu; Zhao, Faqiong; Zeng, Baizhao

    2016-03-11

    The present work reports the electrochemical fabrication of an ionic liquid functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes-polyaniline (MWCNT@IL/PANI) nanocomposite coating and its application in the headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography (GC) determination of benzoic acid esters (i.e., methyl benzoate, ethyl benzoate, propyl benzoate and butyl benzoate). The MWCNTs was firstly functionalized with amine-terminated IL (MWCNT@IL) through chemical reduction, and then was doped in PANI during the electropolymerization of aniline. The resulting coating was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and thermo gravimetry. It showed net-like structure and had high thermal stability (up to 330°C). Furthermore, it presented high selectivity for the four benzoic acid esters and thus suited for their HS-SPME-GC determination. Results showed that under optimized extraction conditions, the detection limits were less than 6.1ngL(-1) (S/N=3) and the linear detection ranges were 0.012-50μgL(-1) (R≥0.9957) for these analytes. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were lower than 6.4% for five successive measurements with one fiber, and the RSDs for fiber-to-fiber were 4.4-9.6% (n=5). The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of these benzoic acid esters in perfume samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymers coated on multi-walled carbon nanotubes through a simple indirect method for the determination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in environmental water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weijie; Jiao, Feipeng; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Xinyu

    2013-11-01

    A new and facile method was presented to graft molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) analysis. In brief, CNTs were firstly coated with a layer of vinyl group modified silica, followed by a common precipitation polymerization with 2,4-D as the template, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the crosslinker and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. The imprinted effects obtained by using different monomers were investigated, and the results showed that acrylamide (AM) and styrene as mixed monomers was the best choice. This functionalized material was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG), which demonstrated a successful polymerization reaction on CNTs with MIPs grafting ratio of about 80%. The results of static adsorption experiments indicated the imprinted material possessed fast kinetics and good selectivity for 2,4-D molecules. A corresponding analytical method was developed and demonstrated to be applicable for the determination of 2,4-D in environmental water. The recoveries were in the range from 74.6% to 81.2% with relative standard deviation below 7.0%. To be emphasized, the method for MIPs coating proposed herein also provides a significant reference for other radical polymerization reactions based on CNTs.

  20. Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas; Chai, G.; Heinrich, H.; Chow, L.; Schenkel, T.

    2007-08-01

    We report on the transport of energetic electrons through single, well aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTs in a protective carbon fiber coating enables the application of focused ion beam based sample preparation techniques for the non-destructive isolation and alignment of individual tubes. Aligned tubes with lengths of 0.7 to 3 mu m allow transport of 300 keV electrons in a transmission electron microscope through their hollow cores at zero degree incident angles and for a misalignment of up to 1 degree.

  1. Patterning of single walled carbon nanotubes using a low-fluence excimer laser photoablation process

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Junghun; Jain, Kanti; Ho Xinning; Rogers, John A.

    2008-04-28

    Carbon nanotube films were patterned by an excimer laser projection photoablation process at low incident energy conditions. The carbon nanotubes were deposited on a quartz substrate and then a conventional photoresist was coated on it as a photoablation assistor. The photoresist and the carbon nanotubes were simultaneously patterned by the projection photoablation process, and then the photoresist was removed. It was possible to make clean patterns of carbon nanotubes even though the incident fluence on the carbon nanotubes was significantly lower than the threshold energy otherwise needed for their direct ablation.

  2. Photoreactivity of unfunctionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes involving hydroxyl radical: chiral dependency and surface coating effect.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen-Che; Beigzadehmilani, Somayeh; Jafvert, Chad T; Zepp, Richard G

    2014-04-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have a variety of potential and demonstrated applications, and their production rates are increasing rapidly. This increase in production has motivated research on their transport and potential transformation and their toxicity in the environment. In this work, we examined the direct and indirect photoreactivity of SWCNTs under sunlight conditions. We found that the direct photoreactivity of pristine SWCNTs is generally low; however, indirect photoreaction involving ·OH may be significant in natural aquatic environments. Environmental photochemical reactions generating ·OH lead to distinct changes in SWCNT fluorescence efficiency in the near-infrared (NIR) region, Raman spectra, and light attenuation spectra in the UV, visible, and NIR regions, indicating that covalent functionalization of SWCNTs occurs. The reactivity of SWCNTs to ·OH is dependent on the specific chiral structure of the SWCNTs and the surfactant associated with it. An operationally defined second-order rate constant (based on the decrease in NIR fluorescence signals) for all SWCNT chiral species reacting with ·OH was estimated to be (2.91 ± 1.30) × 10(10) M(-1 )s(-1). Our work suggests that photochemical reactions may be a significant transformation pathway of SWCNTs in aquatic systems.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes over iron carbide nanoparticles coated Al powder using thermal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, S. K.; Seth, R. K.; Rashmi; Teotia, Satish; Mamta; Chahal, Rajeev; Mathur, R. B.

    2013-02-01

    A simple method is described to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the thermal decomposition of toluene at 750°C over a thin catalyst film deposited on Al powder. This method allows the bulk metal surface to act as both the catalyst and support for CNT growth. The catalyst film on Al was prepared from an ethanol solution of iron nitrate. Under the growth conditions, iron nitrate formed an amorphous iron oxide layer that transform into crystalline Fe2O3, which was further reduced to Fe3O4 and Fe3C. It is believed that the growth of CNTs took place on iron carbide nanoparticles that were formed from FeO. The characterization of CNTs was mainly carried out by powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence and thermogravimatric analysis. The CNTs were found to be highly dispersed in Al powder. This composite powder could be further used for the fabrication of Al matrix composites using powder metallurgy process in which the powder were first cold pressed at 500-550 MPa followed by sintering at 620°C for 2 h under a vacuum of 10-2 torr. The mechanical properties of the sintered composites were measured using a microhardness tester and a Universal testing Instron machine.

  4. Miniemulsion copolymerization of (meth)acrylates in the presence of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for reinforced coating applications.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, Bertha T; Farías-Cepeda, Lorena; Ovando-Medina, Víctor M; Asua, José M; Rosales-Marines, Lucero; Tomovska, Radmila

    2017-01-01

    Film forming, stable hybrid latexes made of methyl metacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) copolymer reinforced with modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by in situ miniemulsion polymerization. The MWCNTs were pretreated by an air sonication process and stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone. The presence of the MWCNTs had no significant effect on the polymerization kinetics, but strongly affected the polymer characteristics (Tg and insoluble polymer fraction). The performance of the in situ composites was compared with that of the neat polymer dispersion as well as with those of the polymer/MWCNT physical blends. The in situ composites showed the presence of an additional phase likely due to the strong interaction between the polymer and MWNCTs (including grafting) that reduced the mobility of the polymer chains. As a result, a substantial increase of both the storage and the loss moduli was achieved. At 60 °C, which is above the main transition region of the polymer, the in situ composites maintained the reinforcement, whereas the blends behaved as a liquid-like material. This suggests the formation of a 3D network, in good agreement with the high content of insoluble polymer in the in situ composites.

  5. Miniemulsion copolymerization of (meth)acrylates in the presence of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for reinforced coating applications

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martínez, Bertha T; Ovando-Medina, Víctor M; Asua, José M; Rosales-Marines, Lucero

    2017-01-01

    Film forming, stable hybrid latexes made of methyl metacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) copolymer reinforced with modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by in situ miniemulsion polymerization. The MWCNTs were pretreated by an air sonication process and stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone. The presence of the MWCNTs had no significant effect on the polymerization kinetics, but strongly affected the polymer characteristics (T g and insoluble polymer fraction). The performance of the in situ composites was compared with that of the neat polymer dispersion as well as with those of the polymer/MWCNT physical blends. The in situ composites showed the presence of an additional phase likely due to the strong interaction between the polymer and MWNCTs (including grafting) that reduced the mobility of the polymer chains. As a result, a substantial increase of both the storage and the loss moduli was achieved. At 60 °C, which is above the main transition region of the polymer, the in situ composites maintained the reinforcement, whereas the blends behaved as a liquid-like material. This suggests the formation of a 3D network, in good agreement with the high content of insoluble polymer in the in situ composites. PMID:28690968

  6. The enhancement of photo-thermo-electric conversion in tilted Bi2Sr2Co2O(y) thin films through coating a layer of single-wall carbon nanotubes light absorber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shufang; Bai, Zilong; Yan, Guoying; Zhang, Hongrui; Wang, Jianglong; Yu, Wei; Fu, Guangsheng

    2013-07-29

    Light-induced transverse thermoelectric effect has been investigated in c-axis tilted Bi(2)Sr(2)Co(2)O(y) thin films coated with a single-wall carbon nanotubes light absorption layer. Open-circuit voltage signals were detected when the sample surface was irradiated by different lasers with wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet to near-infrared and the voltage sensitivity was enhanced as a result of the increased light absorption at the carbon nanotubes layer. Moreover, the enhancement degree was found to be dependent on the laser wavelength as well as the absorption coating size. This work opens up new strategy toward the practical applications of layered cobaltites in photo-thermo-electric conversion devices.

  7. Role of carbon nanotube interlayer in enhancing the electron field emission behavior of ultrananocrystalline diamond coated Si-tip arrays.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Hsun; Kunuku, Srinivasu; Kurian, Joji; Manekkathodi, Afsal; Chen, Lih-Juann; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2015-04-15

    We improved the electron field emission properties of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films grown on Si-tip arrays by using the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as interlayer and post-treating the films in CH4/Ar/H2 plasma. The use of CNTs interlayer effectively suppresses the presence of amorphous carbon in the diamond-to-Si interface that enhances the transport of electrons from Si, across the interface, to diamond. The post-treatment process results in hybrid-granular-structured diamond (HiD) films via the induction of the coalescence of the ultrasmall grains in these films that enhanced the conductivity of the films. All these factors contribute toward the enhancement of the electron field emission (EFE) process for the HiDCNT/Si-tip emitters, with low turn-on field of E0 = 2.98 V/μm and a large current density of 1.68 mA/cm(2) at an applied field of 5.0 V/μm. The EFE lifetime stability under an operation current of 6.5 μA was improved substantially to τHiD/CNT/Si-tip = 365 min. Interestingly, these HiDCNT/Si-tip materials also show enhanced plasma illumination behavior, as well as improved robustness against plasma ion bombardment when they are used as the cathode for microplasma devices. The study concludes that the use of CNT interlayers not only increase the potential of these materials as good EFE emitters, but also prove themselves to be good microplasma devices with improved performance.

  8. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  9. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  10. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  12. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  13. Removal of some impurities from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yongcheng; Zhou, Gumin; Wang, Guoping; Qu, Meizhen; Yu, Zuolong

    2003-07-01

    A non-destructive mild oxidation method of removing some impurities from as-grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), by H 2O 2 oxidation and HCl treatment, has been investigated, and somewhat pure carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The CNTs from which some impurities were removed have been evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and temperature programmed oxidation and gas chromatography (TPO-GC).

  14. Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    replacement of air space with the polymer matrix. A similar affinity is not known to exist between CNTs and aluminum , where the wetting angle between...Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites by Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna ARL-TR-5252 August 2010...Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  15. Atomic layer deposition coating of carbon nanotubes with zinc oxide causes acute phase immune responses in human monocytes in vitro and in mice after pulmonary exposure.

    PubMed

    Dandley, Erinn C; Taylor, Alexia J; Duke, Katherine S; Ihrie, Mark D; Shipkowski, Kelly A; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C

    2016-06-08

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a method for applying conformal nanoscale coatings on three-dimensional structures. We hypothesized that surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with polycrystalline ZnO by ALD would alter pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by human monocytes in vitro and modulate the lung and systemic immune response following oropharyngeal aspiration in mice. Pristine (U-MWCNTs) were coated with alternating doses of diethyl zinc and water over increasing ALD cycles (10 to 100 ALD cycles) to yield conformal ZnO-coated MWCNTs (Z-MWCNTs). Human THP-1 monocytic cells were exposed to U-MWCNTs or Z-MWCNTs in vitro and cytokine mRNAs measured by Taqman real-time RT-PCR. Male C57BL6 mice were exposed to U- or Z-MWCNTs by oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) and lung inflammation evaluated at one day post-exposure by histopathology, cytokine expression and differential counting of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells. Lung fibrosis was evaluated at 28 days. Cytokine mRNAs (IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL10, TNF-α) in lung, heart, spleen, and liver were quantified at one and 28 days. DNA synthesis in lung tissue was measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake. ALD resulted in a conformal coating of MWCNTs with ZnO that increased proportionally to the number of coating cycles. Z-MWCNTs released Zn(+2) ions in media and increased IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL10, and TNF-α mRNAs in THP-1 cells in vitro. Mice exposed to Z-MWCNTs by OPA had exaggerated lung inflammation and a 3-fold increase in monocytes and neutrophils in BALF compared to U-MWCNTs. Z-MWCNTs, but not U-MWCNTs, induced IL-6 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein in the lungs of mice and increased IL-6 mRNA in heart and liver. U-MWCNTs but not Z-MWCNTs stimulated airway epithelial DNA synthesis in vivo. Lung fibrosis at 28 days was not significantly different between mice treated with U-MWCNT or Z-MWCNT. Pulmonary exposure to ZnO-coated MWCNTs produces a systemic acute phase response that

  16. Creep- and fatigue-resistant, rapid piezoresistive responses of elastomeric graphene-coated carbon nanotube aerogels over a wide pressure range.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Michelle N; Islam, Mohammad F

    2017-01-19

    Lightweight, flexible piezoresistive materials with wide operational pressure ranges are in demand for applications such as human physical activity and health monitoring, robotics, and for functional interfacing between living systems and wearable electronics. Piezoresistivity of many elastomeric foams of polymers and carbon allotropes satisfies much of the required characteristics for these applications except creep and fatigue resistance due to their viscoelasticity, critically limiting the reliability and lifetime of integrated devices. We report the piezoresistive responses from aerogels of graphene-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), made using a facile and versatile sol-gel method. Graphene crosslinks the junctions of the underlying random network of SWCNTs, generating lightweight elastomeric aerogels with a mass density of ≈11 mg mL(-1) (volume fraction ≈7.7 × 10(-3)) and a Young's modulus of ≈0.4 MPa. The piezoresistivity of these aerogels spans wide compressive pressures up to at least 120 kPa with sensitivity that exhibit ultrafast temporal responses of <27 ms and <3% delay ratio over 10(4) compressive loading-unloading cycles at rates between 0.1-10 Hz. Most importantly, the piezoresistive responses do not show any creep at least for 1 hour and 80 kPa of compressive static loading. We suggest that the fatigue- and creep-resistant, ultrafast piezoresistive responses of these elastomeric aerogels are highly attractive for use in dynamic and static lightweight, pressure sensing applications such as human activity monitoring and soft robotics.

  17. High loading of uniformly dispersed Pt nanoparticles on polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes and its application in simultaneous determination of dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mouhong; Huang, Haoliang; Liu, Yingju; Liang, Canjian; Fei, Shidong; Chen, Xiaofen; Ni, Chunlin

    2013-02-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were homogeneously covered with a bio-functional polydopamine (PDOP) by a simple dip-coating approach in mild basic solution. Then, uniformly dispersed and highly loaded platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) were deposited on MWCNT@PDOP by a mild reductant, and were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Afterwards, this nanocomposite was modified on the glass carbon electrode and applied to simultaneously determine dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Results showed that a linear electro-oxidation response was found for DA and UA in the range of 0.25-20 μM and 0.3-13 μM with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.08 μM and 0.12 μM, respectively. In addition, the detection sensitivities for DA and UA by DPV were 1.03 μA μM(-1) and 2.09 μA μM(-1), respectively, which were much higher than those from a cyclic voltammogram. Finally, the reproducibility and stability of the nanocomposite were also evaluated, demonstrating that such MWCNT@PDOP@PtNPs can be a promising candidate for advanced electrode material in electrochemical sensing and other electrocatalytic applications.

  18. High loading of uniformly dispersed Pt nanoparticles on polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes and its application in simultaneous determination of dopamine and uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mouhong; Huang, Haoliang; Liu, Yingju; Liang, Canjian; Fei, Shidong; Chen, Xiaofen; Ni, Chunlin

    2013-02-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were homogeneously covered with a bio-functional polydopamine (PDOP) by a simple dip-coating approach in mild basic solution. Then, uniformly dispersed and highly loaded platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) were deposited on MWCNT@PDOP by a mild reductant, and were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Afterwards, this nanocomposite was modified on the glass carbon electrode and applied to simultaneously determine dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Results showed that a linear electro-oxidation response was found for DA and UA in the range of 0.25-20 μM and 0.3-13 μM with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.08 μM and 0.12 μM, respectively. In addition, the detection sensitivities for DA and UA by DPV were 1.03 μA μM-1 and 2.09 μA μM-1, respectively, which were much higher than those from a cyclic voltammogram. Finally, the reproducibility and stability of the nanocomposite were also evaluated, demonstrating that such MWCNT@PDOP@PtNPs can be a promising candidate for advanced electrode material in electrochemical sensing and other electrocatalytic applications.

  19. Large-Scale Processing of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John; Sridhar, K. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Scale-up difficulties and high energy costs are two of the more important factors that limit the availability of various types of nanotube carbon. While several approaches are known for producing nanotube carbon, the high-powered reactors typically produce nanotubes at rates measured in only grams per hour and operate at temperatures in excess of 1000 C. These scale-up and energy challenges must be overcome before nanotube carbon can become practical for high-consumption structural and mechanical applications. This presentation examines the issues associated with using various nanotube production methods at larger scales, and discusses research being performed at NASA Ames Research Center on carbon nanotube reactor technology.

  20. Mapping differential cellular protein response of mouse alveolar epithelial cells to multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a function of atomic layer deposition coating.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Gina M; Taylor, Alexia J; Hussain, Salik; Dandley, Erinn C; Griffith, Emily H; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C; Bereman, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a prototypical engineered nanomaterial, have been increasingly manufactured for a variety of novel applications over the past two decades. However, since CNTs possess fiber-like shape and cause pulmonary fibrosis in rodents, there is concern that mass production of CNTs will lead to occupational exposure and associated pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to use contemporary proteomics to investigate the mechanisms of cellular response in E10 mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro after exposure to multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) that were functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a method used to generate highly uniform and conformal nanoscale thin-film coatings of metals to enhance novel conductive properties of CNTs. We hypothesized that specific types of metal oxide coatings applied to the surface of MWCNTs by ALD would determine distinct proteomic profiles in mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro that could be used to predict oxidative stress and pulmonary inflammation. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs were functionalized by ALD with zinc oxide (ZnO) to yield Z-MWCNTs or aluminum oxide (Al2O3) to yield A-MWCNTs. Significant differential protein expression was found in the following critical pathways: mTOR/eIF4/p70S6K signaling and Nrf-2 mediated oxidative stress response increased following exposure to Z-MWCNTs, interleukin-1 signaling increased following U-MWCNT exposure, and inhibition of angiogenesis by thrombospondin-1, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial dysfunction increased following A-MWCNT exposure. This study demonstrates that specific types of metal oxide thin film coatings applied by ALD produce distinct cellular and biochemical responses related to lung inflammation and fibrosis compared to uncoated MWCNT exposure in vitro.

  1. Electron-Beam Irradiation Effect on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Nylon-6 Nanocomposite Fibers Infused with Diamond and Diamond Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, Muhammad A.; Jeelani, Shaik; Rangari, Vijaya K.; Gome, Michelle G.; Moura, Esperidiana. A. B.

    2016-02-01

    Nylon-6 is an engineering plastic with excellent properties and processability, which are essential in several industrial applications. The addition of filler such as diamond (DN) and diamond coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to form molded composites may increase the range of Nylon-6 applications due to the resulting increase in strength. The effects of electron-beam irradiation on these thermoplastic nanocomposites are either increase in the cross-linking or causes chain scission. In this study, DN-coated CNTs were synthesized using the sonochemical technique in the presence of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The DN-coated CNTs nanoparticles and diamond nanoparticles were then introduced into Nylon-6 polymer through a melt extrusion process to form nanocomposite fibers. They were further tested for their mechanical (Tensile) and thermal properties (thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)). These composites were further exposed to the electron-beam (160kGy, 132kGy and 99kGy) irradiation using a 1.5MeV electron-beam accelerator, at room temperature, in the presence of air and tested for their thermal and mechanical properties. The best ultimate tensile strength was found to be 690MPa and 864MPa irradiated at 132 for DN/CNTs/Nylon-6 and Diamond/Nylon-6 nanocomposite fiber as compared to 346MPa and 321MPa for DN/CNTs/Nylon-6 and Diamond/Nylon-6 nanocomposite fiber without irradiation. The neat Nylon-6 tensile strength was 240MPa. These results are consistent with the activation energy calculated from TGA graphs. DSC analysis result shows that the slight increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) and decrease in melting temperature (Tm) which was expected from high electron-beam radiation dose.

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau

  3. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  4. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  5. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-20

    300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described...0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube transducer that can operate in a passive acoustic mode for data...acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An underwater acoustic

  6. NMR investigations of hydrogen in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Goze-Bac, C.; Krämer, S.; Mehring, M.; Roth, S.; Bernier, P.

    2002-10-01

    We report proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements on hydrogen loaded single walled carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes were produced with different kinds of catalysts and hydrogen loaded under 23 bar hydrogen pressure. The hydrogen adsorption properties of the carbon nanotube materials were investigated by temperature dependent analysis of the 1H-NMR spectra.

  7. Control of carbon nanotube handedness using a supramolecular chiral surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picaud, F.; Herlem, G.; Girardet, C.

    2011-10-01

    Sorting diameter and handedness of carbon nanotubes still appears as an important challenge in nanotechnology. In this context, supramolecular structures formed by self-assembled chiral molecules deposited on well-defined metal surfaces can be used to discriminate the two isomers of carbon nanotubes. Calculations are carried out to determine the adsorption energy of nanotube enantiomers on alaninate coated Cu(110) surface. The results show a significant discrimination of the L and R handed isomers by such a surface and an additional selectivity in terms of small and large tube diameters.

  8. Halloysite nanotube coatings suppress leukocyte spreading

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Andrew D.; Marsh, Graham; Waugh, Richard E.; Foster, David G.; King, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale topography of adhesive surfaces is known to be an important factor governing cellular behavior. Previous work has shown that surface coatings composed of halloysite nanotubes enhances the adhesion, and therefore capture, of rare target cells such as circulating tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate a unique feature of these coatings in its ability to reduce the adhesion of leukocytes and prevent leukocyte spreading. Surfaces were prepared with coatings of halloysite nanotubes and functionalized for leukocyte adhesion with E-selectin, and the dilution of nanotube concentration revealed a threshold concentration below which cell spreading became comparable with smooth surfaces. Evaluation of surface roughness characteristics determined that the average distance between discrete surface features correlated with adhesion metrics, with a separation distance of approximately 2 μm identified as the critical threshold. Computational modeling of the interaction of leukocytes with halloysite nanotube coated surfaces of varying concentrations demonstrates that the geometry of the cell surface and adhesive counter-surface produce a significantly diminished effective contact area compared to a leukocyte interacting with a smooth surface. PMID:26605493

  9. Poly(brilliant green) and poly(thionine) modified carbon nanotube coated carbon film electrodes for glucose and uric acid biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ghica, M Emilia; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-12-01

    Poly(brilliant green) (PBG) and poly(thionine) (PTH) films have been formed on carbon film electrodes (CFEs) modified with carbon nanotubes (CNT) by electropolymerisation using potential cycling. Voltammetric and electrochemical impedance characterisation were performed. Glucose oxidase and uricase, as model enzymes, were immobilised on top of PBG/CNT/CFE and PTH/CNT/CFE for glucose and uric acid (UA) biosensing. Amperometric determination of glucose and UA was carried out in phosphate buffer pH 7.0 at -0.20 and +0.30 V vs. SCE, respectively, and the results were compared with other similarly modified electrodes existing in the literature. An interference study and recovery measurements in natural samples were successfully performed, indicating these architectures to be good and promising biosensor platforms.

  10. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  11. Helical polycarbodiimide cloaking of carbon nanotubes enables inter-nanotube exciton energy transfer modulation.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki-Uprety, Januka; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2014-11-05

    The use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as near-infrared optical probes and sensors require the ability to simultaneously modulate nanotube fluorescence and functionally derivatize the nanotube surface using noncovalent methods. We synthesized a small library of polycarbodiimides to noncovalently encapsulate SWCNTs with a diverse set of functional coatings, enabling their suspension in aqueous solution. These polymers, known to adopt helical conformations, exhibited ordered surface coverage on the nanotubes and allowed systematic modulation of nanotube optical properties, producing up to 12-fold differences in photoluminescence efficiency. Polymer cloaking of the fluorescent nanotubes facilitated the first instance of controllable and reversible internanotube exciton energy transfer, allowing kinetic measurements of dynamic self-assembly and disassembly.

  12. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  13. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by

  14. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  15. Magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Kang, N.; Kong, W. J.; Hu, J. S.; Pan, Z. W.; Xie, S. S.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes bundles. At temperatures above 15 K, the magnetoresistance was found to follow exactly a scaling law as predicted by the theory of two-dimensional (2D) weak localization. Below 15 K, the 2D weak localization behavior is modified due to the formation of a Coulomb gap. This modification does not fit to those theories which treat electron-electron interaction as a perturbation. Altshular-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) resistance oscillation was observed in milli-Kelvin temperature range. The results will be discussed in terms of the interplay between electron-electron interaction and disorder scattering in multiwall carbon nanotube.

  16. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  17. Separation and liquid chromatography using a single carbon nanotube

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Riju; Mochalin, Vadym N.; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Use of a single template-grown carbon nanotube as a separation column to separate attoliter volumes of binary mixtures of fluorescent dyes has been demonstrated. The cylindrical nanotube walls are used as stationary phase and the surface area is increased by growing smaller multi-walled carbon nanotubes within the larger nanotube column. Liquid-liquid extraction is performed to separate selectively soluble solutes in a solvent, and chromatographic separation is demonstrated using thin, long nanotubes coated inside with iron oxide nanoparticles. The setup is also used to determine the diffusion coefficient of a solute at the sub-micrometer scale. This study opens avenues for analytical chemistry in attoliter volumes of fluids for various applications and cellular analysis at the single cell level. PMID:22798987

  18. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  19. Separation and liquid chromatography using a single carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Riju; Mochalin, Vadym N; Lukatskaya, Maria R; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Use of a single template-grown carbon nanotube as a separation column to separate attoliter volumes of binary mixtures of fluorescent dyes has been demonstrated. The cylindrical nanotube walls are used as stationary phase and the surface area is increased by growing smaller multi-walled carbon nanotubes within the larger nanotube column. Liquid-liquid extraction is performed to separate selectively soluble solutes in a solvent, and chromatographic separation is demonstrated using thin, long nanotubes coated inside with iron oxide nanoparticles. The setup is also used to determine the diffusion coefficient of a solute at the sub-micrometer scale. This study opens avenues for analytical chemistry in attoliter volumes of fluids for various applications and cellular analysis at the single cell level.

  20. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  1. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  2. Preparation of nanocrystalline-coated carbon nanotube/Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 composite with excellent electromagnetic property as microwave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiao-Bing; Shen, Lu; Li, Lei; Huang, Tong-Ming; Hu, Chun-Feng; Pan, Wei-Ming; Jin, Xi-Hai; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian; Huang, Qing

    2013-04-01

    A combined precipitation-hydrothermal method was used to fabricate carbon nanotube/Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 ferrite composite powders. The phase, microstructure and electromagnetic properties of CNT/Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 composites were investigated. After surface modification, The zeta potential value of CNTs could maintain at about -50 mV when pH is higher than 8, which affords a suitable surface environment for in situ coating of Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanocrystallines. With increasing CNTs content, the saturation magnetization of the composites is gradually reduced, while the complex magnetic permeability changes little. The complex dielectric constant of the composites is significantly increased when the concentration of CNTs approaches the percolation threshold value of 2 wt%. When CNTs content is 5 wt%, the reflection ratios are less than -10 dB within the frequency range 2-9 GHz, and the reflection ratios reach a minimum -32.5 dB at a frequency of about 3.9 GHz.

  3. Evaluation of the solid-phase microextraction fiber coated with single walled carbon nanotubes for the determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanlong; Ma, Xiaoxia; Yuan, Dongxing; Chen, Jinsheng

    2010-04-09

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coated with single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was prepared by electrophoretic deposition and treated at 500 degrees C in H(2) stream. In order to evaluate the characteristics of the obtained fiber, it was applied in the headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) from water sample and quantification by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The results indicated that the thermal treatment with H(2) enhanced the extraction of the SWCNTs fiber for BTEX significantly. Thermal stability and durability of the fiber were also investigated, showing excellent stability up to 350 degrees C and life time over 120 times. In the comparison with the commercial CAR-PDMS fiber, the SWCNTs fiber showed similar and higher extraction efficiencies for BTEX. Under the optimized conditions, the linearity, LODs (S/N=3) and LOQs (S/N=10) of the method based on the SWCNTs fiber were 0.5-50.0, 0.005-0.026 and 0.017-0.088 microg/L, respectively. Repeatability for one fiber (n=3) was in the range of 1.5-5.6% and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility (n=3) was in the range of 4.2-8.3%. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of BTEX compounds in seawater, tap water and wastewater from a paint plant. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Super-aligned carbon nanotube films with a thin metal coating as highly conductive and ultralight current collectors for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Wu, Yang; Wu, Hengcai; Luo, Yufeng; Wang, Datao; Jiang, Kaili; Li, Qunqing; Li, Yadong; Fan, Shoushan; Wang, Jiaping

    2017-05-01

    Cross-stacked super-aligned carbon nanotube (SACNT) films are promising for use as current collectors in lithium-ion batteries because of their outstanding capability to decrease the weight and thickness of inactive material and strong adhesion to the electrodes. However, the relatively poor conductivity of SACNT films may limit their application to large-size electrodes or at high current rate. Herein, a facile approach is proposed to improve the conductivity of SACNT films by electron-beam deposition of a thin metal film on their surface. Such modification lowers the sheet resistance by three orders of magnitude while keeping the extremely small fraction of SACNT current collectors. The metal-coated SACNT films strongly inhibit polarization during the electrochemical reaction, resulting in improved cell performance compared with that of metal and uncoated CNT current collectors. The improvement in conductivity and cell performance achieved by this approach is so large that the effect of the increase of inactive material is overwhelmed, leading to increased gravimetric energy density.

  5. Carbon nanotubes@silicon dioxide nanohybrids coating for solid-phase microextraction of organophosphorus pesticides followed by gas chromatography-corona discharge ion mobility spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Jafari, Mohammad Taghi; Mossaddegh, Mehdi

    2016-01-15

    A high efficiency solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coated with porous carbon nanotubes-silicon dioxide (CNTs-SiO2) nanohybrids was synthesized and applied for the determination of some organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in vegetables, fruits and water samples. Gas chromatography-corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry was used as the detection system. Glucose, as a biocompatible compound, was used for connecting CNT and SiO2 during a hydrothermal process. The electrospinning technique was also applied for the fiber preparation. The parameters affecting the efficiency of extraction, including stirring rate, salt effect, extraction temperature, extraction time, desorption temperature and desorption time, were investigated and optimized. The developed CNTs@SiO2 fiber presented better extraction efficiency than the commercial SPME fibers (PA, PDMS, and PDMS-DVB). The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 6.2 and 9.0%, respectively. For water samples, the limits of detection were in the range of 0.005-0.020 μg L(-1) and the limits of quantification were between 0.010 and 0.050 μg L(-1). The results showed a good linearity in the range of 0.01-3.0 μg L(-1) for the analytes. The spiking recoveries ranged from 79 (± 9) to 99 (± 8). The method was successfully applied for the determination of OPPs in real samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A direct urea microfluidic fuel cell with flow-through Ni-supported-carbon- nanotube-coated sponge as porous electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Yifei; Wu, Zucheng; Leung, Dennis Y. C.

    2017-09-01

    A direct urea microfluidic fuel cell (UMFC) is demonstrated using a Ni-supported-carbon-nanotube-coated sponge (Ni/CNT@Sponge) as the flow-through porous anode. Ni/CNT@Sponge electrode is prepared through Ni/CNT composite synthesis followed by sponge dipping-drying process. Ni/CNT catalyst shows better performance to urea electrooxidation than Ni/C. The three-dimensional architecture of Ni/CNT@Sponge can provide high effective active area, which enhances the UMFC cell performance. The UMFC works in an alkaline and an acid environment at the anode and cathode respectively, achieving a high theoretical OCV of 1.976 V. With 3 M urea in 3 M KOH as anolyte, 1.5 M H2SO4 as the catholyte, an OCV of 0.92 V at 20 °C can be obtained. Peak power density and maximum current density of 3.9 mW cm-2 and 23 mA cm-2 can be achieved, respectively, which increase to 6.6 mW cm-2 and 33 mA cm-2, respectively when the temperature is increased to 45 °C. This work develops a new type of urea microfluidic fuel cell, also opens up a promising approach for urea-rich wastewater treatment.

  7. Electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties of SmCo coated single-wall carbon nanotubes/NiZn-ferrite nanocrystalline composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, M. C.; Yu, L. M.; Sheng, L. M.; An, K.; Ren, W.; Zhao, X. L.

    2014-05-01

    The electromagnetism and microwave absorption properties of SmCo coated single-wall carbon nanotubes (SmCo@SWCNTs) and Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 ferrite (NiZn-ferrite) nanocrystalline composites with different ingredient weight ratios were investigated in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. SmCo@SWCNTs were prepared by a direct current arc discharge method. NiZn-ferrite nanocrystalline was synthesized by a sol-gel method. The electromagnetic properties of the nanocomposites in the paraffin matrix were measured by a vector network analyzer. The Debye equation and Bruggeman symmetric medium equation were introduced to explain the dielectric properties of the nanocomposites, and the mechanisms for the dielectric and magnetic losses were discussed. The experiment results reveal that the absorbing properties of the nanocomposites could be improved by tuning for a suitable weight ratio between SmCo@SWCNTs and NiZn-ferrite nanocrystallines. The reflection loss simulation calculations demonstrated that the nanocomposite could be excellent materials for microwave absorption.

  8. An efficient approach to selective electromembrane extraction of naproxen by means of molecularly imprinted polymer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes-reinforced hollow fibers.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, Zeinab; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar

    2016-10-28

    In this work, a novel microextraction technique using molecularly imprinted polymer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MIP-MWCNTs) in electromembrane extraction (EME) procedure is described. The method in combination with HPLC-UV was utilized to determine naproxen, as an acidic model drug, in urine, plasma and wastewater samples. For this purpose, MIP-MWCNTs were placed in the pores of polypropylene hollow fiber. The MIP-MWCNTs-EME method has the advantages of high selectivity and cleanup of MIP along with high enrichment ability of the EME in a single step extraction. Continuing with the research, optimization of the factors affecting the migration of naproxen from sample solutions to MIP-MWCNTs sites and then into the lumen of hollow fiber was explored. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) of the developed method was calculated to be 0.3μgL(-1). All relative standard deviations (RSDs) were lower than 3%. Linearity of the method was obtained within the range of 1-1000μgL(-1) with the coefficient of determination (r(2)) being higher than 0.999. Under the optimized conditions, an extraction recovery of 66% was obtained, which corresponded to a preconcentration factor of 88. Finally, the developed method was satisfactorily used to determine naproxen in urine, plasma and wastewater samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High-performance dye-sensitized solar cells with gel-coated binder-free carbon nanotube films as counter electrode.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xiaoguang; Cho, Swee Jen; Fan, Benhu; Ouyang, Jianyong

    2010-10-01

    High-performance dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) with binder-free films of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), as the counter electrode are reported. The CNT films were fabricated by coating gels, which were prepared by dispersing CNTs in low-molecular-weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) through mechanical grinding and subsequent ultrasonication, on fluorine tin oxide (FTO) glass. PEG was removed from the CNT films through heating. These binder-free CNT films were rough and exhibited good adhesion to substrates. They were used as the counter electrode of DSCs. The DSCs with SWCNT or MWCNT counter electrodes exhibited a light-to-electricity conversion efficiency comparable with that with the conventional platinum (Pt) counter electrode, when the devices were tested immediately after device fabrication. The DSCs with an SWCNT counter electrode exhibited good stability in photovoltaic performance. The efficiency did not decrease after four weeks. On the other hand, DSCs with the MWCNT or Pt counter electrode exhibited a remarkable decrease in the photovoltaic efficiency after four weeks. The high photovoltaic performance of these DSCs is related to the excellent electrochemical catalysis of CNTs on the redox of the iodide/triiodide pair, as revealed by the cyclic voltammetry and ac impedance spectroscopy.

  10. High-performance dye-sensitized solar cells with gel-coated binder-free carbon nanotube films as counter electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaoguang; Cho, Swee Jen; Fan, Benhu; Ouyang, Jianyong

    2010-10-01

    High-performance dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) with binder-free films of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), as the counter electrode are reported. The CNT films were fabricated by coating gels, which were prepared by dispersing CNTs in low-molecular-weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) through mechanical grinding and subsequent ultrasonication, on fluorine tin oxide (FTO) glass. PEG was removed from the CNT films through heating. These binder-free CNT films were rough and exhibited good adhesion to substrates. They were used as the counter electrode of DSCs. The DSCs with SWCNT or MWCNT counter electrodes exhibited a light-to-electricity conversion efficiency comparable with that with the conventional platinum (Pt) counter electrode, when the devices were tested immediately after device fabrication. The DSCs with an SWCNT counter electrode exhibited good stability in photovoltaic performance. The efficiency did not decrease after four weeks. On the other hand, DSCs with the MWCNT or Pt counter electrode exhibited a remarkable decrease in the photovoltaic efficiency after four weeks. The high photovoltaic performance of these DSCs is related to the excellent electrochemical catalysis of CNTs on the redox of the iodide/triiodide pair, as revealed by the cyclic voltammetry and ac impedance spectroscopy.

  11. Molybdenum disulfide nanosheets coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite for highly sensitive determination of chloramphenicol in food samples milk, honey and powdered milk.

    PubMed

    Govindasamy, Mani; Chen, Shen-Ming; Mani, Veerappan; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Umamaheswari, Rajaji; Joseph Santhanaraj, K; Sathiyan, Anandaraj

    2017-01-01

    We have described a hybrid material that consists of molybdenum disulfide nanosheets (MoS2) coated on functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) for sensitive and selective determination of chloramphenicol (CAP). The MoS2/f-MWCNTs nanocomposite was successfully prepared through a hydrothermal process and its structure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The MoS2/f-MWCNTs nanocomposite holds excellent electrochemical properties and it displays excellent electrocatalytic ability to CAP. Under optimized working conditions, the nanocomposite film modified electrode responds linearly to CAP in the concentration range of 0.08-1392μM. The detection limit was obtained as 0.015μM (±0.003). The electrode has high level of selectivity in presence of large excess concentrations of interfering species. In addition, the modified electrode offers satisfactory repeatability, reproducibility and stability. The practical applicability of the electrode was demonstrated in food samples such as, milk, powdered milk and honey samples and the recoveries are agreeable which clearly revealed its practical feasibility in food analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of a novel microextraction technique for aqueous samples: porous membrane envelope filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes coated with molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Feng; Deng, Minjie; Liu, Xue; Zhao, Hongxia; Li, Xiaona; Quan, Xie; Chen, Jingwen

    2011-03-01

    A novel microextraction technique based on membrane-protected multiwalled carbon nanotubes coated with molecularly imprinted polymer (MWCNTs-MIP) was developed. In this technique, MWCNTs-MIP were packed inside a polypropylene membrane envelope, which was then clamped onto a paper clip. For extraction, the packed membrane envelope was first impregnated with toluene and then placed in sample solutions. Target analytes in the solutions were first extracted into toluene in the membrane envelope, and were then extracted specifically onto the MWCNTs-MIP. After the extraction, target analytes were desorbed in methanol for liquid chromatography analysis. MWCNTs-MIP of prometryn were used as a model to demonstrate the feasibility of this novel microextraction technique. Factors affecting the extraction including organic solvent, stirring rate, extraction time, salt concentration, and pH were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection (a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) for the selected triazine herbicides were 0.08-0.38 μg/L. The prepared membrane envelope could be used at least 50 times. The developed method was used for the analysis of the triazines spiked in river water, wastewater, and liquid milk, with recoveries ranging from 79.3-97.4, 58.9-110.3 and 76.2-104.9%, respectively.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Material Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Leonard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Niolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2006-01-01

    The nanomaterial activities at NASA Johnson Space Center focus on carbon nanotube production, characterization and their applications for aerospace systems. Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced by arc and laser methods. Characterization of the nanotube material is performed using the NASA JSC protocol developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA. A possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be discussed. Changes in the quality of the material collected in different regions of the arc and laser production chambers is assessed using the original JSC protocol. The observed variations indicate different growth conditions in different regions of the production chambers.

  14. Plasma CVD of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Cruden, B.; Hash, D.; Meyyappan, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes(CNT) exhibit remarkable mechanical and unique electronic properties and thus have created excitement in the research community about their potential in electronics, computing, sensor and structural applications. Realization of these applications critically depends on the ability to control the properties(such as diameter, chirality) as well purity. We have investigated CNT growth using an inductively coupled plasma(ICP) process using hydrocarbon feedstock. The catalyst required for nanotube growth consists of thin sputtered layers of aluminum and iron(10 nm each) and aligned carbon nanotubes have been obtained. Optical emission diagnostics as well as a plasma modeling effort have been undertaken to understand growth mechanisms. This presentation will discuss growth characteristics under various pressure, power and feedgas compositions and our understanding from modeling and diagnostics.

  15. Polypropylene membrane coated with carbon nanotubes functionalized with chitosan: Application in the microextraction of polychlorinated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Ge, Dandan; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-08-21

    Acid oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with chitosan were coated on polypropylene membrane and used as sorbent to extract trace polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from environmental water samples. The analytes were extracted by the hydrophobic interaction between analytes and the functionalized CNTs. The chitosan polymer coating also contributed to extraction efficiency. Microextraction conditions (different types of desorption solvent, extraction time, salt concentration, stirring rate and desorption time) were optimized by means of orthogonal array design (OAD). A mixed level OAD matrix, OA16 (4(1)×2(12)) was employed for the initial optimization. Based on the results of the first step, n-hexane was chosen as desorption solvent and 5min was selected as desorption time. Extraction time, stirring rate and salt concentration were further optimized in the second step by an OA16 (4(5)) matrix. Under the optimized conditions, calibration curves with coefficients of determination higher than 0.993 over the concentration range of 0.2 and 50ng/ml. Low limits of detection (<0.60ng/l) and acceptable reproducibility with relative standard deviations in the range of 0.17% and 5.01%, were achieved. The developed method was applied to extract PCBs and PBDEs from environmental water samples. The relative recoveries of the analytes spiked into the real water samples ranged from 85.6 to 104.1% at 0.2ng/ml of each analyte, and from 82.4 to 98.6% at 2ng/ml of each analyte.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes: Present and Future Commercial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Volder, Michael F. L.; Tawfick, Sameh H.; Baughman, Ray H.; Hart, A. John

    2013-02-01

    Worldwide commercial interest in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reflected in a production capacity that presently exceeds several thousand tons per year. Currently, bulk CNT powders are incorporated in diverse commercial products ranging from rechargeable batteries, automotive parts, and sporting goods to boat hulls and water filters. Advances in CNT synthesis, purification, and chemical modification are enabling integration of CNTs in thin-film electronics and large-area coatings. Although not yet providing compelling mechanical strength or electrical or thermal conductivities for many applications, CNT yarns and sheets already have promising performance for applications including supercapacitors, actuators, and lightweight electromagnetic shields.

  17. Carbon nanotubes: present and future commercial applications.

    PubMed

    De Volder, Michael F L; Tawfick, Sameh H; Baughman, Ray H; Hart, A John

    2013-02-01

    Worldwide commercial interest in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reflected in a production capacity that presently exceeds several thousand tons per year. Currently, bulk CNT powders are incorporated in diverse commercial products ranging from rechargeable batteries, automotive parts, and sporting goods to boat hulls and water filters. Advances in CNT synthesis, purification, and chemical modification are enabling integration of CNTs in thin-film electronics and large-area coatings. Although not yet providing compelling mechanical strength or electrical or thermal conductivities for many applications, CNT yarns and sheets already have promising performance for applications including supercapacitors, actuators, and lightweight electromagnetic shields.

  18. Multi-scale Rule-of-Mixtures Model of Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Lamina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Roddick, Jaret C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    A unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy lamina in which the carbon fibers are coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes is modeled with a multi-scale method, the atomistically informed rule-of-mixtures. This multi-scale model is designed to include the effect of the carbon nanotubes on the constitutive properties of the lamina. It included concepts from the molecular dynamics/equivalent continuum methods, micromechanics, and the strength of materials. Within the model both the nanotube volume fraction and nanotube distribution were varied. It was found that for a lamina with 60% carbon fiber volume fraction, the Young's modulus in the fiber direction varied with changes in the nanotube distribution, from 138.8 to 140 GPa with nanotube volume fractions ranging from 0.0001 to 0.0125. The presence of nanotube near the surface of the carbon fiber is therefore expected to have a small, but positive, effect on the constitutive properties of the lamina.

  19. Conductance Oscillations in Squashed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrez, H.; Anantram, M. P.; Svizhenko, A.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics and electrical conductance calculations are used to probe the electromechanical properties of squashed metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance and bandgap of armchair nanotubes show oscillations upon squashing. The physical origin of these oscillations is attributed to interaction of carbon atoms with a fourth neighbor. Squashing of armchair and zigzag nanotubes ultimately leads to metallic behavior.

  20. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  2. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    ScienceCinema

    Leonard, Francois

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  3. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Francois

    2014-06-11

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  5. Thermoelectrics: Carbon nanotubes get high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispin, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Waste heat can be converted to electricity by thermoelectric generators, but their development is hindered by the lack of cheap materials with good thermoelectric properties. Now, carbon-nanotube-based materials are shown to have improved properties when purified to contain only semiconducting species and then doped.

  6. Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Supriyo; Anatram, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    The recent report of quantized conductance in a 4 m long multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) raises the exciting possibility of ballistic transport at room temperature over relatively long distances. We argue that this is made possible by the special symmetry of the eigenstates of the lowest propagating modes in metallic nanotubes which suppresses backscattering. This unusual effect is absent for the higher propagating modes so that transport is not ballistic once the bias exceeds the cut-off energy for the higher modes, which is estimated to be approximately 75 meV for nanotubes of diameter approximately 15 nm. Also, we show that the symmetry of the eigenstates can significantly affect their coupling to the reservoir and hence the contact resistance. A simple model is presented that can be used to understand the observed conductance-voltage characteristics.

  7. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  8. Degradation of flumequine in aqueous solution by persulfate activated with common methods and polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes catalysts.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Ping; Sui, Yunxia; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-11-15

    In recent years, flumequine (FLU) has been ubiquitously detected in surface waters and municipal wastewaters. In light of its potential negative impacts to aquatic species, growing concern has been arisen for the removal of this antibiotic from natural waters. In this study, the kinetics, degradation mechanisms and pathways of aqueous FLU by persulfate (PS) oxidation were systematically determined. Three common activation methods, including heat, Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), and a novel heterogeneous catalyst, namely, polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ), were investigated to activate PS for FLU removal. It was found that these three common activators enhanced FLU degradation obviously, while several influencing factors, such as solution pH, inorganic ions (especially HCO3(-) at 5 mmol/L) and dissolved organic matter extracts, exerted their different effects on FLU removal. The catalysts were characterized, and an efficient catalytic degradation performance, high stability and excellent reusability were observed. The measured total organic carbon levels suggested that FLU can be effectively mineralized by using the catalysts. Radical mechanism was studied by combination of the quenching tests and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. It was assumed that sulfate radicals predominated in the activation of PS with Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ for FLU removal, while hydroxyl radicals also contributed to the catalytic oxidation process. In addition, a total of fifteen reaction intermediates of FLU were identified, from which two possible pathways were proposed involving hydroxylation, decarbonylation and ring opening. Overall, this study represented a systematical evaluation regarding the transformation process of FLU by PS, and showed that the heterogeneous catalysts can efficiently activate PS for FLU removal from the water environment.

  9. Carbon nanotubes by the metallocene route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Rahul; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1997-03-01

    Pyrolysis of metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and nickelocene, is shown to yield carbon nanotubes and metal-filled onion-like structures. Pyrolysis of benzene in the presence of a metallocene gives high yields of nanotubes, the wall thickness of the nanotubes depending on the metallocene content. Pyrolysis of benzene in the absence of any metal however gives monodispersed nanospheres of carbon rather than nanotubes.

  10. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  11. Polymer-assisted deposition of films and preparation of carbon nanotube arrays using the films

    DOEpatents

    Luo, Hongmei; Li, Qingwen; Bauer, Eve; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi

    2013-07-16

    Carbon nanotubes were prepared by coating a substrate with a coating solution including a suitable solvent, a soluble polymer, a metal precursor having a first metal selected from iron, nickel, cobalt, and molybdenum, and optionally a second metal selected from aluminum and magnesium, and also a binding agent that forms a complex with the first metal and a complex with the second metal. The coated substrate was exposed to a reducing atmosphere at elevated temperature, and then to a hydrocarbon in the reducing atmosphere. The result was decomposition of the polymer and formation of carbon nanotubes on the substrate. The carbon nanotubes were often in the form of an array on the substrate.

  12. Controlled Synthesis of Core-Shell Carbon@MoS2 Nanotube Sponges as High-Performance Battery Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunsong; Ma, Zhimin; Chen, Yijun; Zou, Mingchu; Yousaf, Muhammad; Yang, Yanbing; Yang, Liusi; Cao, Anyuan; Han, Ray P S

    2016-12-01

    Heterogeneous inorganic nanotube structures consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes coated by long, continuous MoS2 sheets with tunable sheet number are synthesized using a carbon-nanotube sponge as a template. The resulting 3D porous hybrid sponges have potential applications as high-performance freestanding anodes for Li-ion batteries with excellent specific capacity and cycling stability.

  13. Carbon-Nanotube Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Wong, Eric; Schlecht, Erich; Hunt, Brian; Siegel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Schottky diodes based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are being developed as essential components of the next generation of submillimeter-wave sensors and sources. Initial performance predictions have shown that the performance characteristics of these devices can exceed those of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes that have been the components of choice for room-temperature submillimeter-wave sensors for more than 50 years. For state-of-the-art Schottky diodes used as detectors at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz, the inherent parasitic capacitances associated with their semiconductor junction areas and the resistances associated with low electron mobilities limit achievable sensitivity. The performance of such a detector falls off approximately exponentially with frequency above 500 GHz. Moreover, when used as frequency multipliers for generating signals, state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes exhibit extremely low efficiencies, generally putting out only micro-watts of power at frequencies up to 1.5 THz. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes can be overcome by exploiting the unique electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A single-walled carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on its chirality, and exhibits high electron mobility (recently reported to be approx.= 2x10(exp 5)sq cm/V-s) and low parasitic capacitance. Because of the narrowness of nanotubes, Schottky diodes based on carbon nanotubes have ultra-small junction areas (of the order of a few square nanometers) and consequent junction capacitances of the order of 10(exp -18) F, which translates to cutoff frequency >5 THz. Because the turn-on power levels of these devices are very low (of the order of nano-watts), the input power levels needed for pumping local oscillators containing these devices should be lower than those needed for local oscillators containing state-of-the-art solid

  14. Multifunctional brushes made from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Anyuan; Veedu, Vinod P.; Li, Xuesong; Yao, Zhaoling; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2005-07-01

    Brushes are common tools for use in industry and our daily life, performing a variety of tasks such as cleaning, scraping, applying and electrical contacts. Typical materials for constructing brush bristles include animal hairs, synthetic polymer fibres and metal wires (see, for example, ref. 1). The performance of these bristles has been limited by the oxidation and degradation of metal wires, poor strength of natural hairs, and low thermal stability of synthetic fibres. Carbon nanotubes, having a typical one-dimensional nanostructure, have excellent mechanical properties, such as high modulus and strength, high elasticity and resilience, thermal conductivity and large surface area (50-200 m2 g-1). Here we construct multifunctional, conductive brushes with carbon nanotube bristles grafted on fibre handles, and demonstrate their several unique tasks such as cleaning of nanoparticles from narrow spaces, coating of the inside of holes, selective chemical adsorption, and as movable electromechanical brush contacts and switches. The nanotube bristles can also be chemically functionalized for selective removal of heavy metal ions.

  15. Functional Carbon Nanocomposite, Optoelectronic, and Catalytic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu Teng

    Over the past couple decades, fundamental research into carbon nanomaterials has produced a steady stream of groundbreaking physical science. Their record setting mechanical strength, chemical stability, and optoelectronic performance have fueled many optimistic claims regarding the breadth and pace of carbon nanotube and graphene integration. However, present synthetic, processing, and economic constraints have precluded these materials from many practical device applications. To overcome these limitations, novel synthetic techniques, processing methodologies, device geometries, and mechanistic insight were developed in this dissertation. The resulting advancements in material production and composite device performance have brought carbon nanomaterials ever closer to commercial implementation. For improved materials processing, vacuum co-deposition was first demonstrated as viable technique for forming carbon nanocomposite films without property distorting covalent modifications. Co-deposited nanoparticle, carbon nanotube, and graphene composite films enabled rapid device prototyping and compositional optimization. Cellulosic polymer stabilizers were then shown to be highly effective carbon nanomaterial dispersants, improving graphene production yields by two orders of magnitude in common organic solvents. By exploiting polarity interactions, iterative solvent exchange was used to further increase carbon nanomaterial dispersion concentrations by an additional order of magnitude, yielding concentrated inks. On top of their low causticity, these cellulosic nanomaterial inks have highly tunable viscosities, excellent film forming capacity, and outstanding thermal stability. These processing characteristics enable the efficient scaling of carbon nanomaterial coatings and device production using existing roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Utilizing these process improvements, high-performance gas sensing, energy storage, transparent conductor, and photocatalytic

  16. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Nygârd, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike in conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and valley freedom. The interplay between the two is the focus of this review. The energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are explained, together with their consequences for transport measurements through nanotube quantum dots. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly modifies their transport behavior. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, open questions for the field are also clearly stated. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both be reduced to a low level.

  17. Morphing Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-20

    would operate by swelling of an active material in a direction locally perpendicular to the CNTs. This shape change, in combination with the mechanical... materials and active surfaces. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS Morphing Structures, Plant-mimetic Design, Cabon Nanotube, Active Polymers 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...and it was proposed that morphing CNT microstructures would operate by swelling of an active material in a direction locally perpendicular to the

  18. Carbon nanotube electrodes for effective interfacing with retinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Shoval, Asaf; Adams, Christopher; David-Pur, Moshe; Shein, Mark; Hanein, Yael; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the use of carbon nanotube coated microelectrodes as an interface material for retinal recording and stimulation applications. Test devices were micro-fabricated and consisted of 60, 30 mum diameter electrodes at spacing of 200 mum. These electrodes were coated via chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes, resulting in conducting, three dimensional surfaces with a high interfacial area. These attributes are important both for the quality of the cell-surface coupling as well as for electro-chemical interfacing efficiency. The entire chip was packaged to fit a commercial multielectrode recording and stimulation system. Electrical recordings of spontaneous spikes from whole-mount neonatal mouse retinas were consistently obtained minutes after retinas were placed over the electrodes, exhibiting typical bursting and propagating waves. Most importantly, the signals obtained with carbon nanotube electrodes have exceptionally high signal to noise ratio, reaching values as high as 75. Moreover, spikes are marked by a conspicuous gradual increase in amplitude recorded over a period of minutes to hours, suggesting improvement in cell-electrode coupling. This phenomenon is not observed in conventional commercial electrodes. Electrical stimulation using carbon nanotube electrodes was also achieved. We attribute the superior performances of the carbon nanotube electrodes to their three dimensional nature and the strong neuro-carbon nanotube affinity. The results presented here show the great potential of carbon nanotube electrodes for retinal interfacing applications. Specifically, our results demonstrate a route to achieve a reduction of the electrode down to few micrometers in order to achieve high efficacy local stimulation needed in retinal prosthetic devices.

  19. Interfacial heat flow in carbon nanotube suspensions.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Scott T; Cahill, David G; Shenogin, Sergei; Xue, Liping; Ozisik, Rahmi; Barone, Paul; Usrey, Monica; Strano, Michael S; Siddons, Giles; Shim, Moonsub; Keblinski, Pawel

    2003-11-01

    The enormous amount of basic research into carbon nanotubes has sparked interest in the potential applications of these novel materials. One promising use of carbon nanotubes is as fillers in a composite material to improve mechanical behaviour, electrical transport and thermal transport. For composite materials with high thermal conductivity, the thermal conductance across the nanotube-matrix interface is of particular interest. Here we use picosecond transient absorption to measure the interface thermal conductance (G) of carbon nanotubes suspended in surfactant micelles in water. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer from a carbon nanotube to a model hydrocarbon liquid are in agreement with experiment. Our findings indicate that heat transport in a nanotube composite material will be limited by the exceptionally small interface thermal conductance (G approximately 12 MW m(-2) K(-1)) and that the thermal conductivity of the composite will be much lower than the value estimated from the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the nanotubes and their volume fraction.

  20. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ajai Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Johansson, Leena-Sisko

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.