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Sample records for carbon nanotube transistors

  1. Sub-10 nm carbon nanotube transistor.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Aaron D; Luisier, Mathieu; Han, Shu-Jen; Tulevski, George; Breslin, Chris M; Gignac, Lynne; Lundstrom, Mark S; Haensch, Wilfried

    2012-02-01

    Although carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors have been promoted for years as a replacement for silicon technology, there is limited theoretical work and no experimental reports on how nanotubes will perform at sub-10 nm channel lengths. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the first sub-10 nm CNT transistor, which is shown to outperform the best competing silicon devices with more than four times the diameter-normalized current density (2.41 mA/μm) at a low operating voltage of 0.5 V. The nanotube transistor exhibits an impressively small inverse subthreshold slope of 94 mV/decade-nearly half of the value expected from a previous theoretical study. Numerical simulations show the critical role of the metal-CNT contacts in determining the performance of sub-10 nm channel length transistors, signifying the need for more accurate theoretical modeling of transport between the metal and nanotube. The superior low-voltage performance of the sub-10 nm CNT transistor proves the viability of nanotubes for consideration in future aggressively scaled transistor technologies.

  2. Stretchable transistors with buckled carbon nanotube films as conducting channels

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Michael S; Xu, Feng

    2015-03-24

    Thin-film transistors comprising buckled films comprising carbon nanotubes as the conductive channel are provided. Also provided are methods of fabricating the transistors. The transistors, which are highly stretchable and bendable, exhibit stable performance even when operated under high tensile strains.

  3. Noise characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube network transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kim, Kang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Tae; Min, Yo-Sep; Park, Wanjun

    2008-07-01

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are studied with field effect transistors (FETs). Due to the geometrical complexity of nanotube networks in the channel area and the large number of tube-tube/tube-metal junctions, the inverse frequency, 1/f, dependence of the noise shows a similar level to that of a single single-walled carbon nanotube transistor. Detailed analysis is performed with the parameters of number of mobile carriers and mobility in the different environment. This shows that the change in the number of mobile carriers resulting in the mobility change due to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules (mostly oxygen molecules) to the tube surface is a key factor in the 1/f noise level for carbon nanotube network transistors.

  4. Noise characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube network transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kim, Kang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Tae; Min, Yo-Sep; Park, Wanjun

    2008-07-16

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are studied with field effect transistors (FETs). Due to the geometrical complexity of nanotube networks in the channel area and the large number of tube-tube/tube-metal junctions, the inverse frequency, 1/f, dependence of the noise shows a similar level to that of a single single-walled carbon nanotube transistor. Detailed analysis is performed with the parameters of number of mobile carriers and mobility in the different environment. This shows that the change in the number of mobile carriers resulting in the mobility change due to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules (mostly oxygen molecules) to the tube surface is a key factor in the 1/f noise level for carbon nanotube network transistors. PMID:21828739

  5. Carbon nanotube transistors, sensors, and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian

    Carbon nanotubes are tiny hollow cylinders, made from a single graphene sheet, that possess many amazing properties. Another reason why nanotubes have generated intense research activities from scientists of various disciplines is they represent a new class of materials for the study of one-dimensional physics. In this thesis we investigate the electrical transport of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes and their potential applications as biological sensors. Electrons have been predicted, by theoretical physicists, to go through nanotubes without much resistance. But this has not been properly quantified experimentally, and the origin of the routinely observed large resistance in nanotubes is not clear. In this thesis we show that in moderate long high quality nanotubes the electrical transport is limited by electron-phonon scattering. Systematic studies are carried out using many devices of different diameters at various temperatures. The resistance and inverse of peak mobility are observed to decrease linearly with temperature, indicating the influence of phonons. The conductance and peak mobility scales with nanotube diameters also, in a linear fashion and quadratic fashion respectively. Based on electron-phonon scattering, a theory model is developed that can not only predict how the resistance changes with gate voltage but also explain the observed temperature and diameter dependence. This work clarifies the nature of electrical transport in nanotubes and sets a performance limit of nanotube devices in diffusive regime. The electrical transport in nanotubes is extremely sensitive to local electrostatic environment due to their small size, large surface to volume ratio and high mobility, making nanotubes ideal key elements in biological sensors. In the second part of this thesis, we integrate nanotubes with supported lipid bilayers, mimic structures of cell membranes, and use this platform as a way to introduce biomolecules into the vicinity of

  6. Mechanism of gas sensing in carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Isha

    Gas sensors based on carbon nanotubes in the field effect transistor configuration have exhibited impressive sensitivities compared to the existing technologies. However, the lack of an understanding of the gas sensing mechanism in these carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) has impeded setting-up a calibration standard and customization of these nano-sensors for specified gas sensing application. Calibration requires identifying fundamental transistor parameters and establishing how they vary in the presence of a gas and influence the overall sensing behavior. This work focuses on modeling the sensing behavior of a CNTFET in the presence of oxidizing (NO 2) and reducing (NH3) gases and determining how each of the transistor parameters, namely: the Schottky barrier height, Schottky barrier width and doping level of the nanotube are affected by the presence of these gases. Earlier experiments have shown that the carbon nanotube-metal interface is responsible for the observed change in the CNTFET response. The interface consists of the metal contact and the depletion region in the carbon nanotube. A change in the metal work function will change the Schottky barrier height, whereas doping of the depletion region will affect the Schottky barrier width and the doping level of the carbon nanotube. A theoretical model containing these parameters was systematically fitted to the experimental transfer characteristics for different concentrations of NO2 and NH3. A direct correlation between the measured changes in the CNTFET saturated conductance and the Schottky barrier height was found. These changes are directly related to the changes in the metal work function of the electrodes that I determined experimentally, independently, with a Kelvin probe system. The overall change in the CNTFET characteristics were explained and quantified by also including changes due to doping from molecules adsorbed at the carbon nanotube-metal interface through the parameters

  7. Detection of supported lipid bilayers with carbon nanotube transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2005-03-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are important synthetic structures that can be used to mimic and study the properties and functions of cellular membranes, as well as to perform various bioassays which involve membrane bound receptors. The fusion of phospholipid vesicles and formation of a supported lipid bilayer can be detected in real time with high sensitivity by carbon nanotube field effect transistors which have been patterned on the same substrate. The properties of different vesicles, such as fusion rates and phospholipid composition can be distinguished by the conductance change of carbon nanotube field effect transistors. Fluorescence is used to verify the formation of a supported lipid bilayer, although the detection scheme is label-free. This demonstrates that electrical detection with carbon nanotubes can provide a powerful tool for study of lipid membranes.

  8. Hysteresis free carbon nanotube thin film transistors comprising hydrophobic dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, J.; Ding, J.; Li, Z.; Cheng, F.; Du, N.; Malenfant, P. R. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present two examples of carbon nanotube network thin film transistors with strongly hydrophobic dielectrics comprising either Teflon-AF or a poly(vinylphenol)/poly(methyl silsesquioxane) (PVP/pMSSQ) blend. In the absence of encapsulation, bottom gated transistors in air ambient show no hysteresis between forward and reverse gate sweep direction. Device threshold gate voltage and On-current present excellent time dependent stability even under dielectric stress. Furthermore, threshold gate voltage for hole conduction is negative upon device encapsulation with PVP/pMSSQ enabling much improved current On/Off ratio at 0 V. This work addresses two major challenges impeding solution based fabrication of relevant thin film transistors with printable single-walled carbon nanotube channels.

  9. A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube transistor.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-L; Kim, K; Truong, Q; Shen, A; Li, Z; Chen, Y

    2012-07-11

    A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) transistor is presented in this paper. The spiking neuron circuit has a crossbar architecture in which the transistor gates are connected to its row electrodes and the transistor sources are connected to its column electrodes. An electrochemical cell is incorporated in the gate of the transistor by sandwiching a hydrogen-doped poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether (PEG) electrolyte between the CNT channel and the top gate electrode. An input spike applied to the gate triggers a dynamic drift of the hydrogen ions in the PEG electrolyte, resulting in a post-synaptic current (PSC) through the CNT channel. Spikes input into the rows trigger PSCs through multiple CNT transistors, and PSCs cumulate in the columns and integrate into a 'soma' circuit to trigger output spikes based on an integrate-and-fire mechanism. The spiking neuron circuit can potentially emulate biological neuron networks and their intelligent functions.

  10. A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-L.; Kim, K.; Truong, Q.; Shen, A.; Li, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2012-07-01

    A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) transistor is presented in this paper. The spiking neuron circuit has a crossbar architecture in which the transistor gates are connected to its row electrodes and the transistor sources are connected to its column electrodes. An electrochemical cell is incorporated in the gate of the transistor by sandwiching a hydrogen-doped poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether (PEG) electrolyte between the CNT channel and the top gate electrode. An input spike applied to the gate triggers a dynamic drift of the hydrogen ions in the PEG electrolyte, resulting in a post-synaptic current (PSC) through the CNT channel. Spikes input into the rows trigger PSCs through multiple CNT transistors, and PSCs cumulate in the columns and integrate into a ‘soma’ circuit to trigger output spikes based on an integrate-and-fire mechanism. The spiking neuron circuit can potentially emulate biological neuron networks and their intelligent functions.

  11. A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube transistor.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-L; Kim, K; Truong, Q; Shen, A; Li, Z; Chen, Y

    2012-07-11

    A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) transistor is presented in this paper. The spiking neuron circuit has a crossbar architecture in which the transistor gates are connected to its row electrodes and the transistor sources are connected to its column electrodes. An electrochemical cell is incorporated in the gate of the transistor by sandwiching a hydrogen-doped poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether (PEG) electrolyte between the CNT channel and the top gate electrode. An input spike applied to the gate triggers a dynamic drift of the hydrogen ions in the PEG electrolyte, resulting in a post-synaptic current (PSC) through the CNT channel. Spikes input into the rows trigger PSCs through multiple CNT transistors, and PSCs cumulate in the columns and integrate into a 'soma' circuit to trigger output spikes based on an integrate-and-fire mechanism. The spiking neuron circuit can potentially emulate biological neuron networks and their intelligent functions. PMID:22710137

  12. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors Using Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, Hirofumi; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka; Mizutani, Takashi

    2006-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are grown using grid-inserted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The field effect transistor operation was confirmed using the PECVD grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The preferential growth of the semiconducting nanotubes was confirmed in the grid-inserted PECVD by measuring current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the devices. Based on the measurement of the electrical breakdown of the metallic CNTs, the probability of growing the semiconducting nanotubes has been estimated to be more than 90%.

  13. Integrating carbon nanotubes into silicon by means of vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingqi; Wang, Qingxiao; Yue, Weisheng; Guo, Zaibing; Li, Liang; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xianbin; Abutaha, Anas I.; Alshareef, H. N.; Zhang, Yafei; Zhang, X. X.

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been integrated into silicon for use in vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). A unique feature of these devices is that a silicon substrate and a metal contact are used as the source and drain for the vertical transistors, respectively. These CNTFETs show very different characteristics from those fabricated with two metal contacts. Surprisingly, the transfer characteristics of the vertical CNTFETs can be either ambipolar or unipolar (p-type or n-type) depending on the sign of the drain voltage. Furthermore, the p-type/n-type character of the devices is defined by the doping type of the silicon substrate used in the fabrication process. A semiclassical model is used to simulate the performance of these CNTFETs by taking the conductance change of the Si contact under the gate voltage into consideration. The calculation results are consistent with the experimental observations.Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been integrated into silicon for use in vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). A unique feature of these devices is that a silicon substrate and a metal contact are used as the source and drain for the vertical transistors, respectively. These CNTFETs show very different characteristics from those fabricated with two metal contacts. Surprisingly, the transfer characteristics of the vertical CNTFETs can be either ambipolar or unipolar (p-type or n-type) depending on the sign of the drain voltage. Furthermore, the p-type/n-type character of the devices is defined by the doping type of the silicon substrate used in the fabrication process. A semiclassical model is used to simulate the performance of these CNTFETs by taking the conductance change of the Si contact under the gate voltage into consideration. The calculation results are consistent with the experimental observations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00978a

  14. Carbon Nanotube Gated Lateral Resonant Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. P.

    2005-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have generated a great deal of interest for use in novel devices due to their small size and high current densities. We have produced a new type of lateral resonant tunneling field-effect transistor using a Y-junction multiwalled carbon nanotube as the dual gate on a narrow wire etched from a modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The two branches of the Y-junction nanotube produced in an alumina nanotemplate array ootnotetextLi, J., Papadopoulos, C. and Xu, J. M., ``Growing Y- Junction Carbon Nanotubes" Nature 402, 253-254, 2000. are used as gates to produce a voltage-tunable double-barrier potential for the carriers traveling from source to drain along the wire. The three terminal I-V characteristics of the device have been measured at 4.2K. Conductance oscillation is observed as a function of dual gate potential, indicating electron resonant tunneling through the energy states between the barriers. Detailed measurement and comparison with self-consistent potential simulations will be presented.

  15. Polymer electrolyte gating of carbon nanotube network transistors.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Taner; Gaur, Anshu; Rogers, John A; Shim, Moonsub

    2005-05-01

    Network behavior in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is examined by polymer electrolyte gating. High gate efficiencies, low voltage operation, and the absence of hysteresis in polymer electrolyte gating lead to a convenient and effective method of analyzing transport in SWNT networks. Furthermore, the ability to control carrier type with chemical groups of the host polymer allows us to examine both electron and hole conduction. Comparison to back gate measurements is made on channel length scaling. Frequency measurements are also made giving an upper limit of approximately 300 Hz switching speed for poly(ethylene oxide)/LiClO(4) gated SWNT thin film transistors. PMID:15884892

  16. Enhanced shot noise in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, A.; Fiori, G.; Iannaccone, G.

    2009-12-21

    We predict shot noise enhancement in defect-free carbon nanotube field-effect transistors through a numerical investigation based on the self-consistent solution of the Poisson and Schroedinger equations within the nonequilibrium Green's functions formalism, and on a Monte Carlo approach to reproduce injection statistics. Noise enhancement is due to the correlation between trapping of holes from the drain into quasibound states in the channel and thermionic injection of electrons from the source, and can lead to an appreciable Fano factor of 1.22 at room temperature.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Synaptic Transistor Network for Pattern Recognition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-11-18

    Inspired by the human brain, a neuromorphic system combining complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and adjustable synaptic devices may offer new computing paradigms by enabling massive neural-network parallelism. In particular, synaptic devices, which are capable of emulating the functions of biological synapses, are used as the essential building blocks for an information storage and processing system. However, previous synaptic devices based on two-terminal resistive devices remain challenging because of their variability and specific physical mechanisms of resistance change, which lead to a bottleneck in the implementation of a high-density synaptic device network. Here we report that a three-terminal synaptic transistor based on carbon nanotubes can provide reliable synaptic functions that encode relative timing and regulate weight change. In addition, using system-level simulations, the developed synaptic transistor network associated with CMOS circuits can perform unsupervised learning for pattern recognition using a simplified spike-timing-dependent plasticity scheme.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Synaptic Transistor Network for Pattern Recognition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-11-18

    Inspired by the human brain, a neuromorphic system combining complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and adjustable synaptic devices may offer new computing paradigms by enabling massive neural-network parallelism. In particular, synaptic devices, which are capable of emulating the functions of biological synapses, are used as the essential building blocks for an information storage and processing system. However, previous synaptic devices based on two-terminal resistive devices remain challenging because of their variability and specific physical mechanisms of resistance change, which lead to a bottleneck in the implementation of a high-density synaptic device network. Here we report that a three-terminal synaptic transistor based on carbon nanotubes can provide reliable synaptic functions that encode relative timing and regulate weight change. In addition, using system-level simulations, the developed synaptic transistor network associated with CMOS circuits can perform unsupervised learning for pattern recognition using a simplified spike-timing-dependent plasticity scheme. PMID:26512729

  19. Thin film transistors using PECVD-grown carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yuki; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka; Mizutani, Takashi

    2010-05-21

    Thin film transistors with a carbon nanotube (CNT) network as a channel have been fabricated using grid-inserted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) which has the advantage of preferential growth of the CNTs with semiconducting behavior in the I-V characteristics of CNT field effect transistors (CNT-FETs). Taking advantage of the preferential growth and suppression of bundle formation, a large ON current of 170 microA mm(-1), which is among the largest in these kinds of devices with a large ON/OFF current ratio of about 10(5), has been realized in the relatively short channel length of 10 microm. The field effect mobility of the device was 5.8 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). PMID:20418603

  20. Thin film transistors using PECVD-grown carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yuki; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka; Mizutani, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Thin film transistors with a carbon nanotube (CNT) network as a channel have been fabricated using grid-inserted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) which has the advantage of preferential growth of the CNTs with semiconducting behavior in the I-V characteristics of CNT field effect transistors (CNT-FETs). Taking advantage of the preferential growth and suppression of bundle formation, a large ON current of 170 µA mm - 1, which is among the largest in these kinds of devices with a large ON/OFF current ratio of about 105, has been realized in the relatively short channel length of 10 µm. The field effect mobility of the device was 5.8 cm2 V - 1 s - 1.

  1. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kocabas, Coskun; Kim, Hoon-sik; Banks, Tony; Rogers, John A.; Pesetski, Aaron A.; Baumgardner, James E.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.; Zhang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    The potential to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in advanced electronics represents a continuing, major source of interest in these materials. However, scalable integration of SWNTs into circuits is challenging because of difficulties in controlling the geometries, spatial positions, and electronic properties of individual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio frequency (RF) SWNT analog electronic devices, such as narrow band amplifiers operating in the VHF frequency band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demonstration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios, in which SWNT devices provide all of the key functions, including resonant antennas, fixed RF amplifiers, RF mixers, and audio amplifiers. These results represent important first steps to practical implementation of SWNTs in high-speed analog circuits. Comparison studies indicate certain performance advantages over silicon and capabilities that complement those in existing compound semiconductor technologies. PMID:18227509

  2. Carbon nanotube gated lateral resonant tunneling field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. P.; Perkins, B. R.; Yin, A. J.; Zaslavsky, A.; Xu, J. M.; Beresford, R.; Snider, G. L.

    2005-10-01

    We have produced a lateral resonant tunneling field-effect transistor using a Y-junction multiwalled carbon nanotube as the dual gate on a narrow channel etched from a modulation-doped GaAs /AlGaAs heterostructure. When the Y-junction nanotube is negatively biased, electrons traveling from source to drain along the channel face a voltage-tunable electrostatic double-barrier potential. We measured the three-terminal IDS(VDS,VGS) characteristics of the device at 4.2 K and observed gate-induced structure in the transconductance and negative differential resistance in the drain current. We interpret the data in terms of resonant tunneling through one-dimensional subbands confined by a self-consistently calculated electrostatic potential.

  3. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics.

  4. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  6. Wafer-level hysteresis-free resonant carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ji; Bartsch, Sebastian T; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2015-03-24

    We report wafer-level fabrication of resonant-body carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) in a dual-gate configuration. An integration density of >10(6) CNTFETs/cm(2), an assembly yield of >80%, and nanoprecision have been simultaneously obtained. Through combined chemical and thermal treatments, hysteresis-free (in vacuum) suspended-body CNTFETs have been demonstrated. Electrostatic actuation by lateral gate and FET-based readout of mechanical resonance have been achieved at room temperature. Both upward and downward in situ frequency tuning has been experimentally demonstrated in the dual-gate architecture. The minuscule mass, high resonance frequency, and in situ tunability of the resonant CNTFETs offer promising features for applications in radio frequency signal processing and ultrasensitive sensing. PMID:25752991

  7. Exploration of vertical scaling limit in carbon nanotube transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chenguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Yang, Yingjun; Xiao, Mengmeng; Ding, Li; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-05-01

    Top-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT FETs) were fabricated by using ultra-thin (4.5 nm or thinner) atomic-layer-deposition grown HfO2 as gate insulator, and shown to exhibit high gate efficiency, i.e., all examined (totally 76) devices present very low room temperature subthreshold swing with an averaged value of 64 mV/Dec, without observable carrier mobility degradation. The gate leakage of the CNT FET under fixed gate voltage is dependent not only on the thickness of HfO2 insulator, but also on the diameter of the CNT. The vertical scaling limit of CNT FETs is determined by gate leakage standard in ultra large scale integrated circuits. HfO2 film with effective oxide thickness of 1.2 nm can provide both excellent gate electrostatic controllability and small gate leakage for sub-5 nm FETs based on CNT with small diameter.

  8. Towards parallel fabrication of single electron transistors using carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Muhammad R.; Joung, Daeha; Khondaker, Saiful I.

    2015-05-01

    Single electron transistors (SETs) are considered to be promising building blocks for post CMOS era electronic devices, however, a major bottleneck for practical realization of SET based devices is a lack of a parallel fabrication approach. Here, we have demonstrated a technique for the scalable fabrication of SETs using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The approach is based on the integration of solution processed individual SWNTs via dielectrophoresis (DEP) at the selected position of the circuit with a 100 nm channel length, where the metal-SWNT Schottky contact works as a tunnel barrier. Measurements carried out at a low temperature (4.2 K) show that the majority of the devices with a contact resistance (RT) > 100 kΩ display SET behavior. For the devices with 100 kΩ < RT < 1 MΩ, periodic, well-defined Coulomb diamonds with a charging energy of ~14 meV, corresponding to the transport through a single quantum dot (QD) was observed. For devices with high RT (>1 MΩ) multiple QD behavior was observed. From the transport study of 50 SWNT devices, a total of 38 devices show SET behavior giving a yield of 76%. The results presented here are a significant step forward for the practical realization of SET based devices.Single electron transistors (SETs) are considered to be promising building blocks for post CMOS era electronic devices, however, a major bottleneck for practical realization of SET based devices is a lack of a parallel fabrication approach. Here, we have demonstrated a technique for the scalable fabrication of SETs using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The approach is based on the integration of solution processed individual SWNTs via dielectrophoresis (DEP) at the selected position of the circuit with a 100 nm channel length, where the metal-SWNT Schottky contact works as a tunnel barrier. Measurements carried out at a low temperature (4.2 K) show that the majority of the devices with a contact resistance (RT) > 100 kΩ display SET

  9. High performance transistors via aligned polyfluorene-sorted carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Gerald J.; Joo, Yongho; Singha Roy, Susmit; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2014-02-24

    We evaluate the performance of exceptionally electronic-type sorted, semiconducting, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) in field effect transistors (FETs). High on-conductance and high on/off conductance modulation are simultaneously achieved at channel lengths which are both shorter and longer than individual s-SWCNTs. The s-SWCNTs are isolated from heterogeneous mixtures using a polyfluorene-derivative as a selective agent and aligned on substrates via dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly at densities of ∼50 s-SWCNTs μm{sup −1}. At a channel length of 9 μm the s-SWCNTs percolate to span the FET channel, and the on/off ratio and charge transport mobility are 2.2 × 10{sup 7} and 46 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively. At a channel length of 400 nm, a large fraction of the s-SWCNTs directly span the channel, and the on-conductance per width is 61 μS μm{sup −1} and the on/off ratio is 4 × 10{sup 5}. These results are considerably better than previous solution-processed FETs, which have suffered from poor on/off ratio due to spurious metallic nanotubes that bridge the channel. 4071 individual and small bundles of s-SWCNTs are tested in 400 nm channel length FETs, and all show semiconducting behavior, demonstrating the high fidelity of polyfluorenes as selective agents and the promise of assembling s-SWCNTs from solution to create high performance semiconductor electronic devices.

  10. Towards parallel fabrication of single electron transistors using carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhammad R; Joung, Daeha; Khondaker, Saiful I

    2015-06-01

    Single electron transistors (SETs) are considered to be promising building blocks for post CMOS era electronic devices, however, a major bottleneck for practical realization of SET based devices is a lack of a parallel fabrication approach. Here, we have demonstrated a technique for the scalable fabrication of SETs using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The approach is based on the integration of solution processed individual SWNTs via dielectrophoresis (DEP) at the selected position of the circuit with a 100 nm channel length, where the metal-SWNT Schottky contact works as a tunnel barrier. Measurements carried out at a low temperature (4.2 K) show that the majority of the devices with a contact resistance (RT) > 100 kΩ display SET behavior. For the devices with 100 kΩ < RT < 1 MΩ, periodic, well-defined Coulomb diamonds with a charging energy of ∼14 meV, corresponding to the transport through a single quantum dot (QD) was observed. For devices with high RT (>1 MΩ) multiple QD behavior was observed. From the transport study of 50 SWNT devices, a total of 38 devices show SET behavior giving a yield of 76%. The results presented here are a significant step forward for the practical realization of SET based devices.

  11. Self aligned hysteresis free carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlafman, M.; Tabachnik, T.; Shtempluk, O.; Razin, A.; Kochetkov, V.; Yaish, Y. E.

    2016-04-01

    Hysteresis phenomenon in the transfer characteristics of carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNT FET) is being considered as the main obstacle for successful realization of electronic devices based on CNTs. In this study, we prepare four kinds of CNTFETs and explore their hysteretic behavior. Two kinds of devices comprise on-surface CNTs (type I) and suspended CNTs (type II) with thin insulating layer underneath and a single global gate which modulates the CNT conductance. The third and fourth types (types III and IV) consist of suspended CNT over a metallic local gate underneath, where for type IV the local gate was patterned self aligned with the source and drain electrodes. The first two types of devices, i.e., type I and II, exhibit substantial hysteresis which increases with scanning range and sweeping time. Under high vacuum conditions and moderate electric fields ( |E |>4 ×106 V /cm ), the hysteresis for on-surface devices cannot be eliminated, as opposed to suspended devices. Interestingly, type IV devices exhibit no hysteresis at all at ambient conditions, and from the different roles which the global and local gates play for the four types of devices, we could learn about the hysteresis mechanism of this system. We believe that these self aligned hysteresis free FETs will enable the realization of different electronic devices and sensors based on CNTs.

  12. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks.

  13. Towards parallel fabrication of single electron transistors using carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhammad R; Joung, Daeha; Khondaker, Saiful I

    2015-06-01

    Single electron transistors (SETs) are considered to be promising building blocks for post CMOS era electronic devices, however, a major bottleneck for practical realization of SET based devices is a lack of a parallel fabrication approach. Here, we have demonstrated a technique for the scalable fabrication of SETs using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The approach is based on the integration of solution processed individual SWNTs via dielectrophoresis (DEP) at the selected position of the circuit with a 100 nm channel length, where the metal-SWNT Schottky contact works as a tunnel barrier. Measurements carried out at a low temperature (4.2 K) show that the majority of the devices with a contact resistance (RT) > 100 kΩ display SET behavior. For the devices with 100 kΩ < RT < 1 MΩ, periodic, well-defined Coulomb diamonds with a charging energy of ∼14 meV, corresponding to the transport through a single quantum dot (QD) was observed. For devices with high RT (>1 MΩ) multiple QD behavior was observed. From the transport study of 50 SWNT devices, a total of 38 devices show SET behavior giving a yield of 76%. The results presented here are a significant step forward for the practical realization of SET based devices. PMID:25962565

  14. Imperceptible and Ultraflexible p-Type Transistors and Macroelectronics Based on Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-01-26

    Flexible thin-film transistors based on semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes are promising for flexible digital circuits, artificial skins, radio frequency devices, active-matrix-based displays, and sensors due to the outstanding electrical properties and intrinsic mechanical strength of carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, previous research effort only led to nanotube thin-film transistors with the smallest bending radius down to 1 mm. In this paper, we have realized the full potential of carbon nanotubes by making ultraflexible and imperceptible p-type transistors and circuits with a bending radius down to 40 μm. In addition, the resulted transistors show mobility up to 12.04 cm(2) V(-1) S(-1), high on-off ratio (∼10(6)), ultralight weight (<3 g/m(2)), and good mechanical robustness (accommodating severe crumpling and 67% compressive strain). Furthermore, the nanotube circuits can operate properly with 33% compressive strain. On the basis of the aforementioned features, our ultraflexible p-type nanotube transistors and circuits have great potential to work as indispensable components for ultraflexible complementary electronics.

  15. Fabrication of n-type carbon nanotube field-effect transistors by Al doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hwangyou; Kim, Ju-Jin; Song, Woon; Moon, Sunkyung; Kim, Nam; Kim, Jinhee; Park, Noejung

    2006-03-01

    We report the effect of an Al layer, covering the central part of the nanotube channel, on the electrical transport properties of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs). The CNFETs, consisting of single-walled carbon nanotube or double-walled carbon nanotube between two Pd electrodes on top of SiO2 layer, which showed p-type or ambipolar transport behaviors, exhibit clear n-type characteristics after the Al deposition. We ascribe such conversions into n-type behaviors to the electron doping in the Al-covered nanotube region, which results in the bending of the nanotube bands nearby the edges of the Al layer. This technique, Al deposition under a high vacuum, may give rise to a practical fabrication method for the n-type CNFET, which may enable us to develop complementary logic nanotube electronic devices.

  16. High-performance carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible paper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Yun, Ki Nam; Yu, Hyun-Yong; Shim, Joon Hyung; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising materials as active channels for flexible transistors owing to their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. However, flexible SWCNT transistors have never been realized on paper substrates, which are widely used, inexpensive, and recyclable. In this study, we fabricated SWCNT thin-film transistors on photo paper substrates. The devices exhibited a high on/off current ratio of more than 106 and a field-effect mobility of approximately 3 cm2/V.s. The proof-of-concept demonstration indicates that SWCNT transistors on flexible paper substrates could be applied as low-cost and recyclable flexible electronics.

  17. High-performance carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible paper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Na; Yun, Ki Nam; Yu, Hyun-Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-03-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising materials as active channels for flexible transistors owing to their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. However, flexible SWCNT transistors have never been realized on paper substrates, which are widely used, inexpensive, and recyclable. In this study, we fabricated SWCNT thin-film transistors on photo paper substrates. The devices exhibited a high on/off current ratio of more than 10{sup 6} and a field-effect mobility of approximately 3 cm{sup 2}/V·s. The proof-of-concept demonstration indicates that SWCNT transistors on flexible paper substrates could be applied as low-cost and recyclable flexible electronics.

  18. Carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors on flexible/stretchable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Javey, Ali

    2016-03-29

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus for flexible thin-film transistors. In one aspect, a device includes a polymer substrate, a gate electrode disposed on the polymer substrate, a dielectric layer disposed on the gate electrode and on exposed portions of the polymer substrate, a carbon nanotube network disposed on the dielectric layer, and a source electrode and a drain electrode disposed on the carbon nanotube network.

  19. Hysteresis in Carbon Nanotube Transistors: Measurement and Analysis of Trap Density, Energy Level, and Spatial Distribution.

    PubMed

    Park, Rebecca Sejung; Shulaker, Max Marcel; Hills, Gage; Suriyasena Liyanage, Luckshitha; Lee, Seunghyun; Tang, Alvin; Mitra, Subhasish; Wong, H-S Philip

    2016-04-26

    We present a measurement technique, which we call the Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement, for characterizing hysteresis in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, and demonstrate its applicability for a broad range of 1D and 2D nanomaterials beyond carbon nanotubes. The Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement enables the quantification (density, energy level, and spatial distribution) of charged traps responsible for hysteresis. A physics-based model of the charge trapping process for a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor is presented and experimentally validated using the Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement. Leveraging this model, we discover a source of traps (surface traps) unique to devices with low-dimensional channels such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires (beyond interface traps which exist in today's silicon field-effect transistors). The different charge trapping mechanisms for interface traps and surface traps are studied based on their temperature dependencies. Through these advances, we are able to quantify the interface trap density for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (∼3 × 10(13) cm(-2) eV(-1) near midgap), and compare this against a range of previously studied dielectric/semiconductor interfaces.

  20. Advances in NO2 sensing with individual single-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    PubMed Central

    Muoth, Matthias; Roman, Cosmin; Haluska, Miroslav; Hierold, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    Summary The charge carrier transport in carbon nanotubes is highly sensitive to certain molecules attached to their surface. This property has generated interest for their application in sensing gases, chemicals and biomolecules. With over a decade of research, a clearer picture of the interactions between the carbon nanotube and its surroundings has been achieved. In this review, we intend to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, focusing not only on the effect of adsorbates but also the effect of dielectric charge traps on the electrical transport in single-walled carbon nanotube transistors that are to be used in sensing applications. Recently, contact-passivated, open-channel individual single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors have been shown to be operational at room temperature with ultra-low power consumption. Sensor recovery within minutes through UV illumination or self-heating has been shown. Improvements in fabrication processes aimed at reducing the impact of charge traps have reduced the hysteresis, drift and low-frequency noise in carbon nanotube transistors. While open challenges such as large-scale fabrication, selectivity tuning and noise reduction still remain, these results demonstrate considerable progress in transforming the promise of carbon nanotube properties into functional ultra-low power, highly sensitive gas sensors. PMID:25551046

  1. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yun, H.; McAllister, K.; Lee, S. W.; Na, J.; Kim, G. T.; Lee, B. J.; Kim, J. J.; Jeong, G. H.; Lee, I.; Kim, K. S.

    2015-07-20

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode patterns on top of the aligned SWNT along one direction. Both single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials; typical p-type transistor and Schottky diode behavior were observed, respectively. Based on our fabrication method and device performances, several issues are suggested and discussed to improve the device reliability and finally to realize all carbon based future electronic systems.

  2. Electric Characteristics of the Carbon Nanotube Network Transistor with Directly Grown ZnO Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Bae, Gi Yoon; Suh, Dong Ik; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We report on the electrical characteristics of field effect transistors fabricated with random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes with surfaces modified by ZnO nanoparticles. ZnO nanoparticles are directly grown on single-walled carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition using diethylzinc (DEZ) and water. Electrical observations show that ZnO nanoparticles act as charge transfer sources that provide electrons to the nanotube channel. The valley position in ambipolar transport of nanotube transistors is negatively shifted for 3V due to the electronic n-typed property of ZnO nanoparticles. However, the Raman resonance remains invariant despite the charge transfer effect produced by ZnO nanoparticles.

  3. Electric Characteristics of the Carbon Nanotube Network Transistor with Directly Grown ZnO Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Bae, Gi Yoon; Suh, Dong Ik; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We report on the electrical characteristics of field effect transistors fabricated with random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes with surfaces modified by ZnO nanoparticles. ZnO nanoparticles are directly grown on single-walled carbon nanotubes by atomic layer deposition using diethylzinc (DEZ) and water. Electrical observations show that ZnO nanoparticles act as charge transfer sources that provide electrons to the nanotube channel. The valley position in ambipolar transport of nanotube transistors is negatively shifted for 3V due to the electronic n-typed property of ZnO nanoparticles. However, the Raman resonance remains invariant despite the charge transfer effect produced by ZnO nanoparticles. PMID:27455727

  4. Short Channel Field-Effect-Transistors with Inkjet-Printed Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seonpil; Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael L; Hersam, Mark C; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-11-01

    Short channel field-effect-transistors with inkjet-printed semiconducting carbon nanotubes are fabricated using a novel strategy to minimize material consumption, confining the inkjet droplet into the active channel area. This fabrication approach is compatible with roll-to-roll processing and enables the formation of high-performance short channel device arrays based on inkjet printing. PMID:26312458

  5. Thin film nanotube transistors based on self-assembled, aligned, semiconducting carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael; Small, Joshua P; Steiner, Mathias; Freitag, Marcus; Green, Alexander A; Hersam, Mark C; Avouris, Phaedon

    2008-12-23

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) are now poised to revolutionize the display, sensor, and flexible electronics markets. However, there is a limited choice of channel materials compatible with low-temperature processing. This has inhibited the fabrication of high electrical performance TFTs. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have very high mobilities and can be solution-processed, making thin film CNT-based TFTs a natural direction for exploration. The two main challenges facing CNT-TFTs are the difficulty of placing and aligning CNTs over large areas and low on/off current ratios due to admixture of metallic nanotubes. Here, we report the self-assembly and self-alignment of CNTs from solution into micron-wide strips that form regular arrays of dense and highly aligned CNT films covering the entire chip, which is ideally suitable for device fabrication. The films are formed from pre-separated, 99% purely semiconducting CNTs and, as a result, the CNT-TFTs exhibit simultaneously high drive currents and large on/off current ratios. Moreover, they deliver strong photocurrents and are also both photo- and electroluminescent.

  6. Controlled n-Type Doping of Carbon Nanotube Transistors by an Organorhodium Dimer.

    PubMed

    Geier, Michael L; Moudgil, Karttikay; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-07-13

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transistors are among the most developed nanoelectronic devices for high-performance computing applications. While p-type SWCNT transistors are easily achieved through adventitious adsorption of atmospheric oxygen, n-type SWCNT transistors require extrinsic doping schemes. Existing n-type doping strategies for SWCNT transistors suffer from one or more issues including environmental instability, limited carrier concentration modulation, undesirable threshold voltage control, and/or poor morphology. In particular, commonly employed benzyl viologen n-type doping layers possess large thicknesses, which preclude top-gate transistor designs that underlie high-density integrated circuit layouts. To overcome these limitations, we report here the controlled n-type doping of SWCNT thin-film transistors with a solution-processed pentamethylrhodocene dimer. The charge transport properties of organorhodium-treated SWCNT thin films show consistent n-type behavior when characterized in both Hall effect and thin-film transistor geometries. Due to the molecular-scale thickness of the organorhodium adlayer, large-area arrays of top-gated, n-type SWCNT transistors are fabricated with high yield. This work will thus facilitate ongoing efforts to realize high-density SWCNT integrated circuits. PMID:27253896

  7. Liquid-crystalline processing of highly oriented carbon nanotube arrays for thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyunhyub; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a simple solution-based method for the fabrication of highly oriented carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays to be used for thin-film transistors. We exploit the liquid-crystalline behavior of a CNT solution near the receding contact line during tilted-drop casting and produced long-range nematic-like ordering of carbon nanotube stripes caused by confined micropatterned geometry. We further demonstrate that the performance of thin-film transistors based on these densely packed and uniformly oriented CNT arrays is largely improved compared to random CNTs. This approach has great potential in low-cost, large-scale processing of high-performance electronic devices based on high-density oriented CNT films with record electrical characteristics such as high conductance, low resistivity, and high career mobility.

  8. Thermionic field emission transport in carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Perello, David J; Lim, Seong Chu; Chae, Seung Jin; Lee, Innam; Kim, Moon J; Lee, Young Hee; Yun, Minhee

    2011-03-22

    With experimental and analytical analysis, we demonstrate a relationship between the metal contact work function and the electrical transport properties saturation current (Isat) and differential conductance (σsd=∂Isd/∂Vsd) in ambient exposed carbon nanotubes (CNT). A single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown 6 mm long semiconducting single-walled CNT is electrically contacted with a statistically significant number of Hf, Cr, Ti, Pd, and Au electrodes, respectively. The observed exponentially increasing relationship of Isat and σsd with metal contact work function is explained by a theoretical model derived from thermionic field emission. Statistical analysis and spread of the data suggest that the conduction variability in same CNT devices results from differences in local surface potential of the metal contact. Based on the theoretical model and methodology, an improved CNT-based gas sensing device layout is suggested. A method to experimentally determine gas-induced work function changes in metals is also examined.

  9. Monitoring Single-Molecule Protein Dynamics with a Carbon Nanotube Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Philip G.

    2014-03-01

    Nanoscale electronic devices like field-effect transistors have long promised to provide sensitive, label-free detection of biomolecules. Single-walled carbon nanotubes press this concept further by not just detecting molecules but also monitoring their dynamics in real time. Recent measurements have demonstrated this premise by monitoring the single-molecule processivity of three different enzymes: lysozyme, protein Kinase A, and the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I. With all three enzymes, single molecules tethered to nanotube transistors were electronically monitored for 10 or more minutes, allowing us to directly observe a range of activity including rare transitions to chemically inactive and hyperactive conformations. The high bandwidth of the nanotube transistors further allow every individual chemical event to be clearly resolved, providing excellent statistics from tens of thousands of turnovers by a single enzyme. Initial success with three different enzymes indicates the generality and attractiveness of the nanotube devices as a new tool to complement other single-molecule techniques. Research on transduction mechanisms provides the design rules necessary to further generalize this architecture and apply it to other proteins. The purposeful incorporation of just one amino acid is sufficient to fabricate effective, single molecule sensors from a wide range of enzymes or proteins.

  10. High performance of potassium n-doped carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radosavljević, M.; Appenzeller, J.; Avouris, Ph.; Knoch, J.

    2004-05-01

    We describe a robust technique for the fabrication of high performance vertically scaled n-doped field-effect transistors from large band gap carbon nanotubes. These devices have a tunable threshold voltage in the technologically relevant range (-1.3 V⩽Vth⩽0.5 V) and can carry up to 5-6 μA of current in the on-state. We achieve such performance by exposure to potassium (K) vapor and device annealing in high vacuum. The treatment has a twofold effect to: (i) controllably shift Vth toward negative gate biases via bulk doping of the nanotube (up to about 0.6e-/nm), and (ii) increase the on-current by 1-2 orders of magnitude. This current enhancement is achieved by lowering external device resistance due to more intimate contact between K metal and doped nanotube channel in addition to potential reduction of the Schottky barrier height at the contact.

  11. High Performance n-Type Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors with Chemically Doped Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javey, Ali; Tu, Ryan; Farmer, Damon B.; Guo, Jing; Gordon, Roy G.; Dai, Hongjie

    2005-02-01

    Short channel (~80 nm) n-type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) with potassium (K) doped source and drain regions and high-k gate dielectrics (ALD HfO2) are obtained. For nanotubes with diameter ~ 1.6 nm and bandgap ~ 0.55 eV, we obtain n-MOSFET-like devices exhibiting high on-currents due to chemically suppressed Schottky barriers at the contacts, subthreshold swing of 70mV/decade, negligible ambipolar conduction and high on/off ratios up to 10^6 at a bias voltage of 0.5V. The results compare favorably with the state-of-the-art silicon n-MOSFETs and demonstrate the potential of SWNTs for future complementary electronics. The effects of doping level on the electrical characteristics of the nanotube devices are discussed.

  12. Investigating the effect of some parameters of the channel on the characteristics of tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valed Karimi, Najmeh; Pourasad, Yaghoub

    2016-08-01

    This paper studies p-i-n tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor to investigate the effect of various parameters of the channel on the characteristics of tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. Tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (T-CNTFET) has been simulated using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF), and the transmission was conducted through inelastic scattering. Besides the evaluation of device performance, various parameters of the channel were also compared. One of the parameters is considered as the variable, while other parameters of the channel are constant. Then, improved characteristics were discussed by selection of some channel parameters. T-CNTFET with CNT (10, 0) with oxide thickness = 1 nm shows reduced sub-threshold swing (18 mV/decade).

  13. Organic nanodielectrics for low voltage carbon nanotube thin film transistors and complementary logic gates.

    PubMed

    Hur, Seung-Hyun; Yoon, Myung-Han; Gaur, Anshu; Shim, Moonsub; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Rogers, John A

    2005-10-12

    We report the implementation of three dimensionally cross-linked, organic nanodielectric multilayers as ultrathin gate dielectrics for a type of thin film transistor device that uses networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes as effective semiconductor thin films. Unipolar n- and p-channel devices are demonstrated by use of polymer coatings to control the behavior of the networks. Monolithically integrating these devices yields complementary logic gates. The organic multilayers provide exceptionally good gate dielectrics for these systems and allow for low voltage, low hysteresis operation. The excellent performance characteristics suggest that organic dielectrics of this general type could provide a promising path to SWNT-based thin film electronics.

  14. Fabrication process of carbon nanotube field effect transistors using atomic layer deposition passivation for biosensors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Okochi, Mina; Honda, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    Fabrication process of the carbon nanotube (CNT) field effect transistors (FETs) for biosensors was studied. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 was applied to the deposition of the passivation/gate insulator film. The CNT-FETs did not show the drain current degradation after ALD passivation even though the passivation by Si3N4 deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) resulted in a significant drain current decrease. This indicates the advantage of the present ALD technique in terms of the damage suppression. The biosensing operation was confirmed using thus fabricated CNT-FETs. PMID:20355371

  15. Ultrasensitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Using Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kerman, Kagan; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-12-01

    We have sensitively detected DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) in real time. Amino modified peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotides at 5' end were covalently immobilized onto the Au surface of the back gate. For 11-mer PNA oligonucletide probe, full-complementary DNA with concentration as low as 6.8 fM solution could be effectively detected. Our CNTFET-based biochip is a promising candidate for the development of an integrated, high-throughput, multiplexed DNA biosensor for medical, forensic and environmental diagnostics.

  16. Enrichment of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by carbothermic reaction for use in all-nanotube field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shisheng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-11-27

    Selective removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and consequent enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs were achieved through an efficient carbothermic reaction with a NiO thin film at a relatively low temperature of 350 °C. All-SWCNT field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated with the aid of a patterned NiO mask, in which the as-grown SWCNTs behaving as source/drain electrodes and the remaining semiconducting SWCNTs that survive in the carbothermic reaction as a channel material. The all-SWCNT FETs demonstrate improved current ON/OFF ratios of ∼10(3).

  17. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide films for carbon nanotube network transistor passivation.

    PubMed

    Grigoras, Kestutis; Zavodchikova, Marina Y; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ermolov, Vladimir; Franssila, Sami

    2011-10-01

    Ultra-thin (2-5 nm thick) aluminum oxide layers were grown on non-functionalized individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and their bundles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique in order to investigate the mechanism of the coating process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the uniformity and conformality of the coatings grown at different temperatures (80 degrees C or 220 degrees C) and with different precursors for oxidation (water and ozone). We found that bundles of SWCNTs were coated continuously, but at the same time, bare individual nanotubes remained uncoated. The successful coating of bundles was explained by the formation of interstitial pores between the individual SWCNTs constituting the bundle, where the precursor molecules can adhere, initiating the layer growth. Thicker alumina layers (20-35 nm thick) were used for the coating of bottom-gated SWCNT-network based field effect transistors (FETs). ALD layers, grown at different conditions, were found to influence the performance of the SWCNT-network FETs: low temperature ALD layers caused the ambipolarity of the channel and pronounced n-type conduction, whereas high temperature ALD processes resulted in hysteresis suppression in the transfer characteristics of the SWCNT transistors and preserved p-type conduction. Fixed charges in the ALD layer have been considered as the main factor influencing the conduction change of the SWCNT network based transistors.

  18. Recent Progress in Obtaining Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Transistor Applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ahmad E; Rogers, John A; Alam, Muhammad A

    2015-12-22

    High purity semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) with a narrow diameter distribution are required for high-performance transistors. Achieving this goal is extremely challenging because the as-grown material contains mixtures of s-SWCNTs and metallic- (m-) SWCNTs with wide diameter distributions, typically inadequate for integrated circuits. Since 2000, numerous ex situ methods have been proposed to improve the purity of the s-SWCNTs. The majority of these techniques fail to maintain the quality and integrity of the s-SWCNTs with a few notable exceptions. Here, the progress in realizing high purity s-SWCNTs in as-grown and post-processed materials is highlighted. A comparison of transistor parameters (such as on/off ratio and field-effect mobility) obtained from test structures establishes the effectiveness of various methods and suggests opportunities for future improvements.

  19. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Aïssa, B.; Nedil, M.; Kroeger, J.; Haddad, T.; Rosei, F.

    2015-09-28

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 10{sup 4} and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 10{sup 4} s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices.

  20. Recent Progress in Obtaining Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Transistor Applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ahmad E; Rogers, John A; Alam, Muhammad A

    2015-12-22

    High purity semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) with a narrow diameter distribution are required for high-performance transistors. Achieving this goal is extremely challenging because the as-grown material contains mixtures of s-SWCNTs and metallic- (m-) SWCNTs with wide diameter distributions, typically inadequate for integrated circuits. Since 2000, numerous ex situ methods have been proposed to improve the purity of the s-SWCNTs. The majority of these techniques fail to maintain the quality and integrity of the s-SWCNTs with a few notable exceptions. Here, the progress in realizing high purity s-SWCNTs in as-grown and post-processed materials is highlighted. A comparison of transistor parameters (such as on/off ratio and field-effect mobility) obtained from test structures establishes the effectiveness of various methods and suggests opportunities for future improvements. PMID:26540144

  1. Highly stretchable carbon nanotube transistors enabled by buckled ion gel gate dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng-Yin; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Ma, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Juan; Xu, Feng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Arnold, Michael S.

    2015-08-03

    Deformable field-effect transistors (FETs) are expected to facilitate new technologies like stretchable displays, conformal devices, and electronic skins. We previously demonstrated stretchable FETs based on buckled thin films of polyfluorene-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes as the channel, buckled metal films as electrodes, and unbuckled flexible ion gel films as the dielectric. The FETs were stretchable up to 50% without appreciable degradation in performance before failure of the ion gel film. Here, we show that by buckling the ion gel, the integrity and performance of the nanotube FETs are extended to nearly 90% elongation, limited by the stretchability of the elastomer substrate. The FETs maintain an on/off ratio of >10{sup 4} and a field-effect mobility of 5 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} under elongation and demonstrate invariant performance over 1000 stretching cycles.

  2. Transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube transistors after gamma radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Vitusevich, S. A.; Sydoruk, V. A.; Klein, N.; Offenhaeusser, A.; Petrychuk, M. V.; Danilchenko, B. A.; Ural, A.; Bosman, G.

    2010-03-15

    Single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) were characterized before and after gamma radiation treatment using noise spectroscopy. The results obtained demonstrate that in long channel CNT-FETs with a length of 10 {mu}m the contribution of contact regions can be neglected. Moreover, radiation treatment with doses of 1x10{sup 6} and 2x10{sup 6} rad allows a considerable decrease parallel to the nanotube parasitic conductivity and even the shift region with maximal conductivity to the voltage range of nearly zero gate voltage that improves the working point of the FETs. The Hooge parameters obtained before and after gamma radiation treatment with a dose of 1x10{sup 6} rad are found to be about 5x10{sup -3}. The parameters are comparable with typical values for conventional semiconductors.

  3. Metal contact effect on the performance and scaling behavior of carbon nanotube thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Liang, Xuelei; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-21

    Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact resistivity was found to increase with channel length, which is a consequence of the percolating nature of the transport in CNT films, and this behavior does not exist in CNT-FETs and normal 2D Ohmic conductors. Electrical transport in CNT-TFTs has been predicted to scale with channel length by stick percolation theory. However, the scaling behavior is also impacted, or even covered up by the effect of Rc. Once the contact effect is excluded, the covered scaling behavior can be revealed correctly. A possible way of reducing Rc in CNT-TFTs was proposed. We believe the findings in this paper will strengthen our understanding of CNT-TFTs, and even accelerate the commercialization of CNT-TFT technology.

  4. Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices.

    PubMed

    King, Benjamin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a simple vacuum filtration process. Vacuum filtration of nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solution formed nematic domains on the filter membrane surface and exhibited local ordering. A 2D fast Fourier transform was used to calculate the order parameters from scanning electron microscopy images. The order parameter was observed to be sensitive to the filtration time demonstrating different regions of transformation namely nucleation of nematic domains, nanotube accumulation and large domain growth.Transmittance versus sheet resistance measurements of such films resulted in optical to dc conductivity of σ(opt)/σ(dc) = 9.01 indicative of purely semiconducting nanotube liquid crystal network.Thin films of nanotube liquid crystals with order parameters ranging from S = 0.1-0.5 were patterned into conducting channels of transistor devices which showed high I(on)/I(off) ratios from 10-19,800 and electron mobility values μ(e) = 0.3-78.8 cm(2) (V-s)(-1), hole mobility values μ(h) = 0.4-287 cm(2) (V-s)(-1). High I on/I off ratios were observed at low order parameters and film mass. A Schottky barrier transistor model is consistent with the observed transistor characteristics. Electron and hole mobilities were seen to increase with order parameters and carbon nanotube mass fractions. A fundamental tradeoff between decreasing on/off ratio and increasing mobility with increasing nanotube film mass and order parameter is therefore concluded. Increase in order parameters of nanotubes liquid crystals improved the electronic transport properties as witnessed by the increase in σ(dc)/σ(opt) values on macroscopic films and high mobilities in microscopic transistors. Liquid crystal networks of semiconducting nanotubes as demonstrated here are simple to fabricate, transparent, scalable and could find wide ranging device applications.

  5. Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a simple vacuum filtration process. Vacuum filtration of nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solution formed nematic domains on the filter membrane surface and exhibited local ordering. A 2D fast Fourier transform was used to calculate the order parameters from scanning electron microscopy images. The order parameter was observed to be sensitive to the filtration time demonstrating different regions of transformation namely nucleation of nematic domains, nanotube accumulation and large domain growth.Transmittance versus sheet resistance measurements of such films resulted in optical to dc conductivity of σ opt/σ dc = 9.01 indicative of purely semiconducting nanotube liquid crystal network.Thin films of nanotube liquid crystals with order parameters ranging from S = 0.1-0.5 were patterned into conducting channels of transistor devices which showed high I on/I off ratios from 10-19 800 and electron mobility values μ e = 0.3-78.8 cm2 (V-s)-1, hole mobility values μ h = 0.4-287 cm2 (V-s)-1. High I on/I off ratios were observed at low order parameters and film mass. A Schottky barrier transistor model is consistent with the observed transistor characteristics. Electron and hole mobilities were seen to increase with order parameters and carbon nanotube mass fractions. A fundamental tradeoff between decreasing on/off ratio and increasing mobility with increasing nanotube film mass and order parameter is therefore concluded. Increase in order parameters of nanotubes liquid crystals improved the electronic transport properties as witnessed by the increase in σ dc/σ opt values on macroscopic films and high mobilities in microscopic transistors. Liquid crystal networks of semiconducting nanotubes as demonstrated here are simple to fabricate, transparent, scalable and could find wide ranging device applications.

  6. Defect Screening Effects of Fluoropolymer Capping in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seonpil; Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael; Hersam, Mark; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-03-01

    One of the most promising uses of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is as active channel semiconductor materials in field-effect transistors (FETs). Recent advances in the availability of highly sorted semiconducting SWCNT source material and in printing such nanotubes to realize high-performance thin-film transistors make them very promising candidates for printed electronics. In this presentation, we report on the substantial improvements in the characteristics of SWCNT FET devices and circuits comprised of these devices by the use of coatings of the fluoropolymer containing copolymer, PVDF-TrFE. The origins of these improvements may be attributed to the polar nature of C-F bonds and the local organization of the fluoropolymer at the interfaces with the SWCNTs so as to partially neutralize charged defects. This hypothesis was tested by the experiments using a number of vapor phase polar molecules which produce similar effects on the FET characteristics. The polar vapor experiments show that dipoles can partially neutralize residual charges arising from defects/impurities. The dipole present in polar molecules adopts an orientation that tends to cancel the effects of the charged defect/impurity from the perspective of mobile charges in the SWCNTs.

  7. Polymer-sorted semiconducting carbon nanotube networks for high-performance ambipolar field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Schiessl, Stefan P; Fröhlich, Nils; Held, Martin; Gannott, Florentina; Schweiger, Manuel; Forster, Michael; Scherf, Ullrich; Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-01-14

    Efficient selection of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from as-grown nanotube samples is crucial for their application as printable and flexible semiconductors in field-effect transistors (FETs). In this study, we use atactic poly(9-dodecyl-9-methyl-fluorene) (a-PF-1-12), a polyfluorene derivative with asymmetric side-chains, for the selective dispersion of semiconducting SWNTs with large diameters (>1 nm) from plasma torch-grown SWNTs. Lowering the molecular weight of the dispersing polymer leads to a significant improvement of selectivity. Combining dense semiconducting SWNT networks deposited from an enriched SWNT dispersion with a polymer/metal-oxide hybrid dielectric enables transistors with balanced ambipolar, contact resistance-corrected mobilities of up to 50 cm(2)·V(-1)·s(-1), low ohmic contact resistance, steep subthreshold swings (0.12-0.14 V/dec) and high on/off ratios (10(6)) even for short channel lengths (<10 μm). These FETs operate at low voltages (<3 V) and show almost no current hysteresis. The resulting ambipolar complementary-like inverters exhibit gains up to 61. PMID:25493421

  8. Polymer-Sorted Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Networks for High-Performance Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Efficient selection of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from as-grown nanotube samples is crucial for their application as printable and flexible semiconductors in field-effect transistors (FETs). In this study, we use atactic poly(9-dodecyl-9-methyl-fluorene) (a-PF-1-12), a polyfluorene derivative with asymmetric side-chains, for the selective dispersion of semiconducting SWNTs with large diameters (>1 nm) from plasma torch-grown SWNTs. Lowering the molecular weight of the dispersing polymer leads to a significant improvement of selectivity. Combining dense semiconducting SWNT networks deposited from an enriched SWNT dispersion with a polymer/metal-oxide hybrid dielectric enables transistors with balanced ambipolar, contact resistance-corrected mobilities of up to 50 cm2·V–1·s–1, low ohmic contact resistance, steep subthreshold swings (0.12–0.14 V/dec) and high on/off ratios (106) even for short channel lengths (<10 μm). These FETs operate at low voltages (<3 V) and show almost no current hysteresis. The resulting ambipolar complementary-like inverters exhibit gains up to 61. PMID:25493421

  9. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency. PMID:22901374

  10. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET.

    PubMed

    Tan, Michael Loong Peng; Lentaris, Georgios; Amaratunga Aj, Gehan

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency.

  11. Thin film transistors using preferentially grown semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Eun Hong; Kim, Jong Min; Min, Yo-Sep; Kim, Eunseong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-07-01

    Nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistors were fabricated and their reproducible transport properties were investigated. The networked single-walled carbon nanotubes were directly grown by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Optical analysis confirmed that the nanotubes were mostly semiconductors without clear metallic resonances in both the Raman and the UV-vis-IR spectroscopy. The transistors made by the nanotube networks whose density was much larger than the percolation threshold also showed no metallic paths. Estimation based on the conductance change of semiconducting nanotubes in the SWNT network due to applied gate voltage difference (conductance difference for on and off state) indicated a preferential growth of semiconducting nanotubes with an advantage of water-assisted PECVD. The nanotube transistors showed 10-5 of on/off ratio and ~8 cm2 V-1 s-1 of field effect mobility.

  12. Thin film transistors using preferentially grown semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Eun Hong; Kim, Jong Min; Min, Yo-Sep; Kim, Eunseong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-07-22

    Nearly perfect semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube random network thin film transistors were fabricated and their reproducible transport properties were investigated. The networked single-walled carbon nanotubes were directly grown by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Optical analysis confirmed that the nanotubes were mostly semiconductors without clear metallic resonances in both the Raman and the UV-vis-IR spectroscopy. The transistors made by the nanotube networks whose density was much larger than the percolation threshold also showed no metallic paths. Estimation based on the conductance change of semiconducting nanotubes in the SWNT network due to applied gate voltage difference (conductance difference for on and off state) indicated a preferential growth of semiconducting nanotubes with an advantage of water-assisted PECVD. The nanotube transistors showed 10(-5) of on/off ratio and approximately 8 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) of field effect mobility. PMID:19567966

  13. High-performance partially aligned semiconductive single-walled carbon nanotube transistors achieved with a parallel technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilei; Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2013-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are widely thought to be a strong contender for next-generation printed electronic transistor materials. However, large-scale solution-based parallel assembly of SWNTs to obtain high-performance transistor devices is challenging. SWNTs have anisotropic properties and, although partial alignment of the nanotubes has been theoretically predicted to achieve optimum transistor device performance, thus far no parallel solution-based technique can achieve this. Herein a novel solution-based technique, the immersion-cum-shake method, is reported to achieve partially aligned SWNT networks using semiconductive (99% enriched) SWNTs (s-SWNTs). By immersing an aminosilane-treated wafer into a solution of nanotubes placed on a rotary shaker, the repetitive flow of the nanotube solution over the wafer surface during the deposition process orients the nanotubes toward the fluid flow direction. By adjusting the nanotube concentration in the solution, the nanotube density of the partially aligned network can be controlled; linear densities ranging from 5 to 45 SWNTs/μm are observed. Through control of the linear SWNT density and channel length, the optimum SWNT-based field-effect transistor devices achieve outstanding performance metrics (with an on/off ratio of ~3.2 × 10(4) and mobility 46.5 cm(2) /Vs). Atomic force microscopy shows that the partial alignment is uniform over an area of 20 × 20 mm(2) and confirms that the orientation of the nanotubes is mostly along the fluid flow direction, with a narrow orientation scatter characterized by a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of <15° for all but the densest film, which is 35°. This parallel process is large-scale applicable and exploits the anisotropic properties of the SWNTs, presenting a viable path forward for industrial adoption of SWNTs in printed, flexible, and large-area electronics.

  14. A mathematical space mapping model for ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamifar, Farnousha; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a mathematical model is presented based on mathematical space mapping for ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. This model is generalized from another model that was based on the concept of neural space mapping to calculate the three parameters of a coarse model. These parameters were the threshold voltage, the Early voltage, and assumed constant k of a modified "level 1" MOSFET model in simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis (SPICE). In this work, three analytical relations are introduced to replace the neural networks of the main model. The comparisons between the proposed model and a well-known reference model, named FETToy, show that the proposed model had reasonable accuracy in terms of different biases and physical parameters.

  15. Performance analysis of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistors using NEGF formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbastegan, Saber; Shahhoseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the simulation study of a junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor (JL-CNTFET) and a comparison is made with the conventional CNTFET using the atomistic scale simulation, within the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism. In order to have a comprehensive analysis, both analog and digital parameters of the device are studied. Results have shown that JL-CNTFET with respect to C-CNTFET shows slightly higher ION/IOFF ratio about two times larger than that of C-CNTFET, smaller electric field along channel more than three order of magnitude and reduced tunneling current about 100 times. In addition, the investigation of analog properties of both devices has exhibited that junctionless structure has a transconductance about two times and an intrinsic gain of 15 dB larger than C-CNTFET in same bias condition which makes JL-CNTFET a promising candidate for low voltage analog applications.

  16. Carbon nanotube based field-effect transistors: merits and fundamental limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lian-Mao

    The development of even more powerful computer systems are made possible by scaling of CMOS transistors, and this simple process has afforded continuous improvement in both the device switch time and integration density. However, CMOS scaling has become very difficult at the 22-nm node and unlikely to be rewarding beyond the 14-nm node. Among other new approaches, carbon nanotube devices are emerging as the most promising technique with unique properties that are ideal for nanoelectronics. In particular, perfect n-type and p-type contacts are now available for controlled injection of electrons into the conduction band and holes into the valence band of the CNT, paving the way for a doping free fabrication of CNT based ballistic CMOS, high performance optoelectronic devices, and integrated circuits. These results will be compared with data projected for Si CMOS toward the end of the roadmap at 2026, as well as with those thermodynamic and quantum limits.

  17. Inkjet printed ambipolar transistors and inverters based on carbon nanotube/zinc tin oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bongjun; Jang, Seonpil; Dodabalapur, Ananth; Geier, Michael L.; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2014-02-10

    We report ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) consisting of inkjet printed semiconductor bilayer heterostructures utilizing semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO). The bilayer structure allows for electron transport to occur principally in the amorphous oxide layer and hole transport to occur exclusively in the SWCNT layer. This results in balanced electron and hole mobilities exceeding 2 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} at low operating voltages (<5 V) in air. We further show that the SWCNT-ZTO hybrid ambipolar FETs can be integrated into functional inverter circuits that display high peak gain (>10). This work provides a pathway for realizing solution processable, inkjet printable, large area electronic devices, and systems based on SWCNT-amorphous oxide heterostructures.

  18. Metal contact effect on the performance and scaling behavior of carbon nanotube thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Liang, Xuelei; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-01

    Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact resistivity was found to increase with channel length, which is a consequence of the percolating nature of the transport in CNT films, and this behavior does not exist in CNT-FETs and normal 2D Ohmic conductors. Electrical transport in CNT-TFTs has been predicted to scale with channel length by stick percolation theory. However, the scaling behavior is also impacted, or even covered up by the effect of Rc. Once the contact effect is excluded, the covered scaling behavior can be revealed correctly. A possible way of reducing Rc in CNT-TFTs was proposed. We believe the findings in this paper will strengthen our understanding of CNT-TFTs, and even accelerate the commercialization of CNT-TFT technology.Metal-tube contact is known to play an important role in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) which are fabricated on individual CNTs. Less attention has been paid to the contact effect in network type carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs). In this study, we demonstrate that contact plays an even more important role in CNT-TFTs than in CNT-FETs. Although the Schottky barrier height at the metal-tube contact can be tuned by the work function of the metal, similar to the case in CNT-FETs, the contact resistance (Rc) forms a much higher proportion of the total resistance in CNT-TFTs. Interestingly, the contact

  19. Modeling and simulation of carbon nanotube field effect transistor and its circuit application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Saini, Dinesh Kumar; Agarwal, Dinesh; Aggarwal, Sajal; Khosla, Mamta; Raj, Balwinder

    2016-07-01

    The carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) is modelled for circuit application. The model is based on the transport mechanism and it directly relates the transport mechanism with the chirality. Also, it does not consider self consistent equations and thus is used to develop the HSPICE compatible circuit model. For validation of the model, it is applied to the top gate CNTFET structure and the MATLAB simulation results are compared with the simulations of a similar structure created in NanoTCAD ViDES. For demonstrating the circuit compatibility of the model, two circuits viz. inverter and SRAM are designed and simulated in HSPICE. Finally, SRAM performance metrics are compared with those of device simulations from Nano TCAD ViDES.

  20. Detection of α-fetoprotein in human serum using carbon nanotube transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Hye-Mi; Park, Dong-Won; Lee, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Beom Soo; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2009-03-01

    We have fabricated antibody-coated carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNT-FET) sensor for the detection of α-fetoprotein (AFP), single chain glycoprotein of 70 kDa that is normally expressed in the fetal liver, in human serum. The AFP-specific antibodies were immobilized on CNT with linker molecule such as pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. To prevent nonspecific adsorption of antigen, we performed blocking procedure using bovine serum albumin (BSA). Antibody-antigen binding was determined by measuring electrical conductance change of FET and took an average of thereshold voltage change before and after binding. Also we checked concentration-dependent conductance change in human serum using both p-type SWNT-FETs and n-type SWNT-FETs.

  1. A measurement technique for circumventing hysteresis and conductance drift in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, Andrew; Ballarotto, Vincent; Cumings, John

    2014-01-31

    We present a measurement protocol that effectively eliminates both the hysteresis and the temporal drift typically observed in the channel conductance of single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT FETs) during the application of gate voltages. Before each resistance measurement, the gate is first stepped through a series of alternating positive and negative voltages to produce a neutral charge distribution within the device. This process is highly effective at removing the hysteresis in the channel conductance, and time-dependent measurements further demonstrate that the drain current is stable and single-valued, independent of the prior measurement history. The effectiveness of this method can be understood within the Preisach hysteresis model, which we demonstrate as a useful framework to predict the observed results. PMID:24394672

  2. A measurement technique for circumventing hysteresis and conductance drift in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnell, Andrew; Ballarotto, Vincent; Cumings, John

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement protocol that effectively eliminates both the hysteresis and the temporal drift typically observed in the channel conductance of single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT FETs) during the application of gate voltages. Before each resistance measurement, the gate is first stepped through a series of alternating positive and negative voltages to produce a neutral charge distribution within the device. This process is highly effective at removing the hysteresis in the channel conductance, and time-dependent measurements further demonstrate that the drain current is stable and single-valued, independent of the prior measurement history. The effectiveness of this method can be understood within the Preisach hysteresis model, which we demonstrate as a useful framework to predict the observed results.

  3. Modeling of Gate Bias Modulation in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The threshold voltages of a carbon-nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) are studied. The CNT channel is so thin that there is no voltage drop perpendicular to the gate electrode plane, and this makes the device characteristics quite unique. The relation between the voltage and the electrochemical potentials, and the mass action law for electrons and holes are examined in the context of CNTs, and inversion and accumulation threshold voltages (V(sub Ti), and V(sub Ta)) are derived. V(sub Ti) of the CNTFETs has a much stronger doping dependence than that of the metal-oxide- semiconductor FETs, while V(sub Ta) of both devices depends weakly on doping with the same functional form.

  4. Performance analysis of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistors using NEGF formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbastegan, Saber; Shahhoseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the simulation study of a junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor (JL-CNTFET) and a comparison is made with the conventional CNTFET using the atomistic scale simulation, within the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism. In order to have a comprehensive analysis, both analog and digital parameters of the device are studied. Results have shown that JL-CNTFET with respect to C-CNTFET shows slightly higher ION/IOFF ratio about two times larger than that of C-CNTFET, smaller electric field along channel more than three order of magnitude and reduced tunneling current about 100 times. In addition, the investigation of analog properties of both devices has exhibited that junctionless structure has a transconductance about two times and an intrinsic gain of 15 dB larger than C-CNTFET in same bias condition which makes JL-CNTFET a promising candidate for low voltage analog applications.

  5. All-printed and transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajed, Farzam; Rutherglen, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    We present fully transparent single-walled all-carbon nanotube thin film transistors (SWCNT TFT) fabricated using low-cost inkjet printing methods. Such a demonstration provides a platform towards low cost fully printed transparent electronics. The SWCNT TFTs were printed with metallic and semiconducting SWCNT using a room temperature printing process, without the requirement of expensive cleanroom facilities. The unoptimized SWCNT TFTs fabricated exhibited an Ion/off ratio of 92 and mobility of 2.27 cm2V-1s-1 and transmissivity of 82%. The combination of both high electrical performance and high transparency make all-SWCNT TFTs desirable for next generation transparent display backplanes and products such as Google Glass.

  6. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Star, Alexander; Tu, Eugene; Niemann, Joseph; Gabriel, Jean-Christophe P.; Joiner, C. Steve; Valcke, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We report carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NTNFETs) that function as selective detectors of DNA immobilization and hybridization. NTNFETs with immobilized synthetic oligonucleotides have been shown to specifically recognize target DNA sequences, including H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination in the HFE gene, responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis. The electronic responses of NTNFETs upon single-stranded DNA immobilization and subsequent DNA hybridization events were confirmed by using fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides and then were further explored for label-free DNA detection at picomolar to micromolar concentrations. We have also observed a strong effect of DNA counterions on the electronic response, thus suggesting a charge-based mechanism of DNA detection using NTNFET devices. Implementation of label-free electronic detection assays using NTNFETs constitutes an important step toward low-cost, low-complexity, highly sensitive and accurate molecular diagnostics. hemochromatosis | SNP | biosensor

  7. Sensing Reversible Protein–Ligand Interactions with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on the reversible detection of CaptAvidin, a tyrosine modified avidin, with single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) noncovalently functionalized with biotin moieties using 1-pyrenebutyric acid as a linker. Binding affinities at different pH values were quantified, and the sensor’s response at various ionic strengths was analyzed. Furthermore, protein “fingerprints” of NeutrAvidin and streptavidin were obtained by monitoring their adsorption at several pH values. Moreover, gold nanoparticle decorated SWNT FETs were functionalized with biotin using 1-pyrenebutyric acid as a linker for the CNT surface and (±)-α-lipoic acid linkers for the gold surface, and reversible CaptAvidin binding is shown, paving the way for potential dual mode measurements with the addition of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). PMID:25126155

  8. Single-molecule measurements of proteins using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) provide a promising platform for investigating proteins at the single-molecule level. Recently, we have demonstrated that SWCNT FETs have sufficient sensitivity and bandwidth to monitor the conformational motions and processivity of an individual T4 lysozyme molecule. This is accomplished by functionalizing a SWCNT FET device with a single protein and measuring the conductance versus time through the device as it is submerged in an electrolyte solution. To generalize this approach for the study of a wide variety of proteins at the single-molecule level, this dissertation investigates the conjugation process to determine and isolate the key parameters involved in functionalizing a SWCNT with a single protein, the physical basis for transducing conformational motion of a protein into an electrical signal, and finally, the general application of the technique to monitor the binary and ternary complex formation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA).

  9. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    The display market is presently dominated by the active matrix liquid crystal display (LCD). However, the active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display is argued to become the successor to the LCD, and is already beginning its way into the market, mainly in small size displays. But, for AMOLED technology to become comparable in market share to LCD, larger size displays must become available at a competitive price with their LCD counterparts. A major issue preventing low-cost large AMOLED displays is the thin-film transistor (TFT) technology. Unlike the voltage driven LCD, the OLEDs in the AMOLED display are current driven. Because of this, the mature amorphous silicon TFT backplane technology used in the LCD must be upgraded to a material possessing a higher mobility. Polycrystalline silicon and transparent oxide TFT technologies are being considered to fill this need. But these technologies bring with them significant manufacturing complexity and cost concerns. Carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) offer a unique solution to this problem (now known as the AMOLED backplane problem). The CN-VFET allows the use of organic semiconductors to be used for the semiconductor layer. Organics are known for their low-cost large area processing compatibility. Although the mobility of the best organics is only comparable to that of amorphous silicon, the CN-VFET makes up for this by orienting the channel vertically, as opposed to horizontally (like in conventional TFTs). This allows the CN-VFET to achieve sub-micron channel lengths without expensive high resolution patterning. Additionally, because the CN-VFET can be easily converted into a light emitting transistor (called the carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic light emitting transistor---CN-VOLET) by essentially stacking an OLED on top of the CN-VFET, more potential benefits can be realized. These potential benefits include, increased aperture ratio, increased OLED

  10. The Effect of Hydrophobin Protein on Conductive Properties of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors: First Study on Sensing Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yotprayoonsakl, Peerapong; Szilvay, Géza R; Laaksonen, Päivi; Linder, Markus B; Ahlskog, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Hydrophobin is a surface active protein having both hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional domains which has previously been used for functionalization and solubilization of graphene and carbon nanotubes. In this work, field-effect transistors based on single nanotubes have been employed for electronic detection of hydrophobin protein in phosphate buffer solution. Individual nanotubes, single- and multiwalled, are characterized by atomic force microscopy after being immersed in protein solution, showing a relatively dense coverage with hydrophobin. We have studied aspects such as nanotube length (0.3-1.2 µm) and the hysteresis effect in the gate voltage dependent conduction. When measured in ambient condition after the exposure to hydrophobin, the resistance increase has a strong dependence on the nanotube length, which we ascribe to mobility degradation and localization effects. The change could be exceptionally large when measured in-situ in solution and at suitable gate voltage conditions, which is shown to relate to the different mechanism behind the hysteresis effect. PMID:26413623

  11. Random networks of carbon nanotubes optimized for transistor mass-production: searching for ultimate performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žeželj, M.; Stanković, I.

    2016-10-01

    Random networks of as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) contain both metallic (m-CNTs) and semiconducting (s-CNTs) nanotubes in an approximate ratio of 1:2, which leads to a trade-off between on-conductance and the on/off ratio. We demonstrate how this design problem can be solved with a realistic numerical approach. We determine the CNT density, length, and channel dimensions under which CNT thin-film transistors simultaneously attain on-conductance higher than 1 μS and an on/off ratio higher than 104. The fact that asymmetric systems have more pronounced finite-size scaling behavior than symmetric systems allows us additional design freedom. A realization probability of the desired characteristics higher than 99% is obtained for the channels with aspect ratio {L}{{CH}}/{W}{{CH}}\\lt 1.2 and normalized size {L}{{CH}}{W}{{CH}}/{l}{{CNT}}2\\gt 250 when the CNT length is {l}{{CNT}}=4-20 μ {{m}} and the normalized density of CNTs is close to the value where the probability of percolation through only s-CNT pathways reaches its maximum.

  12. Low Power, Red, Green and Blue Carbon Nanotube Enabled Vertical Organic Light Emitting Transistors for Active Matrix OLED Displays

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M. A.; Liu, B.; Donoghue, E. P.; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Kim, D. Y.; So, Franky; Rinzler, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are potential alternatives to polycrystalline silicon as the semiconductor used in the backplane of active matrix organic light emitting diode displays. Demonstrated here is a light-emitting transistor with an organic channel, operating with low power dissipation at low voltage, and high aperture ratio, in three colors: red, green and blue. The single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode is responsible for the high level of performance demonstrated. A major benefit enabled by this architecture is the integration of the drive transistor, storage capacitor and light emitter into a single device. Performance comparable to commercialized polycrystalline-silicon TFT driven OLEDs is demonstrated.

  13. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-28

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (±2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec(-1)), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and high on/off ratio (10(4)-10(7)). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption.

  14. Advantages of flattened electrode in bottom contact single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Setiadi, Agung; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    We fabricated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) devices on flattened electrodes, in which there are no height difference between metal electrodes and the substrate. SWNT-FET fabricated using bottom contact technique have some advantages, such that the SWNTs are free from electron irradiation, have direct contact with the desired metal electrodes, and can be functionalized before or after deposition. However, the SWNTs can be bent at the contact point with the metal electrodes leading to a different electrical characteristic of the devices. The number of SWNT direct junctions in short channel length devices is drastically increased by the use of flattened electrodes due to strong attractive interaction between SWNT and the substrate. The flattened electrodes show a better balance between their hole and electron mobility compared to that of the non-flattened electrodes, that is, ambipolar FET characteristic. It is considered that bending of the SWNTs in the non-flattened electrode devices results in a higher Schottky barrier for the electrons.

  15. Modeling of Gate Bias Modulation in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The threshold voltages of a carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) are derived and compared with those of the metal oxide-semiconductor (MOS) FETs. The CNT channel is so thin that there is no voltage drop perpendicular to the gate electrode plane, which is the CNT diameter direction, and this makes the CNTFET characteristics quite different from those in MOSFETs. The relation between the voltage and the electrochemical potentials, and the mass action law for electrons and holes are examined in the context of CNTs, and it is shown that the familiar relations are still valid because of the macroscopic number of states available in the CNTs. This is in sharp contrast to the cases of quantum dots. Using these relations, we derive an inversion threshold voltage V(sub Ti) and an accumulation threshold voltage V(sub Ta) as a function of the Fermi level E(sub F) in the channel, where E(sub F) is a measure of channel doping. V(sub Ti) of the CNTFETs has a much stronger dependence than that of MOSFETs, while V(sub Ta)s of both CNTFETs and MOSFETs depend quite weakly on E(sub F) with the same functional form. This means the transition from normally-off mode to normally-on mode is much sharper in CNTFETs as the doping increases, and this property has to be taken into account in circuit design.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor for cholesterol detection

    SciTech Connect

    Barik, Md. Abdul Dutta, Jiten Ch.

    2014-08-04

    We have reported fabrication and characterization of polyaniline (PANI)/zinc oxide (ZnO) membrane-based junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor deposited on indium tin oxide glass plate for the detection of cholesterol (0.5–22.2 mM). Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized on the PANI/ZnO membrane by physical adsorption technique. Electrical response has been recorded using digital multimeter (Agilent 3458A) in the presence of phosphate buffer saline of 50 mM, pH 7.0, and 0.9% NaCl contained in a glass pot. The results of response studies for cholesterol reveal linearity as 0.5–16.6 mM and improved sensitivity of 60 mV/decade in good agreement with Nernstian limit ∼59.2 mV/decade. The life time of this sensor has been found up to 5 months and response time of 1 s. The limit of detection with regression coefficient (r) ∼ 0.998 and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}) were found to be ∼0.25 and 1.4 mM, respectively, indicating high affinity of ChOx to cholesterol. The results obtained in this work show negligible interference with glucose and urea.

  17. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors for the fast and selective detection of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2008-08-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) which can selectively detect human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). HIgG antibodies, which are strongly adsorbed onto the walls of the SWCNTs, are the basic elements of the recognition layer. The non-specific binding of proteins and the effects of other interferences are avoided by covering the non-adsorbed areas of the SWCNTs with Tween 20. The selectivity of the sensor has been tested against bovine serum albumin (BSA), the most abundant protein in plasma. HIgG in aqueous solution with concentrations from 1.25 mg L(-1) (8 nM) can be readily detected with response times of about 10 min. The SWCNT networks that form the basis of the sensor are easily grown by chemical vapour deposition. Silver screen-printed electrodes make the sensor quick to build. The sensitivity obtained with this sensor is similar to other FET devices based on SWCNTs built using much more complicated lithography processes. Moreover, the sensor is a reagentless device that does not need labels to detect HIgG.

  18. Solution-processed zinc oxide nanoparticles/single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangmei; Sun, Jia; Qian, Chuan; Hu, Xiaotao; Wu, Han; Huang, Yulan; Yang, Junliang

    2016-09-01

    Solution-processed thin-film transistors (TFTs) are the essential building blocks for manufacturing the low-cost and large-area consumptive electronics. Herein, solution-processed TFTs based on the composites of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were fabricated by the methods of spin-coating and doctor-blading. Through controlling the weight of SWCNTs, the ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs fabricated by spin-coating demonstrated a field-effect mobility of 4.7 cm2/Vs and a low threshold voltage of 0.8 V, while the TFTs devices fabricated by doctor-blading technique showed reasonable electrical performance with a mobility of 0.22 cm2/Vs. Furthermore, the ion-gel was used as an efficient electrochemical gate dielectric because of its large electric double-layer capacitance. The operating voltage of all the TFTs devices is as low as 4.0 V. The research suggests that ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs have the potential applications in low-cost, large-area and flexible consumptive electronics, such as chemical-biological sensors and smart label.

  19. Enzyme assays using sensor arrays based on ion-selective carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Melzer, K; Bhatt, V Deep; Jaworska, E; Mittermeier, R; Maksymiuk, K; Michalska, A; Lugli, P

    2016-10-15

    In the fields of clinical diagnostics and point-of-care diagnosis as well as food and environmental monitoring there is a high demand for reliable high-throughput, rapid and highly sensitive assays for a simultaneous detection of several analytes in complex and low-volume samples. Sensor platforms based on solution-processable electrolyte-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) are a simple and cost-effective alternative for conventional assays. In this work we demonstrate a selective as well as direct detection of the products of an enzyme-substrate interaction, here the for metabolic processes important urea-urease system, with sensors based on spray-coated CNT-FETs. The selective and direct detection is achieved by immobilizing the enzyme urease via certain surface functionalization techniques on the sensor surface and further modifying the active interfaces with polymeric ion-selective membranes as well as pH-sensitive layers. Thereby, we can avoid the generally applied approach for a field-effect based detection of enzyme reactions via detecting changes in the pH value due to an on-going enzymatic reaction and directly detect selectively the products of the enzymatic conversion. Thus, we can realize a buffering-capacity independent monitoring of changes in the substrate concentration. PMID:27140308

  20. Evaluation of interface trap densities and quantum capacitance in carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Choi, B.; Choi, S.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Jeon, M.; Lee, Y.; Han, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, D. M.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S.; Choi, S.-J.

    2016-07-01

    The interface trap density in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network thin-film transistors (TFTs) is a fundamental and important parameter for assessing the electronic performance of TFTs. However, the number of studies on the extraction of interface trap densities, particularly in SWNT TFTs, has been insufficient. In this work, we propose an efficient technique for extracting the energy-dependent interface traps in SWNT TFTs. From the measured dispersive, frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, the dispersive-free, frequency-independent C-V curve was obtained, thus enabling the extraction and analysis of the interface trap density, which was found to be approximately 8.2 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 at the valence band edge. The frequency-independent C-V curve also allows further extraction of the quantum capacitance in the SWNT network without introducing any additional fitting process or parameters. We found that the extracted value of the quantum capacitance in SWNT networks is lower than the theoretical value in aligned SWNTs due to the cross point of SWNTs on the SWNT network. Therefore, the method proposed in this work indicates that the C-V measurement is a powerful tool for obtaining deep physical insights regarding the electrical performance of SWNT TFTs.

  1. Highly Uniform Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors and Medium Scale Integrated Circuits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhang, Panpan; Ding, Li; Han, Jie; Qiu, Song; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-08-10

    Top-gated p-type field-effect transistors (FETs) have been fabricated in batch based on carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin films prepared from CNT solution and present high yield and highly uniform performance with small threshold voltage distribution with standard deviation of 34 mV. According to the property of FETs, various logical and arithmetical gates, shifters, and d-latch circuits were designed and demonstrated with rail-to-rail output. In particular, a 4-bit adder consisting of 140 p-type CNT FETs was demonstrated with higher packing density and lower supply voltage than other published integrated circuits based on CNT films, which indicates that CNT based integrated circuits can reach to medium scale. In addition, a 2-bit multiplier has been realized for the first time. Benefitted from the high uniformity and suitable threshold voltage of CNT FETs, all of the fabricated circuits based on CNT FETs can be driven by a single voltage as small as 2 V.

  2. Investigation of optimal hydrogen sensing performance in semiconducting carbon nanotube network transistors with palladium electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bongsik; Lee, Dongil; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Jeon, Minsu; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-11-01

    The work function of palladium (Pd) is known to be sensitive to hydrogen (H2) via the formation of a surface dipole layer or Pd hydride. One approach to detect such a change in the work function is based on the formation of a Schottky barrier between Pd and a semiconductor. Here, we demonstrate a H2 sensor operable at room temperature by assembling solution-processed, pre-separated semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network bridged by Pd source/drain (S/D) electrodes in a configuration of field-effect transistors (FETs) with a local back-gate electrode. To begin with, we observed that the H2 response of the fabricated SWNT FETs can be enhanced in the linear operating regime, where the change in the work function of the Pd S/D electrodes by H2 can be effectively detected. We also explore the H2 responses in various SWNT FETs with different physical dimensions to optimize the sensing performance.

  3. Enzyme assays using sensor arrays based on ion-selective carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Melzer, K; Bhatt, V Deep; Jaworska, E; Mittermeier, R; Maksymiuk, K; Michalska, A; Lugli, P

    2016-10-15

    In the fields of clinical diagnostics and point-of-care diagnosis as well as food and environmental monitoring there is a high demand for reliable high-throughput, rapid and highly sensitive assays for a simultaneous detection of several analytes in complex and low-volume samples. Sensor platforms based on solution-processable electrolyte-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) are a simple and cost-effective alternative for conventional assays. In this work we demonstrate a selective as well as direct detection of the products of an enzyme-substrate interaction, here the for metabolic processes important urea-urease system, with sensors based on spray-coated CNT-FETs. The selective and direct detection is achieved by immobilizing the enzyme urease via certain surface functionalization techniques on the sensor surface and further modifying the active interfaces with polymeric ion-selective membranes as well as pH-sensitive layers. Thereby, we can avoid the generally applied approach for a field-effect based detection of enzyme reactions via detecting changes in the pH value due to an on-going enzymatic reaction and directly detect selectively the products of the enzymatic conversion. Thus, we can realize a buffering-capacity independent monitoring of changes in the substrate concentration.

  4. Compact model for ballistic MOSFET-like carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolkader, Tarek M.; Fikry, Wael

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a compact model for MOSFET-like ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) is presented. The model is based on calculating the charge and surface potential on the top of the barrier between source and drain using closed-form analytical formulae. The formula for the surface potential is obtained by merging two simplified expressions obtained in two extreme cases (very low and very high gate bias). Two fitting parameters are introduced whose values are extracted by best fitting model results with numerically calculated ones. The model has a continuous derivative and thus it is SPICE-compatible. Accuracy of the model is compared to previous analytical model presented in the literature with numerical results taken as a reference. Proposed model proves to give less relative error over a wide range of gate biases, and for a drain bias up to 0.5 V. In addition, the model enables the calculation of quantum and gate capacitance analytically reproducing the negative capacitance behaviour known in CNFETs.

  5. Highly Uniform Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors and Medium Scale Integrated Circuits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhang, Panpan; Ding, Li; Han, Jie; Qiu, Song; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-08-10

    Top-gated p-type field-effect transistors (FETs) have been fabricated in batch based on carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin films prepared from CNT solution and present high yield and highly uniform performance with small threshold voltage distribution with standard deviation of 34 mV. According to the property of FETs, various logical and arithmetical gates, shifters, and d-latch circuits were designed and demonstrated with rail-to-rail output. In particular, a 4-bit adder consisting of 140 p-type CNT FETs was demonstrated with higher packing density and lower supply voltage than other published integrated circuits based on CNT films, which indicates that CNT based integrated circuits can reach to medium scale. In addition, a 2-bit multiplier has been realized for the first time. Benefitted from the high uniformity and suitable threshold voltage of CNT FETs, all of the fabricated circuits based on CNT FETs can be driven by a single voltage as small as 2 V. PMID:27459084

  6. Wafer scale fabrication of carbon nanotube thin film transistors with high yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Boyuan; Liang, Xuelei; Yan, Qiuping; Zhang, Han; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Peng, Lianmao; Xie, Sishen

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs) are promising candidates for future high performance and low cost macro-electronics. However, most of the reported CNT-TFTs are fabricated in small quantities on a relatively small size substrate. The yield of large scale fabrication and the performance uniformity of devices on large size substrates should be improved before the CNT-TFTs reach real products. In this paper, 25 200 devices, with various geometries (channel width and channel length), were fabricated on 4-in. size ridged and flexible substrates. Almost 100% device yield were obtained on a rigid substrate with high out-put current (>8 μA/μm), high on/off current ratio (>105), and high mobility (>30 cm2/V.s). More importantly, uniform performance in 4-in. area was achieved, and the fabrication process can be scaled up. The results give us more confidence for the real application of the CNT-TFT technology in the near future.

  7. DC modeling and the source of flicker noise in passivated carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunkook; Kim, Seongmin; Janes, David B; Mohammadi, Saeed; Back, Juhee; Shim, Moonsub

    2010-09-24

    DC and intrinsic low-frequency noise properties of p-channel depletion-mode carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNT-FETs) are investigated. To characterize the intrinsic noise properties, a thin atomic layer deposited (ALD) HfO(2) gate dielectric is used as a passivation layer to isolate CNT-FETs from environmental factors. The ALD HfO(2) gate dielectric in these high-performance top-gated devices is instrumental in attaining hysteresis-free current-voltage characteristics and minimizes low-frequency noise. Under small drain-source voltage, the carriers in the CNT channel are modulated by the gate electrode and the intrinsic 1/f noise is found to be correlated with charge trapping/detrapping from the oxide substrate as expected. When thermionic emission is the dominant carrier transport mechanism in CNT-FETs under large drain-source voltages, the excess 1/f noise is attributed to the noise stemming from metal-CNT Schottky barrier contacts as revealed by the measurements.

  8. Detection of the Odor Signature of Ovarian Cancer using DNA-Decorated Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Christopher; Kybert, Nicholas; Yodh, Jeremy; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    Carbon nanotubes are low-dimensional materials that exhibit remarkable chemical and bio-sensing properties and have excellent compatibility with electronic systems. Here, we present a study that uses an electronic olfaction system based on a large array of DNA-carbon nanotube field effect transistors vapor sensors to analyze the VOCs of blood plasma samples collected from patients with malignant ovarian cancer, patients with benign ovarian lesions, and age-matched healthy subjects. Initial investigations involved coating each CNT sensor with single-stranded DNA of a particular base sequence. 10 distinct DNA oligomers were used to functionalize the carbon nanotube field effect transistors, providing a 10-dimensional sensor array output response. Upon performing a statistical analysis of the 10-dimensional sensor array responses, we showed that blood samples from patients with malignant cancer can be reliably differentiated from those of healthy control subjects with a p-value of 3 x 10-5. The results provide preliminary evidence that the blood of ovarian cancer patients contains a discernable volatile chemical signature that can be detected using DNA-CNT nanoelectronic vapor sensors, a first step towards a minimally invasive electronic diagnostic technology for ovarian cancer.

  9. Electronic transport properties of inner and outer shells in near ohmic-contacted double-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuchun; Zhou, Liyan; Zhao, Shangqian; Wang, Wenlong; Liang, Wenjie; Wang, Enge

    2014-06-14

    We investigate electronic transport properties of field-effect transistors based on double-walled carbon nanotubes, of which inner shells are metallic and outer shells are semiconducting. When both shells are turned on, electron-phonon scattering is found to be the dominant phenomenon. On the other hand, when outer semiconducting shells are turned off, a zero-bias anomaly emerges in the dependence of differential conductance on the bias voltage, which is characterized according to the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid model describing tunneling into one-dimensional materials. We attribute these behaviors to different contact conditions for outer and inner shells of the double-walled carbon nanotubes. A simple model combining Luttinger liquid model for inner metallic shells and electron-phonon scattering in outer semiconducting shells is given here to explain our transport data at different temperatures.

  10. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  11. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  12. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  13. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  14. Optical Signature of Charge Transfer in n-Type Carbon Nanotube Transistors Doped with Printable Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Matsuzaki, Satoki; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Takenobu, Taishi

    2012-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are known to be p-type semiconductors, due to unintentional hole doping. Therefore, air-stable electron dopants are important for the fabrication of logic circuits. Recently, n-type characteristics of SWCNT film transistors have been achieved by using several types of donative organic molecules, and these molecular dopants have opened a route for application. However, it is still unclear whether the cause of n-type operation is the Fermi level shift of SWCNTs or the lowering of the Schottky barrier for electrons. In this study, we found the evidences of electron transfer from organic molecules to SWCNTs using optical measurements.

  15. Fabrication of air-stable n-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible substrates using bilayer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanhong; Li, Qunqing; Jin, Yuanhao; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Kaili; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed charges in the ALD layer. The key advantage of the method is the relatively low temperature (120 or 90 °C) required here for the ALD process because we need not employ this step to totally remove the absorbates on the SWNTs. This advantage facilitates the integration of both p-type and n-type transistors through a simple lift off process and compact CMOS inverters were demonstrated. We also demonstrated that the doping of SWNTs in the channel plays a more important role than the Schottky barriers at the metal contacts in carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, unlike the situation in individual SWNT-based transistors.Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed

  16. High-performance carbon-nanotube-based complementary field-effect-transistors and integrated circuits with yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiyong Si, Jia; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2014-08-11

    High-performance p-type carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors utilizing yttrium oxide as gate dielectric are presented by optimizing oxidization and annealing processes. Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect-transistors (FETs) are then fabricated on CNTs, and the p- and n-type devices exhibit symmetrical high performances, especially with low threshold voltage near to zero. The corresponding CMOS CNT inverter is demonstrated to operate at an ultra-low supply voltage down to 0.2 V, while displaying sufficient voltage gain, high noise margin, and low power consumption. Yttrium oxide is proven to be a competitive gate dielectric for constructing high-performance CNT CMOS FETs and integrated circuits.

  17. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (+/-2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec-1), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm2 V-1 s-1) and high on/off ratio (104-107). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption.Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge

  18. Radio Frequency Transistors Using Aligned Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes with Current-Gain Cutoff Frequency and Maximum Oscillation Frequency Simultaneously Greater than 70 GHz.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Brady, Gerald J; Gui, Hui; Rutherglen, Chris; Arnold, Michael S; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-07-26

    In this paper, we report record radio frequency (RF) performance of carbon nanotube transistors based on combined use of a self-aligned T-shape gate structure, and well-aligned, high-semiconducting-purity, high-density polyfluorene-sorted semiconducting carbon nanotubes, which were deposited using dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly method. These transistors show outstanding direct current (DC) performance with on-current density of 350 μA/μm, transconductance as high as 310 μS/μm, and superior current saturation with normalized output resistance greater than 100 kΩ·μm. These transistors create a record as carbon nanotube RF transistors that demonstrate both the current-gain cutoff frequency (ft) and the maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) greater than 70 GHz. Furthermore, these transistors exhibit good linearity performance with 1 dB gain compression point (P1dB) of 14 dBm and input third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 22 dBm. Our study advances state-of-the-art of carbon nanotube RF electronics, which have the potential to be made flexible and may find broad applications for signal amplification, wireless communication, and wearable/flexible electronics. PMID:27327074

  19. Printed thin film transistors and CMOS inverters based on semiconducting carbon nanotube ink purified by a nonlinear conjugated copolymer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenya; Dou, Junyan; Zhao, Jianwen; Tan, Hongwei; Ye, Jun; Tange, Masayoshi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiang; Guo, Wenrui; Ma, Changqi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Zhang, Kai; Cui, Zheng

    2016-02-28

    Two innovative research studies are reported in this paper. One is the sorting of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and ink formulation by a novel semiconductor copolymer and second is the development of CMOS inverters using not the p-type and n-type transistors but a printed p-type transistor and a printed ambipolar transistor. A new semiconducting copolymer (named P-DPPb5T) was designed and synthesized with a special nonlinear structure and more condensed conjugation surfaces, which can separate large diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) from arc discharge SWCNTs according to their chiralities with high selectivity. With the sorted sc-SWCNTs ink, thin film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated by aerosol jet printing. The TFTs displayed good uniformity, low operating voltage (±2 V) and subthreshold swing (SS) (122-161 mV dec(-1)), high effective mobility (up to 17.6-37.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and high on/off ratio (10(4)-10(7)). With the printed TFTs, a CMOS inverter was constructed, which is based on the p-type TFT and ambipolar TFT instead of the conventional p-type and n-type TFTs. Compared with other recently reported inverters fabricated by printing, the printed CMOS inverters demonstrated a better noise margin (74% 1/2 Vdd) and was hysteresis free. The inverter has a voltage gain of up to 16 at an applied voltage of only 1 V and low static power consumption. PMID:26847814

  20. Length separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes and its impact on structural and electrical properties of wafer-level fabricated carbon nanotube-field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Simon; Hermann, Sascha; Schulz, Stefan E.; Gessner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    For an industrial realization of devices based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) such as field-effect transistors (FETs) it becomes increasingly important to consider technological aspects such as intrinsic device structure, integration process controllability as well as yield. From the perspective of a wafer-level integration technology, the influence of SWCNT length on the performance of short-channel CNT-FETs is demonstrated by means of a statistical and comparative study. Therefore, a methodological development of a length separation process based on size-exclusion chromatography was conducted in order to extract well-separated SWCNT dispersions with narrowed length distribution. It could be shown that short SWCNTs adversely affect integrability and reproducibility, underlined by a 25% decline of the integration yield with respect to long SWCNTs. Furthermore, it turns out that the significant changes in electrical performance are directly linked to a SWCNT chain formation in the transistor channel. In particular, CNT-FETs with long SWCNTs outperform reference and short SWCNTs with respect to hole mobility and subthreshold controllability by up to 300% and up to 140%, respectively. As a whole, this study provides a statistical and comparative analysis towards chain-less CNT-FETs fabricated with a wafer-level technology.

  1. Self-aligned T-gate high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube RF transistors operated in quasi-ballistic transport and quantum capacitance regime.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuchi; Badmaev, Alexander; Jooyaie, Alborz; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Galatsis, Kosmas; Enaya, Hani A; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-08-28

    Carbon nanotube RF transistors are predicted to offer good performance and high linearity when operated in the ballistic transport and quantum capacitance regime; however, realization of such transistors has been very challenging. In this paper, we introduce a self-aligned fabrication method for carbon nanotube RF transistors, which incorporate a T-shaped (mushroom-shaped) aluminum gate, with oxidized aluminum as the gate dielectric. In this way, the channel length can be scaled down to 140 nm, which enables quasi-ballistic transport, and the gate dielectric is reduced to 2-3 nm aluminum oxide, leading to quasi-quantum capacitance operation. A current-gain cutoff frequency (f(t)) up to 23 GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency (f(max)) of 10 GHz are demonstrated. Furthermore, the linearity properties of nanotube transistors are characterized by using the 1 dB compression point measurement with positive power gain for the first time, to our knowledge. Our work reveals the importance and potential of separated semiconducting nanotubes for various RF applications.

  2. Static and low frequency noise characterization of N-type random network of carbon nanotubes thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Min-Kyu; Mouis, Mireille; Jeon, Dae-Young; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Un Jeong; Ghibaudo, Gérard

    2013-10-01

    Static and low frequency noise (LFN) characterizations in two-dimensional (2D) N-type random network thin film transistors (RN-TFTs) based on single-walled carbon nanotubes were presented. For the electrical parameter extraction, the Y-function method was used to suppress the series resistance (Rsd) influence. The gate-to-channel capacitance (Cgc) was directly measured by the split capacitance-to-voltage method and compared to 2D metal-plate capacitance model (C2D). In addition, to account for the percolation-dominated 2D RN-TFTs, a numerical percolation simulation was performed. LFN measurements were also carried out and the results were well interpreted by the carrier number and correlated mobility fluctuation model. Finally, one-dimensional (1D) cylindrical analytical capacitance based model (C1D) was suggested and applied to provide better consistency between all electrical parameters based on experimental and simulation results.

  3. Attachment of a Genetically Engineered Antibody to a Carbon Nanotube Transistor for Detection of Prostate Cancer Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Mitchell; Dailey, Jennifer; Goldsmith, Brett; Robinson, Matthew; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a novel detection method for osteopontin (OPN) by attaching an engineered single chain variable fragment (scFv) protein with high binding affinity for OPN to a carbon nanotube transistor. Osteopontin is a potential new biomarker for prostate cancer; its presence in humans is already associated with several forms of cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis and stress. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men and as such represents a major public health issue. Detection of early-stage cancer often results in successful treatment, with long term disease-free survival in 60-90% of patients. Electronic transport measurements are used to detect the presence of OPN in solution at clinically relevant concentrations.

  4. Low voltage, high performance inkjet printed carbon nanotube transistors with solution processed ZrO2 gate insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjun; Jang, Seonpil; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L.; Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2013-08-01

    High-performance single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin-film transistors are fabricated by single-pass inkjet printing of SWCNTs on high-κ solution-processed ZrO2 gate dielectric. We demonstrate that an ultraviolet ozone treatment of the ZrO2 substrate is critical in achieving a uniform dispersion of sorted SWCNTs in the semiconducting channel. The resulting devices exhibit excellent performance with mobility and on/off current ratio exceeding 30 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 105, respectively, at low operating voltages (<5 V). The single-pass inkjet printing process demonstrated in this letter shows great promise as a reliable and scalable method for SWCNT based high performance electronics.

  5. Probing Biological Processes on Supported Lipid Bilayers with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose Manuel; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2006-03-01

    We have formed supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) by small unilamellar vesicle fusion on substrates containing single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT-FETs). We are able to detect the self-assembly of SLBs electrically with SWNT-FETs since their threshold voltages are shifted by this event. The SLB fully covers the NT surface and lipid molecules can diffuse freely in the bilayer surface across the NT. To study the interactions of important biological entities with receptors imbedded within the membrane, we have also integrated a membrane protein, GT1b ganglioside, in the bilayer. While bare gangliosides can diffuse freely across the NT, interestingly the NT acts as a diffusion barrier for the gangliosides when they are bound with tetanus toxin. This experiment opens the possibility of using SWNT-FETs as biosensors for label-free detection.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Memory Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are among the most cited prototypical materials for nanoelectronics and information storage devices, a dominant position that originates from their intrinsic structural and electronic properties. In this chapter we review the developments in memory elements that directly exploit the unique properties of carbon nanotubes. Fundamental operational principles and characteristics are examined for the different types of carbon nanotube-based memory devices along with the current status of experimental fabrication and scalability. These include memory elements based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFET), nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), and electromigration. Many of these devices show tremendous promise for providing enhanced densities, lower power requirements, more efficient read/write processes, and non-volatility of data.

  7. A facile and low-cost length sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by precipitation and applications for thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Hui; Chen, Haitian; Khripin, Constantine Y.; Liu, Bilu; Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their combinations. Polyelectrolytes such as polymethacrylate (PMAA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are found to be especially effective on cholate and deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs. By adding PMAA to these nanotube dispersions in a stepwise fashion, we have achieved nanotube precipitation in a length-dependent order: first nanotubes with an average length of 650 nm, and then successively of 450 nm, 350 nm, and 250 nm. A similar effect of nanotube length sorting has also been observed for PSS. To demonstrate the utility of the length fractionation, the 650 nm-long nanotube fraction was subjected to an aqueous two-phase separation to obtain semiconducting enriched nanotubes. Thin-film transistors fabricated with the resulting semiconducting SWCNTs showed a carrier mobility up to 18 cm2 (V s)-1 and an on/off ratio up to 107. Our result sheds new light on the phase behavior of aqueous nanotube dispersions under high concentrations of polymers and salts, and offers a facile, low-cost, and scalable method to produce length sorted semiconducting nanotubes for macroelectronics applications.Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their

  8. In Situ Fabrication of Nano Transistors by Selective Deposition of a Gate Dielectric around Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Jeong, Young K; Peters, John A; Nam, Gwang-Hyeon; Jin, Sunghwan; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2015-11-01

    The CNT-SiO2 core-shell structure is particularly appealing because the insulating SiO2 layer wraps around the CNTs, functioning as a gate dielectric. However, it is still a challenge to expose both end-caps of the structure for enabling them to serve as electrodes, which additionally requires complicated postprocesses. Here, we present a unique CNTs-SiO2 core-shell structure where both ends are uncovered with SiO2 in a "peeled-wire" structure. In this structure, SiO2 particles partially encapsulate the CNTs during the synthesis, resulting in both end-caps of the nanotube being self-exposed and electrically conductive. The field-effect transistor build-up with this structure exhibits p-type characteristics with a linear conductance behavior on Id-Vd output performance. This approach for making self-formed electrodes in the CNT-SiO2 core-shell structure provides a simple and efficient way for applying them to future nanodevices in terms of process simplicity and cost effectiveness. PMID:26466360

  9. Utilizing carbon nanotube electrodes to improve charge injection and transport in bis(trifluoromethyl)-dimethyl-rubrene ambipolar single crystal transistors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L; Nakayama, Yasuo; McGarry, Kathryn A; Geier, Michael L; Uragami, Yuki; Mase, Kazuhiko; Douglas, Christopher J; Ishii, Hisao; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2013-11-26

    We have examined the significant enhancement of ambipolar charge injection and transport properties of bottom-contact single crystal field-effect transistors (SC-FETs) based on a new rubrene derivative, bis(trifluoromethyl)-dimethyl-rubrene (fm-rubrene), by employing carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes. The fundamental challenge associated with fm-rubrene crystals is their deep-lying HOMO and LUMO energy levels, resulting in inefficient hole injection and suboptimal electron injection from conventional Au electrodes due to large Schottky barriers. Applying thin layers of CNT network at the charge injection interface of fm-rubrene crystals substantially reduces the contact resistance for both holes and electrons; consequently, benchmark ambipolar mobilities have been achieved, reaching 4.8 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for hole transport and 4.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electron transport. We find that such improved injection efficiency in fm-rubrene is beneficial for ultimately unveiling its intrinsic charge transport properties so as to exceed those of its parent molecule, rubrene, in the current device architecture. Our studies suggest that CNT electrodes may provide a universal approach to ameliorate the charge injection obstacles in organic electronic devices regardless of charge carrier type, likely due to the electric field enhancement along the nanotube located at the crystal/electrode interface.

  10. Utilizing carbon nanotube electrodes to improve charge injection and transport in bis(trifluoromethyl)-dimethyl-rubrene ambipolar single crystal transistors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L; Nakayama, Yasuo; McGarry, Kathryn A; Geier, Michael L; Uragami, Yuki; Mase, Kazuhiko; Douglas, Christopher J; Ishii, Hisao; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2013-11-26

    We have examined the significant enhancement of ambipolar charge injection and transport properties of bottom-contact single crystal field-effect transistors (SC-FETs) based on a new rubrene derivative, bis(trifluoromethyl)-dimethyl-rubrene (fm-rubrene), by employing carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes. The fundamental challenge associated with fm-rubrene crystals is their deep-lying HOMO and LUMO energy levels, resulting in inefficient hole injection and suboptimal electron injection from conventional Au electrodes due to large Schottky barriers. Applying thin layers of CNT network at the charge injection interface of fm-rubrene crystals substantially reduces the contact resistance for both holes and electrons; consequently, benchmark ambipolar mobilities have been achieved, reaching 4.8 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for hole transport and 4.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electron transport. We find that such improved injection efficiency in fm-rubrene is beneficial for ultimately unveiling its intrinsic charge transport properties so as to exceed those of its parent molecule, rubrene, in the current device architecture. Our studies suggest that CNT electrodes may provide a universal approach to ameliorate the charge injection obstacles in organic electronic devices regardless of charge carrier type, likely due to the electric field enhancement along the nanotube located at the crystal/electrode interface. PMID:24175573

  11. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  12. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  13. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies.

  14. T-gate aligned nanotube radio frequency transistors and circuits with superior performance.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuchi; Lin, Yung-Chen; Kim, Pyojae; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-05-28

    In this paper, we applied self-aligned T-gate design to aligned carbon nanotube array transistors and achieved an extrinsic current-gain cutoff frequency (ft) of 25 GHz, which is the best on-chip performance for nanotube radio frequency (RF) transistors reported to date. Meanwhile, an intrinsic current-gain cutoff frequency up to 102 GHz is obtained, comparable to the best value reported for nanotube RF transistors. Armed with the excellent extrinsic RF performance, we performed both single-tone and two-tone measurements for aligned nanotube transistors at a frequency up to 8 GHz. Furthermore, we utilized T-gate aligned nanotube transistors to construct mixing and frequency doubling analog circuits operated in gigahertz frequency regime. Our results confirm the great potential of nanotube-based circuit applications and indicate that nanotube transistors are promising building blocks in high-frequency electronics.

  15. Flexible logic circuits based on top-gate thin film transistors with printed semiconductor carbon nanotubes and top electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Zhen; Zhao, Jianwen; Xu, Wenya; Gu, Weibing; Zhang, Xiang; Qian, Long; Cui, Zheng

    2014-11-01

    In this report printed thin film transistors and logic circuits on flexible substrates are reported. The top-gate thin film transistors were made of the sorted semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) ink as channel material and printed silver lines as top electrodes and interconnect. 5 nm HfOx thin films pre-deposited on PET substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) act as the adhesion layers to significantly improve the immobilization efficiency of sc-SWCNTs and environmental stability. The immobilization mechanism was investigated in detail. The flexible partially-printed top-gate SWCNT TFTs display ambipolar characteristics with slightly strong p-type when using 50 nm HfOx thin films as dielectric layer, as well as the encapsulation layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 120 °C. The hole mobility, on/off ratio and subthreshold swing (SS) are ~46.2 cm2 V-1 s-1, 105 and 109 mV per decade, respectively. Furthermore, partially-printed TFTs show small hysteresis, low operating voltage (2 V) and high stability in air. Flexible partially-printed inverters show good performance with voltage gain up to 33 with 1.25 V supply voltage, and can work at 10 kHz. The frequency of flexible partially-printed five-stage ring oscillators can reach 1.7 kHz at supply voltages of 2 V with per stage delay times of 58.8 μs. This work paves a way to achieve printed SWCNT advanced logic circuits and systems on flexible substrates.In this report printed thin film transistors and logic circuits on flexible substrates are reported. The top-gate thin film transistors were made of the sorted semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) ink as channel material and printed silver lines as top electrodes and interconnect. 5 nm HfOx thin films pre-deposited on PET substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) act as the adhesion layers to significantly improve the immobilization efficiency of sc-SWCNTs and environmental stability. The immobilization mechanism

  16. Dependence of sensitivity of biosensor for carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with top-gate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Masuhiro; Murata, Katsuyuki; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we used biosensors that employ a top-gate-type carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET) for detecting target proteins in a solution. The dependence of the sensitivity of the biosensor on structural characteristics of the top gate, such as the thicknesses of its insulator and electrode and the relative permittivity of the insulator, was examined by simulations and by experiment which change the thickness of the insulator. Results of calculations performed by the finite element method showed that a thin insulator with a relative permittivity greater than 20 would lead to high sensitivity of the CNT-FET biosensor. Experimental investigation supported this result. The transconductance of a CNT-FET with a 20-nm-thick insulating layer was found to be approximately six times higher than that with 50-nm-thick and 80-nm-thick insulating layers. Moreover, the sensitivity of the CNT-FET biosensor with the 20-nm-thick insulating layer was also higher than that of a CNT-FET with a thicker insulating layer. By the experimental measurements, the influence of insulator thickness on the sensitivity of the biosensor was elucidated for the first time.

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with graphene oxide passivation for fast, sensitive, and selective protein detection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jingbo; Mao, Shun; Zhang, Yang; Cui, Shumao; Steeber, Douglas A; Chen, Junhong

    2013-04-15

    We report a novel technique to design an insulating membrane with attachment sites on top of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for achieving high sensitivity and selectivity in an SWNT field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor. Because electronic properties of SWNTs are extremely sensitive to the surface state, direct immobilization of proteins or DNAs onto SWNTs will generate surface defects through chemical reactions or physical adsorption, resulting in degradation of performance and instability of SWNT-FET biosensor devices. Here we demonstrate fabrication of novel FET biosensor devices using SWNTs as semiconducting channels, and a monolayer of graphene oxide (GO) membrane covered on the SWNTs as a passivating layer to avoid direct attachment of biomaterials on SWNTs, thereby preserving intrinsic electrical properties of SWNTs. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are decorated on the GO layer for the covalent attachment of biotin, which is then used to selectively detect the target avidin. The passivation with GO layers can effectively lead to enhanced sensitivity of biosensor devices through increasing the on/off ratio of FET sensors.

  18. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm(2) V(-1) sec(-)1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 10(4)), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process. PMID:27184121

  19. Selective Dispersion of Highly Pure Large-Diameter Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes by a Flavin for Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsuk; Kim, Somin; Kwon, Hyeokjae; Hong, Sukhyun; Im, Seongil; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Scalable and simple methods for selective extraction of pure, semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is of profound importance for electronic and photovoltaic applications. We report a new, one-step procedure to obtain respective large-diameter s- and metallic (m)-SWNT enrichment purity in excess of 99% and 78%, respectively, via interaction between the aromatic dispersing agent and SWNTs. The approach utilizes N-dodecyl isoalloxazine (FC12) as a surfactant in conjunction with sonication and benchtop centrifugation methods. After centrifugation, the supernatant is enriched in s-SWNTs with less carbonaceous impurities, whereas precipitate is enhanced in m-SWNTs. In addition, the use of an increased centrifugal force enhances both the purity and population of larger diameter s-SWNTs. Photoinduced energy transfer from FC12 to SWNTs is facilitated by respective electronic level alignment. Owing to its peculiar photoreduction capability, FC12 can be employed to precipitate SWNTs upon UV irradiation and observe absorption of higher optical transitions of SWNTs. A thin-film transistor prepared from a dispersion of enriched s-SWNTs was fabricated to verify electrical performance of the sorted sample and was observed to display p-type conductance with an average on/off ratio over 10(6) and an average mobility over 10 cm(2)/V·s. PMID:27538495

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with graphene oxide passivation for fast, sensitive, and selective protein detection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jingbo; Mao, Shun; Zhang, Yang; Cui, Shumao; Steeber, Douglas A; Chen, Junhong

    2013-04-15

    We report a novel technique to design an insulating membrane with attachment sites on top of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for achieving high sensitivity and selectivity in an SWNT field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor. Because electronic properties of SWNTs are extremely sensitive to the surface state, direct immobilization of proteins or DNAs onto SWNTs will generate surface defects through chemical reactions or physical adsorption, resulting in degradation of performance and instability of SWNT-FET biosensor devices. Here we demonstrate fabrication of novel FET biosensor devices using SWNTs as semiconducting channels, and a monolayer of graphene oxide (GO) membrane covered on the SWNTs as a passivating layer to avoid direct attachment of biomaterials on SWNTs, thereby preserving intrinsic electrical properties of SWNTs. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are decorated on the GO layer for the covalent attachment of biotin, which is then used to selectively detect the target avidin. The passivation with GO layers can effectively lead to enhanced sensitivity of biosensor devices through increasing the on/off ratio of FET sensors. PMID:23202350

  1. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm2 V−1 sec−1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 104), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process. PMID:27184121

  2. Logic circuits composed of flexible carbon nanotube thin-film transistor and ultra-thin polymer gate dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongil; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Seong, Hyejeong; Im, Sung Gap; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Printing electronics has become increasingly prominent in the field of electronic engineering because this method is highly efficient at producing flexible, low-cost and large-scale thin-film transistors. However, TFTs are typically constructed with rigid insulating layers consisting of oxides and nitrides that are brittle and require high processing temperatures, which can cause a number of problems when used in printed flexible TFTs. In this study, we address these issues and demonstrate a method of producing inkjet-printed TFTs that include an ultra-thin polymeric dielectric layer produced by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) at room temperature and highly purified 99.9% semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Our integrated approach enables the production of flexible logic circuits consisting of CNT-TFTs on a polyethersulfone (PES) substrate that have a high mobility (up to 9.76 cm2 V‑1 sec‑1), a low operating voltage (less than 4 V), a high current on/off ratio (3 × 104), and a total device yield of 90%. Thus, it should be emphasized that this study delineates a guideline for the feasibility of producing flexible CNT-TFT logic circuits with high performance based on a low-cost and simple fabrication process.

  3. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Sung Hun E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr Shin, Jongmin; Cho, In-Tak; Lee, Jong-Ho E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr; Han, Sang Youn; Lee, Dong Joon; Lee, Chi Hwan; Rogers, John A. E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr

    2014-07-07

    This paper presents materials, device designs, and physical/electrical characteristics of a form of nanotube electronics that is physically transient, in the sense that all constituent elements dissolve and/or disperse upon immersion into water. Studies of contact effects illustrate the ability to use water soluble metals such as magnesium for source/drain contacts in nanotube based field effect transistors. High mobilities and on/off ratios in transistors that use molybdenum, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide enable full swing characteristics for inverters at low voltages (∼5 V) and with high gains (∼30). Dissolution/disintegration tests of such systems on water soluble sheets of polyvinyl alcohol demonstrate physical transience within 30 min.

  4. Mobilities in ambipolar field effect transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotube network and formed on a gold nanoparticle template

    SciTech Connect

    Wongsaeng, Chalao; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-04-07

    Ambipolar field effect transistors based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network formed on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) template with polyvinyl alcohol as a gate insulator were studied by measuring the current–gate voltage characteristics. It was found that the mobilities of holes and electrons increased with increasing AuNP number density. The disturbances in the flow pattern of the carbon feedstock in the chemical vapor deposition growth that were produced by the AuNP geometry, resulted in the differences in the crystallinity and the diameter, as well as the changes in the degree of the semiconductor behavior of the SWNTs.

  5. Normally-ON and Normally-OFF Carbon Nanotube-based Ionic-Liquid Supercapacitor-Gated Vertical Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Jonathan; Cook, Alexander; Bykova, Julia; Srivastav, Vidisha; Micheli, Joseph; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2014-03-01

    We report on novel implementations of the vertical organic field effect transistor (VOFET). Instead of a typical capacitor below the organic diode, a carbon nanotube (CNT) based ionic-liquid supercapacitor (or ionic gate) is on top. The present work has been motivated by the discovery that the conductivity and work function of carbon nanotubes can be strongly modified by electric double layer charging (EDLC) in an electrolyte as much as +/-0.7eV. The conductivity of EDLC CNT is enhanced by a factor of two. By coupling the ionic gate with an organic diode, charge injection into the diode can be controlled via modulation of the workfunction of the CNT electrode, resulting in transistor-like behavior. Additionally, the high capacitance of the supercapacitor will enable the VOFET to be operated at low voltages. The entire device is processed under ambient conditions with no vacuum equipment used. We have tested VOFETs with two different materials, p-type P3HT and n-type PC70BM. The polarity of the charge transported in the material determines the charge injection rate and whether the device is a normally-ON or a normally-OFF transistor. Both devices have high current transport, excellent output characteristics, good on-off ratios and low operation voltages. We believe that these novel VOFETs will have exciting potential for various future electronic applications.

  6. Chemically Functionalized, Well-Dispersed Carbon Nanotubes in Lithium-Doped Zinc Oxide for Low-Cost, High-Performance Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Son, Gi-Cheol; Chee, Sang-Soo; Jun, Ji-Hyun; Son, Myungwoo; Lee, Sun Sook; Choi, Youngmin; Jeong, Sunho; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2016-04-13

    Surface-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are introduced into lithium-doped ZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) as an alternative to the conventional incorporation of an expensive element, indium. The crucial role of surface functionalization of CNTs is clarified with the demonstration of indium-free ZnO-based TFTs with a field-effect mobility of 28.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off current ratio of 9 × 10(6) for low-cost, high-performance electronics. PMID:26856958

  7. Chemically Functionalized, Well-Dispersed Carbon Nanotubes in Lithium-Doped Zinc Oxide for Low-Cost, High-Performance Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Son, Gi-Cheol; Chee, Sang-Soo; Jun, Ji-Hyun; Son, Myungwoo; Lee, Sun Sook; Choi, Youngmin; Jeong, Sunho; Ham, Moon-Ho

    2016-04-13

    Surface-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are introduced into lithium-doped ZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) as an alternative to the conventional incorporation of an expensive element, indium. The crucial role of surface functionalization of CNTs is clarified with the demonstration of indium-free ZnO-based TFTs with a field-effect mobility of 28.6 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off current ratio of 9 × 10(6) for low-cost, high-performance electronics.

  8. Tuning the threshold voltage of carbon nanotube transistors by n-type molecular doping for robust and flexible complementary circuits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiliang; Wei, Peng; Li, Yaoxuan; Han, Jeff; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Naab, Benjamin D.; Liu, Nan; Wang, Chenggong; Adijanto, Eric; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Morishita, Satoshi; Li, Qiaochu; Gao, Yongli; Cui, Yi; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    Tuning the threshold voltage of a transistor is crucial for realizing robust digital circuits. For silicon transistors, the threshold voltage can be accurately controlled by doping. However, it remains challenging to tune the threshold voltage of single-wall nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors. Here, we report a facile method to controllably n-dope SWNTs using 1H-benzoimidazole derivatives processed via either solution coating or vacuum deposition. The threshold voltages of our polythiophene-sorted SWNT thin-film transistors can be tuned accurately and continuously over a wide range. Photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed that the SWNT Fermi level shifted to the conduction band edge with increasing doping concentration. Using this doping approach, we proceeded to fabricate SWNT complementary inverters by inkjet printing of the dopants. We observed an unprecedented noise margin of 28 V at VDD = 80 V (70% of 1/2VDD) and a gain of 85. Additionally, robust SWNT complementary metal−oxide−semiconductor inverter (noise margin 72% of 1/2VDD) and logic gates with rail-to-rail output voltage swing and subnanowatt power consumption were fabricated onto a highly flexible substrate. PMID:24639537

  9. Band-to-band tunneling in a carbon nanotube metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor is dominated by phonon-assisted tunneling.

    PubMed

    Koswatta, Siyuranga O; Lundstrom, Mark S; Nikonov, Dmitri E

    2007-05-01

    Band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) devices have recently gained a lot of interest due to their potential for reducing power dissipation in integrated circuits. We have performed extensive simulations for the BTBT operation of carbon nanotube metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (CNT-MOSFETs) using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism for both ballistic and dissipative quantum transport. In comparison with recently reported experimental data (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 3518-3519), we have obtained strong evidence that BTBT in CNT-MOSFETs is dominated by optical phonon assisted inelastic transport, which can have important implications on the transistor characteristics. It is shown that, under large biasing conditions, two-phonon scattering may also become important. PMID:17388638

  10. A study of junction effect transistors and their roles in carbon nanotube field emission cathodes in compact pulsed power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Qiong

    This thesis is focusing on a study of junction effect transistors (JFETs) in compact pulsed power applications. Pulsed power usually requires switches with high hold-off voltage, high current, low forward voltage drop, and fast switching speed. 4H-SiC, with a bandgap of 3.26 eV (The bandgap of Si is 1.12eV) and other physical and electrical superior properties, has gained much attention in high power, high temperature and high frequency applications. One topic of this thesis is to evaluate if 4H-SiC JFETs have a potential to replace gas phase switches to make pulsed power system compact and portable. Some other pulsed power applications require cathodes of providing stable, uniform, high electron-beam current. So the other topic of this research is to evaluate if Si JFET-controlled carbon nanotube field emitter cold cathode will provide the necessary e-beam source. In the topic of "4H-SiC JFETs", it focuses on the design and simulation of a novel 4H-SiC normally-off VJFET with high breakdown voltage using the 2-D simulator ATLAS. To ensure realistic simulations, we utilized reasonable physical models and the established parameters as the input into these models. The influence of key design parameters were investigated which would extend pulsed power limitations. After optimizing the key design parameters, with a 50-mum drift region, the predicted breakdown voltage for the VJFET is above 8kV at a leakage current of 1x10-5A/cm2 . The specific on-state resistance is 35 mO·cm 2 at VGS = 2.7 V, and the switching speed is several ns. The simulation results suggest that the 4H-SiC VJFET is a potential candidate for improving switching performance in repetitive pulsed power applications. To evaluate the 4H-SiC VJFETs in pulsed power circuits, we extracted some circuit model parameters from the simulated I-V curves. Those parameters are necessary for circuit simulation program such as SPICE. This method could be used as a test bench without fabricating the devices to

  11. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  12. Adjustable hydrazine modulation of single-wall carbon nanotube network field effect transistors from p-type to n-type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ruixuan; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jianlong; Sun, Yilin; Sun, MengXing; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Xian

    2016-11-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network field effect transistors (FETs), which show decent p-type electronic properties, have been fabricated. The use of hydrazine as an aqueous solution and a strong n-type dopant for the SWCNTs is demonstrated in this paper. The electrical properties are obviously tuned by hydrazine treatment at different concentrations on the surface of the SWCNT network FETs. The transport behavior of SWCNTs can be modulated from p-type to n-type, demonstrating the controllable and adjustable doping effect of hydrazine. With a higher concentration of hydrazine, more electrons can be transferred from the hydrazine molecules to the SWCNT network films, thus resulting in a change of threshold voltage, carrier mobility and on-current. By cleaning the device, the hydrazine doping effects vanish, which indicates that the doping effects of hydrazine are reversible. Through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization, the doping effects of hydrazine have also been studied.

  13. Adjustable hydrazine modulation of single-wall carbon nanotube network field effect transistors from p-type to n-type.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ruixuan; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jianlong; Sun, Yilin; Sun, MengXing; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Xian

    2016-11-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network field effect transistors (FETs), which show decent p-type electronic properties, have been fabricated. The use of hydrazine as an aqueous solution and a strong n-type dopant for the SWCNTs is demonstrated in this paper. The electrical properties are obviously tuned by hydrazine treatment at different concentrations on the surface of the SWCNT network FETs. The transport behavior of SWCNTs can be modulated from p-type to n-type, demonstrating the controllable and adjustable doping effect of hydrazine. With a higher concentration of hydrazine, more electrons can be transferred from the hydrazine molecules to the SWCNT network films, thus resulting in a change of threshold voltage, carrier mobility and on-current. By cleaning the device, the hydrazine doping effects vanish, which indicates that the doping effects of hydrazine are reversible. Through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization, the doping effects of hydrazine have also been studied.

  14. Adjustable hydrazine modulation of single-wall carbon nanotube network field effect transistors from p-type to n-type.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ruixuan; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jianlong; Sun, Yilin; Sun, MengXing; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Xian

    2016-11-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network field effect transistors (FETs), which show decent p-type electronic properties, have been fabricated. The use of hydrazine as an aqueous solution and a strong n-type dopant for the SWCNTs is demonstrated in this paper. The electrical properties are obviously tuned by hydrazine treatment at different concentrations on the surface of the SWCNT network FETs. The transport behavior of SWCNTs can be modulated from p-type to n-type, demonstrating the controllable and adjustable doping effect of hydrazine. With a higher concentration of hydrazine, more electrons can be transferred from the hydrazine molecules to the SWCNT network films, thus resulting in a change of threshold voltage, carrier mobility and on-current. By cleaning the device, the hydrazine doping effects vanish, which indicates that the doping effects of hydrazine are reversible. Through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization, the doping effects of hydrazine have also been studied. PMID:27670730

  15. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  16. High-performance printed carbon nanotube thin-film transistors array fabricated by a nonlithography technique using hafnium oxide passivation layer and mask.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2012-12-01

    The large-scale application of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) for printed electronics requires scalable, repeateable, as well as noncontaminating assembly techniques. Previously explored nanotube deposition methods include serial methods such as inkjet printing and parallel methods such as spin-coating with photolithography. The serial methods are usually slow, whereas the photolithography-related parallel methods result in contamination of the nanotubes. In this paper, we report a reliable clean parallel method for fabrication of arrays of carbon nanotube-based field effect transistors (CNTFETs) involving shadow mask patterning of a passivating layer of Hafnium oxide (HfO(2)) over the nanotube (CNT) active channel regions and plasma etching of the unprotected nanotubes. Pure (99%) semiconducting SWCNTs are first sprayed over the entire surface of a wafer substrate followed by a two-step shadow masking procedure to first deposit metal electrodes and then a HfO(2) isolation/passivation layer over the device channel region. The exposed SWCNT network outside the HfO(2) protected area is removed with oxygen plasma etching. The HfO(2) thus serves as both the device isolation mask during the plasma etching and as a protective passivating layer in subsequent use. The fabricated devices on SiO(2)/Si substrate exhibit good device performance metrics, with on/off ratio ranging from 1 × 10(1) to 3 × 10(5) and mobilities of 4 to 23 cm(2)/(V s). The HfO(2)/Si devices show excellent performance with on/off ratios of 1 × 10(2) to 2 × 10(4) and mobilities of 8 to 56 cm(2)/(V s). The optimum devices (on HfO(2)/Si) have an on/off ratio of 1 × 10(4) and mobility as high as 46 cm(2)/(V s). This HfO(2)-based patterning method enables large scale fabrication of CNTFETs with no resist residue or other contamination on the device channel. Further, shadow masking circumvents the need for expensive and area-limited lithography patterning process. The device

  17. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  18. Effects of Ambient Air and Temperature on Ionic Gel Gated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistor and Circuits.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaping; Zhou, Lili

    2015-10-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT TFT) and circuits were fabricated by fully inkjet printing gold nanoparticles as source/drain electrodes, semiconducting SWCNT thin films as channel materials, PS-PMMA-PS/EMIM TFSI composite gel as gate dielectrics, and PEDOT/PSS as gate electrodes. The ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT shows reversible conversion from p-type transistor behavior in air to ambipolar features under vacuum due to reversible oxygen doping in semiconducting SWCNT thin films. The threshold voltages of ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT and inverters are largely shifted to the low value (0.5 V for p-region and 1.0 V for n-region) by vacuum annealing at 140 °C to exhausively remove water that is incorporated in the ionic gel as floating gates. The vacuum annealed ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT shows linear temperature dependent transconductances and threshold voltages for both p- and n-regions. The strong temperature dependent transconductances (0.08 μS/K for p-region, 0.4 μS/K for n-region) indicate their potential application in thermal sensors. In the other hand, the weak temperature dependent threshold voltages (-1.5 mV/K for p-region, -1.1 mV/K for n-region) reflect their excellent thermal stability.

  19. Composite films of oxidized multiwall carbon nanotube and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) as a contact electrode for transistor and inverter devices.

    PubMed

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2012-02-01

    Composite films of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polymerized with poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) were prepared by spin-coating a mixture solution. The effect of the MWNT loading and the MWNT oxidation, with acid solution or ultraviolet (UV)-ozone treatment, on the film properties such as surface roughness, work function, surface energy, optical transparency and conductivity were studied. Also pentacene thin film transistors and inverters were made with these composite films as a contact metal and the device characteristics were measured. The oxidation of MWNT reduced the conductivity of MWNT/PEDOT:PSS composite film but increased the work function and transparency. UV-ozone treated MWNT/PEDOT:PSS composite film showed higher conductivity (14000 Ω/□) and work function (4.9 eV) than acid-oxidized MWNT/PEDOT:PSS composite film and showed better performance as a source/drain electrode in organic thin film transistor (OTFT) than other types of MWNT/PEDOT:PSS composite films. Hole injection barrier of the UV-ozone treated MWNT/PEDOT:PSS composite film with pentacene was significantly lower than any other films because of the higher work function. PMID:22264140

  20. Carbon nanotube computer.

    PubMed

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  1. Raman mapping investigation of single-walled carbon nanotube bending in bottom-contact field-effect-transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiadi, Agung; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the bending of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in bottom-contact SWNT devices using Raman mapping measurements. The height difference between the metal electrodes and the substrate caused the SWNTs to bend, down-shifting the G+ and G- bands of the bent SWNTs. No shifting of the G+ and G- bands was observed when flat electrodes were used. Shifting of the G+ and G- bands in SWNTs is strongly correlated to modulation of the Fermi level. We confirmed this effect by measuring the transport properties of the SWNT devices, which were in good agreement with the Raman measurement results.

  2. Nonmagnetic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipert, Kamil; Kretzschmar, Florian; Ritschel, Manfred; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Büchner, Bernd

    2009-03-01

    We have synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single-, double-, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes without magnetic impurities. In particular, we have applied a rhenium-based CVD technique yielding nonmagnetic carbon nanotubes with diamagnetic Re particles. In addition, carbon nanotubes prepared with iron as catalyst particles are annealed at very high temperatures in which the catalyst material is completely vaporized, while the carbon nanotubes are structurally preserved. Detailed magnetic studies show for both approaches a clear diamagnetic behavior typical for pure carbon nanotubes but no indication of ferromagnetic or paramagnetic material.

  3. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  4. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  5. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  6. Effect of ambient air on n-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors chemically doped with poly(ethylene imine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunishi, Tomohiro; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Ohno, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Chemical doping with poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) is often used to produce n-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors (CNT TFTs) with stability in air. However, the effect of air on the device characteristics has not yet been fully investigated. In this study, we performed a detailed investigation on how the oxygen and water present in air affect stability issues, including hysteresis, current collapse, and ambipolar properties of PEI-doped n-type CNT TFTs fabricated on a transparent plastic film. We found that current collapse and hysteresis are predominantly caused by the combination of water and oxygen, suggesting that a water/oxygen redox reaction is responsible for the instability of PEI-doped devices. Water vapor has a rather more severe impact in the case of PEI-doped devices than in the case of undoped CNT TFTs because of the hygroscopicity of PEI. Surface passivation with Al2O3, deposited by a low-temperature atomic layer deposition technique, notably improved the stability of the device properties in ambient air.

  7. Doping-free fabrication of n-type random network single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistor with yttrium contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Leihua; Chor, Eng Fong; Wu, Yihong

    2011-05-01

    This work reports the realization of high performance n-type random network single-walled carbon nanotube (rn-SWCNT) field effect transistor (FET) by means of contact engineering, where a low work function metal, Yttrium (Y), is used as the source and drain contacts. The presence of crossed metallic ( m-) and semiconducting ( s-) SWCNT junctions in the channel of rn-SWCNT FETs, which form p-type rectifying Schottky barrier, is believed to introduce non-negligible hole current in the fabricated FETs and lead to undesirable ambipolar characteristic. By means of soaking in 2,4,6-triphenylpyrylium tetrafluoroborate (2,4,6-TPPT), we have successfully converted the ambipolar rn-SWCNT FETs to highly unipolar n-type devices by selectively removing the m-SWCNTs in the FET channel. The best characteristics of our unipolar n-type rn-SWCNT FETs are as follows: on/off current ratio up to ∼10 5, mobility as high as 25 cm 2 V -1 s -1, and transconductance of 0.12 μS/μm; they have demonstrated air-stable n-type characteristics and are also more reproducibility than individual SWCNT FETs.

  8. Highly enhanced gas sensing in single-walled carbon nanotube-based thin-film transistor sensors by ultraviolet light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tingting; Wei, Liangming; Zhou, Zhihua; Shi, Diwen; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Jiang; Yu, Yuan; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yafei

    2012-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) random networks are easily fabricated on a wafer scale, which provides an attractive path to large-scale SWCNT-based thin-film transistor (TFT) manufacturing. However, the mixture of semiconducting SWCNTs and metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) in the networks significantly limits the TFT performance due to the m-SWCNTs dominating the charge transport. In this paper, we have achieved a uniform and high-density SWCNT network throughout a complete 3-in. Si/SiO2 wafer using a solution-based assembly method. We further utilized UV radiation to etch m-SWCNTs from the networks, and a remarkable increase in the channel current on/off ratio ( I on/ I off) from 11 to 5.6 × 103 was observed. Furthermore, we used the SWCNT-TFTs as gas sensors to detect methyl methylphosphonate, a stimulant of benchmark threats. It was found that the SWCNT-TFT sensors treated with UV radiation show a much higher sensitivity and faster response to the analytes than those without treatment with UV radiation.

  9. Barrier-free tunneling in a carbon heterojunction transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Youngki; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2010-07-01

    Recently it has been experimentally shown that a graphene nanoribbon (GNR) can be obtained by unzipping a carbon nanotube (CNT). This makes it possible to fabricate all-carbon heterostructures that have a unique interface between a CNT and a GNR. Here we demonstrate that such a heterojunction may be utilized to obtain a unique transistor operation. By performing a self-consistent nonequilibrium Green's function based calculation on an atomistically defined structure, we show that such a transistor may reduce energy dissipation below the classical limit while not compromising speed—thus providing an alternate route toward ultralow-power, high-performance carbon-heterostructure electronics.

  10. Naturally produced carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Santos, C.; Martínez-Hernández, A. L.; Consultchi, A.; Rodríguez, R.; Castaño, V. M.

    2003-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes represent an impressive kind of materials with diverse unexpected properties, and different methods to artificially produce them have been developed. Recently, they have also been synthesized at low temperatures, demonstrating that these materials might exist in fluids or carbon rocks of the Earth's crust. A new type of natural encapsulated carbon nanotubes found in a coal-petroleum mix is presented. These findings show that all allotropic carbon forms known up to date can be produced in Nature, where pressure, catalysts particles, shear stress and parameters other than exclusively very high temperature, seem to play an important role for producing nanotubes.

  11. Composite Semiconductor Material of Carbon Nanotubes and Poly[5,5'-bis(3-dodecyl-2-thienyl)-2,2'-bithiophene] for High-Performance Organic Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derry, Cameron; Wu, Yiliang; Zhu, Shiping; Deen, Jamal

    2013-12-01

    A nonpercolating network of non-covalently functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes was embedded within air-stable poly[5,5'-bis(3-dodecyl-2-thienyl)-2,2'-bithiophene] (PQT-12) thin films for the purpose of enhancing the field-effect mobility in thin-film transistors. The host polymer was used to stabilize the nanotubes in suspension through π-orbital overlap caused by simple application of ultrasonication. The stable nanotube suspension was cast into two different device architectures, both of which exhibited excellent on/off ratios ranging from 105 to 106 and dramatically improved mobilities compared with pristine PQT-12 semiconductor. A single-layer film with nanotubes embedded throughout was easy to fabricate and had mobility up to 0.34 cm2/Vs, an enhancement of over 3× compared with PQT-12. Placing the nanotubes closer to the dielectric surface in a dual-layer approach resulted in a mobility improvement of up to six times (0.58 cm2/Vs). The effects of the nanotube content on the polymer interaction within the suspension, film morphology, and electrical properties were investigated as well.

  12. Hemotoxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Methven, Laura; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes may enter into the bloodstream and interact with blood components indirectly via translocation following unintended exposure or directly after an intended administration for biomedical purposes. Once introduced into systemic circulation, nanotubes will encounter various proteins, biomolecules or cells which have specific roles in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. It is therefore essential to determine whether those interactions will lead to adverse effects or not. Advances in the understanding of how carbon nanotubes interact with blood proteins, the complement system, red blood cells and the hemostatic system are reviewed in this article. While many studies on carbon nanotube health risk assessment and their biomedical applications have appeared in the last few years, reports on the hemocompatibility of these nanomaterials remain surprisingly limited. Yet, defining the hemotoxicological profile is a mandatory step toward the development of clinically-relevant medications or contrast agents based on carbon nanotubes.

  13. Intrinsically stretchable and transparent thin-film transistors based on printable silver nanowires, carbon nanotubes and an elastomeric dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jiajie; Li, Lu; Chen, Dustin; Hajagos, Tibor; Ren, Zhi; Chou, Shu-Yu; Hu, Wei; Pei, Qibing

    2015-01-01

    Thin-film field-effect transistor is a fundamental component behind various mordern electronics. The development of stretchable electronics poses fundamental challenges in developing new electronic materials for stretchable thin-film transistors that are mechanically compliant and solution processable. Here we report the fabrication of transparent thin-film transistors that behave like an elastomer film. The entire fabrication is carried out by solution-based techniques, and the resulting devices exhibit a mobility of ∼30 cm2 V−1 s−1, on/off ratio of 103–104, switching current >100 μA, transconductance >50 μS and relative low operating voltages. The devices can be stretched by up to 50% strain and subjected to 500 cycles of repeated stretching to 20% strain without significant loss in electrical property. The thin-film transistors are also used to drive organic light-emitting diodes. The approach and results represent an important progress toward the development of stretchable active-matrix displays. PMID:26173436

  14. Intrinsically stretchable and transparent thin-film transistors based on printable silver nanowires, carbon nanotubes and an elastomeric dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiajie; Li, Lu; Chen, Dustin; Hajagos, Tibor; Ren, Zhi; Chou, Shu-Yu; Hu, Wei; Pei, Qibing

    2015-07-01

    Thin-film field-effect transistor is a fundamental component behind various mordern electronics. The development of stretchable electronics poses fundamental challenges in developing new electronic materials for stretchable thin-film transistors that are mechanically compliant and solution processable. Here we report the fabrication of transparent thin-film transistors that behave like an elastomer film. The entire fabrication is carried out by solution-based techniques, and the resulting devices exhibit a mobility of ~30 cm2 V-1 s-1, on/off ratio of 103-104, switching current >100 μA, transconductance >50 μS and relative low operating voltages. The devices can be stretched by up to 50% strain and subjected to 500 cycles of repeated stretching to 20% strain without significant loss in electrical property. The thin-film transistors are also used to drive organic light-emitting diodes. The approach and results represent an important progress toward the development of stretchable active-matrix displays.

  15. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  16. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  17. Investigation of light doping and hetero gate dielectric carbon nanotube tunneling field-effect transistor for improved device and circuit-level performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yuan; Wang, Huan; Xu, Hongsong; Xu, Min; Jiang, Sitao; Yue, Gongshu

    2016-03-01

    We perform a comparative study (both for device and circuit simulations) of three carbon nanotube tunneling field-effect transistor (CNT-TFET) designs: high-K gate dielectric TFETs (HK-TFETs), hetero gate dielectric TFETs (HTFETs) and a novel CNT-TFET-based combination of light doping and hetero gate dielectric TFETs (LD-HTFETs). At device level, the effects of channel and gate dielectric engineering on the switching and high-frequency characteristics for CNT-TFET have been theoretically investigated using a quantum kinetic model. This model is based on two-dimensional non-equilibrium Green’s functions solved self-consistently with Poisson’s equations. It is revealed that the proposed LD-HTFET structure can significantly reduce leakage current, enhance control ability of the gate on the channel, improve the switching speed, and is more suitable for use in low-power, high-frequency circuits. At circuit level, using HSPICE with look-up table-based Verilog-A models, the performance and reliability of CNT-TFET logic gate circuits is evaluated on the basis of power consumption, average delay, stability, energy consumption and power-delay product (PDP). Simulation results indicate that, compared to a traditional CNT-TFET-based circuit, the one based on LD-HTFET has a significantly better performance (static noise margin, energy, delay, PDP). It is also observed that our proposed design exhibits better robustness under different operational conditions by considering power supply voltage and temperature variations. Our results may be useful for designing and optimizing CNTFET devices and circuits.

  18. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  19. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  20. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  1. Automated circuit fabrication and direct characterization of carbon nanotube vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, G.; Shlafman, M.; Tabachnik, T.; Rogachevsky, Z.; Rechnitz, S.; Goldshtein, I.; Shlafman, S.; Gordon, N.; Alchanati, G.; Itzhak, M.; Moshe, Y.; Hajaj, E. M.; Nir, H.; Milyutin, Y.; Izraeli, T. Y.; Razin, A.; Shtempluck, O.; Kotchtakov, V.; Yaish, Y. E.

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have fascinated many researchers due to their unprecedented properties. However, a major drawback in utilizing carbon nanotubes for practical applications is the difficulty in positioning or growing them at specific locations. Here we present a simple, rapid, non-invasive and scalable technique that enables optical imaging of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotube scaffold serves as a seed for nucleation and growth of small size, optically visible nanocrystals. After imaging the molecules can be removed completely, leaving the surface intact, and thus the carbon nanotube electrical and mechanical properties are preserved. The successful and robust optical imaging allowed us to develop a dedicated image processing algorithm through which we are able to demonstrate a fully automated circuit design resulting in field effect transistors and inverters. Moreover, we demonstrate that this imaging method allows not only to locate carbon nanotubes but also, as in the case of suspended ones, to study their dynamic mechanical motion. PMID:27396506

  2. Automated circuit fabrication and direct characterization of carbon nanotube vibrations.

    PubMed

    Zeevi, G; Shlafman, M; Tabachnik, T; Rogachevsky, Z; Rechnitz, S; Goldshtein, I; Shlafman, S; Gordon, N; Alchanati, G; Itzhak, M; Moshe, Y; Hajaj, E M; Nir, H; Milyutin, Y; Izraeli, T Y; Razin, A; Shtempluck, O; Kotchtakov, V; Yaish, Y E

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have fascinated many researchers due to their unprecedented properties. However, a major drawback in utilizing carbon nanotubes for practical applications is the difficulty in positioning or growing them at specific locations. Here we present a simple, rapid, non-invasive and scalable technique that enables optical imaging of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotube scaffold serves as a seed for nucleation and growth of small size, optically visible nanocrystals. After imaging the molecules can be removed completely, leaving the surface intact, and thus the carbon nanotube electrical and mechanical properties are preserved. The successful and robust optical imaging allowed us to develop a dedicated image processing algorithm through which we are able to demonstrate a fully automated circuit design resulting in field effect transistors and inverters. Moreover, we demonstrate that this imaging method allows not only to locate carbon nanotubes but also, as in the case of suspended ones, to study their dynamic mechanical motion. PMID:27396506

  3. Automated circuit fabrication and direct characterization of carbon nanotube vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeevi, G.; Shlafman, M.; Tabachnik, T.; Rogachevsky, Z.; Rechnitz, S.; Goldshtein, I.; Shlafman, S.; Gordon, N.; Alchanati, G.; Itzhak, M.; Moshe, Y.; Hajaj, E. M.; Nir, H.; Milyutin, Y.; Izraeli, T. Y.; Razin, A.; Shtempluck, O.; Kotchtakov, V.; Yaish, Y. E.

    2016-07-01

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have fascinated many researchers due to their unprecedented properties. However, a major drawback in utilizing carbon nanotubes for practical applications is the difficulty in positioning or growing them at specific locations. Here we present a simple, rapid, non-invasive and scalable technique that enables optical imaging of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotube scaffold serves as a seed for nucleation and growth of small size, optically visible nanocrystals. After imaging the molecules can be removed completely, leaving the surface intact, and thus the carbon nanotube electrical and mechanical properties are preserved. The successful and robust optical imaging allowed us to develop a dedicated image processing algorithm through which we are able to demonstrate a fully automated circuit design resulting in field effect transistors and inverters. Moreover, we demonstrate that this imaging method allows not only to locate carbon nanotubes but also, as in the case of suspended ones, to study their dynamic mechanical motion.

  4. Cutting and sharpening carbon nanotubes using a carbon nanotube 'nanoknife'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xian Long; Chen, Qing; Liu, Yang; Mao Peng, Lian

    2007-05-01

    A new method has been developed to precisely cut and to sharpen carbon nanotubes using a 'nanoknife', which is a short carbon nanotube adhered to a metal tip. The mechanism for the cutting and the sharpening was proposed to be local vaporization of carbon caused by Joule heating. The 'nanoknife' was also found useful to cut other nanotubes and nanowires. The cutting process was also found useful to construct complex carbon nanotube structures.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail. PMID:26264684

  6. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Flexible and Stretchable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Le; Wang, Chuan

    2015-08-01

    The low-cost and large-area manufacturing of flexible and stretchable electronics using printing processes could radically change people's perspectives on electronics and substantially expand the spectrum of potential applications. Examples range from personalized wearable electronics to large-area smart wallpapers and from interactive bio-inspired robots to implantable health/medical apparatus. Owing to its one-dimensional structure and superior electrical property, carbon nanotube is one of the most promising material platforms for flexible and stretchable electronics. Here in this paper, we review the recent progress in this field. Applications of single-wall carbon nanotube networks as channel semiconductor in flexible thin-film transistors and integrated circuits, as stretchable conductors in various sensors, and as channel material in stretchable transistors will be discussed. Lastly, state-of-the-art advancement on printing process, which is ideal for large-scale fabrication of flexible and stretchable electronics, will also be reviewed in detail.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Suspended Carbon Nanotube Devices in Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Artyukhin, A; Stadermann, M; Stroeve, P; Bakajin, O; Noy, A

    2006-10-30

    Suspended carbon nanotube devices are a promising platform for future bio-electronic applications. Suspended carbon nanotube transistors have been previously fabricated in air; however all previous attempts to bring them into liquid failed. We analyze forces acting on the suspended nanotube devices during immersion into liquids and during device operation and show that surface tension forces acting on the suspended nanotubes during transfer into the liquid phase are responsible for the nanotube damage. We have developed a new strategy that circumvents these limitations by coating suspended nanotubes with a rigid inorganic shell in the gas phase. The coating reinforces the nanotubes and allows them to survive transfer through the interface. Subsequent removal of the coating in the solution phase restores pristine suspended nanotubes. We demonstrate that devices fabricated using this technique preserve their original electrical characteristics.

  9. Electrical properties and applications of carbon nanotube structures.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2007-01-01

    The experimentally verified electrical properties of carbon nanotube structures and manifestations in related phenomena such as thermoelectricity, superconductivity, electroluminescence, and photoconductivity are reviewed. The possibility of using naturally formed complex nanotube morphologies, such as Y-junctions, for new device architectures are then considered. Technological applications of the electrical properties of nanotube derived structures in transistor applications, high frequency nanoelectronics, field emission, and biological sensing are then outlined. The review concludes with an outlook on the technological potential of nanotubes and the need for new device architectures for nanotube systems integration. PMID:17450889

  10. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  11. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  12. Electronic transport characteristics in silicon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Guangcun; Wang, Yu; Huang, Wei

    2011-07-01

    The successful synthesis of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) has been reported, making these nanostructures a new novel candidate for future nanodevices. By self-consistently solving the Poisson equations using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism, we investigate the electronic transport and the role of gate bias in affecting the drive current of single-walled silicon nanotube (SW-SiNT) field-effect transistors (FETs). By comparison of a SW-CNT FET, it is found that the SW-SiNT with a high- k HfO gate oxide is a promising candidate for nanotube transistor with better performance. The results discussed here would serve as a versatile and powerful guideline for future experimental studies of SW-SiNT-based transistor with the purpose of exploring device application for nanoelectronics.

  13. A tunable carbon nanotube electromechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Vera; Yaish, Yuval; Üstünel, Hande; Roundy, David; Arias, Tomás A.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2004-09-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. In particular, NEMS oscillators have been proposed for use in ultrasensitive mass detection, radio-frequency signal processing, and as a model system for exploring quantum phenomena in macroscopic systems. Perhaps the ultimate material for these applications is a carbon nanotube. They are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross-sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus may be able to sense its own motion. In spite of this great promise, a room-temperature, self-detecting nanotube oscillator has not been realized, although some progress has been made. Here we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string-like oscillation modes of doubly clamped nanotube oscillators. We show that the resonance frequency can be widely tuned and that the devices can be used to transduce very small forces.

  14. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuan Ping

    2010-03-01

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage. PMID:20672061

  16. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    So, Hye-Mi; Sim, Jin Woo; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun; Chang, Won Seok

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  17. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  18. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact.

  19. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Abdel-Daiem, A

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc. For commercial applications, large quantities and high purity of carbon nanotubes are needed. Different types of carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in various ways. The most common techniques currently practiced are arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition and flame synthesis. The purification of CNTs is carried out using various techniques mainly oxidation, acid treatment, annealing, sonication, filtering chemical functionalization, etc. However, high-purity purification techniques still have to be developed. Real applications are still under development. This paper addresses the current research on the challenges that are associated with synthesis methods, purification methods, and dispersion and toxicity of CNTs within the scope of different engineering applications, energy, and environmental impact. PMID:26377211

  20. Copper-philic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgamwar, Sachin U.; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotube is having poor wet-ability with copper metal. Wet-ability of carbon nanotube was improved by exposing and creating more active sites on the surface of carbon nanotube. Carbon nanotubes were subjected to the prolong ultrasonication treatment of 20×103 Hz and 500W, which helped in disentanglement of carbon nanotube agglomerates and in breaking the weak bonds like pentagonal or heptagonal structure on the surface and on the CNT cap. Disentanglement of the carbon nanotube, resulted in exposing the defective sites on the surface and breaking of weak bonds, which assisted in creating the new defects on the surface. This process results in generates more active sites on the surface and it helps in improving the wet-ability of the carbon nanotube in copper.

  1. Carbon nanotube filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  2. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    PubMed

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  3. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  4. Carbon nanotube actuators

    PubMed

    Baughman; Cui; Zakhidov; Iqbal; Barisci; Spinks; Wallace; Mazzoldi; De Rossi D; Rinzler; Jaschinski; Roth; Kertesz

    1999-05-21

    Electromechanical actuators based on sheets of single-walled carbon nanotubes were shown to generate higher stresses than natural muscle and higher strains than high-modulus ferroelectrics. Like natural muscles, the macroscopic actuators are assemblies of billions of individual nanoscale actuators. The actuation mechanism (quantum chemical-based expansion due to electrochemical double-layer charging) does not require ion intercalation, which limits the life and rate of faradaic conducting polymer actuators. Unlike conventional ferroelectric actuators, low operating voltages of a few volts generate large actuator strains. Predictions based on measurements suggest that actuators using optimized nanotube sheets may eventually provide substantially higher work densities per cycle than any previously known technology.

  5. Bending and Twisting of Suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Arthur; Xu, Ya-Qiong; McEuen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    We combine suspended, aligned carbon nanotube transistors with optical trapping techniques and scanning photocurrent microscopy to investigate the mechanics of suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes as well as DNA-nanotube systems in solution. We study the movement of nanotubes by monitoring their photocurrent images and measure their thermal fluctuations by imaging microbeads that are tightly attached to nanotubes by single-stranded DNA. By analyzing thermal fluctuations of these microbeads and by using optical tweezers we are able to obtain the torsional and bending stiffness of nanotubes and then calculate their diameters. We can also measure, with subangstrom resolution, the effective attachment point of the microbead to the nanotube.

  6. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  8. Spin-based Optomechanics with Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-01-01

    A simple scheme for determination of spin-orbit coupling strength in spinbased optomechanics with carbon nanotubes is introduced, under the control of a strong pump field and a weak signal field. The physical mechanism comes from the phonon induced transparency (PIT), by relying on the coherent coupling of electron spin to vibrational motion of the nanotube, which is analogous to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect in atom systems. Based on this spin-nanotube optomechanical system, we also conceptually design a single photon router and a quantum microwave transistor, with ultralow pump power (~ pW) and tunable switching time, which should provide a unique platform for the study of spin-based microwave quantum optics and quantum information processing. PMID:23198093

  9. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  10. Method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor); Frazier, Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for manufacturing carbon nanotubes, including a step of inducing electrical current through a carbon anode and a carbon cathode under conditions effective to produce the carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon cathode is larger than the carbon anode. Preferably, a welder is used to induce the electrical current via an arc welding process. Preferably, an exhaust hood is placed on the anode, and the process does not require a closed or pressurized chamber. The process provides high-quality, single-walled carbon nanotubes, while eliminating the need for a metal catalyst.

  11. Carbon nanotube plane fastener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirahara, Kaori; Ajioka, Shoichi; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2011-12-01

    We report a feature of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that arises when the surfaces of two vertically-aligned CNT brushes are pressed together. Adhesion between the CNTs creates a plane fastener-like device. Observations from scanning electron microscopy and measurements of adhesion properties indicate a device-dependence on CNT density and shape near the tip region. Among other applications, such fasteners have the potential to attach small components onto micron-sized electronic devices.

  12. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  13. Carbon nanotube network varactor.

    PubMed

    Generalov, A A; Anoshkin, I V; Erdmanis, M; Lioubtchenko, D V; Ovchinnikov, V; Nasibulin, A G; Räisänen, A V

    2015-01-30

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  14. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  15. Graphene/Carbon Nanotube Cross-Junction Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blees, Melina; Xu, Xiaodong; van der Zande, Arend; Zhong, Zhaohui; Gabor, Nathan; Pham, Phi; McEuen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    We have built crossed carbon nanotube/graphene junctions from CVD graphene and aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes. Large-area single-layer graphene was grown on a copper film and transferred to silicon oxide, then lithographically patterned and electrically contacted. Highly aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes were CVD-grown on quartz and transferred to complete the devices. We probed these new geometries using electrical measurements, studied their optoelectronic response with scanning photocurrent microscopy, and explored the temperature and gate dependence of the junctions. We found that graphene acts as a very good electrode for carbon nanotubes, pointing to the possibility of creating fully-integrated, transparent, flexible transistors purely from carbon nanomaterials.

  16. High Speed Capacitor-Inverter Based Carbon Nanotube Full Adder

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Carbon Nanotube filed-effect transistor (CNFET) is one of the promising alternatives to the MOS transistors. The geometry-dependent threshold voltage is one of the CNFET characteristics, which is used in the proposed Full Adder cell. In this paper, we present a high speed Full Adder cell using CNFETs based on majority-not (Minority) function. Presented design uses eight transistors and eight capacitors. Simulation results show significant improvement in terms of delay and power-delay product in comparison to contemporary CNFET Adder Cells. Simulations were carried out using HSPICE based on CNFET model with 0.6 V VDD. PMID:20671796

  17. High speed capacitor-inverter based carbon nanotube full adder.

    PubMed

    Navi, K; Rashtian, M; Khatir, A; Keshavarzian, P; Hashemipour, O

    2010-01-01

    Carbon Nanotube filed-effect transistor (CNFET) is one of the promising alternatives to the MOS transistors. The geometry-dependent threshold voltage is one of the CNFET characteristics, which is used in the proposed Full Adder cell. In this paper, we present a high speed Full Adder cell using CNFETs based on majority-not (Minority) function. Presented design uses eight transistors and eight capacitors. Simulation results show significant improvement in terms of delay and power-delay product in comparison to contemporary CNFET Adder Cells. Simulations were carried out using HSPICE based on CNFET model with 0.6 V VDD. PMID:20671796

  18. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    PubMed

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  19. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  20. Assembly, physics, and application of highly electronic-type purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes in aligned array field effect transistors and photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in (1) achieving highly monodisperse semiconducting carbon nanotubes without problematic metallic nanotubes and (2) depositing these nanotubes into useful, organized arrays and assemblies on substrates have created new opportunities for studying the physics of these one-dimensional conductors and for applying them in electronics and photonics technologies. In this talk, I will present on two topics that are along these lines. In the first, we have pioneered a scalable approach for depositing aligned arrays of ultrahigh purity semiconducting SWCNTs (prepared using polyfluorene-derivatives) called floating evaporative self-assembly (FESA). FESA is exploited to create FETs with exceptionally high combined on-conductance and on-off ratio of 261 μS/ μm and 2 x105, respectively, for a channel length of 240 nm. This is 1400 x greater on-off ratio than SWCNT FETs fabricated by other methods, at comparable on-conductance per width of 250 μS/ μm, and 30-100 x greater on-conductance per width, at comparable on-off ratio of 105-107. In the second, we have discovered how to efficiently harvest photons using semiconducting SWCNTs by driving the dissociation of excitons using donor/acceptor heterojunctions. The flow of energy in SWCNT films occurs across a complex energy landscape, temporally resolved using two-dimensional white light ultrafast spectroscopy. We have demonstrated simple solar cells driven by SWCNT excitons, based on bilayers between C60 and ultrathin (5 nm) films of SWCNTs that achieve a 1% solar power conversion efficiency (7% at the bandgap). High internal quantum efficiency indicates that future blended or multijunction cells exploiting multiple layers will be many times more efficient.

  1. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale. PMID:27074626

  2. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  3. Silicon Encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A dual stage process of depositing bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (BCNTs) by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and coating Si using Radio frequency sputtering (RFS) technique. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron field emission studies (EFE). SEM results suggest a dense network of homogeneous silicon-coated BCNTs. From the comprehensive analysis of the results provided by these techniques emerges the picture of Si encapsulated BCNTs. PMID:20652067

  4. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  5. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  7. MoS{sub 2} nanotube field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Strojnik, M. E-mail: dragan.mihailovic@ijs.si; Mrzel, A.; Buh, J.; Strle, J.; Kovic, A.; Mihailovic, D. E-mail: dragan.mihailovic@ijs.si

    2014-09-15

    We report on electric field effects on electron transport in multi-walled MoS{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs), fabricated using a two-step synthesis method from Mo{sub 6}S{sub x}I{sub 9-x} nanowire bundle precursors. Transport properties were measured on 20 single nanotube field effect transistor (FET) devices, and compared with MoS{sub 2} layered crystal devices prepared using identical fabrication techniques. The NTs exhibited mobilities of up to 0.014 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1} and an on/off ratio of up to 60. As such they are comparable with previously reported WS{sub 2} nanotube FETs, but materials defects and imperfections apparently limit their performance compared with multilayer MoS{sub 2} FETs with similar number of layers.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  9. Analysis of long-channel nanotube field-effect-transistors (NT FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an analysis of long-channel nanotube (NT) field effect transistors (FET) from NASA's Ames Research Center. The structure of such a transistor including the electrode contact, 1D junction, and the planar junction is outlined. Also mentioned are various characteristics of a nanotube tip-equipped scanning tunnel microscope (STM).

  10. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  11. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  12. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  13. Bolometric-Effect-Based Wavelength-Selective Photodetectors Using Sorted Single Chirality Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Shi, Rongmei; Miao, Jinshui; Wei, Li; Chen, Yuan; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper exploits the chirality-dependent optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes for applications in wavelength-selective photodetectors. We demonstrate that thin-film transistors made with networks of carbon nanotubes work effectively as light sensors under laser illumination. Such photoresponse was attributed to photothermal effect instead of photogenerated carriers and the conclusion is further supported by temperature measurements. Additionally, by using different types of carbon nanotubes, including a single chirality (9,8) nanotube, the devices exhibit wavelength-selective response, which coincides well with the absorption spectra of the corresponding carbon nanotubes. This is one of the first reports of controllable and wavelength-selective bolometric photoresponse in macroscale assemblies of chirality-sorted carbon nanotubes. The results presented here provide a viable route for achieving bolometric-effect-based photodetectors with programmable response spanning from visible to near-infrared by using carbon nanotubes with pre-selected chiralities. PMID:26643777

  14. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  15. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single-and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs. PMID:23933617

  16. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V

    2013-12-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs.

  17. Carbon nanotubes as vaccine scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Dao, Tao; Mulvey, Justin J.; Feinberg, Evan; Alidori, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes display characteristics that are potentially useful in their development as scaffolds for vaccine compositions. These features include stability in vivo, lack of intrinsic immunogenicity, low toxicity, and the ability to be appended with multiple copies of antigens. In addition, the particulate nature of carbon nanotubes and their unusual properties of rapid entry into antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, make them especially useful as carriers of antigens. Early attempts demonstrating carbon nanotube-based vaccines can be used in both infectious disease settings and cancer are promising. PMID:23899863

  18. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  19. All About Chlorinated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbahar, Dogan; Berber, Savas

    2011-03-01

    The halogens are viable alternatives to harsher chemicals in the post-process of purification of carbon nanotube production. However the chlorine is known to bind less agresively to carbon nanotubes than fluorine and hydrogen. Therefore, in principle the residual Cl left after the halogen gas treatment of the nanotubes can be removed without damaging the nanotube walls easier. We report ab initio density functional calculation results about pure and defective carbon nanotubes of various diameters interacting with single and multiple chlorine atoms. We first focus on pure nanotubes and investigate the adsorption of additional Cl atoms near the first adsorbtion site, investigate the clustering tendency and most favourable configurations. We report the energetics results as well as the alteration of electronic properties. We then focus on monovacancy and divacancy defects on carbon nanotubes. It is a known fact that the defective site to be more active in this case. We apply the same procedure as in the pure nanotubes but also investigate the effect of chlorination on reconstruction process and also electronic transport properties. Supported by TUBITAK Grant No 108T740.

  20. Observation of the urbach tail in the effective density of States in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jones, David A; Lee, Ji Ung

    2011-10-12

    While a number of studies have reported evidence of localized states in carbon nanotube devices, the density distribution of these states has not been reported until now. By measuring trap emission current in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, we observe a prominent exponential tail in the density of states near the band edge. Since continuous distributions of localized states are typically associated with highly disordered systems, this observation was quite unexpected in carbon nanotubes, which are nearly ideal crystals. This continuum of localized states may explain a variety of phenomena in carbon nanotube systems, including the nearly universal lack of n-type conduction in strongly gated field-effect transistors. While our focus is on carbon nanotubes, this phenomenon may be ubiquitous to low-dimensional semiconductors in nonvacated environments.

  1. High-density integration of carbon nanotubes via chemical self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hongsik; Afzali, Ali; Han, Shu-Jen; Tulevski, George S.; Franklin, Aaron D.; Tersoff, Jerry; Hannon, James B.; Haensch, Wilfried

    2012-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have potential in the development of high-speed and power-efficient logic applications. However, for such technologies to be viable, a high density of semiconducting nanotubes must be placed at precise locations on a substrate. Here, we show that ion-exchange chemistry can be used to fabricate arrays of individually positioned carbon nanotubes with a density as high as 1 × 109 cm-2--two orders of magnitude higher than previous reports. With this approach, we assembled a high density of carbon-nanotube transistors in a conventional semiconductor fabrication line and then electrically tested more than 10,000 devices in a single chip. The ability to characterize such large distributions of nanotube devices is crucial for analysing transistor performance, yield and semiconducting nanotube purity.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  3. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  4. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  5. Dispersible carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Soulié-Ziakovic, Corinne; Nicolaÿ, Renaud; Prevoteau, Alexandre; Leibler, Ludwik

    2014-01-27

    A method is proposed to produce nanoparticles dispersible and recyclable in any class of solvents, and the concept is illustrated with the carbon nanotubes. Classically, dispersions of CNTs can be achieved through steric stabilization induced by adsorbed or grafted polymer chains. Yet, the surface modification of CNTs surfaces is irreversible, and the chemical nature of the polymer chains imposes the range of solvents in which CNTs can be dispersed. To address this limitation, supramolecular bonds can be used to attach and to detach polymer chains from the surface of CNTs. The reversibility of supramolecular bonds offers an easy way to recycle CNTs as well as the possibility to disperse the same functional CNTs in any type of solvent, by simply adapting the chemical nature of the stabilizing chains to the dispersing medium. The concept of supramolecular functionalization can be applied to other particles, for example, silica or metal oxides, as well as to dispersing in polymer melts, films or coatings.

  6. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  7. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  8. Cantilevered carbon nanotube hygrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroyanagi, Toshinori; Terada, Yuki; Takei, Kuniharu; Akita, Seiji; Arie, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the effects of humidity on the vibrations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using two types of CNT cantilevers: open-ended and close-ended CNT cantilevers. As the humidity increases, the resonant frequency of the open-ended CNT cantilever decreases due to the adsorption of water molecules onto the CNT tip, whereas that of the close-ended CNT cantilever increases probably due to the change in the viscosity of the air surrounding the CNT cantilever, which is negatively correlated with the humidity of air. Our findings suggest that a close-ended CNT cantilever is more suitable for a quick-response and ultrasensitive hygrometer because it continuously reads the viscosity change of moist air in the vicinity of the CNT.

  9. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Haider; Yetisen, Ali K.; Ahmed, Rajib; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2-3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  10. Oscillating carbon nanotori along carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Hill, James M.

    2007-03-01

    The discovery of carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and C60 fullerenes, has given rise to a number of potential nanoscale devices. One such device is the gigahertz oscillator, comprising an inner shell sliding inside an outer shell of a multiwalled carbon nanotube, and which, at least theoretically, generates oscillatory frequencies in the gigahertz range. Following the concept of these gigahertz oscillators and the recent discovery of “fullerene crop circles,” here we propose the notion of a nanotorus-nanotube oscillator comprising a carbon nanotorus which is sucked by the van der Waals force onto the carbon nanotube, and subsequently oscillates along the nanotube axis due to the equal and opposite pulselike forces acting at either end of the nanotube. Assuming a continuum approach, where the interatomic interactions are replaced by uniform atomic surface densities, and assuming that the geometry of the nanotube and nanotorus is such that the nanotorus always remains symmetrically situated around the nanotube, we present the basic mechanics of such a system, including the determination of the suction and acceptance energies, and the frequency of the resulting oscillatory motion. In contrast to the previously studied gigahertz nanoscale oscillators, here the oscillatory frequencies are shown to be in the megahertz range. Our study, although purely theoretical must necessarily precede any experimental implementation of such oscillatory systems.

  11. PECVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAninch, Ian; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), using inductively coupled plasma, has been used to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCF) on substrates sputtered with aluminum and iron catalyst. The capacitive plasma's power has been shown to cause a transition from nanotubes to nanofibers, depending on the strength of the plasma. The temperature, placement, and other factors have been shown to affect the height and density of the tube and fiber growth.

  12. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  13. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  14. Controlled growth of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vajtai, R; Wei, B Q; Ajayan, P M

    2004-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties and hold great promise for future applications. The most important aspects of this structure are its low density, high aspect ratio, one dimensionality, high mechanical strength and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We present a short, state-of-the-art account of tailored nanotube growth. To provide these properties in real devices there exists a need for producing nanotubes on substrates. The challenge in the creation of mesoscale nanotube-based architectures and tailored nanotube networks consisting of thousands of tubes in a predefined order is obviously great. Currently, chemical vapour deposition (CVD) appears to be the most powerful method for achieving such required structures. We describe our work on a new synthesis method, based on catalytic CVD using mainly gas-phase catalyst delivery. Gas-phase catalyst delivery allows us to assemble single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in predetermined multiple orientations on substrates to build one- to three-dimensional architectures. We are able to control, to a large extent, the types of nanotubes produced, their lengths, locations and their orientations. The ability to make mesoscale architectures with nanotubes should lead us to develop applications in areas such as nano-electromechanical systems.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes for Polymer Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anctil, Annick; Dileo, Roberta; Schauerman, Chris; Landi, Brian; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being investigated for optical absorption, exciton dissociation, and carrier transport in polymer photovoltaic devices. In the present work, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by an Alexandrite pulsed laser vaporization reactor at standard conditions and purified based upon our previously reported TOP procedure. The SWNTs were dispersed in polymer composites for pure MEH-PPV, pure P3HT, and [C60]-PCBM-P3HT (1:1 by weight) as a function of nanotube weight loading (0.1 -- 5% w/w). The AM0 current-voltage measurements for structures sandwiched between PEDOT/PSS coated ITO substrates and an evaporated aluminum contact demonstrate the dramatic effect of SWNT content on the short circuit current density, with conversions efficiencies consistently greater than 1%. The temperature coefficient for nanotube-containing polymer photovoltaics has been compared to conventional PCBM-P3HT devices, and the general relationship of increasing efficiency with increasing temperature is observed. However, the necessity to control nanotube percolation to prevent device shunting has led to recent developments which focus on controlling nanotube length through oxidative cutting, the deposition of intrinsic polymer layers, and the use of aligned carbon nanotube arrays for preferential charge transport.

  17. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Sevilla Torres, Galo A.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2014-06-01

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective.

  18. Carbon nanotube network embroidered graphene films for monolithic all-carbon electronics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Enzheng; Li, Hongbian; Yang, Long; Hou, Junfeng; Li, Yuanchang; Li, Li; Cao, Anyuan; Fang, Ying

    2015-01-27

    A unique cage growth of graphene is developed by using carbon nanotube (CNT) spider webs as porous templates, resulting in CNT/graphene hybrids with high conductivity and mechanical flexibility. Furthermore, monolithic all-carbon transistors with graphene as active elements and CNT/graphene hybrids as contacts and interconnects are directly formed by chemical synthesis, and flexible all-carbon bioelectronics are subsequently demonstrated for in vivo mapping of cardiac signals. PMID:25607917

  19. Electronic Sensitivity of Carbon Nanotubes to Internal Water Wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Di; Pang, Pei; He, Jin; Luo, Tao; Park, Jae Hyun nmn; Krstic, Predrag S; Nuckolls, Colin; Tang, Jinyao; Lindsay, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed devices in which the interior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistor acts as a nanofluidic channel that connects two fluid reservoirs, permitting measurement of the electronic properties of the SWCNT as it is wetted by an analyte. Wetting of the inside of the SWCNT by water turns the transistor on, while wetting of the outside has little effect. These observations are consistent with theoretical simulations that show that internal water both generates a large dipole electric field, causing charge polarization of the tube and metal electrodes, and shifts the valance band of the SWCNT, while external water has little effect.

  20. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  1. Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Intelligence Bulletin 65: Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... composed of engineered nanoparticles, such as metal oxides, nanotubes, nanowires, quantum dots, and carbon fullerenes (buckyballs), among ...

  2. Single carbon nanotube photovoltaic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkelid, M.; Zwiller, V.

    2013-10-01

    Here we present photocurrent measurements on a single suspended carbon nanotube p-n junction. The p-n junction was induced by electrostatic doping by local gates, and the E11 and E22 resonances in the nanotube could be probed using photocurrent spectroscopy. Current-voltage characteristics were recorded, revealing an enhanced optoelectronic response on resonance. The internal power conversion efficiency for the nanotube diode was extracted on and off resonance with the E11 and E22, and a large internal power conversion efficiency was observed. An internal efficiency of up to 23% is reported for the E11, showing the potential of carbon nanotubes to be used as the active element in photovoltaic devices. Finally, a photovoltaic device is proposed which exploits this enhanced efficiency.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  4. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  5. Directed Growth of Carbon Nanotubes Across Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Meyyapan, Meyya

    2008-01-01

    An experiment has shown that when single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown by chemical vapor deposition in the presence of an electric field of suitable strength, the nanotubes become aligned along the electric field. In an important class of contemplated applications, one would exploit this finding in fabricating nanotube transistors; one would grow SWNTs across gaps between electrodes that would serve, subsequently, as source and drain contacts during operation of the transistors. In preparation for the experiment, a multilayer catalyst comprising a 20-nmthick underlayer of iridium (platinum group), a 1-nm-thick middle layer of iron, and a 0.2-nm-thick outer layer of molybdenum was ion-beam sputtered onto a quartz substrate. A 25 micrometers-diameter iron wire was used as a shadow mask during the sputtering to create a 25 micrometers gap in the catalyst. Then electrical leads were connected to the catalyst areas separated by the gap so that these catalyst areas would also serve as electrodes. The substrate as thus prepared was placed in a growth chamber that consisted of a quartz tube of 1-in. (2.54-cm) diameter enclosed in a furnace. SWNTs of acceptably high quantity and quality were grown in 10 minutes with methane at atmospheric pressure flowing through the chamber at a rate of 1,000 standard cubic centimeters per minute at a temperature of 900 C. To prevent oxidation of the SWNTs, the chamber was purged with 99.999-percent pure argon before and after growth, and the chamber was cooled to less than 300 C before opening it to the atmosphere after growth. When no voltage was applied across the gap, the SWNTs grew in random directions extending out from the edges of the catalyst at the gap. When a potential of 10 V was applied between the catalyst/electrode areas to create an electric field across the gap, the SWNTs grew across the gap, as shown in the figure.

  6. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  8. Large-Scale Processing of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John; Sridhar, K. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Scale-up difficulties and high energy costs are two of the more important factors that limit the availability of various types of nanotube carbon. While several approaches are known for producing nanotube carbon, the high-powered reactors typically produce nanotubes at rates measured in only grams per hour and operate at temperatures in excess of 1000 C. These scale-up and energy challenges must be overcome before nanotube carbon can become practical for high-consumption structural and mechanical applications. This presentation examines the issues associated with using various nanotube production methods at larger scales, and discusses research being performed at NASA Ames Research Center on carbon nanotube reactor technology.

  9. Microscopy of single-layer carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Su; Zhou, Dan

    1994-07-01

    Single-layer carbon nanotubes produced with yttrium carbide as catalyst have been studied with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The morphology, condition of iamging and the method of measurement to determine the actual diameter of a single-layer carbon nanotube have been detailed and the growth mechanism of single-layer carbon nanotubes has been discussed in this research.

  10. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  11. Improving Ambipolar Charge Injection in Polymer FETs with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaumseil, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Efficient charge injection is a key issue for organic field-effect transistors (FET). Various methods can be used to optimize injection of either holes or electrons, for example, by modifying the workfunction of metallic electrodes with self-assembled monolayers. For ambipolar FETs this is much more difficult because injection of both charge carriers has to be improved at the same time. Here we demonstrate a simple process to significantly improve ambipolar charge injection in bottom contact/top gate polymer field-effect transistors by adding single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) to the semiconducting polymer at concentrations well below the percolation limit. Such polymer/carbon nanotube hybrid systems are easily produced by ultrasonication and dispersion of SWNT in a conjugated polymer solution. Even at very low nanotube concentrations the charge injection of both holes and electrons, for example, into poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) is significantly enhanced leading to lower contact resistances and threshold voltages than in FETs with pristine polymer films. This method can be extended to other semiconductors like n-type naphthalene-bis(dicarboximide)-based polymers (e.g. P(NDI2OD-T2)) for which hole injection was greatly enhanced. The proposed mechanism for this effect of carbon nanotubes on injection is independent of the polarity of the charge carriers. It can be maximized by patterning layers of pure carbon nanotubes onto the injecting electrodes before spincoating the pristine polymers leading to almost ohmic contacts for polymers, which usually show only strongly Schottky-barrier-limited injection. This improved injection of holes and electrons allows for a wider range of accessible polymers for ambipolar and thus also light-emitting transistors.

  12. Controllable Hysteresis and Threshold Voltage of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-tube Transistors with Ferroelectric Polymer Top-Gate Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi-Lin; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhang, Cheng; Dai, Rui-Xuan; Li, Xian; Meng, Xiang-Jian; Zhu, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Double-gated field effect transistors have been fabricated using the SWCNT networks as channel layer and the organic ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) film spin-coated as top gate insulators. Standard photolithography process has been adopted to achieve the patterning of organic P(VDF-TrFE) films and top-gate electrodes, which is compatible with conventional CMOS process technology. An effective way for modulating the threshold voltage in the channel of P(VDF-TrFE) top-gate transistors under polarization has been reported. The introduction of functional P(VDF-TrFE) gate dielectric also provides us an alternative method to suppress the initial hysteresis of SWCNT networks and obtain a controllable ferroelectric hysteresis behavior. Applied bottom gate voltage has been found to be another effective way to highly control the threshold voltage of the networked SWCNTs based FETs by electrostatic doping effect. PMID:26980284

  13. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  14. Bandgap modulation of carbon nanotubes by encapsulated metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jhinhwan; Kim, H; Kahng, S-J; Kim, G; Son, Y-W; Ihm, J; Kato, H; Wang, Z W; Okazaki, T; Shinohara, H; Kuk, Young

    2002-02-28

    Motivated by the technical and economic difficulties in further miniaturizing silicon-based transistors with the present fabrication technologies, there is a strong effort to develop alternative electronic devices, based, for example, on single molecules. Recently, carbon nanotubes have been successfully used for nanometre-sized devices such as diodes, transistors, and random access memory cells. Such nanotube devices are usually very long compared to silicon-based transistors. Here we report a method for dividing a semiconductor nanotube into multiple quantum dots with lengths of about 10nm by inserting Gd@C82 endohedral fullerenes. The spatial modulation of the nanotube electronic bandgap is observed with a low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscope. We find that a bandgap of approximately 0.5eV is narrowed down to approximately 0.1eV at sites where endohedral metallofullerenes are inserted. This change in bandgap can be explained by local elastic strain and charge transfer at metallofullerene sites. This technique for fabricating an array of quantum dots could be used for nano-electronics and nano-optoelectronics.

  15. Carbon nanotube: the inside story.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were serendipitously discovered as a byproduct of fullerenes by direct current (DC) arc discharge; and today this is the most-wanted material in the nanotechnology research. In this brief review, I begin with the history of the discovery of CNTs and focus on CNTs produced by arc discharge in hydrogen atmosphere, which is little explored outside my laboratory. DC arc discharge evaporation of pure graphite rod in pure hydrogen gas results in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) of high crystallinity in the cathode deposit. As-grown MWCNTs have very narrow inner diameter. Raman spectra of these MWCNTs show high-intensity G-band, unusual high-frequency radial breathing mode at 570 cm(-1), and a new characteristic peak near 1850 cm(-1). Exciting carbon nanowires (CNWs), consisting of a linear carbon chain in the center of MWCNTs are also produced. Arc evaporation of graphite rod containing metal catalysts results in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the whole chamber like macroscopic webs. Two kinds of arc method have been developed to produce SWCNTs: Arc plasma jet (APJ) and Ferrum-Hydrogen (FH) arc methods. Some new purification methods for as-produced SWCNTs are reviewed. Finally, double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are also described.

  16. Single molecule sensing with carbon nanotube devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick C.; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Iftikhar, Mariam; Corso, Brad L.; Gul, O. Tolga; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    2013-09-01

    Nanoscale electronic devices like field-effect transistors have long promised to provide sensitive, label-free detection of biomolecules. In particular, single-walled carbon nanotubes have the requisite sensitivity to detect single molecule events and sufficient bandwidth to directly monitor single molecule dynamics in real time. Recent measurements have demonstrated this premise by monitoring the dynamic, single-molecule processivity of three different enzymes: lysozyme, protein Kinase A, and the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I. In each case, recordings resolved detailed trajectories of tens of thousands of individual chemical events and provided excellent statistics for single-molecule events. This electronic technique has a temporal resolution approaching 1 microsecond, which provides a new window for observing brief, intermediate transition states. In addition, the devices are indefinitely stable, so that the same molecule can be observed for minutes and hours. The extended recordings provide new insights into rare events like transitions to chemically-inactive conformations.

  17. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by

  18. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  19. Photodetector based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A.; Kitsyuk, E.; Ryazanov, R.; Timoshenkov, V.; Adamov, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Photodetector based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) was investigated. Sensors were done on quartz and silicon susbtrate. Samples of photodetectors sensors were produced by planar technology. This technology included deposition of first metal layer (Al), lithography for pads formation, etching, and formation of local catalyst area by inverse lithography. Vertically-aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes were directly synthesized on substrate by PECVD method. I-V analysis and spectrum sensitivity of photodetector were investigated for 0.4 μm - 1.2 μm wavelength. Resistivity of CNT layers over temperature was detected in the range of -20°C to 100°C.

  20. All carbon nanotubes are not created equal

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, David B; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents the various factors that enter into consideration when choosing the source of carbon nanotubes for a specific application. Carbon nanotubes are giant molecules made of pure carbon. They have captured the imagination of the scientific community by the unique structure that provides superior physical, chemical, and electrical properties. However, a surprisingly wide disparity exists between the intrinsic properties determined under ideal conditions and the properties that carbon nanotubes exhibit in real world situations. The lack of uniformity in carbon nanotube properties is likely to be the main obstacle holding back the development of carbon nanotube applications. This tutorial addresses the nonuniformity of carbon nanotube properties from the synthesis standpoint. This synthesis-related nonuniformity is on top of the intrinsic chirality distribution that gives the ~1:2 ratio of metallic to semiconducting nanotubes. From the standpoint of carbon bonding chemistry the variation in the quality and reproducibility of carbon nanotube materials is not unexpected. It is an intrinsic feature that is related to the metastability of carbon structures. The extent to which this effect is manifested in carbon nanotube formation is governed by the type and the kinetics of the carbon nanotube synthesis reaction. Addressing this variation is critical if nanotubes are to live up to the potential already demonstrated by their phenomenal physical properties.

  1. Biomedical applications of carbon-nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Jay Russell; Jin, Chunming; Narayan, Roger J; Aggarwal, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    The unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes make them attractive for a variety of biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubes have been used to modify conventional biomedical materials to enhance mechanical properties, biocompatibility, or to impart other functionalities. New multifunctional composite materials using carbon nanotubes have been developed by combining them with inorganic, polymeric or biological materials. The biomedical applications for which novel carbon nanotube composites have been investigated include antimicrobial coatings, neural implants, tissue engineering scaffolds and electrochemical biosensors. In this paper, research on development and application of carbon nanotube composites for biomedical applications has been reviewed. PMID:23277017

  2. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanotube forests on copper catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Bartosz; Terzyk, Artur P.; Wiśniewski, Marek; Gauden, Piotr A.; Szybowicz, Mirosław

    2014-09-01

    The growth of carbon nanotubes on bulk copper is studied. We show for the first time, that super growth chemical vapor deposition method can be successfully applied for preparation of nanotubes on copper catalyst, and the presence of hydrogen is necessary. Next, different methods of copper surface activation are studied, to improve catalyst efficiency. Among them, applied for the first time for copper catalyst in nanotubes synthesis, sulfuric acid activation is the most promising. Among tested samples the surface modified for 10 min is the most active, causing the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests. Obtained results have potential importance in application of nanotubes and copper in electronic chips and nanodevices.

  3. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  4. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Passive Intermodulation Device for Nonlinear Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Mitchell; Perez, Israel; Rockway, John

    2014-03-01

    The navy is interested in designing RF front-ends for receivers to handle high power jammers and other strong interferers. Instead of blocking that energy or dissipating it as heat in filters or amplifiers, this project investigates re-directing that energy for harvesting and storage. The approach is based on channelizing a high power jamming signal into a passive intermodulation device to create intermodulation products in sub-band frequencies, which could then be harvested for energy. The intermodulation device is fabricated using carbon nanotube transistors and such devices can be modified by creating chemical defects in the sidewalls of the nanotubes and locally gating the devices with a slowly varying electric field. These effects controllably enhance the hysteretic non-linearity in the transistors IV behavior. Combining these components with a RF energy harvester on the back-end should optimize the re-use of inbound jamming energy while maximizing the utility of standard back end radio components.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Material Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Leonard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Niolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2006-01-01

    The nanomaterial activities at NASA Johnson Space Center focus on carbon nanotube production, characterization and their applications for aerospace systems. Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced by arc and laser methods. Characterization of the nanotube material is performed using the NASA JSC protocol developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA. A possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be discussed. Changes in the quality of the material collected in different regions of the arc and laser production chambers is assessed using the original JSC protocol. The observed variations indicate different growth conditions in different regions of the production chambers.

  7. Plasma CVD of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Cruden, B.; Hash, D.; Meyyappan, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes(CNT) exhibit remarkable mechanical and unique electronic properties and thus have created excitement in the research community about their potential in electronics, computing, sensor and structural applications. Realization of these applications critically depends on the ability to control the properties(such as diameter, chirality) as well purity. We have investigated CNT growth using an inductively coupled plasma(ICP) process using hydrocarbon feedstock. The catalyst required for nanotube growth consists of thin sputtered layers of aluminum and iron(10 nm each) and aligned carbon nanotubes have been obtained. Optical emission diagnostics as well as a plasma modeling effort have been undertaken to understand growth mechanisms. This presentation will discuss growth characteristics under various pressure, power and feedgas compositions and our understanding from modeling and diagnostics.

  8. Conductance Oscillations in Squashed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrez, H.; Anantram, M. P.; Svizhenko, A.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics and electrical conductance calculations are used to probe the electromechanical properties of squashed metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance and bandgap of armchair nanotubes show oscillations upon squashing. The physical origin of these oscillations is attributed to interaction of carbon atoms with a fourth neighbor. Squashing of armchair and zigzag nanotubes ultimately leads to metallic behavior.

  9. Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Supriyo; Anatram, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    The recent report of quantized conductance in a 4 m long multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) raises the exciting possibility of ballistic transport at room temperature over relatively long distances. We argue that this is made possible by the special symmetry of the eigenstates of the lowest propagating modes in metallic nanotubes which suppresses backscattering. This unusual effect is absent for the higher propagating modes so that transport is not ballistic once the bias exceeds the cut-off energy for the higher modes, which is estimated to be approximately 75 meV for nanotubes of diameter approximately 15 nm. Also, we show that the symmetry of the eigenstates can significantly affect their coupling to the reservoir and hence the contact resistance. A simple model is presented that can be used to understand the observed conductance-voltage characteristics.

  10. Can nitrones functionalize carbon nanotubes?

    PubMed

    Ghini, Giacomo; Luconi, Lapo; Rossin, Andrea; Bianchini, Claudio; Giambastiani, Giuliano; Cicchi, Stefano; Lascialfari, Luisa; Brandi, Alberto; Giannasi, Alessandra

    2010-01-14

    An unprecedented functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been conveniently achieved by the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of a cyclic nitrone. This organic functionalization yields materials with a great solubility in DMF (close to 10 mg per mL of DMF) preferentially occurring at the defects of the MWCNT sp(2) network. PMID:20024342

  11. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Francois

    2014-06-11

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  12. Thermoelectrics: Carbon nanotubes get high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispin, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Waste heat can be converted to electricity by thermoelectric generators, but their development is hindered by the lack of cheap materials with good thermoelectric properties. Now, carbon-nanotube-based materials are shown to have improved properties when purified to contain only semiconducting species and then doped.

  13. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    ScienceCinema

    Leonard, Francois

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  14. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  15. LDRD final report : chromophore-functionalized aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this project was to expand upon previously demonstrated single carbon nanotube devices by preparing a more practical, multi-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device. As a late-start, proof-of-concept project, the work focused on the fabrication and testing of chromophore-functionalized aligned SWNT field effect transistors (SWNT-FET). Such devices have not yet been demonstrated. The advantages of fabricating aligned SWNT devices include increased device cross-section to improve sensitivity to light, elimination of increased electrical resistance at nanotube junctions in random mat devices, and the ability to model device responses. The project did not achieve the goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays, but a new SWNT growth capability was established that will benefit future projects. Although the ultimate goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays was not achieved, the work did lead to a new carbon nanotube growth capability at Sandia/CA. The synthesis of dense arrays of horizontally aligned SWNTs is a developing area of research with significant potential for new discoveries. In particular, the ability to prepare arrays of carbon nanotubes of specific electronic types (metallic or semiconducting) could yield new classes of nanoscale devices.

  16. Arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes with full surface coverage for high-performance electronics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen; Tulevski, George S; Zhu, Yu; Lu, Darsen D; Haensch, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have exceptional electronic properties and have been proposed as a replacement for silicon in applications such as low-cost thin-film transistors and high-performance logic devices. However, practical devices will require dense, aligned arrays of electronically pure nanotubes to optimize performance, maximize device packing density and provide sufficient drive current (or power output) for each transistor. Here, we show that aligned arrays of semiconducting carbon nanotubes can be assembled using the Langmuir-Schaefer method. The arrays have a semiconducting nanotube purity of 99% and can fully cover a surface with a nanotube density of more than 500 tubes/µm. The nanotube pitch is self-limited by the diameter of the nanotube plus the van der Waals separation, and the intrinsic mobility of the nanotubes is preserved after array assembly. Transistors fabricated using this approach exhibit significant device performance characteristics with a drive current density of more than 120 µA µm(-1), transconductance greater than 40 µS µm(-1) and on/off ratios of ∼1 × 10(3).

  17. Carbon nanotubes by the metallocene route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Rahul; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1997-03-01

    Pyrolysis of metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and nickelocene, is shown to yield carbon nanotubes and metal-filled onion-like structures. Pyrolysis of benzene in the presence of a metallocene gives high yields of nanotubes, the wall thickness of the nanotubes depending on the metallocene content. Pyrolysis of benzene in the absence of any metal however gives monodispersed nanospheres of carbon rather than nanotubes.

  18. Endohedral impurities in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Clougherty, Dennis P

    2003-01-24

    A generalization of the Anderson model that includes pseudo-Jahn-Teller impurity coupling is proposed to describe distortions of an endohedral impurity in a carbon nanotube. Within mean-field theory, spontaneous axial symmetry breaking is found when the vibronic coupling strength g exceeds a critical value. The effective potential is found to have O(2) symmetry, in agreement with numerical calculations. For metallic zigzag nanotubes endohedrally doped with transition metals in the dilute limit, the low-energy properties of the system may display two-channel Kondo behavior; however, strong vibronic coupling is seen to exponentially suppress the Kondo energy scale. PMID:12570507

  19. Endohedral Impurities in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2003-01-01

    A generalization of the Anderson model that includes pseudo-Jahn-Teller impurity coupling is proposed to describe distortions of an endohedral impurity in a carbon nanotube. Within mean-field theory, spontaneous axial symmetry breaking is found when the vibronic coupling strength g exceeds a critical value. The effective potential is found to have O(2) symmetry, in agreement with numerical calculations. For metallic zigzag nanotubes endohedrally doped with transition metals in the dilute limit, the low-energy properties of the system may display two-channel Kondo behavior; however, strong vibronic coupling is seen to exponentially suppress the Kondo energy scale.

  20. Carbon nanotubes and graphene towards soft electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-04-01

    Although silicon technology has been the main driving force for miniaturizing device dimensions to improve cost and performance, the current application of Si to soft electronics (flexible and stretchable electronics) is limited due to material rigidity. As a result, various prospective materials have been proposed to overcome the rigidity of conventional Si technology. In particular, nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are promising due to outstanding elastic properties as well as an excellent combination of electronic, optoelectronic, and thermal properties compared to conventional rigid silicon. The uniqueness of these nano-carbon materials has opened new possibilities for soft electronics, which is another technological trend in the market. This review covers the recent progress of soft electronics research based on CNTs and graphene. We discuss the strategies for soft electronics with nano-carbon materials and their preparation methods (growth and transfer techniques) to devices as well as the electrical characteristics of transparent conducting films (transparency and sheet resistance) and device performances in field effect transistor (FET) (structure, carrier type, on/off ratio, and mobility). In addition to discussing state of the art performance metrics, we also attempt to clarify trade-off issues and methods to control the trade-off on/off versus mobility). We further demonstrate accomplishments of the CNT network in flexible integrated circuits on plastic substrates that have attractive characteristics. A future research direction is also proposed to overcome current technological obstacles necessary to realize commercially feasible soft electronics.

  1. From carbon nanotubes to carbon atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas García, Gilberto; Zhang, Weijia; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Carbyne is a linear allotrope of carbon. It is formed by a linear arrangement of carbon atoms with sp-hybridization. We present a reliable and reproducible experiment to obtain these carbon atomic chains using few-layer-graphene (FLG) sheets and a HRTEM. First the FLG sheets were synthesized from worm-like exfoliated graphite and then drop-casted on a lacey-carbon copper grid. Once in the TEM, two holes are opened near each other in a FLG sheet by focusing the electron beam into a small spot. Due to the radiation, the carbon atoms rearrange themselves between the two holes and form carbon fibers. The beam is concentrated on the carbon fibers in order excite the atoms and induce a tension until multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is formed. As the radiation continues the MWCNT breaks down until there is only a single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Then, when the SWCNT breaks, an atomic carbon chain is formed, lasts for several seconds under the radiation and finally breaks. This demonstrates the stability of this carbon structure.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  3. Carbon-Nanotube Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Wong, Eric; Schlecht, Erich; Hunt, Brian; Siegel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Schottky diodes based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are being developed as essential components of the next generation of submillimeter-wave sensors and sources. Initial performance predictions have shown that the performance characteristics of these devices can exceed those of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes that have been the components of choice for room-temperature submillimeter-wave sensors for more than 50 years. For state-of-the-art Schottky diodes used as detectors at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz, the inherent parasitic capacitances associated with their semiconductor junction areas and the resistances associated with low electron mobilities limit achievable sensitivity. The performance of such a detector falls off approximately exponentially with frequency above 500 GHz. Moreover, when used as frequency multipliers for generating signals, state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes exhibit extremely low efficiencies, generally putting out only micro-watts of power at frequencies up to 1.5 THz. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes can be overcome by exploiting the unique electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A single-walled carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on its chirality, and exhibits high electron mobility (recently reported to be approx.= 2x10(exp 5)sq cm/V-s) and low parasitic capacitance. Because of the narrowness of nanotubes, Schottky diodes based on carbon nanotubes have ultra-small junction areas (of the order of a few square nanometers) and consequent junction capacitances of the order of 10(exp -18) F, which translates to cutoff frequency >5 THz. Because the turn-on power levels of these devices are very low (of the order of nano-watts), the input power levels needed for pumping local oscillators containing these devices should be lower than those needed for local oscillators containing state-of-the-art solid

  4. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  5. Carbon nanotubes for thermal interface materials in microelectronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei

    As the integration scale of transistors/devices in a chip/system keeps increasing, effective cooling has become more and more important in microelectronics. To address the thermal dissipation issue, one important solution is to develop thermal interface materials with higher performance. Carbon nanotubes, given their high intrinsic thermal and mechanical properties, and their high thermal and chemical stabilities, have received extensive attention from both academia and industry as a candidate for high-performance thermal interface materials. The thesis is devoted to addressing some challenges related to the potential application of carbon nanotubes as thermal interface materials in microelectronics. These challenges include: 1) controlled synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates via chemical vapor deposition and the fundamental understanding involved; 2) development of a scalable annealing process to improve the intrinsic properties of synthesized carbon nanotubes; 3) development of a state-of-art assembling process to effectively implement high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes into a flip-chip assembly; 4) a reliable thermal measurement of intrinsic thermal transport property of vertically aligned carbon nanotube films; 5) improvement of interfacial thermal transport between carbon nanotubes and other materials. The major achievements are summarized. 1. Based on the fundamental understanding of catalytic chemical vapor deposition processes and the growth mechanism of carbon nanotube, fast synthesis of high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates (e.g., copper, quartz, silicon, aluminum oxide, etc.) has been successfully achieved. The synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on the bulk copper substrate by the thermal chemical vapor deposition process has set a world record. In order to functionalize the synthesized carbon nanotubes while maintaining their good vertical alignment

  6. Transport spectroscopy of chemical nanostructures: the case of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenjie; Bockrath, Marc; Park, Hongkun

    2005-01-01

    Transport spectroscopy, a technique based on current-voltage measurements of individual nanostructures in a three-terminal transistor geometry, has emerged as a powerful new tool to investigate the electronic properties of chemically derived nanostructures. In this review, we discuss the utility of this approach using the recent studies of single-nanotube transistors as an example. Specifically, we discuss how transport measurements can be used to gain detailed insight into the electronic motion in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes in several distinct regimes, depending on the coupling strength of the contacts to the nanotubes. Measurements of nanotube devices in these different conductance regimes have enabled a detailed analysis of the transport properties, including the experimental determination of all Hartree-Fock parameters that govern the electronic structure of metallic nanotubes and the demonstration of Fabry-Perot resonators based on the interference of electron waves.

  7. TRANSPORT SPECTROSCOPY OF CHEMICAL NANOSTRUCTURES: The Case of Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenjie; Bockrath, Marc; Park, Hongkun

    2005-05-01

    Transport spectroscopy, a technique based on current-voltage measurements of individual nanostructures in a three-terminal transistor geometry, has emerged as a powerful new tool to investigate the electronic properties of chemically derived nanostructures. In this review, we discuss the utility of this approach using the recent studies of single-nanotube transistors as an example. Specifically, we discuss how transport measurements can be used to gain detailed insight into the electronic motion in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes in several distinct regimes, depending on the coupling strength of the contacts to the nanotubes. Measurements of nanotube devices in these different conductance regimes have enabled a detailed analysis of the transport properties, including the experimental determination of all Hartree-Fock parameters that govern the electronic structure of metallic nanotubes and the demonstration of Fabry-Perot resonators based on the interference of electron waves.

  8. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Nygârd, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike in conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and valley freedom. The interplay between the two is the focus of this review. The energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are explained, together with their consequences for transport measurements through nanotube quantum dots. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly modifies their transport behavior. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, open questions for the field are also clearly stated. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both be reduced to a low level.

  9. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  10. Wetting transition for carbon nanotube arrays under metal contacts.

    PubMed

    Perebeinos, V; Tersoff, J

    2015-02-27

    Structural arrays with nanoscale spacing arise in many device concepts. Carbon nanotube transistors are an extreme example, where a practical technology will require arrays of parallel nanotubes with spacing of order 10 nm or less. We show that with decreasing pitch there is a first-order transition, from a robust structure in which the metal wets the substrate between tubes, to a poorly wetting structure in which the metal rides atop the nanotube array without touching the substrate. The latter is analogous to the superhydrophobic "lotus leaf effect." There is a sharp minimum in the delamination energy of metal contacts at the transition pitch. We discuss implications for contact resistance and possible mitigation strategies. PMID:25768770

  11. Wetting Transition for Carbon Nanotube Arrays under Metal Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perebeinos, V.; Tersoff, J.

    2015-02-01

    Structural arrays with nanoscale spacing arise in many device concepts. Carbon nanotube transistors are an extreme example, where a practical technology will require arrays of parallel nanotubes with spacing of order 10 nm or less. We show that with decreasing pitch there is a first-order transition, from a robust structure in which the metal wets the substrate between tubes, to a poorly wetting structure in which the metal rides atop the nanotube array without touching the substrate. The latter is analogous to the superhydrophobic "lotus leaf effect." There is a sharp minimum in the delamination energy of metal contacts at the transition pitch. We discuss implications for contact resistance and possible mitigation strategies.

  12. Submicrosecond-timescale readout of carbon nanotube mechanical motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, H. B.; Johnston, S. R.; van der Zant, H. S. J.; Steele, G. A.

    2013-07-01

    We report fast readout of the motion of a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator. A close-proximity high electron mobility transistor amplifier is used to increase the bandwidth of the measurement of nanotube displacements from the kHz to the MHz regime. Using an electrical detection scheme with the nanotube acting as a mixer, we detect the amplitude of its mechanical motion at room temperature with an intermediate frequency of 6 MHz and a timeconstant of 780 ns, both up to five orders of magnitude faster than achieved before. The transient response of the mechanical motion indicates a ring-down time faster than our enhanced time resolution, placing an upper bound on the contribution of energy relaxation processes to the room temperature mechanical quality factor.

  13. Twisting Graphene into Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kit, Oleg O.; Tallinen, Tuomas; Mahadevan, L.; Timonen, Jussi; Koskinen, Pekka

    2012-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes are usually described as being rolled up from graphene sheets; this process, however, have never been realized experimentally. We showed that graphene can indeed be transformed into nanotube by twisting [1]. Further, we showed that tube formation can be well-explained within classical theory of elasticity---in fact the very mechanism of tube formation can be observed by twisting a strap from one's backpack (try now!). Furthermore, we showed that nanotube chirality may not only be predicted, but can also be controlled externally. The quantum molecular dynamic simulations at T=300K were achieved thanks to the revised periodic boundary conditions (RPBC) approach [2-3]. The structures similar to simulated have been recently observed experimentally [4]. This novel rote for nanotube formation opens new opportunities in nanomaterial manipulation not restricted to carbon alone. In the presentation, I will describe tube formation, as well as outline the easy and efficient technique for distorted nanostructures simulation, the RPBC approach. [4pt] [1] O. O. Kit et al. arXiv:1108.0048[0pt] [2] P. Koskinen & O. O. Kit PRL 105, 106401 (2010)[0pt] [3] O. O. Kit, L. Pastewka, P. Koskinen PRB 84, 155431 (2011)[0pt] [4] A. Chuvilin et al. Nature Materials 10, 687 (2011)

  14. Double-walled carbon nanotube processing.

    PubMed

    Moore, Katherine E; Tune, Daniel D; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2015-05-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been the focus of intense research, and the body of literature continues to grow exponentially, despite more than two decades having passed since the first reports. As well as extensive studies of the fundamental properties, this has seen SWCNTs used in a plethora of applications as far ranging as microelectronics, energy storage, solar cells, and sensors, to cancer treatment, drug delivery, and neuronal interfaces. On the other hand, the properties and applications of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) have remained relatively under-explored. This is despite DWCNTs not only sharing many of the same unique characteristics of their single-walled counterparts, but also possessing an additional suite of potentially advantageous properties arising due to the presence of the second wall and the often complex inter-wall interactions that arise. For example, it is envisaged that the outer wall can be selectively functionalized whilst still leaving the inner wall in its pristine state and available for signal transduction. A similar situation arises in DWCNT field effect transistors (FETs), where the outer wall can provide a convenient degree of chemical shielding of the inner wall from the external environment, allowing the excellent transconductance properties of the pristine nanotubes to be more fully exploited. Additionally, DWCNTs should also offer unique opportunities to further the fundamental understanding of the inter-wall interactions within and between carbon nanotubes. However, the realization of these goals has so far been limited by the same challenge experienced by the SWCNT field until recent years, namely, the inherent heterogeneity of raw, as-produced DWCNT material. As such, there is now an emerging field of research regarding DWCNT processing that focuses on the preparation of material of defined length, diameter and electronic type, and which is rapidly building upon the experience gained by the broader

  15. Analytical modeling of glucose biosensors based on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, carbon nanotubes have received widespread attention as promising carbon-based nanoelectronic devices. Due to their exceptional physical, chemical, and electrical properties, namely a high surface-to-volume ratio, their enhanced electron transfer properties, and their high thermal conductivity, carbon nanotubes can be used effectively as electrochemical sensors. The integration of carbon nanotubes with a functional group provides a good and solid support for the immobilization of enzymes. The determination of glucose levels using biosensors, particularly in the medical diagnostics and food industries, is gaining mass appeal. Glucose biosensors detect the glucose molecule by catalyzing glucose to gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of oxygen. This action provides high accuracy and a quick detection rate. In this paper, a single-wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistor biosensor for glucose detection is analytically modeled. In the proposed model, the glucose concentration is presented as a function of gate voltage. Subsequently, the proposed model is compared with existing experimental data. A good consensus between the model and the experimental data is reported. The simulated data demonstrate that the analytical model can be employed with an electrochemical glucose sensor to predict the behavior of the sensing mechanism in biosensors. PMID:24428818

  16. Dispersion of carbon nanotubes using organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Dumonteil, S; Demortier, A; Detriche, S; Raes, C; Fonseca, A; Rühle, M; Nagy, J B

    2006-05-01

    Phenyl ethyl alcohol was used for fast and stable dispersion of carbon nanotubes. This solvent, more effective than ethanol and toluene, allows easy dispersion of carbon nanotubes for TEM characterization. For TEM grids prepared at high dilution, it is possible to observe each tube separately. Applying that solvent, it was possible to measure the length, the diameter and the solubility of different carbon nanotubes samples.

  17. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  18. High-throughput optical imaging and spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes in devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Zhou, Qin; Jin, Chenhao; Li, Jinghua; Zhou, Weiwei; Liu, Jie; Wang, Enge; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are uniquely identified by a pair of chirality indices (n,m), which dictate the physical structures and electronic properties of each species. Carbon nanotube research is currently facing two outstanding challenges: achieving chirality-controlled growth and understanding chirality-dependent device physics. Addressing these challenges requires, respectively, high-throughput determination of the nanotube chirality distribution on growth substrates and in situ characterization of the nanotube electronic structure in operating devices. Direct optical imaging and spectroscopy techniques are well suited for both goals, but their implementation at the single nanotube level has remained a challenge due to the small nanotube signal and unavoidable environment background. Here, we report high-throughput real-time optical imaging and broadband in situ spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes on various substrates and in field-effect transistor devices using polarization-based microscopy combined with supercontinuum laser illumination. Our technique enables the complete chirality profiling of hundreds of individual carbon nanotubes, both semiconducting and metallic, on a growth substrate. In devices, we observe that high-order nanotube optical resonances are dramatically broadened by electrostatic doping, an unexpected behaviour that points to strong interband electron-electron scattering processes that could dominate ultrafast dynamics of excited states in carbon nanotubes.

  19. High-throughput optical imaging and spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes in devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Zhou, Qin; Jin, Chenhao; Li, Jinghua; Zhou, Weiwei; Liu, Jie; Wang, Enge; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are uniquely identified by a pair of chirality indices (n,m), which dictate the physical structures and electronic properties of each species. Carbon nanotube research is currently facing two outstanding challenges: achieving chirality-controlled growth and understanding chirality-dependent device physics. Addressing these challenges requires, respectively, high-throughput determination of the nanotube chirality distribution on growth substrates and in situ characterization of the nanotube electronic structure in operating devices. Direct optical imaging and spectroscopy techniques are well suited for both goals, but their implementation at the single nanotube level has remained a challenge due to the small nanotube signal and unavoidable environment background. Here, we report high-throughput real-time optical imaging and broadband in situ spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes on various substrates and in field-effect transistor devices using polarization-based microscopy combined with supercontinuum laser illumination. Our technique enables the complete chirality profiling of hundreds of individual carbon nanotubes, both semiconducting and metallic, on a growth substrate. In devices, we observe that high-order nanotube optical resonances are dramatically broadened by electrostatic doping, an unexpected behaviour that points to strong interband electron-electron scattering processes that could dominate ultrafast dynamics of excited states in carbon nanotubes.

  20. Multilayer Film Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie; Arnold, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An approach to assemble multilayers of carbon nanotubes on a substrate is presented. Chemical vapor deposition using a transition metal catalyst formulation is used to grow the nanotubes. Results show a bilayer assembly of nanotubes each with a different density of tubes.

  1. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  2. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome. PMID:27564421

  3. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  5. From carbon nanobells to nickel nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Maik, D.; Zhang, G. Y.; Staedler, T.; Jiang, X.

    2009-01-01

    A generic strategy is proposed to prepare one dimensional (1D) metallic nanotubes by using 1D carbon nanostructures as the initial templates. Following the strategy, nickel (Ni) nanotubes are prepared by using carbon nanobells (CNBs) as the initial templates. CNBs are first prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Carbon/nickel core/shell structures are then prepared by electroplating the CNBs in a nickel-Watts electrolytic cell. In the final step, the carbon core is selectively removed by employing hydrogen plasma etching to obtain Ni nanotubes. The mechanism leading to Ni nanotubes is briefly discussed.

  6. From carbon nanobells to nickel nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, S.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Maik, D.; Zhang, G. Y.; Staedler, T.; Jiang, X.

    2009-01-05

    A generic strategy is proposed to prepare one dimensional (1D) metallic nanotubes by using 1D carbon nanostructures as the initial templates. Following the strategy, nickel (Ni) nanotubes are prepared by using carbon nanobells (CNBs) as the initial templates. CNBs are first prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Carbon/nickel core/shell structures are then prepared by electroplating the CNBs in a nickel-Watts electrolytic cell. In the final step, the carbon core is selectively removed by employing hydrogen plasma etching to obtain Ni nanotubes. The mechanism leading to Ni nanotubes is briefly discussed.

  7. Understanding Charge Transport in Mixed Networks of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to select and enrich semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with high purity has led to a fast rise of solution-processed nanotube network field-effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities and on/off current ratios. However, it remains an open question whether it is best to use a network of only one nanotube species (monochiral) or whether a mix of purely semiconducting nanotubes but with different bandgaps is sufficient for high performance FETs. For a range of different polymer-sorted semiconducting SWNT networks, we demonstrate that a very small amount of narrow bandgap nanotubes within a dense network of large bandgap nanotubes can dominate the transport and thus severely limit on-currents and effective carrier mobility. Using gate-voltage-dependent electroluminescence, we spatially and spectrally reveal preferential charge transport that does not depend on nominal network density but on the energy level distribution within the network and carrier density. On the basis of these results, we outline rational guidelines for the use of mixed SWNT networks to obtain high performance FETs while reducing the cost for purification. PMID:26867006

  8. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  9. Switching behavior of semiconducting carbon nanotubes under an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochefort, Alain; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Avouris, Phaedon

    2001-04-01

    We investigate theoretically the switching characteristics of semiconducting carbon nanotubes connected to gold electrodes under an external (gate) electric field. We find that the external introduction of holes is necessary to account for the experimental observations. We identify metal-induced gap states (MIGS) at the contacts and find that the MIGS of an undoped tube would not significantly affect the switching behavior, even for very short tube lengths. We also explore the miniaturization limits of nanotube transistors, and, on the basis of their switching ratio, we conclude that transistors with channels as short as 50 Å would have adequate switching characteristics.

  10. Improved Process for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Cassell, A.; Delzeit, L.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    An improved process has been developed for the efficient fabrication of carbon nanotube probes for use in atomic-force microscopes (AFMs) and nanomanipulators. Relative to prior nanotube tip production processes, this process offers advantages in alignment of the nanotube on the cantilever and stability of the nanotube's attachment. A procedure has also been developed at Ames that effectively sharpens the multiwalled nanotube, which improves the resolution of the multiwalled nanotube probes and, combined with the greater stability of multiwalled nanotube probes, increases the effective resolution of these probes, making them comparable in resolution to single-walled carbon nanotube probes. The robust attachment derived from this improved fabrication method and the natural strength and resiliency of the nanotube itself produces an AFM probe with an extremely long imaging lifetime. In a longevity test, a nanotube tip imaged a silicon nitride surface for 15 hours without measurable loss of resolution. In contrast, the resolution of conventional silicon probes noticeably begins to degrade within minutes. These carbon nanotube probes have many possible applications in the semiconductor industry, particularly as devices are approaching the nanometer scale and new atomic layer deposition techniques necessitate a higher resolution characterization technique. Previously at Ames, the use of nanotube probes has been demonstrated for imaging photoresist patterns with high aspect ratio. In addition, these tips have been used to analyze Mars simulant dust grains, extremophile protein crystals, and DNA structure.

  11. Physically unclonable cryptographic primitives using self-assembled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhaoying; Comeras, Jose Miguel M. Lobez; Park, Hongsik; Tang, Jianshi; Afzali, Ali; Tulevski, George S.; Hannon, James B.; Liehr, Michael; Han, Shu-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Information security underpins many aspects of modern society. However, silicon chips are vulnerable to hazards such as counterfeiting, tampering and information leakage through side-channel attacks (for example, by measuring power consumption, timing or electromagnetic radiation). Single-walled carbon nanotubes are a potential replacement for silicon as the channel material of transistors due to their superb electrical properties and intrinsic ultrathin body, but problems such as limited semiconducting purity and non-ideal assembly still need to be addressed before they can deliver high-performance electronics. Here, we show that by using these inherent imperfections, an unclonable electronic random structure can be constructed at low cost from carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes are self-assembled into patterned HfO2 trenches using ion-exchange chemistry, and the width of the trench is optimized to maximize the randomness of the nanotube placement. With this approach, two-dimensional (2D) random bit arrays are created that can offer ternary-bit architecture by determining the connection yield and switching type of the nanotube devices. As a result, our cryptographic keys provide a significantly higher level of security than conventional binary-bit architecture with the same key size.

  12. Physically unclonable cryptographic primitives using self-assembled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoying; Comeras, Jose Miguel M Lobez; Park, Hongsik; Tang, Jianshi; Afzali, Ali; Tulevski, George S; Hannon, James B; Liehr, Michael; Han, Shu-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Information security underpins many aspects of modern society. However, silicon chips are vulnerable to hazards such as counterfeiting, tampering and information leakage through side-channel attacks (for example, by measuring power consumption, timing or electromagnetic radiation). Single-walled carbon nanotubes are a potential replacement for silicon as the channel material of transistors due to their superb electrical properties and intrinsic ultrathin body, but problems such as limited semiconducting purity and non-ideal assembly still need to be addressed before they can deliver high-performance electronics. Here, we show that by using these inherent imperfections, an unclonable electronic random structure can be constructed at low cost from carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes are self-assembled into patterned HfO2 trenches using ion-exchange chemistry, and the width of the trench is optimized to maximize the randomness of the nanotube placement. With this approach, two-dimensional (2D) random bit arrays are created that can offer ternary-bit architecture by determining the connection yield and switching type of the nanotube devices. As a result, our cryptographic keys provide a significantly higher level of security than conventional binary-bit architecture with the same key size. PMID:26900757

  13. Design tools for a DNA-guided self-assembling carbon nanotube technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, C.; Johri, V.; Cheung, M.; Patwardhan, J.; Lebeck, A.; Sorin, D.

    2004-09-01

    The shift in technology away from silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS) to novel nanoscale technologies requires new design tools. In this paper, we explore one particular nanotechnology: carbon nanotube transistors that are self-assembled into circuits by using DNA. We develop design tools and demonstrate how to use them to develop circuitry based on this nanotechnology.

  14. Detecting Lyme disease using antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Jennifer; Lerner, Mitchell; Goldsmith, Brett; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We combine antibodies for Lyme flagellar protein with carbon nanotube transistors to create an electronic sensor capable of definitive detection of Lyme disease. Over 35,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported in the United States each year, of which more than 23 percent are originally misdiagnosed. Rational design of the coupling of the biological system to the electronic system gives us a flexible sensor platform which we can apply to several biological systems. By coupling these antibodies to carbon nanotubes in particular, we allow for fast, sensitive, highly selective, electronic detection. Unlike antibody or biomarker detection, bacterial protein detection leads to positive identification of both early and late stage bacterial infections, and is easily expandable to environmental monitoring.

  15. Lipid bilayers covalently anchored to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-05-29

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules.

  16. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  18. Electrostatic gating in carbon nanotube aptasensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Han Yue; Alsager, Omar A.; Zhu, Bicheng; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Plank, Natalie O. V.

    2016-07-01

    Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10 picomolar. The signal was shown to arise from a specific aptamer-target interaction that stabilises a G-quadruplex structure, bringing high negative charge density near the CNT channel. Electrostatic gating is established via the specificity and the sign of the current response, and by observing its suppression when higher ionic strength decreases the Debye length at the CNT-water interface. Sensitivity towards potassium and selectivity against other ions is demonstrated in both resistive mode and real time transistor mode measurements. The effective device architecture presented, along with the identification of clear response signatures, should inform the development of new electronic biosensors using the growing library of aptamer receptors.Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10

  19. Longitudinal solitons in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Astakhova, T. Yu.; Gurin, O. D.; Menon, M.; Vinogradov, G. A.

    2001-07-15

    We present results on soliton excitations in carbon nanotubes (CNT's) using Brenner's many-body potential. Our numerical simulations demonstrate high soliton stability in (10,10) CNT's. The interactions of solitons and solitary excitation with CNT defect are found to be inelastic if the excitations and defects length scales are comparable, resulting in a substantial part of soliton energy being distributed inhomogeneously over the defect bonds. In these solitary-excitation--cap collisions the local energy of a few bonds in the cap can exceed the average energy by an order of magnitude and more. This phenomenon, denoted the ''Tsunami effect,'' can contribute dynamically to the recently proposed ''kinky chemistry.'' We also present results of changes in the local density of states and variations in the atomic partial charges estimated at different time instants of the solitary-excitation Tsunami at the nanotube cap.

  20. An anticorrosive magnesium/carbon nanotube composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, M.; Hayashi, T.; Itoh, I.; Kim, Y. A.; Shimamoto, D.; Muramatsu, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Morimoto, S.; Terrones, M.; Iinou, S.; Koide, S.

    2008-02-01

    Here, we report a drastically improved anticorrosive characteristic of magnesium alloy composites with the introduction of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Highly depressed corrosion of nanotube-filled magnesium composite in salt water is due to the formation of stable oxide films along the grain boundaries of magnesium. Our results indicate that carbon nanotube acted as effective multifunctional filler to improve both mechanical and anticorrosive performances of magnesium alloy.

  1. Covalent Sidewall Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, I.W.; Saini, R. K.; Mickelson, E. T.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Progress of fluorination of single-wall carbon nanotubes is being reported. Covalent attachment of alkyl groups including methyl, n-butyl and n-hexyl groups to the sidewalls of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been achieved. Quantitative measurement of the alkylation was done by thermal gravimetric analysis. FTIR, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR were used to characterize these alkylated SWNTs. Application of these nanotubes are being investigated-fibers, composites, batteries, lubricants, etc.

  2. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  3. Polymer Self-assembly on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulianini, Michele; Motta, Nunzio

    This chapter analyses the poly(3-hexylthiophene) self-assembly on carbon nanotubes and the interaction between the two materials forming a new hybrid nanostructure. The chapter starts with a review of the several studies investigating polymers and biomolecules self-assembled on nanotubes. Then conducting polymers and polythiophenes are briefly introduced. Accordingly, carbon nanotube structure and properties are reported in Sect. 3. The experimental section starts with the bulk characterisation of polymer thin films with the inclusion of uniformly distributed carbon nanotubes. By using volume film analysis techniques (AFM, TEM, UV-Vis and Raman), we show how the polymer's higher degree of order is a direct consequence of interaction with carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, it is through the use of nanoscale analysis and molecular dynamic simulations that the self-assembly of the polymer on the nanotube surface can be clearly evidenced and characterised. In Sect. 6, the effect of the carbon templating structure on the P3HT organisation on the surface is investigated, showing the chirality-driven polymer assembly on the carbon nanotube surface. The interaction between P3HT and CNTs brings also to charge transfer, with the modification of physical properties for both species. In particular, the alteration of the polymer electronic properties and the modification of the nanotube mechanical structure are a direct consequence of the P3HT π-π stacking on the nanotube surface. Finally, some considerations based on molecular dynamics studies are reported in order to confirm and support the experimental results discussed.

  4. Ophthalmologial Applications of Carbon Nanotube Nanotechology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David; Girten, Beverly (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development of an implantable device consisting of an array of carbon nanotubes on a silicon chip for restoration of vision in patients with macular degeneration and other retinal disorders is presented. The use of carbon nanotube bucky paper for retinal cell transplantation is proposed. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  5. Formation of ordered ice nanotubes inside carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kenichiro; Gao, G. T.; Tanaka, Hideki; Zeng, X. C.

    2001-08-01

    Following their discovery, carbon nanotubes have attracted interest not only for their unusual electrical and mechanical properties, but also because their hollow interior can serve as a nanometre-sized capillary, mould or template in material fabrication. The ability to encapsulate a material in a nanotube also offers new possibilities for investigating dimensionally confined phase transitions. Particularly intriguing is the conjecture that matter within the narrow confines of a carbon nanotube might exhibit a solid-liquid critical point beyond which the distinction between solid and liquid phases disappears. This unusual feature, which cannot occur in bulk material, would allow for the direct and continuous transformation of liquid matter into a solid. Here we report simulations of the behaviour of water encapsulated in carbon nanotubes that suggest the existence of a variety of new ice phases not seen in bulk ice, and of a solid-liquid critical point. Using carbon nanotubes with diameters ranging from 1.1nm to 1.4nm and applied axial pressures of 50MPa to 500MPa, we find that water can exhibit a first-order freezing transition to hexagonal and heptagonal ice nanotubes, and a continuous phase transformation into solid-like square or pentagonal ice nanotubes.

  6. Nanocapillarity and chemistry in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte, D.; Chatelain, A.; Heer, W.A. de

    1996-12-13

    Open carbon nanotubes were filled with molten silver nitrate by capillary forces. Only those tubes with inner diameters of 4 nanometers or more were filled, suggesting a capillarity size dependence as a result of the lowering of the nanotube-salt interface energy with increasing curvature of the nanotube walls. Nanotube cavities should also be less chemically reactive than graphite and may serve as nanosize test tubes. This property has been illustrated by monitoring the decomposition of silver nitrate within nanotubes in situ in an electron microscope, which produced chains of silver nanobeads separated by high-pressure gas pockets. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Atomic Entanglement in Carbon Nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2006-03-01

    The development of materials that may host quantum coherent states is a critical research problem for the nearest future. Recent progress in the growth of centimeter-long small-diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNs)[1] and successful experiments on the encapsulation of single atoms into CNs[2], stimulate the study of dynamical quantum processes in atomically doped CN systems. We have recently shown[3] that atomic states may be strongly coupled to vacuum surface photonic modes in the CN, thus forming quasi-1D cavity polaritons similar to those observed for quantum dots in semiconductor nanocavities[4], which were recently suggested to be a possible way to produce the excitonic qubit entanglement[5]. Here, we show that, being strongly coupled to the (resonator-like) cylindrical nanotube environment, the two atomic quasi-1D polaritons can be easily entangled as well, thus challenging a novel alternative approach towards quantum information transfer over centimeter-long distances. [1]L.X.Zheng et al, Proc. Nanotech 2005 (May 8-12, 2005, Anaheim, CA, USA), vol.3, p.126. [2]G.-H.Jeong et al, Phys. Rev. B68,075410(2003). [3]I.V.Bondarev and Ph.Lambin, in: Trends in Nanotubes Reasearch (NovaScience, NY, 2005); Phys. Rev. B70,035407(2004); Phys. Rev. B72,035451(2005). [4]T.Yoshie et al, Nature 432,200(2004). [5]S.Hughes, Phys. Rev. Lett.94,227402(2005).

  8. A modified structure for MOSFET-like carbon nanotube FET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeydi, Maryam Mirasanloo; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, non-equilibrium Green's function method is used to investigate the characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). Leakage current resulted from band-to-band tunneling, and ambipolarity behaviors are among the known effects for CNTFET devices. To minimize these phenomena, a modified structure is presented in which density of source and drain in the transistor is reduced in steps while going toward the intrinsic channel. The proposed structure shows a better ambipolar property and less power-delay product at a given I ON/ I OFF ratio, and also less delay time at a given I ON compared with the available structure. Also, its other ON- and OFF-state characteristics are almost intact. Afterward, the effect of different factors on the behavior of the device and their optimal values such as channel length changes, chirality, dielectric constant, and gate length changes are investigated.

  9. Selective breakdown of metallic pathways in double-walled carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Ng, Allen L; Sun, Yong; Powell, Lyndsey; Sun, Chuan-Fu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lee, Cheng S; Wang, YuHuang

    2015-01-01

    Covalently functionalized, semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit remarkable properties and can outperform their single-walled carbon nanotube counterparts. In order to harness their potential for electronic applications, metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes must be separated from the semiconductors. However, the inner wall is inaccessible to current separation techniques which rely on the surface properties. Here, the first approach to address this challenge through electrical breakdown of metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes, both inner and outer walls, within networks of mixed electronic types is described. The intact semiconductors demonstrate a ∼62% retention of the ON-state conductance in thin film transistors in response to covalent functionalization. The selective elimination of the metallic pathways improves the ON/OFF ratio, by more than 360 times, to as high as 40 700, while simultaneously retaining high ON-state conductance.

  10. Endohedral Impurities in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis

    2003-03-01

    A generalization of the Anderson model that includes pseudo-Jahn-Teller impurity coupling is proposed to describe distortions of an endohedral impurity in a carbon nanotube. Treating the distortion within mean-field theory, spontaneous axial symmetry breaking is found when the vibronic coupling strength g exceeds a critical value g_c. The effective potential in the symmetry-broken state is found to have O(2) symmetry, in agreement with numerical calculations. The consequences of such a distortion on electronic transport will be discussed.

  11. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  12. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  13. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  14. Towards chirality-pure carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yani; Zheng, Lianxi

    2010-10-01

    Current as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes vary in diameter and chirality, which results in variations in their electronic and optical properties. Two approaches have been intensively studied to obtain chirality-pure nanotube structures and thus uniform properties for advanced applications. The first approach involves the post-synthesis separation according to the nanotubes' chiral vectors (n, m), and the second one involves direct synthes of carbon nanotubes with the same (n, m). This paper reviews the efforts along these two directions, with emphasis on the most recent progress of post-synthesis separation and the perspectives of controllable synthesis.

  15. Carbon nanotube materials characterization and devices design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng

    The objective of this research is to characterize the electrical and mechanical properties of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) materials, and explore possible device applications for these materials. In order to achieve this goal, different forms of Carbon Nanotube materials---including Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Nanotube Arrays, Carbon Nanotube Ribbon, Carbon Nanotube Thread, and sub-micrometer Carbon Nanotube Thread---were tested under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) using a Micromanipulator (MM). Video and sound recording of the testing in the microscope provided new understanding how thread is formed and how nanotube materials fail. As-produced and thermally treated nanotubes were also tested. The main electrical parameters measured were electrical resistivity and maximum current density. The main mechanical property measured was strength. Together, these parameters are helping to determine the strongest and most conductive forms of CNT material. Putting nanotube materials into application is the ultimate goal of this continuing research. Several aggressive application ideas were investigated in a preliminary way in this work. In biomedical applications, a bundle of CNTs was formed for use as an electrode for accurate biosensing. A simple robot was designed using CNT electrical fiber. The robot was powered by two solenoids and could act as an in-body sensor and actuator to perform some impossible tasks from the viewpoint of current medical technology. In aerospace engineering, CNT materials could replace copper wire to reduce the weight of aircraft. Based on the excellent mechanical properties of CNT materials, a challenging idea is to use CNT material to build elevators to move payloads to outer space without using rockets. This dissertation makes contributions in the characterization of nanotube materials and in the design of miniature electromagnetic devices.

  16. Electrostatic gating in carbon nanotube aptasensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Han Yue; Alsager, Omar A; Zhu, Bicheng; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Plank, Natalie O V

    2016-07-14

    Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10 picomolar. The signal was shown to arise from a specific aptamer-target interaction that stabilises a G-quadruplex structure, bringing high negative charge density near the CNT channel. Electrostatic gating is established via the specificity and the sign of the current response, and by observing its suppression when higher ionic strength decreases the Debye length at the CNT-water interface. Sensitivity towards potassium and selectivity against other ions is demonstrated in both resistive mode and real time transistor mode measurements. The effective device architecture presented, along with the identification of clear response signatures, should inform the development of new electronic biosensors using the growing library of aptamer receptors. PMID:27376166

  17. One-dimensional lipid bilayers on carbon nanotubes: Structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukhin, Alexander Borisovich

    In this work we report design, assembly, and properties of one-dimensional lipid bilayers wrapped around polymer-coated carbon nanotubes. We propose to use this platform as a tool for interfacing nanomaterials with biological systems. We start by presenting a new general procedure for noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes based on polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer assembly. We confirm formation of multilayer polymer structures around individual carbon nanotubes by transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy, and demonstrate that sign of the outmost polymer layer controls surface properties of the multilayer assembly. We study how rigidity of a polymer chain influences its ability to adsorb onto high curvature substrates, such as carbon nanotubes. We then build the one-dimensional lipid bilayer structure by spontaneous assembly of lipid molecules in a continuous nanoshell around a template of a carbon nanotube wrapped with hydrophilic polymer cushion layers. We demonstrate that such one-dimensional lipid membranes are fluid and can heal defects, even over repeated damage-recovery cycles. Measured diffusion coefficients of lipid molecules in our polymer-supported bilayers are about 3 orders of magnitude lower than typical values for fluid lipid membranes, which we attribute to strong electrostatic polyelectrolyte-lipid interactions. To explore the potential for device integration of one-dimensional bilayers we investigate effect of polyelectrolyte multilayers on electrical properties of carbon nanotube transistors. We demonstrate that complex interaction of adsorbed species with the device substrate can produce significant and sometimes unexpected side effects on device characteristics. Finally, we fabricate transistors with suspended carbon nanotube channels and devise a method to transfer them in liquid. It allows us to assemble one-dimensional lipid membranes on carbon nanotube devices, characterize their electrical properties, and

  18. Development of Carbon-Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a short discussion of one company's effort to develop composites of carbon nanotubes in epoxy and other polymer matrices. The focus of the discussion is on the desirability of chemically modifying carbon nanotubes to overcome their inherent chemical nonreactivity and thereby enable the formation of strong chemical bonds between nanotubes and epoxies (or other polymeric matrix materials or their monomeric precursors). The chemical modification is effected in a process in which discrete functional groups are covalently attached to the nanotube surfaces. The functionalization process was proposed by the company and demonstrated in practice for the first time during this development effort. The covalently attached functional groups are capable of reacting with the epoxy or other matrix resin to form covalent bonds. Furthermore, the company uses this process to chemically modify the nanotube surfaces, affording tunable adhesion to polymers and solubility in select solvents. Flat-sheet composites containing functionalized nanotubes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.

  19. Cutting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J.; Gu, Zhenning; Shaver, Jonah; Chen, Zheyi; Flor, Erica L.; Schmidt, Daniel J.; Chan, Candace; Hauge, Robert H.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2005-07-01

    A two-step process is utilized for cutting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The first step requires the breakage of carbon-carbon bonds in the lattice while the second step is aimed at etching at these damage sites to create short, cut nanotubes. To achieve monodisperse lengths from any cutting strategy requires control of both steps. Room-temperature piranha and ammonium persulfate solutions have shown the ability to exploit the damage sites and etch SWNTs in a controlled manner. Despite the aggressive nature of these oxidizing solutions, the etch rate for SWNTs is relatively slow and almost no new sidewall damage is introduced. Carbon-carbon bond breakage can be introduced through fluorination to ~C2F, and subsequent etching using piranha solutions has been shown to be very effective in cutting nanotubes. The final average length of the nanotubes is approximately 100 nm with carbon yields as high as 70-80%.

  20. Si/Ge hetero-structure nanotube tunnel field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, A. N.; Hussain, M. M.

    2015-01-07

    We discuss the physics of conventional channel material (silicon/germanium hetero-structure) based transistor topology mainly core/shell (inner/outer) gated nanotube vs. gate-all-around nanowire architecture for tunnel field effect transistor application. We show that nanotube topology can result in higher performance through higher normalized current when compared to nanowire architecture at V{sub dd} = 1 V due to the availability of larger tunneling cross section and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination. Both architectures are able to achieve sub 60 mV/dec performance for more than five orders of magnitude of drain current. This enables the nanotube configuration achieving performance same as the nanowire architecture even when V{sub dd} is scaled down to 0.5 V.

  1. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics.

    PubMed

    Solov'yov, Ilia A; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V; Greiner, Walter

    2008-11-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms are known. The parameters of the liquid surface model and its potential applications are discussed. The model has been suggested for open end and capped nanotubes. The influence of the catalytic nanoparticle, atop which nanotubes grow, on the nanotube stability is also discussed. The suggested model gives an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions.

  2. Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Hansel; Hudson, Steve; Bhat, Biliyar; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical molecules composed of carbon atoms in a regular hexagonal arrangement. If nanotubes can be uniformly dispersed in a supporting matrix to form structural materials, the resulting structures could be significantly lighter and stronger than current aerospace materials. Work is currently being done to develop an electrolyte-based self-assembly process that produces a Carbon Nanotube/Nickel composite material with high specific strength. This process is expected to produce a lightweight metal matrix composite material, which maintains it's thermal and electrical conductivities, and is potentially suitable for applications such as advanced structures, space based optics, and cryogenic tanks.

  3. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  4. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  5. Lipid nanoscaffolds in carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Catharina; Koziol, Krzysztof K K; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V

    2013-10-01

    We present the fabrication of lipid nanoscaffolds inside carbon nanotube arrays by employing the nanostructural self-assembly of lipid molecules. The nanoscaffolds are finely tunable into model biomembrane-like architectures (planar), soft nanochannels (cylindrical) or 3-dimensionally ordered continuous bilayer structures (cubic). Carbon nanotube arrays hosting the above nanoscaffolds are formed by packing of highly oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes which facilitate the alignment of lipid nanostructures without requiring an external force. Furthermore, the lipid nanoscaffolds can be created under both dry and hydrated conditions. We show their direct application in reconstitution of egg proteins. Such nanoscaffolds find enormous potential in bio- and nano-technological fields.

  6. Microcapsule carbon nanotube devices for therapeutic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulamarva, Arun; Raja, Pavan M. V.; Bhathena, Jasmine; Chen, Hongmei; Talapatra, Saikat; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Nalamasu, Omkaram; Prakash, Satya

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a new class of nanomaterials that have immense potential in the field of biomedicine. Their ability to carry large quantities of therapeutic molecules makes them prime candidates for providing targeted delivery of therapeutics for use in various diseases. However, their utility is limited due to the problems faced during their delivery to target sites. This article for the first time describes the design of a novel microcapsule carbon nanotube targeted delivery device. This device has potential in the targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes in suitable membranes along with their cargo, safely and effectively to the target loci.

  7. Carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids: tools and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoa, Bibiana; Zheng, Ming; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Diner, Bruce A.

    2006-05-01

    Nucleic acids, with their intrinsic structural properties as well as their high specificity, are playing an important role in the rapid development of nano-technologies. In turn, these new technologies and their efficient performance enable fast and precise methods for detection of nucleic acids, improving the diagnosis of diseases and identification of pathogens. We discuss the use of nucleic acids to disperse and sort single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and carbon nanotube-based field effect transistors (CNT-FETs) to electrically detect specific nucleic acid sequences. Both DNA and RNA are efficient agents for dispersion and separation of SWNTs by diameter and chirality. Fractions enriched in a narrow band gap distribution of DNA:SWNT hybrids do not alter the electronic performance of field effect transistors. A CNT-FET fulfills the requirements for a nanosensing device that can greatly exceed the existing technologies. Electrical detection of specific nucleic acid sequence could potentially overcome the current limitations of optical detection, by increasing sensitivity and speed, while reducing sample manipulation, size, and cost.

  8. Defect-Free Carbon Nanotube Coils.

    PubMed

    Shadmi, Nitzan; Kremen, Anna; Frenkel, Yiftach; Lapin, Zachary J; Machado, Leonardo D; Legoas, Sergio B; Bitton, Ora; Rechav, Katya; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Galvão, Douglas S; Jorio, Ado; Novotny, Lukas; Kalisky, Beena; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2016-04-13

    Carbon nanotubes are promising building blocks for various nanoelectronic components. A highly desirable geometry for such applications is a coil. However, coiled nanotube structures reported so far were inherently defective or had no free ends accessible for contacting. Here we demonstrate the spontaneous self-coiling of single-wall carbon nanotubes into defect-free coils of up to more than 70 turns with identical diameter and chirality, and free ends. We characterize the structure, formation mechanism, and electrical properties of these coils by different microscopies, molecular dynamics simulations, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical and magnetic measurements. The coils are highly conductive, as expected for defect-free carbon nanotubes, but adjacent nanotube segments in the coil are more highly coupled than in regular bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes, owing to their perfect crystal momentum matching, which enables tunneling between the turns. Although this behavior does not yet enable the performance of these nanotube coils as inductive devices, it does point a clear path for their realization. Hence, this study represents a major step toward the production of many different nanotube coil devices, including inductors, electromagnets, transformers, and dynamos.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  10. Defect-Free Carbon Nanotube Coils.

    PubMed

    Shadmi, Nitzan; Kremen, Anna; Frenkel, Yiftach; Lapin, Zachary J; Machado, Leonardo D; Legoas, Sergio B; Bitton, Ora; Rechav, Katya; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Galvão, Douglas S; Jorio, Ado; Novotny, Lukas; Kalisky, Beena; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2016-04-13

    Carbon nanotubes are promising building blocks for various nanoelectronic components. A highly desirable geometry for such applications is a coil. However, coiled nanotube structures reported so far were inherently defective or had no free ends accessible for contacting. Here we demonstrate the spontaneous self-coiling of single-wall carbon nanotubes into defect-free coils of up to more than 70 turns with identical diameter and chirality, and free ends. We characterize the structure, formation mechanism, and electrical properties of these coils by different microscopies, molecular dynamics simulations, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical and magnetic measurements. The coils are highly conductive, as expected for defect-free carbon nanotubes, but adjacent nanotube segments in the coil are more highly coupled than in regular bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes, owing to their perfect crystal momentum matching, which enables tunneling between the turns. Although this behavior does not yet enable the performance of these nanotube coils as inductive devices, it does point a clear path for their realization. Hence, this study represents a major step toward the production of many different nanotube coil devices, including inductors, electromagnets, transformers, and dynamos. PMID:26708150

  11. The electrical conduction variation in stained carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Wei Fan, Jun; Lin, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes become stained from coupling with foreign molecules, especially from adsorbing gas molecules. The charge exchange, which is due to the orbital hybridization, occurred in the stained carbon nanotube induces electrical dipoles that consequently vary the electrical conduction of the nanotube. We propose a microscopic model to evaluate the electrical current variation produced by the induced electrical dipoles in a stained zigzag carbon nanotube. It is found that stronger orbital hybridization strengths and larger orbital energy differences between the carbon nanotube and the gas molecules help increasing the induced electrical dipole moment. Compared with the stain-free carbon nanotube, the induced electrical dipoles suppress the current in the nanotube. In the carbon nanotubes with induced dipoles the current increases as a result of increasing orbital energy dispersion via stronger hybridization couplings. In particular, at a fixed hybridization coupling, the current increases with the bond length for the donor-carbon nanotube but reversely for the acceptor-carbon nanotube.

  12. Covalent enzyme immobilization onto carbon nanotubes using a membrane reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voicu, Stefan Ioan; Nechifor, Aurelia Cristina; Gales, Ovidiu; Nechifor, Gheorghe

    2011-05-01

    Composite porous polysulfone-carbon nanotubes membranes were prepared by dispersing carbon nanotubes into a polysulfone solution followed by the membrane formation by phase inversion-immersion precipitation technique. The carbon nanotubes with amino groups on surface were functionalized with different enzymes (carbonic anhydrase, invertase, diastase) using cyanuric chloride as linker between enzyme and carbon nanotube. The composite membrane was used as a membrane reactor for a better dispersion of carbon nanotubes and access to reaction centers. The membrane also facilitates the transport of enzymes to active carbon nanotubes centers for functionalization (amino groups). The functionalized carbon nanotubes are isolated by dissolving the membranes after the end of reaction. Carbon nanotubes with covalent immobilized enzymes are used for biosensors fabrications. The obtained membranes were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Thermal analysis, FT-IR Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and functionalized carbon nanotubes were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy.

  13. Dissymmetric carbon nanotubes by bipolar electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Warakulwit, Chompunuch; Nguyen, Thi; Majimel, Jérome; Delville, Marie-Hélène; Lapeyre, Véronique; Garrigue, Patrick; Ravaine, Valérie; Limtrakul, Jumras; Kuhn, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    Short carbon nanotubes have been modified selectively on one end with metal using a bulk technique based on bipolar electrochemistry. A stabilized suspension of nanotubes is introduced in a capillary containing an aqueous metal salt solution, and a high electric field is applied to orientate and polarize the individual tubes. During their transport through the capillary under sufficient polarization (30 kV), each nanotube is the site of water oxidation on one end and the site of metal ion reduction on the other end with the size of the formed metal cluster being proportional to the potential drop along the nanotube.

  14. Quantum conductance of carbon nanotube peapods

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S.C.; Louie, Steven G.

    2003-08-01

    We present a first-principles study of the quantum conductance of hybrid nanotube systems consisting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) encapsulating either an isolated single C60 molecule or a chain of C60 molecules (nanotube peapods). The calculations show a rather weak bonding interaction between the fullerenes and the SWCNTs. The conductance of a (10,10) SWCNT with a single C60 molecule is virtually unaffected at the Fermi level, but exhibits quantized resonant reductions at the molecular levels. The nanotube peapod arrangement gives rise to high density of states for the fullerene highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital bands.

  15. Flightweight Carbon Nanotube Magnet Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Ruoff, R. S.; Chandrasekhar, V.; Dikin, D. A.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Virtually all plasma-based systems for advanced airborne/spaceborne propulsion and power depend upon the future availability of flightweight magnet technology. Unfortunately, current technology for resistive and superconducting magnets yields system weights that tend to counteract the performance advantages normally associated with advanced plasma-based concepts. The ongoing nanotechnology revolution and the continuing development of carbon nanotubes (CNT), however, may ultimately relieve this limitation in the near future. Projections based on recent research indicate that CNTs may achieve current densities at least three orders of magnitude larger than known superconductors and mechanical strength two orders of magnitude larger than steel. In fact, some published work suggests that CNTs are superconductors. Such attributes imply a dramatic increase in magnet performance-to-weight ratio and offer real hope for the construction of true flightweight magnets. This Technical Publication reviews the technology status of CNTs with respect to potential magnet applications and discusses potential techniques for using CNT wires and ropes as a winding material and as an integral component of the containment structure. The technology shortfalls are identified and a research and technology strategy is described that addresses the following major issues: (1) Investigation and verification of mechanical and electrical properties, (2) development of tools for manipulation and fabrication on the nanoscale, (3) continuum/molecular dynamics analysis of nanotube behavior when exposed to practical bending and twisting loads, and (4) exploration of innovative magnet fabrication techniques that exploit the natural attributes of CNTs.

  16. Microfabricated electroactive carbon nanotube actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Arti; Baughman, Ray H.; De Rossi, Danilo; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Tesconi, Mario; Tognetti, Alessandro; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2001-07-01

    A variety of microfabrication techniques have been developed at the University of Pisa. They are based either on pressure or piston actuated microsyringes or modified ink-jet printers. This work present the results of a study aimed at fabricating carbon nanotube (NT) actuators using micro-syringes. In order to prevent the nanotubes from aggregating into clumps, they were enclosed in a partially cross-linked polyvinylalcohol - polyallylamine matrix. After sonication the solution remained homogenously dispersed for about 40 minutes, which was sufficient time for deposition. Small strips of NT, about 5 mm across and 15 mm long were deposited. Following deposition, the films were baked at 80 degree(s)C and their thickness, impedance and mechanical resistance measured. The results indicate that 50 minutes of baking time is sufficient to give a constant resistivity of 1.12 x 10-2 (Omega) m per layer similar to a typical semiconductor, and each layer has a thickness of about 6 micrometers .

  17. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  18. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  19. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes: Alternative Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley; Scott, Carl; Gorelik, Olga; Nikolaev, Pasha; Hulse, Lou; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2000-01-01

    Traditional carbon nanotube purification process involves nitric acid refluxing and cross flow filtration using surfactant TritonX. This is believed to result in damage to nanotubes and surfactant residue on nanotube surface. Alternative purification procedures involving solvent extraction, thermal zone refining and nitric acid refiuxing are used in the current study. The effect of duration and type of solvent to dissolve impurities including fullerenes and P ACs (polyaromatic compounds) are monitored by nuclear magnetic reasonance, high performance liquid chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal zone refining yielded sample areas rich in nanotubes as seen by scanning electric microscopy. Refluxing in boiling nitric acid seem to improve the nanotube content. Different procedural steps are needed to purify samples produced by laser process compared to arc process. These alternative methods of nanotube purification will be presented along with results from supporting analytical techniques.

  20. Photonics based on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Among direct-bandgap semiconducting nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit strong quasi-one-dimensional excitonic optical properties, which confer them a great potential for their integration in future photonics devices as an alternative solution to conventional inorganic semiconductors. In this paper, we will highlight SWCNT optical properties for passive as well as active applications in future optical networking. For passive applications, we directly compare the efficiency and power consumption of saturable absorbers (SAs) based on SWCNT with SA based on conventional multiple quantum wells. For active applications, exceptional photoluminescence properties of SWCNT, such as excellent light-emission stabilities with temperature and excitation power, hold these nanometer-scale materials as prime candidates for future active photonics devices with superior performances. PMID:23803293

  1. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  2. Carbon Nanotube Based Light Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, russell A. (Inventor); Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A light sensor substrate comprises a base made from a semi-conductive material and topped with a layer of an electrically non-conductive material. A first electrode and a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors are positioned on the layer of electrically non-conductive material with the CNT-based conductors being distributed in a spaced apart fashion about a periphery of the first electrode. Each CNT-based conductor is coupled on one end thereof to the first electrode and extends away from the first electrode to terminate at a second free end. A second or gate electrode is positioned on the non-conductive material layer and is spaced apart from the second free end of each CNT-based conductor. Coupled to the first and second electrode is a device for detecting electron transfer along the CNT-based conductors resulting from light impinging on the CNT-based conductors.

  3. Targeting carbon nanotubes against cancer.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Chiara; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Da Ros, Tatiana; Kostarelos, Kostas; Bianco, Alberto; Prato, Maurizio

    2012-04-25

    The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as polyvalent tools for cancer treatment is progressing at a very fast pace. The most promising approach is the targeted delivery of drugs, designed to selectively direct the therapeutic treatment towards the tumours. CNTs may offer several advantages to overcome one of the main limitations of most existing anticancer therapies, namely the lack of selectivity. Herein, an account of the existing literature on CNT-based nanomedicine for cancer treatment is given. The most significant results obtained so far in the field of drug delivery are presented for many anticancer chemotherapeutics (doxorubicin, methotrexate, taxanes, platinum analogues, camptothecine and gemcitabine), but also for immunotherapeutics and nucleic acids. Moreover, the alternative anticancer therapies based on thermal ablation and radiotherapy are discussed. The attention throughout the review is focused on the different targeting strategies proposed so far, mainly based on antibodies, but also on other specifically recognised molecules or on the application of an external magnetic field.

  4. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  5. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen; Kerr, John B.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  6. Engineering molecular chains in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Thomas W.; Pfeiffer, Rudolf; Howells, Jonathan; Peterlik, Herwig; Kuzmany, Hans; Kräutler, Bernhard; da Ros, Tatiana; Melle-Franco, Manuel; Zerbetto, Francesco; Milić, Dragana; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2012-11-01

    A range of mono- and bis-functionalised fullerenes have been synthesised and inserted into single-walled carbon nanotubes. The effect of the size and shape of the functional groups of the fullerenes on the resultant 1D arrays formed within the nanotubes was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The addition of non-planar, sterically bulky chains to the fullerene cage results in highly ordered 1D structures in which the fullerenes are evenly spaced along the internal nanotube cavity. Theoretical calculations reveal that the functional groups interact with neighbouring fullerene cages to space the fullerenes evenly within the confines of the nanotube. The addition of two functional groups to opposite sides of the fullerene cages results in a further increase in the separation of the fullerene cages within the nanotubes at the cost of lower nanotube filling rates.A range of mono- and bis-functionalised fullerenes have been synthesised and inserted into single-walled carbon nanotubes. The effect of the size and shape of the functional groups of the fullerenes on the resultant 1D arrays formed within the nanotubes was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The addition of non-planar, sterically bulky chains to the fullerene cage results in highly ordered 1D structures in which the fullerenes are evenly spaced along the internal nanotube cavity. Theoretical calculations reveal that the functional groups interact with neighbouring fullerene cages to space the fullerenes evenly within the confines of the nanotube. The addition of two functional groups to opposite sides of the fullerene cages results in a further increase in the separation of the fullerene cages within the nanotubes at the cost of lower nanotube filling rates. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HRTEM images of 4@SWNT, space filling models of 1-6@SWNT structures and crystal packing

  7. Ultralong single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L X; O'Connell, M J; Doorn, S K; Liao, X Z; Zhao, Y H; Akhadov, E A; Hoffbauer, M A; Roop, B J; Jia, Q X; Dye, R C; Peterson, D E; Huang, S M; Liu, J; Zhu, Y T

    2004-10-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 by Iijima, there has been great interest in creating long, continuous nanotubes for applications where their properties coupled with extended lengths will enable new technology developments. For example, ultralong nanotubes can be spun into fibres that are more than an order of magnitude stronger than any current structural material, allowing revolutionary advances in lightweight, high-strength applications. Long metallic nanotubes will enable new types of micro-electromechanical systems such as micro-electric motors, and can also act as a nanoconducting cable for wiring micro-electronic devices. Here we report the synthesis of 4-cm-long individual single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at a high growth rate of 11 microm s(-1) by catalytic chemical vapour deposition. Our results suggest the possibility of growing SWNTs continuously without any apparent length limitation.

  8. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  9. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  10. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  11. [Hygienic evaluation of multilayer carbon nanotubes].

    PubMed

    Haliullin, T O; Zalyalov, R R; Shvedova, A A; Tkachov, A G

    2015-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that traditional methods evaluating work conditions on contemporary innovative enterprises producing nanomaterials assess these conditions as harmless and safe. At the same time, special investigation methods enable to reveal new hazards for workers' health: the study results prove that workers engaged into multilayer carbon nanotubes production are exposed to multilayer carbon nanotubes aerosols in concentrations exceeding internationally acceptable levels of 1 μg/ml (NIOSH)--that can harm the workers' health.

  12. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the . substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carver liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to The CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  13. Carbon nanotube superlattices in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.

    The influence of magnetic field on the band structure of carbon nanotube superlattices is investigated. In particular, we study superlattices built of finite sections of (6,6) and (12,0) tubes connected by pentagon/heptagon topological defects. Magnetic field is parallel to the axis of the superlattice. We demonstrate that the superlattice band structure does not show periodicity with the flux quantum, which is typical for pure carbon nanotubes.

  14. Interfaces Between Carbon Nanotubes and Nickel Nanoparticles in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bai; Liu, Lirui

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with metals can be used in capacitors, sensors, rechargeable batteries, and so on. Their interface significantly affects the properties of the composites. Here, we show that three kinds of interfaces between crystalline Ni and CNTs exist, namely, ordered, distorted, and disordered. They presented lattice states of Ni atoms near the interface, whereas the (111)Ni plane was parallel to the CNTs' surface and appeared apart in a smaller or bigger angle. The coherent face-centered cubic (f.c.c)/hexagonal close-packed structure (h.c.p) boundary was formed between the crystalline Ni and CNTs at the ordered interface, in which the match was (111)Ni//(0001)Carbon. We suggested a dislocation model for the coherent interface. The model explained why the angle between (200)Ni and the CNTs' inner surface was 52.9° rather than the theoretical value of 54.75°. The (1)/(2)[11\\bar {1}] dislocation was formed to fit the coherent relationship. Thus, Ni lattice shrinkage occurred. Further study indicated that the formation mechanism of crystalline Ni in CNTs was through heterogeneous nucleation on the inner wall surface and growth of the crystal nucleus.

  15. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Gately, Reece D

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications. PMID:25821693

  16. Method for manufacturing high quality carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A non-catalytic process for the production of carbon nanotubes includes supplying an electric current to a carbon anode and a carbon cathode which have been securely positioned in the open atmosphere with a gap between them. The electric current creates an electric arc between the carbon anode and the carbon cathode, which causes carbon to be vaporized from the carbon anode and a carbonaceous residue to be deposited on the carbon cathode. Inert gas is pumped into the gap to flush out oxygen, thereby preventing interference with the vaporization of carbon from the anode and preventing oxidation of the carbonaceous residue being deposited on the cathode. The anode and cathode are cooled while electric current is being supplied thereto. When the supply of electric current is terminated, the carbonaceous residue is removed from the cathode and is purified to yield carbon nanotubes.

  17. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Insepov, Zeke; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  18. Separated Carbon Nanotube Macroelectronics for Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yue; Zhang, Jialu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Pochiang; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-02-01

    Active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display holds great potential for the next generation visual technologies due to its high light efficiency, flexibility, lightweight, and low-temperature processing. However, suitable thin-film transistors (TFTs) are required to realize the advantages of AMOLED. Pre-separated, semiconducting enriched carbon nanotubes are excellent candidates for this purpose because of their excellent mobility, high percentage of semiconducting nanotubes, and room-temperature processing compatibility. Here we report, for the first time, the demonstration of AMOLED displays driven by separated nanotube thin-film transistors (SN-TFTs) including key technology components such as large-scale high-yield fabrication of devices with superior performance, carbon nanotube film density optimization, bilayer gate dielectric for improved substrate adhesion to the deposited nanotube film, and the demonstration of monolithically integrated AMOLED display elements with 500 pixels driven by 1000 SN-TFTs. Our approach can serve as the critical foundation for future nanotube-based thin-film display electronics.

  19. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Based Microfluidic Elements for Filtration and Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajin, O; Ben-Barak, N; Peng, J; Noy, A

    2003-06-25

    We have developed a method for integration of patterned arrays of carbon nanotubes or the ''nanotube mesh'' into microfabricated channels. The method includes standard lithographic methods for patterning and etching the substrate, followed by catalyst patterning, CVD deposition of nanotubes, and anodic bonding of coverslip top. We will describe a carbon nanotube filtering device fabricated using this method and discuss the use of carbon nanotube arrays as molecular concentration and separation media.

  1. Polymerization initated at sidewalls of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Hudson, Jared L. (Inventor); Krishnamoorti, Ramanan (Inventor); Yurekli, Koray (Inventor); Mitchell, Cynthia A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to aryl halide (such as aryl bromide) functionalized carbon nanotubes that can be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials with improved dispersion ability in polymer matrices. In this process the aryl halide is reacted with an alkyllithium species or is reacted with a metal to replace the aryl-bromine bond with an aryl-lithium or aryl-metal bond, respectively. It has further been discovered that other functionalized carbon nanotubes, after deprotonation with a deprotonation agent, can similarly be utilized in anionic polymerization processes to form polymer-carbon nanotube materials. Additionally or alternatively, a ring opening polymerization process can be performed. The resultant materials can be used by themselves due to their enhanced strength and reinforcement ability when compared to their unbound polymer analogs. Additionally, these materials can also be blended with pre-formed polymers to establish compatibility and enhanced dispersion of nanotubes in otherwise hard to disperse matrices resulting in significantly improved material properties. The resultant polymer-carbon nanotube materials can also be used in drug delivery processes due to their improved dispersion ability and biodegradability, and can also be used for scaffolding to promote cellular growth of tissue.

  2. Modeling of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, G.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet stringent environmental, safety and performance requirements from respective regulatory bodies, various technology-based industries are promoting the use of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced lightweight and high strength polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) as a substitute to conventional materials both in structural and non-structural applications. The superior mechanical properties of PNCs made up of CNTs or bundles of CNTs can be attributed to the interfacial interaction between the CNTs and matrix, CNT's morphologies and to their uniform dispersion in the matrix. In PNCs, CNTs physically bond with polymeric matrix at a level where the assumption of continuum level interactions is not applicable. Modeling and prediction of mechanical response and failure behavior of CNTs and their composites becomes a complex task and is dealt with the help of up-scale modeling strategies involving multiple spatial and temporal scales in hierarchical or concurrent manner. Firstly, the article offers an insight into various modeling techniques in studying the mechanical response of CNTs; namely, equivalent continuum approach, quasi-continuum approach and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In the subsequent steps, these approaches are combined with analytical and numerical micromechanics models in a multiscale framework to predict the average macroscopic response of PNCs. The review also discusses the implementation aspects of these computational approaches, their current status and associated challenges with a future outlook.

  3. Carbon nanotube biocompatibility with cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibaldi, Silvano; Brunelli, Claudio; Bavastrello, Valter; Ghigliotti, Giorgio; Nicolini, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Purified carbon nanotubes are new carbon allotropes, sharing similarities with graphite, that have recently been proposed for their potential use with biological systems as probes for in vitro research and for diagnostic and clinical purposes. However the biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes with cells represents an important problem that, so far, remains largely uninvestigated. The objective of this in vitro study is to explore the cytocompatibility properties of purified carbon nanofibres with cardiomyocytes. Cardiac muscle cells from a rat heart cell line H9c2 (2-1) have been used. Highly purified single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) were suspended at the concentration of 0.2 mg ml-1 by ultrasound in complete Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, and administered to cells to evaluate cell proliferation and shape changes by light microscopy, cell viability by trypan blue exclusion, and apoptosis, determined flow cytometrically by annexin/PI staining. Microscopic observation evidenced that carbon nanotubes bind to the cell membrane, causing a slight modification in cell shape and in cell count only after three days of treatment. Cell viability was not affected by carbon nanotubes in the first three days of culture, while after this time, cell death was slightly higher in nanotube-treated cells (p = ns). Accordingly, nanotube treatment induced little and non-significant change in the apoptotic cell number at day 1 and 3. The effect of nanotubes bound to cells was tested by reseeding treated cardiomyocytes. Cells from a trypsinized nanotube-treated sample showed a limited ability to proliferate, and a definite difference in shape, with a high degree of cell death: compared to reseeded untreated ones, in SWNT-treated samples the annexin-positive/PI-negative cells increased from 2.9% to 9.3% in SWNT (p<0.05, where p<0.05 defines a statistically significant difference with a probability above 95%), and the annexin-positive/PI-positive cells increased from 5.2% to 18.7% (p<0

  4. Splitting and joining in carbon nanotube/nanoribbon/nanotetrahedron growth.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takayuki; Kohno, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    We report a novel phenomenon for carbon nanotube growth that results in a new carbon nanotube morphology. A carbon nanotube grown via metal nanoparticle-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition splits into two flattened nanotubes during growth and the two flattened nanotubes merge to form a ring of carbon nanotube/nanoribbon. This novel process is revealed by transmission electron microscopy observations of the carbon nanostructures. We propose that the splitting-and-joining process involves only one metal catalyst nanoparticle and a self-folding mechanism that we have named the origami mechanism to explain the process and the formation of nanoribbons and nanotetrahedra. PMID:25559588

  5. Carbon nanotube ecotoxicity in amphibians: assessment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and comparison with double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mouchet, Florence; Landois, Perine; Puech, Pascal; Pinelli, Eric; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Gauthier, Laury

    2010-08-01

    The potential impact of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated under normalized laboratory conditions according to the International Standard micronucleus assay ISO 21427-1 for 12 days of half-static exposure to 0.1, 1, 10 and 50 mg/l of MWNTs in water. Three different end points were carried out for 12 days of exposure: mortality, growth inhibition and micronuclei induction in erythrocytes of the circulating blood of larvae. Raman spectroscopy analysis was used to study the presence of carbon nanotubes in the biological samples. Considering the high diversity of carbon nanotubes according to their different characteristics, MWNTs were analyzed in Xenopus larvae, comparatively to double-walled carbon nanotubes used in a previous study in similar conditions. Growth inhibition in larvae exposed to 50 mg/l of MWNTs was evidenced; however, no genetoxicity (micronucleus assay) was noticed, at any concentration. Carbon nanotube localization in the larvae leads to different possible hypothesis of mechanisms explaining toxicity in Xenopus.

  6. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  7. Physical removal of metallic carbon nanotubes from nanotube network devices using a thermal and fluidic process.

    PubMed

    Ford, Alexandra C; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M; Kane, Alexander A; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V; Krafcik, Karen L; Billups, W Edward; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François

    2013-03-15

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is versatile and is applied to devices post-fabrication.

  8. Selective Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes: Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Khare, Bishun

    2010-01-01

    An alternative method of low-temperature plasma functionalization of carbon nanotubes provides for the simultaneous attachment of molecular groups of multiple (typically two or three) different species or different mixtures of species to carbon nanotubes at different locations within the same apparatus. This method is based on similar principles, and involves the use of mostly the same basic apparatus, as those of the methods described in "Low-Temperature Plasma Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes" (ARC-14661-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2004), page 45. The figure schematically depicts the basic apparatus used in the aforementioned method, with emphasis on features that distinguish the present alternative method from the other. In this method, one exploits the fact that the composition of the deposition plasma changes as the plasma flows from its source in the precursor chamber toward the nanotubes in the target chamber. As a result, carbon nanotubes mounted in the target chamber at different flow distances (d1, d2, d3 . . .) from the precursor chamber become functionalized with different species or different mixtures of species. In one series of experiments to demonstrate this method, N2 was used as the precursor gas. After the functionalization process, the carbon nanotubes from three different positions in the target chamber were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to identify the molecular groups that had become attached. On carbon nanotubes from d1 = 1 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-N and C=N. On carbon nanotubes from d2 = 2.5 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-(NH)2 and/or C=NH2. (The H2 was believed to originate as residual hydrogen present in the nanotubes.) On carbon nanotubes from d3 = 7 cm no functionalization could be detected - perhaps, it was conjectured, because this distance is downstream of the plasma source, all of the free ions and free radicals of

  9. Fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene for molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Julio R; Villalta-Cerdas, Adrián; Echegoyen, Luis

    2012-01-01

    With the constant growing complexity of electronic devices, the top-down approach used with silicon based technology is facing both technological and physical challenges. Carbon based nanomaterials are good candidates to be used in the construction of electronic circuitry using a bottom-up approach, because they have semiconductor properties and dimensions within the required physical limit to establish electrical connections. The unique electronic properties of fullerenes for example, have allowed the construction of molecular rectifiers and transistors that can operate with more than two logical states. Carbon nanotubes have shown their potential to be used in the construction of molecular wires and FET transistors that can operate in the THz frequency range. On the other hand, graphene is not only the most promising material for replacing ITO in the construction of transparent electrodes but it has also shown quantum Hall effect and conductance properties that depend on the edges or chemical doping. The purpose of this review is to present recent developments on the utilization carbon nanomaterials in molecular electronics.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymers for Radiation Shielding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibeault, S. (Technical Monitor); Vaidyanathan, Ranji

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the use of Extrusion Freeform Fabrication (EEF) for the fabrication of carbon nanotubes. The presentation addresses TGA analysis, Raman spectroscopy, radiation tests, and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotubes.

  11. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  12. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  13. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-14

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  14. Carbon nanotube-based synthetic gecko tapes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2007-06-26

    We have developed a synthetic gecko tape by transferring micropatterned carbon nanotube arrays onto flexible polymer tape based on the hierarchical structure found on the foot of a gecko lizard. The gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm(2)) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micrometer-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak van der Waals interactions into high shear forces. We have demonstrated for the first time a macroscopic flexible patch that can be used repeatedly with peeling and adhesive properties better than the natural gecko foot. The carbon nanotube-based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics, and space applications.

  15. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Bakajin, O; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D

    2004-04-06

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Assuming Knudsen diffusion through this nanotube membrane, a maximum helium transport rate (for a pressure drop of 1 atm) of 0.25 cc/sec is predicted. Helium flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate greater than 1x10{sup -6} cc/sec. For viscous, laminar flow conditions, water is estimated to flow across the nanotube membrane (under a 1 atm pressure drop) at up to 2.8x10{sup -5} cc/sec (1.7 {micro}L/min).

  16. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  17. Electrical switching in metallic carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Woo; Ihm, Jisoon; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    2005-04-15

    We present first-principles calculations of quantumtransport that show that the resistance of metallic carbon nanotubes canbe changed dramatically with homogeneous transverse electric fields ifthe nanotubes have impurities or defects. The change of the resistance ispredicted to range over more than 2 orders of magnitude withexperimentally attainable electric fields. This novel property has itsorigin that backscattering of conduction electrons by impurities ordefects in the nanotubes is strongly dependent on the strength and/ordirection of the applied electric fields. We expect this property to opena path to new device applications of metallic carbonnanotubes.

  18. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steini Moura, Cassio; Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio; Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A.

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  19. Does water dope carbon nanotubes?

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Robert A.; Payne, Michael C.; Mostofi, Arash A.

    2014-10-28

    We calculate the long-range perturbation to the electronic charge density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a result of the physisorption of a water molecule. We find that the dominant effect is a charge redistribution in the CNT due to polarisation caused by the dipole moment of the water molecule. The charge redistribution is found to occur over a length-scale greater than 30 Å, highlighting the need for large-scale simulations. By comparing our fully first-principles calculations to ones in which the perturbation due to a water molecule is treated using a classical electrostatic model, we estimate that the charge transfer between CNT and water is negligible (no more than 10{sup −4} e per water molecule). We therefore conclude that water does not significantly dope CNTs, a conclusion that is consistent with the poor alignment of the relevant energy levels of the water molecule and CNT. Previous calculations that suggest water n-dopes CNTs are likely due to the misinterpretation of Mulliken charge partitioning in small supercells.

  20. Bending fracture in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Lu, Hsin-Fang

    2008-12-10

    A novel approach was adopted to incur bending fracture in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Expanded graphite (EG) was made by intercalating and exfoliating natural graphite flakes. The EG was deposited with nickel particles, from which CNTs were grown by chemical vapor deposition. The CNTs were tip-grown, and their roots were fixed on the EG flakes. The EG flakes were compressed, and many CNTs on the surface were fragmented due to the compression-induced bending. Two major modes of the bending fracture were observed: cone-shaped and shear-cut. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the crack growth within the graphene layers. The bending fracture is characterized by two-region crack growth. An opening crack first appears around the outer-tube due to the bending-induced tensile stress. The crack then branches to grow along an inclined direction toward the inner-tube due to the presence of the shear stress in between graphene layers. An inner-tube pullout with inclined side surface is formed. The onset and development of the crack in these two regions are discussed. PMID:21730690

  1. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christman, Jeremy; Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in nanostructure technology have made it possible to create small devices at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes (CNT's) are among the most exciting building blocks of nanotechnology. Their versatility and extremely desirable properties for electronic and other devices have driven intense research and development efforts in recent years. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be presented. The theoretical investigation is mainly based on molecular dynamics. Green Kubo relation is used for the study of thermal conductivity. Results include kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux autocorrelation function, and heat conduction of various CNT structures. Most of the computation and simulation has been conducted on the Beowulf cluster at Ball State University. Various software packages and tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), and NanoHUB, the open online resource at Purdue University have been used for the research. The work has been supported by the Indiana Academy of Science Research Fund, 2010-2011.

  2. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  3. Electrical properties of multiwalled carbon nanotube film

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, S. V. Malinovskaya, O. S.; Mal'tsev, S. N.

    2007-07-15

    The multiwalled carbon nanotube films examined in this study are produced by two methods: current annealing of carbon paper and dc magnetron sputtering. The conductivity and the temperature dependence of resistance of the samples are measured. The thermal conductivity of the film-substrate system is evaluated.

  4. Bio-functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Anindya; Khazaee, Maryam; Opitz, Jörg; Beyer, Eckhard; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-10-28

    Here we present a hybrid approach to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution, exploring a non-covalent binding strategy. We focus on formation of hybrid complexes consisting of carbon nanotubes decorated by single stranded DNA, non-covalently attached using surfactants as intermediate layers. Unlike single walled carbon nanotubes, revealing easy side wall wrapping of DNA, we observe that wrapping of nucleic acids around multi-walled carbon nanotubes is diameter dependent. PMID:24013382

  5. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6](3-) precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ∼0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance.

  6. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6]3− precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ∼0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance. PMID:27025784

  7. High-sensitive label-free biosensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2006-02-01

    DNA hybridization has sensitively been detected using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) in real time. After full-complementary DNA introduction, the source-drain current gradually increased while monitoring in real time. Full-complementary DNA with concentration as low as 1 fmol/L solution could be effectively detected. Our CNTFET-based biochip is a promising candidate for the development of an integrated, high-throughput, multiplexed DNA biosensor for medical, forensic and environmental diagnostics.

  8. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  9. InAs/Si Hetero-Junction Nanotube Tunnel Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Amir N.; Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Hetero-structure tunnel junctions in non-planar gate-all-around nanowire (GAA NW) tunnel FETs (TFETs) have shown significant enhancement in ‘ON’ state tunnel current over their all-silicon counterpart. Here we show the unique concept of nanotube TFET in a hetero-structure configuration that is capable of much higher drive current as opposed to that of GAA NW TFETs.Through the use of inner/outer core-shell gates, a single III-V hetero-structured nanotube TFET leverages physically larger tunneling area while achieving higher driver current (ION) and saving real estates by eliminating arraying requirement. Numerical simulations has shown that a 10 nm thin nanotube TFET with a 100 nm core gate has a 5×normalized output current compared to a 10 nm diameter GAA NW TFET. PMID:25923104

  10. Measurement Challenges for Carbon Nanotube Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pasha; Gorelik, Olga; Yowell, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    The advances in large scale applications of carbon nanotubes demand a reliable supply of raw and processed materials. It is imperative to have a consistent quality control of these nanomaterials to distinguish material inconsistency from the modifications induced by processing of nanotubes for any application. NASA Johnson Space Center realized this need five years back and started a program to standardize the characterization methods. The JSC team conducted two workshops (2003 and 2005) in collaboration with NIST focusing on purity and dispersion measurement issues of carbon nanotubes [1]. In 2004, the NASA-JSC protocol was developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA [2]. This protocol is routinely used by several researchers across the world as a first step in characterizing raw and purified carbon nanotubes. A suggested practice guide consisting of detailed chapters on TGA, Raman, electron microscopy and NIR absorption is in the final stages and is undergoing revisions with input from the nanotube community [3]. The possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be presented. Recent activities at ANSI and ISO towards implementing these protocols as nanotube characterization standards will be discussed.

  11. Selective synthesis and device applications of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes using isopropyl alcohol as feedstock.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuchi; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Liu, Bilu; Lin, Xue; Parker, Jason; Beasley, Cara; Wong, H-S Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-08-28

    The development of guided chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a great platform for wafer-scale integration of aligned nanotubes into circuits and functional electronic systems. However, the coexistence of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes is still a major obstacle for the development of carbon-nanotube-based nanoelectronics. To address this problem, we have developed a method to obtain predominantly semiconducting nanotubes from direct CVD growth. By using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as the carbon feedstock, a semiconducting nanotube purity of above 90% is achieved, which is unambiguously confirmed by both electrical and micro-Raman measurements. Mass spectrometric study was performed to elucidate the underlying chemical mechanism. Furthermore, high performance thin-film transistors with an on/off ratio above 10(4) and mobility up to 116 cm(2)/(V·s) have been achieved using the IPA-synthesized nanotube networks grown on silicon substrate. The method reported in this contribution is easy to operate and the results are highly reproducible. Therefore, such semiconducting predominated single-walled carbon nanotubes could serve as an important building block for future practical and scalable carbon nanotube electronics.

  12. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  13. A comparative study on the lithium-ion storage performances of carbon nanotubes and tube-in-tube carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Jun; Liu, Xi; Cui, Guanglei; Zhu, Bo; Weinberg, Gisela; Schlögl, Robert; Maier, Joachim; Su, Dang Sheng

    2010-03-22

    A comparative study of the electrochemical performances of carbon nanotubes and tube-in-tube carbon nanotubes reveals a dependence effect of lithium-ion storage behavior on the detailed nanostructure of carbon nanotubes. In particular, the impurity that graphitic particles or graphene fragments inherently present in carbon nanotubes plays a crucial role in the lithium-ion storage capacity of the carbon nanotubes. Compared to acid-washed carbon nanotubes, the assembly of graphitic impurity fragments in the tube-in-tube structures hinders lithium-ion diffusion, thus drastically decreasing the rate performance of lithium-ion storage. Significantly, our results indicate that the lithium-ion storage capacity of carbon nanotubes as anode electrodes can be improved or controlled by optimizing the microstructure composition of impurity graphitic nanoparticles or graphene fragments in the matrix of the carbon nanotubes.

  14. Formation of Carbon Nanotubes in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Even though nanotube science has become one of the worlds most rapidly advancing areas of research, very little is known about the processes involved in nanotube synthesis. To study the formation of carbon nanotubes in an environment unhindered by the buoyancy induced flows generated by the high temperatures necessary to vaporize carbon and grow nanotubes, we have designed a miniature carbon arc apparatus that can produce carbon nanotubes under microgravity conditions. During the first phase of this project, we designed, built, and successfully tested the mini carbon arc in both 1g and 2.2 sec drop tower microgravity conditions. We have demonstrated that microgravity can eliminate the strong convective flows from the carbon arc and we have successfully produced single-walled carbon nanotubes in microgravity. We believe that microgravity processing will allow us to better understand the nanotube formation process and eventually allow us to grow nanotubes that are superior to ground-based production.

  15. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on lysozyme gelation.

    PubMed

    Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo

    2014-09-01

    The possibility to disperse carbon nanotubes in biocompatible matrices has got substantial interest from the scientific community. Along this research line, the inclusion of single walled carbon nanotubes in lysozyme-based hydrogels was investigated. Experiments were performed at different nanotube/lysozyme weight ratios. Carbon nanotubes were dispersed in protein solutions, in conditions suitable for thermal gelation. The state of the dispersions was determined before and after thermal treatment. Rheology, dynamic light scattering and different microscopies investigated the effect that carbon nanotubes exert on gelation. The gelation kinetics and changes in gelation temperature were determined. The effect of carbon and lysozyme content on the gel properties was, therefore, determined. At fixed lysozyme content, moderate amounts of carbon nanotubes do not disturb the properties of hydrogel composites. At moderately high volume fractions in carbon nanotubes, the gels become continuous in both lysozyme and nanotubes. This is because percolating networks are presumably formed. Support to the above statements comes by rheology.

  16. Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and their Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, K. J.; Srivastava, Deepak; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the folloving: carbon nanotube (CNT): structures, application of carbon nanotubes, simulation method, Elastic properties of carbon nanotubes, yield strain of CNT, yielding under tensile stress, yielding: strain-rate and temperature dependence, yield strain under tension, yielding at realistic conditions, nano fibers, polymer CNT composite, force field, density dependency on temperature, diffusion coefficients, young modulus, and conclusions.

  17. Interaction of pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Monticelli, Luca; Tieleman, D Peter

    2013-10-10

    Carbon nanotubes are widely used in a growing number of applications. Their interactions with biological materials, cell membranes in particular, is of interest in applications including drug delivery and for understanding the toxicity of carbon nanotubes. We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations with the MARTINI model to study the interactions of model nanotubes of different thickness, length, and patterns of chemical modification with model membranes. In addition, we characterize the interactions of small bundles of carbon nanotubes with membrane models. Short pristine carbon nanotubes readily insert into membranes and adopt an orientation parallel to the plane of the membrane in the center of the membrane. Larger aggregates and functionalized nanotubes exhibit a range of possible interactions. The distribution and orientation of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by functionalizing the nanotubes. Free energy calculations provide thermodynamic insight into the preferred orientations of different nanotubes and quantify structural defects in the lipid matrix.

  18. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  19. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  20. In situ tuning and probing the ambipolar field effect on multiwall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Li-Ying; Chang, Chia-Seng

    2014-12-15

    We report a method of fabricating ultra-clean and hysteresis-free multiwall carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) inside the ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscope equipped with a movable gold tip as a local gate. By tailoring the shell structure of the nanotube and varying the drain-source voltage (V{sub ds}), we can tune the electronic characteristic of a multiwall CNFET in situ. We have also found that the Schottky barriers of a multiwall CNFET are generated within the nanotube, but not at the nanotube/electrode contacts, and the barrier height has been derived. We have subsequently demonstrated the ambipolar characteristics of the CNFET with concurrent high-resolution imaging and local gating.

  1. Carbon nanotube high-performance logic technology - challenges and current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shu-Jen

    2015-03-01

    In the last four decades, we have witnessed a tremendous information technology revolution originated from the relentless scaling of Si complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices. CMOS scaling provides ever-improved transistor performance, density, power and cost, and will continue to bring new applications and functions to our daily life. However, the conventional homogeneous scaling of silicon devices has become very difficult, firstly due to the unsatisfactory electrostatic control from the gate dielectric. In addition, as we look forward to the technology nodes with sub-10 nm channel length, non-Si based channel materials will be required to provide continuous carrier velocity enhancement when the conventional strained-Si techniques run out of steam. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are promising to replace silicon as the channel material for high-performance electronics near the end of silicon scaling roadmap, with their superb electrical properties, intrinsic ultrathin body, and nearly transparent contact with certain metals. This talk discusses recent advances in modeling and experimental works that reveal the properties and potential of ultra-scaled nanotube transistors, separation and assembly techniques for forming nanotube arrays with high semiconducting nanotube purity and tight pitch separation, and engineering aspects of their implementation in integrated circuits and functional systems. A concluding discussion highlights most significant challenges from technology points of view, and provides perspectives on the future of carbon nanotube based nanoelectronics.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Computer: Transforming Scientific Discoveries into Working Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Subhasish

    2014-03-01

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy- delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. However, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are subject to substantial inherent imperfections that pose major obstacles to the design of robust and very large-scale CNFET digital systems: (i) It is nearly impossible to guarantee perfect alignment and positioning of all CNTs. This limitation introduces stray conducting paths, resulting in incorrect circuit functionality. (ii) CNTs can be metallic or semiconducting depending on chirality. Metallic CNTs cause shorts resulting in excessive leakage and incorrect circuit functionality. A combination of design and processing technique overcomes these challenges by creating robust CNFET digital circuits that are immune to these inherent imperfections. This imperfection-immune design paradigm enables the first experimental demonstration of the carbon nanotube computer, and, more generally, arbitrary digital systems that can be built using CNFETs. The CNT computer is capable of performing multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we emulate 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet demonstrated. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next

  3. A review on protein functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Kathyayini; Reddy, Roopa; Reddy, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely recognized and used for controlled drug delivery and in various other fields due to their unique properties and distinct advantages. Both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes are used and/or studied for potential applications in medical, energy, textile, composite, and other areas. Since CNTs are chemically inert and are insoluble in water or other organic solvents, they are functionalized or modified to carry payloads or interact with biological molecules. CNTs have been preferably functionalized with proteins because CNTs are predominantly used for medical applications such as delivery of drugs, DNA and genes, and also for biosensing. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand the interactions, cytotoxicity, and potential applications of protein functionalized CNTs but contradicting results have been published on the cytotoxicity of the functionalized CNTs. This paper provides a brief review of CNTs functionalized with proteins, methods used to functionalize the CNTs, and their potential applications. PMID:26660626

  4. Carbon nanotubes in neuroregeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, we have experienced an increasing interest and an improved understanding of the application of nanotechnology to the nervous system. The aim of such studies is that of developing future strategies for tissue repair to promote functional recovery after brain damage. In this framework, carbon nanotube based technologies are emerging as particularly innovative tools due to the outstanding physical properties of these nanomaterials together with their recently documented ability to interface neuronal circuits, synapses and membranes. This review will discuss the state of the art in carbon nanotube technology applied to the development of devices able to drive nerve tissue repair; we will highlight the most exciting findings addressing the impact of carbon nanotubes in nerve tissue engineering, focusing in particular on neuronal differentiation, growth and network reconstruction. PMID:23856411

  5. A review on protein functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Kathyayini; Reddy, Roopa; Reddy, Narendra

    2015-12-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely recognized and used for controlled drug delivery and in various other fields due to their unique properties and distinct advantages. Both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled (MWCNTs) carbon nanotubes are used and/or studied for potential applications in medical, energy, textile, composite, and other areas. Since CNTs are chemically inert and are insoluble in water or other organic solvents, they are functionalized or modified to carry payloads or interact with biological molecules. CNTs have been preferably functionalized with proteins because CNTs are predominantly used for medical applications such as delivery of drugs, DNA and genes, and also for biosensing. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand the interactions, cytotoxicity, and potential applications of protein functionalized CNTs but contradicting results have been published on the cytotoxicity of the functionalized CNTs. This paper provides a brief review of CNTs functionalized with proteins, methods used to functionalize the CNTs, and their potential applications.

  6. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  7. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajen B; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-07-27

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs.

  8. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  9. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rajen B.; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J.; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-07-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs.

  10. Refoldable Peptide Barrel -- Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Alexey; Wang, Boyang; Kral, Petr

    2008-03-01

    We design hybrid bio-nano-junctions formed by cylindrical peptide structures covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The cylinders are composed of 5 pairs of antiparallel peptide strands that are ``one-to-one'' matched and covalently bonded through ester and amide bonds to the terminal C atoms in two (20,0) carbon nanotubes. The remaining terminal carbons in the CNTs are replaced by nitrogens, forming embedded quinoline-like structures. The used peptide strands are composed of charged amino acids that form cylindrical patterns with preferred stable configurations. By applying a torque to the nanotubes, we can reversibly fold and control the overall structure of the peptide barrels. The junctions might allow the collection and delivery of drugs and activation of biological molecules attached to them.

  11. Boron-Filled Hybrid Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajen B; Chou, Tsengming; Kanwal, Alokik; Apigo, David J; Lefebvre, Joseph; Owens, Frank; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    A unique nanoheterostructure, a boron-filled hybrid carbon nanotube (BHCNT), has been synthesized using a one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The BHCNTs can be considered to be a novel form of boron carbide consisting of boron doped, distorted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating boron nanowires. These MWCNTs were found to be insulating in spite of their graphitic layered outer structures. While conventional MWCNTs have great axial strength, they have weak radial compressive strength, and do not bond well to one another or to other materials. In contrast, BHCNTs are shown to be up to 31% stiffer and 233% stronger than conventional MWCNTs in radial compression and have excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The corrugated surface of BHCNTs enables them to bond easily to themselves and other materials, in contrast to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). BHCNTs can, therefore, be used to make nanocomposites, nanopaper sheets, and bundles that are stronger than those made with CNTs. PMID:27460526

  12. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis Through Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirado, Pablo; Garcia, Rafael; Montes, Jorge; Melendrez, Rodrigo; Barboza, Marcelino; Contreras, Oscar

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes show a great potential of applications since there discovery by Iijima in 1991[1] due to their numerous physical-chemical properties such as their high weight to strength relationship, which make them ideal to use in high resistance compound materials, and in many other applications[2] In this work, a novel method for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes is presented, starting from an ultra-thin sheet of graphite synthesized by the chemical vapor decomposition technique (CVD), using ultra high purity methane and hydrogen at 1200°C in a horizontal quartz reactor. For the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, the graphite sheets were exposed to different doses of radiation, with the objective of breaking the graphite bonds and form carbon nanotubes; a Gammacell equipment model 220 Excel was used for the purpose, which counts with a radiation source of cobalt 60, and a current radiation rate of 0.9 Gy/seconds. The time of exposure to radiation was varied in each sample, according to the desired dose of radiation in each case, afterwards the samples were characterized using the Raman spectroscopy and TEM microscopy techniques with the objective of observing the kind of nanotubes formed, their morphology and their number of defects. Results will be shown during the poster session.

  13. Orientational Growth of Carbon Nanotube for Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could improve numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been made in investigating the growth mechanism of MWCNT to synthesize high quality MWCNT. Most applications require uniform aligned CNT. In this presentation, a directional growth of CNT will be reported. Carbon nanotubes are synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Temperature and pressure are two important growth parameters for fabricating carbon nanotubes. It is found that the nanotube diameter distribution mainly depends on the growth-temperature. With the substrate surface normal either along or against the gravity vector, different growth orientations of MWCNT are observed by scanning electron microscopy although the Raman spectra are similar for samples synthesized at different locations. The sizes of these carbon nanotubes in each sample are quite uniform and the length of the tube is up to several tens of micrometers. These results suggest the gravitation effects in the growth of long and small diameter CNT.

  14. Lipid nanoscaffolds in carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukner, Catharina; Koziol, Krzysztof K. K.; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V.

    2013-09-01

    We present the fabrication of lipid nanoscaffolds inside carbon nanotube arrays by employing the nanostructural self-assembly of lipid molecules. The nanoscaffolds are finely tunable into model biomembrane-like architectures (planar), soft nanochannels (cylindrical) or 3-dimensionally ordered continuous bilayer structures (cubic). Carbon nanotube arrays hosting the above nanoscaffolds are formed by packing of highly oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes which facilitate the alignment of lipid nanostructures without requiring an external force. Furthermore, the lipid nanoscaffolds can be created under both dry and hydrated conditions. We show their direct application in reconstitution of egg proteins. Such nanoscaffolds find enormous potential in bio- and nano-technological fields.We present the fabrication of lipid nanoscaffolds inside carbon nanotube arrays by employing the nanostructural self-assembly of lipid molecules. The nanoscaffolds are finely tunable into model biomembrane-like architectures (planar), soft nanochannels (cylindrical) or 3-dimensionally ordered continuous bilayer structures (cubic). Carbon nanotube arrays hosting the above nanoscaffolds are formed by packing of highly oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes which facilitate the alignment of lipid nanostructures without requiring an external force. Furthermore, the lipid nanoscaffolds can be created under both dry and hydrated conditions. We show their direct application in reconstitution of egg proteins. Such nanoscaffolds find enormous potential in bio- and nano-technological fields. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data on the alignment of lipid nanostructures, control and time resolved 2-d images of egg ovalbumin encapsulation and a summary picture of the present work. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02068a

  15. Carbon nanotubes as actuators in smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monner, Hans P.; Muehle, Stefan; Wierach, Peter

    2003-08-01

    Carbon Nanotubes have diameters in nanometer scale, are up to tens of microns long and can be single- or multi-walled (SWNT and MWNT). Compared with carbon fibers, which typically have a Young's modulus of up to 750 GPa, the elastic modulus of Carbon Nanotubes has been measured to be approximately 1-2 TPa. The strength of Carbon Nanotubes has been reported to be about two order of magnitude higher than current high strength carbon fibers. Additionally especially SWNT show excellent actuator behaviour. Electromechanical actuators based on sheets of SWNT show to generate higher stress than natural muscles and higher strains than ferroelectrics like PZT. Unlike conventional ferroelectric actuators, low operating voltages of a few volts generate large actuator strains. Thus, this paper will give a brief overview of the current activities within this field and show some recent results of the Carbon Nanotube actuator development at the DLR-Institute of Structural Mechanic suggesting that optimized SWNT sheets may eventually provide substantially higher work densities per cycle than any previously known material.

  16. Stable doping of carbon nanotubes via molecular self assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.; Chen, Y.; Podzorov, V.; Cook, A.; Zakhidov, A.

    2014-10-14

    We report a novel method for stable doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) based on methods of molecular self assembly. A conformal growth of a self-assembled monolayer of fluoroalkyl trichloro-silane (FTS) at CNT surfaces results in a strong increase of the sheet conductivity of CNT electrodes by 60–300%, depending on the CNT chirality and composition. The charge carrier mobility of undoped partially aligned CNT films was independently estimated in a field-effect transistor geometry (~100 cm²V⁻¹s⁻¹). The hole density induced by the FTS monolayer in CNT sheets is estimated to be ~1.8 ×10¹⁴cm⁻². We also show that FTS doping of CNT anodes greatly improves the performance of organic solar cells. This large and stable doping effect, easily achieved in large-area samples, makes this approach very attractive for applications of CNTs in transparent and flexible electronics.

  17. Analog neuromorphic module based on carbon nanotube synapses.

    PubMed

    Shen, Alex Ming; Chen, Chia-Ling; Kim, Kyunghyun; Cho, Byungjin; Tudor, Andrew; Chen, Yong

    2013-07-23

    We report an analog neuromorphic module composed of p-type carbon nanotube (CNT) synapses and an integrate-and-fire (I&F) circuit. The CNT synapse has a field-effect transistor structure with a random CNT network as its channel and an aluminum oxide dielectric layer implanted with indium ions as its gate. A positive voltage pulse (spike) applied on the gate attracts electrons into the defect sites of the gate dielectric layer, and the trapped electrons are gradually released after the pulse is removed. The electrons modify the hole concentration and induce a dynamic postsynaptic current in the CNT channel. Multiple input spikes induce excitatory or inhibitory postsynaptic currents via excitatory or inhibitory CNT synapses, which flow toward an I&F circuit to trigger output spikes. The dynamic transfer function between the input and output spikes of the neuromorphic module is analyzed. The module could potentially be scaled up to emulate biological neural networks and their functions.

  18. A molybdenum disulfide/carbon nanotube heterogeneous complementary inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    We report a simple, bottom-up/top-down approach for integrating drastically different nanoscale building blocks to form a heterogeneous complementary inverter circuit based on layered molybdenum disulfide and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. The fabricated CNT/MoS2 inverter is composed of n-type molybdenum disulfide (MOS2) and p-type CNT transistors, with a high voltage gain of 1.3. The CNT channels are fabricated using directed assembly while the layered molybdenum disulfide channels are fabricated by mechanical exfoliation. This bottom-up fabrication approach for integrating various nanoscale elements with unique characteristics provides an alternative cost-effective methodology to complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors, laying the foundation for the realization of high performance logic circuits.

  19. A molybdenum disulfide/carbon nanotube heterogeneous complementary inverter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2012-08-24

    We report a simple, bottom-up/top-down approach for integrating drastically different nanoscale building blocks to form a heterogeneous complementary inverter circuit based on layered molybdenum disulfide and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. The fabricated CNT/MoS(2) inverter is composed of n-type molybdenum disulfide (MOS(2)) and p-type CNT transistors, with a high voltage gain of 1.3. The CNT channels are fabricated using directed assembly while the layered molybdenum disulfide channels are fabricated by mechanical exfoliation. This bottom-up fabrication approach for integrating various nanoscale elements with unique characteristics provides an alternative cost-effective methodology to complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors, laying the foundation for the realization of high performance logic circuits.

  20. Electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, D.; Yanagi, K.; Takenobu, T.; Okada, S.; Marumoto, K.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit various excellent properties, such as ballistic transport. However, their electrically induced charge carriers and the relation between their spin states and the ballistic transport have not yet been microscopically investigated because of experimental difficulties. Here we show an electron spin resonance (ESR) study of semiconducting single-walled CNT thin films to investigate their spin states and electrically induced charge carriers using transistor structures under device operation. The field-induced ESR technique is suitable for microscopic investigation because it can directly observe spins in the CNTs. We observed a clear correlation between the ESR decrease and the current increase under high charge density conditions, which directly demonstrated electrically induced ambipolar spin vanishments in the CNTs. The result provides a first clear evidence of antimagnetic interactions between spins of electrically induced charge carriers and vacancies in the CNTs. The ambipolar spin vanishments would contribute the improvement of transport properties of CNTs because of greatly reduced carrier scatterings. PMID:26148487

  1. Recording Single Molecule Dynamics and Function using Carbon Nanotube Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongki; Sims, Patrick; Moody, Issa; Olsen, Tivoli; Corso, Brad L.; Tolga Gul, O.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale electronic devices like field-effect transistors (FETs) have long promised to provide sensitive, label-free detection of biomolecules. In particular, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have the requisite sensitivity to detect single molecule events, and have sufficient bandwidth to directly monitor single molecule dynamics in real time. Recent measurements have demonstrated this premise by monitoring the dynamic, single-molecule processivity of three different enzymes: lysozyme, protein Kinase A, and the Klenow fragment of polymerase I. Initial successes in each case indicate the generality and attractiveness of SWNT FETs as a new tool to complement other single molecule techniques. Furthermore, our focused research on transduction mechanisms provides the design rules necessary to further generalize this SWNT FET technique. This presentation will summarize these rules, and demonstrate how the purposeful incorporation of just one amino acid is sufficient to fabricate effective, single molecule nanocircuits from a wide range of enzymes or proteins.

  2. Ultralight multiwalled carbon nanotube aerogel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Jianhua; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Kumar, Amit; Joung, Daeha; Li, Qiang; Khondaker, Saiful I; Seal, Sudipta; Zhai, Lei

    2010-12-28

    Ultralight multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) aerogel is fabricated from a wet gel of well-dispersed pristine MWCNTs. On the basis of a theoretical prediction that increasing interaction potential between CNTs lowers their critical concentration to form an infinite percolation network, poly(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate) (PTMSPMA) is used to disperse and functionalize MWCNTs where the subsequent hydrolysis and condensation of PTMSPMA introduces strong and permanent chemical bonding between MWCNTs. The interaction is both experimentally and theoretically proven to facilitate the formation of a MWCNT percolation network, which leads to the gelation of MWCNT dispersion at ultralow MWCNT concentration. After removing the liquid component from the MWCNT wet gel, the lightest ever free-standing MWCNT aerogel monolith with a density of 4 mg/cm(3) is obtained. The MWCNT aerogel has an ordered macroporous honeycomb structure with straight and parallel voids in 50-150 μm separated by less than 100 nm thick walls. The entangled MWCNTs generate mesoporous structures on the honeycomb walls, creating aerogels with a surface area of 580 m(2)/g which is much higher than that of pristine MWCNTs (241 m(2)/g). Despite the ultralow density, the MWCNT aerogels have an excellent compression recoverable property as demonstrated by the compression test. The aerogels have an electrical conductivity of 3.2 × 10(-2) S·cm(-1) that can be further increased to 0.67 S·cm(-1) by a high-current pulse method without degrading their structures. The excellent compression recoverable property, hierarchically porous structure with large surface area, and high conductivity grant the MWCNT aerogels exceptional pressure and chemical vapor sensing capabilities. PMID:21090673

  3. A carbon nanotube optical rectenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Asha; Singh, Virendra; Bougher, Thomas L.; Cola, Baratunde A.

    2015-12-01

    An optical rectenna—a device that directly converts free-propagating electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies to direct current—was first proposed over 40 years ago, yet this concept has not been demonstrated experimentally due to fabrication challenges at the nanoscale. Realizing an optical rectenna requires that an antenna be coupled to a diode that operates on the order of 1 PHz (switching speed on the order of 1 fs). Diodes operating at these frequencies are feasible if their capacitance is on the order of a few attofarads, but they remain extremely difficult to fabricate and to reliably couple to a nanoscale antenna. Here we demonstrate an optical rectenna by engineering metal-insulator-metal tunnel diodes, with a junction capacitance of ˜2 aF, at the tip of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (˜10 nm in diameter), which act as the antenna. Upon irradiation with visible and infrared light, we measure a d.c. open-circuit voltage and a short-circuit current that appear to be due to a rectification process (we account for a very small but quantifiable contribution from thermal effects). In contrast to recent reports of photodetection based on hot electron decay in a plasmonic nanoscale antenna, a coherent optical antenna field appears to be rectified directly in our devices, consistent with rectenna theory. Finally, power rectification is observed under simulated solar illumination, and there is no detectable change in diode performance after numerous current-voltage scans between 5 and 77 °C, indicating a potential for robust operation.

  4. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  5. Modeling of Current-Voltage Characteristics in Large Metal-Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in recent experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube [Collins et al., Science 278, 100 (1997)]. We claim that there are two contact modes for a tip (metal)-nanotube (semiconductor) junction depending whether the alignment of the metal and the semiconductor band structures is (1) variable (vacuum-gap) or (2) fixed (touching) with V. With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube. However, the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in forward current with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, while with V > 0 for an p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type. We apply this model to the source-drain I-V characteristics in a long nanotube-channel field-effect-transistor with metallic electrodes at low temperature [Zhou et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1597 (2000)], and show that two independent metal-semiconductor junctions in series are responsible for the observed behavior.

  6. Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Carbon-Phenenolic Ablator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B. A.; Waid, M.; Moloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of PICA (phenolic impregnated carbon ablator) as the selected material for heat shielding for future earth return vehicles. It briefly reviews the manufacturing of PICA and the advantages for the use of heat shielding, and then explains the reason for using Carbon Nanotubes to improve strength of phenolic resin that binds carbon fibers together. It reviews the work being done to create a carbon nanotube enhanced PICA. Also shown are various micrographic images of the various PICA materials.

  7. Computational Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomechanics of individual carbon and boron-nitride nanotubes and their application as reinforcing fibers in polymer composites has been reviewed with interplay of theoretical modeling, computer simulations and experimental observations. The emphasis in this work is on elucidating the multi-length scales of the problems involved, and of different simulation techniques that are needed to address specific characteristics of individual nanotubes and nanotube polymer-matrix interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are shown to be sufficient to describe the generic behavior such as strength and stiffness modulus but are inadequate to describe elastic limit and nature of plastic buckling at large strength. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown to bring out explicit atomic nature dependent behavior of these nanoscale materials objects that are not accessible either via continuum mechanics based descriptions or through classical molecular dynamics based simulations. As examples, we discus local plastic collapse of carbon nanotubes under axial compression and anisotropic plastic buckling of boron-nitride nanotubes. Dependence of the yield strain on the strain rate is addressed through temperature dependent simulations, a transition-state-theory based model of the strain as a function of strain rate and simulation temperature is presented, and in all cases extensive comparisons are made with experimental observations. Mechanical properties of nanotube-polymer composite materials are simulated with diverse nanotube-polymer interface structures (with van der Waals interaction). The atomistic mechanisms of the interface toughening for optimal load transfer through recycling, high-thermal expansion and diffusion coefficient composite formation above glass transition temperature, and enhancement of Young's modulus on addition of nanotubes to polymer are discussed and compared with experimental observations.

  8. The Use of Plasma Vortexes in Creating Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Alexander; Alexander Leith Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been created in a variety of ways such as arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Each of these techniques has been proven to produce carbon nanotubes in small quantities in a lab setting. This is the problem that we have been addressing. Over the course of 16 months, we have been working on a new method of carbon nanotube production that is based around fluid dynamics and plasma. We have created the basic components to test this new way to produce carbon nanotubes. This research will ideally provide a new avenue for carbon nanotube production. Worked with Dr. Randal Tagg of the University of Colorado Denver.

  9. Titania carbon nanotube composites for enhanced photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios

    Photocatalytic composites have been used for the past few decades in a wide range of applications. The most common application is the purification of air and water by removing toxic compounds. There is limited use however towards biocidal applications. Despite their high efficiency, photocatalytic materials are not comparable to the effectiveness of conventional biocidal compounds such as chlorine and alcoholic disinfectants. On the other hand, nearly a decade ago with the discovery of the carbon nanotubes a new vibrant scientific field emerged. Nanotubes are unique structures of carbon that posse amazing electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. In this research carbon nanotubes are used as photocatalytic enhancers. They were coated with anatase titania to form a composite material. Two different types of nanotubes (metallic versus non-metallic) were used and the photocatalytic activity was measured. The metallic tubes demonstrated exceptional photocatalytic properties, while non-metallic tubes had low photocatalytic efficiency. The reason for that difference was investigated and was the major focus of this research. The research concluded that the reasons for the high efficiency of the carbon nanotubes were (i) the metallic nature of the tubes and (ii) the possible bond between the titania coating and the underlying graphite layers (C-O-Ti). Since both composites had the same indications regarding the C-O-Ti bond, the metallic nature of the carbon nanotubes is believed to be the most dominant factor contributing to the enhancement of the photocatalysis. The composite material may have other potential applications such as for sensing and photovoltaic uses.

  10. Exciton-Polariton Dynamics in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, Igor

    2007-03-01

    This work addresses theoretically the nonlinear response of phonon-coupled excitons[1] in carbon nanotubes to an external electromagnetic field. The photon Green's function approach developed recently to quantize the electromagnetic field in the presence of quasi-1D absorbing bodies[2],[3] is being used to study the dynamics of phonon-coupled excitonic states interacting with the surface photonic modes excited by the external electromagnetic field in semiconductor carbon nanotubes. The formation of the new elementary excitations, exciton-polaritons, representing the eigen states of the full photon-matter Hamiltonian has been studied for small-diameter nanotubes under strong exciton-photon coupling. Time-resolved simulations have been performed of the coherent exciton- polariton dynamics with the exciton-phonon interactions taken into account. The criteria for the coherent control of the excitonic states population in optically excited carbon nanotubes have been formulated. [1]F.Plentz et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 247401 (2005). [2]I.V.Bondarev and Ph.Lambin, Phys. Rev. B 72, 035451 (2005). [3]I.V.Bondarev and Ph.Lambin, in: Trends in Nanotubes Reasearch (NovaScience, New York, 2006), p.139.

  11. Scanning probe microscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiamin

    This dissertation presents research on scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes. In total three experiments will be discussed. The first experiment uses a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to study the topographic and spectroscopic properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). Graphene was first isolated and identified on SiO2 substrates, which was later found to be the source of graphene quality degradation, e.g. large surface roughness, increased resistivity and random doping etc. Researchers have been trying to replace SiO2 with other materials and hBN is by far the most successful one. Our STM study shows an order of magnitude reduction in surface roughness and electrostatic potential variation compared with graphene on SiO2. The second experiment shows a novel quantum interference effect of electron waves in graphene, loosely referred to as "Friedel oscillations." These arise when incident electron waves interfere with waves scattered from defects in the sample. This interference pattern shows up as a spatial variation in the local density of states, which can be probed by the STM. We measured such Friedel oscillations in graphene near step edges of hBN. Due to its peculiar band structure, the oscillations in graphene have a faster decay rate and their wavelength is an order of magnitude longer than similar oscillations previously observed on noble metal surfaces. By measuring the dependence of the Friedel oscillations on electron energy, we map out the band structure of graphene. The last experiment studies a different system: carbon nanotube quantum dots. By combining scanning probe microscopy and transport measurements, we obtain spatial information about quantum dots formed in a carbon nanotube field effect transistor. We also demonstrate the ability to tune the coupling strength between two quantum dots in series.

  12. Compressed carbon nanotubes: a family of new multifunctional carbon allotropes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Zhao, Zhisheng; Tian, Fei; Oganov, Artem R; Wang, Qianqian; Xiong, Mei; Fan, Changzeng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Yu, Dongli; Wang, Hui-Tian; Xu, Bo; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    The exploration of novel functional carbon polymorphs is an enduring topic of scientific investigations. In this paper, we present simulations demonstrating metastable carbon phases as the result of pressure induced carbon nanotube polymerization. The configuration, bonding, electronic, and mechanical characteristics of carbon polymers strongly depend on the imposed hydrostatic/non-hydrostatic pressure, as well as on the geometry of the raw carbon nanotubes including diameter, chirality, stacking manner, and wall number. Especially, transition processes under hydrostatic/non-hydrostatic pressure are investigated, revealing unexpectedly low transition barriers and demonstrating sp(2)→sp(3) bonding changes as well as peculiar oscillations of electronic property (e.g., semiconducting→metallic→semiconducting transitions). These polymerized nanotubes show versatile and superior physical properties, such as superhardness, high tensile strength and ductility, and tunable electronic properties (semiconducting or metallic).

  13. Carbon nanotubes as optical biomedical sensors.

    PubMed

    Kruss, Sebastian; Hilmer, Andrew J; Zhang, Jingqing; Reuel, Nigel F; Mu, Bin; Strano, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Biosensors are important tools in biomedical research. Moreover, they are becoming an essential part of modern healthcare. In the future, biosensor development will become even more crucial due to the demand for personalized-medicine, point-of care devices and cheaper diagnostic tools. Substantial advances in sensor technology are often fueled by the advent of new materials. Therefore, nanomaterials have motivated a large body of research and such materials have been implemented into biosensor devices. Among these new materials carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are especially promising building blocks for biosensors due to their unique electronic and optical properties. Carbon nanotubes are rolled-up cylinders of carbon monolayers (graphene). They can be chemically modified in such a way that biologically relevant molecules can be detected with high sensitivity and selectivity. In this review article we will discuss how carbon nanotubes can be used to create biosensors. We review the latest advancements of optical carbon nanotube based biosensors with a special focus on near-infrared (NIR)-fluorescence, Raman-scattering and fluorescence quenching.

  14. Improved Method of Purifying Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of removing the residues of fabrication from carbon nanotubes has been invented. These residues comprise amorphous carbon and metal particles that are produced during the growth process. Prior methods of removing the residues include a variety of processes that involved the use of halogens, oxygen, or air in both thermal and plasma processes. Each of the prior methods entails one or more disadvantages, including non-selectivity (removal or damage of nanotubes in addition to removal of the residues), the need to dispose of toxic wastes, and/or processing times as long as 24 hours or more. In contrast, the process described here does not include the use of toxic chemicals, the generation of toxic wastes, causes little or no damage to the carbon nanotubes, and involves processing times of less than 1 hour. In the improved method, purification is accomplished by flowing water vapor through the reaction chamber at elevated temperatures and ambient pressures. The impurities are converted to gaseous waste products by the selective hydrogenation and hydroxylation by the water in a reaction chamber. This process could be performed either immediately after growth or in a post-growth purification process. The water used needs to be substantially free of oxygen and can be obtained by a repeated freeze-pump-thaw process. The presence of oxygen will non-selectively attach the carbon nanotubes in addition to the amorphous carbon.

  15. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Field-Effect Transistors for Label-Free Chemical/Biological Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, PingAn; Zhang, Jia; Li, Le; Wang, Zhenlong; O’Neill, William; Estrela, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, electrical detection of chemical and biological species using novel nanostructure-based devices has attracted significant attention for chemical, genomics, biomedical diagnostics, and drug discovery applications. The use of nanostructured devices in chemical/biological sensors in place of conventional sensing technologies has advantages of high sensitivity, low decreased energy consumption and potentially highly miniaturized integration. Owing to their particular structure, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability, carbon nanotube and graphene based electrical devices have been widely developed for high performance label-free chemical/biological sensors. Here, we review the latest developments of carbon nanostructure-based transistor sensors in ultrasensitive detection of chemical/biological entities, such as poisonous gases, nucleic acids, proteins and cells. PMID:22399927

  16. Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of today’s carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Porifera’s carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

  17. Coupling of carbon and peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Javier; Vázquez-Vázquez, Carlos; Kalinin, Arseny; Geckeler, Kurt E; Granja, Juan R

    2014-02-12

    Two of the main types of nanotubular architectures are the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and the self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs). We here report the preparation of the dual composite resulting from the ordered combination of both tubular motifs. In the resulting architecture, the SWCNTs can act as templates for the assembly of SCPNs that engage the carbon nanotubes noncovalently via pyrene "paddles", each member of the resulting hybrid stabilizing the other in aqueous solution. The particular hybrids obtained in the present study formed highly ordered oriented arrays and display complementary properties such as electrical conductivity. Furthermore, a self-sorting of the cyclic peptides toward semiconducting rather than metallic SWCNTs is also observed in the aqueous dispersions. It is envisaged that a broad range of exploitable properties may be achieved and/or controlled by varying the cyclic peptide components of similar SWCNT/SCPN hybrids.

  18. Exciton Hierarchies in Gapped Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Konik, R.M.

    2011-04-01

    We present evidence that the strong electron-electron (e-e) interactions in gapped carbon nanotubes lead to finite hierarchies of excitons within a given nanotube subband. We study these hierarchies by employing a field theoretic reduction of the gapped carbon nanotube permitting e-e interactions to be treated exactly. We analyze this reduction by employing a Wilsonian-like numerical renormalization group. We are so able to determine the gap ratios of the one-photon excitons as a function of the effective strength of interactions. We also determine within the same subband the gaps of the two-photon excitons, the single particle gaps, as well as a subset of the dark excitons. The strong e-e interactions in addition lead to strongly renormalized dispersion relations where the consequences of spin-charge separation can be readily observed.

  19. Exciton hierarchies in gapped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Konik, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    We present evidence that the strong electron-electron (e-e) interactions in gapped carbon nanotubes lead to finite hierarchies of excitons within a given nanotube subband. We study these hierarchies by employing a field theoretic reduction of the gapped carbon nanotube permitting e-e interactions to be treated exactly. We analyze this reduction by employing a Wilsonian-like numerical renormalization group. We are so able to determine the gap ratios of the one-photon excitons as a function of the effective strength of interactions. We also determine within the same subband the gaps of the two-photon excitons, the single particle gaps, as well as a subset of the dark excitons. The strong e-e interactions in addition lead to strongly renormalized dispersion relations where the consequences of spin-charge separation can be readily observed.

  20. High Performance Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Alan; Collins, Steve; Munoz, Edgar; Razal, Joselito; Ebron, Von; Ferraris, John; Baughman, Ray

    2003-03-01

    Exploiting the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes has remained somewhat elusive due to the inability to process the as produced insoluble soot into functional macroscopic assemblies. To this end we have developed a simple but effective method to produce continuous, homogeneous fibers containing carbon nanotubes having as-spun mechanical properties that compare very favorably to recognized synthetic and natural "super fibers" such as Kevlar and spider silk. By using novel spinning apparatus, spinning solutions, and spinning coagulants, we have spun nanotube fibers having record lengths, record tensile strengths, and having an energy-to-break (toughness) higher than any material that we have found. As an example of the potential multi-functionalities of our fibers, we have fabricated fiber supercapacitors, which we weave into textiles.

  1. CARBON NANOTUBES IN MICROWAVE ENVIRONMENT-IGNITION AND RECONSTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The unusual property of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-wall (MWNT) nanotubes and Buckminsterfullerene (C-60) is observed upon exposure to microwave-assisted ignition. Carbon nanotubes known for a range of mechanical and electronic properties because of their unique...

  2. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans. PMID:27468684

  3. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L J; Ulmert, Hans David S; Brea, Elliott J; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans. PMID:27468684

  4. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ying; Zepp, Richard G

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that may damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate environmental transformations of CNTs. Photosensitization by derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus with different intrinsic characteristics (e.g., diameter and electronic properties), has been investigated under environmentally relevant aquatic conditions. We used the CNT-sensitized photoisomerization of sorbic acid ((2E,4E)-hexa-2,4-dienoic acid) and singlet oxygen formation to quantify the triplet states ((3)CNT*) formed upon irradiation of selected single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The CNTs used in our studies were derivatized by carboxyl groups to facilitate their dispersion in water. Results indicate that high-defect-density (thus well-stabilized), small-diameter, and semiconducting-rich CNTs have higher-measured excited triplet state formation and therefore singlet oxygen ((1)O2) yield. Derivatized SWCNTs were significantly more photoreactive than derivatized MWCNTs. Moreover, addition of sodium chloride resulted in increased aggregation and small increases in (1)O2 production of CNTs. The most photoreactive CNTs exhibited comparable photoreactivity (in terms of (3)CNT* formation and (1)O2 yield) to reference natural organic matter (NOM) under sunlight irradiation with the same mass-based concentration. Selected reference NOM could therefore be useful in evaluating environmental photoreactivity or intended antibacterial applications of CNTs.

  5. Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes for Everyone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu-Dutt, Sharmistha; Minus, Marilyn L.; Jain, Rahul; Nepal, Dhriti; Kumar, Satish

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the extraordinary potential to change our lives by improving existing products and enabling new ones. Current and future research and industrial workforce professionals are very likely to encounter some aspects of nanotechnology including CNT science and technology in their education or profession. The simple structure…

  6. In-line manufacture of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Nicol Michele; Signorelli, Riccardo; Martini, Fabrizio; Corripio Luna, Oscar Enrique

    2015-04-28

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are facilitated by methods and apparatus disclosed herein. Advantageously, the methods and apparatus make use of a single production unit, and therefore provide for uninterrupted progress in a fabrication process. Embodiments of control systems for a variety of CNT production apparatus are included.

  7. Multiwall carbon nanotubes reinforced epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    The emergence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to myriad possibilities for structural polymer composites with superior specific modulus, strength, and toughness. While the research activities in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer composites (NRPs) have made enormous progress towards fabricating next-generation advanced structural materials with added thermal, optical, and electrical advantages, questions concerning the filler dispersion, interface, and CNT alignment in these composites remain partially addressed. In this dissertation, the key technical challenges related to the synthesis, processing, and reinforcing mechanics governing the effective mechanical properties of NRPs were introduced and reviewed in the first two chapters. Subsequently, issues on the dispersion, interface control, hierarchical structure, and multi-functionality of NRPs were addressed based on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced DGEBA epoxy systems (NREs). In chapter 3, NREs with enhanced flexural properties were discussed in the context of improved dispersion and in-situ formation of covalent bonds at the interface. In chapter 4, NREs with controlled interface and tailored thermomechanical properties were demonstrated through the judicious choice of surface functionality and resin chemistry. In chapter 5, processing-condition-induced CNT organization in hierarchical epoxy nanocomposites was analyzed. In Chapter 6, possibilities were explored for multi-functional NREs for underwater acoustic structural applications. Finally, the findings of this dissertation were concluded and future research was proposed for ordered carbon nanotube array reinforced nanocomposites in the last chapter. Four journal publications resulted from this work are listed in Appendix.

  8. Heat Transport in Liquid Polyester Resin with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vales-Pinzón, C.; Quiñones-Weiss, G.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Medina-Esquivel, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes represent one of the most important materials in nanoscience and nanotechnology, due to their outstanding structural, mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. It has been shown that when incorporated in a polymeric matrix, carbon nanotubes can improve its physical properties. In this work, thermal-diffusivity measurements of composite materials, prepared by mixing carbon nanotubes in liquid polyester resin, were performed by means of the thermal-wave resonant cavity. The results show an increase of the thermal diffusivity when the volume fraction of carbon nanotubes grows. It is also shown that this increase depends strongly on the diameter of the nanotubes.

  9. Exploring the Immunotoxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yanmei; Zhang, Qiu; Mu, Qingxin; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Bing

    2008-08-01

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their applications in nanomedicine lead to the increased exposure risk of nanomaterials to human beings. Although reports on toxicity of nanomaterials are rapidly growing, there is still a lack of knowledge on the potential toxicity of such materials to immune systems. This article reviews some existing studies assessing carbon nanotubes’ toxicity to immune system and provides the potential mechanistic explanation.

  10. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    PubMed

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  12. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-02-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors.

  13. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors. PMID:26888337

  14. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors. PMID:26888337

  15. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    PubMed

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states. PMID:27598112

  16. Atomic nanotube welders: boron interstitials triggering connections in double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Endo, Morinobu; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong-Ahm; Van Lier, Gregory; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2005-06-01

    Here we demonstrate that the incorporation of boron (B) atoms between double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) during thermal annealing (1400-1600 degrees C) results in covalent nanotube "Y" junctions, DWNT coalescence, and the formation of flattened multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). These processes occur via the merging of adjacent tubes, which is triggered by B interstitial atoms. We observe that B atom interstitials between DWNTs are responsible for the rapid establishment of covalent connections between neighboring tubes (polymerization), thereby resulting in the fast annealing of the carbon cylinders with B atoms embedded in the newly created carbon nanotube network. Once B is in the lattice, tube faceting (polygonization) starts to occur, and the electronic properties are expected to change dramatically. Therefore, B atoms indeed act as atomic nanotube fusers (or welders), and this process could now be used in assembling novel electronic nanotube devices, nanotube networks, carbon nanofoams and heterojunctions exhibiting p-type electronic properties.

  17. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations. PMID:24022336

  18. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold.

    PubMed

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F A; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G; Brooks, James S

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations.

  19. Carbon nanotubes on a spider silk scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Eden; Saleh, Wasan R.; Lebedev, Victor; Acquah, Steve F. A.; Laukhin, Vladimir; Alamo, Rufina G.; Brooks, James S.

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the compatibility between spider silk and conducting materials is essential to advance the use of spider silk in electronic applications. Spider silk is tough, but becomes soft when exposed to water. Here we report a strong affinity of amine-functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes for spider silk, with coating assisted by a water and mechanical shear method. The nanotubes adhere uniformly and bond to the silk fibre surface to produce tough, custom-shaped, flexible and electrically conducting fibres after drying and contraction. The conductivity of coated silk fibres is reversibly sensitive to strain and humidity, leading to proof-of-concept sensor and actuator demonstrations.

  20. Digital and FM demodulation of a doubly clamped single-walled carbon-nanotube oscillator: towards a nanotube cell phone.

    PubMed

    Gouttenoire, Vincent; Barois, Thomas; Perisanu, Sorin; Leclercq, Jean-Louis; Purcell, Stephen T; Vincent, Pascal; Ayari, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Electromechanical resonators are a key element in radio-frequency telecommunication devices and thus new resonator concepts from nanotechnology can readily find important industrial opportunities. Here, the successful experimental realization of AM, FM, and digital demodulation with suspended single-walled carbon-nanotube resonators in a field-effect transistor configuration is reported. The crucial role played by the electromechanical resonance in demodulation is clearly demonstrated. The FM technique is shown to lead to the suppression of unwanted background signals and the reduction of noise for a better detection of the mechanical motion of nanotubes. The digital data-transfer rate of standard cell-phone technology is within the reach of these devices.