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Sample records for carbon nanotube-based nanostructures

  1. Novel Carbon Nanotube-Based Nanostructures for High-Temperature Gas Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Chen; Kozo Saito

    2008-08-31

    The primary objective of this research is to examine the feasibility of using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a high temperature sensor material for fossil energy systems where reducing atmospheres are present. In the initial period of research, we fabricated capacitive sensors for hydrogen sensing using vertically aligned MWCNTs. We found that CNT itself is not sensitive to hydrogen. Moreover, with the help of Pd electrodes, hydrogen sensors based on CNTs are very sensitive and fast responsive. However, the Pd-based sensors can not withstand high temperature (T<200 C). In the last year, we successfully fabricated a hydrogen sensor based on an ultra-thin nanoporous titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) film supported by an AAO substrate, which can operate at 500 C with hydrogen concentrations in a range from 50 to 500 ppm.

  2. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  4. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Based Flexible Supercapacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Electrochemical double layer capacitors are fabricated using carbon nanotube (CNT)/paper flexible electrodes. An extensive...TERMS Carbon nanotube, supercapacitor, electrochemical double layer capacitor 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18...layer capacitors (Supercapacitors) are expected to play a significant role in future hybrid power systems due to their high specific power, cycle

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Based Light Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, russell A. (Inventor); Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A light sensor substrate comprises a base made from a semi-conductive material and topped with a layer of an electrically non-conductive material. A first electrode and a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors are positioned on the layer of electrically non-conductive material with the CNT-based conductors being distributed in a spaced apart fashion about a periphery of the first electrode. Each CNT-based conductor is coupled on one end thereof to the first electrode and extends away from the first electrode to terminate at a second free end. A second or gate electrode is positioned on the non-conductive material layer and is spaced apart from the second free end of each CNT-based conductor. Coupled to the first and second electrode is a device for detecting electron transfer along the CNT-based conductors resulting from light impinging on the CNT-based conductors.

  8. Applications of carbon nanotubes-based biomaterials in biomedical nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Polizu, Stefania; Savadogo, Oumarou; Poulin, Philippe; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2006-07-01

    One of the facets of nanotechnology applications is the immense opportunities they offer for new developments in medicine and health sciences. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have particularly attracted attention for designing new monitoring systems for environment and living cells as well as nanosensors. Carbon nanotubes-based biomaterials are also employed as support for active prosthesis or functional matrices in reparation of parts of the human body. These nanostructures are studied as molecular-level building blocks for the complex and miniaturized medical device, and substrate for stimulation of cellular growth. The CNTs are cylindrical shaped with caged molecules which can act as nanoscale containers for molecular species, well required for biomolecular recognition and drug delivery systems. Endowed with very large aspect ratios, an excellent electrical conductivity and inertness along with mechanical robustness, nanotubes found enormous applications in molecular electronics and bioelectronics. The ballistic electrical behaviour of SWNTs conjugated with functionalization promotes a large variety of biosensors for individual molecules. Actuative response of CNTs is considered very promising feature for nanodevices, micro-robots and artificial muscles. An description of CNTs based biomaterials is attempted in this review, in order to point out their enormous potential for biomedical nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Based Electrochemical Supercapacitor Electrodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-30

    solution properties and electrospinning conditions, one can produce particles or fibers with controlled morphology for specific applications...Poly( acrylonitrile) (PAN) based nanofibers were electrospun with controlled diameter . A sacrificial polymer, poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (SAN...has been used to control porosity. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been used to increase electrode conductivity and hence power density. The diameter of

  10. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Bakajin, O; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D

    2004-04-06

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Assuming Knudsen diffusion through this nanotube membrane, a maximum helium transport rate (for a pressure drop of 1 atm) of 0.25 cc/sec is predicted. Helium flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate greater than 1x10{sup -6} cc/sec. For viscous, laminar flow conditions, water is estimated to flow across the nanotube membrane (under a 1 atm pressure drop) at up to 2.8x10{sup -5} cc/sec (1.7 {micro}L/min).

  11. Carbon nanotube based hybrid nanocarbon foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrizan Jamal, M.; Zhang, Mei

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based nanocarbon foams (NFs) and the hybrid nanocarbon foams (HNFs) are fabricated in this work. The NFs are formed by using poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres as a template to create micro-scaled pores. The cell walls are made of CNT networks with nano-scaled pores. The interconnections among CNTs are secured using graphene and nanographite generated via carbonization of polyacrylonitrile. The resulting NFs are ultra-lightweight, highly elastic, electrically and thermally conductive, and robust in structure. The HNFs are made by infiltrating thermoplastic polymer into the NFs in a controllable procedure. Compared to NFs, the HNFs have much higher strength, same electrical conductivity, and limited increase in density. The compressive strength of the HNF increased more than 50 times while the density was changed less than 10 times due to the polymer infiltration. It is found that the deformed HNFs can recover in both structure and property when they are heated over the glass transition temperature of the infiltrated polymer. Such remarkable healing capability could broaden the applications of the HNFs.

  12. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Chemical Gas Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Arunpama B.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional thermal conductivity gauges (e.g. Pirani gauges) lend themselves to applications such as leak detectors, or in gas chromatographs for identifying various gas species. However, these conventional gauges are physically large, operate at high power, and have a slow response time. A single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT)-based chemical sensing gauge relies on differences in thermal conductance of the respective gases surrounding the CNT as it is voltage-biased, as a means for chemical identification. Such a sensor provides benefits of significantly reduced size and compactness, fast response time, low-power operation, and inexpensive manufacturing since it can be batch-fabricated using Si integrated-circuit (IC) process technology.

  13. Pristine carbon nanotubes based resistive temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md Bayazeed; Saini, Sudhir Kumar; Sharma, Daya Shankar; Agarwal, Pankaj B.

    2016-04-01

    A good sensor must be highly sensitive, faster in response, of low cost cum easily producible, and highly reliable. Incorporation of nano-dimensional particles/ wires makes conventional sensors more effective in terms of fulfilling the above requirements. For example, Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are promising sensing element because of its large aspect ratio, unique electronic and thermal properties. In addition to their use for widely reported chemical sensing, it has also been explored for temperature sensing. This paper presents the fabrication of CNTs based temperature sensor, prepared on silicon substrate using low cost spray coating method, which is reliable and reproducible method to prepare uniform CNTs thin films on any substrate. Besides this, simple and inexpensive method of preparation of dispersion of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in 1,2 dichlorobenzene by using probe type ultrasonicator for debundling the CNTs for improving sensor response were used. The electrical contacts over the dispersed SWNTs were taken using silver paste electrodes. Fabricated sensors clearly show immediate change in resistance as a response to change in temperature of SWNTs. The measured sensitivity (change in resistance with temperature) of the sensor was found ˜ 0.29%/°C in the 25°C to 60°C temperature range.

  14. Three-dimensional carbon nanotube based photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells with a three dimensional (3D) morphology are an exciting new research thrust with promise to create cheaper, more efficient solar cells. This work introduces a new type of 3D PV device based on carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays. These arrays are paired with the thin film heterojunction, CdTe/CdS, to form a complete 3D carbon nanotube PV device (3DCNTPV). Marriage of a complicated 3D structure with production methods traditionally used for planar CdTe solar cell is challenging. This work examines the problems associated with processing these types of cells and systematically alters production methods of the semiconductor layers and electrodes to increase the short circuit current (Isc), eliminate parasitic shunts, and increase the open circuit voltage (Voc). The main benefit of 3D solar cell is the ability to utilize multiple photon interactions with the solar cell surface. The three dimensionality allows photons to interact multiple times with the photoactive material, which increases the absorption and the overall power output over what is possible with a two dimensional (2D) morphology. To quantify the increased power output arising from these multiple photon interactions, a new absorption efficiency term, eta3D, is introduced. The theoretical basis behind this new term and how it relates to the absorption efficiency of a planar cell, eta 2D, is derived. A unique model for the average number of multiple photon impingements, Gamma, is proposed based on three categories of 3D morphology: an infinite trench, an enclosed box, and an array of towers. The derivation of eta3D and Gamma for these 3D PV devices gives a complete picture of the enhanced power output over 2D cells based on CNT array height, pitch, radius, and shape. This theory is validated by monte carlo simulations and experiment. This new type of 3D PV devices has been shown to work experimentally. The first 3DCNTPV cells created posses Isc values of 0.085 to 17.872mA/cm2 and Voc values

  15. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrodes for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, M.

    2008-01-01

    A nanotube array based on vertically aligned nanotubes or carbon nanofibers has been invented for use in localized electrical stimulation and recording of electrical responses in selected regions of an animal body, especially including the brain. There are numerous established, emerging, and potential applications for localized electrical stimulation and/or recording, including treatment of Parkinson s disease, Tourette s syndrome, and chronic pain, and research on electrochemical effects involved in neurotransmission. Carbon-nanotube-based electrodes offer potential advantages over metal macroelectrodes (having diameters of the order of a millimeter) and microelectrodes (having various diameters ranging down to tens of microns) heretofore used in such applications. These advantages include the following: a) Stimuli and responses could be localized at finer scales of spatial and temporal resolution, which is at subcellular level, with fewer disturbances to, and less interference from, adjacent regions. b) There would be less risk of hemorrhage on implantation because nano-electrode-based probe tips could be configured to be less traumatic. c) Being more biocompatible than are metal electrodes, carbon-nanotube-based electrodes and arrays would be more suitable for long-term or permanent implantation. d) Unlike macro- and microelectrodes, a nano-electrode could penetrate a cell membrane with minimal disruption. Thus, for example, a nanoelectrode could be used to generate an action potential inside a neuron or in proximity of an active neuron zone. Such stimulation may be much more effective than is extra- or intracellular stimulation via a macro- or microelectrode. e) The large surface area of an array at a micron-scale footprint of non-insulated nanoelectrodes coated with a suitable electrochemically active material containing redox ingredients would make it possible to obtain a pseudocapacitance large enough to dissipate a relatively large amount of electric charge

  16. Carbon Nanotube Based Chemical Sensors for Space and Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2009-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using photolithography and thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to nitrogen dioxide, acetone, benzene, nitrotoluene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing of carbon nanotubes in our sensor platform can be understood by intra- and inter-tube electron modulation in terms of charge transfer mechanisms. As a result of the charge transfer, the conductance of p-type or hole-richer SWNTs in air will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost. Additionally, a wireless capability of such a sensor chip can be used for networked mobile and fixed-site detection and warning systems for military bases, facilities and battlefield areas.

  17. Carbon Nanotubes Based Nanoelectrode Arrays: Fabrication, Evaluation, and Sensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Tu, Yi; Lu, Fang; Yantasee, Wassana; Ren, Zhifeng

    2004-10-05

    The fabrication, electrochemical characterization, and applications of low-site density carbon nanotubes based nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) are reported in this work. Spin-coating of an epoxy resin provides a new way to create the electrode passivation layer that effectively reduces the current leakage and eliminates the electrode capacitance by sealing the side-wall of CNTs. The CNT-NEAs fabricated in our work effectively use the open ends of CNTs for electrochemical sensing. The open ends of the CNTs have fast electron transfer rates similar to a graphite edge-plane electrode, while the side-walls present very slow electron transfer rates similar to the graphitic basal plane. Cyclic voltammetry showed the sigmoidal shape curves with low capacitive current and scan-rate-independent limiting current. The CNT-NEAs were used successfully for voltammetric detection of trace concentrations of lead (II) at ppb level. The successful development of a glucose biosensor based on CNT-NEAs for the selective detection of glucose is also described. Glucose oxidase was covalently immobilized on the CNTs tips via carbodiimide chemistry by forming amide linkages between the amine residues and carboxylic acid groups on the open ends of CNTs. The biosensor effectively performs selective electrochemical detections of glucose in the presence of common interferences. The CNT-NEAs provide an excellent platform for ultra sensitive electrochemical sensors for chemical and biological sensing.

  18. Single-wall carbon nanotube-based proton exchange membrane assembly for hydrogen fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Girishkumar, G; Rettker, Matthew; Underhile, Robert; Binz, David; Vinodgopal, K; McGinn, Paul; Kamat, Prashant

    2005-08-30

    A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for hydrogen fuel cells has been fabricated using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) support and platinum catalyst. Films of SWCNTs and commercial platinum (Pt) black were sequentially cast on a carbon fiber electrode (CFE) using a simple electrophoretic deposition procedure. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy showed that the nanotubes and the platinum retained their nanostructure morphology on the carbon fiber surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) revealed that the carbon nanotube-based electrodes exhibited an order of magnitude lower charge-transfer reaction resistance (R(ct)) for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) than did the commercial carbon black (CB)-based electrodes. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) assembly fabricated using the CFE/SWCNT/Pt electrodes was evaluated using a fuel cell testing unit operating with H(2) and O(2) as input fuels at 25 and 60 degrees C. The maximum power density obtained using CFE/SWCNT/Pt electrodes as both the anode and the cathode was approximately 20% better than that using the CFE/CB/Pt electrodes.

  19. Carbon nanotube-based functional materials for optical limiting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Ying; Liu, Ying; Doyle, James; He, Nan; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Bai, Jinrui; Blau, Werner J

    2007-01-01

    Optical limiting is an important application of nonlinear optics, useful for the protection of human eyes, optical elements, and optical sensors from intense laser pulses. An optical limiter is such a device that strongly attenuates high intensity light and potentially damaging light such as focused laser beams, whilst allowing for the high transmission of ambient light. Optical limiting properties of carbon nanotube suspensions, solubilized carbon nanotubes, small molecules doped carbon nanotubes and polymer/carbon nanotube composites have been reviewed. The optical limiting responses of carbon nanotube suspensions are shown to be dominated by nonlinear scattering as a result of thermally induced solvent-bubble formation and sublimation of the nanotubes, while the solubilized carbon nanotubes optically limit through nonlinear absorption mechanism and exhibit significant solution-concentration-dependent optical limiting responses. In the former case the optical limiting results are independent of nanotube concentrations at the same linear transmittance as that of the solubilized systems. Many efforts have been invested into the research of polymer/carbon nanotube composites in an attempt to allow for the fabrication of films required for the use of nanotubes in a real optical limiting application. The higher carbon nanotube content samples block the incident light more effectively at higher incident energy densities or intensities. The optical limiting mechanism of these composite materials is quite complicated. Besides nonlinear scattering contribution to the optical limiting, there may also be other contributions e.g., nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction, electronic absorption and others to the optical limiting. Further improvements in the optical limiting efficiency of the composites and in the dispersion and alignment properties of carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix could be realized by variation of both nanostructured guest and polymer host, and by

  20. Carbon-nanotube-based liquids: a new class of nanomaterials and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Ngoc Minh; Thang Bui, Hung; Nguyen, Manh Hong; Khoi Phan, Hong

    2014-03-01

    Carbon-nanotube-based liquids—a new class of nanomaterials—have shown many interesting properties and distinctive features offering unprecedented potential for many applications. This paper summarizes the recent progress on the study of the preparation, characterization and properties of carbon-nanotube-based liquids including so-called nanofluids, nanolubricants and different kinds of nanosolutions containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes/single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene. A broad range of current and future applications of these nanomaterials in the fields of energy saving, power electronic and optoelectronic devices, biotechnology and agriculture are presented. The paper also identifies challenges and opportunities for future research.

  1. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube-Based Vacuum Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Toda, Risaku (Inventor); Del Castillo, Linda Y. (Inventor); Murthy, Rakesh (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention proficiently produce carbon nanotube-based vacuum electronic devices. In one embodiment a method of fabricating a carbon nanotube-based vacuum electronic device includes: growing carbon nanotubes onto a substrate to form a cathode; assembling a stack that includes the cathode, an anode, and a first layer that includes an alignment slot; disposing a microsphere partially into the alignment slot during the assembling of the stack such that the microsphere protrudes from the alignment slot and can thereby separate the first layer from an adjacent layer; and encasing the stack in a vacuum sealed container.

  2. A new nonlinear model for analyzing the behaviour of carbon nanotube-based resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhi, Hamed; Païdoussis, Michael P.; Misra, Arun K.

    2016-09-01

    The present study develops a new size-dependent nonlinear model for the analysis of the behaviour of carbon nanotube-based resonators. In particular, based on modified couple stress theory, the fully nonlinear equations of motion of the carbon nanotube-based resonator are derived using Hamilton's principle, taking into account both the longitudinal and transverse displacements. Molecular dynamics simulation is then performed in order to verify the validity of the developed size-dependent continuum model at the nano scale. The nonlinear partial differential equations of motion of the system are discretized by means of the Galerkin technique, resulting in a high-dimensional reduced-order model of the system. The pseudo-arclength continuation technique is employed to examine the nonlinear resonant behaviour of the carbon nanotube-based resonator. A new universal pull-in formula is also developed for predicting the occurrence of the static pull-in and validated using numerical simulations.

  3. Nanostructured Carbon Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    carbon coatings and explores a very broad range of potentially important carbon nanostructures that may be used in future technologies. A new method ...for the synthesis of nanostructured carbon coatings on the surface of SiC and other metal carbides is described. This method is accomplished through the...With the fall in cost of fullerene powders, this method may become important in the future as a method to produce nanocrystalline diamond free of metal

  4. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Samina; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-01-01

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Based Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Dai, Hongjie; Saini, Subhash

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) enable nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) because of their inherent nanostructure, intrinsic electric conductivity and mechanical resilience. The collaborative work between Stanford (experiment) and NASA Ames (theory and simulation) has made progress in two types of CNT based NEMS for nanoelectronics and sensor applications. The CNT tipped scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a NEMS in which CNT tips are used for nanoscale probing, imaging and manipulating. It showed great improvement in probing surfaces and biological systems over conventional tips. We have recently applied it to write (lithography) and read (image) uniform SiO2 lines on large Si surface area at speed up to 0.5 mm per s. Preliminary work using approximately 10 nm multiwall nanotube tips produced approximately 10 nm structures and showed that the CNT tips didn't wear down when crashed as conventional tips often do. This presents a solution to the long standing tip-wear problem in SPM nanolithography. We have also explored potential of CNT tips in imaging DNA in water. Preliminary experiment using 10 nm CNT tips reached 5 nm resolution. The 1 nm nanolithography and 1 nm DNA imaging can be expected by using approximately 1 nm CNT tips. In contrast to CNT tipped SPM, we also fabricated CNT devices on silicon wafer in which CNTs connect patterned metallic lines on SiO2/Si by a simple chemical vapor deposition process. Using conventional lithography for silicon wafer, we have been able to obtain CNT based transistors and sensors. Investigations of the CNT NEMS as physical, biological and chemical sensors are in progress and will be discussed.

  6. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr, Joe H.

    2016-07-05

    A method of making a mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel, including the steps of dispersing nanotubes in an aqueous media or other media to form a suspension, adding reactants and catalyst to the suspension to create a reaction mixture, curing the reaction mixture to form a wet gel, drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce the mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel. The aerogel is mechanically robust, electrically conductive, and ultralow-density, and is made of a porous carbon material having 5 to 95% by weight carbon nanotubes and 5 to 95% carbon binder.

  7. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H

    2014-04-01

    A method of making a mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel, including the steps of dispersing nanotubes in an aqueous media or other media to form a suspension, adding reactants and catalyst to the suspension to create a reaction mixture, curing the reaction mixture to form a wet gel, drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce the mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel. The aerogel is mechanically robust, electrically conductive, and ultralow-density, and is made of a porous carbon material having 5 to 95% by weight carbon nanotubes and 5 to 95% carbon binder.

  8. Systems and Methods for Implementing Robust Carbon Nanotube-Based Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Kristof, Valerie (Inventor); Toda, Risaku (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement carbon nanotube-based field emitters. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a carbon nanotube field emitter includes: patterning a substrate with a catalyst, where the substrate has thereon disposed a diffusion barrier layer; growing a plurality of carbon nanotubes on at least a portion of the patterned catalyst; and heating the substrate to an extent where it begins to soften such that at least a portion of at least one carbon nanotube becomes enveloped by the softened substrate.

  9. Dynamic radiography using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Dike, S.; Lin, W.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2004-10-01

    We report a dynamic radiography system with a carbon nanotube based field-emission microfocus x-ray source. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution as short as nanoseconds. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging are demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for noninvasive imaging in biomedical research and industrial inspection.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Based Microfluidic Elements for Filtration and Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajin, O; Ben-Barak, N; Peng, J; Noy, A

    2003-06-25

    We have developed a method for integration of patterned arrays of carbon nanotubes or the ''nanotube mesh'' into microfabricated channels. The method includes standard lithographic methods for patterning and etching the substrate, followed by catalyst patterning, CVD deposition of nanotubes, and anodic bonding of coverslip top. We will describe a carbon nanotube filtering device fabricated using this method and discuss the use of carbon nanotube arrays as molecular concentration and separation media.

  11. Vibrational behaviors of multiwalled-carbon-nanotube-based nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyu; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2004-01-01

    This letter studies the promising application of carbon nanotubes as nanoresonators. Both single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes are considered and the significant difference in the vibration behavior between them has been identified. The individual tube wall is treated as frame-like structures and simulated by the molecular-structural-mechanics method. The interlayer van der Waals interactions are represented by Lennard-Jones potential and simulated by a nonlinear truss rod model. The results show that fundamental frequencies of double-walled carbon nanotubes are about 10% lower than those of single-walled carbon nanotubes of the same outer diameter. The noncoaxial vibration of double-walled nanotubes begins at the third resonant frequency and does not significantly diminish the value of double-walled nanotubes as high-frequency nanoresonators.

  12. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    So, Hye-Mi; Sim, Jin Woo; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun; Chang, Won Seok

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  13. Gecko inspired carbon nanotube based thermal gap pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Sunny; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Thermal management has become a critical factor in designing the next generation of microprocessors. The bottleneck in design of material for efficient heat transfer from electronic units to heat sinks is to enhance heat flow across interface between two dissimilar, rough surfaces. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been shown to be promising candidates for thermal transport. However, the heat transport across the interface continues to be a challenging hurdle. In the current work we designed free standing thermal pads based on gecko-inspired carbon nanotube adhesives. The pads were made of metallic carbon nanotubes and the structure was designed such that it would allow large area of intimate contact. We showed that these adhesive pads can be used as electrical and thermal interconnects.

  14. Roll-to-Roll production of carbon nanotubes based supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Childress, Anthony; Karakaya, Mehmet; Roberts, Mark; Arcilla-Velez, Margarita; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials provide an excellent platform for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). However, current industrial methods for producing carbon nanotubes are expensive and thereby increase the costs of energy storage to more than 10 Wh/kg. In this regard, we developed a facile roll-to-roll production technology for scalable manufacturing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with variable density on run-of-the-mill kitchen Al foils. Our method produces MWNTs with diameter (heights) between 50-100 nm (10-100 μm), and a specific capacitance as high as ~ 100 F/g in non-aqueous electrolytes. In this talk, the fundamental challenges involved in EDLC-suitable MWNT growth, roll-to-roll production, and device manufacturing will be discussed along with electrochemical characteristics of roll-to-roll MWNTs. Research supported by NSF CMMI Grant1246800.

  15. Carbon nanotubes based functional materials for MSL and biosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nanyan

    In this thesis, several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) based functional materials have been successfully synthesized and systematically characterized. Their applications for MicroStereoLithography (MSL) and biosensor were further explored. A new mild oxidization method for oxidizing multi-walled CNTs was developed using potassium permanganate as the oxidant and assisted with phase transfer catalyst. The novel oxidization procedure gives significantly higher yield and high functional group density. Facilitated with the above functional groups, a variety of homogeneous polymer/CNTs nanocomposites were prepared through either chemical or physical interactions and they were systematically characterized. UV curable oligomers have been attached to the wall of the oxidized carbon nanotubes, and they were cured by MicroStereoLithography (MSL) UV light laser with both free radical and cationic polymerization mechanisms. Furthermore, graphite and several CNTs-based glucose thick film biosensors are fabricated and evaluated.

  16. Piezoresistive Strain Sensors Made from Carbon Nanotubes Based Polymer Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Alamusi; Hu, Ning; Fukunaga, Hisao; Atobe, Satoshi; Liu, Yaolu; Li, Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, nanocomposites based on various nano-scale carbon fillers, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are increasingly being thought of as a realistic alternative to conventional smart materials, largely due to their superior electrical properties. Great interest has been generated in building highly sensitive strain sensors with these new nanocomposites. This article reviews the recent significant developments in the field of highly sensitive strain sensors made from CNT/polymer nanocomposites. We focus on the following two topics: electrical conductivity and piezoresistivity of CNT/polymer nanocomposites, and the relationship between them by considering the internal conductive network formed by CNTs, tunneling effect, aspect ratio and piezoresistivity of CNTs themselves, etc. Many recent experimental, theoretical and numerical studies in this field are described in detail to uncover the working mechanisms of this new type of strain sensors and to demonstrate some possible key factors for improving the sensor sensitivity. PMID:22346667

  17. Carbon-nanotube based nano-electro-mechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, S. J.; Hall, A. R.; Spivak, D. M.; Falvo, M. R.; Superfine, R.; Washburn, S.

    2004-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and performance of nanometer-scale electromechanical oscillators which use multi-walled carbon nanotubes as torsional springs. Carbon nanotube devices may offer high quality factors due to the inert surface of the torsional member, and high sensitivity due to their nanoscale dimensions. They also provide a means to study the effects of torsion on nanotube transport. The devices have a paddle-oscillator geometry and are driven electrostatically. In previous work we manipulated these devices directly with a scanning probe to measure the torsional properties of the nanotube, its shear modulus, and its subsequent stiffening under repeated strain [1]. Here we use both optical and electron-beam techniques to measure the response of the devices to applied voltages. We demonstrate both quasi-static and on-resonance performance characteristics. 1. P. A. Williams, S. J. Papadakis, A. M. Patel, M. R. Falvo, S. Washburn, and R. Superfine, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 255502 (2002).

  18. Carbon Nanotube Based Deuterium Ion Source for Improved Neutron Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, R. L.; Jiang, N.; Thuesen, L.; Leung, K. N.; Antolak, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Field ionization uses high electric fields to cause the ionization and emission of ions from the surface of a sharp electrode. We are developing a novel field ionization neutron generator using carbon nanotubes (CNT) to produce the deuterium ion current. The generator consists of three major components: a deuterium ion source made of carbon nanotubes, a smooth negatively-biased target electrode, and a secondary electron suppression system. When a negative high voltage is applied on the target electrode, a high gradient electric field is formed at the tips of the carbon nanotubes. This field is sufficiently strong to create deuterium (D) ions at or near the nanotubes which are accelerated to the target causing D-D reactions to occur and the production of neutrons. A cross magnetic field is used to suppress secondary emission electrons generated on the target surface. We have demonstrated field ionization currents of 70 nA (1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}) at hydrogen gas pressure of 10 mTorr. We have found that the current scales proportionally with CNT area and also with the gas pressure in the range of 1 mTorr to 10 mTorr. We have demonstrated pulse cut-off times as short as 2 {mu}sec. Finally, we have shown the feasibility of generating neutrons using deuterium gas.

  19. Carbon nanotube based gecko inspired self-cleaning adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ajayan, Pulickel; Ali, Dhinojwala

    2008-03-01

    Wall climbing organisms like geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without use of any viscoelastic material. The hairy structure found in gecko feet allows them to obtain intimate contact over a large area thus allowing then to adhere using van der Waals interactions. Not only high adhesion, the geometry of the hairs makes gecko feet self cleaning, thus allowing them to walk continuously without worrying about loosing adhesive strength. Such properties if mimicked synthetically could form basis of a new class of materials, which, unlike conventional adhesives would show two contradictory properties, self cleaning and high adhesion. Such materials would form essential component of applications like wall climbing robot. We tried to synthesize such material using micropatterened vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. When dealing with large areas, probability of defects in the structure increase, forming patterns instead of using uniform film of carbon nanotubes helps to inhibit crack propagation, thus gives much higher adhesive strength than a uniform film. When carbon nanotube patterns with optimized aspect ratio are used, both high adhesion and self cleaning properties are observed.

  20. Carbon nanotube-based nano-fluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud Seyyed Fakhrabadi, Mir; Rastgoo, Abbas; Taghi Ahmadian, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    The paper investigates the influences of fluid flow on static and dynamic behaviours of electrostatically actuated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using strain gradient theory. This nonclassical elasticity theory is applied in order to obtain more accurate results possessing higher agreement with the experimental data. The effects of various fluid parameters such as the fluid viscosity, velocity, mass and temperature on the pull-in properties of the CNTs with two cantilever and doubly clamped boundary conditions are studied. The results reveal the applicability of the proposed nano-system as nano-valves or nano-fluidic sensors.

  1. Carbon nanotube-based separation columns for microchip electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, K B; Delacourt, B; Kutter, J P

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of the stationary phase for microchip chromatography is most often done by packing of the individual separation channel after fabrication of the microfluidic chip, which is a very time-consuming and costly process (Kutter. J Chromatogr A 1221:72-82, 2012). Here, we describe in detail the fabrication and operation protocols for devices with microfabricated carbon nanotube stationary phases for reverse-phase chromatography. In this protocol, the lithographically defined stationary phase is fabricated in the channel before bonding of a lid, thereby circumventing the difficult packaging procedures used in more conventional protocols.

  2. Study of carbon nanotubes based Polydimethylsiloxane composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, M. I.; Giorcelli, M.; Shahzad, N.; Guastella, S.; Castellino, M.; Jagdale, P.; Tagliaferro, A.

    2013-06-01

    Thanks to their remarkable characteristics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have fields of applications which are growing every day. Among them, the use of CNTs as filler for polymers is one of the most promising. In this work we report on Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites with different weight percentages (0.0% to 3.0%) of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) having diameter 10-30 nm and length 20-30 μm. To achieve optimum dispersion of CNTs in PDMS matrix, high speed mechanical stirring and ultrasonication were performed. By using the doctor blade technique, 70 μm thick uniform films were produced on glass. They were subsequently thermally cured and detached from the glass to get flexible and self standing films. The surface morphological study done by FESEM, shows that CNTs are well dispersed in the PDMS. Raman spectroscopy and FTIR were used to investigate the possible structural changes in the polymer composite. To examine the optical behavior UV-VIS spectroscopy was employed in both specular and diffused modes. A linear increase in absorption coefficient is found with the increasing percentage of CNTs while the transmittance decreases exponentially. The results confirm the dependence of optical limiting effect on the quantity of MWCNTs. Based on optical study, MWCNTs/PDMS composite films can be a promising material to extend performances of optical limiters against laser pulses, which is often required in lasing systems.

  3. Heat dissipation for microprocessor using multiwalled carbon nanotubes based liquid.

    PubMed

    Hung Thang, Bui; Trinh, Pham Van; Chuc, Nguyen Van; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity (2000 W/m · K compared with thermal conductivity of Ag 419 W/m · K). This suggested an approach in applying the CNTs in thermal dissipation system for high power electronic devices, such as computer processor and high brightness light emitting diode (HB-LED). In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based liquid was made by COOH functionalized MWCNTs dispersed in distilled water with concentration in the range between 0.2 and 1.2 gram/liter. MWCNT based liquid was used in liquid cooling system to enhance thermal dissipation for computer processor. By using distilled water in liquid cooling system, CPU's temperature decreases by about 10°C compared with using fan cooling system. By using MWCNT liquid with concentration of 1 gram/liter MWCNTs, the CPU's temperature decreases by 7°C compared with using distilled water in cooling system. Theoretically, we also showed that the presence of MWCNTs reduced thermal resistance and increased the thermal conductivity of liquid cooling system. The results have confirmed the advantages of the MWCNTs for thermal dissipation systems for the μ -processor and other high power electronic devices.

  4. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a

  5. A carbon nanotube based ammonia sensor on cotton textile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Beomseok; Li, Jing; Meyyappan, M.

    2013-05-01

    A single-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) based ammonia (NH3) sensor was implemented on a cotton yarn. Two types of sensors were fabricated: Au/sensing CNT/Au and conducting/sensing/conducting all CNT structures. Two perpendicular Au wires were designed to contact CNT-cotton yarn for metal-CNT sensor, whereas nanotubes were used for the electrode as well as sensing material for the all CNT sensor. The resistance shift of the CNT network upon NH3 was monitored in a chemiresistor approach. The CNT-cotton yarn sensors exhibited uniformity and repeatability. Furthermore, the sensors displayed good mechanical robustness against bending. The present approach can be utilized for low-cost smart textile applications.

  6. 3D Printing of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Microsupercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Zhou, Han; Li, Ben Q; Ding, Shujiang

    2017-02-08

    A novel 3D printing procedure is presented for fabricating carbon-nanotubes (CNTs)-based microsupercapacitors. The 3D printer uses a CNTs ink slurry with a moderate solid content and prints a stream of continuous droplets. Appropriate control of a heated base is applied to facilitate the solvent removal and adhesion between printed layers and to improve the structure integrity without structure delamination or distortion upon drying. The 3D-printed electrodes for microsupercapacitors are characterized by SEM, laser scanning confocal microscope, and step profiler. Effect of process parameters on 3D printing is also studied. The final solid-state microsupercapacitors are assembled with the printed multilayer CNTs structures and poly(vinyl alcohol)-H3PO4 gel as the interdigitated microelectrodes and electrolyte. The electrochemical performance of 3D printed microsupercapacitors is also tested, showing a significant areal capacitance and excellent cycle stability.

  7. A carbon nanotube based x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Richard A.; Bauch, Jürgen; Wünsche, Dietmar; Lackner, Gerhard; Majumder, Anindya

    2016-11-01

    X-ray detectors based on metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors couple instantaneous measurement with high accuracy. However, they only have a limited measurement lifetime because they undergo permanent degradation due to x-ray beam exposure. A field effect transistor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, overcomes this drawback of permanent degradation, because it can be reset into its starting state after being exposed to the x-ray beam. In this work the CNTs were deposited using a dielectrophoresis method on SiO2 coated p-type (boron-doped) Si substrates. For the prepared devices a best gate voltage shift of 244 V Gy-1 and a source-drain current sensitivity of 382 nA Gy-1 were achieved. These values are larger than those reached by the currently used MOSFET based devices.

  8. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Sensing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Smits, Jan M.; Williams, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based materials represent the future aerospace vehicle construction material of choice based primarily on predicted strength-to-weight advantages and inherent multifunctionality. The multifunctionality of SWCNTs arises from the ability of the nanotubes to be either metallic or semi-conducting based on their chirality. Furthermore, simply changing the environment around a SWCNT can change its conducting behavior. This phenomenon is being exploited to create sensors capable of measuring several parameters related to vehicle structural health (i.e. strain, pressure, temperature, etc.) The structural health monitor is constructed using conventional electron-beam lithographic and photolithographic techniques to place specific electrode patterns on a surface. SWCNTs are then deposited between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic alignment technique. Prototypes have been constructed on both silicon and polyimide substrates, demonstrating that surface-mountable and multifunctional devices based on SWCNTs can be realized.

  9. Carbon nanotube based transparent conductive films: progress, challenges, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Azumi, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Developments in the manufacturing technology of low-cost, high-quality carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are leading to increased industrial applications for this remarkable material. One of the most promising applications, CNT based transparent conductive films (TCFs), are an alternative technology in future electronics to replace traditional TCFs, which use indium tin oxide. Despite significant price competition among various TCFs, CNT-based TCFs have good potential for use in emerging flexible, stretchable and wearable optoelectronics. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the fabrication, properties, stability and applications of CNT-based TCFs. The challenges of current CNT-based TCFs for industrial use, in comparison with other TCFs, are considered. We also discuss the potential of CNT-based TCFs, and give some possible strategies to reduce the production cost and improve their conductivity and transparency. PMID:27877899

  10. Recent Advances in Carbon Nanotube-Based Enzymatic Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cosnier, Serge; Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent trends in the field of enzymatic fuel cells. Thanks to the high specificity of enzymes, biofuel cells can generate electrical energy by oxidation of a targeted fuel (sugars, alcohols, or hydrogen) at the anode and reduction of oxidants (O2, H2O2) at the cathode in complex media. The combination of carbon nanotubes (CNT), enzymes and redox mediators was widely exploited to develop biofuel cells since the electrons involved in the bio-electrocatalytic processes can be efficiently transferred from or to an external circuit. Original approaches to construct electron transfer based CNT-bioelectrodes and impressive biofuel cell performances are reported as well as biomedical applications. PMID:25386555

  11. Predicting the effective thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube based nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Venkata Sastry, N N; Bhunia, Avijit; Sundararajan, T; Das, Sarit K

    2008-02-06

    Adding a small volume fraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to a liquid enhances the thermal conductivity significantly. Recent experimental findings report an anomalously wide range of enhancement values that continue to perplex the research community and remain unexplained. In this paper we present a theoretical model based on three-dimensional CNT chain formation (percolation) in the base liquid and the corresponding thermal resistance network. The model considers random CNT orientation and CNT-CNT interaction forming the percolating chain. Predictions are in good agreement with almost all available experimental data. Results show that the enhancement critically depends on the CNT geometry (length), volume fraction, thermal conductivity of the base liquid and the nanofluid (CNT-liquid suspension) preparation technique. Based on the physical mechanism of heat conduction in the nanofluid, we introduce a new dimensionless parameter that alone characterizes the nanofluid thermal conductivity with reasonable accuracy (∼ ± 5%).

  12. Actuation mechanisms of carbon nanotube-based architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Sebastian; Mahrholz, Thorsten; Wierach, Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    State of the art smart materials such as piezo ceramics or electroactive polymers cannot feature both, mechanical stiffness and high active strain. Moreover, properties like low density, high mechanical stiffness and high strain at the same time driven by low energy play an increasingly important role for their future application. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), show this behavior. Their active behavior was observed 1999 the first time using paper-like mats made of CNT. Therefore the CNT-papers are electrical charged within an electrolyte thus forming a double- layer. The measured deflection of CNT material is based on the interaction between the charged high surface area formed by carbon nanotubes and ions provided by the electrolyte. Although CNT-papers have been extensively analyzed as well at the macro-scale as nano-scale there is still no generally accepted theory for the actuation mechanism. This paper focuses on investigations of the actuation mechanisms of CNT-papers in comparison to vertically aligned CNT-arrays. One reason of divergent results found in literature might be attributed to different types of CNT samples. While CNT-papers represent architectures of short CNTs which need to bridge each other to form the dimensions of the sample, the continuous CNTs of the array feature a length of almost 3 mm, along which the experiments are carried out. Both sample types are tested within an actuated tensile test set-up under different conditions. While the CNT-papers are tested in water-based electrolytes with comparably small redox-windows the hydrophobic CNT-arrays are tested in ionic liquids with comparatively larger redox-ranges. Furthermore an in-situ micro tensile test within an SEM is carried out to prove the optimized orientation of the MWCNTs as result of external load. It was found that the performance of CNT-papers strongly depends on the test conditions. However, the CNT-arrays are almost unaffected by the conditions showing active response at negative

  13. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-based RF antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwi, Taha A.; Al-Rizzo, Hussain M.; Rucker, Daniel G.; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Li, Zhongrui; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2010-01-01

    A novel application that utilizes conductive patches composed of purified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) embedded in a sodium cholate composite thin film to create microstrip antennas operating in the microwave frequency regime is proposed. The MWCNTs are suspended in an adhesive solvent to form a conductive ink that is printed on flexible polymer substrates. The DC conductivity of the printed patches was measured by the four probe technique and the complex relative permittivity was measured by an Agilent E5071B probe. The commercial software package, CST Microwave Studio (MWS), was used to simulate the proposed antennas based on the measured constitutive parameters. An excellent agreement of less than 0.2% difference in resonant frequency is shown. Simulated and measured results were also compared against identical microstrip antennas that utilize copper conducting patches. The proposed MWCNT-based antennas demonstrate a 5.6% to 2.2% increase in bandwidth, with respect to their corresponding copper-based prototypes, without significant degradation in gain and/or far-field radiation patterns.

  14. Highly ordered carbon nanotubes based on porous aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Pan, H; Gao, H; Lim, S H; Feng, Y P; Lin, J

    2004-11-01

    Highly ordered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely pursued due to their unique properties. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) exhibits great possibility for this purpose. Here, CNTs based on AAO templates were produced using acetylene or ethylene as the hydrocarbon sources with or without the presence of Co catalysts. CNTs grown on the Co-embedded AAO samples were normally confined within the nanopores of the AAO template. It was found that C2H4 normally requires 100 degrees C higher pyrolysis temperature than C2H2 under otherwise identical conditions. The pyrolysis temperature is greatly reduced with the presence of Co catalysts. CNTs can grow out of the nanopores if Co particles are present at the bottom of the nanopores, and if the nanopores are short in length or large in diameter. The graphitization of AAO-template grown CNTs was studied by Raman spectroscopy. CNTs produced from ethylene are generally better in graphitization than those from acetylene, and CNTs grown with the presence of Co catalysts deposited at the bottom of nanopores are better than those without Co catalysts or with Co catalysts coated on the entire inner wall of nanopores. The growth temperature is found not to play a critical role in graphitization.

  15. Carbon nanotube-based supercapacitors using low cost collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirhoseiny, Maryam; Zandi, Majid; Mosayyebi, Abolghasem; Khademian, Mehrzad

    2016-01-01

    In this work, electrochemical double layer supercapacitors were fabricated using multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite microfilm as electrode. To improve the electrochemical properties, MWCNTs were functionalized with -COOH by acid treatments. CNT/PVA films have been deposited on different current collectors by spin coating to drastically enhance the electrode performance. Electrode fabrication involved various stages preparing of the CNT composite, and coating of the CNT/PVA paste on different substrates which also served as current collector. Al, Ni and graphite were used and compared as current collectors. The surface morphology of the fabricated electrodes was investigated with scanning electrode microscopy (SEM). Overall cell performance was evaluated with a multi-channel potentiostat/galvanostat analyzer. Each supercapacitor cell was subjected to charge-discharge cycling study at different current rates from 0.2Ag-1 to 1Ag-1. The results showed that graphite-based electrodes offer advantages of significantly higher conductivity and superior capacitive behavior compared to thin film electrodes formed on Ni and Al current collectors. The specific capacitance of graphite based electrode is found to be 29Fg-1.

  16. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes based upon distance traveled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or NH.sub.3 or NF.sub.3 or F.sub.2 or CF.sub.4 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. The predominant species that are deposited on the CNT array vary with the distance d measured along a path from the precursor gas to the CNT array; two or three different predominant species can be deposited on a CNT array for distances d=d1 and d=d2>d1 and d=d3>d2.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Based Flow-Through Electrochemical Cell for Electroanalysis.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Andrea; Erel, Yigal; Mandler, Daniel

    2016-11-15

    A flow-through electrode made of a carbon nanotubes (CNT) film deposited on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane was assembled and employed for the determination of low concentration of copper as a model system by linear sweep anodic stripping voltammetry (LSASV). CNT films with areal mass ranging from 0.12 to 0.72 mg cm(-2) were characterized by measurement of sheet resistance, water permeation flux and capacitance. Moreover, CNT with two different sizes and PTFE membrane with two different pore diameters (0.45 and 5.0 μm) were evaluated during the optimization of the electrode. Thick layers made of small CNT exhibited the lowest sheet resistance and the greatest analytical response, whereas thin layers of large CNT had the lowest capacitance and the highest permeation flux. Electrodes made of 0.12 mg cm(-2) of large CNT deposited on 5.0 μm PTFE enabled sufficiently high mass transfer and collection efficiency for detecting 64 ppt of Cu(II) within 5 min of deposition and 4.0 mL min(-1) flow rate. The analytical response was linear over 4 orders of magnitude (10(-9) to 10(-5) M) of Cu(II). The excellent performance of the flow-through CNT membrane integrated in a flow cell makes it an appealing approach not only for electroanalysis, but also for the electrochemical treatment of waters, such as the removal of low concentrations of heavy metals and organics.

  18. Sensing Mechanisms for Carbon Nanotube Based NH3 Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ning; Zhang, Qing; Chow, Chee L.; Tan, Ooi K.; Marzari, Nicola N.

    2009-03-31

    There has been an argument on carbon nanotube (CNT) based gas detectors with a field-effect transistor (FET) geometry: do the response signals result from charge transfer between adsorbed gas molecules and the CNT channel and/or from the gas species induced Schottky barrier modulation at the CNT/metal contacts? To differentiate the sensing mechanisms, we employed three CNTFET structures, i.e., (1) the entire CNT channel and CNT/electrode contacts are accessible to NH3 gas; (2) the CNT/electrode contacts are passivated with a Si3N4 thin film, leaving the CNT channel open to the gas and, in contrast, (3) the CNT channel is covered with the film, while the contacts are open to the gas. We suggest that the Schottky barrier modulation at the contacts is the dominant mechanism from room temperature to 150°C. At higher temperatures, the charge transfer process contributes to the response signals. There is a clear evidence that the adsorption of NH3 on the CNT channel is facilitated by environmental oxygen.

  19. Sensing mechanisms for carbon nanotube based NH3 gas detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ning; Zhang, Qing; Chow, Chee Lap; Tan, Ooi Kiang; Marzari, Nicola

    2009-04-01

    There has been an argument on carbon nanotube (CNT) based gas detectors with a field-effect transistor (FET) geometry: do the response signals result from charge transfer between adsorbed gas molecules and the CNT channel and/or from the gas species induced Schottky barrier modulation at the CNT/metal contacts? To differentiate the sensing mechanisms, we employed three CNTFET structures, i.e., (1) the entire CNT channel and CNT/electrode contacts are accessible to NH(3) gas; (2) the CNT/electrode contacts are passivated with a Si(3)N(4) thin film, leaving the CNT channel open to the gas and, in contrast, (3) the CNT channel is covered with the film, while the contacts are open to the gas. We suggest that the Schottky barrier modulation at the contacts is the dominant mechanism from room temperature to 150 degrees C. At higher temperatures, the charge transfer process contributes to the response signals. There is a clear evidence that the adsorption of NH(3) on the CNT channel is facilitated by environmental oxygen.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  1. Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Monitoring Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell; Jordan, Jeffrey; Oglesby, Donald; Watkins, Anthony; Patry, JoAnne; Smits, Jan; Williams, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based sensors for structural health monitoring (SHM) can be embedded in structures of all geometries to monitor conditions both inside and at the surface of the structure to continuously sense changes. These CNTs can be manipulated into specific orientations to create small, powerful, and flexible sensors. One of the sensors is a highly flexible sensor for crack growth detection and strain field mapping that features a very dense and highly ordered array of single-walled CNTs. CNT structural health sensors can be mass-produced, are inexpensive, can be packaged in small sizes (0.5 micron(sup 2)), require less power than electronic or piezoelectric transducers, and produce less waste heat per square centimeter than electronic or piezoelectric transducers. Chemically functionalized lithographic patterns are used to deposit and align the CNTs onto metallic electrodes. This method consistently produces aligned CNTs in the defined locations. Using photo- and electron-beam lithography, simple Cr/Au thin-film circuits are patterned onto oxidized silicon substrates. The samples are then re-patterned with a CNT-attracting, self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to delineate the desired CNT locations between electrodes. During the deposition of the solution-suspended single- wall CNTs, the application of an electric field to the metallic contacts causes alignment of the CNTs along the field direction. This innovation is a prime candidate for smart skin technologies with applications ranging from military, to aerospace, to private industry.

  2. FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A CARBON NANOTUBE-BASED NANOKNIFE

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Rice, P.; Mahajan, R. L.; McIntosh, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate construction and testing of a prototype microtome knife for cutting ~100 nm thick slices of frozen-hydrated biological samples based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT). A piezoelectric-based 3-D manipulator was used inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to select and position individual MWCNTs, which were subsequently welded in place using electron beam-induced deposition (EBID). The knife is built on a pair of tungsten needles with provision to adjust the distance between the needle tips, accommodating various lengths of MWCNTs. We performed experiments to test the mechanical strength of MWCNT in the completed device using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. An increasing force was applied at the midpoint of nanotube until failure, which was observed in situ in the SEM. The maximum breaking force was approximately (8 × 10−7) N which corresponds well with the typical microtome cutting forces reported in the literature. In situ cutting experiments were performed on a cell biological embedding plastic (epoxy) by pushing it against the nanotube. Initial experiments show indentation marks on the epoxy surface. Quantitative analysis is currently limited by the surface asperities which have the same dimensions as the nanotube. PMID:19417497

  3. Fabrication and characterization of a carbon nanotube-based nanoknife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Rice, P.; Mahajan, R. L.; McIntosh, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication and testing of a prototype microtome knife based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) for cutting ~100 nm thick slices of frozen-hydrated biological samples. A piezoelectric-based 3D manipulator was used inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to select and position individual MWCNTs, which were subsequently welded in place using electron beam-induced deposition. The knife is built on a pair of tungsten needles with provision to adjust the distance between the needle tips, accommodating various lengths of MWCNTs. We performed experiments to test the mechanical strength of a MWCNT in the completed device using an atomic force microscope tip. An increasing force was applied at the mid-point of the nanotube until failure occurred, which was observed in situ in the SEM. The maximum breaking force was approximately (8 × 10-7) N which corresponds well with the typical microtome cutting forces reported in the literature. In situ cutting experiments were performed on a cell biological embedding plastic (epoxy) by pushing it against the nanotube. Initial experiments show indentation marks on the epoxy surface. Quantitative analysis is currently limited by the surface asperities, which have the same dimensions as the nanotube.

  4. Advances in carbon nanotube based electrochemical sensors for bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Zheng, Dan; Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Luong, John H T; Sheu, Fwu-Shan

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical (EC) sensing approaches have exploited the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as electrode materials owing to their unique structures and properties to provide strong electrocatalytic activity with minimal surface fouling. Nanofabrication and device integration technologies have emerged along with significant advances in the synthesis, purification, conjugation and biofunctionalization of CNTs. Such combined efforts have contributed towards the rapid development of CNT-based sensors for a plethora of important analytes with improved detection sensitivity and selectivity. The use of CNTs opens an opportunity for the direct electron transfer between the enzyme and the active electrode area. Of particular interest are also excellent electrocatalytic activities of CNTs on the redox reaction of hydrogen peroxide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, two major by-products of enzymatic reactions. This excellent electrocatalysis holds a promising future for the simple design and implementation of on-site biosensors for oxidases and dehydrogenases with enhanced selectivity. To date, the use of an anti-interference layer or an artificial electron mediator is critically needed to circumvent unwanted endogenous electroactive species. Such interfering species are effectively suppressed by using CNT based electrodes since the oxidation of NADH, thiols, hydrogen peroxide, etc. by CNTs can be performed at low potentials. Nevertheless, the major future challenges for the development of CNT-EC sensors include miniaturization, optimization and simplification of the procedure for fabricating CNT based electrodes with minimal non-specific binding, high sensitivity and rapid response followed by their extensive validation using "real world" samples. A high resistance to electrode fouling and selectivity are the two key pending issues for the application of CNT-based biosensors in clinical chemistry, food quality and control, waste water treatment and bioprocessing.

  5. Reusable glucose sensing using carbon nanotube-based self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Samaddar, Sarbani; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr.

    2013-09-01

    Lipid functionalized single walled carbon nanotube-based self assembly forms a super-micellar structure. This assemblage has been exploited to trap glucose oxidase in a molecular cargo for glucose sensing. The advantage of such a molecular trap is that all components of this unique structure (both the trapping shell and the entrapped enzyme) are reusable and rechargeable. The unique feature of this sensing method lies in the solid state functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes that facilitates liquid state immobilization of the enzyme. The method can be used for soft-immobilization (a new paradigm in enzyme immobilization) of enzymes with better thermostability that is imparted by the strong hydrophobic environment provided through encapsulation by the nanotubes.Lipid functionalized single walled carbon nanotube-based self assembly forms a super-micellar structure. This assemblage has been exploited to trap glucose oxidase in a molecular cargo for glucose sensing. The advantage of such a molecular trap is that all components of this unique structure (both the trapping shell and the entrapped enzyme) are reusable and rechargeable. The unique feature of this sensing method lies in the solid state functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes that facilitates liquid state immobilization of the enzyme. The method can be used for soft-immobilization (a new paradigm in enzyme immobilization) of enzymes with better thermostability that is imparted by the strong hydrophobic environment provided through encapsulation by the nanotubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02609d

  6. Critical role of the sorting polymer in carbon nanotube-based minority carrier devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mallajosyula, Arun T.; Nie, Wanyi; Gupta, Gautam; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2016-11-27

    A prerequisite for carbon nanotube-based optoelectronic devices is the ability to sort them into a pure semiconductor phase. One of the most common sorting routes is enabled through using specific wrapping polymers. Here we show that subtle changes in the polymer structure can have a dramatic influence on the figures of merit of a carbon nanotube-based photovoltaic device. By comparing two commonly used polyfluorenes (PFO and PFO-BPy) for wrapping (7,5) and (6,5) chirality SWCNTs, we demonstrate that they have contrasting effects on the device efficiency. We attribute this to the differences in their ability to efficiently transfer charge. Although PFO may act as an efficient interfacial layer at the anode, PFO-BPy, having the additional pyridine side groups, forms a high resistance layer degrading the device efficiency. By comparing PFO|C60 and C60-only devices, we found that presence of a PFO layer at low optical densities resulted in the increase of all three solar cell parameters, giving nearly an order of magnitude higher efficiency over that of C60-only devices. In addition, with a relatively higher contribution to photocurrent from the PFO-C60 interface, an open circuit voltage of 0.55 V was obtained for PFO-(7,5)-C60 devices. On the other hand, PFO-BPy does not affect the open circuit voltage but drastically reduces the short circuit current density. Lastly, these results indicate that the charge transport properties and energy levels of the sorting polymers have to be taken into account to fully understand their effect on carbon nanotube-based solar cells.

  7. Critical role of the sorting polymer in carbon nanotube-based minority carrier devices

    DOE PAGES

    Mallajosyula, Arun T.; Nie, Wanyi; Gupta, Gautam; ...

    2016-11-27

    A prerequisite for carbon nanotube-based optoelectronic devices is the ability to sort them into a pure semiconductor phase. One of the most common sorting routes is enabled through using specific wrapping polymers. Here we show that subtle changes in the polymer structure can have a dramatic influence on the figures of merit of a carbon nanotube-based photovoltaic device. By comparing two commonly used polyfluorenes (PFO and PFO-BPy) for wrapping (7,5) and (6,5) chirality SWCNTs, we demonstrate that they have contrasting effects on the device efficiency. We attribute this to the differences in their ability to efficiently transfer charge. Although PFOmore » may act as an efficient interfacial layer at the anode, PFO-BPy, having the additional pyridine side groups, forms a high resistance layer degrading the device efficiency. By comparing PFO|C60 and C60-only devices, we found that presence of a PFO layer at low optical densities resulted in the increase of all three solar cell parameters, giving nearly an order of magnitude higher efficiency over that of C60-only devices. In addition, with a relatively higher contribution to photocurrent from the PFO-C60 interface, an open circuit voltage of 0.55 V was obtained for PFO-(7,5)-C60 devices. On the other hand, PFO-BPy does not affect the open circuit voltage but drastically reduces the short circuit current density. Lastly, these results indicate that the charge transport properties and energy levels of the sorting polymers have to be taken into account to fully understand their effect on carbon nanotube-based solar cells.« less

  8. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-18

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  9. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  10. Novel self-sensing carbon nanotube-based composites for rehabilitation of structural steel members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Shafique; Doshi, Sagar; Schumacher, Thomas; Thostenson, Erik T.; McConnell, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue and fracture are among the most critical forms of damage in metal structures. Fatigue damage can initiate from microscopic defects (e.g., surface scratches, voids in welds, and internal defects) and initiate a crack. Under cyclic loading, these cracks can grow and reach a critical level to trigger fracture of the member which leads to compromised structural integrity and, in some cases, catastrophic failure of the entire structure. In our research, we are investigating a solution using carbon nanotube-based sensing composites, which have the potential to simultaneously rehabilitate and monitor fatigue-cracked structural members. These composites consist of a fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) layer and a carbon nanotube-based sensing layer, which are integrated to form a novel structural self-sensing material. The sensing layer is composed of a non-woven aramid fabric that is coated with carbon nanotubes (CNT) to form an electrically conductive network that is extremely sensitive to detecting deformation as well as damage accumulation via changes in the resistance of the CNT network. In this paper, we introduce the sensing concept, describe the manufacturing of a model sensing prototype, and discuss a set of small-scale laboratory experiments to examine the load-carrying capacity and damage sensing response.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Based Sensor to Monitor Crack Growth in Cracked Aluminum Structures Underneath Composite Patching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, T. M.; Kwon, Y. W.; Hart, D. C.; Loup, D. C.; Rasmussen, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The paper investigates a carbon nanotube-based sensor to detect crack propagation in aluminum structures underneath composite patching. Initial tests are conducted to determine the correct procedure and materials to properly fabricate a carbon nanotube (CNT) based sensor, which is then placed in between a composite patch and the aluminum structure. The CNTs have been utilized as sensors in previous studies but only for sensing crack propagation within the composite itself. This study focuses on crack propagation in the base material and is not concerned with the composite. In this application, the composite is only a patch and can be replaced if damaged. The study conducts both tension and fatigue testing to determine the usefulness of the CNT sensor. The CNT sensor is shown to be effective in giving an indication of the crack propagation in the aluminum. Correlation is done between the crack propagation length and the increase in electrical resistance in the CNT sensor under tensile and cyclic loading, respectively.

  12. Influence of functionalization on mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotube-based silver composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal; Sharma, Manjula

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have extended the molecular-level mixing method to fabricate multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced silver nanocomposites. The multiwall nanotubes used in the synthesis process were dispersed by two ways viz. covalent and non-covalent functionalization techniques. To elucidate the comparative effects of functionalization, structural, mechanical and electrical properties of nanocomposites were evaluated before and after sintering. The structural characterization revealed that the nanotubes were embedded, anchored and homogenously dispersed within the silver matrix. Hardness and Young's modulus of nanotube-reinforced nanocomposite were increased by a factor of 1-1.6 times than that of pure silver, even before and after the sintering. Covalently functionalized nanotube-based composites have shown more enhanced mechanical properties. The CNT reinforcement also improved the electrical conductivity of low-conducting nanosilver matrix before sintering. Non-covalently functionalized nanotube-based nanosilver composites showed more increased electrical conductivity before sintering. But a negative reinforcement effect was observed in high-conducting bulk silver matrix after the sintering. Thus, covalent functionalization might be appropriate for mechanical improvement in low-strength materials. However, non-covalent functionalization is suitable for electrical enhancement in low-conducting nanomaterials.

  13. A Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-based Biosensor for Monitoring Microcystin-LR in Sources of Drinking Water Supplies

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor is developed for monitoring microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a toxic cyanobacterial toxin, in sources of drinking water supplies. The biosensor electrodes are fabricated using dense, mm-long multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) arrays gro...

  14. Modelling the nonlinear behaviour of double walled carbon nanotube based resonator with curvature factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear vibration analysis of a double walled carbon nanotube based mass sensor with curvature factor or waviness, which is doubly clamped at a source and a drain. Nonlinear vibrational behaviour of a double-walled carbon nanotube excited harmonically near its primary resonance is considered. The double walled carbon nanotube is harmonically excited by the addition of an excitation force. The modelling involves stretching of the mid plane and damping as per phenomenon. The equation of motion involves four nonlinear terms for inner and outer tubes of DWCNT due to the curved geometry and the stretching of the central plane due to the boundary conditions. The vibrational behaviour of the double walled carbon nanotube with different surface deviations along its axis is analyzed in the context of the time response, Poincaré maps and Fast Fourier Transformation diagrams. The appearance of instability and chaos in the dynamic response is observed as the curvature factor on double walled carbon nanotube is changed. The phenomenon of Periodic doubling and intermittency are observed as the pathway to chaos. The regions of periodic, sub-harmonic and chaotic behaviour are clearly seen to be dependent on added mass and the curvature factors in the double walled carbon nanotube. Poincaré maps and frequency spectra are used to explicate and to demonstrate the miscellany of the system behaviour. With the increase in the curvature factor system excitations increases and results in an increase of the vibration amplitude with reduction in excitation frequency.

  15. Improved thermoelectric power output from multilayered polyethylenimine doped carbon nanotube based organic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, Corey A.; Montgomery, David S.; Barbalace, Ryan L.; Carlson, Rowland D.; Carroll, David L.

    2014-05-14

    By appropriately selecting the carbon nanotube type and n-type dopant for the conduction layers in a multilayered carbon nanotube composite, the total device thermoelectric power output can be increased significantly. The particular materials chosen in this study were raw single walled carbon nanotubes for the p-type layers and polyethylenimine doped single walled carbon nanotubes for the n-type layers. The combination of these two conduction layers leads to a single thermocouple Seebeck coefficient of 96 ± 4 μVK{sup −1}, which is 6.3 times higher than that previously reported. This improved Seebeck coefficient leads to a total power output of 14.7 nW per thermocouple at the maximum temperature difference of 50 K, which is 44 times the power output per thermocouple for the previously reported results. Ultimately, these thermoelectric power output improvements help to increase the potential use of these lightweight, flexible, and durable organic multilayered carbon nanotube based thermoelectric modules in low powered electronics applications, where waste heat is available.

  16. Modeling of carbon nanotube-based devices: from nanoFETs to THz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, Aldo; Pecchia, Alessandro; Petrolati, Eleonora; Paoloni, Claudio

    2006-08-01

    In the first part of the present contribution, we will report on transport calculations of nanoscaled devices based on Carbon Nanotubes obtained via self-consistent density-functional method coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function approaches. In particular, density functional tight-binding techniques are very promising due to their intrinsic efficiency. This scheme allows treatment of systems comprising a large number of atoms and enables the computation of the current flowing between two or more contacts in a fully self-consistent manner with the open boundary conditions that naturally arise in transport problems. We will give a description of this methodology and application to field effect transistor based on Carbon nanotubes. The advances in manufacturing technology are allowing new opportunities even for vacuum electron devices producing radio-frequency radiation. Modern micro and nano-technologies can overcome the typical severe limitations of vacuum tube devices. As an example, Carbon Nanotubes used as cold emitters in micron-scaled triodes allow for frequency generation up to THz region. The purpose of the second part of this contribution will be a description of the modelling of Carbon Nanotube based vacuum devices such as triodes. We will present the calculation of important figures of merit and possible realizations.

  17. Controlling the Cross-Sensitivity of Carbon Nanotube-Based Gas Sensors to Water Using Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Evans, Gwyn P; Buckley, David J; Adedigba, Abdul-Lateef; Sankar, Gopinathan; Skipper, Neal T; Parkin, Ivan P

    2016-10-05

    Carbon nanotube-based gas sensors can be used to detect harmful environmental pollutants such as NO2 at room temperature. Although they show promise as low-powered, sensitive, and affordable monitoring devices, cross-sensitivity of functionalized carbon nanotubes to water vapor often obscures the detection of target molecules. This is a barrier to adoption for monitoring of airborne pollutants because of the varying humidity levels found in real world environments. Zeolites, also known as molecular sieves because of their selective adsorption properties, are used in this work to control the cross-sensitivity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based sensors to water vapor. Zeolites incorporated into the sensing layer are found to reduce interference effects that would otherwise obscure the identification of NO2 gas, permitting repeatable detection over a range of relative humidities. This significant improvement is found to depend on the arrangement of the SWCNT-zeolite layers in the sensing device, as well as the hydrophilicity of the chosen zeolite.

  18. Analytical Calculation of Sensing Parameters on Carbon Nanotube Based Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Elnaz; Buntat, Zolkafle; Ahmad, Mohd Hafizi; Enzevaee, Aria; Yousof, Rubiyah; Iqbal, Syed Muhammad Zafar; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi.; Sidik, Muhammad Abu Bakar; Karimi, Hediyeh

    2014-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are generally nano-scale tubes comprising a network of carbon atoms in a cylindrical setting that compared with silicon counterparts present outstanding characteristics such as high mechanical strength, high sensing capability and large surface-to-volume ratio. These characteristics, in addition to the fact that CNTs experience changes in their electrical conductance when exposed to different gases, make them appropriate candidates for use in sensing/measuring applications such as gas detection devices. In this research, a model for a Field Effect Transistor (FET)-based structure has been developed as a platform for a gas detection sensor in which the CNT conductance change resulting from the chemical reaction between NH3 and CNT has been employed to model the sensing mechanism with proposed sensing parameters. The research implements the same FET-based structure as in the work of Peng et al. on nanotube-based NH3 gas detection. With respect to this conductance change, the I–V characteristic of the CNT is investigated. Finally, a comparative study shows satisfactory agreement between the proposed model and the experimental data from the mentioned research. PMID:24658617

  19. Analytical calculation of sensing parameters on carbon nanotube based gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Elnaz; Buntat, Zolkafle; Ahmad, Mohd Hafizi; Enzevaee, Aria; Yousof, Rubiyah; Iqbal, Syed Muhammad Zafar; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Sidik, Muhammad Abu Bakar; Karimi, Hediyeh

    2014-03-20

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are generally nano-scale tubes comprising a network of carbon atoms in a cylindrical setting that compared with silicon counterparts present outstanding characteristics such as high mechanical strength, high sensing capability and large surface-to-volume ratio. These characteristics, in addition to the fact that CNTs experience changes in their electrical conductance when exposed to different gases, make them appropriate candidates for use in sensing/measuring applications such as gas detection devices. In this research, a model for a Field Effect Transistor (FET)-based structure has been developed as a platform for a gas detection sensor in which the CNT conductance change resulting from the chemical reaction between NH3 and CNT has been employed to model the sensing mechanism with proposed sensing parameters. The research implements the same FET-based structure as in the work of Peng et al. on nanotube-based NH3 gas detection. With respect to this conductance change, the I-V characteristic of the CNT is investigated. Finally, a comparative study shows satisfactory agreement between the proposed model and the experimental data from the mentioned research.

  20. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongbo; Thostenson, Erik T.; Schumacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM). This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT) onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity. PMID:26197323

  1. Carbon nanostructures for orthopedic medical applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lijuan; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-09-01

    Carbon nanostructures (including carbon nanofibers, nanostructured diamond, fullerene materials and so forth) possess extraordinary physiochemical, mechanical and electrical properties attractive to bioengineers and medical researchers. In the past decade, numerous developments towards the fabrication and biological studies of carbon nanostructures have provided opportunities to improve orthopedic applications. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review on carbon nanostructure advances in orthopedic research. Orthopedic medical device applications of carbon nanotubes/carbon nanofibers and nanostructured diamond (including particulate nanodiamond and nanocrystalline diamond coatings) are emphasized here along with other carbon nanostructures that have promising potential. In addition, widely used fabrication techniques for producing carbon nanostructures in both the laboratory and in industry are briefly introduced. In conclusion, carbon nanostructures have demonstrated tremendous promise for orthopedic medical device applications to date, and although some safety, reliability and durability issues related to the manufacturing and implantation of carbon nanomaterials remain, their future is bright.

  2. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  4. Heat dissipation for the Intel Core i5 processor using multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based ethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thang, Bui Hung; Van Trinh, Pham; Quang, Le Dinh; Huong, Nguyen Thi; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are some of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown by using chemical vapor deposition is 600 ± 100 Wm-1K-1 compared with the thermal conductivity 419 Wm-1K-1 of Ag. Carbon-nanotube-based liquids — a new class of nanomaterials, have shown many interesting properties and distinctive features offering potential in heat dissipation applications for electronic devices, such as computer microprocessor, high power LED, etc. In this work, a multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based liquid was made of well-dispersed hydroxyl-functional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-OH) in ethylene glycol (EG)/distilled water (DW) solutions by using Tween-80 surfactant and an ultrasonication method. The concentration of MWCNT-OH in EG/DW solutions ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 gram/liter. The dispersion of the MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions was evaluated by using a Zeta-Sizer analyzer. The MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions were used as coolants in the liquid cooling system for the Intel Core i5 processor. The thermal dissipation efficiency and the thermal response of the system were evaluated by directly measuring the temperature of the micro-processor using the Core Temp software and the temperature sensors built inside the micro-processor. The results confirmed the advantages of CNTs in thermal dissipation systems for computer processors and other high-power electronic devices.

  5. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes-anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  6. Multi Objective Optimization of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotube Based Nanogrinding Wheel Using Grey Relational and Regression Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuramalingam, Prabhu; Vinayagam, Babu Kupusamy

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotube mixed grinding wheel is used in the grinding process to analyze the surface characteristics of AISI D2 tool steel material. Till now no work has been carried out using carbon nanotube based grinding wheel. Carbon nanotube based grinding wheel has excellent thermal conductivity and good mechanical properties which are used to improve the surface finish of the workpiece. In the present study, the multi response optimization of process parameters like surface roughness and metal removal rate of grinding process of single wall carbon nanotube (CNT) in mixed cutting fluids is undertaken using orthogonal array with grey relational analysis. Experiments are performed with designated grinding conditions obtained using the L9 orthogonal array. Based on the results of the grey relational analysis, a set of optimum grinding parameters is obtained. Using the analysis of variance approach the significant machining parameters are found. Empirical model for the prediction of output parameters has been developed using regression analysis and the results are compared empirically, for conditions of with and without CNT grinding wheel in grinding process.

  7. Shear deformable deformation of carbon nanotubes based on a new analytical nonlocal Timoshenko beam nodel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianming; Yang, Yang

    2015-03-10

    According to Hamilton’s principle, a new mathematical model and analytical solutions for nonlocal Timoshenko beam model (ANT) is established based on nonlocal elastic continuum theory when shear deformation and nonlocal effect are considered. The new ANT equilibrium equations and boundary conditions are derived for bending analysis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with simply supported, clamped and cantilever. The ANT deflection solutions demonstrate that the CNT stiffness is enhanced by the presence of nonlocal stress effects. Furthermore, the new ANT model concluded verifiable bending behaviors for a cantilever CNT with point load at the free end, which depends on the strength of nonlocal stress. Therefore, this new model will gives a better prediction for mechanical behaviors of nanostructures.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization and Utility of Carbon Nanotube Based Hybrid Sensors in Bioanalytical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhulika, Sushmee

    The detection of gaseous analytes and biological molecules is of prime importance in the fields of environmental pollution control, food and water - safety and analysis; and medical diagnostics. This necessitates the development of advanced and improved technology that is reliable, inexpensive and suitable for high volume production. The conventional sensors are often thin film based which lack sensitivity due to the phenomena of current shunting across the charge depleted region when an analyte binds with them. One dimensional (1-D) nanostructures provide a better alternative for sensing applications by eliminating the issue of current shunting due to their 1-D geometries and facilitating device miniaturization and low power operations. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are 1-D nanostructures that possess small size, high mechanical strength, high electrical and thermal conductivity and high specific area that have resulted in their wide spread applications in sensor technology. To overcome the issue of low sensitivity of pristine CNTs and to widen their scope, hybrid devices have been fabricated that combine the synergistic properties of CNTs along with materials like metals and conducting polymers (CPs). CPs exhibit electronic, magnetic and optical properties of metals and semiconductors while retaining the processing advantages of polymers. Their high chemical sensitivity, room temperature operation and tunable charge transport properties has made them ideal for use as transducing elements in chemical sensors. In this dissertation, various CNT based hybrid devices such as CNT-conducting polymer and graphene-CNT-metal nanoparticles based sensors have been developed and demonstrated towards bioanalytical applications such as detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and saccharides. Electrochemical polymerization enabled the synthesis of CPs and metal nanoparticles in a simple, cost effective and controlled way on the surface of CNT based platforms thus resulting in

  9. Magnesium oxide grafted carbon nanotubes based impedimetric genosensor for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manoj Kumar; Ali, Md Azahar; Srivastava, Saurabh; Agrawal, Ved Varun; Ansari, S G; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2013-12-15

    Nanostructured magnesium oxide (size<10nm) grafted carboxyl (COOH) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (nMgO-cMWCNTs) deposited electrophoretically onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass electrode and have been utilized for Vibrio cholerae detection. Aminated 23 bases single stranded DNA (NH2-ssDNA) probe sequence (O1 gene) of V. cholerae has been covalently functionalized onto nMgO-cMWCNTs/ITO electrode surface using EDC-NHS chemistry. This DNA functionalized MgO grafted cMWCNTs electrode has been characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical techniques. The results of XPS studies reveal that sufficient O-C=O groups present at the nMgO-cMWCNTs surface are utilized for DNA binding. The results of hybridization studies conducted with fragmented target DNA (ftDNA) of V. cholerae using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) reveal sensitivity as 3.87 Ω ng(-1) cm(-2), detection limit of ~21.70 ng µL(-1) in the linear range of 100-500 ng µL(-1) and stability of about 120 days. The proposed DNA functionalized nMgO-cMWCNTs nanomatrix provides a novel impedimetric platform for the fabrication of a compact genosensor device for biomedical application.

  10. Photonic crystal wave guide for non-cryogenic cooled carbon nanotube based middle wave infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Carmen Kar Man; Xi, Ning; Lou, Jianyong; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Chen, Hongzhi

    2010-10-01

    We report high sensitivity carbon nanotube (CNT) based middle wave infrared (MWIR) sensors with a two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide. MWIR sensors are of great importance in a variety of current military applications including ballistic missile defense, surveillance and target detection. Unlike other existing MWIR sensing materials, CNTs exhibit low noise level and can be used as new nano sensing materials for MWIR detection where cryogenic cooling is not required. However, the quantum efficiency of the CNT based infrared sensor is still limited by the small sensing area and low incoming electric field. Here, a photonic nanostructure is used as a resonant cavity for boosting the electric field intensity at the position of the CNT sensing element. A two-dimensional photonic crystal with periodic holes in a polymer thin film is fabricated and a resonant cavity is formed by removing holes from the array of the photonic crystal. Based on the design of the photonic crystal topologies, we theoretically study the electric field distribution to predict the resonant behavior of the structure. Numerical simulations reveal the field is enhanced and almost fully confined to the defect region of the photonic crystal. To verify the electric field enhancement effect, experiments are also performed to measure the photocurrent response of the sensor with and without the photonic crystal resonant cavity. Experimental results show that the photocurrent increases ~3 times after adding the photonic crystal resonant cavity.

  11. Carbon nanotube-based glucose oxidase nanocomposite anode materials for bio-fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, Jonathan

    The field of nanotechnology has benefited medicine, science, and engineering. The advent of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and protein-inorganic interfacing have received much attention due to their unique nanostructures which can be modified to act as a scaffold to house proteins or create nanowires. The current trend incorporates the robustness and specificity characteristics of proteins to the mechanical strength, enlarged surface area, and conductive capabilities emblematic of their inorganic counterparts. Bio-Fuel Cells (BFCs) and Biosensors remain at the forefront and devices such as implantable glucose monitors are closer to realization than ever before. This research strives to exploit potential energy from the eukaryotic enzyme Glucose Oxidase (GOx) during oxidation of its substrate, glucose. During this process, a two-electron transfer occurs at its two FAD redox centres which can be harnessed via an electrochemical setup involving a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNTs) modified electrode. The objective is to develop a MWCNT-GOx bionanocomposite capable of producing and sustaining a competitive power output. To help with this aim, investigation into a crosslinked enzyme cluster (CEC) immobilization technique is envisioned to amplify power output due to its highly concentrated, reusable, and thermally stable characteristics. Numerous CEC-GOx-MWCNT composites were fabricated with the highest initial output reaching 170 muW/cm 2. It was hypothesized that the carbohydrate moiety increased tunnelling distance and therefore hindered electron transfer. Efforts to produce a recombinant GOx without the encumbrance were unsuccessful. Two sub-clone constructs were explored and although a recombinant protein was identified, it was not confirmed to be GOx. BFC testing on bionanocomposites integrating non-glycosylated GOx could not be performed although there remains a strong contention that the recombinant would demonstrate superior power densities in comparison to its

  12. Issues related to the characterization and fabrication of coiled carbon nanotube based inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraby, Hasan Mohammad

    The superior inductive properties of coiled carbon nanotubes (CCNTs) have been demonstrated through numerical computations. It is shown, through computations, that a range of inductance values (in the pH to muH range) operational at THz frequencies could be obtained through a variation of CCNT geometric parameters, which can be accomplished through rational synthesis. A comparison of the proposed inductor material to conventional inductor material e.g. copper (Cu), in terms of both component footprint and material volume, indicated a greater quality factor (Q) through the use of the CCNTs. Experimental characterization of these CCNT inductors require high quality ohmic contacts. Focused ion beam based metal deposition is one of the easiest ways to create contacts on those nanostructures. Metal deposition with focused ion beam (FIB) systems result in material composed of carbon, oxygen, gallium and the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor. Four point probe measurements to determine the material resistivity and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to determine the relative chemical composition were conducted on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum (Pt) and tungsten (W) lines. It has been shown that the gallium (Ga) percentage in the metal line plays a significant role in reducing the electrical resistivity of the material. Effective media theory (EMT), specifically using Mc Lachlan's general effective medium (GEM) equation is used to describe the relationship between the chemical compositions of the FIB deposited metal lines and the corresponding electrical resistivity. The relation between the chemical elements and the resistivity of the FIB deposited metal lines will make possible the accurate estimation of their resistance without using conventional probe stations. Like metals insulators can also be deposited using the FIB system. Insulator deposition by FIB systems results in SiO2 layers with impurities from gallium (Ga) and carbon (C). The

  13. Dispersion and separation of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, Brian J. (Inventor); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Ruf, Herbert J. (Inventor); Evans, Christopher M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to dispersions of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents containing alkyl amide compounds and/or diamide compounds. The invention also relates to methods of dispersing nanostructured carbon in organic solvents and methods of mobilizing nanostructured carbon. Also disclosed are methods of determining the purity of nanostructured carbon.

  14. Carbon nanotube-based mode-locked wavelength-switchable fiber laser via net gain cross section alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, A. A.; Mohamad, H.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Muhammad, F. D.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a carbon nanotube-based mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser with switchable wavelength in the C-band wavelength region by varying the net gain cross section of erbium. The carbon nanotube is coated on a tapered fiber to form the saturable absorber for the purpose of mode-locking by exploiting the concept of evanescent field interaction on the tapered fiber with the carbon nanotube in a ring cavity configuration. The propagation loss is adjusted by inducing macrobend losses of the optical fiber in the cavity through a fiber spooling technique. Since the spooling radius can be gradually adjusted to achieve continuous tuning of attenuation, this passive tuning approach can be an alternative to optical tunable attenuator, with freedom of external device integration into the laser cavity. Based on this alteration, the net gain cross section of the laser system can be tailored to three different lasing wavelength ranges; 1533, 1560 nm and both (1533 and 1560 nm) with the minimum pulse duration of 734 fs. The proposed design is simple and stable with high beam quality and good reliability for multiple applications.

  15. Electrical and optical properties of reduced graphene oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based nanocomposites: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goumri, Meryem; Lucas, Bruno; Ratier, Bernard; Baitoul, Mimouna

    2016-10-01

    Graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotubes have attracted interest for a number of potential applications. One of the most actively pursued applications uses graphene and carbon nanotubes as a transparent conducting electrode in solar cells, displays or touch screens. In this work, in situ reduced graphene oxide/Poly (vinyl alcohol) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate/Poly (vinyl alcohol) composites were prepared by water dispersion and different reduction treatments. Comparative studies were conducted to explore the electrical and optical properties of nanocomposites based on graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. A thermal reduction of graphene oxide was more effective, producing films with sheet resistances as low as 102-103 Ω/square with 80% transmittance for 550 nm light. The percolation threshold of the thermally reduced graphene oxide composites (0.35 vol%) was much lower than that of the chemically reduced graphene oxide composites (0.57 vol%), and than that of the carbon nanotubes composites (0.47 vol%). The Seebeck coefficient of graphene oxide films changes from about 40 μV/K to -30 μV/K after an annealing of three hours at 200 °C. The optical absorption of the nanocomposites showed a high absorbance in near UV regions and the photoluminescence enhancement was achieved at 1 wt% graphene loading, while the carbon nanotubes based composite presents a significant emission at 0.7 wt% followed with a photoluminescence quenching at higher fraction of the nanofillers 1.6 wt% TRGO and 1 wt% MWCNTs.

  16. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures on iron nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshanova, A.; Partizan, G.; Mansurov, B.; Medyanova, B.; Mansurova, M.; Aliev, B.; Jiang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the results of experiments on synthesis of carbon nanostructures (CNs) by the method of thermal chemical vapor deposition using iron nanopowders obtained by the method of electrical explosion of wires as catalysts. To study the process of nucleation and growth of individual carbon nanostructures, experiments were conducted not only on nanopowders, but also on the separated clusters. To determine the optimum conditions of the carbon nanostructures synthesis and lower temperature limit, experiments were performed at different temperatures (300-700°C) and pressures (100-400 mbar). The experiments have shown that the lower temperature limit for carbon nanostructures synthesis on the iron nanopowders is 350°C and in this process the growth of carbon nanostructures is not so massive. Stable growth of carbon nanostructures for nanopowders began from 400°C during the entire range of pressures. The analysis of Raman spectroscopy showed that the most optimum conditions for obtaining nanotubes of high quality are P = 100 mbar and T = 425°C.

  17. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2016-10-04

    Disclosed here is a device comprising a porous carbon aerogel or composite thereof as an energy storage material, catalyst support, sensor or adsorbent, wherein the porous carbon aerogel comprises a network of interconnected struts comprising carbon nanotube bundles covalently crosslinked by graphitic carbon nanoparticles, wherein the carbon nanotubes account for 5 to 95 wt. % of the aerogel and the graphitic carbon nanoparticles account for 5 to 95 wt. % of the aerogel, and wherein the aerogel has an electrical conductivity of at least 10 S/m and is capable of withstanding strains of more than 10% before fracture.

  18. Copper-decorated carbon nanotubes-based composite electrodes for nonenzymatic detection of glucose

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare three types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT)-based composite electrodes and to modify their surface by copper electrodeposition for nonenzymatic oxidation and determination of glucose from aqueous solution. Copper-decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes composite electrode (Cu/CNT-epoxy) exhibited the highest sensitivity to glucose determination. PMID:22616801

  19. Nondestructive evaluation techniques for development and characterization of carbon nanotube based superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wainwright, Elliot; Williams, Phillip; Siochi, Emile J.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, multiple commercial vendors have developed capability for the production of large-scale quantities of high-quality carbon nanotube sheets and yarns [1]. While the materials have found use in electrical shielding applications, development of structural systems composed of a high volume fraction of carbon nanotubes is still lacking [2]. A recent NASA program seeks to address this by prototyping a structural nanotube composite with strength-to-weight ratio exceeding current state-of-the-art carbon fiber composites. Commercially available carbon nanotube sheets, tapes, and yarns are being processed into high volume fraction carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. Nondestructive evaluation techniques have been applied throughout this development effort for material characterization and process control. This paper will report on the progress of these efforts, including magnetic characterization of residual catalyst content, Raman scattering characterization of nanotube diameter and nanotube strain, and polarized Raman scattering for characterization of nanotube alignment.

  20. Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Development and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Based Superstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wainwright, Elliot; Williams, Phillip; Siochi, Emile J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, multiple commercial vendors have developed capability for the production of large-scale quantities of high-quality carbon nanotube sheets and yarns. While the materials have found use in electrical shielding applications, development of structural systems composed of a high volume fraction of carbon nanotubes is still lacking. A recent NASA program seeks to address this by prototyping a structural nanotube composite with strength-toweight ratio exceeding current state-of-the-art carbon fiber composites. Commercially available carbon nanotube sheets, tapes, and yarns are being processed into high volume fraction carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. Nondestructive evaluation techniques have been applied throughout this development effort for material characterization and process control. This paper will report on the progress of these efforts, including magnetic characterization of residual catalyst content, Raman scattering characterization of nanotube diameter, defect ratio, and nanotube strain, and polarized Raman scattering for characterization of nanotube alignment.

  1. Carbon Nanostructures in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Brian Lee; Naderi, Naghmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent advances in developing biocompatible materials for treating bone loss or defects have dramatically changed clinicians’ reconstructive armory. Current clinically available reconstructive options have certain advantages, but also several drawbacks that prevent them from gaining universal acceptance. A wide range of synthetic and natural biomaterials is being used to develop tissue-engineered bone. Many of these materials are currently in the clinical trial stage. Methods: A selective literature review was performed for carbon nanostructure composites in bone tissue engineering. Results: Incorporation of carbon nanostructures significantly improves the mechanical properties of various biomaterials to mimic that of natural bone. Recently, carbon-modified biomaterials for bone tissue engineering have been extensively investigated to potentially revolutionize biomaterials for bone regeneration. Conclusion: This review summarizes the chemical and biophysical properties of carbon nanostructures and discusses their functionality in bone tissue regeneration. PMID:28217212

  2. Carbon Nanotube-based Sensor and Method for Continually Sensing Changes in a Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffry D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A sensor has a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors operatively positioned on a substrate. The conductors are arranged side-by-side, such as in a substantially parallel relationship to one another. At least one pair of spaced-apart electrodes is coupled to opposing ends of the conductors. A portion of each of the conductors spanning between each pair of electrodes comprises a plurality of carbon nanotubes arranged end-to-end and substantially aligned along an axis. Because a direct correlation exists between resistance of a carbon nanotube and carbon nanotube strain, changes experienced by the portion of the structure to which the sensor is coupled induce a change in electrical properties of the conductors.

  3. Binding and condensation of plasmid DNA onto functionalized carbon nanotubes: toward the construction of nanotube-based gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi; Pantarotto, Davide; McCarthy, David; Chaloin, Olivier; Hoebeke, Johan; Partidos, Charalambos D; Briand, Jean-Paul; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2005-03-30

    -CNT:DNA complexes to suggest that large surface area leading to very efficient DNA condensation is not necessary for effective gene transfer. However, it will require further investigation to determine whether the degree of binding and tight association between DNA and nanotubes is a desirable trait to increase gene expression efficiency in vitro or in vivo. This study constitutes the first thorough investigation into the physicochemical interactions between cationic functionalized carbon nanotubes and DNA toward construction of carbon nanotube-based gene transfer vector systems.

  4. Effect of sintering on mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotube based silver nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, H.; Sharma, V.

    2015-03-01

    Nanocrystalline (single and multiwall) carbon nanotube reinforced silver nanocomposites are successfully synthesized by a modified molecular level mixing method. These materials are subsequently sintered up to 800 °C in inert atmosphere for 12 h. To elucidate the effect of sintering, micro-structural, mechanical and electrical properties of fabricated nanocomposites are evaluated before and after sintering. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic characterization have revealed that the carbon nanotubes are embedded, anchored and homogenously dispersed in silver matrix. Measured hardness and Young's modulus of fabricated nanocomposites are increased by 20-30 % after sintering. The carbon nanotube reinforcement has also improved electrical conductivity of low conducting nano-silver matrix before sintering. However, negative reinforcement effect is observed in high conducting bulk silver matrix after sintering. Comparatively improved mechanical and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites than multiwall nanotube reinforced nanocomposite are observed, which are correlated with high aspect ratio and larger effective contact surface area of single wall carbon nanotubes.

  5. Carbon nanotube-based sensor and method for detection of crack growth in a structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Kite, Marlen T. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Williams, Phillip A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A sensor has a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors operatively positioned on a substrate. The conductors are arranged side-by-side, such as in a substantially parallel relationship to one another. At least one pair of spaced-apart electrodes is coupled to opposing ends of the conductors. A portion of each of the conductors spanning between each pair of electrodes comprises a plurality of carbon nanotubes arranged end-to-end and substantially aligned along an axis. Because a direct correlation exists between the resistance of a carbon nanotube and its strain, changes experienced by the portion of the structure to which the sensor is coupled induce a corresponding change in the electrical properties of the conductors, thereby enabling detection of crack growth in the structure.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  7. Sub percolation threshold carbon nanotube based polyvinylidene fluoride polymer-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Cedric Antony

    The study of piezoelectric materials has traditionally focused largely on homogeneous crystalline or semi-crystalline materials. This research focuses on the concept of piezoelectric composites using selective microstructural reinforcement in the piezoelectric material to improve the piezoelectric properties. This is done using a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and carbon nanotube composite as the model system. A multi-tiered engineering approach is taken to understand the material (experimental and computational analyses) and design a composite system which provides an effective platform for future research in piezoelectric improvement. A finite element analysis is used to evaluate the ability of carbon nanotubes to generate a heterogeneous electric field where local improvements in electric field produce an increase in the effective piezoelectric strength. The study finds that weight percent and aspect ratio of the carbon nanotubes are of key importance while formations of percolating networks are detrimental to performance. This motivates investigation into electrospinning into a method of producing sub percolation threshold composites with large carbon nanotube content. However, the electrospun fabrics have too low of a dielectric strength to sustain high strength electric fields. This is studied within the context of high voltage physics and a solution inspired by traditional composites manufacturing is proposed wherein the electrospun fiber mat is used as the fiber reinforcing component of a polymer-polymer composite. This composite is thoroughly analyzed to show that it allows for a high dielectric strength combined with high carbon nanotube content. It is also shown that the PVDF contains the proper crystal structure to allow for piezoelectric properties. Furthermore, the addition of carbon nanotubes greatly improves the strength and stiffness of the composite, as well as affecting the internal electric field response to an applied voltage. These qualities

  8. Continuous production of flexible carbon nanotube-based transparent conductive films.

    PubMed

    Fraser, I Stuart; Motta, Marcelo S; Schmidt, Ron K; Windle, Alan H

    2010-08-01

    This work shows a simple, single-stage, scalable method for the continuous production of high-quality carbon nanotube-polymer transparent conductive films from carbon feedstock. Besides the ease of scalability, a particular advantage of this process is that the concentration of nanotubes in the films, and thus transparency and conductivity, can be adjusted by changing simple process parameters. Therefore, films can be readily prepared for any application desired, ranging from solar cells to flat panel displays. Our best results show a surface resistivity of the order of 300 Ω square(-1) for a film with 80% transparency, which is promising at this early stage of process development.

  9. Continuous production of flexible carbon nanotube-based transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, I. Stuart; Motta, Marcelo S.; Schmidt, Ron K.; Windle, Alan H.

    2010-08-01

    This work shows a simple, single-stage, scalable method for the continuous production of high-quality carbon nanotube-polymer transparent conductive films from carbon feedstock. Besides the ease of scalability, a particular advantage of this process is that the concentration of nanotubes in the films, and thus transparency and conductivity, can be adjusted by changing simple process parameters. Therefore, films can be readily prepared for any application desired, ranging from solar cells to flat panel displays. Our best results show a surface resistivity of the order of 300 Ω square-1 for a film with 80% transparency, which is promising at this early stage of process development.

  10. Study of Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Properties of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-29

    Publications: [1]. G. L. Zhao, Z. Ye, Z. Li, J. A. Roberts, "New carbon nanotube-epoxy composite for dampening microwave cavity resonance", IEEE Xplore ...Nanotechnology ( IEEE - NANO), 2012 12th IEEE Conference on 20-23 Aug. 2012. [2]. Z. Li, G. L. Zhao, P. Zhang, S. Guo, J. Tang, " Thermoelectric

  11. Production and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanotube-Based Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William; Gorelik, Olga; Files, Brad; Scott, Carl; Santos, Beatrice; Mayeaux, Brian; Victor, Joe

    1999-01-01

    The Nobel Prize winning discovery of the Buckuball (C60) in 1985 at Rice University by a group including Dr. Richard Smalley led to the whole new class of carbon allotropes including fullerenes and nanotubes. Especially interesting from many viewpoints are single-walled carbon nanotubes, which structurally are like a single graphitic sheet wrapped around a cylinder and capped at the ends. This cylinders have diameter as small as 0.5 - 2 nm (1/100,000th the diameter of a human hair) and are as long as 0.1 - 1 mm. Nanotubes are really individual molecules and believed to be defect-free, leading to high tensile strength despite their low density. Additionally, these fibers exhibit electrical conductivity as high as copper, thermal conductivity as high as diamond, strength 100 times higher than steel at one-sixth the weight, and high strain to failure. Thus it is believed that developments in the field of nanotechnology will lead to stronger and lighter composite materials for next generation spacecraft. Lack of a bulk method of production is the primary reason nanotubes are not used widely today. Toward this goal JSC nanotube team is exploring three distinct production techniques: laser ablation, arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition (CVD, in collaboration with Rice University). In laser ablation technique high-power laser impinges on the piece of carbon containing small amount of catalyst, and nanotubes self-assemble from the resulting carbon vapor. In arc generator similar vapor is created in arc discharge between carbon electrodes with catalyst. In CVD method nanotubes grow at much lower temperature on small catalyst particles from carbon-containing feedstock gas (methane or carbon monoxide). As of now, laser ablation produces cleanest material, but mass yield is rather small. Arc discharge produces grams of material, but purity is low. CVD technique is still in baby steps, but preliminary results look promising, as well as perspective of scaling the process

  12. Effect of electrode gap on the sensing properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes based gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2016-11-01

    Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were grown on Si substrate coated with alumina and iron using chemical vapor deposition. Electrode gap of 10, 25 and 50 µm were adopted to determine the effect of varying gap spacing on the sensing properties such as voltage breakdown, sensitivity and selectivity for three gases namely argon, carbon dioxide and ammonia. Argon has the lowest voltage breakdown for every electrode gap. The fabricated MWCNT based gas sensor drastically reduced the voltage breakdown by 89.5% when the electrode spacing is reduced from 50 µm to 10 µm. The reduction is attributed to the high non-uniform electric field between the electrodes caused by the protrusion of nanotips. The sensor shows good sensitivity and selectivity with the ability to detect the gas in the mixture with air provided that the concentration is ≥ 20% where the voltage breakdown will be close to the pure gas.

  13. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes: A Platform for Studying Nanofluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D; Bakajin, O

    2004-05-25

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Nitrogen flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate of 0.086 cc/sec. Calculations of water flow across a nanotube membrane give a rate of 2.1x10{sup -6} cc/sec (0.12 {micro}L/min).

  14. Carbon nanotube-based aptasensors for the rapid and ultrasensitive detection of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Blondeau, Pascal; Rius, F Xavier; Riu, Jordi

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present a new generation of potentiometric biosensors based on carbon nanotubes (transducer layer of the biosensor) and aptamers (sensing layer of the biosensor) for the ultralow and selective detection of microorganisms. We show that with these aptasensors we were able to detect a few CFU of the target bacteria almost in real-time, both in buffered and in real samples.

  15. Variational principles for transversely vibrating multiwalled carbon nanotubes based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model.

    PubMed

    Adali, Sarp

    2009-05-01

    Variational principles are derived for multiwalled carbon nanotubes undergoing vibrations. Derivations are based on the continuum modeling with the Euler-Bernoulli beam representing the nanotubes and small scale effects taken into account via the nonlocal elastic theory. Hamilton's principle for multiwalled nanotubes is given and Rayleigh's quotient for the frequencies is derived for nanotubes undergoing free vibrations. Natural and geometric boundary conditions are derived which lead to a set of coupled boundary conditions due to nonlocal effects.

  16. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Damage Detection and Self Healing in Structural Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-29

    system has been used to detect damage accumulation in composite laminates in situ under quasi-static uniaxial and cyclic loading conditions. Large... coating on the surface of two E-glass fibers is shown in Fig. 5. Fig. 5. (a) Carbon nanotube agglomerates on the surface of glass fibers in the...unidirectional E-glass composites in which the center ply of the laminate was cut in the middle of the specimen to promote ply delamination during tensile

  17. Potentiometric online detection of aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous phase using carbon nanotube-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Washe, Alemayehu P; Macho, Santiago; Crespo, Gastón A; Rius, F Xavier

    2010-10-01

    Surfaces made of entangled networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display a strong adsorption affinity for aromatic hydrocarbons. Adsorption of these compounds onto the walls of SWCNTs changes the electrical characteristics of the SWCNT-solution interface. Using these features, we have developed a potentiometric sensor to detect neutral aromatic species. Specifically, we can detect online aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial coolant water. Our chromatographic results confirm the adsorption of toluene onto the walls of carbon nanotubes, and our impedance spectroscopy data show the change in the double layer capacitance of the carbon nanotube-solution interface upon addition of toluene, thus confirming the proposed sensing mechanism. The sensor showed a toluene concentration dependent EMF response that follows the shape of an adsorption isotherm and displayed an immediate response to the presence of toluene with a detection limit of 2.1 ppm. The sensor does not respond to other nonaromatic hydrocarbons that may coexist with aromatic hydrocarbons in water. It shows a qualitative sensitivity and selectivity of 100% and 83%, respectively, which confirms its ability to detect aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous solutions. The sensor showed an excellent ability to immediately detect the presence of toluene in actual coolant water. Its operational characteristics, including its fast response, low cost, portability, and easy use in online industrial applications, improve those of current chromatographic or spectroscopic techniques.

  18. Carbon nanotube-based coatings to induce flow enhancement in hydrophilic nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemann, Enrique; Walther, J. H.; Zambrano, Harvey A.

    2016-11-01

    With the emergence of the field of nanofluidics, the transport of water in hydrophilic nanopores has attracted intensive research due to its many promising applications. Experiments and simulations have found that flow resistance in hydrophilic nanochannels is much higher than those in macrochannels. Indeed, this might be attributed to significant fluid adsorption on the channel walls and to the effect of the increased surface to volume ratio inherent to the nanoconfinement. Therefore, it is desirable to explore strategies for drag reduction in nanopores. Recently, studies have found that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) feature ultrafast water flow rates which result in flow enhancements of 1 to 5 orders of magnitude compared to Hagen-Poiseuille predictions. In the present study, CNT-based coatings are considered to induce water flow enhancement in silica nanopores with different radius. We conduct atomistic simulations of pressurized water flow inside tubular silica nanopores with and without inner coaxial carbon nanotubes. In particular, we compute water density and velocity profiles, flow enhancement and slip lengths to understand the drag reduction capabilities of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes implemented as coating material in silica nanopores. We wish to thank partial funding from CRHIAM and FONDECYT project 11130559, computational support from DTU and NLHPC (Chile).

  19. Generalized Protein Attachment Chemistry for Highly Sensitive Carbon Nanotube-Based Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Mitchell; Pazina, Tatiana; Robinson, Matthew; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2012-02-01

    We developed a label free covalent functionalization procedure for attaching proteins to carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs). Biomarker proteins are becoming increasingly useful for early diagnosis of disease, ranging from cancer to arthritis to stress. Current clinical immunoassays for measuring patient protein levels are costly and require significant processing time. Using diazonium salts followed by stabilization of carboxylic acid groups, we can attach a variety of proteins to carbon nanotubes as confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Proteins maintain the integrity of their epitope and bind to their corresponding complementary proteins. Carbon nanotube transistors are superior readout elements for such protein binding events due to their speed and comparable scale. Resulting changes in the electronic transport properties of CNTFETs demonstrate a concentration-dependent response. Binding of osteopontin (OPN), a biomarker for prostate cancer, to its complementary single chain variable fragment (scFv) can be detected down to 1 pg/mL with these methods. Moreover, these devices exhibit selectivity for OPN. Such high sensitivity biosensors could be used in parallel to test a single small volume patient sample for any number of potentially ominous biomarker proteins.

  20. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  1. Hysteresis contributions to the apparent gate pulse refreshing of carbon nanotube based sensors.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Matthew H; Dorsey, Andrew M; Salaets, Natalie M

    2009-08-26

    We have fabricated back-gated carbon nanotube (CNT) field effect transistors (FET) and used them to sense NH(3) (ammonia) gas. After observing the long time required for the sensor to recover after being exposed to NH(3), we attempted to accelerate the sensor recovery by pulsing the gate electrode for a period of time at an appropriate bias. We have found that most, if not all, of the apparent sensor refreshing due to the gate pulse is actually a measurement artifact resulting from device hysteresis.

  2. Structural Damping and Health Monitoring Enhancement via Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube-Based Composites Tailoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-23

    Chaining of Carbon Nanofibers in Liquid Epoxy,” J. Physics D: Applied Physics, 43:175402 (2010), 10 p. http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0022- 3727 /43/17...NUMBER W911NF-07-1-0395 611102 Form Approved OMB NO. 0704-0188 51004-EG.1 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S...CNT composites (Figure 10 ). Relative to the randomly oriented non-covalently functionalized MWCNT material, the transverse DC resistivity of

  3. Synthesis and optical properties of ZnO and carbon nanotube based coaxial heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. S.; Lee, S.-M.; Scholz, R.; Knez, M.; Gösele, U.; Fallert, J.; Kalt, H.; Zacharias, M.

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes and ZnO based functional coaxial heterostructured nanotubes have been fabricated by using atomic layer deposition. An irregular structured shell composed of ZnO nanocrystals was deposited on pristine nanotubes, while a highly defined ZnO shell was deposited on the tubes after its functionalization with Al2O3. Photoluminescence measurements of the ZnO shell on Al2O3/nanotube show a broad green band emission, whereas the shell grown on the bare nanotube shows a band shifted to the orange spectral range.

  4. Carbon nanotube-based multi electrode arrays for neuronal interfacing: progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bareket-Keren, Lilach; Hanein, Yael

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings have been demonstrated over the past several years as a promising material for neuronal interfacing applications. In particular, in the realm of neuronal implants, CNTs have major advantages owing to their unique mechanical and electrical properties. Here we review recent investigations utilizing CNTs in neuro-interfacing applications. Cell adhesion, neuronal engineering and multi electrode recordings with CNTs are described. We also highlight prospective advances in this field, in particular, progress toward flexible, bio-compatible CNT-based technology. PMID:23316141

  5. On-line carbon nanotube-based biosensors in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, YeoHeung; Dong, Zhongyun; Shanov, Vesselin N.; Bange, Adam; Heineman, William R.; Halsall, H. Brian; Conforti, Laura; Bhattacharya, Amit; Schulz, Mark J.

    2007-04-01

    Highly aligned double wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNT) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were synthesized in the shape of towers and embedded into microchannels for use as a biosensor. The towers were fabricated on a substrate patterned in 1mm x 1mm blocks with 1 mm spacing between the blocks. Chemical vapor deposition was used for the nanotube synthesis process. Patterned towers up to 8 mm high were grown and easily peeled off the silicon substrate. A nanotube electrode was then soldered on printed circuit boards and epoxy was cast into the tower under pressure. After curing, the top of the tower was polished. RF-plasma at 13.56 MHz was used to enhance the electrocatalytic effect of the nanotube electrode by removing excess epoxy and exposing the ends of the nanotubes. Au particles were electrodeposited on the plasma treated tower electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) for the reduction of 6 mM K 3Fe(CN)6 (in a 1.0 M KNO3 supporting electrolyte) was performed to examine the redox behavior of the nanotube tower electrode. Next, a master mold for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was patterned using SU-8 and then a Pt disk electrode was embedded into the PDMS. The final fluidic channel between the epoxy-nanotube electrode and PDMS was sealed using a UV-curing adhesive. Impedance between the Pt and nanotube electrodes was monitored while flowing different solutions and LNCaP prostate cells. The impedance changed in proportion to the concentration of cells in the solution. A needle-type composite microelectrode was then fabricated by injecting a carbon nanotube-epoxy solution into a pulled-glass tube. CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) to detect dopamine were showed a highly linear response with a sensitivity 100 nA/mM. Based on the impedance results using the flowing cells and the CV and DPV results, carbon nanotube microelectrodes are a promising candidate for cancer cell detection and neurotransmitter detection.

  6. Measurement of Contractile Activity in Small Animal's Digestive Organ by Carbon Nanotube-Based Force Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Takeda, Naoki; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Koike, Kanako; Shimatani, Yuichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Akiya, Masahiro; Taguchi, Akira

    2011-03-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT)-based force transducer designed to be embedded in the body of a live animal was fabricated and implanted into the stomach of a rat omit to measure contractile movement. The transducer comprised dispersed poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted multiwalled CNTs applied to a comb-like Au-electrode formed on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) sheet. The implanted rat was injected with acetylcholine to induce muscular contractions and changes in the resistance of the transducer were measured. Such changes arise owing to strain in the CNT network upon distortion. The measured resistance change was found to be proportional to the concentration of injected acetylcholine.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10706 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10706 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-12-576) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. Growth of half-meter long carbon nanotubes based on Schulz-Flory distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rufan; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Qiang; Xie, Huanhuan; Qian, Weizhong; Wei, Fei

    2013-07-23

    The Schulz-Flory distribution is a mathematical function that describes the relative ratios of polymers of different length after a polymerization process, based on their relative probabilities of occurrence. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are big carbon molecules which have a very high length-to-diameter ratio, somewhat similar to polymer molecules. Large amounts of ultralong CNTs have not been obtained although they are highly desired. Here, we report that the Schulz-Flory distribution can be applied to describe the relative ratios of CNTs of different lengths produced with a floating chemical vapor deposition process, based on catalyst activity/deactivation probability. With the optimized processing parameters, we successfully synthesized 550-mm-long CNTs, for which the catalyst deactivation probability of a single growth step was ultralow. Our finding bridges the Schulz-Flory distribution and the synthesis of one-dimensional nanomaterials for the first time, and sheds new light on the rational design of process toward controlled production of nanotubes/nanowires.

  12. Tubular micro-scale multiwalled carbon nanotube-based scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sharon L; Church, Jeffrey S; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2009-03-01

    In this study we have prepared a tubular knitted scaffold from a 9 ply multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) yarn and a composite scaffold, formed by electrospinning poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibres onto the knitted scaffold. Both structures were assessed for in vitro biocompatibility with NR6 mouse fibroblast cells for up to 22 days and their suitability as tissue engineering scaffolds considered. The MWCNT yarn was found to support cell growth throughout the culture period, with fibroblasts attaching to, and proliferating on, the yarn surface. The knitted tubular scaffold contained large pores that inhibited cell spanning, leading to the formation of cell clusters on the yarn, and an uneven cell distribution on the scaffold surface. The smaller pores, created through electrospinning, were found to promote cell spanning, leading to a uniform distribution of cells on the composite scaffold surface. Evaluation of the electrical and mechanical properties of the knitted scaffold determined resistance levels of 0.9 kOmega/cm, with a breaking load and extension to break approaching 0.7N and 8%, respectively. The PLGA/MWCNT composite scaffold presented in this work not only supports cell growth, but also has the potential to utilize the full range of electrical and mechanical properties that carbon nanotubes have to offer.

  13. Design and reinforcement: vertically aligned carbon nanotube-based sandwich composites.

    PubMed

    Zeng, You; Ci, Lijie; Carey, Brent J; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2010-11-23

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforcement of polymer composites has not yielded optimum results in that the composite properties are typically compromised by poor dispersion and random orientation of CNTs in polymers. Given the short lengths available for nanotubes, opportunities lie in incorporating CNTs with other structural reinforcements such as carbon fibers (CFs) to achieve improvement over existing composite designs. Growth of vertically aligned CNTs (VACNTs) offers new avenues for designing high-performance composites by integrating CFs and nanotubes into layered 3D architectures. To obtain composites with high rigidity and damping, we have designed and fabricated VACNT-based sandwich composites from simply stacking the freestanding VACNTs and CF fabrics and infiltrating with epoxy matrix. Comparing with the CF/epoxy laminates, the VACNT-based sandwich composites exhibit higher flexural rigidity and damping, which is achieved due to the effective integration of the VACNTs as an interfacial layer between the CF stacks. Furthermore, the lighter weight of these VACNT-based sandwich composites offers advantages in aerospace and transportation applications.

  14. Functionalized carbon nanotubes based filters for chromium removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Elsehly, Emad M; Chechenin, N G; Makunin, A V; Motaweh, H A; Leksina, E G

    2017-04-01

    This investigation examines the filtration efficiency of chromium from aqueous solution using two types of commercial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) (Taunit-M (TM) and Taunit-MD (TMD)). These MWCNTs were modified using two complementary treatments, purification (using a mixture of hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide) and functionalization (using nitric acid). The effect of these treatments on the morphology of MWCNT Taunit filters was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to estimate the outer diameter distribution and element content deposited on filters. Effects of different parameters, i.e., carbon nanotube filter mass, concentration of chromium in aqueous solution, and pH of aqueous solution, on removal of this heavy metal were determined. From these investigations, the removal efficiency of chromium could reach 97% for modified TM and 70% for modified TMD at concentration of 10 ppm, suggesting that modified TM is an excellent adsorbent for chromium removal from aqueous solutions and more efficient than modified TMD. A significant increase in chromium removal by modified TM at pH = 2 has been observed compared with higher pH values. It was found that modified TM filters can be reused through many cycles of regeneration with high performance. Modified TM filters may be a promising candidate for heavy metal ion removal from industrial wastewater.

  15. Carbon nanotube based betulin formulation shows better efficacy against Leishmania parasite.

    PubMed

    Saudagar, Prakash; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel antileishmanial formulation of betulin (BET) attached to functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs). We conjugated betulin, a pentacyclic triterpenoid secondary metabolite, to carboxylic acid chains on f-CNTs to obtain BET attached functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNT-Bet). The drug release profile demonstrated a fairly slow release of BET. The in-vitro cytotoxicities of BET, f-CNT and f-CNT-BET on J774A.1 macrophage cell line were 211.05±7.14μg/ml; 24.67±3.11μg/ml and 72.63±6.14μg/ml, respectively. The IC50 of BET and f-CNT-BET against intracellular Leishmania donovani amastigotes were 8.33±0.41μg/ml and 0.69±0.08μg/ml, respectively. The results demonstrate better antileishmanial efficiency of f-CNT-BET formulation than BET alone and with no significant cytotoxicity observed on host cells.

  16. Development of novel graphene and carbon nanotubes based multifunctional polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, S. N. Khan, M. O. Naguib, H. E.

    2014-05-15

    This paper investigates strategies to alter the nano-and-microstructures of carbon-based filler-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The matrix materials being studied in this work include polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) and liquid crystal polymer (LCP). A set of experiments were performed to investigate various strategies (i) to fabricate a morphological structure within the polymer matrix; (ii) to develop a thermally and electrically conductive network of nano-scaled fillers; and (iii) to produce a thermally conductive but electrically insulative network of hybrid fillers of nano-and-micro scales. The PMCs' structure-to-property relationships, including electrical and thermal properties, were revealed. In particular, the composites' effective thermal conductivities could be increased by as much as 10-folded over the neat polymers. By structuring the embedded electrically conductive pathways in the PMCs, their electrical conductivities could be tailored to levels that ranged from those of electrical insulators to those of semi-conductors. These multifunctional carbon-based filler-reinforced PMCs are envisioned to be potential solutions of various engineering problems. For example, light-weight thermally conductive PMCs with tailored electrical conductivities can serve as a new family of materials for electronic packaging or heat management applications.

  17. Development of novel graphene and carbon nanotubes based multifunctional polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, S. N.; Khan, M. O.; Naguib, H. E.

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates strategies to alter the nano-and-microstructures of carbon-based filler-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The matrix materials being studied in this work include polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) and liquid crystal polymer (LCP). A set of experiments were performed to investigate various strategies (i) to fabricate a morphological structure within the polymer matrix; (ii) to develop a thermally and electrically conductive network of nano-scaled fillers; and (iii) to produce a thermally conductive but electrically insulative network of hybrid fillers of nano-and-micro scales. The PMCs' structure-to-property relationships, including electrical and thermal properties, were revealed. In particular, the composites' effective thermal conductivities could be increased by as much as 10-folded over the neat polymers. By structuring the embedded electrically conductive pathways in the PMCs, their electrical conductivities could be tailored to levels that ranged from those of electrical insulators to those of semi-conductors. These multifunctional carbon-based filler-reinforced PMCs are envisioned to be potential solutions of various engineering problems. For example, light-weight thermally conductive PMCs with tailored electrical conductivities can serve as a new family of materials for electronic packaging or heat management applications.

  18. Determination of calcium ion in sap using carbon nanotube-based ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Rafael; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2010-08-01

    A new reduced-size solid-state electrode using carbon nanotubes as the transducing layer has been developed for the direct determination of Ca(2+) in sap, overcoming problems encountered by commercial ISEs analysing real complex samples. We show that this solid-contact ISE, which can be easily miniaturized, can be used directly in diluted real samples without any other pretreatment. The performance parameters of the new ISE include a Nernstian slope and excellent stability, good coefficients of selectivity, range of linearity (10(-5) to 10(-2.5) M) and limit of detection (10(-6.2) M), thus making it an excellent tool for determining Ca(2+) in a wide range of plant species.

  19. Tailoring properties of carbon-nanotube-based foams by ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Shin, S. J.; Worsley, M. A.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2012-09-01

    Particle irradiation is an effective method for manipulating properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This potential, however, remains unexplored for macroscopic assemblies of cross-linked CNTs. Here, we study structural and electrical properties of ultralow-density cross-linked CNT-based nanofoams exposed to ion irradiation at room temperature over a wide range of ion masses and fluences. For all irradiation conditions studied, the electrical resistance of nanofoams initially increases with a rate that scales with the number of ballistically generated displacements. This process is attributed to the buildup of defects in graphitic nanoligaments. Irradiation with Ne and heavier ions leads to a decrease in the electrical resistance at large fluences, which is attributed to radiation-induced foam densification. In addition, heavy-ion bombardment causes amorphization of CNTs and smoothing of ligament surfaces. These results demonstrate that ion bombardment can be used for tailoring density, ligament morphology, and electrical properties of CNT-based foams.

  20. Intrinsic memory function of carbon nanotube-based ferroelectric field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Xu, Zhi; Bai, Xuedong; Gu, Changzhi; Wang, Enge

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the intrinsic memory function of ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) based on an integration of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and epitaxial ferroelectric films. In contrast to the previously reported "charge-storage" CNT-FET memories, whose operations are haunted by a lack of control over the "charge traps", the present CNT-FeFETs exhibit a well-defined memory hysteresis loop induced by the reversible remnant polarization of the ferroelectric films. Large memory windows approximately 4 V, data retention time up to 1 week, and ultralow power consumption (energy per bit) of femto-joule, are highlighted in this report. Further simulations and experimental results show that the memory device is valid under operation voltage less than 1 V due to an electric-field enhancement effect induced by the ultrathin SWCNTs.

  1. Characteristics of carbon nanotubes based micro-bubble generator for thermal jet printing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenli; Li, Yupeng; Sun, Weijun; Wang, Yunbo; Zhu, Chao

    2011-12-01

    We propose a conceptional thermal printhead with dual microbubble generators mounted parallel in each nozzle chamber, where multiwalled carbon nanotubes are adopted as heating elements with much higher energy efficiency than traditional approaches using noble metals or polysilicon. Tailing effect of droplet can be excluded by appropriate control of grouped bubble generations. Characteristics of the corresponding micro-fabricated microbubble generators were comprehensively studied before the formation of printhead. Electrical properties of the microheaters on glass substrate in air and performance of bubble generation underwater focusing on the relationships between input power, device resistance and bubble behavior were probed. Proof-of-concept bubble generations grouped to eliminate the tailing effect of droplet were performed indicating precise pattern with high resolution could be realized by this kind of printhead. Experimental results revealed guidance to the geometric design of the printhead as well as its fabrication margin and the electrical control of the microbubble generators.

  2. Rotating-Electric-Field-Induced Carbon-Nanotube-Based Nanomotor in Water: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mushfiqur; Chowdhury, Mokter Mahmud; Alam, Md Kawsar

    2017-03-29

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is shown that a carbon nanotube (CNT) suspended in water and subjected to a rotating electric field of proper magnitude and angular speed can be rotated with the aid of water dipole orientations. Based on this principle, a rotational nanomotor structure is designed and the system is simulated in water. Use of the fast responsiveness of electric-field-induced CNT orientation in water is employed and its operation at ultrahigh-speed (over 10(11) r.p.m.) is shown. To explain the basic mechanism, the behavior of the rotational actuation, originated from the water dipole orientation, is also analyzed . The proposed nanomotor is capable of rotating an attached load (such as CNT) at a precise angle as well as nanogear-based complex structures. The findings suggest potential way of using the electric-field-induced CNT rotation in a polarizable fluids as a novel tool to operate nanodevices and systems.

  3. Carbon nanotube based X-ray sources: Applications in pre-clinical and medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh Z.; Burk, Laurel; Wang, Ko-Han; Cao, Guohua; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-08-01

    Field emission offers an alternate method of electron production for Bremsstrahlung based X-ray tubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as very effective field emitters, allowing them to serve as electron sources for X-ray sources, with specific advantages over traditional thermionic tubes. CNT derived X-ray sources can create X-ray pulses of any duration and frequency, gate the X-ray pulse to any source and allow the placement of many sources in close proximity.We have constructed a number of micro-CT systems based on CNT X-ray sources for applications in small animal imaging, specifically focused on the imaging of the heart and lungs. This paper offers a review of the pre-clinical applications of the CNT based micro-CT that we have developed. We also discuss some of the current and potential clinical applications of the CNT X-ray sources.

  4. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor Technologies for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, S.; Fireman, H.; Huffman, C.; Maloney, P.; Nikolaev, P.; Yowell, L.; Kim, K.; Kohl, P. A.; Higgins, C. D.; Turano, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or supercapacitors, have tremendous potential as high-power energy sources for use in low-weight hybrid systems for space exploration. Electrodes based on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer exceptional power and energy performance due to the high surface area, high conductivity, and the ability to functionalize the SWCNTs to optimize capacitor properties. This paper will report on the preparation of electrochemical capacitors incorporating SWCNT electrodes and their performance compared with existing commercial technology. Preliminary results indicate that substantial increases in power and energy density are possible. The effects of nanotube growth and processing methods on electrochemical capacitor performance is also presented. The compatibility of different SWCNTs and electrolytes was studied by varying the type of electrolyte ions that accumulate on the high-surface-area electrodes.

  5. Fabrication of single-walled carbon-nanotube-based pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Stampfer, C; Helbling, T; Obergfell, D; Schöberle, B; Tripp, M K; Jungen, A; Roth, S; Bright, V M; Hierold, C

    2006-02-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of bulk micromachined pressure sensors based on individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the active electromechanical transducer elements. The electromechanical sensor device consists of an individual electrically connected SWNT adsorbed on top of a 100-nm-thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) circular alumina (Al(2)O(3)) membrane with a radius in the range of 50-100 microm. A white light interferometer (WLI) was used to measure the deflection of the membrane due to differential pressure, and the mechanical properties of the device were characterized by bulge testing. Finally, we performed the first electromechanical measurements on strained metallic SWNTs adhering to a membrane and found a piezoresistive gauge factor of approximately 210 for metallic SWNTs.

  6. Nanomanipulation and Lithography for Carbon Nanotube Based Nondestructive Evaluation Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Smits, Jan; Namkung, Min; Ingram, JoAnne; Watkins, Neal; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Louie, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer great potential for advanced sensor development due to the unique electronic transport properties of the material. However, a significant obstacle to the realization of practical CNT devices is the formation of reliable and reproducible CNT to metallic contacts. In this work, scanning probe techniques are explored for both fabrication of metallic junctions and positioning of singlewalled CNTs across these junctions. The use of a haptic force feedback interface to a scanning probe microscope is used to enable movement of nanotubes over micron length scales with nanometer precision. In this case, imaging of the surface is performed with light or intermittent contact to the surface. Increased tip-to-sample interaction forces are then applied to either create junctions or position CNTs. The effect of functionalization of substrate surfaces on the movement and tribology of the materials is also studied. The application of these techniques to the fabrication of CNT-based sensors for nondestructive evaluation applications is discussed.

  7. Effect of parametric variation on the performance of single wall carbon nanotube based field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Mubashshir; Khan, Ayub; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-11-01

    The effects of dielectric constant and gate insulator thickness on the performance of single wall carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been analyzed using a mathematical model based on FETToy simulator. Both the parameters are found to have significant effect on the device performance, particularly the on-current; while the on-current (ION) increases on scaling down the gate oxide thickness, the level of leakage current (IOFF) is not considerably affected. This is an advantage of CNTFET over conventional MOSFETs where the thickness of thin oxide layer causes drastic increase in gate leakage current. Our analysis results show that thinner gate oxide and larger CNT improve the performance of CNTFETs. Therefore, the performance of our simulated CNTFETs using this model has clear lead over those of conventional MOSFETs.

  8. Label-Free Electrical Detection Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Label-free detections of biomolecules have attracted great attention in a lot of life science fields such as genomics, clinical diagnosis and practical pharmacy. In this article, we reviewed amperometric and potentiometric biosensors based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In amperometric detections, CNT-modified electrodes were used as working electrodes to significantly enhance electroactive surface area. In contrast, the potentiometric biosensors were based on aptamer-modified CNT field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). Since aptamers are artificial oligonucleotides and thus are smaller than the Debye length, proteins can be detected with high sensitivity. In this review, we discussed on the technology, characteristics and developments for commercialization in label-free CNT-based biosensors. PMID:22346703

  9. Electrophoretically deposited multiwalled carbon nanotube based amperometric genosensor for E.coli detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Hema; Solanki, Shipra; Sumana, Gajjala

    2016-04-01

    This work reports on a sensitive and selective genosensor fabrication method for Escherichia coli (E.coli) detection. The functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) synthesized via chemical vapour deposition have been deposited electrophoretically onto indium tin oxide coated glass surface and have been utilized as matrices for the covalent immobilization of E.coli specific probe oligonucleotide that was identified from the 16s rRNA coding region of the E.coli genome. This fabricated functionalized MWCNT based platform sought to provide improved fundamental characteristics to electrode interface in terms of electro-active surface area and diffusion coefficient. Electrochemical cyclic voltammetry revealed that this genosensor exhibits a linear response to complementary DNA in the concentration range of 10-7 to 10-12 M with a detection limit of 1×10-12 M.

  10. Effect of nitrogen doping on the electromagnetic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanygin, M. A.; Sedelnikova, O. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Plyushch, A. O.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Lapko, K. N.; Sokol, A. A.; Ivashkevich, O. A.; Lambin, Ph.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen-doped and pure carbon nanotube (CNT) based composites were fabricated for investigating their dielectric properties in static regime as well as electromagnetic response properties in microwave frequency range (Ka-band). Two classes of host matrix—polystyrene and phosphate unfired ceramics—have been used for composites fabrication. The study reveals miscellaneous effect of nitrogen doping on the dielectric permittivity, dc conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency of CNT-based composites, produced with both polymer and ceramic matrices. The high-frequency polarizability, estimated for different-length CNTs, and static polarizability, calculated for nitrogen-containing CNT models using a quantum-chemical approach, show that this effect results from a decrease of the nanotube defect-free-length and deterioration of the polarizability with incorporation of nitrogen in pyridinic form.

  11. Fast, Ultrasensitive Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species Using a Carbon Nanotube Based-Electrocatalytic Intracellular Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a highly sensitive electrocatalytic sensor-cell construct that can electrochemically communicate with the internal environment of immune cells (e.g., macrophages) via the selective monitoring of a particular reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide. The sensor, which is based on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with an osmium electrocatalyst, enabled the unprecedented detection of a local intracellular “pulse” of ROS on a short second time scale in response to bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide-LPS) stimulation. Our studies have shown that this initial pulse of ROS is dependent on NADPH oxidase (NOX) and toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The results suggest that bacteria can induce a rapid intracellular pulse of ROS in macrophages that initiates the classical innate immune response of these cells to infection. PMID:26438964

  12. Electrical and mechanical characterisation of single wall carbon nanotubes based composites for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Whulanza, Yudan; Battini, Elena; Vannozzi, Lorenzo; Vomero, Maria; Ahluwalia, Arti; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the realisation of conductive matrices for application to tissue engineering research. We used poly(L-lactide (PLLA)), poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) as polymer matrix, because they are biocompatible and biodegradable. The conductive property was integrated to them by adding single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the polymer matrix. Several SWNTs concentrations were introduced aiming to understand how they influence and modulate mechanical properties, impedance features and electric percolation threshold of polymer matrix. It was observed that a concentration of 0.3% was able to transform insulating matrix into conductive one. Furthermore, a conductive model of the SWNT/polymer was developed by applying power law of percolation threshold.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotube-based composites and their applications for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadh, Tawfik Abdo Saleh

    This dissertation describes the synthesis of carbon nanotube/ metal oxides composites including alumina, iron oxide, manganese oxide, tungsten oxide and zinc oxide using sol gel methods and thermal process. The conditions of the reactions were proper optimized. The methods have the additional advantage of reducing cost by minimizing time, amount of reagent consumed, man power required, and simple equipments used, and improved the ability to control the process. Different techniques, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) conducted for the characterization of the synthesized materials. The properties and activities of the synthesized materials have been tested for removal or degradation of various pollutants, such as lead, arsenic, chromium, cyanide

  14. Detection of airborne carbon nanotubes based on the reactivity of the embedded catalyst.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, N; Kasper, G

    2015-01-01

    A previously described method for detecting catalyst particles in workplace air((1,2)) was applied to airborne carbon nanotubes (CNT). It infers the CNT concentration indirectly from the catalytic activity of metallic nanoparticles embedded as part of the CNT production process. Essentially, one samples airborne CNT onto a filter enclosed in a tiny chemical reactor and then initiates a gas-phase catalytic reaction on the sample. The change in concentration of one of the reactants is then determined by an IR sensor as measure of activity. The method requires a one-point calibration with a CNT sample of known mass. The suitability of the method was tested with nickel containing (25 or 38% by weight), well-characterized multi-walled CNT aerosols generated freshly in the lab for each experiment. Two chemical reactions were investigated, of which the oxidation of CO to CO2 at 470°C was found to be more effective, because nearly 100% of the nickel was exposed at that temperature by burning off the carbon, giving a linear relationship between CO conversion and nickel mass. Based on the investigated aerosols, a lower detection limit of 1 μg of sampled nickel was estimated. This translates into sampling times ranging from minutes to about one working day, depending on airborne CNT concentration and catalyst content, as well as sampling flow rate. The time for the subsequent chemical analysis is on the order of minutes, regardless of the time required to accumulate the sample and can be done on site.

  15. V-type nerve agent detection using a carbon nanotube-based amperometric enzyme electrode.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kanchan A; Prouza, Marek; Kum, Maxwell; Wang, Joseph; Tang, Jason; Haddon, Robert; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    An enzyme electrode for the detection of V-type nerve agents, VX (O-ethyl-S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothioate) and R-VX (O-isobutyl-S-2-diethylaminoethyl methylphosphonothioate), is proposed. The principle of the new biosensor is based on the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of the nerve agents and amperometric detection of the thiol-containing hydrolysis products at carbon nanotube-modified screen-printed electrodes. Demeton-S was used as a nerve agent mimic. 2-(Diethylamino)ethanethiol (DEAET) and 2-(dimethylamino)ethanethiol (DMAET), the thiol-containing hydrolysis product and hydrolysis product mimic of R-VX and VX, respectively, were monitored by exploiting the electrocatalytic activity of carbon nanotubes (CNT). As low as 2 microM DMAET and 0.8 microM DEAET were detected selectively at a low applied potential of 0.5 V vs Ag/AgCl at a CNT-modified mediator-free amperometric electrode. Further, the large surface area and the hydrophobicity of CNT was used to immobilize organophosphorus hydrolase mutant with improved catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of the P-S bond of phosphothiolester neurotoxins including VX and R-VX nerve gases to develop a novel, mediator-free, membrane-free biosensor for V-type nerve agents. The applicability of the biosensor was demonstrated for direct, rapid, and selective detection of V-type nerve agents' mimic demeton-S. The selectivity of the sensor against interferences and application to spiked lake water samples was demonstrated.

  16. Creation of carbon nanotube based bioSensors through dielectrophoretic assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Nilan S.; Kim, Steve; Annam, Kaushik; Bane, Danielle; Subramanyam, Guru

    2015-08-01

    Due to their excellent electrical, optical, and mechanical properties, nanosized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have attracted significant attention as a transducing element in nano-bio sensor research. Controlled assembly, device fabrication, and bio-functionalization of the SWNTs are crucial in creating the sensors. In this study, working biosensor platforms were created using dielectrophoretic assembly of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a bridge between two gold electrodes. SWNTs in a commercial SDS surfactant solution were dispensed in the gap between the two gold electrodes, followed by applying an ac voltage across the two electrodes. The dielectrophoresis aligns the CNTs and forms a bridge between the two electrodes. A copious washing and a subsequent annealing of the devices at 200 °C remove the surfactants and create an excellent semiconducting (p-type) bridge between the two electrodes. A liquid gated field effect transistor (LGFET) was built using DI water as the gate dielectric and the SWNT bridge as the channel. Negative gate voltages of the FET increased the drain current and applying a positive gate voltage of +0.5V depleted the channel of charges and turned the device off. The biosensor was verified using both the two terminal and three terminal devices. Genomic salmon DNA dissolved in DI water was applied on the SWNT bridge in both type of devices. In the two terminal device, the conductance of the bridge dropped by 65x after the binding of the DNA. In the LGFET, the transconductance of the device decreased 2X after the binding of the DNA. The binding of the DNA also suppressed hysteresis in the Drain Current vs Gate Voltage characteristics of the LGFET.

  17. Continuous Carbon Nanotube-Based Fibers and Films for Applications Requiring Enhanced Heat Dissipation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Mikhalchan, Anastasiia; Tran, Thang Q; Jewell, Daniel; Duong, Hai M; Marconnet, Amy M

    2016-07-13

    The production of continuous carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers and films has paved the way to leverage the superior properties of individual carbon nanotubes for novel macroscale applications such as electronic cables and multifunctional composites. In this manuscript, we synthesize fibers and films from CNT aerogels that are continuously grown by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) and measure thermal conductivity and natural convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber and film. To probe the mechanisms of heat transfer, we develop a new, robust, steady-state thermal characterization technique that enables measurement of the intrinsic fiber thermal conductivity and the convective heat transfer coefficient from the fiber to the surrounding air. The thermal conductivity of the as-prepared fiber ranges from 4.7 ± 0.3 to 28.0 ± 2.4 W m(-1) K(-1) and depends on fiber volume fraction and diameter. A simple nitric acid treatment increases the thermal conductivity by as much as a factor of ∼3 for the fibers and ∼6.7 for the thin films. These acid-treated CNT materials demonstrate specific thermal conductivities significantly higher than common metals with the same absolute thermal conductivity, which means they are comparatively lightweight, thermally conductive fibers and films. Beyond thermal conductivity, the acid treatment enhances electrical conductivity by a factor of ∼2.3. Further, the measured convective heat transfer coefficients range from 25 to 200 W m(-2) K(-1) for all fibers, which is higher than expected for macroscale materials and demonstrates the impact of the nanoscale CNT features on convective heat losses from the fibers. The measured thermal and electrical performance demonstrates the promise for using these fibers and films in macroscale applications requiring effective heat dissipation.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Based Nanotechnology for NASA Mission Needs and Societal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) exhibit extraordinary mechanical properties and unique electronic properties and therefore, have received much attention for more than a decade now for a variety of applications ranging from nanoelectronics, composites to meeting needs in energy, environmental and other sectors. In this talk, we focus on some near term potential of CNT applications for both NASA and other Agency/societal needs. The most promising and successful application to date is a nano chem sensor at TRL 6 that uses a 16-256 sensor array in the construction of an electronic nose. Pristine, doped, functionalized and metal-loaded SWCNTs are used as conducting materials to provide chemical variation across the individual elements of the sensor array. This miniaturized sensor has been incorporated in an iPhone for homeland security applications. Gases and vapors relevant to leak detection in crew vehicles, biomedical, mining, chemical threats, industrial spills and others have been demonstrated. SWCNTs also respond to radiation exposure via a change in conductivity and therefore, a similar strategy is being pursued to construct a radiation nose to identify radiation sources (gamma, protons, neutrons, X-ray, etc.) with their energy levels. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown using plasma enhanced CVD typically are vertical, individual, freestanding structures and therefore, are ideal for construction of nanoelectrodes. A nanoelectrode array (NEA) can be the basis for an affinity-based biosensor to meet the needs in applications such as lab-on-a-chip, environmental monitoring, cancer diagnostics, biothreat monitoring, water and food safety and others. A couple of demonstrations including detection of e-coli and ricin will be discussed. The NEA is also useful for implantation in the brain for deep brain stimulation and neuroengineering applications. Miniaturization of payload such as science instrumentation and power sources is critical to reduce launch costs. High current density

  19. Development of functionalized multi-walled carbon-nanotube-based alginate hydrogels for enabling biomimetic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joddar, Binata; Garcia, Eduardo; Casas, Atzimba; Stewart, Calvin M.

    2016-08-01

    Alginate is a hydrogel commonly used for cell culture by ionically crosslinking in the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions. However these alginate gels are mechanically unstable, not permitting their use as scaffolds to engineer robust biological bone, breast, cardiac or tumor tissues. This issue can be addressed via encapsulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) serving as a reinforcing phase while being dispersed in a continuous phase of alginate. We hypothesized that adding functionalized MWCNT to alginate, would yield composite gels with distinctively different mechanical, physical and biological characteristics in comparison to alginate alone. Resultant MWCNT-alginate gels were porous, and showed significantly less degradation after 14 days compared to alginate alone. In vitro cell-studies showed enhanced HeLa cell adhesion and proliferation on the MWCNT-alginate compared to alginate. The extent of cell proliferation was greater when cultured atop 1 and 3 mg/ml MWCNT-alginate; although all MWCNT-alginates lead to enhanced cell cluster formation compared to alginate alone. Among all the MWCNT-alginates, the 1 mg/ml gels showed significantly greater stiffness compared to all other cases. These results provide an important basis for the development of the MWCNT-alginates as novel substrates for cell culture applications, cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  20. Understanding the emission current limiting step in the carbon nanotube based polymer composite cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, David; Connolly, Thomas; Smith, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based electronic applications often make use of the intrinsically high electrical conductivity of the nanotubes for charge transport. One attractive area for the exploitation of nanotubes is to combine their high electrical conductivity with their high aspect ratio leading to the development CNT based cathodes. In the presence of an electric field the field lines concentrate on the tip of nanotube and the resultant high local electric field (few V/nm) can result in electron tunneling (Fowler -- Nordheim tunneling) from the tip and emission. Embedding a nanotube in a polymer matrix opens up the possibility of a large area and a solution processable way to produce cathodes. We have studied the factors that control the rate limiting step for electron transport in functionalized CNTs in polyvinyl alcohol composites. We demonstrate excellent emission and current transport for nanotube volume fractions down to as low as 1 vol.% and that in the range from 1 vol.% to 7 vol.% the threshold field for emission does not significantly depend on nanotube content. Key to good emission is the ability to disperse the nanotubes efficiently.

  1. Design and evaluation of carbon nanotube based optical power limiting materials.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Salma; Mirza, Shamim; Sarkar, Abhijit; Rayfield, George W

    2010-08-01

    Optical power limiters (OPLs) are "smart materials" that follow passive approaches to provide laser protection. They have the potential for protecting optical sensors and possibly even human eyes from laser-pulse damage. Optical power limiting has been a subject of increasing interest for more than two decades now. The interest is due to the increasingly large number of applications based on lasers that are currently available. Several research groups have been attempting to develop novel OPL materials based on nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores. As a result, there are a large number of publications and patents on this subject. To date, however, there is not a single OPL material available which, taken individually, can provide ideal and smooth attenuation of an output beam. Therefore, the design and development of radically new types of materials for OPL is urgently required. During the last few years, materials containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have established themselves as some of the best-performing optical limiters; however, such materials are difficult to prepare and have issues with stability. In this review, the origin of OPL as well as the mechanisms of OPL are discussed. Ways to modify CNTs to make them suitable for OPL applications is also discussed.

  2. Fully Automated Field-Deployable Bioaerosol Monitoring System Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyup; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonbin; Shin, Su-Kyoung; Yi, Hana; Jang, Dae-Ho; Shin, Sehyun; Lee, Byung Yang

    2016-05-17

    Much progress has been made in the field of automated monitoring systems of airborne pathogens. However, they still lack the robustness and stability necessary for field deployment. Here, we demonstrate a bioaerosol automonitoring instrument (BAMI) specifically designed for the in situ capturing and continuous monitoring of airborne fungal particles. This was possible by developing highly sensitive and selective fungi sensors based on two-channel carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs), followed by integration with a bioaerosol sampler, a Peltier cooler for receptor lifetime enhancement, and a pumping assembly for fluidic control. These four main components collectively cooperated with each other to enable the real-time monitoring of fungi. The two-channel CNT-FETs can detect two different fungal species simultaneously. The Peltier cooler effectively lowers the working temperature of the sensor device, resulting in extended sensor lifetime and receptor stability. The system performance was verified in both laboratory conditions and real residential areas. The system response was in accordance with reported fungal species distribution in the environment. Our system is versatile enough that it can be easily modified for the monitoring of other airborne pathogens. We expect that our system will expedite the development of hand-held and portable systems for airborne bioaerosol monitoring.

  3. A heparin-functionalized carbon nanotube-based affinity biosensor for dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Daniel; Mulchandani, Ashok; Yates, Marylynn V

    2017-05-15

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted primarily by Aedes mosquitos and is major cause of disease in tropical and subtropical regions. Colloquially known as Dengue Fever, infection can cause hemorrhagic disorders and death in humans and non-human primates. We report a novel electronic biosensor based on a single-walled carbon nanotube network chemiresistive transducer that is functionalized with heparin for low-cost, label-free, ultra-sensitive, and rapid detection of whole dengue virus (DENV). Heparin, an analog of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans that are receptors for dengue virus during infection of Vero cells and hepatocytes, was used for the first time in a biosensor as a biorecognition element instead of traditional antibody. Detection of DENV in viral culture supernatant has similar sensitivity as the corresponding viral titer in phosphate buffer despite the presence of growth media and Vero cell lysate. The biosensor demonstrated sensitivity within the clinically relevant range for humans and infected Aedes aegypti. It has potential application in clinical diagnosis and can improve point-of-care diagnostics of dengue infection.

  4. Carbon nanotube-based nanocarriers: the importance of keeping it clean.

    PubMed

    Delogu, Lucia G; Stanford, Stephanie M; Santelli, Eugenio; Magrini, Andrea; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Rosato, Nicola; Mustelin, Tomas; Bottini, Nunzio; Bottini, Massimo

    2010-08-01

    Nanotechnology-introduced materials have promising applications as nanocarriers for drugs, peptides, proteins and nucleic acids. Several studies showed that the geometry (shape and size) and chemical properties of nanoparticles affect the kinetics and pathways of cellular uptake and their intracellular trafficking and signaling. Accurate physico-chemical characterization of nanoparticles customarily precedes their use in cell biology and in vivo experiments. However, a fact that is easily overlooked is that nanomaterials decorated with organic matter or resuspended in aqueous buffers can be theoretically contaminated by fungal and bacterial microorganisms. While investigating the effects of extensively characterized PEGylated carbon nanotubes (PNTs) on T lymphocyte activation, we demonstrated bacterial contamination of PNTs, which correlated with low reproducibility and artifacts in cell signaling assays. Contamination and artifacts were easily eliminated by preparing the materials in sterile conditions. We propose that simple sterile preparation procedures should be adopted and sterility evaluation of nanoparticles should be customarily performed, prior to assessing nanoparticle intracellular internalization, trafficking and their effects on cells and entire organisms.

  5. Carbon Nanotube-Based Digital Vacuum Electronics and Miniature Instrumentation for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, H.; Toda, R.; Lin, R. H.; Liao, A.; Mojarradi, M.

    2010-01-01

    JPL has developed high performance cold cathodes using arrays of carbon nanotube bundles that produce > 15 A/sq cm at applied fields of 5 to 8 V/micron without any beam focusing. They have exhibited robust operation in poor vacuums of 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -4) Torr- a typically achievable range inside hermetically sealed microcavities. Using these CNT cathodes JPL has developed miniature X-ray tubes capable of delivering sufficient photon flux at acceleration voltages of <20kV to perform definitive mineralogy on planetary surfaces; mass ionizers that offer two orders of magnitude power savings, and S/N ratio better by a factor of five over conventional ionizers. JPL has also developed a new class of programmable logic gates using CNT vacuum electronics potentially for Venus in situ missions and defense applications. These digital vacuum electronic devices are inherently high-temperature tolerant and radiation insensitive. Device design, fabrication and DC switching operation at temperatures up to 700 C are presented in this paper.

  6. Single carbon nanotube-based reversible regulation of biological motor activity.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuichi; Nagata, Mitsunori; Matsutaka, Hiroshi; Okada, Takeru; Sato, Masaaki K; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Because of their small size and high thermal conductivity, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are excellent candidates for exploring heat transfer at the level of individual molecules in biological research. With a view toward examining the thermal regulation of single biomolecules, we here developed single CNTs as a new platform for observing the motile activity of myosin motors. On multiwall CNTs (diameter ∼170 nm; length ∼10 μm) coated with skeletal-muscle myosin, the ATP-driven sliding of single actin filaments was clearly observable. The normal sliding speed was ∼6 μm/s. Locally irradiating one end of the CNT with a red laser (642 nm), without directly irradiating the active myosin motors, accelerated the sliding speed to ∼12 μm/s, indicating the reversible activation of protein function on a single CNT in real time. The temperature along the CNT, which was estimated from the temperature-dependence of the sliding speed, decreased with the distance from the irradiated spot. Using these results with the finite element method, we calculated a first estimation of the thermal conductivity of multiwall CNTs in solution, as 1540 ± 260 (Wm(-1) K(-1)), which is consistent with the value estimated from the width dependency of multiwall CNTs and the length dependency of single-wall CNTs in a vacuum or air. The temporal regulation of local temperature through individual CNTs should be broadly applicable to the selective activation of various biomolecules in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Characteristics of cesium ion sorption from aqueous solution on bentonite- and carbon nanotube-based composites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shubin; Han, Cho; Wang, Xiangke; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2014-06-15

    The technology development of Cs(+) capture from aqueous solution is crucial for the disposal of nuclear waste and still remains a significant challenge. Previous researches have been proven that ion exchanges with the cations and hydroxyl exchange are the main sorption mechanisms for Cs(+). Therefore, how important are the cation exchange and the hydroxyl exchange mechanisms to Cs(+) sorption? And whether can we improve the sorption capacity of the material by increasing the amount of hydroxyl groups? With these in mind, we herein designed the chitosan-grafted carbon nanotubes (CS-g-CNTs) and the chitosan-grafted bentonite (CS-g-bentonite) by plasma-induced grafting method. The interactions of Cs(+) with CNTs, bentonite, CS-g-CNTs and CS-g-bentonite composites were investigated. The sorption of Cs(+) is mainly dominated by strong cation exchange in monovalent Group I and divalent Group II. And the cation-exchange mechanism is much more effective than the hydroxyl group exchange. The effect of hydroxyl groups is dependent on the property of the matrix. We cannot improve the Cs adsorption capacity of material for Cs(+) only by increasing the amount of hydroxyl groups in any case. The spatial structure and the cation-exchange capacity of the material are important factors for choosing the sorbent for Cs(+) removal from radioactive waste water.

  8. A carbon nanotube based resettable sensor for measuring free chlorine in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Leo H. H.; Hoque, Enamul; Kruse, Peter; Ravi Selvaganapathy, P.

    2015-02-09

    Free chlorine from dissolved chlorine gas is widely used as a disinfectant for drinking water. The residual chlorine concentration has to be continuously monitored and accurately controlled in a certain range around 0.5–2 mg/l to ensure drinking water safety and quality. However, simple, reliable, and reagent free monitoring devices are currently not available. Here, we present a free chlorine sensor that uses oxidation of a phenyl-capped aniline tetramer (PCAT) to dope single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and to change their resistance. The oxidation of PCAT by chlorine switches the PCAT-SWCNT system into a low resistance (p-doped) state which can be detected by probing it with a small voltage. The change in resistance is found to be proportional to the log-scale concentration of the free chlorine in the sample. The p-doping of the PCAT-SWCNT film then can be electrochemically reversed by polarizing it cathodically. This sensor not only shows good sensing response in the whole concentration range of free chlorine in drinking water but is also able to be electrochemically reset back many times without the use of any reagents. This simple sensor is ideally suited for measuring free chlorine in drinking water continuously.

  9. Highly ordered carbon nanotubes based on porous aluminum oxide: fabrication and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pan, H; Gao, H; Lim, S H; Feng, Y P; Lin, J

    2005-02-01

    Highly ordered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are wildly pursued due to their unique properties. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) exhibits great possibility for this purpose. Here, CNTs based on AAO template were produced using acetylene or ethylene as the hydrocarbon sources with or without the presence of Co catalysts. CNTs grown on the Co-embedded AAO samples were normally confined within the nanopores of the AAO template. It was found that C2H4 normally requires 100 degrees C higher pyrolysis temperature than C2H2 under otherwise identical conditions. The pyrolysis temperature is greatly reduced with the presence of Co catalysts. CNTs can grow out of the nanopores, if Co particles are present at the bottom of the nanopores and if the nanopores are short in length or large in diameter. The graphitization of AAO template grown CNTs was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The CNTs produced from ethylene are generally better in graphitization than those from acetylene, and the CNTs grown with the presence of Co catalysts deposited at the bottom of nanopores are better than those without Co catalysts or with Co catalysts coated on the entire inner wall of nanopores. The growth temperature is found not to play a critical role in graphitization.

  10. Predicting adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbon nanotubes based on quantitative structure property relationship principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Akhoondi, Reza; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Ahmadi, Farhad

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) models were developed to predict the adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Five descriptors chosen by combining self-organizing map and stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques were used to connect the structure of the studied chemicals with their adsorption descriptor (K∞) using linear and nonlinear modeling techniques. Correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.99 and root-mean square error (RMSE) of 0.29 for multilayered perceptron neural network (MLP-NN) model are signs of the superiority of the developed nonlinear model over MLR model with R2 of 0.93 and RMSE of 0.36. The results of cross-validation test showed the reliability of MLP-NN to predict the K∞ values for the aromatic contaminants. Molar volume and hydrogen bond accepting ability were found to be the factors much influencing the adsorption of the compounds. The developed QSPR, as a neural network based model, could be used to predict the adsorption of organic compounds by CNTs.

  11. Ag nanocrystal as a promoter for carbon nanotube-based room-temperature gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shumao; Pu, Haihui; Mattson, Eric C; Lu, Ganhua; Mao, Shun; Weinert, Michael; Hirschmugl, Carol J; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija; Chen, Junhong

    2012-09-28

    We have investigated the room-temperature sensing enhancement of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) for multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-based gas sensors using electrical measurements, in situ infrared (IR) microspectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Multiple hybrid nanosensors with structures of MWCNTs/SnO(2)/Ag and MWCNTs/Ag have been synthesized using a process that combines a simple mini-arc plasma with electrostatic force directed assembly, and characterized by electron microscopy techniques. Ag NPs were found to enhance the sensing behavior through the "electronic sensitization" mechanism. In contrast to sensors based on bare MWCNTs and MWCNTs/SnO(2), sensors with Ag NPs show not only higher sensitivity and faster response to NO(2) but also significantly enhanced sensitivity to NH(3). Our DFT calculations indicate that the increased sensitivity to NO(2) is attributed to the formation of a NO(3) complex with oxygen on the Ag surface accompanying a charge rearrangement and a net electron transfer from the hybrid to NO(2). The significant response to NH(3) is predicted to arise because NH(3) is attracted to hollow sites on the oxidized Ag surface with the H atoms pointing towards Ag atoms and electron donation from H to the hybrid sensor.

  12. Aligned carbon nanotube based ultrasonic microtransducers for durability monitoring in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebental, B.; Chainais, P.; Chenevier, P.; Chevalier, N.; Delevoye, E.; Fabbri, J.-M.; Nicoletti, S.; Renaux, P.; Ghis, A.

    2011-09-01

    Structural health monitoring of porous materials such as concrete is becoming a major component in our resource-limited economy, as it conditions durable exploitation of existing facilities. Durability in porous materials depends on nanoscale features which need to be monitored in situ with nanometric resolution. To address this problem, we put forward an approach based on the development of a new nanosensor, namely a capacitive micrometric ultrasonic transducer whose vibrating membrane is made of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Such sensors are meant to be embedded in large numbers within a porous material in order to provide information on its durability by monitoring in situ neighboring individual micropores. In the present paper, we report on the feasibility of the key building block of the proposed sensor: we have fabricated well-aligned, ultra-thin, dense SWNT membranes that show above-nanometer amplitudes of vibration over a large range of frequencies spanning from 100 kHz to 5 MHz.

  13. Sustaining GHz oscillation of carbon nanotube based oscillators via a MHz frequency excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Zhe Liu, Jefferson

    2016-05-01

    There have been intensive studies to investigate the properties of gigahertz nano-oscillators based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Many of these studies, however, revealed that the unique telescopic translational oscillations in such devices would damp quickly due to various energy dissipation mechanisms. This challenge remains the primary obstacle against its practical applications. Herein, we propose a design concept in which a GHz oscillation could be re-excited by a MHz mechanical motion. This design involves a triple-walled CNT, in which sliding of the longer inner tube at a MHz frequency can re-excite and sustain a GHz oscillation of the shorter middle tube. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations prove this design concept at ˜10 nm scale. A mathematical model is developed to explore the feasibility at a larger size scale. As an example, in an oscillatory system with the CNT’s length above 100 nm, the high oscillatory frequency range of 1.8-3.3 GHz could be excited by moving the inner tube at a much lower frequency of 53.4 MHz. This design concept together with the mechanical model could energize the development of GHz nano-oscillators in miniaturized electro-mechanical devices.

  14. Electromechanical interactions in a carbon nanotube based thin film field emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N; Roy Mahapatra, D; Sun, Y; Yeow, J T W; Melnik, R V N; Jaffray, D A

    2008-01-16

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as promising candidates for biomedical x-ray devices and other applications of field emission. CNTs grown/deposited in a thin film are used as cathodes for field emission. In spite of the good performance of such cathodes, the procedure to estimate the device current is not straightforward and the required insight towards design optimization is not well developed. In this paper, we report an analysis aided by a computational model and experiments by which the process of evolution and self-assembly (reorientation) of CNTs is characterized and the device current is estimated. The modeling approach involves two steps: (i) a phenomenological description of the degradation and fragmentation of CNTs and (ii) a mechanics based modeling of electromechanical interaction among CNTs during field emission. A computational scheme is developed by which the states of CNTs are updated in a time incremental manner. Finally, the device current is obtained by using the Fowler-Nordheim equation for field emission and by integrating the current density over computational cells. A detailed analysis of the results reveals the deflected shapes of the CNTs in an ensemble and the extent to which the initial state of geometry and orientation angles affect the device current. Experimental results confirm these effects.

  15. Development of functionalized multi-walled carbon-nanotube-based alginate hydrogels for enabling biomimetic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Joddar, Binata; Garcia, Eduardo; Casas, Atzimba; Stewart, Calvin M.

    2016-01-01

    Alginate is a hydrogel commonly used for cell culture by ionically crosslinking in the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions. However these alginate gels are mechanically unstable, not permitting their use as scaffolds to engineer robust biological bone, breast, cardiac or tumor tissues. This issue can be addressed via encapsulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) serving as a reinforcing phase while being dispersed in a continuous phase of alginate. We hypothesized that adding functionalized MWCNT to alginate, would yield composite gels with distinctively different mechanical, physical and biological characteristics in comparison to alginate alone. Resultant MWCNT-alginate gels were porous, and showed significantly less degradation after 14 days compared to alginate alone. In vitro cell-studies showed enhanced HeLa cell adhesion and proliferation on the MWCNT-alginate compared to alginate. The extent of cell proliferation was greater when cultured atop 1 and 3 mg/ml MWCNT-alginate; although all MWCNT-alginates lead to enhanced cell cluster formation compared to alginate alone. Among all the MWCNT-alginates, the 1 mg/ml gels showed significantly greater stiffness compared to all other cases. These results provide an important basis for the development of the MWCNT-alginates as novel substrates for cell culture applications, cell therapy and tissue engineering. PMID:27578567

  16. Scratch-resistant, highly conductive, and high-strength carbon nanotube-based composite yarns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Sun, Yinghui; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Ruifeng; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2010-10-26

    High-strength and conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns are very attractive in many potential applications. However, there is a difficulty when simultaneously enhancing the strength and conductivity of CNT yarns. Adding some polymers into CNT yarns to enhance their strength will decrease their conductivity, while treating them in acid or coating them with metal nanoparticles to enhance their conductivity will reduce their strength. To overcome this difficulty, here we report a method to make high-strength and highly conductive CNT-based composite yarns by using a continuous superaligned CNT (SACNT) yarn as a conductive framework and then inserting polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) into the intertube spaces of the framework through PVA/dimethyl sulphoxide solution to enhance the strength of yarns. The as-produced CNT/PVA composite yarns possess very high tensile strengths up to 2.0 GPa and Young's moduli more than 120 GPa, much higher than those of the CNT/PVA yarns reported. The electric conductivity of as-produced composite yarns is as high as 9.2 × 10(4) S/m, comparable to HNO(3)-treated or Au nanoparticle-coated CNT yarns. These composite yarns are flexible, lightweight, scratch-resistant, very stable in the lab environment, and resistant to extremely humid ambient and as a result can be woven into high-strength and heatable fabrics, showing potential applications in flexible heaters, bullet-proof vests, radiation protection suits, and spacesuits.

  17. A carbon nanotube based resettable sensor for measuring free chlorine in drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Leo H. H.; Hoque, Enamul; Kruse, Peter; Ravi Selvaganapathy, P.

    2015-02-01

    Free chlorine from dissolved chlorine gas is widely used as a disinfectant for drinking water. The residual chlorine concentration has to be continuously monitored and accurately controlled in a certain range around 0.5-2 mg/l to ensure drinking water safety and quality. However, simple, reliable, and reagent free monitoring devices are currently not available. Here, we present a free chlorine sensor that uses oxidation of a phenyl-capped aniline tetramer (PCAT) to dope single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and to change their resistance. The oxidation of PCAT by chlorine switches the PCAT-SWCNT system into a low resistance (p-doped) state which can be detected by probing it with a small voltage. The change in resistance is found to be proportional to the log-scale concentration of the free chlorine in the sample. The p-doping of the PCAT-SWCNT film then can be electrochemically reversed by polarizing it cathodically. This sensor not only shows good sensing response in the whole concentration range of free chlorine in drinking water but is also able to be electrochemically reset back many times without the use of any reagents. This simple sensor is ideally suited for measuring free chlorine in drinking water continuously.

  18. Processing strategies for smart electroconductive carbon nanotube-based bioceramic bone grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, D.; Oliveira, F. J.; Ferreira, N. M.; Araújo, R. F.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Lopes, M. A.; Gomes, P. S.; Fernandes, M. H.; Silva, R. F.

    2014-04-01

    Electroconductive bone grafts have been designed to control bone regeneration. Contrary to polymeric matrices, the translation of the carbon nanotube (CNT) electroconductivity into oxide ceramics is challenging due to the CNT oxidation during sintering. Sintering strategies involving reactive-bed pressureless sintering (RB + P) and hot-pressing (HP) were optimized towards prevention of CNT oxidation in glass/hydroxyapatite (HA) matrices. Both showed CNT retentions up to 80%, even at 1300 °C, yielding an increase of the electroconductivity in ten orders of magnitude relative to the matrix. The RB + P CNT compacts showed higher electroconductivity by ˜170% than the HP ones due to the lower damage to CNTs of the former route. Even so, highly reproducible conductivities with statistical variation below 5% and dense compacts up to 96% were only obtained by HP. The hot-pressed CNT compacts possessed no acute toxicity in a human osteoblastic cell line. A normal cellular adhesion and a marked orientation of the cell growth were observed over the CNT composites, with a proliferation/differentiation relationship favouring osteoblastic functional activity. These sintering strategies offer new insights into the sintering of electroconductive CNT containing bioactive ceramics with unlimited geometries for electrotherapy of the bone tissue.

  19. Quantitative Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leendert G J; de With, Gijsbertus

    2016-08-03

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is a valuable technique for correlating the electrical properties of a material with its topographic features and for identifying and characterizing conductive pathways in polymer composites. However, aspects such as compatibility between tip material and sample, contact force and area between the tip and the sample, tip degradation and environmental conditions render quantifying the results quite challenging. This study aims at finding the suitable conditions for C-AFM to generate reliable, reproducible, and quantitative current maps that can be used to calculate the resistance in each point of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network, nonimpregnated as well as impregnated with a polymer. The results obtained emphasize the technique's limitation at the macroscale as the resistance of these highly conductive samples cannot be distinguished from the tip-sample contact resistance. Quantitative C-AFM measurements on thin composite sections of 150-350 nm enable the separation of sample and tip-sample contact resistance, but also indicate that these sections are not representative for the overall SWCNT network. Nevertheless, the technique was successfully used to characterize the local electrical properties of the composite material, such as sample homogeneity and resistance range of individual SWCNT clusters, at the nano- and microscale.

  20. Bioinspired Multifunctional Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Carbon-Nanotube-Based Conducting Pastes by Facile and Scalable Printing.

    PubMed

    Han, Joong Tark; Kim, Byung Kuk; Woo, Jong Seok; Jang, Jeong In; Cho, Joon Young; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2017-03-01

    Directly printed superhydrophobic surfaces containing conducting nanomaterials can be used for a wide range of applications in terms of nonwetting, anisotropic wetting, and electrical conductivity. Here, we demonstrated that direct-printable and flexible superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated on flexible substrates via with an ultrafacile and scalable screen printing with carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conducting pastes. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) copolymer was used as an additive for conducting pastes to realize the printability of the conducting paste as well as the hydrophobicity of the printed surface. The screen-printed conducting surfaces showed a high water contact angle (WCA) (>150°) and low contact angle hysteresis (WCA < 5°) at 25 wt % PDMS-PEG copolymer in the paste, and they have an electrical conductivity of over 1000 S m(-1). Patterned superhydrophobic surfaces also showed sticky superhydrophobic characteristics and were used to transport water droplets. Moreover, fabricated films on metal meshes were used for an oil/water separation filter, and liquid evaporation behavior was investigated on the superhydrophobic and conductive thin-film heaters by applying direct current voltage to the film.

  1. Sensing human physiological response using wearable carbon nanotube-based fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long; Loh, Kenneth J.; Koo, Helen S.

    2016-04-01

    Flexible and wearable sensors for human monitoring have received increased attention. Besides detecting motion and physical activity, measuring human vital signals (e.g., respiration rate and body temperature) provide rich data for assessing subjects' physiological or psychological condition. Instead of using conventional, bulky, sensing transducers, the objective of this study was to design and test a wearable, fabric-like sensing system. In particular, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-latex thin films of different MWCNT concentrations were first fabricated using spray coating. Freestanding MWCNT-latex films were then sandwiched between two layers of flexible fabric using iron-on adhesive to form the wearable sensor. Second, to characterize its strain sensing properties, the fabric sensors were subjected to uniaxial and cyclic tensile load tests, and they exhibited relatively stable electromechanical responses. Finally, the wearable sensors were placed on a human subject for monitoring simple motions and for validating their practical strain sensing performance. Overall, the wearable fabric sensor design exhibited advances such as flexibility, ease of fabrication, light weight, low cost, noninvasiveness, and user comfort.

  2. Aligned carbon nanotube based ultrasonic microtransducers for durability monitoring in civil engineering.

    PubMed

    Lebental, B; Chainais, P; Chenevier, P; Chevalier, N; Delevoye, E; Fabbri, J-M; Nicoletti, S; Renaux, P; Ghis, A

    2011-09-30

    Structural health monitoring of porous materials such as concrete is becoming a major component in our resource-limited economy, as it conditions durable exploitation of existing facilities. Durability in porous materials depends on nanoscale features which need to be monitored in situ with nanometric resolution. To address this problem, we put forward an approach based on the development of a new nanosensor, namely a capacitive micrometric ultrasonic transducer whose vibrating membrane is made of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Such sensors are meant to be embedded in large numbers within a porous material in order to provide information on its durability by monitoring in situ neighboring individual micropores. In the present paper, we report on the feasibility of the key building block of the proposed sensor: we have fabricated well-aligned, ultra-thin, dense SWNT membranes that show above-nanometer amplitudes of vibration over a large range of frequencies spanning from 100 kHz to 5 MHz.

  3. Carbon nanotube-based polymer nanocomposites: Fractal network to hierarchical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha

    The dispersion of anisotropic nanoparticles such as single-walled carbon nanotubes in polymeric matrices promises the ability to develop advanced materials with controlled and tailored combinations of properties. However, dispersion of such nanotubes in a polymer matrix is an extremely challenging task due to strong attractive interactions between the nanotubes. The successful dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in poly(ethylene oxide) using an anionic surfactant (lithium dodecyl sulfate) as compatibilizer is reported here. The geometrical percolation threshold (pc, in vol %) of nanotubes, as revealed by melt-state rheological measurements, is found to be at ˜ 0.09 vol % loading, which corresponds to an effective tube anisotropy of ˜ 650. The system shows an even earlier development of the electrical percolation at 0.03 vol % SWNT loading as obtained by electrical conductivity measurements. In their quiescent state, the nanotubes show hierarchical fractal network (mass fractal dimension ˜ 2.3 +/- 0.2) made of aggregated flocs. Inside the floc, individual or small bundles of nanotubes overlap each other to form a dense mesh. The interfloc interactions provides the stress bearing capacity for these nano composites and are responsible for the unique modulus scaling of these systems (˜(p-pc)delta, 3.0 ≤ delta ≤ 4.5). The interaction is inversely related to the particle dispersion state, which influences the absolute values of the viscoelastic parameters. As a direct consequence of the self-similar fractal network, the linear flow properties display 'time-temperature-composition' superposition. This superposability can be extended for non-linear deformations when the non-linear properties are scaled by the local strain experienced by the elements of the network. More interestingly, under steady shear, these nanocomposites show network-independent behavior. The absolute stress value is a function of the nanotube loading, but the characteristic time

  4. Protein functionalized carbon nanotubes-based smart lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Azahar; Solanki, Pratima R; Srivastava, Saurabh; Singh, Samer; Agrawal, Ved V; John, Renu; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2015-03-18

    A label-free impedimetric lab on a chip (iLOC) is fabricated using protein (bovine serum albumin) and antiapolipoprotein B functionalized carbon nanotubes-nickel oxide (CNT-NiO) nanocomposite for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) detection. The antiapolipoprotein B (AAB) functionalized CNT-NiO microfluidic electrode is assembled with polydimethylsiloxane rectangular microchannels (cross section: 100 × 100 μm). Cytotoxicity of the synthesized CNTs, NiO nanoparticles, and CNT-NiO nanocomposite has been investigated in the presence of lung epithelial cancer A549 cell line using MTT assay. The CNT-NiO nanocomposite shows higher cell viability at a concentration of 6.5 μg/mL compared to those using individual CNTs. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the toxicity increases with increasing CNTs concentration. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have been used to quantify the functional groups present on the CNT-NiO electrode surface before and after proteins functionalization. The binding kinetic and electrochemical activities of CNT-NiO based iLOC have been conducted using chronocoulometry and impedance spectroscopic techniques. This iLOC shows excellent sensitivity of 5.37 kΩ (mg/dL)(-1) and a low detection limit of 0.63 mg/dL in a wide concentration range (5-120 mg/dL) of LDL. The binding kinetics of antigen-antibody interaction of LDL molecules reveal a high association rate constant (8.13 M(-1) s(-1)). Thus, this smart nanocomposite (CNT-NiO) based iLOC has improved stability and reproducibility and has implications toward in vivo diagnostics.

  5. Metal-filled carbon nanotube based optical nanoantennas: bubbling, reshaping, and in situ characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zheng; Tao, Xinyong; Cui, Xudong; Fan, Xudong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Dong, Lixin

    2012-08-01

    Controlled fabrication of metal nanospheres on nanotube tips for optical antennas is investigated experimentally. Resembling soap bubble blowing using a straw, the fabrication process is based on nanofluidic mass delivery at the attogram scale using metal-filled carbon nanotubes (m@CNTs). Two methods have been investigated including electron-beam-induced bubbling (EBIB) and electromigration-based bubbling (EMBB). EBIB involves the bombardment of an m@CNT with a high energy electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), with which the encapsulated metal is melted and flowed out from the nanotube, generating a metallic particle on a nanotube tip. In the case where the encapsulated materials inside the CNT have a higher melting point than what the beam energy can reach, EMBB is an optional process to apply. Experiments show that, under a low bias (2.0-2.5 V), nanoparticles can be formed on the nanotube tips. The final shape and crystallinity of the nanoparticles are determined by the cooling rate. Instant cooling occurs with a relatively large heat sink and causes the instant shaping of the solid deposit, which is typically similar to the shape of the molten state. With a smaller heat sink as a probe, it is possible to keep the deposit in a molten state. Instant cooling by separating the deposit from the probe can result in a perfect sphere. Surface and volume plasmons characterized with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) prove that resonance occurs between a pair of as-fabricated spheres on the tip structures. Such spheres on pillars can serve as nano-optical antennas and will enable devices such as scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probes, scanning anodes for field emitters, and single molecule detectors, which can find applications in bio-sensing, molecular detection, and high-resolution optical microscopy.

  6. Metal-filled carbon nanotube based optical nanoantennas: bubbling, reshaping, and in situ characterization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Tao, Xinyong; Cui, Xudong; Fan, Xudong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Dong, Lixin

    2012-09-21

    Controlled fabrication of metal nanospheres on nanotube tips for optical antennas is investigated experimentally. Resembling soap bubble blowing using a straw, the fabrication process is based on nanofluidic mass delivery at the attogram scale using metal-filled carbon nanotubes (m@CNTs). Two methods have been investigated including electron-beam-induced bubbling (EBIB) and electromigration-based bubbling (EMBB). EBIB involves the bombardment of an m@CNT with a high energy electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), with which the encapsulated metal is melted and flowed out from the nanotube, generating a metallic particle on a nanotube tip. In the case where the encapsulated materials inside the CNT have a higher melting point than what the beam energy can reach, EMBB is an optional process to apply. Experiments show that, under a low bias (2.0-2.5 V), nanoparticles can be formed on the nanotube tips. The final shape and crystallinity of the nanoparticles are determined by the cooling rate. Instant cooling occurs with a relatively large heat sink and causes the instant shaping of the solid deposit, which is typically similar to the shape of the molten state. With a smaller heat sink as a probe, it is possible to keep the deposit in a molten state. Instant cooling by separating the deposit from the probe can result in a perfect sphere. Surface and volume plasmons characterized with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) prove that resonance occurs between a pair of as-fabricated spheres on the tip structures. Such spheres on pillars can serve as nano-optical antennas and will enable devices such as scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probes, scanning anodes for field emitters, and single molecule detectors, which can find applications in bio-sensing, molecular detection, and high-resolution optical microscopy.

  7. Lightweight carbon nanotube-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Monica; Cole, Daniel P.; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Reddy, Arava L. M.; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Karna, Shashi P.; Bundy, Mark L.

    2012-06-01

    There is a strong need for small, lightweight energy storage devices that can satisfy the ever increasing power and energy demands of micro unmanned systems. Currently, most commercial and developmental micro unmanned systems utilize commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) lithium polymer batteries for their energy storage needs. While COTS lithium polymer batteries are the industry norm, the weight of these batteries can account for up to 60% of the overall system mass and the capacity of these batteries can limit mission durations to the order of only a few minutes. One method to increase vehicle endurance without adding mass or sacrificing payload capabilities is to incorporate multiple system functions into a single material or structure. For example, the body or chassis of a micro vehicle could be replaced with a multifunctional material that would serve as both the vehicle structure and the on-board energy storage device. In this paper we present recent progress towards the development of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems. Randomly oriented and vertically aligned CNT-polymer composite electrodes with varying degrees of flexibility are used as the primary building blocks for lightweight structural-supercapacitors. For the purpose of this study, the mechanical properties of the CNT-based electrodes and the charge-discharge behavior of the supercapacitor devices are examined. Because incorporating multifunctionality into a single component often degrades the properties or performance of individual structures, the performance and property tradeoffs of the CNT-based structural-energy storage devices will also be discussed.

  8. Covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures and methods for their separation

    DOEpatents

    Wang, YuHuang; Brozena, Alexandra H; Deng, Shunliu; Zhang, Yin

    2015-03-17

    The present invention is directed to carbon nanostructures, e.g., carbon nanotubes, methods of covalently functionalizing carbon nanostructures, and methods of separating and isolating covalently functionalized carbon. In some embodiments, carbon nanotubes are reacted with alkylating agents to provide water soluble covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes. In other embodiments, carbon nanotubes are reacted with a thermally-responsive agent and exposed to light in order to separate carbon nanotubes of a specific chirality from a mixture of carbon nanotubes.

  9. Development of a Carbon Nanotube-Based Micro-CT and its Applications in Preclinical Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel May

    Due to the dependence of researchers on mouse models for the study of human disease, diagnostic tools available in the clinic must be modified for use on these much smaller subjects. In addition to high spatial resolution, cardiac and lung imaging of mice presents extreme temporal challenges, and physiological gating methods must be developed in order to image these organs without motion blur. Commercially available micro-CT imaging devices are equipped with conventional thermionic x-ray sources and have a limited temporal response and are not ideal for in vivo small animal studies. Recent development of a field-emission x-ray source with carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode in our lab presented the opportunity to create a micro-CT device well-suited for in vivo lung and cardiac imaging of murine models for human disease. The goal of this thesis work was to present such a device, to develop and refine protocols which allow high resolution in vivo imaging of free-breathing mice, and to demonstrate the use of this new imaging tool for the study many different disease models. In Chapter 1, I provide background information about x-rays, CT imaging, and small animal micro-CT. In Chapter 2, CNT-based x-ray sources are explained, and details of a micro-focus x-ray tube specialized for micro-CT imaging are presented. In Chapter 3, the first and second generation CNT micro-CT devices are characterized, and successful respiratory- and cardiac-gated live animal imaging on normal, wild-type mice is achieved. In Chapter 4, respiratory-gated imaging of mouse disease models is demonstrated, limitations to the method are discussed, and a new contactless respiration sensor is presented which addresses many of these limitations. In Chapter 5, cardiac-gated imaging of disease models is demonstrated, including studies of aortic calcification, left ventricular hypertrophy, and myocardial infarction. In Chapter 6, several methods for image and system improvement are explored, and radiation

  10. Materials Integration and Doping of Carbon Nanotube-based Logic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Michael

    Over the last 20 years, extensive research into the structure and properties of single- walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has elucidated many of the exceptional qualities possessed by SWCNTs, including record-setting tensile strength, excellent chemical stability, distinctive optoelectronic features, and outstanding electronic transport characteristics. In order to exploit these remarkable qualities, many application-specific hurdles must be overcome before the material can be implemented in commercial products. For electronic applications, recent advances in sorting SWCNTs by electronic type have enabled significant progress towards SWCNT-based integrated circuits. Despite these advances, demonstrations of SWCNT-based devices with suitable characteristics for large-scale integrated circuits have been limited. The processing methodologies, materials integration, and mechanistic understanding of electronic properties developed in this dissertation have enabled unprecedented scales of SWCNT-based transistor fabrication and integrated circuit demonstrations. Innovative materials selection and processing methods are at the core of this work and these advances have led to transistors with the necessary transport properties required for modern circuit integration. First, extensive collaborations with other research groups allowed for the exploration of SWCNT thin-film transistors (TFTs) using a wide variety of materials and processing methods such as new dielectric materials, hybrid semiconductor materials systems, and solution-based printing of SWCNT TFTs. These materials were integrated into circuit demonstrations such as NOR and NAND logic gates, voltage-controlled ring oscillators, and D-flip-flops using both rigid and flexible substrates. This dissertation explores strategies for implementing complementary SWCNT-based circuits, which were developed by using local metal gate structures that achieve enhancement-mode p-type and n-type SWCNT TFTs with widely separated and

  11. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Tichelaar, F D; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M

    2015-02-13

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al2O3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm(2) to 2500 μm(2)) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism.

  12. ZnS nanocrystals decorated single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive label-free DNA sensor

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh; Das, Basanta K.; Srinives, Sira; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    We fabricated ZnS nanocrystals decorated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based chemiresistive sensor for DNA. Since the charge transfer in the hybrid nanostructures is considered to be responsible for many of their unique properties, the role of ZnS nanocrystals toward its performance in DNA sensor was delineated. It was found that the free carboxyl groups surrounding the ZnS nanocrystals allowed large loading of single strand DNA (ssDNA) probe that provided an ease of hybridization with target complementary c-ssDNA resulting in large electron transfer to SWNT. Thus it provided a significant improvement in sensitivity toward c-ssDNA as compared to bare SWNT based DNA sensor. PMID:21286239

  13. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-03-21

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  14. Structural colors: from plasmonic to carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Shi, Haofei; Wu, Yi-Kuei; Kaplan, Alex F; Ok, Jong G; Guo, L Jay

    2011-11-18

    In addition to colorant-based pigmentation, structure is a major contributor to a material's color. In nature, structural color is often caused by the interaction of light with dielectric structures whose dimensions are on the order of visible-light wavelengths. Different optical interactions including multilayer interference, light scattering, the photonic crystal effect, and combinations thereof give rise to selective transmission or reflection of particular light wavelengths, which leads to the generation of structural color. Recent developments in nanofabrication of plasmonic and carbon nanostructures have opened another efficient way to control light properties at the subwavelength scale, including visible-light wavelength selection, which can produce structural color. In this Concept, the most relevant and representative achievements demonstrated over the last several years are presented and analyzed. These plasmonic and carbon nanostructures are believed to offer great potential for high-resolution color displays and spectral filtering applications.

  15. A carbon nanotube-based high-sensitivity electrochemical immunosensor for rapid and portable detection of clenbuterol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Chen, Haode; Peng, Hongzhen; Song, Shiping; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin; Ding, Min; Li, Lanying; Ren, Shuzhen; Zou, Ziying; Fan, Chunhai

    2011-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes have shown their unique advantages of mechanical, chemical and electronic properties in bioanalysis. We herein report a new method to efficiently and reproducibly prepare multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)-protein sensing layers for electrochemical immunosensors. This method employs centrifugation to prepare a conjugate of MWNTs and goat anti mouse-immunoglobulin G (IgG) (secondary antibody). The conjugates were then deposited on screen-printed electrodes to form a nanostructured layer (MWNT-I layer). CLB monoclonal antibody was assembled through its binding to the secondary antibody. The MWNT-I layer-based electrodes were used for rapid and sensitive amperometric immunosensing detection of clenbuterol (CLB) in swine urine samples. Horseradish peroxidase-coupled CLB (CLB-HRP) competed with free CLB in the samples to bind the monoclonal antibody. It has shown significantly higher sensitivity and better reproducibility than the chemical conjugation method. This MWNT-based immunosensor is highly sensitive, leading to a limit of detection of 0.1 ng/mL within a rapid assay time of 16 min. Its sensitivity is at least 1 order of magnitude higher than that of a normal immunosensor (without MWNTs). The sensing device is portable with disposable screen-printed electrode, satisfactorily meeting the requirements for field detection of food security-related species.

  16. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Azam, M.A.; Jantan, N.H.; Dorah, N.; Seman, R.N.A.R.; Manaf, N.S.A.; Kudin, T.I.T.; Yahya, M.Z.A.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF{sub 6} non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1} at a scan rate of 1 mV s{sup −1}.

  17. Dynamic response of a carbon nanotube-based rotary nano device with different carbon-hydrogen bonding layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hang; Cai, Kun; Wan, Jing; Gao, Zhaoliang; Chen, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    In a nano rotational transmission system (RTS) which consists of a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as the motor and a coaxially arranged double walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) as a bearing, the interaction between the motor and the rotor in bearing, which has great effects on the response of the RTS, is determined by their adjacent edges. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the interaction is analyzed when the adjacent edges have different carbon-hydrogen (Csbnd H) bonding layouts. In the computational models, the rotor in bearing and the motor with a specific input rotational speed are made from the same armchair SWCNT. Simulation results demonstrate that a perfect rotational transmission could happen when the motor and rotor have the same Csbnd H bonding layout on their adjacent ends. If only half or less of the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends are bonded with hydrogen atoms, the strong attraction between the lower speed (100 GHz) motor and rotor leads to a synchronous rotational transmission. If only the motor or the rotor has Csbnd H bonds on their adjacent ends, no rotational transmission happens due to weak interaction between the bonded hydrogen atoms on one end with the sp1 bonded carbon atoms on the other end.

  18. Shape-Controlled Growth of Carbon Nanostructures: Yield and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao; Sun, Xiao; Yang, Nianjun; Xia, Junhai; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Xin

    2015-08-24

    Carbon nanostructures with precisely controlled shapes are difficult materials to synthesize. A facet-selective-catalytic process was thus proposed to synthesize polymer-linked carbon nanostructures with different shapes, covering straight carbon nanofiber, carbon nano Y-junction, carbon nano-hexapus, and carbon nano-octopus. A thermal chemical vapor deposition process was applied to grow these multi-branched carbon nanostructures at temperatures lower than 350 °C. Cu nanoparticles were utilized as the catalyst and acetylene as the reaction gas. The growth of those multi-branched nanostructures was realized through the selective growth of polymer-like sheets on certain indexed facets of Cu catalyst. The vapor-facet-solid (VFS) mechanism, a new growth mode, has been proposed to interpret such a growth in the steps of formation, diffusion, and coupling of carbon-containing oligomers, as well as their final precipitation to form nanostructures on the selective Cu facets.

  19. Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-01-27

    Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to material within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.

  20. Magneto Transport in Three Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Timir; Wang, Lei; Jaroszynski, Jan; Yin, Ming; Alameri, Dheyaa

    Electrical properties of self-assembled three dimensional nanostructures are interesting topic. Here we report temperature dependence of magneto transport in such carbon nanostructures with periodic spherical voids. Specimens with different void diameters in the temperature range from 200 mK to 20 K were studied. Above 2 K, magnetoresistance, MR = [R(B) - R(0)] / R(0), crosses over from quadratic to a linear dependence with the increase of magnetic field [Wang et al., APL 2015; DOI:10.1063/1.4926606]. We observe MR to be non-saturating even up to 18 Tesla. Furthermore, MR demonstrates universality because all experimental data can be collapsed on to a single curve, as a universal function of B/T. Below 2 K, magnetoresistance saturates with increasing field. Quantum Hall like steps are also observed in this low temperature regime. Remarkably, MR of our sample displays orientation independence, an attractive feature for technological applications.

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotube based pH sensors on a flexible parylene-C substrate.

    PubMed

    Yang, C F; Chen, C L; Busnaina, A; Dokmeci, M R

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) based pH sensor utilizing a low temperature Dielectrophoretic (DEP) assembly process on a flexible parylene-C substrate. Parylene-C, a light weight, flexible and inert material, is compatible with many microfabrication processes. Furthermore, utilizing parylene-C as a flexible substrate, one can readily create a suspended microplatform utilizing an O2 plasma etch process. Suspended nanobridges have larger exposed surface areas and may potentially have enhanced sensitivity for sensing applications. Fabricating these structures on a thin (10 microm) parylene-C substrate allows their utilization as flexible devices or in wearable sensor applications. We have successfully assembled suspended SWNT nanobridges across a spacing of 4 microm. The electrical characterization results from the assembled SWNTs yield ohmic behavior with a measured two-terminal resistance of approximately 17Komega. Furthermore, the conductometric measurements of the SWNT sensors have demonstrated that corresponding to an increase in pH value, the resistance of SWNTs has decreased due to the OH- group that attached on to the wall of the SWNTs and changed the electrical properties of the SWNTs. These novel suspended nanostructures can be used as potential candidates in nanosensor applications.

  2. Carbon nanotubes based transistors composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes mats as gas sensors: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondavalli, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    This contribution presents the main studies on the CNTFET based gas sensors obtained using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes mats (SWCNTs) as channel. Although these devices have allowed one to achieve sensors with an impressive sensitivity compared to existing technologies, the physical interpretation of the effect of interaction between the gas molecules and the CNTFETs has not yet been clarified. Concerning selectivity, we will deal with the main routes that have been proposed to overcome this problem: functionalization using polymers, electrodes metal diversification, metal decoration of SWCNT mats.

  3. Programmably Shaped Carbon Nanostructure from Shape-Conserving Carbonization of DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Sun, Wei; Ricardo, Karen B; Wang, Dong; Shen, Jie; Yin, Peng; Liu, Haitao

    2016-03-22

    DNA nanostructures are versatile templates for low cost, high resolution nanofabrication. However, due to the limited chemical stability of pure DNA structures, their applications in nanofabrication have long been limited to low temperature processes or solution phase reactions. Here, we demonstrate the use of DNA nanostructure as a template for high temperature, solid-state chemistries. We show that programmably shaped carbon nanostructures can be obtained by a shape-conserving carbonization of DNA nanostructures. The DNA nanostructures were first coated with a thin film of Al2O3 by atomic layer deposition (ALD), after which the DNA nanostructure was carbonized in low pressure H2 atmosphere at 800-1000 °C. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) data showed that carbon nanostructures were produced and the shape of the DNA nanostructure was preserved. Conductive AFM measurement shows that the carbon nanostructures are electrically conductive.

  4. Modification of anisotropic plasma diffusion via auxiliary electrons emitted by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Malferrari, L; Odorici, F; Veronese, G P; Rizzoli, R; Mascali, D; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Castro, G; Miracoli, R; Serafino, T

    2012-02-01

    The diffusion mechanism in magnetized plasmas is a largely debated issue. A short circuit model was proposed by Simon, assuming fluxes of lost particles along the axial (electrons) and radial (ions) directions which can be compensated, to preserve the quasi-neutrality, by currents flowing throughout the conducting plasma chamber walls. We hereby propose a new method to modify Simon's currents via electrons injected by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun. We found this improves the source performances, increasing the output current for several charge states. The method is especially sensitive to the pumping frequency. Output currents for given charge states, at different auxiliary electron currents, will be reported in the paper and the influence of the frequency tuning on the compensation mechanism will be discussed.

  5. High-resolution photocurrent mapping of carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Burghard, Marko; Mews, Alf

    2012-07-24

    The spatial resolution of photocurrent measurements on carbon nanostructures has reached 20 nm, as demonstrated by Hartschuh and co-workers for individual carbon nanotubes in this issue of ACS Nano. In this Perspective, we provide a brief overview of the applications of scanning photocurrent microscopy to various one- and two-dimensional nanostructures and highlight the importance of the optical antenna concept for future studies of the optoelectronic properties of hybrid nanostructures.

  6. Thermionic Converters Based on Nanostructured Carbon Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeck, Franz A. M.; Wang, Yunyu; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Thermionic energy converters are based on electron emission through thermal excitation and collection where the thermal energy is directly converted into electrical power. Conventional thermionic energy converters based on emission from planar metal emitters have been limited due to space charge. This paper presents a novel approach to thermionic energy conversion by focusing on nanostructured carbon materials, sulfur doped nanocrystalline diamond and carbon nanotube films as emitters. These materials exhibit intrinsic field enhancement which can be exploited in lowering the emission barrier, i.e. the effective work function. Moreover, emission from these materials is described in terms of emission sites as a result of a non-uniform spatial distribution of the field enhancement factor. This phenomenon can prove advantageous in a converter configuration to mitigate space charge effects by reducing the transit time of electrons in the gap due to an accelerated charge carrier transport.

  7. Multifunctional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Energy Storage Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiran; Wei, Huige; Lu, Yang; Wei, Suying; Wujcik, Evan K.; Guo, Zhanhu

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials.These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and electrical conductivity. This succinct review aims to report on the recent advances in energy storage applications involving these multifunctional carbon nanostructures. The advanced design and testing of multifunctional carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications—specifically, electrochemical capacitors, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells—are emphasized with comprehensive examples. PMID:28347034

  8. Supramolecular Complexation of Carbon Nanostructures by Crown Ethers.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luis; Illescas, Beatriz M; Martín, Nazario

    2017-04-07

    Since their discovery, crown ethers as well as the most recent carbon nanostructures, namely fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have received a lot of attention from the chemical community. Merging these singular chemical structures by noncovalent forces has provided a large number of unprecedented supramolecular assemblies with new geometric and electronic properties whose more representative examples are presented in this Synopsis organized according to the different nature of the carbon nanostructures.

  9. INTERSTELLAR ANALOGS FROM DEFECTIVE CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES ACCOUNT FOR INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Zhenquan; Abe, Hiroya; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Ohara, Satoshi; Chihara, Hiroki; Koike, Chiyoe; Kaneko, Kenji

    2010-11-15

    Because interstellar dust is closely related to the evolution of matter in the galactic environment and many other astrophysical phenomena, the laboratory synthesis of interstellar dust analogs has received significant attention over the past decade. To simulate the ultraviolet (UV) interstellar extinction feature at 217.5 nm originating from carbonaceous interstellar dust, many reports focused on the UV absorption properties of laboratory-synthesized interstellar dust analogs. However, no general relation has been established between UV interstellar extinction and artificial interstellar dust analogs. Here, we show that defective carbon nanostructures prepared by high-energy collisions exhibit a UV absorption feature at 220 nm which we suggest accounts for the UV interstellar extinction at 217.5 nm. The morphology of some carbon nanostructures is similar to that of nanocarbons discovered in the Allende meteorite. The similarity between the absorption feature of the defective carbon nanostructures and UV interstellar extinction indicates a strong correlation between the defective carbon nanostructures and interstellar dust.

  10. Supercritical carbon dioxide approach to nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xiang-Rong

    Supercritical fluid technology is a novel and emerging strategy to generate nanomaterials in small areas, within high-aspect-ratio structures, on complicated surfaces and poor wettable substrates with high uniformity, high homogeneity and minimum environmental problems. In this dissertation, several strategies were developed for thin film deposition and nanocomposite fabrication. In developing supercritical fluid immersion deposition (SFID), supercritical or near supercritical CO2 was used as a new solvent for immersion deposition, a galvanic displacement process traditionally carried out in aqueous HF solutions containing metal ions, to selectively develop Pd, Cu, Ag and other metal films on featured and non-featured Si substrates. Annealing of thin palladium films deposited by SFID can lead to the formation of palladium silicide in small features on Si substrates. Deposition of metal films on germanium substrates was also achieved through SFID. Through hydrogen reduction of metal-beta-diketone complexes in supercritical CO2, a rapid, convenient and environmentally benign approach has been developed to synthesize a variety of nanostructured materials: (1) Metal (Pd, Ni and Cu) nanowires and nanorods sheathed within multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) templates; (2) nanoparticles of palladium, rhodium and ruthenium decorated onto functionalized MWCNTs. These highly dispersed nanoparticles are expected to exhibit promising catalytic properties for a variety of chemical or electrochemical reactions; (3) Cu, Pd or Cu-Pd alloy nanocrystals deposited onto SiO2 nanowires (NWs), SiO2 microfibers, or SiC NWs. Different types of nanostructures were achieved, including nanocrystal-NW, spherical aggregation-NW, shell-NW composites and "mesoporous" metals supported by the framework of NWs.

  11. Continuous versus discrete for interacting carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Hill, James M.

    2007-04-01

    Intermolecular forces between two interacting nanostructures can be obtained by either summing over all the individual atomic interactions or by using a continuum or continuous approach, where the number of atoms situated at discrete locations is averaged over the surface of each molecule. This paper aims to undertake a limited comparison of the continuum approach, the discrete atom-atom formulation and a hybrid discrete-continuum formulation for a range of molecular interactions involving a carbon nanotube, including interactions with another carbon nanotube and the fullerenes C60, C70 and C80. In the hybrid approach only one of the interacting molecules is discretized and the other is considered to be continuous. The hybrid discrete-continuum formulation would enable non-regular shaped molecules to be described, particularly useful for drug delivery systems which employ carbon nanotubes as carriers. The present investigation is important to obtain a rough estimate of the anticipated percentage errors which may occur between the various approaches in any specific application. Although our investigation is by no means comprehensive, overall we show that typically the interaction energies for these three approaches differ on average by at most 10% and the forces by 5%, with the exception of the C80 fullerene. For the C80 fullerene, while the intermolecular forces and the suction energies are in reasonable overall agreement, the point-wise energies can be significantly different. This may in part be due to differences in modelling the geometry of the C80 fullerene, but also the suction energies involve integrals of the energy, and therefore any errors or discrepancies in the point-wise energy tend to be smoothed out to give reasonable overall agreement for the former quantities.

  12. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system: Cancer therapy: A review.

    PubMed

    Dineshkumar, B; Krishnakumar, K; Bhatt, A R; Paul, D; Cherian, J; John, A; Suresh, S

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are advanced nano-carrier for delivery of drugs especially anti-cancer drugs. In the field of CNT-based drug delivery system, both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used for targeting anticancer drugs in tissues and organs, where the high therapeutic effect is necessary. Benefits of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in drug delivery systems are; avoiding solvent usage and reducing the side effects. Therefore, the present review article described about achievement of SWCNTs and MWCNTs to deliver the anticancer drugs with different cancerous cell lines.

  13. Biotemplate synthesis of carbon nanostructures using bamboo as both the template and the carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xiaodan; Yang, Qian; Zheng, Yifan; Mo, Weimin; Hu, Jianguan; Huang, Wanzhen

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new method for the in situ growth of carbon nanostructures was demonstrated. • The bamboo was selected as both the green carbon source and the biotemplate. • Four distinct structural types of carbon nanostructure have been identified. • The corresponding growth mechanism of each carbon nanostructure was proposed. - Abstract: A series of carbon nanostructures were prepared via a biotemplate method by catalytic decomposition of bamboo impregnated with ferric nitrate. The natural nanoporous bamboo was used as both the green carbon source and the template for the in situ growth of carbon nanostructures. Scanning electron microscope, field emission transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope were used to characterize the product. Four distinct structural types of carbon nanostructures have been identified, namely nanofibers, hollow carbon nanospheres, herringbone and bamboo-shaped nanotubes. The effect of reaction temperature (from 600 to 900 °C) on the growth behavior of carbon nanostructures was investigated and the corresponding growth mechanism was proposed. At low temperature the production of nanofibers was favored, while higher temperature led to bamboo-shaped nanostructures.

  14. Effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes based on Timoshenko laminated beam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    Based on Timoshenko laminated beam models, this paper investigates the influence of initial stress on the vibration and transverse wave propagation in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under ultrahigh frequency (above 1 THz), in which the initial stress in the MWNTs can occur due to thermal or lattice mismatch between different materials. Considering van der Waals force interaction between two adjacent tubes and effects of rotary inertia and shear deformation, results show that the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes not only affects the number of transverse wave speeds and the magnitude of transverse wave speeds, but also terahertz critical frequencies at which the number of wave speeds changes. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the compressive stress, transverse wave speeds decrease and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes increases. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the tensile stress, transverse wave speeds increase and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes decreases. The investigation of the effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes may be used as a useful reference for the application and the design of nanoelectronic and nanodrive devices, nano-oscillators, and nanosensors, in which carbon nanotubes act as basic elements.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of carbon doped molybdenum oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wisitsoraat, A; Tuantranont, A; Patthanasettakul, V; Lomas, T

    2009-02-01

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOx) nanostructure has gained considerable attention because of its low-cost fabrication by low-temperature evaporation/condensation technique and its promising properties for applications in the field of catalysts and chemical sensors. However, MoOx has some inferior properties including very high electrical resistivity and instability at elevated temperature. These properties may be improved by means of foreign atom addition into its nanostructure. In this work, we develop a simple mean for doping of MoOx nanostructures by introduction of gas source dopant during evaporation. Carbon doped MoOx nanostructures have been synthesized by MoOx powder evaporation in Argon/Acetylene mixture with varying process parameters. Depending on growth conditions, various nanostructures including, nanorod, nanoplate, nanodots, can be formed with different dimensions and doping concentrations. Structural characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that the MoOx based nanostructures are highly crystalline and carbon dopant is successfully incorporated in the structure with controllable concentration. Electrical characterization shows that the electrical conductivity of molybdenum oxide nanostructures can be increased by several orders of magnitude with carbon incorporation.

  16. Single-walled carbon nanotube-based polymer monoliths for the enantioselective nano-liquid chromatographic separation of racemic pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Marwa; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Su, Dawei; Wang, Guoxiu; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2014-09-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were encapsulated into different polymer-based monolithic backbones. The polymer monoliths were prepared via the copolymerization of 20% monomers, glycidyl methacrylate, 20% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) or 16.4% monomers (16% butyl methacrylate, 0.4% sulfopropyl methacrylate), 23.6% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) along with 6% single-walled carbon nanotubes aqueous suspension. The effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the chiral separation of twelve classes of pharmaceutical racemates namely; α- and β-blockers, antiinflammatory drugs, antifungal drugs, dopamine antagonists, norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors, catecholamines, sedative hypnotics, diuretics, antihistaminics, anticancer drugs and antiarrhythmic drugs was investigated. The enantioselective separation was carried out under multimodal elution to explore the chiral recognition capabilities of single-walled carbon nanotubes using reversed phase, polar organic and normal phase chromatographic conditions using nano-liquid chromatography. Baseline separation was achieved for celiprolol, chlorpheniramine, etozoline, nomifensine and sulconazole under multimodal elution conditions. Satisfactory repeatability was achieved through run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch investigations. Our findings demonstrate that single-walled carbon nanotubes represent a promising stationary phase for the chiral separation and may open the field for a new class of chiral selectors.

  17. Investigating interfacial contact configuration and behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube-based nanodevice with atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jianlei; Zhang, Jianwei; He, Xiaoqiao; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Yang, Xinju; Xie, Hui; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), are considered to be the promising candidates for next-generation interconnects with excellent physical and chemical properties ranging from ultrahigh mechanical strength, to electrical properties, to thermal conductivity, to optical properties, etc. To further study the interfacial contact configurations of SWNT-based nanodevice with a 13.56-Å diameter, the corresponding simulations are carried out with the molecular dynamic method. The nanotube collapses dramatically into the surface with the complete collapse on the Au/Ag/graphite electrode surface and slight distortion on the Si/SiO2 substrate surface, respectively. The related dominant mechanism is studied and explained. Meanwhile, the interfacial contact configuration and behavior, depended on other factors, are also analyzed in this article.

  18. Surfactant-assisted direct electron transfer between multi-copper oxidases and carbon nanotube-based porous electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yudai; Yoshino, Syuhei; Miyake, Takeo; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko

    2014-07-14

    The effects of pre-treatment with surfactants on the electrocatalytic reaction of multi-copper oxidases were quantitatively evaluated using a well-structured carbon nanotube forest electrode. It was found that both the charge polarity of the head group and the aromatics in the tail part of the surfactants affect the efficiency of enzymatic electrocatalysis.

  19. New hetero silicon-carbon nanostructure formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Song, S P; Crimp, M A; Ayres, V M; Collard, C J; Holloway, J P; Brake, M L

    2004-09-01

    We report the formation of silicon and carbon hetero-nanostructures in an inductively coupled plasma system by a simultaneous growth/etching mechanism. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were grown during one, three and five hour depositions, while tapered silicon nanowires were progressively etched. The carbon and silicon nanostructures and the interfaces between them were studied by electron microscopies and micro Raman spectroscopies. The potential of this method for large-scale controlled production of nano heterostructures without the requirement of a common catalyst is explored.

  20. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    DOEpatents

    Korsah, Kofi [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  1. Optimization of Designs for Nanotube-based Scanning Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harik, V. M.; Gates, T. S.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Optimization of designs for nanotube-based scanning probes, which may be used for high-resolution characterization of nanostructured materials, is examined. Continuum models to analyze the nanotube deformations are proposed to help guide selection of the optimum probe. The limitations on the use of these models that must be accounted for before applying to any design problem are presented. These limitations stem from the underlying assumptions and the expected range of nanotube loading, end conditions, and geometry. Once the limitations are accounted for, the key model parameters along with the appropriate classification of nanotube structures may serve as a basis for the design optimization of nanotube-based probe tips.

  2. Design of Carbon Nanotube-Based Gas-Diffusion Cathode for O2 Reduction by Multicopper Oxidases (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-04

    incorporate metal (Pt, Pd, Ag ) or metal oxide ( MnO 2 , Co 2 O 3 ) catalysts that are supported on dispersed carbonaceous mate- rials (usually activated...potentials of + 550 mV (versus Ag /AgCl) and current densities approaching 0.5 mA cm 2 (at zero potential) in air-breathing mode. Laccase, Bilirubin...550 mV (versus Ag /AgCl) and current densities approaching 0.5 mA cm 2 (at zero potential) in air-breathing mode. 1. Introduction Carbon is a

  3. Permalloy and Co50Pd50 as ferromagnetic contacts for magnetoresistance measurements in carbon nanotube-based transport structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Caitlin; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on carbon nanotube (CNT) 2-terminal spin-valve devices are presented. Results from samples with both permalloy (Py) and CoPd contacts show repeatable MR switching. In performing gate-dependent MR measurements on the Py-contacted CNTs, two distinct transport regimes are identified, and their transport behavior is discussed with respect to optimizing MR. Results from the first CoPd-contacted CNTs indicate a stable magnetic response with a higher magnitude than that of a Py-contacted nanotube in the same transport regime.

  4. High-Performance Hybrid Bismuth-Carbon Nanotube Based Contrast Agent for X-ray CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Kumar, Ish; Cho, Stephen Y; Cheong, Benjamin Y; Pulikkathara, Merlyn X; Moghaddam, Sakineh E; Whitmire, Kenton H; Wilson, Lon J

    2017-02-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been used for a plethora of biomedical applications, including their use as delivery vehicles for drugs, imaging agents, proteins, DNA, and other materials. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new CNT-based contrast agent (CA) for X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The CA is a hybrid material derived from ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes (20-80 nm long, US-tubes) and Bi(III) oxo-salicylate clusters with four Bi(III) ions per cluster (Bi4C). The element bismuth was chosen over iodine, which is the conventional element used for CT CAs in the clinic today due to its high X-ray attenuation capability and its low toxicity, which makes bismuth a more-promising element for new CT CA design. The new CA contains 20% by weight bismuth with no detectable release of bismuth after a 48 h challenge by various biological media at 37 °C, demonstrating the presence of a strong interaction between the two components of the hybrid material. The performance of the new Bi4C@US-tubes solid material as a CT CA has been assessed using a clinical scanner and found to possess an X-ray attenuation ability of >2000 Hounsfield units (HU).

  5. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao; Li, Jun

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  6. A styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/carbon nanotube-based smart force sensor for automotive tire deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Min-Young; Kim, Ji-Sik; Lee, Ho-Geun; Choi, Seung-Bok; Kim, Gi-Woo

    2016-04-01

    This paper provides a preliminary study on the piezoresistive effect of a styrene-butadiene Rubber (SBR), one of the main ingredients of automotive tire, dispersed with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to explore its feasibility as a force sensor embedded in automotive tires. Typically, the application of CNTs has been successfully applied to the mechanical sensing technology such as a stress/strain and impact sensor. In this study, the potential of using the SBR/CNT as a force sensor for monitoring automotive tire deformation is evaluated for the first time. Experimental results show that the electrical resistance of the SBR/CNT composite changes in response to the sinusoidal loading, as well as static compressive load. These piezoresistive responses of the SBR/CNT composite will be used for sensing the tire deformation caused by the vehicle loading or cracks of tires.

  7. Dynamic analysis of fixed-free single-walled carbon nanotube-based bio-sensors because of various viruses.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Joshi, A Y; Sharma, S C; Harsha, S P

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the vibrations of the fixed-free single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with attached bacterium/virus on the tip have been investigated. To explore the suitability of the SWCNT as a bacterium/virus detector device, first the various types of virus have been taken for the study and then the resonant frequencies of fixed-free SWCNT with attachment of those viruses have been simulated. These resonant frequencies are compared with the published analytical data, and it is shown that the finite element method (FEM) simulation results are in good agreement with the analytical data. The results showed the sensitivity and suitability of the SWCNT having different length and different masses (attached at the tip SWCNT) to identify the bacterium or virus.

  8. Conducting polymer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Niazi, Asad; Biradar, Ashok M.; Rajesh E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu; Mulchandani, Ashok E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu

    2014-10-13

    We report the fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based ultrasensitive label-free chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac biomarker, myoglobin (Ag-cMb). Poly(pyrrole-co-pyrrolepropylic acid) with pendant carboxyl groups was electrochemically deposited on electrophoretically aligned SWNT channel, as a conducting linker, for biomolecular immobilization of highly specific cardiac myoglobin antibody. The device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, source-drain current-voltage (I-V), and charge-transfer characteristic studies. The device exhibited a linear response with a change in conductance in SWNT channel towards the target, Ag-cMb, over the concentration range of 1.0 to 1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a sensitivity of ∼118% per decade with high specificity.

  9. Realizing both high energy and high power densities by twisting three carbon-nanotube-based hybrid fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Zhao, Yang; Cheng, Xunliang; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Fang, Xin; Jiang, Yishu; Chen, Peining; Zhang, Zhitao; Wang, Yonggang; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-09-14

    Energy storage devices, such as lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors, are required for the modern electronics. However, the intrinsic characteristics of low power densities in batteries and low energy densities in supercapacitors have limited their applications. How to simultaneously realize high energy and power densities in one device remains a challenge. Herein a fiber-shaped hybrid energy-storage device (FESD) formed by twisting three carbon nanotube hybrid fibers demonstrates both high energy and power densities. For the FESD, the energy density (50 mWh cm(-3) or 90 Wh kg(-1) ) many times higher than for other forms of supercapacitors and approximately 3 times that of thin-film batteries; the power density (1 W cm(-3) or 5970 W kg(-1) ) is approximately 140 times of thin-film lithium-ion battery. The FESD is flexible, weaveable and wearable, which offers promising advantages in the modern electronics.

  10. Wave dispersion in viscoelastic single walled carbon nanotubes based on the nonlocal strain gradient Timoshenko beam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yugang; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Dong

    2017-03-01

    Based on the nonlocal strain gradient theory and Timoshenko beam model, the properties of wave propagation in a viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) are investigated. The characteristic equations for flexural and shear waves in visco-SWCNTs are established. The influence of the tube size on the wave dispersion is clarified. For a low damping coefficient, threshold diameter for shear wave (SW) is observed, below which the phase velocity of SW is equal to zero, whilst flexural wave (FW) always exists. For a high damping coefficient, SW is absolutely constrained, and blocking diameter for FW is observed, above which the wave propagation is blocked. The effects of the wave number, nonlocal and strain gradient length scale parameters on the threshold and blocking diameters are discussed in detail.

  11. Targeted therapy of SMMC-7721 liver cancer in vitro and in vivo with carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zongfei; Lin, Gaofeng; Lu, Qinghua; Meng, Lingjie; Shen, Xizhong; Dong, Ling; Fu, Chuanlong; Zhang, Xiaoke

    2012-01-01

    A new type of drug delivery system (DDS) involved chitosan (CHI) modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controllable loading/release of anti-cancer doxorubicin (DOX) was constructed. CHI was non-covalently wrapped around SWNTs, imparting water-solubility and biocompatibility to the nanotubes. Folic acid (FA) was also bounded to the outer CHI layer to realize selective killing of tumor cells. The targeting DDS could effectively kill the HCC SMMC-7721 cell lines and depress the growth of liver cancer in nude mice, showing superior pharmaceutical efficiency to free DOX. The results of the blood routine and serum biochemical parameters, combined with the histological examinations of vital organs, demonstrating that the targeting DDS had negligible in vivo toxicity. Thus, this DDS is promising for high treatment efficacy and low side effects for future cancer therapy.

  12. Preparation of the superhydrophobic nano-hybrid membrane containing carbon nanotube based on chitosan and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Kaili; Gao, Aiqin; Cheng, Xi; Xie, Kongliang

    2015-10-05

    The functional nano-hybrid surface containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) on chitosan incorporated with the cationic chitosan (C-CS), MWCNTs and silicon couple agent (KH-560) was designed and prepared. The nano-hybrid membranes (NHM) containing MWCNTs were modified by perfluorooctanesulfonyl fluoride (PFOSF). The superhydrophobic multi-functional membranes with biological activity and superhydrophobic surface were obtained. The incorporated MWCNTs improved the roughness of the nano-hybrid membranes. The perfluorinated end groups of the nano-hybrid membrane surface provided low energy surface. The antibacterial activity, surface superhydrophobicity and mechanical property of the perfluorinated nano-hybrid membranes (PFNM) were discussed. Their morphological structures and surface ingredients were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The PFNMs had excellent antibacterial property and superhydrophobicity. The novel nano-hybrid membranes with excellent antibacterial, superhydrophbic, and mechanical properties have potential applications in the food engineering, bioengineering fields and medical materials.

  13. High-performance carbon-nanotube-based complementary field-effect-transistors and integrated circuits with yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiyong Si, Jia; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2014-08-11

    High-performance p-type carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors utilizing yttrium oxide as gate dielectric are presented by optimizing oxidization and annealing processes. Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect-transistors (FETs) are then fabricated on CNTs, and the p- and n-type devices exhibit symmetrical high performances, especially with low threshold voltage near to zero. The corresponding CMOS CNT inverter is demonstrated to operate at an ultra-low supply voltage down to 0.2 V, while displaying sufficient voltage gain, high noise margin, and low power consumption. Yttrium oxide is proven to be a competitive gate dielectric for constructing high-performance CNT CMOS FETs and integrated circuits.

  14. In vivo electrochemical characterization and inflammatory response of multiwalled carbon nanotube-based electrodes in rat hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnikanti, Saugandhika; Pereira, Marilia G. A. G.; Jaraiedi, Sanaz; Jackson, Kassandra; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.; Li, Qiliang; Peixoto, Nathalia

    2010-02-01

    Stimulating neural electrodes are required to deliver charge to an environment that presents itself as hostile. The electrodes need to maintain their electrical characteristics (charge and impedance) in vivo for a proper functioning of neural prostheses. Here we design implantable multi-walled carbon nanotubes coating for stainless steel substrate electrodes, targeted at wide frequency stimulation of deep brain structures. In well-controlled, low-frequency stimulation acute experiments, we show that multi-walled carbon nanotube electrodes maintain their charge storage capacity (CSC) and impedance in vivo. The difference in average CSCs (n = 4) between the in vivo (1.111 mC cm-2) and in vitro (1.008 mC cm-2) model was statistically insignificant (p > 0.05 or P-value = 0.715, two tailed). We also report on the transcription levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and TLR2 receptor as an immediate response to low-frequency stimulation using RT-PCR. We show here that the IL-1β is part of the inflammatory response to low-frequency stimulation, but TLR2 is not significantly increased in stimulated tissue when compared to controls. The early stages of neuroinflammation due to mechanical and electrical trauma induced by implants can be better understood by detection of pro-inflammatory molecules rather than by histological studies. Tracking of such quantitative response profits from better analysis methods over several temporal and spatial scales. Our results concerning the evaluation of such inflammatory molecules revealed that transcripts for the cytokine IL-1β are upregulated in response to low-frequency stimulation, whereas no modulation was observed for TLR2. This result indicates that the early response of the brain to mechanical trauma and low-frequency stimulation activates the IL-1β signaling cascade but not that of TLR2.

  15. Carbon nanotubes based electrochemical aptasensing platform for the detection of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyl in human blood serum.

    PubMed

    Pilehvar, Sanaz; Ahmad Rather, Jahangir; Dardenne, Freddy; Robbens, Johan; Blust, Ronny; De Wael, Karolien

    2014-04-15

    A novel strategy to sense target molecules in human blood serum is achieved by immobilizing aptamers (APTs) on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) modified electrodes. In this work, the aminated aptamer selected for hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyl (OH-PCB) was covalently immobilized on the surface of the MWCNT-COOH modified glassy carbon electrode through amide linkage. The aptamers function as recognition probes for OH-PCB by the binding induced folding of the aptamer. The developed aptasensing device was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The aptasensor displayed excellent performance for OH-PCB detection with a linear range from 0.16 to 7.5 μM. The sensitivity of the developed aptasensing platform is improved (1×10(-8) M) compared to the published report (1×10(-6) M) for the determination of OH-PCB (Turner et al., 2007). The better performance of the sensor is due to the unique platform, i.e. the presence of APTs onto electrodes and the combination with nanomaterials. The aptamer density on the electrode surface was estimated by chronocoulometry and was found to be 1.4×10(13) molecules cm(-2). The validity of the method and applicability of the aptasensor was successfully evaluated by the detection of OH-PCB in a blood serum sample. The described approach for aptasensing opens up new perspectives in the field of biomonitoring providing a device with acceptable stability, high sensitivity, good accuracy and precision.

  16. Recycled diesel carbon nanoparticles for nanostructured battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuming; Liu, Chang; Sun, Xiaoxuan; Ye, Han; Cheung, Chunshun; Zhou, Limin

    2015-02-01

    Considerable attention has been devoted to using rational nanostructure design to address critical carbonaceous anode material issues for next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, the fabrication of nanostructured carbonaceous anode materials often involves complex processes and expensive starting materials. Diesel engine is an important source of nanostructured carbon particles with diameters ranging 20 nm-60 nm suspended in air, resulting in a serious scourge of global climate and a series of diseases such as lung cancer, asthma, and cardiovascular disease. Here, we show that diesel carbon nanoparticles collected from diesel engines can be chemically activated to create a porous structure. The resulting nanostructured carbon electrodes have a high specific capacity of 936 mAh g-1 after 40 cycles at 0.05 A/g, and excellent cycle stability while retaining a capacity of ∼210 mAh g-1 after 1200 cycles at 5 A/g. As recycled diesel carbon nanoparticles are readily available due to the several billion tons of diesel fuel consumed every year by diesel engines, their use represents an exciting source for nanostructured carbonaceous anode materials for high-performance LIBs and improves our environment and health.

  17. Mechanical, electrical, and thermal expansion properties of carbon nanotube-based silver and silver-palladium alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical, electrical, and thermal expansion properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based silver and silver-palladium (10:1, w/w) alloy nanocomposites are reported. To tailor the properties of silver, CNTs were incorporated into a silver matrix by a modified molecular level-mixing process. CNTs interact weakly with silver because of their non-reactive nature and lack of mutual solubility. Therefore, palladium was utilized as an alloying element to improve interfacial adhesion. Comparative microstructural characterizations and property evaluations of the nanocomposites were performed. The structural characterizations revealed that decorated type-CNTs were dispersed, embedded, and anchored into the silver matrix. The experimental results indicated that the modification of the silver and silver-palladium nanocomposite with CNT resulted in increases in the hardness and Young's modulus along with concomitant decreases in the electrical conductivity and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). The hardness and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites were increased by 30%-40% whereas the CTE was decreased to 50%-60% of the CTE of silver. The significantly improved CTE and the mechanical properties of the CNT-reinforced silver and silver-palladium nanocomposites are correlated with the intriguing properties of CNTs and with good interfacial adhesion between the CNTs and silver as a result of the fabrication process and the contact action of palladium as an alloying element.

  18. Impact of cation-π interactions on the cell voltage of carbon nanotube-based Li batteries.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shaohua; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping

    2016-01-21

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based Li batteries have attracted wide attention because of their high capacity, high cyclability and high energy density and are believed to be one of the most promising electrochemical energy storage systems. In CNT-based Li batteries, the main interaction between the Li(+) ions and the CNT is the cation-π interaction. However, up to now, it is still not clear how this interaction affects the storage characteristics of CNT-based Li batteries. Here, using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we report a highly favorable impact of cation-π interactions on the cell voltage of CNT-based Li batteries. Considering both Li(+)-π interaction and Li-π interaction, we show that cell voltage enhances with the increase of the CNT diameter. In addition, when the Li(+) ion adsorbs on the external wall, the cell voltage is larger than that when it adsorbs on the internal wall. This suggests that CNTs with a large diameter and a low array density are more advantageous to enhance storage performance of CNT-based Li batteries. Compared with Li(+) ions on the (4,4) CNT internal wall, the cell voltage of Li(+) on the (10,10) CNT external wall is 0.55 V higher, which indicates an improvement of about 38%. These results will be helpful for the design of more efficient CNT-based Li batteries.

  19. A fully roll-to-roll gravure-printed carbon nanotube-based active matrix for multi-touch sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wookyu; Koo, Hyunmo; Sun, Junfeng; Noh, Jinsoo; Kwon, Kye-Si; Yeom, Chiseon; Choi, Younchang; Chen, Kevin; Javey, Ali; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-12-01

    Roll-to-roll (R2R) printing has been pursued as a commercially viable high-throughput technology to manufacture flexible, disposable, and inexpensive printed electronic devices. However, in recent years, pessimism has prevailed because of the barriers faced when attempting to fabricate and integrate thin film transistors (TFTs) using an R2R printing method. In this paper, we report 20 × 20 active matrices (AMs) based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a resolution of 9.3 points per inch (ppi) resolution, obtained using a fully R2R gravure printing process. By using SWCNTs as the semiconducting layer and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as the substrate, we have obtained a device yield above 98%, and extracted the key scalability factors required for a feasible R2R gravure manufacturing process. Multi-touch sensor arrays were achieved by laminating a pressure sensitive rubber onto the SWCNT-TFT AM. This R2R gravure printing system overcomes the barriers associated with the registration accuracy of printing each layer and the variation of the threshold voltage (Vth). By overcoming these barriers, the R2R gravure printing method can be viable as an advanced manufacturing technology, thus enabling the high-throughput production of flexible, disposable, and human-interactive cutting-edge electronic devices based on SWCNT-TFT AMs.

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com

    2014-11-24

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml{sup −1}.

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2014-11-01

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml-1 with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml-1.

  2. Analysis of malachite green in aquatic products by carbon nanotube-based molecularly imprinted - matrix solid phase dispersion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Ligang

    2015-10-01

    A simple method based on matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) using molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as sorbents for selective extraction of malachite green (MG) from aquatic products was developed. The MIPs were prepared by using carbon nanotube as support, MG as template, methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate as crosslinker and methylene chloride as solvent. The MIPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. The isothermal adsorption, kinetics absorption and selective adsorption experiments were carried out. We optimized the extraction conditions as follows: the ratio of MIPs to sample was 2:3, the dispersion time was 15min, washing solvent was 4mL 50% aqueous methanol and elution solvent was 3mL methanol-acetic acid (98: 2, v/v). Once the MSPD process was completed, the MG extracted from aquatic products was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The detection limit of MG was 0.7μgkg(-1). The relative standard deviations of intra-day and inter-day were obtained in the range of 0.9%-4.7% and 3.4%-9.8%, respectively. In order to evaluate the applicability and reliability of the proposed method, it was applied to determine MG in different aquatic products samples including fish, shrimp, squid and crabs. The satisfied recoveries were in the range of 89.2%-104.6%. The results showed that this method is faster, simpler and makes extraction and purification in the same system.

  3. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Recently, flexible and transparent conductive films (TCFs) are drawing more attention for their central role in future applications of flexible electronics. Here, we report the controllable fabrication of TCFs for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks through drop casting lithography of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) ink. How ink formula and baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (>1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing, when formulation parameters are well optimized (weight ratio of SWCNT to PEDOT:PSS: 1:0.5, SWCNT concentration: 0.3 mg/ml, and heating rate: 36 °C/minute). Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5 × 5 sensing pixels).

  4. Robotic voltammetry with carbon nanotube-based sensors: a superb blend for convenient high-quality antimicrobial trace analysis

    PubMed Central

    Theanponkrang, Somjai; Suginta, Wipa; Weingart, Helge; Winterhalter, Mathias; Schulte, Albert

    2015-01-01

    A new automated pharmacoanalytical technique for convenient quantification of redox-active antibiotics has been established by combining the benefits of a carbon nanotube (CNT) sensor modification with electrocatalytic activity for analyte detection with the merits of a robotic electrochemical device that is capable of sequential nonmanual sample measurements in 24-well microtiter plates. Norfloxacin (NFX) and ciprofloxacin (CFX), two standard fluoroquinolone antibiotics, were used in automated calibration measurements by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and accomplished were linear ranges of 1–10 μM and 2–100 μM for NFX and CFX, respectively. The lowest detectable levels were estimated to be 0.3±0.1 μM (n=7) for NFX and 1.6±0.1 μM (n=7) for CFX. In standard solutions or tablet samples of known content, both analytes could be quantified with the robotic DPV microtiter plate assay, with recoveries within ±4% of 100%. And recoveries were as good when NFX was evaluated in human serum samples with added NFX. The use of simple instrumentation, convenience in execution, and high effectiveness in analyte quantitation suggest the merger between automated microtiter plate voltammetry and CNT-supported electrochemical drug detection as a novel methodology for antibiotic testing in pharmaceutical and clinical research and quality control laboratories. PMID:25670899

  5. Effect of a concave grid mesh in a carbon nanotube-based field emission X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Lee, Choong Hun

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Successful design using a concave grid mesh for the focusing electron. • Much better X-ray image due to the concave grid mesh. • Higher anode current efficiency using the concave grid mesh versus a flat grid mesh. - Abstract: This study introduces a simple approach to improve the X-ray image quality produced by the carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter X-ray source by altering the geometrical shape of the grid mesh from the conventional flat shape to a concave one in a typical triode structure. The concave shape of the grid electrode increases the effective number of the grid cells in the mesh, which exerted an electric field in the direction of the emitted electrons, thereby increasing the emission current reaching the anode. Furthermore, the curved mesh (concave grid mesh), which was responsible for the extraction of electrons from the field emitter, exhibited a focusing effect on the electron beam trajectory thereby, reducing the focal spot size impinging on the anode and resulted in a better spatial resolution of the X-ray images produced.

  6. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Fuel Cell Benchmarked Against US DOE 2017 Technical Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Neetu; Ramesh, Palanisamy; Bekyarova, Elena; Tian, Xiaojuan; Wang, Feihu; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with varying degrees of functionalization were utilized for the fabrication of SWNT thin film catalyst support layers (CSLs) in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), which were suitable for benchmarking against the US DOE 2017 targets. Use of the optimum level of SWNT -COOH functionality allowed the construction of a prototype SWNT-based PEMFC with total Pt loading of 0.06 mgPt/cm2 - well below the value of 0.125 mgPt/cm2 set as the US DOE 2017 technical target for total Pt group metals (PGM) loading. This prototype PEMFC also approaches the technical target for the total Pt content per kW of power (<0.125 gPGM/kW) at cell potential 0.65 V: a value of 0.15 gPt/kW was achieved at 80°C/22 psig testing conditions, which was further reduced to 0.12 gPt/kW at 35 psig back pressure. PMID:23877112

  7. Carbon nanotube-based self-adhesive polymer electrodes for wireless long-term recording of electrocardiogram signals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benyan; Luo, Zhangyuan; Zhang, Wenzan; Tu, Quan; Jin, Xun

    2016-10-05

    In this study, the concept of polymer electrodes integrated with a wireless electrocardiogram (ECG) system was described. Polymer electrodes for long-term ECG measurements were fabricated by loading high content of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in polydimethylsiloxane. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were added to increase the flexibility of the polymer and the conductivity of the electrode. An ECG electrode patch was fabricated by integrating the electrodes with an adhesive polydimethylsiloxane (aPDMS) layer. Holes in the electrode filled with aPDMS can enable robust contact between the electrode and skin, reducing motion artifacts. A wireless ECG measurement system was developed and adapted to the polymer electrodes. The polymer electrodes combined with the measurement system were successfully applied in wireless, long-term recording of ECG signals. An eleven-day continuous test showed that the ECG signal did not degrade over time. The results of attach/detach tests demonstrated that the ECG signal was affected by motion artifacts after six attach/detach cycles. The electrodes produced are flexible and exhibit good ECG performance, and therefore can be used in wearable medical monitoring systems. The approach proposed in this study holds significant promise for commercial application in medical fields.

  8. Voltage-Gated Transport of Nanoparticles across Free-Standing All-Carbon-Nanotube-Based Hollow-Fiber Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gaoliang; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Fan, Xinfei; Yu, Hongtao; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-07-15

    Understanding the mechanism underlying controllable transmembrane transport observed in biological membranes benefits the development of next-generation separation membranes for a variety of important applications. In this work, on the basis of common structural features of cell membranes, a very simple biomimetic membrane system exhibiting gated transmembrane performance has been constructed using all-carbon-nanotube (CNT)-based hollow-fiber membranes. The conductive CNT membranes with hydrophobic pore channels can be positively or negatively charged and are consequently capable of regulating the transport of nanoparticles across their pore channels by their "opening" or "closing". The switch between penetration and rejection of nanoparticles through/by CNT membranes is of high efficiency and especially allows dynamic control. The underlying mechanism is that CNT pore channels with different polarities can prompt or prevent the formation of their noncovalent interactions with charged nanoparticles, resulting in their rejection or penetration by/through the CNT membranes. The theory about noncovalent interactions and charged pore channels may provide new insight into understanding the complicated ionically and bimolecularly gated transport across cell membranes and can contribute to many other important applications beyond the water purification and resource recovery demonstrated in this study.

  9. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Recently, flexible and transparent conductive films (TCFs) are drawing more attention for their central role in future applications of flexible electronics. Here, we report the controllable fabrication of TCFs for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks through drop casting lithography of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) ink. How ink formula and baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (>1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing, when formulation parameters are well optimized (weight ratio of SWCNT to PEDOT:PSS: 1:0.5, SWCNT concentration: 0.3 mg/ml, and heating rate: 36 °C/minute). Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5 × 5 sensing pixels). PMID:26818091

  10. A fully roll-to-roll gravure-printed carbon nanotube-based active matrix for multi-touch sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wookyu; Koo, Hyunmo; Sun, Junfeng; Noh, Jinsoo; Kwon, Kye-Si; Yeom, Chiseon; Choi, Younchang; Chen, Kevin; Javey, Ali; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    Roll-to-roll (R2R) printing has been pursued as a commercially viable high-throughput technology to manufacture flexible, disposable, and inexpensive printed electronic devices. However, in recent years, pessimism has prevailed because of the barriers faced when attempting to fabricate and integrate thin film transistors (TFTs) using an R2R printing method. In this paper, we report 20 × 20 active matrices (AMs) based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a resolution of 9.3 points per inch (ppi) resolution, obtained using a fully R2R gravure printing process. By using SWCNTs as the semiconducting layer and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as the substrate, we have obtained a device yield above 98%, and extracted the key scalability factors required for a feasible R2R gravure manufacturing process. Multi-touch sensor arrays were achieved by laminating a pressure sensitive rubber onto the SWCNT-TFT AM. This R2R gravure printing system overcomes the barriers associated with the registration accuracy of printing each layer and the variation of the threshold voltage (Vth). By overcoming these barriers, the R2R gravure printing method can be viable as an advanced manufacturing technology, thus enabling the high-throughput production of flexible, disposable, and human-interactive cutting-edge electronic devices based on SWCNT-TFT AMs. PMID:26635237

  11. Impact of cation-π interactions on the cell voltage of carbon nanotube-based Li batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shaohua; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based Li batteries have attracted wide attention because of their high capacity, high cyclability and high energy density and are believed to be one of the most promising electrochemical energy storage systems. In CNT-based Li batteries, the main interaction between the Li+ ions and the CNT is the cation-π interaction. However, up to now, it is still not clear how this interaction affects the storage characteristics of CNT-based Li batteries. Here, using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we report a highly favorable impact of cation-π interactions on the cell voltage of CNT-based Li batteries. Considering both Li+-π interaction and Li-π interaction, we show that cell voltage enhances with the increase of the CNT diameter. In addition, when the Li+ ion adsorbs on the external wall, the cell voltage is larger than that when it adsorbs on the internal wall. This suggests that CNTs with a large diameter and a low array density are more advantageous to enhance storage performance of CNT-based Li batteries. Compared with Li+ ions on the (4,4) CNT internal wall, the cell voltage of Li+ on the (10,10) CNT external wall is 0.55 V higher, which indicates an improvement of about 38%. These results will be helpful for the design of more efficient CNT-based Li batteries.Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based Li batteries have attracted wide attention because of their high capacity, high cyclability and high energy density and are believed to be one of the most promising electrochemical energy storage systems. In CNT-based Li batteries, the main interaction between the Li+ ions and the CNT is the cation-π interaction. However, up to now, it is still not clear how this interaction affects the storage characteristics of CNT-based Li batteries. Here, using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we report a highly favorable impact of cation-π interactions on the cell voltage of CNT-based Li batteries. Considering both Li+-π interaction and Li

  12. A continuum model with a percolation threshold and tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity for carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang; Weng, George J.; Meguid, Shaker A.; Hamouda, Abdel Magid

    2014-05-21

    A continuum model that possesses several desirable features of the electrical conduction process in carbon-nanotube (CNT) based nanocomposites is developed. Three basic elements are included: (i) percolation threshold, (ii) interface effects, and (iii) tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity. We approach the first one through the selection of an effective medium theory. We approach the second one by the introduction of a diminishing layer of interface with an interfacial conductivity to build a 'thinly coated' CNT. The third one is introduced through the observation that interface conductivity can be enhanced by electron tunneling which in turn can be facilitated with the formation of CNT networks. We treat this last issue in a continuum fashion by taking the network formation as a statistical process that can be represented by Cauchy's probability density function. The outcome is a simple and yet widely useful model that can simultaneously capture all these fundamental characteristics. It is demonstrated that, without considering the interface effect, the predicted conductivity would be too high, and that, without accounting for the additional contribution from the tunneling-assisted interfacial conductivity, the predicted conductivity beyond the percolation threshold would be too low. It is with the consideration of all three elements that the theory can fully account for the experimentally measured data. We further use the developed model to demonstrate that, despite the anisotropy of the intrinsic CNT conductivity, it is its axial component along the CNT direction that dominates the overall conductivity. This theory is also proved that, even with a totally insulating matrix, it is still capable of delivering non-zero conductivity beyond the percolation threshold.

  13. Flexoelectricity in Carbon Nanostructures: Nanotubes, Fullerenes, and Nanocones.

    PubMed

    Kvashnin, Alexander G; Sorokin, Pavel B; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-07-16

    We report theoretical analysis of the electronic flexoelectric effect associated with nanostructures of sp(2) carbon (curved graphene). Through the density functional theory calculations, we establish the universality of the linear dependence of flexoelectric atomic dipole moments on local curvature in various carbon networks (carbon nanotubes, fullerenes with high and low symmetry, and nanocones). The usefulness of such dependence is in the possibility to extend the analysis of any carbon systems with local deformations with respect to their electronic properties. This result is exemplified by exploring of flexoelectric effect in carbon nanocones that display large dipole moment, cumulative over their surface yet surprisingly scaling exactly linearly with the length, and with sine-law dependence on the apex angle, dflex ~ L sin(α). Our study points out the opportunity of predicting the electric dipole moment distribution on complex graphene-based nanostructures based only on the local curvature information.

  14. Thermal effects on nonlinear vibration of a carbon nanotube-based mass sensor using finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Keun; Kim, Chang-Wan; Yang, Hyun-Ik

    2017-01-01

    In the present study we carried out a dynamic analysis of a CNT-based mass sensor by using a finite element method (FEM)-based nonlinear analysis model of the CNT resonator to elucidate the combined effects of thermal effects and nonlinear oscillation behavior upon the overall mass detection sensitivity. Mass sensors using carbon nanotube (CNT) resonators provide very high sensing performance. Because CNT-based resonators can have high aspect ratios, they can easily exhibit nonlinear oscillation behavior due to large displacements. Also, CNT-based devices may experience high temperatures during their manufacture and operation. These geometrical nonlinearities and temperature changes affect the sensing performance of CNT-based mass sensors. However, it is very hard to find previous literature addressing the detection sensitivity of CNT-based mass sensors including considerations of both these nonlinear behaviors and thermal effects. We modeled the nonlinear equation of motion by using the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relation, taking into account the additional axial force associated with the thermal effect. The FEM was employed to solve the nonlinear equation of motion because it can effortlessly handle the more complex geometries and boundary conditions. A doubly clamped CNT resonator actuated by distributed electrostatic force was the configuration subjected to the numerical experiments. Thermal effects upon the fundamental resonance behavior and the shift of resonance frequency due to attached mass, i.e., the mass detection sensitivity, were examined in environments of both high and low (or room) temperature. The fundamental resonance frequency increased with decreasing temperature in the high temperature environment, and increased with increasing temperature in the low temperature environment. The magnitude of the shift in resonance frequency caused by an attached mass represents the sensing performance of a mass sensor, i.e., its mass detection

  15. Modeling Mechanical Properties of Carbon Molecular Clusters and Carbon Nanostructural Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014264 TITLE: Modeling Mechanical Properties of Carbon Molecular...Clusters and Carbon Nanostructural Materials DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report...Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 740 © 2003 Materials Research Society 17.2 Modeling mechanical properties of carbon molecular clusters and carbon

  16. Sweet carbon nanostructures: carbohydrate conjugates with carbon nanotubes and graphene and their applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanan; Star, Alexander; Vidal, Sébastien

    2013-06-07

    Because of their unique physicochemical properties, carbon nanotubes and graphene can find promising applications in many fields of biomedical research. However, the pristine nanomaterials suffer from low solubility in aqueous systems which results in their limited biocompatibility. Through the introduction of carbohydrates, the surface properties of these graphitic carbon nanostructures can be modified not just to improve their water solubility but also to enable these versatile nanostructures to interact selectively with biological systems. This review will highlight the synthetic strategies that have been reported for the covalent and noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanostructures with carbohydrates, as well as their applications in biosensing and biomedicine.

  17. Dissociation of formaldehyde in nanostructured carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Aaron; Santiso, Erik; Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco; Gubbins, K. E.

    2004-11-01

    Chemical reactions are frequently carried out in nano-structured media, such as micellar or colloidal solutions, nano-porous media, hydrogels or organogels, or in systems involving nano-particles. Nanostructured environments have been shown to enhance reaction rates through a variety of catalytic effects, such as high surface area, interactions with the nano-structure or confinement. However, at present there is little understanding of the role of the nano-structured material in such reactions and the mechanisms involved are subject of ongoing scientific debate. In this work, we have used state-of-the-art electronic structure techniques to study the prototypical example of the reaction of formaldehyde dissociation (H_2CO arrow H2 + CO) within various configurations of a graphitic pore. Using the Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) method for transition states analysis, we have found that the activation en ergy of the dissociation can be influenced by the presence of a graphitic pore. In particular, while a graphene surface reduces the activation barrier for the reaction, this catalytic effect is enhanced by the presence of two planar sheets, which mimic the geometry of a nano-pore. This can likewise induce a decrease of the activation energy, thus making the reaction more energetically favor able. The reaction activation energy has a dependence on the width of the pore (distance between sheets). A decrease is seen to a point of decreasing width, then a change in the favorable reaction path occurs. It is also found the presence of a vacancy can drastically change the reaction path. These conclusions will be discussed in terms of the charge transfer mechanism seen in the catalytic process.

  18. The mathematical model for synthesis process management of the carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, T. B.; Petrov, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, key difficulties of management process for carbon nanostructure synthesis are described. Tasks of optimum control of the carbon nanostructure synthesis process and management in case of emergency situations are formulated. The mathematical model of carbon nanostructure synthesis is offered. The equations for calculation of quantitative, qualitative indexes, indicators of safety and operability of engineering procedure are provided. The necessity of mathematical model use for carbon nanostructure synthesis is caused by improvement of the quality, the quantity, a decrease in the cost value of carbon nanostructures and an increase in safety of the engineering procedure of their obtaining. Testing and approbation of the mathematical model for carbon nanostructure synthesis are executed on a fullerene industrial production line. Suitability of the mathematical model of carbon nanostructure synthesis for production control in the mode of optimum control and management in case of emergency situations is confirmed. The obtained solution is recommended for implementation on the enterprises of a similar purpose.

  19. Framed carbon nanostructures: synthesis and applications in functional SPM tips.

    PubMed

    Mukhin, I S; Fadeev, I V; Zhukov, M V; Dubrovskii, V G; Golubok, A O

    2015-01-01

    We present a synthesis method to fabricate framed carbon-based nanostructures having highly anisotropic shapes, in particular, the nanofork and nanoscalpel structures which are obtained systematically under optimized growth conditions. A theoretical model is developed to explain the formation of such nanostructures on Si cantilevers and W etched wires exposed to a focused electron beam. We then demonstrate the potentials of these nanostructures as functional tips for scanning probe microscopy. Owing to their anisotropic shapes, such tips can be very useful for nanolithography, nanosurgery of biological objects, and precise manipulation with surface particles. Overall, our method provides a simple and robust way to produce functional scanning probe microscopy tips with variable shapes and enhanced capabilities for different applications compared to standard cantilevers.

  20. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  1. Distribution patterns of different carbon nanostructures in silicon nitride composites.

    PubMed

    Tapasztó, Orsolya; Markó, Márton; Balázsi, Csaba

    2012-11-01

    The dispersion properties of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes as well as mechanically exfoliated few layer graphene flakes within the silicon nitride ceramic matrix have been investigated. Small angle neutron scattering experiments have been employed to gain information on the dispersion of the nano-scale carbon fillers throughout the entire volume of the samples. The neutron scattering data combined with scanning electron microscopy revealed strikingly different distribution patterns for different types of carbon nanostructures. The scattering intensities for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) reveal a decay exponent characteristic to surface fractals, which indicate that the predominant part of nanotubes can be found in loose networks wrapping the grains of the polycrystalline matrix. By contrast, multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were found to be present mainly in the form of bulk aggregate structures, while few-layer graphene (FLG) flakes have been individually dispersed within the host matrix, under the very same preparation and processing conditions.

  2. Thin Polymer Films Containing Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszkiewicz, S.; Piesowicz, E.; Irska, I.; Roslaniec, Z.; Szymczyk, A.; Pawelec, I.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the presented paper, the research experiments were conducted on the preparation and characterization of polymer thin films containing carbon nanotubes, graphene derivatives and hybrid systems of both CNTs/graphene derivatives, in which condensation polymers constituted the matrix. The use of in situ synthesis allowed to obtain nanocomposites with a high degree of homogeneity, which is a key issue for further industrial applications, while the analysis of the physical properties of the obtained materials showed effect of the addition of carbon nanotubes and graphene derivatives on their structure, barrier properties and thermal and electrical conductivity.

  3. Quantifying Energetics of Topological Frustration in Carbon Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Zachary; Costa Girao, Eduardo; Daniels, Colin; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a graph theoretical formalism to account for the fact that sp2 carbon can become spin ordered or generate free radicals for purely topological reasons. The graph theory method is combined with open-density-functional theory calculations to establish the existence of a universal energy of frustration term that is shown to greatly improve the description of carbon nanostructure energetics using classical force-fields. The methodology is illustrated for a number of systems and, owing to the small computational overhead associated, is shown to be easily integratable into any modeling approach based on an adjacency matrix.

  4. Functionalized carbon micro/nanostructures for biomolecular detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penmatsa, Varun

    Advancements in the micro-and nano-scale fabrication techniques have opened up new avenues for the development of portable, scalable and easier-to-use biosensors. Over the last few years, electrodes made of carbon have been widely used as sensing units in biosensors due to their attractive physiochemical properties. The aim of this research is to investigate different strategies to develop functionalized high surface carbon micro/nano-structures for electrochemical and biosensing devices. High aspect ratio three-dimensional carbon microarrays were fabricated via carbon microelectromechanical systems (C-MEMS) technique, which is based on pyrolyzing pre-patterned organic photoresist polymers. To further increase the surface area of the carbon microstructures, surface porosity was introduced by two strategies, i.e. (i) using F127 as porogen and (ii) oxygen reactive ion etch (RIE) treatment. Electrochemical characterization showed that porous carbon thin film electrodes prepared by using F127 as porogen had an effective surface area (Aeff 185%) compared to the conventional carbon electrode. To achieve enhanced electrochemical sensitivity for C-MEMS based functional devices, graphene was conformally coated onto high aspect ratio three-dimensional (3D) carbon micropillar arrays using electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) technique. The amperometric response of graphene/carbon micropillar electrode arrays exhibited higher electrochemical activity, improved charge transfer and a linear response towards H2O2 detection between 250μM to 5.5mM. Furthermore, carbon structures with dimensions from 50 nano-to micrometer level have been fabricated by pyrolyzing photo-nanoimprint lithography patterned organic resist polymer. Microstructure, elemental composition and resistivity characterization of the carbon nanostructures produced by this process were very similar to conventional photoresist derived carbon. Surface functionalization of the carbon nanostructures was performed using

  5. Water-evaporation-induced electricity with nanostructured carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Xue, Guobin; Xu, Ying; Ding, Tianpeng; Li, Jia; Yin, Jun; Fei, Wenwen; Cao, Yuanzhi; Yu, Jin; Yuan, Longyan; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Deng, Shaozhi; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-01-30

    Water evaporation is a ubiquitous natural process that harvests thermal energy from the ambient environment. It has previously been utilized in a number of applications including the synthesis of nanostructures and the creation of energy-harvesting devices. Here, we show that water evaporation from the surface of a variety of nanostructured carbon materials can be used to generate electricity. We find that evaporation from centimetre-sized carbon black sheets can reliably generate sustained voltages of up to 1 V under ambient conditions. The interaction between the water molecules and the carbon layers and moreover evaporation-induced water flow within the porous carbon sheets are thought to be key to the voltage generation. This approach to electricity generation is related to the traditional streaming potential, which relies on driving ionic solutions through narrow gaps, and the recently reported method of moving ionic solutions across graphene surfaces, but as it exploits the natural process of evaporation and uses cheap carbon black it could offer advantages in the development of practical devices.

  6. Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Hollow Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yian

    This dissertation describes fundamental studies of hollow carbon nanostructures, which may be used as electrodes for practical energy storage applications such as batteries or supercapacitors. Electron microscopy is heavily utilized for the nanoscale characterization. To control the morphology of hollow carbon nanostructures, ZnO nanowires serve as sacrificial templates. The first part of this dissertation focuses on the optimization of synthesis parameters and the scale-up production of ZnO nanowires by vapor transport method. Uniform ZnO nanowires with 40 nm width can be produced by using 1100 °C reaction temperature and 20 sccm oxygen flow rate, which are the two most important parameters. The use of ethanol as carbon source with or without water steam provides uniform carbonaceous deposition on ZnO nanowire templates. The amount of as-deposited carbonaceous material can be controlled by reaction temperature and reaction time. Due to the catalytic property of ZnO surface, the thicknesses of carbonaceous layers are typically in nanometers. Different methods to remove the ZnO templates are explored, of which hydrogen reduction at temperatures higher than 700 °C is most efficient. The ZnO templates can also be removed under ethanol environment, but the temperatures need to be higher than 850 °C for practical use. Characterizations of hollow carbon nanofibers show that the hollow carbon nanostructures have a high specific surface area (>1100 m2/g) with the presence of mesopores ( 3.5 nm). The initial data on energy storage as electrodes of electrochemical double layer capacitors show that high specific capacitance (> 220 F/g) can be obtained, which is related to the high surface area and unique porous hollow structure with a thin wall.

  7. Hybrid Carbon-Based Nanostructured Platforms for the Advanced Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, I; Mai-Prochnow, A; Yick, S; Bilek, M M M; Kondyurin, A; Han, Z J; Fang, J; Cvelbar, U; Mariotti, D; Ostrikov, K

    2015-12-01

    Mankind faces several global challenges such as chronic and acute hunger, global poverty, energy deficiency and environment conservation. Common biotechnologies based on batch, fluidbed and other similar processes are now extensively used for the production of a wide range of products such as antibiotics, biofuels, cultured and fermented food products. Unfortunately, these processes suffer from low efficiency, high energy demand, low controllability and rapid biocatalyst degradation by microbiological attack, and thus still are not capable of seriously addressing the global hunger and energy deficiency challenges. Moreover, sustainable future technologies require minimizing the environmental impact of toxic by-products by implementing the "life produces organic matter, organic matter sustains life" principle. Nanostructure-based biotechnology is one of the most promising approaches that can help to solve these challenges. In this work we briefly review the unique features of the carbon-based nanostructured platforms, with some attention paid to other nanomaterials. We discuss the main building blocks and processes to design and fabricate novel platforms, with a focus on dense arrays of the vertically-aligned nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes and graphene. Advantages and disadvantages of these systems are considered.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of branched carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sharali; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Guo, Hongxuan; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Hill, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have atomically smooth surfaces and tend not to form covalent bonds with composite matrix materials. Thus, it is the magnitude of the CNT/fiber interfacial strength that limits the amount of nanomechanical interlocking when using conventional CNTs to improve the structural behavior of composite materials through reinforcement. This arises from two well-known, long standing problems in this research field: (a) inhomogeneous dispersion of the filler, which can lead to aggregation and (b) insufficient reinforcement arising from bonding interactions between the filler and the matrix. These dispersion and reinforcement issues could be addressed by using branched multiwalled carbon nanotubes (b-MWCNTs) as it is known that branched fibers can greatly enhance interfacial bonding and dispersability. Therefore, the use of b-MWCNTs would lead to improved mechanical performance and, in the case of conductive composites, improved electrical performance if the CNT filler was better dispersed and connected. This will provide major benefits to the existing commercial application of CNT-reinforced composites in electrostatic discharge materials (ESD): There would be also potential usage for energy conversion, e.g., in supercapacitors, solar cells and Li-ion batteries. However, the limited availability of b-MWCNTs has, to date, restricted their use in such technological applications. Herein, we report an inexpensive and simple method to fabricate large amounts of branched-MWCNTs, which opens the door to a multitude of possible applications.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of branched carbon nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Guo, Hongxuan; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Hill, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Summary Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have atomically smooth surfaces and tend not to form covalent bonds with composite matrix materials. Thus, it is the magnitude of the CNT/fiber interfacial strength that limits the amount of nanomechanical interlocking when using conventional CNTs to improve the structural behavior of composite materials through reinforcement. This arises from two well-known, long standing problems in this research field: (a) inhomogeneous dispersion of the filler, which can lead to aggregation and (b) insufficient reinforcement arising from bonding interactions between the filler and the matrix. These dispersion and reinforcement issues could be addressed by using branched multiwalled carbon nanotubes (b-MWCNTs) as it is known that branched fibers can greatly enhance interfacial bonding and dispersability. Therefore, the use of b-MWCNTs would lead to improved mechanical performance and, in the case of conductive composites, improved electrical performance if the CNT filler was better dispersed and connected. This will provide major benefits to the existing commercial application of CNT-reinforced composites in electrostatic discharge materials (ESD): There would be also potential usage for energy conversion, e.g., in supercapacitors, solar cells and Li-ion batteries. However, the limited availability of b-MWCNTs has, to date, restricted their use in such technological applications. Herein, we report an inexpensive and simple method to fabricate large amounts of branched-MWCNTs, which opens the door to a multitude of possible applications. PMID:27826499

  10. Functionalized carbon nanostructures for hydrogen catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lung-Hao

    Sodium borohydride, NaBH4, is widely used as a source of pure hydrogen. Hydrogen is of interest because it is a source of clean energy. It can be converted directly into electrical energy by means of fuel cells. One of the objectives of this thesis was to develop a new catalytic process to (i) enhance the rate of hydrogen generation, and (ii) to achieve hydrogen generation equal to 100% of the theoretically expected value. The catalyst investigated in this research is constructed by starting from single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). This material has a very high specific surface area and good conductivity. The SWNT were formed into a paper by a special filtration process. Polysilazane, a polymeric precursor (Ceraset(TM)-SN from KiON Corp., Wiesbaden, Germany) was diluted by acetone and then layered onto SWNT paper. The Ceraset coated SWNT was then pyrolyzed at 1100°C for three hours to form a silicon carbonitride (SiCN), polymer derived ceramic (PDC), layer on the surface of SWNT filtered paper. This functionalized SiCN carbon nanotube paper (SiCN/CNT) was used as the substrate for catalyst dispersions. The catalyst consisted of transition metals, Pt/Pd/Ru. Suspension solutions of Pt, Pd and Ru were impregnated onto the SiCN/CNT paper with the expectation of creating a monolayer of these transition metals on surface of the SiCN/CNT substrate. It is likely that an interaction could occur between the transition metals and the silicon atoms present in the SiCN layer on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. It is known that transition metals and silicon react to form silicides, suggesting the formation of a strong Si-transition metal bond. Therefore, it is possible that this bond could provide good wetting of metal atoms on SiCN functionalized carbon nanotube substrate. In the limit a monolayer of the transition metals may be achieved, which would correspond to a near zero dihedral angle between the substrate and the cluster of transition metals. In such a scenario a

  11. A nanostructured carbon-reinforced polyisobutylene-based thermoplastic elastomer.

    PubMed

    Puskas, Judit E; Foreman-Orlowski, Elizabeth A; Lim, Goy Teck; Porosky, Sara E; Evancho-Chapman, Michelle M; Schmidt, Steven P; El Fray, Mirosława; Piatek, Marta; Prowans, Piotr; Lovejoy, Krystal

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of a polyisobutylene (PIB)-based nanostructured carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer. This thermoplastic elastomer is based on a self-assembling block copolymer having a branched PIB core carrying -OH functional groups at each branch point, flanked by blocks of poly(isobutylene-co-para-methylstyrene). The block copolymer has thermolabile physical crosslinks and can be processed as a plastic, yet retains its rubbery properties at room temperature. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had more than twice the tensile strength of the neat polymer, exceeding the strength of medical grade silicone rubber, while remaining significantly softer. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer displayed a high T(g) of 126 degrees C, rendering the material steam-sterilizable. The carbon also acted as a free radical trap, increasing the onset temperature of thermal decomposition in the neat polymer from 256.6 degrees C to 327.7 degrees C. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had the lowest water contact angle at 82 degrees and surface nano-topography. After 180 days of implantation into rabbit soft tissues, the carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had the thinnest tissue capsule around the microdumbbell specimens, with no eosinophiles present. The material also showed excellent integration into bones.

  12. Filtration properties of hierarchical carbon nanostructures deposited on carbon fibre fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzyp, M.; Mills, C. A.; Rhodes, R.; Pozegic, T. R.; Smith, C. T. G.; Beliatis, M. J.; Rozanski, L. J.; Werbowy, A.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-03-01

    Hierarchical carbon nanostructures have been produced and examined for their use in liquid filtration experiments. The nanostructures are based on carbon nanotube growth and graphite oxide sponge deposition on the surface of commercially available carbon fibre fabrics. The hierarchical nanomaterial construction on the carbon fibre fabric is made possible due to the chemical vapour deposited carbon nanotubes which act as anchoring sites for the solution deposited sponge nanomaterial. The nanomaterials show a high capacity for Rhodamine B filtration, with the carbon fibre—carbon nanotube—graphite oxide sponge fabric showing filtering performance comparable to a commercial activated carbon filter. After 40 successive filtrations of 10 mg ml-1 Rhodamine B solution, the filtrate of dual modified fabrics returned an increase in transparency of 94% when measured at approx. 550 nm compared to 72% for the commercial carbon filter. When normalised with respect to the areal density of the commercial filter, the increase in optical transparency of the filtrate from the dual modified fabrics reduces to 65%. The Rhodamine B is found to deposit in the carbon nanomaterials via a nucleation, growth and saturation mechanism.

  13. The fabrication of carbon nanostructures using electron beam resist pyrolysis and nanomachining processes for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung A; Lee, Kwang-Cheol; Park, Se Il; Lee, Seung S

    2008-05-28

    We present a facile, yet versatile carbon nanofabrication method using electron beam lithography and resist pyrolysis. Various resist nanopatterns were fabricated using a negative electron beam resist, SAL-601, and they were then subjected to heat treatment in an inert atmosphere to obtain carbon nanopatterns. Suspended carbon nanostructures were fabricated by the wet-etching of an underlying sacrificial oxide layer. Free-standing carbon nanostructures, which contain 130 nm wide, 15 nm thick, and 4 µm long nanobridges, were fabricated by resist pyrolysis and nanomachining processes. Electron beam exposure dose effects on resist thickness and pattern widening were studied. The thickness of the carbon nanostructures was thinned down by etching with oxygen plasma. An electrical biosensor utilizing carbon nanostructures as a conducting channel was studied. Conductance modulations of the carbon device due to streptavidin-biotin binding and pH variations were observed.

  14. Nanostructured carbon and carbon nanocomposites for electrochemical energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Su, Dang Sheng; Schlögl, Robert

    2010-02-22

    Electrochemical energy storage is one of the important technologies for a sustainable future of our society, in times of energy crisis. Lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors with their high energy or power densities, portability, and promising cycling life are the cores of future technologies. This Review describes some materials science aspects on nanocarbon-based materials for these applications. Nanostructuring (decreasing dimensions) and nanoarchitecturing (combining or assembling several nanometer-scale building blocks) are landmarks in the development of high-performance electrodes for with long cycle lifes and high safety. Numerous works reviewed herein have shown higher performances for such electrodes, but mostly give diverse values that show no converging tendency towards future development. The lack of knowledge about interface processes and defect dynamics of electrodes, as well as the missing cooperation between material scientists, electrochemists, and battery engineers, are reasons for the currently widespread trial-and-error strategy of experiments. A concerted action between all of these disciplines is a prerequisite for the future development of electrochemical energy storage devices.

  15. Improvement of capacitive performances of symmetric carbon/carbon supercapacitors by addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhaddad, L.; Gamby, J.; Makhloufi, L.; Pailleret, A.; Pillier, F.; Takenouti, H.

    2016-03-01

    A nanostructured polypyrrole powder was synthesized in a previous work from the oxidation of pyrrole by a nanostructured MnO2 powder used simultaneously as an oxidizing agent and a sacrificial template in a redox heterogeneous mechanism. In this study, this original PPy powder was used as an active additive material with different ratio in carbon/carbon symmetrical supercapacitors whose performances were studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using a Swagelok-type cell. From the EIS spectra, the complex capacitance was extracted using a model involving two Cole-Cole type complex capacitances linked in series. The specific capacitance values evaluated by EIS and cyclic voltammetry are in a good agreement between them. The results show that the addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder improves significantly the specific capacitance of the carbon electrode and consequently the performances of carbon/carbon supercapacitors. The original and versatile synthesis method used to produce this polypyrrole powder appears to be attractive for large scale production of promising additives for electrode materials of supercapacitors.

  16. Transition of carbon nanostructures in heptane diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei-Chieh; Hou, Shuhn-Shyurng; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2017-02-01

    The flame synthesis has high potential in industrial production of carbon nanostructure (CNS). Unfortunately, the complexity of combustion chemistry leads to less controlling of synthesized products. In order to improve the understanding of the relation between flames and CNSs synthesized within, experiments were conducted through heptane flames in a stagnation-point liquid-pool system. The operating parameters for the synthesis include oxygen supply, sampling position, and sampling time. Two kinds of nanostructures were observed, carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon nano-onion (CNO). CNTs were synthesized in a weaker flame near extinction. CNOs were synthesized in a more sooty flame. The average diameter of CNTs formed at oxygen concentration of 15% was in the range of 20-30 nm. For oxygen concentration of 17%, the average diameter of CNTs ranged from 24 to 27 nm, while that of CNOs was around 28 nm. For oxygen concentration of 19%, the average diameter of CNOs produced at the sampling position 0.5 mm below the flame front was about 57 nm, while the average diameters of CNOs formed at the sampling positions 1-2.5 mm below the flame front were in the range of 20-25 nm. A transition from CNT to CNO was observed by variation of sampling position in a flame. We found that the morphology of CNS is directly affected by the presence of soot layer due to the carbonaceous environment and the growth mechanisms of CNT and CNO. The sampling time can alter the yield of CNSs depending on the temperature of sampling position, but the morphology of products is not affected.

  17. Electronic and Ionic Transport in Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Di

    This thesis describes several experiments based on carbon nanotube nanofludic devices and field-effect transistors. The first experiment detected ion and molecule translocation through one single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) that spans a barrier between two fluid reservoirs. The electrical ionic current is measured. Translocation of small single stranded DNA oligomers is marked by large transient increases in current through the tube and confirmed by a PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis. Carbon nanotubes simplify the construction of nanopores, permit new types of electrical measurement, and open new avenues for control of DNA translocation. The second experiment constructed devices in which the interior of a single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET) acts as a nanofluidic channel that connects two fluid reservoirs, permitting measurement of the electronic properties of the SWCNT as it is wetted by an analyte. Wetting of the inside of the SWCNT by water turns the transistor on, while wetting of the outside has little effect. This finding may provide a new method to investigate water behavior at nanoscale. This also opens a new avenue for building sensors in which the SWCNT functions as an electronic detector. This thesis also presents some experiments that related to nanofabrication, such as construction of FET with tin sulfide (SnS) quantum ribbon. This work demonstrates the application of solution processed IV-VI semiconductor nanostructures in nanoscale devices.

  18. Modification of nanostructured calcium carbonate for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; Wang, Chao-Qun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Cheng, Si-Xue

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a facile method to modify nanostructured calcium carbonate (CaCO3) gene delivery systems by adding calcium phosphate (CaP) component was developed. CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation of Ca(2+) ions with plasmid DNA in the presence of carbonate and phosphate ions. For comparison, CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates were also prepared. The effects of carbonate ion/phosphate ion (CO3(2-)/PO4(3-)) ratio on the particle size and gene delivery efficiency were investigated. With an appropriate CO3(2-)/PO4(3-) ratio, the co-existence of carbonate and phosphate ions could control the size of co-precipitates effectively, and CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles with a decreased size and improved stability could be obtained. The in vitro gene transfections mediated by different nanoparticles in 293T cells and HeLa cells were carried out, using pGL3-Luc as a reporter plasmid. The gene transfection efficiency of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles could be significantly improved as compared with CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates. The confocal microscopy study indicated that the cellular uptake and nuclear localization of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were significantly enhanced as compared with unmodified CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles.

  19. From carbon nanostructures to high-performance sorbents for chromatographic separation and preconcentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, V. N.; Rodinkov, O. V.; Moskvin, L. N.; Novikov, A. G.; Bugaichenko, A. S.; Krokhina, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    Information on carbon nanostructures (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamond and nanodispersed active carbon) used to develop high-performance sorbents of organics and heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions is collected and analyzed. The advantages in the synthesis of hybrid carbon nanostructures and the possibilities of surface modification of these systems in order to carry out fast sorption pre-concentration are considered. Prospects for application of these materials in sorption technologies and analytical chemistry are discussed. The bibliography includes 364 references.

  20. Selective Cell Growth on Fibronectin-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgung, Seon; Park, Sung Young; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Minbaek; Nam, Jwa-Min; Hong, Seunghun

    2008-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been considered a promising material for biological applications including biosensors, therapeutic application, and nano-structured scaffolds. However, there are still controversies associated with toxicity and biocompatibility of CNTs on live cells. Here, we report general strategy to functionalize CNTs with cell adhesion molecules (fibronectins) for selective and stable adhesion of cells on CNTs. Interestingly, more fibronectins were adsorbed and activated on CNTs rather than on hydrophobic self assembled monolayers (SAMs) or bare substrates (SiO2). We demonstrate the functionality of fibronectins on CNTs with immunofluorescence and molecule-level force measurement study using atomic force microscopy (AFM). These fibronectin-CNT hybrid nanostructures were successfully applied to attract cells selectively onto predefined regions on the substrate. Our strategy was generally available on various cell types including mesenchymal stem cells, KB cells, and NIH3T3 fibroblast cells (Advanced Materials 19, 2530-2534 (2007)). We will also discuss about its impacts on cell biology combined with CNTs.

  1. Magnetic carbon nanostructures: microwave energy-assisted pyrolysis vs. conventional pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiahua; Pallavkar, Sameer; Chen, Minjiao; Yerra, Narendranath; Luo, Zhiping; Colorado, Henry A; Lin, Hongfei; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Khasanov, Airat; Ho, Thomas C; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2013-01-11

    Magnetic carbon nanostructures from microwave assisted- and conventional-pyrolysis processes are compared. Unlike graphitized carbon shells from conventional heating, different carbon shell morphologies including nanotubes, nanoflakes and amorphous carbon were observed. Crystalline iron and cementite were observed in the magnetic core, different from a single cementite phase from the conventional process.

  2. Functional surface chemistry of carbon-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdula, Daner

    The recently discovered abilities to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes and prepare single layer graphene have spurred interest in these sp2-bonded carbon nanostructures. In particular, studies of their potential use in electronic devices are many as silicon integrated circuits are encountering processing limitations, quantum effects, and thermal management issues due to rapid device scaling. Nanotube and graphene implementation in devices does come with significant hurdles itself. Among these issues are the ability to dope these materials and understanding what influences defects have on expected properties. Because these nanostructures are entirely all-surface, with every atom exposed to ambient, introduction of defects and doping by chemical means is expected to be an effective route for addressing these issues. Raman spectroscopy has been a proven characterization method for understanding vibrational and even electronic structure of graphene, nanotubes, and graphite, especially when combined with electrical measurements, due to a wealth of information contained in each spectrum. In Chapter 1, a discussion of the electronic structure of graphene is presented. This outlines the foundation for all sp2-bonded carbon electronic properties and is easily extended to carbon nanotubes. Motivation for why these materials are of interest is readily gained. Chapter 2 presents various synthesis/preparation methods for both nanotubes and graphene, discusses fabrication techniques for making devices, and describes characterization methods such as electrical measurements as well as static and time-resolved Raman spectroscopy. Chapter 3 outlines changes in the Raman spectra of individual metallic single-walled carbon nantoubes (SWNTs) upon sidewall covalent bond formation. It is observed that the initial degree of disorder has a strong influence on covalent sidewall functionalization which has implications on developing electronically selective covalent chemistries and

  3. Self-assembly of double helical nanostructures inside carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cheng; Xue, Qingzhong; Shan, Meixia; Jing, Nuannuan; Ling, Cuicui; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Jiao, Zhiyong; Xing, Wei; Yan, Zifeng

    2013-05-21

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to show that a DNA-like double helix of two poly(acetylene) (PA) chains can form inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The computational results indicate that SWNTs can activate and guide the self-assembly of polymer chains, allowing them to adopt a helical configuration in a SWNT through the combined action of the van der Waals potential well and the π-π stacking interaction between the polymer and the inner surface of SWNTs. Meanwhile both the SWNT size and polymer chain stiffness determine the outcome of the nanostructure. Furthermore, we also found that water clusters encourage the self-assembly of PA helical structures in the tube. This molecular model may lead to a better understanding of the formation of a double helix biological molecule inside SWNTs. Alternatively, it could form the basis of a novel nanoscale material by utilizing the 'empty' spaces of SWNTs.

  4. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100–270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies. PMID:26568414

  5. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-16

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  6. Preparation and characterization of photocatalytic carbon dots-sensitized electrospun titania nanostructured fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haopeng; Zhu, Yihua; Cao, Huimin; Yang, Xiaoling; Li, Chunzhong

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► The TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers are fabricated by using APS combining the electrospinning TiO{sub 2} nanostructured fibers and CDs. ► The CD can work as a photosensitizer in the degradation of rhodamine B under visible light irradiation. ► The TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers exhibit enhanced photocatalytic efficiency and can be easily handled and recycled. -- Abstract: The carbon dots (CDs) are new functional carbon-aceous materials. Compared to conventional dye molecules and semiconductor quantum dots, CDs are superior in chemical inertness and low toxicity. The TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers were fabricated by combining the electrospinning technique and reflux method. Compared with the pure TiO{sub 2} nanostructured fibers and P25, the TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers exhibited enhanced photocatalytic efficiency of photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers could be attributed to the presence of CDs embedded in TiO{sub 2} nanostructured fibers. The CD can work as a photosensitizer in the degradation. Furthermore, the TiO{sub 2}-CDs nanostructured fibers could be easily handled and recycled due to their one-dimensional nanostructural property.

  7. Microwave-assisted functionalization of carbon nanostructures in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Guryanov, Ivan; Toma, Francesca Maria; Montellano López, Alejandro; Carraro, Mauro; Da Ros, Tatiana; Angelini, Guido; D'Aurizio, Eleonora; Fontana, Antonella; Maggini, Michele; Prato, Maurizio; Bonchio, Marcella

    2009-11-23

    The effect of microwave (MW) irradiation and ionic liquids (IL) on the cycloaddition of azomethine ylides to [60]fullerene has been investigated by screening the reaction protocol with regard to the IL medium composition, the applied MW power, and the simultaneous cooling of the system. [60]Fullerene conversion up to 98 % is achieved in 2-10 min, by using a 1:3 mixture of the IL 1-methyl-3-n-octyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([omim]BF(4)) and o-dichlorobenzene, and an applied power as low as 12 W. The mono- versus poly-addition selectivity to [60]fullerene can be tuned as a function of fullerene concentration. The reaction scope includes aliphatic, aromatic, and fluorous-tagged (FT) derivatives. MW irradiation of IL-structured bucky gels is instrumental for the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), yielding group coverages of up to one functional group per 60 carbon atoms of the SWNT network. An improved performance is obtained in low viscosity bucky gels, in the order [bmim]BF(4)> [omim]BF(4)> [hvim]TF(2)N (bmim=1-methyl-3-n-butyl imidazolium; hvim=1-vinyl-3-n-hexadecyl imidazolium). With this protocol, the introduction of fluorous-tagged pyrrolidine moieties onto the SWNT surface (1/108 functional coverage) yields novel FT-CNS (carbon nanostructures) with high affinity for fluorinated phases.

  8. Flame synthesis of carbon nanostructures on Ni-plated hardmetal substrates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we demonstrate that carbon nanostructures could be synthesized on the Ni-plated YG6 (WC-6 wt% Co) hardmetal substrate by a simple ethanol diffusion flame method. The morphologies and microstructures of the Ni-plated layer and the carbon nanostructures were examined by various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mechanism of such carbon nanostructures is discussed. This work may provide a strategy to improve the performance of hardmetal products and thus to widen their potential applications. PMID:21711860

  9. Integration of inorganic nanostructures with polydopamine-derived carbon: tunable morphologies and versatile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Junhua; Seyed Shahabadi, Seyed Ismail; Lu, Xuehong

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA), a mussel adhesive-inspired biomimetic polymer, has attracted tremendous attention owing to its extremely versatile adhesion properties, facile aqueous coating process, capability of self-assembly to form nanostructures, and abundant surface functional groups for secondary modification. PDA is also a fantastic carbon source because it gives nitrogen (N)-doped graphite-like carbon in high yield, and the carbonized PDA (C-PDA) thin coatings have similar properties to those of N-doped multilayered graphene, i.e., they exhibit high electrical conductivity, and good electrochemical and mechanical properties. In comparison with other carbon sources, an outstanding feature of PDA lies in its ease of integration with inorganic nanostructures and capability for easy tailoring the structure and morphology of the resultant composite nanostructures. In this article, different routes for the preparation of C-PDA-based composite nanostructures, such as carbon/metal oxide and carbon/Si hollow, mesoporous, core-shell, yolk-shell nanostructures, are introduced with typical examples. The structures, morphologies and properties of the C-PDA-based composite nanostructures are also reviewed, and their potential applications in various engineering fields, such as energy storage, solar water splitting, flexible electronics, catalysis, sensing and environmental engineering, are highlighted. Finally a future outlook for this fascinating composite-nanostructure enabler is also presented.

  10. Ultrafast dynamics of periodic nanostructure formation on diamondlike carbon films irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, Godai; Miyazaki, Kenzo

    2006-11-01

    Using a pump-probe technique the authors have measured reflectivity of diamondlike carbon (DLC) film irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses to understand dynamic processes responsible for periodic nanostructure formation. The results have shown that characteristic reflectivity change observed as a function of superimposed laser shots is closely associated with the nanostructure formation and the bonding structure change to induce surface swelling, leading to a conclusion that the nanostructure formation on the DLC surface is certainly preceded by the bonding structure change. The nanoscale ablation to produce the nanostructure is discussed based on the local field generation on the surface.

  11. Electrochemical Behavior of Carbon Nanostructured Electrodes: Graphene, Carbon Nanotubes, and Nanocrystalline Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Akshay Sanjay

    The primary goals of this research were to investigate the electrochemical behavior of carbon nanostructures of varying morphology, identify morphological characteristics that improve electrochemical capacitance for applications in energy storage and neural stimulation, and engineer and characterize a boron-­doped diamond (BDD) electrode based electrochemical system for disinfection of human liquid waste. Carbon nanostructures; ranging from vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-­CNTs) to carbon nanosheets (CNS); were synthesized using a MPECVD system. The nanostructures were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. In addition to employing commonly used electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), a new technique was developed to evaluate the energy and power density of individual electrodes. This facilitated comparison of a variety of electrode materials without having to first develop complex device packaging schemes. It was found that smaller pore size and higher density of carbon foliates on a three-dimensional scaffold of carbon nanotubes increased specific capacitance. A design of experiments (DOE) study was conducted to explore the parametric space of the MWCNT system. A range of carbon nanostructures of varying morphology were obtained. It was observed that the capacitance was dependent on defect density. Capacitance increased with defect density. A BDD electrode was characterized for use in a module designed to disinfect human liquid waste as a part of a new advanced energy neutral, water and additive-free toilet designed for treating waste at the point of source. The electrode was utilized in a batch process system that generated mixed oxidants from ions present in simulated urine and inactivated E. Coli bacteria. Among the mixed oxidants, the concentration of chlorine species was measured and was

  12. Microwave Plasma Based Single-Step Method for Generation of Carbon Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    31st ICPIG, July 14-19, 2013, Granada, Spain Microwave plasma based single-step method for generation of carbon nanostructures A. Dias 1 , E...Nowadays, carbon based two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures are one of the ongoing strategic research areas in science and technology. Graphene, an...fabrication, to obtain transferable sheets [1]. A plasma based method to synthesize substrate free, i.e., “free–standing” graphene at ambient conditions has

  13. Electrodes synthesized from carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal metal adlayer

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2014-04-15

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by a surface preparation process involving immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing a suitable quantity of non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means. The nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. The process can be controlled and repeated to obtain a desired film coverage. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  14. Synthesis and Integration of Nanostructured Carbon: Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Nanocomposites and Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulotty, Richard Stephen

    Nanostructured carbon, in the form of tubes or sheets, exhibits exceptional thermal and electrical properties. Graphene, a single atomic sheet of hexagonal sp2 bonded carbon, posesses a thermal conductivity higher than diamond, with an extremely high electron mobility. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), which are tubes composed of one or more graphene sheets, also posess high thermal conductivity and electron mobility. One of the major problems facing the application of nanomaterials is integration into already existing material systems. A second challenge is controlled synthesis of nanomaterials. In this dissertation research novel methods were investigated for coupling carbon nanotubes to polymer matrices, as well as new approaches for controlling the synthesis of graphene and reduced graphene oxide like carbon (R-GOC) on copper (Cu) foils via chemical vapor deposition. It was determined that carboxylic functionalization of carbon nanotubes was effective in improving the coupling of CNTs to polymer matrices, affecting the thermal transport of the resulting CNT-polymer nanocomposites. From the CVD studies it was established that the cooling phase gases flowed after deposition influence the growth mechanics of graphene on Cu foil. Further CVD studies showed that methane may be decomposed directly onto quartz to form reduced graphene oxide like carbon thin films. The obtained thermal characterization results are important for development of CNTs as fillers for composite pastes with high thermal conductivity, and the results of the CVD studies are important for developing further understanding of growth mechanics of bilayer graphene and other nanostructured carbon. In addition to the fundamental study of CVD synthesis of graphene and R-GOC, this dissertation work includes engineering of graphene and R-GOC to various applications, including the development of the thinnest flexible transistor with active materials made from all-2D materials, as well as large-scale electron

  15. Defect studies on as-synthesized and purified carbon nanostructures produced by arc-discharge in solution process.

    PubMed

    Bera, Debasis; Perrault, Jean-Philippe; Heinrich, Helge; Seal, Sudipta

    2006-04-01

    Carbon nanostructures are synthesized using a novel arc-discharge in solution process. A multitude of defects on nanotubes and nanostructures is found. Evidence of these defects in as-synthesized carbon nanostructures is explored using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, heptagonal, toroidal, oval, and spherical nanoshells are found in HRTEM investigation along with carbon nanotubes, carbon nanohorns, carbon rods, nanoporous carbon, dislodged graphene sheets, and amorphous carbon. Purifications are carried out through two oxidation methods to eliminate the amorphous carbon. Several different defects caused by oxidations are also found in purified samples.

  16. Non-faradic carbon nanotube-based supercapacitors: state of the art. Analysis of all the main scientific contributions from 1997 to our days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondavalli, P.; Pribat, D.; Schnell, J.-P.; Delfaure, C.; Gorintin, L.; Legagneux, P.; Baraton, L.; Galindo, C.

    2012-10-01

    This contribution deals with the state of the art of studies concerning the fabrication of electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) also called super- or ultracapacitors and obtained using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) without exploiting Faradic reactions. From the first work published in 1997, EDLCs fabricated using carbon nanotubes as constitutive material for electrodes showed very interesting characteristics. It appeared that they could potentially outperform traditional technologies based on activated carbon. Different methods to fabricate the CNT-based electrodes have been proposed in order to improve the performances (mainly energy densities and power densities), for example filtration, direct growth on metal collector or deposition using an air-brush technique. In this contribution we will introduce the main works in the field. Finally, we will point out an emerging interest for supercapacitors fabricated on flexible substrates, exploiting the outstanding mechanical performances of CNTs, for new kinds of applications such as portable electronics.

  17. Non-covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures for synthesizing carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiqing; Song, Sing I; Song, Ga Young; Kim, Il

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanostructures (CNSs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanodiamonds provide an important type of substrate for constructing a variety of hybrid nanomaterials. However, their intrinsic chemistry-inert surfaces make it indispensable to pre-functionalize them prior to immobilizing additional components onto their surfaces. Currently developed strategies for functionalizing CNSs include covalent and non-covalent approaches. Conventional covalent treatments often damage the structure integrity of carbon surfaces and adversely affect their physical properties. In contrast, the non-covalent approach offers a non-destructive way to modify CNSs with desired functional surfaces, while reserving their intrinsic properties. Thus far, a number of surface modifiers including aromatic compounds, small-molecular surfactants, amphiphilic polymers, and biomacromolecules have been developed to non-covalently functionalize CNS surfaces. Mediated by these surface modifiers, various functional components such as organic species and inorganic nanoparticles were further decorated onto their surfaces, resulting in versatile carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials with broad applications in chemical engineering and biomedical areas. In this review, the recent advances in the generation of such hybrid nanostructures based on non-covalently functionalized CNSs will be reviewed.

  18. Developments in Analytical Chemistry: Acoustically Levitated Drop Reactors for Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Detection of Toxic Organic Phosphonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Christopher Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Developments in analytical chemistry were made using acoustically levitated small volumes of liquid to study enzyme reaction kinetics and by detecting volatile organic compounds in the gas phase using single-walled carbon nanotubes. Experience gained in engineering, electronics, automation, and software development from the design and…

  19. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg-1), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg-1, respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (~0.4 MPa).Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid

  20. Nanostructured membranes and electrodes with sulfonic acid functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Bijay P.; Schieda, M.; Shahi, Vinod K.; Nunes, Suzana P.

    Herein we report the covalent functionalization of multiwall carbon nanotubes by grafting sulfanilic acid and their dispersion into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The nanocomposites were explored as an option for tuning the proton and electron conductivity, swelling, water and alcohol permeability aiming at nanostructured membranes and electrodes for application in alcohol or hydrogen fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. The nanocomposites were extensively characterized, by studying their physicochemical and electrochemical properties. They were processed as self-supporting films with high mechanical stability, proton conductivity of 4.47 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 30 °C and 16.8 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 80 °C and 100% humidity level, electron conductivity much higher than for the plain polymer. The methanol permeability could be reduced to 1/20, keeping water permeability at reasonable values. The ratio of bound water also increases with increasing content of sulfonated filler, helping in keeping water in the polymer in conditions of low external humidity level.

  1. Emission spectra analysis of arc plasma for synthesis of carbon nanostructures in various magnetic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures. By introducing a non-uniform magnetic field in arc plasmas, high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and large-scale graphene flakes can be obtained in a single step. In this paper, ultraviolet-visible emission spectra of arc in different spots under various magnetic conditions are analyzed to provide an in situ investigation for transformation processes of evaporated species and growth of carbon nanostructures in arc. Based on the arc spectra of carbon diatomic Swan bands, vibrational temperature in arc is determined. The vibrational temperature in arc center was measured around 6950 K, which is in good agreement with our simulation results. Experimental and simulation results suggest that SWCNT are formed in the arc periphery region. Transmission electronic microscope and Raman spectroscope are also employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures.

  2. Passively Q-switched Er,Yb:GdAl3(BO3)4 laser with single-walled carbon nanotube based saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachenya, K. N.; Kisel, V. E.; Yasukevich, A. S.; Prudnikova, M. B.; Maltsev, V. V.; Leonyuk, N. I.; Choi, S. Y.; Rotermund, F.; Kuleshov, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a passively Q-switched Er,Yb:GdAl3(BO3)4 diode-pumped laser emitting near 1.5 µm. By using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as a saturable absorber, Q-switched laser pulses with energy of 0.8 µJ and duration of 130 ns at a maximum repetition rate of 500 kHz were obtained at 1550 nm.

  3. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-06-21

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg(-1)), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg(-1), respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (∼ 0.4 MPa).

  4. A comparative study on carbon, boron-nitride, boron-phosphide and silicon-carbide nanotubes based on surface electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi

    2013-06-01

    A density functional theory study was carried out to predict the electrostatic potentials as well as average local ionization energies on both the outer and the inner surfaces of carbon, boron-nitride (BN), boron-phosphide (BP) and silicon-carbide (SiC) single-walled nanotubes. For each nanotube, the effect of tube radius on the surface potentials and calculated average local ionization energies was investigated. It is found that SiC and BN nanotubes have much stronger and more variable surface potentials than do carbon and BP nanotubes. For the SiC, BN and BP nanotubes, there are characteristic patterns of positive and negative sites on the outer lateral surfaces. On the other hand, a general feature of all of the systems studied is that stronger potentials are associated with regions of higher curvature. According to the evaluated surface electrostatic potentials, it is concluded that, for the narrowest tubes, the water solubility of BN tubes is slightly greater than that of SiC followed by carbon and BP nanotubes.

  5. Calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures for the selective capture of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jahyun; Bae, Hyeonhu; Kang, Lei; Huang, Bing; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-10-26

    The development of advanced materials for CO2 capture is of great importance for mitigating climate change. In this paper, we outline our discovery that calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures, i.e., zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs), carbyne, and graphyne, have great potential for selective CO2 capture, as demonstrated via first-principles calculations. Our findings show that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can bind up to three CO2 molecules at each Ca atom site with an adsorption energy of ∼-0.8 eV per CO2, making them suitable for reversible CO2 capture. They adsorb CO2 molecules preferentially, compared with other gas molecules such as H2, N2, and CH4. Moreover, based on equilibrium thermodynamical simulations, we confirm that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can capture CO2 selectively from a gas mixture with a capacity of ∼4.5 mmol g(-1) under ambient conditions. Similar results have been found in other carbon nanomaterials, indicating the generality of carbon based nanostructures for selective CO2 capture under ambient conditions.

  6. Nanostructured carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes for supercapacitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Mingjia; Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Jiangtian; Li, Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2013-01-07

    This paper presents a review of the research progress in the carbon-metal oxide composites for supercapacitor electrodes. In the past decade, various carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes have been developed by integrating metal oxides into different carbon nanostructures including zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticles, one-dimensional nanostructures (carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers), two-dimensional nanosheets (graphene and reduced graphene oxides) as well as three-dimensional porous carbon nano-architectures. This paper has described the constituent, the structure and the properties of the carbon-metal oxide composites. An emphasis is placed on the synergistic effects of the composite on the performance of supercapacitors in terms of specific capacitance, energy density, power density, rate capability and cyclic stability. This paper has also discussed the physico-chemical processes such as charge transport, ion diffusion and redox reactions involved in supercapacitors.

  7. Yeast and carbon nanotube based biocatalyst developed by synergetic effects of covalent bonding and hydrophobic interaction for performance enhancement of membraneless microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Christwardana, Marcelinus; Kwon, Yongchai

    2017-02-01

    Membraneless microbial fuel cell (MFC) employing new microbial catalyst formed as yeast cultivated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and carbon nanotube (yeast/CNT) is suggested. To analyze its catalytic activity and performance and stability of MFC, several characterizations are performed. According to the characterizations, the catalyst shows excellent catalytic activities by facile transfer of electrons via reactions of NAD, FAD, cytochrome c and cytochrome a3, while it induces high maximum power density (MPD) (344mW·m(-2)). It implies that adoption of yeast induces increases in catalytic activity and MFC performance. Furthermore, MPD is maintained to 86% of initial value even after eight days, showing excellent MFC stability.

  8. Role of finite-size effects in the microwave and subterahertz electromagnetic response of a multiwall carbon-nanotube-based composite: Theory and interpretation of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuba, M. V.; Melnikov, A. V.; Paddubskaya, A. G.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Thomsen, C.

    2013-07-01

    Electromagnetic scattering theory has been applied to calculate polarizabilities of finite-length multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in microwave and subterahertz ranges. The influence of the length and diameter of a MWCNT and electron relaxation time on the regime of the MWCNT interaction with an electromagnetic field has been analyzed. Significant screening effect, due to the strong depolarizing field, determines electromagnetic response of the MWCNTs field in a wide gigahertz frequency range. The main features of the gigahertz spectra of effective permittivity and electromagnetic interference shielding efficiencies of a MWCNT-based composite observed previously in experiments have been systematized and theoretically described.

  9. In situ mechanical investigation of carbon nanotube-graphene junction in three-dimensional carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingchao; Kim, Nam Dong; Varshney, Vikas; Sihn, Sangwook; Li, Yilun; Roy, Ajit K; Tour, James M; Lou, Jun

    2017-02-23

    Hierarchically organized three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotubes/graphene (CNTs/graphene) hybrid nanostructures hold great promises in composite and battery applications. Understanding the junction strength between CNTs and graphene is crucial for utilizing such special nanostructures. Here, in situ pulling an individual CNT bundle out of graphene is carried out for the first time using a nanomechanical tester developed in-house, and the measured junction strength of CNTs/graphene is 2.23 ± 0.56 GPa. The post transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of remained graphene after peeling off CNT forest confirms that the failure during pull-out test occurs at the CNT-graphene junction. Such a carefully designed study makes it possible to better understand the interfacial interactions between CNTs and graphene in the 3D CNTs/graphene nanostructures. The coupled experimental and computational effort suggests that the junction between the CNTs and the graphene layer is likely to be chemically bonded, or at least consisting of a mixture of chemical bonding and van der Waals interactions.

  10. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-16

    Kobayashi Y, Yamashita T, Ueno Y, Niwa O, Homma Y, Ogino T. Extremely intense Raman signals from single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended between Si...carbon nanotube field effect transistors with carbon nanotube electrodes. Appl Phys Lett. 2008;92(4):043110-3. [13] Jung YJ, Homma Y, Ogino T...Homma Y, Yamashita T, Kobayashi Y, Ogino T. Interconnection of nanostructures using carbon nanotubes. Physica B. 2002;323(1-4):122-3. [23] Searson

  11. Development of carbon nanotubes based gas diffusion layers by in situ chemical vapor deposition process for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, A. M.; Kanagala, P.; Veedu, V.

    A proprietary in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was developed for gas diffusion layer (GDL) by growing a micro-porous layer on the macro-porous, non-woven fibrous carbon paper. The characteristics of the GDL samples such as, surface morphology, wetting characteristics, and cross-section were characterized using electron microscopes, goniometer and focused ion beam, respectively. Fuel cell performance of the GDLs was evaluated using single cell with hydrogen/oxygen as well as hydrogen/air at ambient pressure, at elevated temperature and various RH conditions using Nafion-212 as an electrolyte. The GDLs with in situ growth of micro-porous layers containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) without any hydrophobic agent showed significant improvement in mechanical robustness as well as fuel cell performance at elevated temperature at lower RH conditions. The micro-porous layer of the GDLs as seen under scanning electron microscope showed excellent surface morphology with surface homogeneity through reinforcement by the multi-walled CNTs.

  12. Electrocatalytic Synthesis of Ammonia at Room Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure from Water and Nitrogen on a Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiming; Perathoner, Siglinda; Ampelli, Claudio; Mebrahtu, Chalachew; Su, Dangsheng; Centi, Gabriele

    2017-03-01

    Ammonia is synthesized directly from water and N2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a flow electrochemical cell operating in gas phase (half-cell for the NH3 synthesis). Iron supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was used as the electrocatalyst in this half-cell. A rate of ammonia formation of 2.2×10(-3)  gNH3  m(-2)  h(-1) was obtained at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a flow of N2 , with stable behavior for at least 60 h of reaction, under an applied potential of -2.0 V. This value is higher than the rate of ammonia formation obtained using noble metals (Ru/C) under comparable reaction conditions. Furthermore, hydrogen gas with a total Faraday efficiency as high as 95.1 % was obtained. Data also indicate that the active sites in NH3 electrocatalytic synthesis may be associated to specific carbon sites formed at the interface between iron particles and CNT and able to activate N2 , making it more reactive towards hydrogenation.

  13. A multi-walled carbon nanotubes based molecularly imprinted polymers electrochemical sensor for the sensitive determination of HIV-p24.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya; Shen, Xiao-Lei; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Hai-Shui; Wang, Li-Shi

    2017-03-01

    To develop a rapid, simple and sensitive method for the determination of human immunodeficiency virus p24 (HIV-p24), a novel molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) electrochemical sensor was constructed on the surface of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by surface polymerization using acrylamide (AAM) as functional monomer, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as cross-linking agent and ammonium persulphate (APS) as initiator. Each modification step was carefully examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The proposed MIPs electrochemical biosensor exhibited specific recognition to HIV-p24 and displayed a broad linear detection range from 1.0×10(-4) to 2ngcm(-3) with a low detection limit of 0.083pgcm(-3) (S/N=3). This performance is superior to most HIV-p24 sensors based on other methods. Meanwhile, this sensor possessed of good selectivity, repeatability, reproducibility, stability and was successfully applied for the determination of HIV-p24 in real human serum samples, giving satisfactory results. The accuracy and reliability of the sensor is further confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  14. Carbon-assisted morphological manipulation of CdS nanostructures and their cathodoluminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Meng; Zhai, Tianyou; Wang Xi; Liao Qing; Ma Ying; Yao, Jiannian

    2009-11-15

    CdS nanostructures with different morphologies and sizes were successfully fabricated through a facile and effective carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method. Through simply changing the positions of silicon substrates, the temperatures and the effects of carbon in different zones were modified, and thus the morphologies of CdS nanostructures were varied from multipods to nanobrushes to nanocups. These nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurement shows that the as-grown CdS nanostructures display different luminescent properties. CdS multipods and nanocups show mainly green emission centered at {approx}496 nm. However, nanobrushes exhibit predominant red emission band peaking at {approx}711 nm. These interesting results show that carbon not only affected the growth process but also influenced the properties of CdS nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: A facile and effective carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method is explored to synthesize CdS multipods, nanobrushes and nanocups. These CdS nanostructures display very different optical properties.

  15. Use of facile mechanochemical method to functionalize carbon nanofibers with nanostructured polyaniline and their electrochemical capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xusheng; Liu, Hong-Yuan; Cai, Guipeng; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Baji, Avinash

    2012-02-01

    A facile approach to functionalize carbon nanofibers [CNFs] with nanostructured polyaniline was developed via in situ mechanochemical polymerization of polyaniline in the presence of chemically treated CNFs. The nanostructured polyaniline grafting on the CNF was mainly in a form of branched nanofibers as well as rough nanolayers. The good dispersibility and processability of the hybrid nanocomposite could be attributed to its overall nanostructure which enhanced its accessibility to the electrolyte. The mechanochemical oxidation polymerization was believed to be related to the strong Lewis acid characteristic of FeCl3 and the Lewis base characteristic of aniline. The growth mechanism of the hierarchical structured nanofibers was also discussed. After functionalization with the nanostructured polyaniline, the hybrid polyaniline/CNF composite showed an enhanced specific capacitance, which might be related to its hierarchical nanostructure and the interaction between the aromatic polyaniline molecules and the CNFs.

  16. Use of facile mechanochemical method to functionalize carbon nanofibers with nanostructured polyaniline and their electrochemical capacitance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A facile approach to functionalize carbon nanofibers [CNFs] with nanostructured polyaniline was developed via in situ mechanochemical polymerization of polyaniline in the presence of chemically treated CNFs. The nanostructured polyaniline grafting on the CNF was mainly in a form of branched nanofibers as well as rough nanolayers. The good dispersibility and processability of the hybrid nanocomposite could be attributed to its overall nanostructure which enhanced its accessibility to the electrolyte. The mechanochemical oxidation polymerization was believed to be related to the strong Lewis acid characteristic of FeCl3 and the Lewis base characteristic of aniline. The growth mechanism of the hierarchical structured nanofibers was also discussed. After functionalization with the nanostructured polyaniline, the hybrid polyaniline/CNF composite showed an enhanced specific capacitance, which might be related to its hierarchical nanostructure and the interaction between the aromatic polyaniline molecules and the CNFs. PMID:22315992

  17. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanostructures through enzyme immobilization in colloidal silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, Evan M.

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and carbon nanopipettes (CNP) provide interesting high aspect ratio scaffolds on which to base functionally gradient materials. In this dissertation, we present a general method for the production of an enzymatically active composite material based on MWNTs. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) was applied to purified MWNTs, generating a positive electrostatic potential on the MWNTs. This positive potential was used to apply negatively charged colloidal silica particle in the presence of a high concentration of enzyme. The silica coating continued to grow via localized condensation of silica particles driven by the buffered saline conditions, immobilizing the enzyme within the coating. The mesoporous nanostructure was characterized via transmission electron microscopy. Optical spectroscopy experiments on the material employed as an active suspension showed that the immobilized enzymes horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and tyrosinase (TV) retained their activity upon incorporation into the material. Using HRP as a model enzyme, it was determined that the MWNT-HRP-Silica material showed similar pH and temperature dependencies in activity to those of free HRP in solution. An examination of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics showed that the material had a slightly higher value of KM than did free HRP. The MWNT-HRP-Silica material was also employed as an active filter membrane, which allowed us to explore the reusable nature of the material. We were able to show the denaturation of the filter due to the loss of Ca2+ cations at low pH and then restore the activity by soaking the filter membrane in 1 mM CaCl2. The MWNT-HRP-Silica material was used to modify a carbon microelectrode and produce a functioning electrochemical sensor for H2O2 . Utilizing cyclic voltammetry, the sensor was shown to have a linear response in limiting current versus concentration of H2O2 of 4.26 pA/microM. We also determined a lower detection limit of 0.67 microM H2O2. CNPs were

  18. Label-free detection of cardiac troponin-I using gold nanoparticles functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, Sharma, Vikash; Puri, Nitin K.; Singh, Rajiv K.; Biradar, Ashok M.; Mulchanadani, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    We report a specific and ultrasensitive, label-free chemiresistive biosensor based on mercaptopropionic acid capped gold nanoparticles (GNP) functionalized single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) hybrid for the detection of cardiac specific biomarker troponin-I (cTnI). GNPs were attached to SWNTs through a molecular linker 1-pyrenemethylamine. The highly specific cTnI antibody was covalently immobilized on GNPs through capping agent using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The cTnI interaction to its corresponding antibody was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNTs channel, and a detailed field-effect transistor characteristic was delineated. The device exhibited a linear response to cTnI from 0.01 to 10 ng ml-1.

  19. Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(L-lactide) diblock copolymer/carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites: LiCl as supramolecular structure-directing agent.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Franck; Raquez, Jean-Marie; Verge, Pierre; Martínez de Arenaza, Inger; Coto, Borja; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Meaurio, Emilio; Dervaux, Bart; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon; Du Prez, Filip; Dubois, Philippe

    2011-11-14

    This work relies on the CNT dispersion in either solution or a polymer matrix through the formation of a three-component supramolecular system composed of PEO-b-PLLA diblock copolymer, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and lithium chloride. According to a one-pot procedure in solution, the "self-assembly" concept has demonstrated its efficiency using suspension tests of CNTs. Characterizations of the supramolecular system by photon correlation spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations highlight the charge transfer interaction from the CNTs toward the PEO-b-PLLA/LiCl complex. Finally, this concept was successfully extended in bulk (absence of solvent) via melt-processing techniques by dispersing these complexes in a commercial polylactide (PLA) matrix. Electrical conductivity measurements and transmission electron microscopy attested for the remarkable dispersion of CNTs, confirming the design of high-performance PLA-based materials.

  20. Toward carbon-nanotube-based theranostic agents for microwave detection and treatment of breast cancer: enhanced dielectric and heating response of tissue-mimicking materials.

    PubMed

    Mashal, Alireza; Sitharaman, Balaji; Li, Xu; Avti, Pramod K; Sahakian, Alan V; Booske, John H; Hagness, Susan C

    2010-08-01

    The experimental results reported in this paper suggest that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have the potential to enhance dielectric contrast between malignant and normal tissue for microwave detection of breast cancer and facilitate selective heating of malignant tissue for microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer. In this study, we constructed tissue-mimicking materials with varying concentrations of SWCNTs and characterized their dielectric properties and heating response. At SWCNT concentrations of less than 0.5% by weight, we observed significant increases in the relative permittivity and effective conductivity. In microwave heating experiments, we observed significantly greater temperature increases in mixtures containing SWCNTs. These temperature increases scaled linearly with the effective conductivity of the mixtures. This work is a first step towards the development of functionalized, tumor-targeting SWCNTs as theranostic (integrated therapeutic and diagnostic) agents for microwave breast cancer detection and treatment.

  1. Influence of size and morphology on the optical properties of carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Hajar; Dorranian, Davoud

    2016-03-01

    Optical properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser ablation method in different liquid environments have been studied experimentally. In this work we used a 7 ns fundamental wavelength of pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm and 10 Hz repetition rate to produce carbon nanostructures including graphene in distilled water, acetone, alcohol, and CTAB. Structure and morphology of carbon nanostructures were studied using their UV-Vis-NIR spectrum, TEM images, and Raman scattering spectrum. Results show that in our experimental condition distilled water was the most capable medium for producing graphene. Color of suspensions varied with the amount of carbon nanoparticles in the suspension while the bandgap energy of samples decreases with increasing the amount of graphene.

  2. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    adhesion and durability in the environment. Though these coatings are efficient in protecting polymer composites, their application imposes severe constraints. Their thermal expansion coefficients may differ markedly from those of polymer composite substrates: as a result, cracks develop in the coatings on thermal cycling and AO can penetrate through them to the substrate. In addition to the technicalities of forming an effective barrier, such factors as cost, convenience of application and ease of repair are important considerations in the selection of a coating for a particular application. The latter issues drive the aerospace research toward the development of novel light composite materials, like the so called polymer nanocomposites, which are materials with a polymer matrix and a filler with at least one dimension less than 100 nanometers. Current interest in nanocomposites has been generated and maintained because nanoparticle-filled polymers exhibit unique combinations of properties not achievable with traditional composites. These combinations of properties can be achieved because of the small size of the fillers, the large surface area the fillers provide, and in many cases the unique properties of the fillers themselves. In particular, the carbon fiber-based polymeric composite materials are the basic point of interest: the aim of the present study is to find new solution to produce carbon fiber-based composites with even more upgraded performances. One intriguing strategy to tackle such an issue has been picked out in the coupling between the carbon fibers and the carbon nanostructures. That for two main reasons: first, carbon nanostructures have shown fancy potentialities for any kind of technological applications since their discovery, second, the chemical affinity between fiber and nanostructure (made of the same element) should be a likely route to approach the typical problems due to thermo-mechanical compatibility. This work is joined in such framework

  3. Application of multiwall carbon nanotubes-based matrix solid phase dispersion extraction for determination of hormones in butter by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Su, Rui; Wang, Xinghua; Xu, Xu; Wang, Ziming; Li, Dan; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xueyuan; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2011-08-05

    The multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-based matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) was applied for the extraction of hormones, including 17-α-ethinylestradiol, 17-α-estradiol, estriol, 17-β-estradiol, estrone, medroxyprogesterone, progesterone and norethisterone acetate in butter samples. The method includes MSPD extraction of the target analytes from butter samples, derivatization of hormones with heptafluorobutyric acid anhydride-acetonitrile mixture, and determination by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mixture containing 0.30 g graphitized MWCNTs and 0.10 g MWCNTs was selected as absorbent. Ethyl acetate was used as elution solvent. The elution solvent volume and flow rate were 12 mL and 0.9 mL min(-1), respectively. The recoveries of hormones obtained by analyzing the five spiked butter samples were from 84.5 to 111.2% and relative standard deviations from 1.9 to 8.9%. Limits of detection and quantification for determining the analytes were in the range of 0.2-1.3 and 0.8-4.5 μg kg(-1), respectively. Compared with other traditional methods, the proposed method is simpler in the operation and shorter in the sample pretreatment time.

  4. [Determination of 21 organophosphorus pesticides in tea by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes based on dispersive solid-phase extraction].

    PubMed

    Rong, Jiefeng; Wei, Hang; Li, Yijun; Huang, Huoshui; Xu, Meizhu

    2016-02-01

    A rapid determination method of 21 organophosphorus pesticides in tea was developed by QuEChERS method using modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-OH), primary-secondary amine (PSA) and MgSO4 coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The pesticide residues in tea were extracted with a hexane-acetone (2:1, v/v) mixture, and cleaned up by dispersive solid-phase extraction using MWCNTs-OH and primary-secondary amine (PSA) as the sorbents. After centrifugation and filtration, the target compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and quantified by the external standard method. Under the optimized conditions, good linearities were obtained in the range of 0. 01- 0. 50 mg/kg. The average recoveries were in the range of 81. 5% -109. 4% at three spiked levels, with relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 5 ) of 2. 3% - 10. 6%. The limits of quantification were 0. 001-0. 040 mg/kg. This method is simple, fast, sensitive, cheap, and can meet the requirements of the rapid detection of organophosphorus pesticides in tea.

  5. Photothermal-Responsive Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Ultrathin Membranes for On/Off Switchable Separation of Oil-in-Water Nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Gao, Shoujian; Ding, Xianguang; Wang, Dong; Jiang, Jiang; Jin, Jian; Jiang, Lei

    2015-05-26

    Oil-contaminated wastewater threatens our environment and health, especially that stabilized by surfactants. Conventional separation protocols become invalid for those surfactant-stabilized nanoemulsions due to their nanometer-sized droplets and extremely high stability. In this paper, photothermal-responsive ultrathin Au nanorods/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) cohybrid single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanoporous membranes are constructed. Such membranes are capable of separating oil-in-water nanoemulsions with a maximum flux up to 35 890 m(2)·h(-1)·bar(-1) because they feature hydrophilicity, underwater oleophobicity, and nanometer pore sizes. It is remarkable that the permeation flux can be simply modulated by light illumination during the process of separation, due to the incorporation of thermal-responsive copolymers and Au nanorods. Meanwhile, it shows ultrahigh separation efficiency (>99.99%) and desired antifouling and recyclability properties. We anticipate that our ultrathin photothermal-responsive SWCNT-based membranes provide potential for the generation of point-of-use water treatment devices.

  6. Carbon nanotube-based substrates promote cardiogenesis in brown adipose-derived stem cells via β1-integrin-dependent TGF-β1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongyu; Mou, Yongchao; Li, Yi; Li, Xia; Chen, Zi; Duval, Kayla; Huang, Zhu; Dai, Ruiwu; Tang, Lijun; Tian, Fuzhou

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy remains one of the promising approaches for cardiac repair and regeneration. However, its applications are restricted by the limited efficacy of cardiac differentiation. To address this issue, we examined whether carbon nanotubes (CNTs) would provide an instructive extracellular microenvironment to facilitate cardiogenesis in brown adipose-derived stem cells (BASCs) and to elucidate the underlying signaling pathways. In this study, we systematically investigated a series of cellular responses of BASCs due to the incorporation of CNTs into collagen (CNT-Col) substrates that promoted cell adhesion, spreading, and growth. Moreover, we found that CNT-Col substrates remarkably improved the efficiency of BASCs cardiogenesis by using fluorescence staining and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Critically, CNTs in the substrates accelerated the maturation of BASCs-derived cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism for promotion of BASCs cardiac differentiation by CNTs was determined by immunostaining, quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay. It is notable that β1-integrin-dependent TGF-β1 signaling pathway modulates the facilitative effect of CNTs in cardiac differentiation of BASCs. Therefore, it is an efficient approach to regulate cardiac differentiation of BASCs by the incorporation of CNTs into the native matrix. Importantly, our findings can not only facilitate the mechanistic understanding of molecular events initiating cardiac differentiation in stem cells, but also offer a potentially safer source for cardiac regenerative medicine. PMID:27660434

  7. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained. PMID:26411839

  8. Multiwalled carbon nanotube based molecular imprinted polymer for trace determination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyaceticacid in natural water samples using a potentiometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anirudhan, Thayyath S.; Alexander, Sheeba

    2014-06-01

    A novel potentiometric sensor based on ion imprinted polymer inclusion membrane (IPIM) was prepared from the modification of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) based molecularly imprinted polymer for the trace determination of the pesticide 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) in natural water samples. MWCNTs are initially functionalized with vinyl groups through nitric acid oxidation along with reacting by allylamine. MWCNT based imprinted polymer (MWCNT-MIP) was synthesized by means of methacrylic acid (MAA) as the monomer, trimethylol propane trimethacrylate (TRIM) as the cross linker, α,α‧-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator and 2,4-D an organochlorine pesticide molecule as the template. Organized material was characterized by means of FTIR, XRD and SEM analyses. The sensing membrane was developed by the inclusion of 2,4-D imprinted polymer materials in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix. The optimization of operational parameters normally used such as amount and nature of plasticizers sensing material, pH and response time was conducted. From the non-imprinted (NIPIM) and imprinted polymer inclusion membrane (IPIM) sensors the response behavior of 2,4-D was compared under optimum conditions. The IPIM sensor responds in the range of 1 × 10-9-1 × 10-5 M and the detection limit was found to be 1.2 × 10-9 M. The stability of MWCNT-IPIM sensor was checked by various methods and it is found to be 3 months and it can be reused many times without losing its sensitivity. For the application of sensor experiments with ground and tap water samples were performed.

  9. Accelerated killing of cancer cells using a multifunctional single-walled carbon nanotube-based system for targeted drug delivery in combination with photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Hasumura, Takashi; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2013-01-01

    The photothermal effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in combination with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeting and accelerated destruction of breast cancer cells is demonstrated in this paper. A targeted drug-delivery system was developed for selective killing of breast cancer cells with polyethylene glycol biofunctionalized and DOX-loaded SWCNTs conjugated with folic acid. In our work, in vitro drug-release studies showed that the drug (DOX) binds at physiological pH (pH 7.4) and is released only at a lower pH, ie, lysosomal pH (pH 4.0), which is the characteristic pH of the tumor environment. A sustained release of DOX from the SWCNTs was observed for a period of 3 days. SWCNTs have strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region. In this special spectral window, biological systems are highly transparent. Our study reports that under laser irradiation at 800 nm, SWCNTs exhibited strong light-heat transfer characteristics. These optical properties of SWCNTs open the way for selective photothermal ablation in cancer therapy. It was also observed that internalization and uptake of folate-conjugated NTs into cancer cells was achieved by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. Results of the in vitro experiments show that laser was effective in destroying the cancer cells, while sparing the normal cells. When the above laser effect was combined with DOX-conjugated SWCNTs, we found enhanced and accelerated killing of breast cancer cells. Thus, this nanodrug-delivery system, consisting of laser, drug, and SWCNTs, looks to be a promising selective modality with high treatment efficacy and low side effects for cancer therapy.

  10. Synthesis of carbon materials via the cold compression of aromatic molecules and carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.

    Carbon's ability for catenation makes it a remarkable element and allows for many interesting and surprising properties and structures. Carbon can exist in one of its two thermodynamically stable bulk crystals, graphite or diamond, one of its several nanostructures: fullerene, nanotube, or graphene, or as an amorphous material with a mixed bonding pattern. Carbon also has an ability to bond heteroatoms such as hydrogen which can increase its properties and structures even further. Pressure has been shown to be able to drastically change the bonding in and structure of carbon based materials. In this dissertation I will present how pressure can be used to synthesize new amorphous hydrogenated carbons and how a battery of analytical techniques can be used to elicit the microstructure of the carbon networks. This microstructure can then be related back to the reaction conditions and more importantly the starting small molecule. This work has been expanded to looking for a molecular analogue to the cold compressed graphite system by investigating the high pressure stability and reactivity of 2-D polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This work was followed by discovering the failure of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes at high static pressures. When the tubes fail they transform into nano-graphitic polyhedra. It has been found that metallic tubes preferentially collapse, leaving the semiconducting tubes intact for the most part. Finally, the most influential work performed in my dissertation has been related to the kinetically controlled solid state reaction of molecular benzene to form diamond nanothreads. These nanothreads pack into hexagonal bundles without axial order. A combination of Raman spectroscopy, x-ray and neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and first principles calculations were performed to confirm their existence. The three data chapters in this dissertation are enhanced by an introduction to carbon based materials and high pressure chemistry

  11. Formation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears: Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Electrophilic Addition of o-Benzyne to Fullerenes, Graphene, and Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in chemical functionalization of fullerene molecules. In some cases, the predominant reaction products are different from those obtained (using the same reactants) from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). One such example is the cycloaddition of o-benzyne to C60. It is well established that benzyne adds across one of the rings in naphthalene, anthracene and other PAHs forming the [2+4] cycloaddition product (benzobicyclo[2.2.2.]-octatriene with naphthalene and triptycene with anthracene). However, Hoke et al demonstrated that the only reaction path for o-benzyne with C60 leads to the [2+2] cycloaddition product in which benzyne adds across one of the interpentagonal bonds (forming a cyclobutene ring in the process). Either reaction product results in a loss of aromaticity and distortion of the PAH or fullerene substrate, and in a loss of strain in the benzyne. It is not clear, however, why different products are preferred in these cases. In the current paper, we consider the stability of benzyne-nanotube adducts and the ability of Brenner's potential energy model to describe the structure and stability of these adducts. The Brenner potential has been widely used for describing diamondoid and graphitic carbon. Recently it has also been used for molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of fullerenes and nanotubes. However, it has not been tested for the case of functionalized fullerenes (especially with highly strained geometries). We use the Brenner potential for our companion nanogear simulations and believe that it should be calibrated to insure that those simulations are physically reasonable. In the present work, Density Functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to determine the preferred geometric structures and energetics for this calibration. The DFT method is a kind of ab initio quantum chemistry method for determining the electronic structure of molecules. For a given basis set

  12. Synthesis of carbon onionlike nanostructures from methane in plasma flow of induction plasmatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchukov, K. E.; Zalogin, G. N.; Krasil'nikov, A. V.; Popov, M. Yu.; Kul'nitskii, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    The results of synthesis of carbon onionlike nanostructures from methane in plasma flow of inert gas (argon) generated in induction high-frequency plasmatron are considered and discussed. Carbon vapor obtained via dissociation of methane in plasma flow was condensed on copper substrates placed in a working chamber of the setup. The content of the synthesized soot was analyzed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the performed experiments, carbon onionlike structures with 20- to 100-nm sizes were obtained.

  13. Theoretical study of amino derivatives and anticancer platinum drug grafted on various carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kraszewski, S; Duverger, E; Ramseyer, C; Picaud, F

    2013-11-07

    Density functional theory calculations with van der Waals approximation have been conducted to analyze the functionalization of various carbon-based nanostructures (fullerene, metallic, and semi-conducting nanotubes) with amino derivative groups. The results obtained with azomethine, show the formation of a five membered ring on fullerenes, and on nanotubes consistent with experimental observations. The attachment of an azomethine plus subsequent drug like a Pt(IV) complex does not perturb the cycloaddition process. Moreover, all theoretical results show that the length of different amino derivatives with subsequent Pt(IV) complex does not affect the complexed therapeutic agent when it is attached onto these carbon-based nanostructures.

  14. Raman spectroscopic studies of thin film carbon nanostructures deposited using electro deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Saurabh; Sasi, Arshali; Jhariya, Sapna; Sasikumar, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work our focus is to synthesize carbon nanostructures (CNS) by electro deposition technique without using any surface pretreatment or catalyst preparation before CNS formation. The process were carried out at significantly low voltage and at low temperature as reported elsewhere. Further the samples were characterized using different characterization tools such as SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM results showed the fibres or tubular like morphology. Raman spectra shows strong finger print at 1600 cm-1 (G peak), 1350 cm-1 (D peak) along with the radial breathing mode (RBM) between 150cm-1 to 300 cm-1. This confirms the formation of tubular carbon nanostructures.

  15. Concentration gradient induced morphology evolution of silica nanostructure growth on photoresist-derived carbon micropatterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of silica nanostructure morphology induced by local Si vapor source concentration gradient has been investigated by a smart design of experiments. Silica nanostructure or their assemblies with different morphologies are obtained on photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode array. At a temperature of 1,000°C, rope-, feather-, and octopus-like nanowire assemblies can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. While at 950°C, stringlike assemblies, bamboo-like nanostructures with large joints, and hollow structures with smaller sizes can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. Both vapor–liquid-solid and vapor-quasiliquid-solid growth mechanisms have been applied to explain the diverse morphologies involving branching, connecting, and batch growth behaviors. The present approach offers a potential method for precise design and controlled synthesis of nanostructures with different features. PMID:22938090

  16. Ambient carbon dioxide capture by different dimensional AlN nanostructures: A comparative DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-08-01

    Strong binding of an isolated carbon dioxide molecule over three different aluminium nitride (AlN) nanostructures (nanocage, nanotube and nanosheet) is verified using density functional calculations. Equilibrium geometries, electronic properties, adsorption energies and thermodynamic stability of each adsorbed configuration are also identified. Optimized configurations are shown at least one corresponding physisorption and chemisorption of CO2 molecule over different AlN nanostructures. Also, the effect of chirality on the adsorption of CO2 molecule is studied over two different finite-sized zigzag (6,0) and armchair (4,4) AlN nanotubes. It is found that the electronic properties of the Al12N12 nanocage are more sensitive to the CO2 molecule than other AlN nanostructures. This indicates the significant potential of Al12N12 nanocage toward the CO2 adsorption, fixation and catalytic applications in contrast to other AlN nanostructures.

  17. Concentration gradient induced morphology evolution of silica nanostructure growth on photoresist-derived carbon micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Tielin; Xi, Shuang; Lai, Wuxing; Liu, Shiyuan; Li, Xiaoping; Tang, Zirong

    2012-09-01

    The evolution of silica nanostructure morphology induced by local Si vapor source concentration gradient has been investigated by a smart design of experiments. Silica nanostructure or their assemblies with different morphologies are obtained on photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode array. At a temperature of 1,000°C, rope-, feather-, and octopus-like nanowire assemblies can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. While at 950°C, stringlike assemblies, bamboo-like nanostructures with large joints, and hollow structures with smaller sizes can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. Both vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-quasiliquid-solid growth mechanisms have been applied to explain the diverse morphologies involving branching, connecting, and batch growth behaviors. The present approach offers a potential method for precise design and controlled synthesis of nanostructures with different features.

  18. Selective growth of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures inside carbon nanotube membranes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid nanostructured arrays based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) and palladium or titanium dioxide materials have been synthesized using self-supported and silicon-supported anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as nanoporous template. It is well demonstrated that carbon nanotubes can be grown using these membranes and hydrocarbon precursors that decompose at temperatures closer to 600°C without the use of a metal catalyst. In this process, carbonic fragments condensate to form stacked graphitic sheets, which adopt the shape of the pores, yielding from these moulds' multi-walled carbon nanotubes. After this process, the ends of the tubes remain open and accessible to other substances, whereas the outer walls are protected by the alumina. Taking advantage of this fact, we have performed the synthesis of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures selectively inside carbon nanotubes using these CNT-AAO membranes as nanoreactors. PMID:22731888

  19. 25th anniversary article: label-free electrical biodetection using carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Kannan; Kern, Klaus

    2014-02-26

    Nanostructures are promising candidates for use as active materials for the detection of chemical and biological species, mainly due to the high surface-to-volume ratio and the unique physical properties arising at the nanoscale. Among the various nanostructures, materials comprised of sp(2) -carbon enjoy a unique position due to the possibility to readily prepare them in various dimensions ranging from 0D, through 1D to 2D. This review focuses on the use of 1D (carbon nanotubes) and 2D (graphene) carbon nanostructures for the detection of biologically relevant molecules. A key advantage is the possibility to perform the sensing operation without the use of any labels or complex reaction schemes. Along this spirit, various strategies reported for the label-free electrical detection of biomolecules using carbon nanostructures are discussed. With their promise for ultimate sensitivity and the capability to attain high selectivity through controlled chemical functionalization, carbon-based nanobiosensors are expected to open avenues to novel diagnostic tools as well as to obtain new fundamental insight into biomolecular interactions down to the single molecule level.

  20. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  1. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Field-Effect Transistors for Label-Free Chemical/Biological Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, PingAn; Zhang, Jia; Li, Le; Wang, Zhenlong; O’Neill, William; Estrela, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, electrical detection of chemical and biological species using novel nanostructure-based devices has attracted significant attention for chemical, genomics, biomedical diagnostics, and drug discovery applications. The use of nanostructured devices in chemical/biological sensors in place of conventional sensing technologies has advantages of high sensitivity, low decreased energy consumption and potentially highly miniaturized integration. Owing to their particular structure, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability, carbon nanotube and graphene based electrical devices have been widely developed for high performance label-free chemical/biological sensors. Here, we review the latest developments of carbon nanostructure-based transistor sensors in ultrasensitive detection of chemical/biological entities, such as poisonous gases, nucleic acids, proteins and cells. PMID:22399927

  2. Formation Monocrystalline Carbon Micro-and Nanostructures Under Femtosecond Laser Irradiation of graphite in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorkov, Kirill S.; Abramov, Dmitrii V.; Kochuev, Dmitriy A.; Arakelian, Sergey M.; Prokoshev, Valery G.

    The combination of high energy and ultra short duration of femtosecond laser pulses allow to reach in the area of impact the local conditions which can change the phase composition of irradiated material. Traditional methods of structural phase transformation of the graphite at high pressures do not provide the abrupt simultaneous cancellation of the applied pressure and temperature. As a result, some of the synthesized nanostructures and metastable forms of carbon are destroyed. The suggested method allows to eliminate this disadvantage. Femtosecond laser radiation provides ultrafast heating of the target material, and the use of liquid nitrogen dramatically accelerates the process of it cooling. The formation of new carbon micro- and nanostructures has been registered at experimental approbation of the proposed method. The check of elemental composition of the created crystals showed that they are formed solely of carbon. The experimental results show the possibility of creation of new (less studied) carbon forms with a variety of properties.

  3. Interfacial properties of a carbyne-rich nanostructured carbon thin film in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Luca Giacomo; Della Foglia, Flavio; Piseri, Paolo; Milani, Paolo

    2016-03-18

    Nanostructured carbon sp(2) (ns-C) thin films with up to 30% of sp-coordinated atoms (carbynes) were produced in a high vacuum by the low kinetic energy deposition of carbon clusters produced in the gas phase and accelerated by a supersonic expansion. Immediately after deposition the ns-C films were immersed in situ in an ionic liquid electrolyte. The interfacial properties of ns-C films in the ionic liquid electrolyte were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The so-prepared carbyne-rich electrodes showed superior electric double layer (EDL) capacitance and electric conductivity compared to ns-C electrodes containing only sp(2) carbon, showing the substantial influence of carbynes on the electrochemical properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes.

  4. Self-Assembled, Nanostructured Carbon for Energy Storage and Water Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to translate a unique approach for the synthesis of self-assembled nanostructured carbon into industrially viable technologies for two important, large-scale applications: electrochemical double-layer capacitors (also referred to as ultracapacitors) for electrical energy storage, and capacitive deionization (CDI) systems for water treatment and desalination.

  5. Maria Goeppert Mayer Award Lecture: Spectroscopy of Hybrid Superconductor-Carbon Nanostructure Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Nadya

    2012-02-01

    The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene have excited much interest, for both fundamental science and technological applications. In this talk, I will discuss how coupling superconductors to these carbon nanostructures can enable new spectroscopic tools. In particular, I will discuss our experiments demonstrating that superconducting probes on carbon nanotube quantum dots can enhance weak spectroscopic features. I will also show how superconducting tunnel probes enable direct measurements of electron-electron interactions in carbon nanotubes. Finally, I will present data showing that connecting graphene to superconductors allows for the spectroscopy of individual, tunable superconducting (Andreev) bound states.

  6. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2013-03-26

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  7. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Harris, Alexander

    2015-10-06

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The manufacturing process may involve initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  8. Confinement effects on chemical reactions in nanostructured carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Aaron; Kostov, Milen; Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco

    2005-03-01

    Chemical reactions are frequently carried out in nano-structured media, such as micellar or colloidal solutions, nano-porous media, hydrogels or organogels, or in systems involving nano-particles. Nanostructured environments have been shown to enhance reaction rates through a variety of catalytic effects, such as high surface area, interactions with the nano-structure or confinement. In this work, we have used state-of-the-art electronic structure techniques to study the prototypical example of the hydrogen-producing reaction of formaldehyde dissociation (H2CO -> H2 + CO) within various configurations of a graphitic pore. Using the Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) method for transition states analysis, we have found that the activation energy of the dissociation can be influenced by the presence of a graphitic pore. In particular, while a graphene surface reduces the activation barrier for the reaction, this catalytic effect is enhanced by the presence of two planar sheets, which mimic the geometry of a nano-pore. These findings will be discussed in terms of the charge transfer and/or polarization mechanism associated with the catalytic process.

  9. Formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukalin, D. A.; Tuchin, A. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Bityutskaya, L. A.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO2) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in evaporating drops at room temperature has been studied. It is established that spherical aggregates with an average diameter of ˜2 μm and rodlike nanostructures with diameters within 250-300 nm and lengths of ˜4 μm are formed under these conditions. The mechanisms of covalent and van der Waals interaction between CNTs and SiO2 are considered in the framework of a phenomenological model of the active center of a closed CNT.

  10. Electrodeposited manganese dioxide nanostructures on electro-etched carbon fibers: High performance materials for supercapacitor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kazemi, Sayed Habib; Maghami, Mostafa Ghaem; Kiani, Mohammad Ali

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We report a facile method for fabrication of MnO{sub 2} nanostructures on electro-etched carbon fiber. • MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode shows outstanding supercapacitive behavior even at high discharge rates. • Exceptional cycle stability was achieved for MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode. • The coulombic efficiency of MnO{sub 2}-ECF electrode is nearly 100%. - Abstract: In this article we introduce a facile, low cost and additive/template free method to fabricate high-rate electrochemical capacitors. Manganese oxide nanostructures were electrodeposited on electro-etched carbon fiber substrate by applying a constant anodic current. Nanostructured MnO{sub 2} on electro-etched carbon fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The electrochemical behavior of MnO{sub 2} electro-etched carbon fiber electrode was investigated by electrochemical techniques including cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A maximum specific capacitance of 728.5 F g{sup −1} was achieved at a scan rate of 5 mV s{sup −1} for MnO{sub 2} electro-etched carbon fiber electrode. Also, this electrode showed exceptional cycle stability, suggesting that it can be considered as a good candidate for supercapacitor electrodes.

  11. Nanostructure Of Carbon Dust Generated In Plasmas Of Different Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Arnas, C.; Mouberi, A.; Hassouni, K.; Michaud, A.; Benedic, F.; Lombardi, G.; Bonnin, X.

    2008-09-07

    Carbon nanoparticles are produced in supersaturated carbon vapors of sputtering discharges as well as from complex reactions between hydrocarbon radicals in Ar/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} microwave discharges. A summary of their formation is reported. Despite different molecular precursors, it is shown that they can exhibit similar carbon concentric microtexture. Correlations are established between the final nanoparticle solid state and the heating mechanisms which are characteristic of each discharge.

  12. Nanostructure Of Carbon Dust Generated In Plasmas Of Different Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnas, C.; Mouberi, A.; Hassouni, K.; Michaud, A.; Bénédic, F.; Lombardi, G.; Bonnin, X.

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanoparticles are produced in supersaturated carbon vapors of sputtering discharges as well as from complex reactions between hydrocarbon radicals in Ar/CH4/H2 microwave discharges. A summary of their formation is reported. Despite different molecular precursors, it is shown that they can exhibit similar carbon concentric microtexture. Correlations are established between the final nanoparticle solid state and the heating mechanisms which are characteristic of each discharge.

  13. Hierarchical nanostructured carbons with meso-macroporosity: design, characterization, and applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Baizeng; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Min-Sik; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2013-07-16

    Nanostructured porous carbon materials have diverse applications including sorbents, catalyst supports for fuel cells, electrode materials for capacitors, and hydrogen storage systems. When these materials have hierarchical porosity, interconnected pores of different dimensions, their potential application is increased. Hierarchical nanostructured carbons (HNCs) that contain 3D-interconnected macroporous/mesoporous and mesoporous/microporous structures have enhanced properties compared with single-sized porous carbon materials, because they have improved mass transport through the macropores/mesopores and enhanced selectivity and increased specific surface area on the level of fine pore systems through mesopores/micropores. The HNCs with macro/mesoporosity are of particular interest because chemists can tailor specific applications through controllable synthesis of HNCs with designed nanostructures. An efficient and commonly used technique for creating HNCs is "nanocasting", a technique that first involves the creation of a sacrificial silica template with hierarchical porous nanostructure and then the impregnation of the silica template with an appropriate carbon source. This is followed by carbonization of the filled carbon precursor, and subsequent removal of the silica template. The resulting HNC is an inverse replica of its parent hierarchical nanostructured silica (HNS). Through such nanocasting, scientists can create different HNC frameworks with tailored pore structures and narrow pore size distribution. Generally, HNSs with specific structure and 3D-interconnected porosity are needed to fabricate HNCs using the nanocasting strategy. However, how can we fabricate a HNS framework with tailored structure and hierarchical porosity of meso-macropores? This Account reports on our recent work in the development of novel HNCs and their interesting applications. We have explored a series of strategies to address the challenges in synthesis of HNSs and HNCs. Through

  14. Synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures from polyurethane sponge for bioimaging and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Zhang, Jingchao; Zhuang, Jing; Wang, Xun

    2015-08-07

    A facile and environmentally friendly method was developed for the fabrication of N-doped carbon nanomaterials by hydrothermal treatment using polyurethane (PU) sponge as a carbon source. We have demonstrated that the hydrothermal decomposition of PU sponge involves top-down hydrolysis and bottom-up polymerization processes for the synthesis of N-doped carbon dots (N-CDs). Fluorescence spectroscopy and cytotoxicity studies indicated that these highly-soluble N-CDs show excellent photoluminescence properties and low cytotoxicity, and can be used as good probes for cellular imaging. Additionally, the N-doped hollow carbon nanostructures can be designed using a simple template method. The prepared N-doped double-shelled hollow carbon nanotubes exhibited excellent ORR electrocatalytic activity and superior durability. Indeed, our method described here can provide an efficient way to synthesize N-doped carbon-based materials for a broad range of applications.

  15. Equilibrium Limit of Boundary Scattering in Carbon Nanostructures: Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Thermal Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin; Kinaci, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Cagin, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    It is widely known that graphene and many of its derivative nanostructures have exceedingly high reported thermal conductivities (up to 4000 W/mK at 300 K). Such attractive thermal properties beg the use of these structures in practical devices; however, to implement these materials while preserving transport quality, the influence of structure on thermal conductivity should be thoroughly understood. For graphene nanostructures, having average phonon mean free paths on the order of one micron, a primary concern is how size influences the potential for heat conduction. To investigate this, we employ a novel technique to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity from the Green-Kubo relations and equilibrium molecular dynamics in systems where phonon-boundary scattering dominates heat flow. Specifically, the thermal conductivities of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes are calculated in sizes up to 3 microns, and the relative influence of boundary scattering on thermal transport is determined to be dominant at sizes less than 1 micron, after which the thermal transport largely depends on the quality of the nanostructure interface. The method is also extended to carbon nanostructures (fullerenes) where phonon confinement, as opposed to boundary scattering, dominates, and general trends related to the influence of curvature on thermal transport in these materials are discussed.

  16. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures in an RF induction plasmatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalogin, G. N.; Krasil'nikov, A. V.; Rudin, N. F.; Popov, M. Yu.; Kul'nitskii, B. A.; Kirichenko, A. N.

    2015-05-01

    The method and results of synthesizing carbon nanotubes and onion-like structures by the sublimation of a mixture of a carbon powder with a catalyst (Y2(CO3)3) in the plasma flow of an inert gas (argon) generated in an rf plasmatron are described. Carbon vapors are condensed into fullerene-containing soot onto various materials (Al, Cu, Ti, stainless steel) placed in the working chamber of an experimental setup. The composition of the synthesized soot is analyzed by modern highly informative methods (Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction). Single-wall carbon nanotubes of a small diameter (1.2 nm) and onion-like structures 10-20 nm in size are formed in experiments. In a reference experiment on a mixture of argon and methane, a material, which consists of a mixture of amorphous carbon, nanosized graphite, and graphite with a crystallite size of several microns, is synthesized. The effect of the substrate material, the gas pressure, and the plasma flow velocity on the formation of carbon nanotubes is studied.

  17. Klein tunneling in carbon nanostructures: A free-particle dynamics in disguise

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubsky, Vit; Nieto, Luis-Miguel; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2011-02-15

    The absence of backscattering in metallic nanotubes as well as perfect Klein tunneling in potential barriers in graphene are the prominent electronic characteristics of carbon nanostructures. We show that the phenomena can be explained by a peculiar supersymmetry generated by a first order Hamiltonian and zero-order supercharge operators. Like the supersymmetry associated with second order reflectionless finite-gap systems, it relates here the low-energy behavior of the charge carriers with the free-particle dynamics.

  18. Pyrolytic deposition of nanostructured titanium carbide coatings on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremlev, K. V.; Ob"edkov, A. M.; Ketkov, S. Yu.; Kaverin, B. S.; Semenov, N. M.; Gusev, S. A.; Tatarskii, D. A.; Yunin, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured titanium carbide coatings have been deposited on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the MOCVD method with bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium dichloride precursor. The obtained TiC/MWCNT hybrid materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is established that a TiC coating deposits onto the MWCNT surface with the formation of a core-shell (MWSNT-TiC) type structure.

  19. Biomass-derived carbon quantum dot sensitizers for solid-state nanostructured solar cells.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Joe; Marinovic, Adam; Sevilla, Marta; Dunn, Steve; Titirici, Magdalena

    2015-04-07

    New hybrid materials consisting of ZnO nanorods sensitized with three different biomass-derived carbon quantum dots (CQDs) were synthesized, characterized, and used for the first time to build solid-state nanostructured solar cells. The performance of the devices was dependent on the functional groups found on the CQDs. The highest efficiency was obtained using a layer-by-layer coating of two different types of CQDs.

  20. Electrochemical detectors based on carbon and metallic nanostructures in capillary and microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    García-Carmona, Laura; Martín, Aida; Sierra, Tania; González, María Cristina; Escarpa, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Carbon and metallic-based nanostructures have been progressively implemented as innovative electrochemical detectors in CE and microchip electrophoresis (ME). For both type of nanomaterials and toward selected examples, this review details the impact of these nanomaterials for enhanced detection performance in CE, ME, and paper-based microfluidic devices. The analytical performance and the analytical potential in real world applications is also presented and discussed.

  1. Ultrathin Carbon Film Protected Silver Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yinshan; Zheng, Xianliang; Tian, Hongwei; Cui, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-06-23

    In this article, ultrathin carbon film protected silver substrate (Ag/C) was prepared via a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The morphological evolution of silver nanostructures underneath, as well as the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of Ag/C hybrid can be tuned by controlling the deposition time. The stability and reproducibility of the as-prepared hybrid were also studied.

  2. In situ analysis of formation of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge by optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Hwangbo, George; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures due to its relatively high growth temperature. By introducing a non- uniform magnetic field with the component normal to arc current, graphene flakes and single-walled carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in one step. In contrast to the growth processes without magnetic field, the magnetically-enhanced arc is confined by the Lorentz force, which generates the plasma jet and makes effective delivery of carbon particles and heat flux. However, there are still unresolved questions concerning the location of the region of nanoparticle synthesis and growth steps of carbon nanostructures. In this work we carried out in situ analysis of the optical spectrum which can provide a unique investigation of the different transformation processes of the carbon and metal catalyst vapors generated from the vaporization of the anode in arc. The experiments were taken for various electrode gaps and different conditions of external magnetic field. Moreover, SEM, TEM, EDX and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene.

  3. In situ analysis of formation of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge by optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Hwangbo, George; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures due to its relatively high growth temperature. By introducing a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to arc current, graphene flakes and single-walled carbon nanotubes can be synthesized in one step. In contrast to the growth processes without magnetic field, the magnetically-enhanced arc is confined by the Lorentz force, which generates the plasma jet and makes effective delivery of carbon particles and heat flux. However, there are still unresolved questions concerning the location of the region of nanoparticle synthesis and growth steps of carbon nanostructures. In this work we carried out in situ analysis of the optical spectrum which can provide a unique investigation of the different transformation processes of the carbon and metal catalyst vapors generated from the vaporization of the anode in arc. The experiments were taken for various electrode gaps and different conditions of external magnetic field. Moreover, SEM, TEM, EDX and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene.

  4. Mesoporous wormholelike carbon with controllable nanostructure for lithium ion batteries application

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoqing; Li, Xinxi; Li, Zhenghui; Zhang, Guoqing; Wu, Dingcai

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Wormholelike carbon (WMC) with controllable nanostructure is prepared by sol–gel method. • The reversible capacity of WMC is much higher than that of many other reported nanocarbons. • The effect of pore diameter on Li storage capacity is investigated. - Abstract: A class of mesoporous wormholelike carbon (WMC) with controllable nanostructure was prepared by sol–gel method and then used as the anode material of lithium-ion batteries. Based on the experimental results, it is found that the nanostructure of the as-prepared WMC plays an important role in the electrochemical performances. A suitable mesopore size is necessary for a high performance carbon-based anode material since it can not only guarantee effective mass transport channels but also provide large surface area. As a result, F30 with a mesopore size of 4.4 nm coupled with high surface area of 1077 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} shows a reversible capacity of 630 mAh g{sup −1}, much higher than commercial graphite and many other reported nanocarbons.

  5. Dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes for intact crystalline graphene nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Joonwon; Narayan Maiti, Uday; Kim, Na-Young; Narayan, Rekha; Jun Lee, Won; Sung Choi, Dong; Oh, Youngtak; Min Lee, Ju; Yong Lee, Gil; Hun Kang, Seok; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ouk Kim, Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atomic level engineering of graphene-based materials is in high demand to enable customize structures and properties for different applications. Unzipping of the graphene plane is a potential means to this end, but uncontrollable damage of the two-dimensional crystalline framework during harsh unzipping reaction has remained a key challenge. Here we present heteroatom dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes as a reliable and controllable route to customized intact crystalline graphene-based nanostructures. Substitutional pyridinic nitrogen dopant sites at carbon nanotubes can selectively initiate the unzipping of graphene side walls at a relatively low electrochemical potential (0.6 V). The resultant nanostructures consisting of unzipped graphene nanoribbons wrapping around carbon nanotube cores maintain the intact two-dimensional crystallinity with well-defined atomic configuration at the unzipped edges. Large surface area and robust electrical connectivity of the synergistic nanostructure demonstrate ultrahigh-power supercapacitor performance, which can serve for AC filtering with the record high rate capability of -85° of phase angle at 120 Hz.

  6. Dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes for intact crystalline graphene nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Joonwon; Narayan Maiti, Uday; Kim, Na-Young; Narayan, Rekha; Jun Lee, Won; Sung Choi, Dong; Oh, Youngtak; Min Lee, Ju; Yong Lee, Gil; Hun Kang, Seok; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ouk Kim, Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atomic level engineering of graphene-based materials is in high demand to enable customize structures and properties for different applications. Unzipping of the graphene plane is a potential means to this end, but uncontrollable damage of the two-dimensional crystalline framework during harsh unzipping reaction has remained a key challenge. Here we present heteroatom dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes as a reliable and controllable route to customized intact crystalline graphene-based nanostructures. Substitutional pyridinic nitrogen dopant sites at carbon nanotubes can selectively initiate the unzipping of graphene side walls at a relatively low electrochemical potential (0.6 V). The resultant nanostructures consisting of unzipped graphene nanoribbons wrapping around carbon nanotube cores maintain the intact two-dimensional crystallinity with well-defined atomic configuration at the unzipped edges. Large surface area and robust electrical connectivity of the synergistic nanostructure demonstrate ultrahigh-power supercapacitor performance, which can serve for AC filtering with the record high rate capability of −85° of phase angle at 120 Hz. PMID:26796993

  7. Modelling of electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margine, Elena Roxana

    The main goals of this dissertation work are the analysis and prediction of the properties of nanoscale carbon materials which hold great potential for nanotechnological applications such as strong conductive composites, field-effect transistors, diodes, rechargeable batteries, etc. Some of these exciting applications are already being actively developed, however their design via trial-and-error experimentation is often difficult and expensive. State-of-the-art simulation methods can be used as a powerful tool to streamline the path to practical implementations. In this thesis I use ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations to explore the response of nanoscale carbon materials to doping. A brief overview of the theoretical methods and of some basic concepts on carbon nanotubes are given in the first two chapters. In Chapter 3 we study the effect of doping in double-walled carbon nanotubes. These systems can be considered as nanoscale capacitors since they have two conducting (or semi-conducting) shells. The experimental work of our collaborators demonstrated for the first time that such a capacitor can be realized by the adsorption of bromine anions at the surface of the outer tube. Our theoretical analysis of the experimental results revealed that this quantum system, surprisingly, behaves exactly as the classical Faraday cage: the electric charge always resides on the outside surface of the conductor, even when the pristine tubes are not metallic. In Chapter 4 I present our findings on the phonon frequencies' response to electron doping in single-walled carbon nanotubes. It is well established that when graphite is doped with electrons, carbon-carbon bonds lengthen and all vibrational frequencies soften. However, in semiconducting carbon nanotubes, the frequency of one mode increases at low levels of alkali doping. Having carefully modelled the process with ab initio methods we conclude that the unusual behavior of the vibrational mode depends on which electronic

  8. Tunneling spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures: A romance in many dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirks, Travis Lee

    In this dissertation we present results from various methods of tunneling spectroscopy in carbon nanotubes, which shed light on electron -- electron interaction in carbon nanotubes and low dimensional systems in general. We also apply those methods to two dimensional graphene sheets. We first review the fabrication techniques used to make the devices studied here. Some of the techniques are standard in nanofabrication, and some were developed in-house to make the particular device geometries studied here possible. In particular, we developed recipes for the growth and contact of clean, ultra-long carbon nanotubes as well as for the fabrication of non-invasive top tunnel probes. We then present results on normal metal tunneling spectroscopy of carbon nanotube devices of varying length. We measure the exponent of the conductance power law in the density of states as a function of device length over two orders of magnitude and find unexpected evidence of finite size effects in long devices. Next, we present results from the first measurement of the non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function in carbon nanotubes measured via non-equilibrium superconducting tunneling spectroscopy and find little evidence of scattering at low temperatures, which is consistent with a clean, strongly interacting Luttinger liquid. In addition, we discuss two ways we are working to extend this powerful technique. We also present results of superconducting tunneling spectroscopy of a clean carbon nanotube quantum dot. We are able to characterize the energy spectrum of the quantum dot and distinguish between spin singlet and spin triplet shell filling. We observe elastic and inelastic co-tunneling features which are not visible when the probe is made normal by a magnetic field. These co-tunneling rates have important technological implications for carbon nanotubes as single electron transistors. We also observe an energetically forbidden conductance inside the superconducting gap

  9. Metal encapsulating carbon nanostructures from oligoalkyne metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dosa, P.I.; Erben, C.; Iyer, V.S.; Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Wasser, I.M.

    1999-11-10

    Carbon nanotubes, onions, and related closed-shell carbon particles have commanded extensive recent attention because of their potential applications as unique electronic, magnetic, and mechanically robust materials. When filled with metals, such nanocapsules have additional promise as magnetic particles, contrasting agents, protecting cloaks, and catalysts and in other applications. Among the various methods for their preparation, the transition metal (especially Fe, Co, and Ni) catalyzed pyrolysis of small organic molecules has shown promise for larger scale production and in structural control. While the use of organometallic complexes as solid catalyst precursors or copyrolytic gaseous ingredients has been reported, all of these studies have been limited to gas-phase experiments at relatively high temperatures. There is very little literature that deals with the organic solid-state generation of carbon nanotubes. The latter suffers from extreme conditions, poor yields, or not readily modifiable starting materials. Development of synthetic organic approaches to closed shell large carbon structures is desirable but in its infancy. Here the authors present a significant step in its progress.

  10. Flavonol-carbon nanostructure hybrid systems: a DFT study on the interaction mechanism and UV/Vis features.

    PubMed

    García, Gregorio; Atilhan, Mert; Aparicio, Santiago

    2016-02-14

    Flavonols are a class of natural compounds with potential biological and pharmacological applications. They are also natural pigments responsible for the diversity of colors in plants. Flavonols offer the possibility of tuning their features through chemical functionalization as well as the presence of an aromatic backbone, which could lead to non-covalent interactions with different nanostructures or aromatic molecules. In this work, a protocol based on ONIOM (QM/QM) calculations to investigate the structural features (binding energies, intermolecular interactions) of flavonols interacting with the surface of several carbon nanostructures (such as graphene, fullerene C60 and carbon nanotubes) is developed. The confinement of flavonols inside carbon nanotubes has also been studied. Three flavonols, galangin, quercetin and myricetin, as well as pristine flavone were selected. Special attention has also been paid to the changes in UV/Vis features of flavonols due to the interaction with carbon nanostructures. Our results point out that π-stacking interactions are the driving force for the adsorption onto carbon nanostructures as well as for the confinement inside carbon nanotubes. Likewise, UV/Vis features of flavonols could be fine-tuned through the interaction with suitable carbon nanostructures.

  11. Transport effects in the electrooxidation of methanol studied on nanostructured Pt/glassy carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Y E; Schneider, A; Jusys, Z; Wickman, B; Kasemo, B; Behm, R J

    2010-03-02

    Transport effects in the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) were investigated using nanostructured Pt/glassy carbon (GC) electrodes and, for comparison, a polycrystalline Pt electrode. The nanostructured Pt/GC electrodes, consisting of a regular array of catalytically active cylindrical Pt nanostructures with 55 +/- 10 nm in diameter and different densities supported on a planar GC substrate, were fabricated employing hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL). The MOR measurements were performed under controlled transport conditions in a thin-layer flow cell interfaced to a differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) setup. The measurements reveal a distinct variation in the MOR activity and selectivity (product distribution) with Pt nanostructure density and with electrolyte flow rate, showing an increasing overall activity, reflected by a higher Faradaic reaction current, as well as a pronounced increase of the turnover frequency for CO(2) formation and of the CO(2) current efficiency with decreasing flow rate and increasing Pt coverage. These findings are discussed in terms of the "desorption-readsorption-reaction" model introduced recently (Seidel et al. Faraday Discuss. 2008, 140, 67). Finally, consequences for applications in direct methanol fuel cells are outlined.

  12. Electrodeposition of Various Au Nanostructures on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nanoelectrode Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayazfar, H.; Afshar, A.; Dolati, A.

    2015-05-01

    An efficient method has been developed to synthesize well-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a conductive Ta substrate by chemical vapor deposition. Free-standing MWCNTs arrays were functionalized through electrochemical oxidation with the formation of hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups. Facile template-free electrochemical routes were then developed for the shape-selective synthesis of less-common Au nanostructures, including flower, sphere, dendrite, rod, sheet, and cabbage onto the aligned MWCNTs at room temperature. Especially, among all the synthesis methods for Au nanocrystals, this is the first report using electrochemical technique to synthesize wide variety shapes of gold nanostructures (GNs) onto the aligned MWCNTs. The morphology of electrodeposited Au nanostructures was controlled by adjustment of the deposition time and potential, the number of potential cycles, the kind of deposition bath, and electrodeposition method. Transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the products. Cyclic voltammograms showed that the MWCNT/Ta electrodes modified with GNs have higher sensitivity compared to the unmodified electrodes in the presence of Fe2+/Fe3+ redox couple. These kinds of aligned-CNT/Au nanostructure hybrid materials introduced by these efficient and simple electrochemical methods could lead to the development of a new generation device for ultrasensitive catalytic and biological application.

  13. Enzymatic electrodes nanostructured with functionalized carbon nanotubes for biofuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Nazaruk, E; Sadowska, K; Biernat, J F; Rogalski, J; Ginalska, G; Bilewicz, R

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured bioelectrodes were designed and assembled into a biofuel cell with no separating membrane. The glassy carbon electrodes were modified with mediator-functionalized carbon nanotubes. Ferrocene (Fc) and 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt (ABTS) bound chemically to the carbon nanotubes were found useful as mediators of the enzyme catalyzed electrode processes. Glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger AM-11 and laccase from Cerrena unicolor C-139 were incorporated in a liquid-crystalline matrix-monoolein cubic phase. The carbon nanotubes-nanostructured electrode surface was covered with the cubic phase film containing the enzyme and acted as the catalytic surface for the oxidation of glucose and reduction of oxygen. Thanks to the mediating role of derivatized nanotubes the catalysis was almost ten times more efficient than on the GCE electrodes: catalytic current of glucose oxidation was 1 mA cm(-2) and oxygen reduction current exceeded 0.6 mA cm(-2). The open circuit voltage of the biofuel cell was 0.43 V. Application of carbon nanotubes increased the maximum power output of the constructed biofuel cell to 100 μW cm(-2) without stirring of the solution which was ca. 100 times more efficient than using the same bioelectrodes without nanotubes on the electrode surface.

  14. Microwave-assisted synthesis of porous carbon-titania and highly crystalline titania nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alison; Marszewski, Michal; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2013-03-01

    Porous carbon-titania and highly crystalline titania nanostructured materials were obtained through a microwave-assisted one-pot synthesis. Resorcinol and formaldehyde were used as carbon precursors, triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 as a stabilizing agent, and titanium isopropoxide as a titania precursor. This microwave-assisted one-pot synthesis involved formation of carbon spheres according to the recently modified Stöber method followed by hydrolysis and condensation of titania precursor. This method afforded carbon-titania composite materials containing anatase phase with specific surface areas as high as 390 m(2) g(-1). The pure nanostructured titania, obtained after removal of carbon through calcination of the composite material in air, was shown to be the anatase phase with considerably higher degree of crystallinity and the specific surface area as high as 130 m(2) g(-1). The resulting titania, because of its high surface area, well-developed porosity, and high crystallinity, is of great interest for catalysis, water treatment, lithium batteries, and other energy-related applications.

  15. Structure and properties of composites based chitosan and carbon nanostructures: atomistic and coarse-grained simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Kolesnikova, A. S.; Grishina, O. A.; Slepchenkov, M. M.

    2015-03-01

    At the present time actual task of the modern materials is the creation of biodegradable biocompatible composite materials possessing high strength properties for medical purposes. One of the most promising biomaterials from a position of creation on their basis super strong nanofibres is chitosan. The aim of this work is a theoretical study of the structural features and physico-mechanical properties of biocomposite materials based on chitosan and carbon nanostructures. As matrix nanocomposite we considered various carbon nano-objects, namely carbon nanotubes and graphene. Using the developed original software complex KVAZAR we built atomistic and coarse-grained models of the biocomposite material. To identify regularities of influence of the configuration of the carbon matrix on the mechanical and electronic properties of biocomposite we carried out a series of numerical experiments using a classical algorithm of molecular dynamics and semi-empirical methods. The obtained results allow us to suggest that the generated biocomposite based on chitosan and carbon nanostructures has high stability and strength characteristics. Such materials can be used in biomedicine as a base material for creating of artificial limbs.

  16. Design, fabrication, and testing of nanostructured carbons and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyong

    Many applications, such as catalysis, sensing, separation and energy storage and conversion, will benefit from the miniaturization of materials to nanometer length scales. This dissertation details my study of nanocomposites based on three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) carbons and zirconia, and three-dimensionally ordered macroporous/mesoporous (3DOM/m) carbons. The macropores of these materials were produced using colloidal crystal templates while the mesopores were generated using surfactant templates. These solids are composed of close-packed and three-dimensionally interconnected spherical macropores surrounded by nanoscale solid or mesoporous wall skeletons. This unique architecture offers large surface areas, pore volumes, and good access into the bulk via a macroporous network. 3DOM carbons have been demonstrated as promising electrode materials for lithium ion batteries and sensors, but their electrochemical performance still needs to be improved. As a model system for the modification of the electrode, 3DOM C/TiO2 was synthesized by fabricating a conformal coating of TiO2 nanoparticles on the macropore walls of 3DOM C. My research further extended the micro-structural design of monolithic carbon from 3DOM to 3DOM/m. 3DOM/m C monoliths with high surface areas, controllable mesopore sizes, and mesopore ordering, were synthesized by three methods. One of the methods is simpler and more environment benign than previously reported methods. The mesopores in 3DOM/m C-based electrode provide room to accommodate secondary phases, such as graphitic carbon, SnO2 and Si which can improve the conductivity or lithium capacity of the electrode. Owing to this advantage, 3DOM/m C/C and 3DOM/m C/SnO2 exhibited significantly improved rate performance, lithium capacity and cycleability, compared with 3DOM C. To meet the demands of nano-sized functional materials in applications such as nano-device fabrication and drug delivery, mesoporous carbon nanoparticles with

  17. Carbon Nanosheets and Nanostructured Electrodes in Organic Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-321

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon nanosheet thin films were employed as nanostructured electrodes in organic solar cells. Due to the nanostructured texture of the carbon nanosheet electrodes, there was an increase in performance over standard ITO electrodes with very thick active layers. ZnO deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used as a hole blocking layer to provide for carrier selectivity of the carbon nanosheets.

  18. Nanostructure modification to carbon nanowall surface employing hydrogen peroxide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoeda, Hironao; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs), which are three-dimensional carbon nanomaterials consisting of stacks of graphene sheets vertically standing on substrates, possess a mazelike architecture containing high-density graphene edges and large-area plane surfaces. A selective morphological modification technique for the surfaces of CNWs after their growth has been developed employing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. It was found that oxidative radicals in H2O2 solution formed characteristic nanometer-scale asperities on the CNW surface without etching from the top edges. Photoelectron spectra indicate that hydroxyl adsorption and subsequent reactions at the edge and plane of graphene contribute to the selective morphological change on the CNW surface.

  19. Nanostructured carbon materials decorated with organophosphorus moieties: synthesis and application

    PubMed Central

    Biagiotti, Giacomo; Langè, Vittoria; Ligi, Cristina; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Flis, Anna; Pietrusiewicz, K Michał; Ghini, Giacomo; Brandi, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    A new synthetic approach for the production of carbon nanomaterials (CNM) decorated with organophosphorus moieties is presented. Three different triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) derivatives were used to decorate oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ox-MWCNTs) and graphene platelets (GPs). The TPPOs chosen bear functional groups able to react with the CNMs by Tour reaction (an amino group), nitrene cycloaddition (an azido group) or CuAAC reaction (one terminal C–C triple bond). All the adducts were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, TEM, XPS, elemental analysis and ICP-AES. The cycloaddition of nitrene provided the higher loading on ox-MWCNTs and GPs as well, while the Tour approach gave best results with nanotubes (CNTs). Finally, we investigated the possibility to reduce the TPPO functionalized CNMs to the corresponding phosphine derivatives and applied one of the materials produced as heterogeneous organocatalyst in a Staudinger ligation reaction. PMID:28326239

  20. Dinuclear transition metal complexes in carbon nanostructured materials synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, J. I.; Hernández, E.; Delgado, E.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) were prepared with two similar techniques using organometallic complexes as catalysts precursors. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and pyrolysis with chlorine gas approaches were employed in order to explore the effect of dinuclear transition metal compounds [Fe2(CO)6(μ-S2C6H2X2), (X=OH, Cl)] in synthesis of CNMs. Our to-date results have shown these complexes generate different carbonaceous materials when they are used in bulk, it was also observed that their performances in synthesis differ even though these compounds are analogous. With X=OH complex used in CVD process, metal nanoparticles of ca. 20-50 nm in size and embedded in carbon matrix were obtained. X=C1 complex has been used in pyrolysis experiments and showed an entire volatilisation or no reaction, depending on selected temperature. Furthermore, obtaining of a new tetranuclear iron cluster is presented in this work.

  1. Nucleation of carbon nanostructures: Molecular dynamics with reactive potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiullina, G. M.; Orekhov, N. D.; Stegailov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present our first results in the study of the details of nucleation in the homogeneous carbon gas phase using computer calculations with molecular dynamics methods. Direct and controlled molecular-dynamics approaches are used and two reactive potentials (ReaxFF and AIREBO) are compared. The calculations have shown that the nucleation process in the AIREBO model is going more actively than in the ReaxFF one.

  2. Functionalizing Carbon Nanotubes and Related Nanostructures for Various Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-26

    applications, such as photovoltaics, optoelectronics, sensing, and energy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nano -Materials, Carbon nano tubes, Silicon Nano Tips 16...SiNTs), GaN nanowires, and related advanced nano -composites. Building on these ground works, a number of photovoltaic, optoelectronic, sensing and...energy/power devices that utilize the above-mentioned nanomaterials as their key components have been developed. Nano -structured system with well

  3. New applications of carbon nanostructures in microbial fuel cells (MFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaca, W.; Żarnowiec, P.; Keczkowska, Justyna; Suchańska, M.; Czerwosz, E.; Kozłowski, M.

    2014-11-01

    In the studies presented we proposed a new application for nanocomposite carbon films (C-Pd). These films were evaluated as an anode material for Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) used for electrical current generation. The results of characterization of C-Pd films composed of carbon and palladium nanograins were obtained using the Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) method. The film obtained by this method exhibits a multiphase structure composed of fullerene nanograins, amorphous carbon and palladium nanocrystals. Raman Spectroscopy (RS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize the chemical composition, morphology and topography of these films. We observed, for MFC with C-Pd anode, the highest electrochemical activity and maximal voltage density - 458 mV (20,8 mV/cm2) for Proteus mirabilis, 426 mV (19,4 mV/cm2) for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 652 mV (29,6 mV/cm2) for sewage bacteria as the microbial catalyst.

  4. Nanotribological properties of nanostructured hard carbon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grierson, David S.

    Hard carbon thin films are important candidate materials to improve the tribological performance of mechanical components ranging from the macro- to the nanoscale. Extensive study at the macroscale has established their excellent tribomechanical properties, but little is known about their nanoscale properties. We investigated three carbon-based films: ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C), and diamond-like carbon (DLC). We used near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition and the nature of the surface bonds. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the work of adhesion and frictional forces between diamond tips (microcrystalline and UNCD) and both UNCD and ta-C surfaces, and between fluorinated DLC (F-DLC) tips and both F-DLC and silicon-containing DLC (Si-DLC). For UNCD, we were able to reach van der Waals's limit of adhesion for hydrocarbons (˜30 mJ/m2) and reduce nanoscale friction forces by terminating defective surfaces with hydrogen. This is particularly important for the underside of UNCD films, which we studied by etching away their underlying substrates. We found that this underside had a higher percentage of sp2 bonding and oxygen than the upper surface, but exposure to hydrogen plasma restored the sp3 character and improved the nanotribological properties. We studied ta-C films annealed from 200°C - 1000°C, and found that thermal annealing increased the sp2 bonding percentage. Above 600°C, the conversion from sp3→sp2 bonding increased dramatically. When the as-deposited films were oxygen-free, we observed no change in the work of adhesion (which is low at ˜40 mJ/m 2) as a function of thermal annealing, but we did see a reduction in nano scale friction. F-DLC and Si-DLC films were investigated before and after thermally annealing them at 300°C in air. The NEXAFS and AFM results demonstrated that Si-DLC is stable, both chemically and

  5. Capacitive energy storage in nanostructured carbon-electrolyte systems.

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Gogotsi, Y

    2013-05-21

    Securing our energy future is the most important problem that humanity faces in this century. Burning fossil fuels is not sustainable, and wide use of renewable energy sources will require a drastically increased ability to store electrical energy. In the move toward an electrical economy, chemical (batteries) and capacitive energy storage (electrochemical capacitors or supercapacitors) devices are expected to play an important role. This Account summarizes research in the field of electrochemical capacitors conducted over the past decade. Overall, the combination of the right electrode materials with a proper electrolyte can successfully increase both the energy stored by the device and its power, but no perfect active material exists and no electrolyte suits every material and every performance goal. However, today, many materials are available, including porous activated, carbide-derived, and templated carbons with high surface areas and porosities that range from subnanometer to just a few nanometers. If the pore size is matched with the electrolyte ion size, those materials can provide high energy density. Exohedral nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes and onion-like carbon, can provide high power due to fast ion sorption/desorption on their outer surfaces. Because of its higher charge-discharge rates compared with activated carbons, graphene has attracted increasing attention, but graphene had not yet shown a higher volumetric capacitance than porous carbons. Although aqueous electrolytes, such as sodium sulfate, are the safest and least expensive, they have a limited voltage window. Organic electrolytes, such as solutions of [N(C2H5)4]BF4 in acetonitrile or propylene carbonate, are the most common in commercial devices. Researchers are increasingly interested in nonflammable ionic liquids. These liquids have low vapor pressures, which allow them to be used safely over a temperature range from -50 °C to at least 100 °C and over a larger voltage window

  6. Computational Modeling of Carbon Nanostructures for Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Guang; Huang, Jingsong; Qiao, Rui; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for electrical double layers formed by ion adsorption in nanoscale carbon pores. In this work a combination of computational methods, including first-principles and classical modeling, are used to explain the onset of an anomalous increase in capacitance for small pores. The study highlights the key role played by pore curvature and nanoconfinement on the capacitance performance. We emphasize the role of modeling in providing a precise understanding of the processes responsible for capacitive energy storage, and how simulations can be used to enhance desired properties and suppress unwanted ones.

  7. Graphitic carbon in a nanostructured titanium oxycarbide thin film to improve implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, R; Ioannidu, C A; Mazzola, L; Politi, L; Misiano, C; Longo, G; Falconieri, M; Scandurra, R

    2015-01-01

    A nanostructured coating layer on titanium implants, able to improve their integration into bones and to protect against the harsh conditions of body fluids, was obtained by Ion Plating Plasma Assisted, a method suitable for industrial applications. A titanium carbide target was attached under vacuum to a magnetron sputtering source powered with a direct current in the 500-1100 W range, and a 100 W radio frequency was applied to the sample holder. The samples produced at 900 W gave the best biological response in terms of overexpression of some genes of proteins involved in bone turnover. We report the characterization of a reference and of an implant sample, both obtained at 900 W. Different micro/nanoscopic techniques evidenced the morphology of the substrates, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to disclose the surface composition. The layer is a 500 nm thick hard nanostructure, composed of 60% graphitic carbon clustered with 15% TiC and 25% Ti oxides.

  8. Fulleranes and Carbon Nanostructures in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Groth, Susana; Cataldo, Franco

    We review the potential contribution of single fullerenes and buckyonions to interstellar extinction. Photoabsorption spectra of these molecules are compared with some of the most relevant features of interstellar extinction, the UV bump, the far UV rise and the diffuse interstellar bands. According to semiempirical models, photoabsorption by fullerenes (single and multishell) could explain the shape, width and peak energy of the most prominent feature of the interstellar absorption, the UV bump at 2,175 Å. Other weaker transitions are predicted in the optical and near-infrared providing a potential explanation for diffuse interstellar bands. In particular, several fullerenes could contribute to the well known strong DIB at 4,430 Å comparing cross sections and available data for this DIB and the UV bump we estimate a density of fullerenes in the diffuse interstellar medium of 0.1-0.2 ppm. These molecules could then be a major reservoir for interstellar carbon. We give an estimation of the carbon fraction locked in these molecules. We discuss the rotation rates and electric dipole emission of hydrogenated icosahedral fullerenes in various phases of the interstellar medium. These molecules could be the carriers of the anomalous microwave emission detected by Watson et al. (Astrophys. J. 624:L89, 2005) in the Perseus molecular complex and Cassasus et al. (2006) in the dark cloud LDN 1622. Hydrogenated forms of fullerenes may account for the dust-correlated microwave emission detected in our Galaxy by Cosmic Microwave Background experiments.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of graphitic carbon nanostructures with controllable size, shape, and position.

    PubMed

    Du, Rongbing; Ssenyange, Solomon; Aktary, Mirwais; McDermott, Mark T

    2009-05-01

    The incorporation of carbon materials in micro- and nanoscale devices is being widely investigated due to the promise of enhanced functionality. Challenges in the positioning and addressability of carbon nanotubes provide the motivation for the development of new processes to produce nanoscale carbon materials. Here, the fabrication of conducting, nanometer-sized carbon structures using a combination of electron beam lithography (EBL) and carbonisation is reported. EBL is used to directly write predefined nanometer-sized patterns in a thin layer of negative resist in controllable locations. Careful heat treatment results in carbon nanostructures with the size, shape, and location originally defined by EBL. The pyrolysis process results in significant shrinkage of the structures in the vertical direction and minimal loss in the horizontal direction. Characterization of the carbonized material indicates a structure consisting of both amorphous and graphitized carbon with low levels of oxygen. The resistivity of the material is similar to other disordered carbon materials and the resistivity is maintained from the bulk to the nanoscale. This is demonstrated by fabricating a nanoscale structure with predictable resistance. The ability to fabricate these conductive structures with known dimensions and in predefined locations can be exploited for a number of applications. Their use as nanoband electrodes is also demonstrated.

  10. Self-catalyzed carbon plasma-assisted growth of tin-doped indium oxide nanostructures by the sputtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setti, Grazielle O.; de Jesus, Dosil P.; Joanni, Ednan

    2016-10-01

    In this work a new strategy for growth of nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) by RF sputtering is presented. ITO is deposited in the presence of a carbon plasma which reacts with the free oxygen atoms during the deposition, forming species like CO x . These species are removed from the chamber by the pumping system, and one-dimensional ITO nanostructures are formed without the need for a seed layer. Different values of substrate temperature and power applied to the gun containing the carbon target were investigated, resulting in different nanostructure morphologies. The samples containing a higher density of nanowires were covered with gold and evaluated as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for detection of dye solutions. The concept might be applied to other oxides, providing a simple method for unidimensional nanostructural synthesis.

  11. Hydrogen adsorption in the series of carbon nanostructures: Graphenes-graphene nanotubes-nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. P.; Kirichenko, A. N.; Tat'yanin, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    A comparative analysis of hydrogen absorption capability is performed for the first time for three types of carbon nanostructures: graphenes, oriented carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs), and pyrocarbon nanocrystallites (PCNs) synthesized in the pores of TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with mean diameters ( D m) of 50 and 90 nm, using methane as the pyrolized gas. The morphology of the carbon nanostructures is studied by means of powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen adsorption is investigated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in combination with mass-spectrometry. It is shown that only OCNTGs can adsorb and store hydrogen, the desorption of which under atmospheric pressure occurs at a temperature of around 175°C. Hydrogen adsorption by OCNTGs is quantitatively determined and found to be about 1.5% of their mass. Applying certain assumptions, the relationship between the mass of carbon required for the formation of single-wall OCNTGs in membrane pores and the surface area of pores is established. Numerical factor Ψ = m dep/ m calc, where m dep is the actual mass of carbon deposited upon the formation of OCNTGs and mcalc is the calculated mass of carbon necessary for the formation of OCNTGs is introduced. It is found that the dependence of specific hydrogen adsorption on the magnitude of the factor has a maximum at Ψ = 1.2, and OCNTGs can adsorb and store hydrogen in the interval 0.4 to 0.6 < Ψ < 1.5 to 1.7. Possible mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption and its relationship to the structure of carbon nanoformations are examined.

  12. In situ TEM studies of carbon and gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas Garcia, Gilberto

    Properties of matter change as structures go down in size to the nanoscale, creating new possibilities for creating new functional materials with better properties than the bulk. In situ TEM techniques were used to probe the properties of two different materials: atomic carbon chains and gold nanoparticles. Carbon chains were synthesized by in situ TEM electron beam irradiation from few-layers-graphene (FLG) flakes. Several chains up to 5 nm long were observed. Aberration corrected TEM confirmed the dimerization of the linear chain as predicted by Peierls. Moreover, it was observed that two linear carbon chains can cross-bond every 9 atoms, and it was confirmed by DFT calculations. Five-fold nanoparticles are not supposed to be stable beyond 5 nm size. Here, decahedra with high index facets in the order of 300 nm were studied by TEM. It was found that the high index facets were only stable by adding a capping agent, otherwise, smooth edges were observed. In this case, a (5x1) hexagonal surface reconstruction was observed on the {001} surfaces, with the hexagonal strings along a [110] and a [410] direction. Additionally, mechanical properties of gold nanoparticles, with and without twin boundaries, under 100 nm were measured by in situ TEM compression experiments. All of the nanoparticles presented yield strengths in the order of GPa. Multi twinned nanoparticles were found to be more malleable, reaching real compressing strains of 100 %, while the single crystal nanoparticle presented less plastic flow. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the twin boundaries contribute to the malleability of the nanoparticles, at the same time it provides a mechanism to stop dislocations, hence, strain hardening the nanoparticle at later stages of compression. Finally, the behavior of a single grain boundary was studied by in situ TEM manipulation of nanoparticles. A liquid-like behavior of a grain boundary is observed after two 40 nm gold nanoparticles are brought to

  13. Improved photovoltaic performance of multiple carbon-doped ZnO nanostructures under UV and visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianbin; Du, Hejun; Sun, Xiao Wei; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Sun, Gengzhi; Li, Fengji; Zheng, Lianxi; Zhang, Sam

    2014-09-01

    We report synthesis of multiple carbon-doped ZnO nanostructures by using carbon cloth as substrates to obtain multiple hollow ZnO microtube-nanowire structures. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analysis clearly show that carbon is doped into ZnO through substitution of carbon for oxygen in the growth and annealing processes. Upon exposure to 633-nm red laser, a distinct photoresponse can be observed, which indicates that carbon doping in ZnO can well extend its light harvesting to visible light region. Furthermore, a prototype of photovoltaic cell was fabricated to demonstrate the photovoltaic performance of multiple carbon-doped ZnO nanostructures under UV and visible light irradiation. This result shows that carbon-doped ZnO can act as effective photoactive materials for photoelectric components.

  14. Electrophysical properties and structural features of shungite (natural nanostructured carbon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations of the electrical conductive properties with a nanoscale locality at nanoampere currents and the results of an analysis of the correlation between the electrical conductivity and structural features of natural glassy carbon, i.e., shungite. The investigations have been performed using atomic force microscopy, electric force spectroscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy, X-ray spectroscopic analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that there are differences in electrical conductive properties of the structurally similar shungite samples formed under different PT conditions. Based on the analysis of the structural parameters and specific features of the shungite compositions, it has been shown that the effect of intercalation of impurities into boundary layers of graphene sheets has the most significant influence on the electrical and physical properties of the shungites. The differences in types and values of conductivity of the shungite samples are determined by the different degrees of intercalation.

  15. Carbon nanostructures on silicon substrates suitable for nanolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Abdi, Y.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Hoseinzadegan, H.; Koohsorkhi, J.

    2006-01-30

    We report the application of vertically grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for submicron and nanolithography. The growth of CNTs is performed on silicon substrates using a nickel-seeded plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method at a temperature of 650 deg. C and with a mixture of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The grown CNTs are encapsulated by a titanium-dioxide film and then mechanically polished to expose the buried nanotubes, and a plasma ashing step finalizes the process. The emission of electrons from the encapsulated nanotubes is used to write patterns on a resist-coated substrate placed opposite to the main CNT holding one. Scanning electron microscope has been used to investigate the nanotubes and the formation of nano-metric lines. Also a novel approach is presented to create isolated nanotubes from a previously patterned cluster growth.

  16. Synthesis and Electron Field-Emission of 1-D Carbon-Related Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Han C.

    2002-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes, a new stable form of carbon that was first identified in 1991 [1], are fullerene-related structures which consist of graphitic cylinders closed at either end with caps containing pentagonal rings. Although carbon nanotube structures are closely related to graphite, the curvature, symmetry and small size induce marked deviations from the graphitic behavior. Various methods have been used to produce carbon nanotubes, e.g., arc-discharge, laser-vaporization, catalytic chemical vapor deposition, but too many impurities also be produced, such as fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles and amorphous carbons. The microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) system has been used to grow carbon nanotubes in this work and other 1-D carbon-related nanostructured materials was synthesized by the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma system. Plasma is generated by microwave excitation at 2.45 GHz by a magnetron passes through a waveguide and fed perpendicularly through a quartz dome into an 875 G magnetic field generated by the coils surrounding the resonance volume that creates the ECR condition. The deposition chamber was pumped down to the base pressure of 6.7X10-4 Pa (5X10-6 Torr) with a turbomolecular pump for ECR-plasma and subatmospheric pressures for MPECVD by a rotary mechanical pump. Well-aligned carbon-related nanostructures have been synthesized in nanoporous alumina or silicon with a uniform diameter of 30-100 nm by microwave excited plasma of CH_4, C_2H_2, N_2, H2 and Ar precursors. Nickel nanowires not only serve as catalysts to decompose hydrocarbons to form nanostructures but also function as an electrical conductor for other advanced applications. A negative dc bias is always applied to the substrate to promote the flow of ion fluxes through the nanochannels of the template materials that facilitate the physical adsorption and subsequent chemical absorption in the formation of carbon- and carbon-nitride nanotubes[2]. The electron

  17. From small aromatic molecules to functional nanostructured carbon by pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, R. R.; Thakare, V. P.; Warule, S.; Lefez, B.; Hannoyer, B.; Jog, J. P.; Ogale, S. B.

    2012-06-01

    A novel route employing UV laser pulses (KrF Excimer, 248 nm) to cleave small aromatic molecules and stitch the generated free radicals into functional nanostructured forms of carbon is introduced. The process differs distinctly from any strategies wherein the aromatic rings are broken in the primary process. It is demonstrated that this pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching (PLPS) process when applied to routine laboratory solvents (or toxic chemical wastes when discarded) Chlorobenzene and o-Dichlorobenzene yields Carbon Nanospheres (CNSs) comprising of graphene-like sheets assembled in onion-like configurations. This room temperature process implemented under normal laboratory conditions is versatile and clearly applicable to the whole family of haloaromatic compounds without and with additions of precursors or other nanomaterials. We further bring out its applicability for synthesis of metal-oxide based carbon nanocomposites.

  18. Computational study of pressure-driven methane transport in hierarchical nanostructured porous carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Kisung; Huang, Liping

    2016-01-28

    Using the reflecting particle method together with a perturbation-relaxation loop developed in our previous work, we studied pressure-driven methane transport in hierarchical nanostructured porous carbons (HNPCs) containing both mesopores and micropores in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The surface morphology of the mesopore wall was systematically varied by tuning interaction strength between carbon atoms and the template in a mimetic nanocasting process. Effects of temperature and mesopore size on methane transport in HNPCs were also studied. Our study shows that increased mesopore wall surface roughness changes the character of the gas-wall interaction from specular to diffuse, while the gas-gas interaction is diminished due to the decrease of adsorption density. Effects of the mesopore wall surface morphology are the most significant at low temperatures and in small channels. Our systematic study provides a better understanding of the transport mechanisms of light gases through carbon nanotube composite membranes in experiments.

  19. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Filipescu, M.; Vizireanu, S.; Vogt, L.; Antohe, S.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2016-06-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO2 nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500-700 mJ/cm2 it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO2 pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  20. Novel carbon nanostructures as catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Sadesh Kumar

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology has advanced rapidly in recent years, with one of active area focused on improving the long-term performance of carbon supported catalysts, which has been recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed for the commercialization of PEMFCs. The central part of a PEMFC is the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) which consists of two electrodes (anode and cathode) and a cation exchange membrane. These electrodes are commonly made of carbon black (most often, Vulcan XC-72) supported on carbon paper or carbon cloth backings. It is the primary objective of this thesis to prepare and investigate carbon nanostructures (CNS, licensed to Hydrogen Research Institute -- IRH, Quebec, Canada), the carbon material with more graphite component like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for use as catalyst support in PEMFCs. High energy ball-milling of activated carbon along with transition metal catalysts under hydrogen atmosphere, followed by heat-treatment leads to nanocrystalline structures of carbon called CNS. However, CNS formed in the quartz tube after heat-treatment is inevitably accompanied by many impurities such as metal particles, amorphous carbon and other carbon nanoparticules. Such impurities are a serious impediment to detailed characterization of the properties of nanostructures. In addition, since the surface of CNS is itself rather inert, it is difficult to control the homogeneity and size distribution of Pt nanoparticules. In this thesis work, we demonstrated a novel mean to purify and functionalize CNS via acid-oxidation under reflux conditions. To investigate and quantify these nanostructures X-ray diffraction, electrical conductivity measurements, specific surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies were used. Cyclic voltammetry studies were performed on different samples to derive estimates for the relationship

  1. Percolation dans des reseaux realistes de nanostructures de carbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe

    Carbon nanotubes have very interesting mechanical and electrical properties for various applications in electronics. They are highly resistant to deformation and can be excellent conductors or semiconductors. However, manipulating individual nanotubes to build structured devices remains very difficult. There is no method for controlling all of the electrical properties, the orientation and the spatial positioning of a large number of nanotubes. The fabrication of disordered networks of nanotubes is much easier, and these systems have a good electrical conductivity which makes them very interesting, especially as materials of transparent and flexible electrodes. There are three main methods of production used to make networks of nanotubes: the solution deposition, the direct growth on substrate and the embedding in a polymer matrix. The solution deposition method can form networks of various densities on a variety of substrates, the direct growth of nanotubes allows the creation of very clean networks on substrates such as SiO2, and the embedding in a polymer matrix can give composite volumes containing varying amounts of nanotubes. Many parameters such as the length of the tubes, their orientation or their tortuosity influence the properties of these networks and the presence of structural disorder complicates the understanding of their interactions. Predicting the properties of a network, such as conductivity, from a few characteristics such as size and density of the tubes can be difficult. This task becomes even more complex if one wants to identify the parameters that will optimize the performance of a device containing the material. We chose to address the carbon nanotube networks problem by developing a series of computer simulation tools that are mainly based on the Monte Carlo method. We take into account a large number of parameters to describe the characteristics of the networks, which allows for a more reliable representation of real networks as well as

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Strontium Carbonate Nanostructures via Simple Hydrothermal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari-Fard, Zahra; Sabet, Mohammad; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2016-02-01

    Strontium carbonate (SrCO3) nanostructures were synthesized via simple hydrothermal method by Sr(NO3)2, ethylenediamine and hydrazine as reagents. The products were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Different parameter's effects on the product size and morphology were investigated. It was found that reagent concentration, reaction time and temperature play key roles in morphology of the obtained product.

  3. Density functional theory for field emission from carbon nano-structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhibing

    2015-12-01

    Electron field emission is understood as a quantum mechanical many-body problem in which an electronic quasi-particle of the emitter is converted into an electron in vacuum. Fundamental concepts of field emission, such as the field enhancement factor, work-function, edge barrier and emission current density, will be investigated, using carbon nanotubes and graphene as examples. A multi-scale algorithm basing on density functional theory is introduced. We will argue that such a first principle approach is necessary and appropriate for field emission of nano-structures, not only for a more accurate quantitative description, but, more importantly, for deeper insight into field emission.

  4. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.

    2002-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e. soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  5. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.; Hull, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e., soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  6. One-dimensional silver nanostructures on single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Eunice; Santiago, Steven; Baez, Luis; Rivera, Daniel; Gonzalez, Miguel; Rivera-Ramos, Milton E; Leon, Madeline; Castro, Miguel E

    2011-11-23

    We report the synthesis and characterization of one-dimensional silver nanostructures using single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as a template material. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy are consistent with the formation of a one-dimensional array of silver particles on SWCNT. We observe evidence for the excitation of the longitudinal silver plasmon mode in the optical absorption spectra of Ag-SWCNT dispersions, even in the lowest silver concentrations employed. The results indicate that silver deposits on SWCNT may be candidates for light-to-energy conversion through the coupling of the electric field excited in arrays of plasmonic particles.

  7. Arc spraying of nano-structured wire on carbon steel: examination of coating microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Al Askandarani, A.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2011-01-17

    Arc spraying of nano-structured wire (TAFA 95MX) onto carbon steel is carried out. The workpieces coated were heat treated at temperature similar to the operating temperature of the hot-path components of power gas turbines. The morphological and microstructural changes in the coating are examined using optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The surface roughness and microhardness of the resulting coatings are measured. It is found that the formation of dimples like structure at surface increased the surface roughness of the coating. The microhardness of the resulting coating is significantly higher than the base material hardness. Heat treatment does not alter the microstructure and microhardness of the coating.

  8. Controlled growth, characterization and thermodynamic behavior of bismuth–tin nanostructures sheathed in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Namjo; Hwang, Kyo Sik; Yang, SeungCheol; Lee, Soon-pung

    2014-03-01

    We report the controlled synthesis of bismuth–tin (Bi–Sn) nanostructures sheathed in graphitic shells that resemble carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Our approach is based on a simple catalytic chemical vapor deposition over a mixture of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SnO{sub 2} supplied as starting materials. Shape control of the nanostructures strongly relies on the weight ratio of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SnO{sub 2}. Sheathed nanoparticles and nanorods are formed at SnO{sub 2} to Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} weight ratios of less than 4:1. They are composed of two separate crystals: rhombohedral Bi and tetragonal Sn{sub 19}Bi crystals. On the other hand, the sheathed nanowires are formed at SnO{sub 2} to Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} weight ratios above 4:1. The nanowires have only tetragonal Sn{sub 19}Bi structure with a diameter of approximately 100 nm. Elementary analyses support the core/shell heterostructure of the resulting products. A favorable temperature for the Sn-rich Sn{sub 19}Bi nanowires is in the range of 700–800 °C, more specifically around 750 °C. Thermodynamic analysis reveals that the CNTs play a significant role in the protection of the Bi–Sn nanostructures during phase transition by temperature change. This simple and reproducible method may be extended to the fabrication of similar binary or ternary nanostructures. - Highlights: • Controlled growth of Bi–Sn nanostructures sheathed in CNTs relies on MSnO{sub 2}/MBi{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Growth mechanism is based on catalytic reaction of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} over an oxide mixture. • Nanoparticles and nanorods consist of rhombohedral Bi and tetragonal Sn{sub 19}Bi. • A favorable temperature for the Sn{sub 19}Bi nanowires is in the range of 700–800 °C. • CNT acts as a protective barrier during phase change of the Bi–Sn nanostructures.

  9. Towards the mechanism of electrochemical hydrogen storage in nanostructured carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurewicz, K.; Frackowiak, E.; Béguin, F.

    The mechanism of electrochemical hydrogen storage in a nanostructured carbon electrode using the electrodecomposition of KOH and H2SO4 aqueous solutions has been investigated by means of galvanostatic and voltammetry techniques. The role of charging the electrical double layer is carefully considered during the process of hydrogen insertion and deinsertion into carbon, i.e. electroreduction and electrooxidation, respectively. Once the electrode potential becomes lower than the equilibrium potential, hydrogen in the zero oxidation state is formed by the reduction of water in alkaline solution or the reduction of hydronium ions H3O+ in acidic medium. In the next step, hydrogen is physically adsorbed (Had) onto the carbon surface and diffuses into the bulk of the carbon material with an efficiency which depends on the type of electrolyte. A higher amount of hydrogen is stored using the KOH medium, and the galvanostatic oxidation shows a well-defined plateau around -0.5 V vs. Normal Hydrogen Electrode (NHE). Due to the high overvoltage value in KOH (η=0.55 V), the recombination steps of Had leading to molecular hydrogen evolution through the chemical (Tafel) or electrochemical (Heyrovsky) reactions are less favoured than in an H2SO4 medium (η=0.32 V). Hence, a meaningful sorption of hydrogen is observed only in the basic electrolyte which shows a reversible capacity of 350 mAh/g (i.e. 1.3 wt.%) with a good electrical efficiency. Such performance demonstrates that nanostructured activated carbons might be a promising alternative to metallic alloys for electrochemical hydrogen storage.

  10. Development of nitrogen enriched nanostructured carbon adsorbents for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon adsorbents containing high nitrogen content were developed by templating melamine-formaldehyde resin in the pores of mesoporous silica by nanocasting technique. A series of adsorbents were prepared by altering the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700 °C and characterized in terms of their textural and morphological properties. CO2 adsorption performance was investigated at various temperatures from 30 to 100 °C by using a thermogravimetric analyzer under varying CO2 concentrations. Multiple adsorption-desorption experiments were also carried out to investigate the adsorbent regenerability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the development of nanostructured materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and elemental analysis indicated the development of carbon adsorbents having high nitrogen content. The surface area and pore volume of the adsorbent carbonized at 700 °C were found to be 266 m(2) g(-1) and 0.25 cm(3) g(-1) respectively. CO2 uptake profile for the developed adsorbents showed that the maximum CO2 adsorption occurred within ca. 100 s. CO2 uptake of 0.792 mmol g(-1) at 30 °C was exhibited by carbon obtained at 700 °C with complete regenerability in three adsorption-desorption cycles. Furthermore, kinetics of CO2 adsorption on the developed adsorbents was studied by fitting the experimental data of CO2 uptake to three kinetic models with best fit being obtained by fractional order kinetic model with error% within range of 5%. Adsorbent surface was found to be energetically heterogeneous as suggested by Temkin isotherm model. Also the isosteric heat of adsorption for CO2 was observed to increase from ca. 30-44 kJ mol(-1) with increase in surface coverage.

  11. Selective and Efficient Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide on Oxide-Derived Nanostructured Silver Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Trześniewski, Bartek J; Xie, Jie; Smith, Wilson A

    2016-08-08

    In this work, the selective electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide on oxide-derived silver electrocatalysts is presented. By a simple synthesis technique, the overall high faradaic efficiency for CO production on the oxide-derived Ag was shifted by more than 400 mV towards a lower overpotential compared to that of untreated Ag. Notably, the Ag resulting from Ag oxide is capable of electrochemically reducing CO2 to CO with approximately 80 % catalytic selectivity at a moderate overpotential of 0.49 V, which is much higher than that (ca. 4 %) of untreated Ag under identical conditions. Electrokinetic studies show that the improved catalytic activity is ascribed to the enhanced stabilization of COOH(.) intermediate. Furthermore, highly nanostructured Ag is likely able to create a high local pH near the catalyst surface, which may also facilitate the catalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 with suppressed H2 evolution.

  12. A hierarchical nanostructured carbon nanofiber-In2S3 photocatalyst with high photodegradation and disinfection abilities under visible light.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Li, An Ran; Tai, Ming Hang; Liu, Zhao Yang; Sun, Darren Delai

    2014-06-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of pollutants under visible light provides a new door to solve the water contamination problem by utilizing free and renewable sunlight. The search for highly efficient photocatalysts with hierarchical nanostructures remains crucial for accessing this new door. In this work, a new hierarchical nanostructured photocatalyst is designed and synthesized, for the first time, by anchoring In2S3 flower-like nanostructures on non-woven carbon nanofiber (CNF). The nanostructures of these CNF-In2S3 composites were fine-tuned, with the aim of achieving the highest photocatalytic activity under visible light. The formation mechanism of the hierarchical nanostructure is also investigated. The results indicate that the optimized hierarchical CNF-In2S3 photocatalyst is superior in photodegradation and disinfection efficiency to that of pure In2S3 under visible-light irradiation. The prominent photocatalytic activities of these hierarchical CNF-In2S3 photocatalysts can be attributed to the excellent properties of enhanced light absorption, large surface area, and efficient charge separation, which are all derived from the special three-dimensional hierarchical nanostructures. Therefore, this work presents the great potential of this hierarchical nanostructured CNF-In2S3 photocatalyst in practical environmental remediation fields.

  13. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J.; Du, L.-X.; Sun, G.-S.; Xie, H.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50–80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss. PMID:26687012

  14. R & D on carbon nanostructures in Russia: scientometric analysis, 1990-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Alexander I.

    2015-02-01

    The analysis, based on scientific publications and patents, was conducted to form an understanding of the overall scientific and technology landscape in the field of carbon nanostructures and determine Russia's place on it. The scientific publications came from the Science Citation Index Expanded database (DB SCIE); the patent information was extracted from databases of the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and Russian Federal Service for Intellectual Property (Rospatent). We used also data about research projects, obtained via information systems of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR). Bibliometric methods are used to rank countries, institutions, and scientists, contributing to the carbon nanostructures research. We analyze the current state and trends of the research in Russia as compared to other countries, and the contribution and impact of its institutions, especially research of the "highest quality." Considerable focus is on research collaboration and its relationship with citation impact. Patent datasets are used to determine the composition of participants of innovative processes and international patent activity of Russian inventors in the field, and to identify the most active representatives of small and medium business and some technological developments ripe for commercialization. The article contains a critical analysis of the findings, including a policy discussion of the country's scientific authorities.

  15. One-dimensional carbon nanostructures for terahertz electron-beam radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Swan, Anna K.; Paiella, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    One-dimensional carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanoribbons can feature near-ballistic electronic transport over micron-scale distances even at room temperature. As a result, these materials provide a uniquely suited solid-state platform for radiation mechanisms that so far have been the exclusive domain of electron beams in vacuum. Here we consider the generation of terahertz light based on two such mechanisms, namely, the emission of cyclotronlike radiation in a sinusoidally corrugated nanowire (where periodic angular motion is produced by the mechanical corrugation rather than an externally applied magnetic field), and the Smith-Purcell effect in a rectilinear nanowire over a dielectric grating. In both cases, the radiation properties of the individual charge carriers are investigated via full-wave electrodynamic simulations, including dephasing effects caused by carrier collisions. The overall light output is then computed with a standard model of charge transport for two particularly suitable types of carbon nanostructures, i.e., zigzag graphene nanoribbons and armchair single-wall nanotubes. Relatively sharp emission peaks at geometrically tunable terahertz frequencies are obtained in each case. The corresponding output powers are experimentally accessible even with individual nanowires, and can be scaled to technologically significant levels using array configurations. These radiation mechanisms therefore represent a promising paradigm for light emission in condensed matter, which may find important applications in nanoelectronics and terahertz photonics.

  16. Nanostructured Carbon/Antimony Composites as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries with Long Life.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Yi, Zheng; Wang, Chunli; Wang, Lidong; Wu, Yaoming; Wang, Limin

    2016-08-05

    A series of nanostructured carbon/antimony composites have been successfully synthesized by a simple sol-gel, high-temperature carbon thermal reduction process. In the carbon/antimony composites, antimony nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed in the pyrolyzed nanoporous carbon matrix. As an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the C/Sb10 composite displays a high initial discharge capacity of 1214.6 mAh g(-1) and a reversible charge capacity of 595.5 mAh g(-1) with a corresponding coulombic efficiency of 49 % in the first cycle. In addition, it exhibits a high reversible discharge capacity of 466.2 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 200 cycles and a high rate discharge capacity of 354.4 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1) . The excellent cycling stability and rate discharge performance of the C/Sb10 composite could be due to the uniform dispersion of antimony nanoparticles in the porous carbon matrix, which can buffer the volume expansion and maintain the integrity of the electrode during the charge-discharge cycles.

  17. Anisotropic Thermal Properties of Nanostructured Magnetic, Carbon and Hybrid Magnetic - Carbon Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Sylvester

    In this dissertation research we investigated thermal properties of three groups of nanostructured materials: (i) magnetic; (ii) reduced graphene oxide films; and (iii) hybrid magnetic -- graphite -- graphene composites. The thermal measurements were conducted using the transient "hot disk" and "laser flash" techniques. The rare-earth free nanostructured SrFe12O19 permanent magnets were produced by the current activated pressure assisted densification technique. The thermal conductivity of the nanostructured bulk magnets was found to range from 3.8 to 5.6 W/mK for the in-plane and 2.36 W/mk to 2.65 W/mK for the cross-plane directions, respectively. The heat conduction was dominated by phonons near the room temperature. The anisotropy of heat conduction was explained by the brick-like alignment of crystalline grains with the longer grain size in-plane direction. The thermal conductivity scales up with the average grain size and mass density of the material revealing weak temperature dependence. Using the nanostructured ferromagnetic Fe3O4 composites as an example system, we incorporated graphene and graphite fillers into magnetic material without changing their morphology. It was demonstrated that addition of 5 wt. % of equal mixture of graphene and graphite flakes to the composite results in a factor of x2.6 enhancement of the thermal conductivity without significant degradation of the saturation magnetization. We investigated thermal conductivity of free-standing reduced graphene oxide films subjected to a high-temperature treatment of up to 1000°C. It was found that the high-temperature annealing dramatically increased the in-plane thermal conductivity, K, of the films from ˜3 W/mK to ˜61 W/mK at room temperature. The cross-plane thermal conductivity, K⊥, revealed an interesting opposite trend of decreasing to a very small value of ˜0.09 W/mK in the reduced graphene oxide films annealed at 1000°C. The obtained films demonstrated an exceptionally strong

  18. Mechanics of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures: Atomistic, continuum, and multi-scale approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Arash

    A new multiscale modeling technique called the Consistent Atomic-scale Finite Element (CAFE) method is introduced. Unlike traditional approaches for linking the atomic structure to its equivalent continuum, this method directly connects the atomic degrees of freedom to a reduced set of finite element degrees of freedom without passing through an intermediate homogenized continuum. As a result, there is no need to introduce stress and strain measures at the atomic level. The Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential is used to calculate the consistent tangent stiffness matrix of the structure. In this finite element formulation, all local and non-local interactions between carbon atoms are taken into account using overlapping finite elements. In addition, a consistent hierarchical finite element modeling technique is developed for adaptively coarsening and refining the mesh over different parts of the model. This process is consistent with the underlying atomic structure and, by refining the mesh to the scale of atomic spacing, molecular dynamic results can be recovered. This method is valid across the scales and can be used to concurrently model atomistic and continuum phenomena so, in contrast with most other multi-scale methods, there is no need to introduce artificial boundaries for coupling atomistic and continuum regions. Effect of the length scale of the nanostructure is also included in the model by building the hierarchy of elements from bottom up using a finite size atom cluster as the building block. To be consistent with the bravais multi-lattice structure of sp2-bonded carbon, two independent displacement fields are used for reducing the order of the model. Sparse structure of the stiffness matrix of these nanostructures is exploited to reduce the memory requirement and to speed up the formation of the system matrices and solution of the equilibrium equations. Applicability of the method is shown with several examples of the nonlinear mechanics of carbon

  19. Carbon-based nanostructured surfaces for enhanced phase-change cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj Kousalya, Arun

    To maintain acceptable device temperatures in the new generation of electronic devices under development for high-power applications, conventional liquid cooling schemes will likely be superseded by multi-phase cooling solutions to provide substantial enhancement to the cooling capability. The central theme of the current work is to investigate the two-phase thermal performance of carbon-based nanostructured coatings in passive and pumped liquid-vapor phase-change cooling schemes. Quantification of the critical parameters that influence thermal performance of the carbon nanostructured boiling surfaces presented herein will lead to improved understanding of the underlying evaporative and boiling mechanisms in such surfaces. A flow boiling experimental facility is developed to generate consistent and accurate heat transfer performance curves with degassed and deionized water as the working fluid. New means of boiling heat transfer enhancement by altering surface characteristics such as surface energy and wettability through light-surface interactions is explored in this work. In this regard, carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings are exposed to low-intensity irradiation emitted from a light emitting diode and the subcooled flow boiling performance is compared against a non-irradiated CNT-coated copper surface. A considerable reduction in surface superheat and enhancement in average heat transfer coefficient is observed. In another work involving CNTs, the thermal performance of CNT-integrated sintered wick structures is evaluated in a passively cooled vapor chamber. A physical vapor deposition process is used to coat the CNTs with varying thicknesses of copper to promote surface wetting with the working fluid, water. Thermal performance of the bare sintered copper powder sample and the copper-functionalized CNT-coated sintered copper powder wick samples is compared using an experimental facility that simulates the capillary fluid feeding conditions of a vapor chamber

  20. Efficient and versatile fibrous adsorbent based on magnetic amphiphilic composites of chrysotile/carbon nanostructures for the removal of ethynilestradiol.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana Paula C; Purceno, Aluir D; de Paula, Camila C A; da Silva, Julio César C; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2013-03-15

    In this work, chrysotile was used as support to grow carbon nanotubes and nanofibers to produce fibrous amphiphilic magnetic nanostructured composites. Iron impregnated on the chrysotile surface at 1, 5 and 15 wt% was used as catalyst to grow carbon nanostructures by CVD (chemical vapor deposition) with ethanol at 800°C. Raman, TG/DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, BET, SEM, TEM, elemental analyses and contact angle measurements suggested the formation of a complex amphiphilic material containing up to 21% of nanostructured hydrophobic carbon supported on hydrophilic Mg silicate fibers with magnetic Fe cores protected by carbon coating. Adsorption tests for the hormone ethynilestradiol (EE), a hazardous water contaminant, showed remarkable adsorption capacities even compared to high surface area activated carbon and multiwall carbon nanotubes. These results are discussed in terms of the hydrophobic surface of the carbon nanotubes and nanofibers completely exposed and accessible for the adsorption of the EE molecules combined with the hydrophilic Mg silicate surface which allows good dispersion in water. The composites are magnetic and after adsorption the dispersed particles can be removed by a simple magnetic process. Moreover, the fibrous composites can be conformed as threads, screens and pellets to produce different filtering media.

  1. Physical properties of low-dimensional sp 2 -based carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, V.; Souza Filho, A. G.; Barros, E. B.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a tremendous growth in the development and understanding of sp 2 carbon-based nanostructures. The impact of this research has led to a number of fundamental discoveries that have played a central role in the understanding of many aspects of materials physics and their applications. Much of this progress has been enabled by the development of new techniques to prepare, modify, and assemble low-dimensional materials into devices. The field has also benefited greatly from much progress in theoretical and computational modeling, as well as from advances in characterization techniques developed to probe and manipulate single atomic layers, nanoribbons, and nanotubes. Some of the most fundamental physical properties of sp2 carbon-based nanostructures are reviewed and their role as model systems for solid-state physics in one and two dimensions is highlighted. The objective of this review is to provide a thorough account on current understanding of how the details of the atomic structure affect phonons, electrons, and transport in these nanomaterials. The review starts with a description of the behavior of single-layer and few-layer graphene and then expands into the analysis of nanoribbons and nanotubes in terms of their reduced dimensionality and curvature. How the properties can be modified and tailored for specific applications is then discussed. The review concludes with a historical perspective and considers some open questions concerning future directions in the physics of low-dimensional systems and their impact on continued advances in solid-state physics, and also looks beyond carbon nanosystems.

  2. Carbon nanotubes/heteroatom-doped carbon core-sheath nanostructures as highly active, metal-free oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sa, Young Jin; Park, Chiyoung; Jeong, Hu Young; Park, Seok-Hee; Lee, Zonghoon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Park, Gu-Gon; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2014-04-14

    A facile, scalable route to new nanocomposites that are based on carbon nanotubes/heteroatom-doped carbon (CNT/HDC) core-sheath nanostructures is reported. These nanostructures were prepared by the adsorption of heteroatom-containing ionic liquids on the walls of CNTs, followed by carbonization. The design of the CNT/HDC composite allows for combining the electrical conductivity of the CNTs with the catalytic activity of the heteroatom-containing HDC sheath layers. The CNT/HDC nanostructures are highly active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction and displayed one of the best performances among heteroatom-doped nanocarbon catalysts in terms of half-wave potential and kinetic current density. The four-electron selectivity and the exchange current density of the CNT/HDC nanostructures are comparable with those of a Pt/C catalyst, and the CNT/HDC composites were superior to Pt/C in terms of long-term durability and poison tolerance. Furthermore, an alkaline fuel cell that employs a CNT/HDC nanostructure as the cathode catalyst shows very high current and power densities, which sheds light on the practical applicability of these new nanocomposites.

  3. Synthesis of carbon nano-structures using organic-molecule intercalated taeniolite layered silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezumi, Takaaki; Wada, Noboru

    2015-03-01

    By calcinating organic-molecule intercalated taeniolite layered silicates, carbon nano-structures were made between the 2:1 layered silicate sheets. Raman scattering, XRD, TGA and SEM were used to characterize the samples. Large taeniolite crystals (NaLiMg2Si4O10F) were first prepared by melting appropriate chemicals at high temperatures using a platinum crucible. Then, the taeniolite crystals made were cation-exchanged with Li+, K+, NH4+,Ca2+ + and Mg2+ in salt solution. Finally, various organic molecules such as ethylene glycol, pyridine and so on were intercalated into the taeniolite crystals, and calcinated under a N2 atmosphere at about 1000K. The resulting crystals are usually gray or black. X-ray (00l) diffraction patterns suggested that the carbon structures may be monolayer thick (i.e., graphene-like). Raman scattering spectra which exhibited a sharp G-band peak with a high G-band/D-band ratio indicated that the carbon structures were relatively well crystallized. Cation and organic-molecule dependence on the carbon structures will be discussed. In addition, evidence for stage-2 taeniolite will be presented.

  4. Electrochemical and DFT study of an anticancer and active anthelmintic drug at carbon nanostructured modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Ghalkhani, Masoumeh; Beheshtian, Javad; Salehi, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The electrochemical response of mebendazole (Meb), an anticancer and effective anthelmintic drug, was investigated using two different carbon nanostructured modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE). Although, compared to unmodified GCE, both prepared modified electrodes improved the voltammetric response of Meb, the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modified GCE showed higher sensitivity and stability. Therefore, the CNTs-GCE was chosen as a promising candidate for the further studies. At first, the electrochemical behavior of Meb was studied by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse and square wave voltammetry. A one step reversible, pH-dependent and adsorption-controlled process was revealed for electro-oxidation of Meb. A possible mechanism for the electrochemical oxidation of Meb was proposed. In addition, electronic structure, adsorption energy, band gap, type of interaction and stable configuration of Meb on the surface of functionalized carbon nanotubes were studied by using density functional theory (DFT). Obtained results revealed that Meb is weakly physisorbed on the CNTs and that the electronic properties of the CNTs are not significantly changed. Notably, CNTs could be considered as a suitable modifier for preparation of the modified electrode for Meb analysis. Then, the experimental parameters affecting the electrochemical response of Meb were optimized. Under optimal conditions, high sensitivity (b(Meb)=dIp,a(Meb)/d[Meb]=19.65μAμM(-1)), a low detection limit (LOD (Meb)=19nM) and a wide linear dynamic range (0.06-3μM) was resulted for the voltammetric quantification of Meb.

  5. Thermally induced transformations of amorphous carbon nanostructures fabricated by electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Kim, Songkil; Fedorov, Andrei G; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2011-03-01

    We studied the thermally induced phase transformations of electron-beam-induced deposited (EBID) amorphous carbon nanostructures by correlating the changes in its morphology with internal microstructure by using combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution confocal Raman microscopy. These carbon deposits can be used to create heterogeneous junctions in electronic devices commonly known as carbon-metal interconnects. We compared two basic shapes of EBID deposits: dots/pillars with widths from 50 to 600 nm and heights from 50 to 500 nm and lines with variable heights from 10 to 150 nm but having a constant length of 6 μm. We observed that during thermal annealing, the nanoscale amorphous deposits go through multistage transformation including dehydration and stress-relaxation around 150 °C, dehydrogenation within 150-300 °C, followed by graphitization (>350 °C) and formation of nanocrystalline, highly densified graphitic deposits around 450 °C. The later stage of transformation occurs well below commonly observed graphitization for bulk carbon (600-800 °C). It was observed that the shape of the deposits contribute significantly to the phase transformations. We suggested that this difference is controlled by different contributions from interfacial footprints area. Moreover, the rate of graphitization was different for deposits of different shapes with the lines showing a much stronger dependence of its structure on the density than the dots.

  6. Field emission characteristics of nano-structured carbon films deposited on differently pretreated Mo films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longyang; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Lei

    2008-12-01

    Nano-structured carbon films (NCFs) were grown on Mo layers by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) system. The Mo layers were deposited on ceramic substrates by electron beam deposition method and were pretreated by different techniques, which include ultrasonically scratching and laser-grooving technology (10 line/mm). NCFs were characterized by a field emission type scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Raman spectra and field emission (FE) I- V measurements. Effects of process parameters on morphologies, structures and FE properties of NCFs were examined. The experimental results show that two kinds of NCFs deposited at the same parameters employed for the MPCVD process were respectively composed of carbon nano-balls and reticular carbon nano-tubes inlayed by carbon nano-balls with dissimilar disorder structures, both NCFs showed each merits and exhibited good field emission properties, especially shown in the uniformity of FE, the uniform field emission images with areas of 4 cm 2 were obtained. Growth mechanism influenced by different pretreated method was discussed and the possible FE mechanisms of the NCFs were also investigated. Finally, the process characteristics of laser-grooving technology were analyzed, and its potential applications were predicted.

  7. Laser nanostructuring 3-D bioconstruction based on carbon nanotubes in a water matrix of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, Alexander Y.; Ichkitidze, Levan P.; Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Savelyev, Mikhail S.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2016-04-01

    3-D bioconstructions were created using the evaporation method of the water-albumin solution with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the continuous and pulsed femtosecond laser radiation. It is determined that the volume structure of the samples created by the femtosecond radiation has more cavities than the one created by the continuous radiation. The average diameter for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) samples was almost two times higher (35-40 nm) than for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) samples (20-30 nm). The most homogenous 3-D bioconstruction was formed from MWCNTs by the continuous laser radiation. The hardness of such samples totaled up to 370 MPa at the nanoscale. High strength properties and the resistance of the 3-D bioconstructions produced by the laser irradiation depend on the volume nanotubes scaffold forming inside them. The scaffold was formed by the electric field of the directed laser irradiation. The covalent bond energy between the nanotube carbon molecule and the oxygen of the bovine serum albumin aminoacid residue amounts 580 kJ/mol. The 3-D bioconstructions based on MWCNTs and SWCNTs becomes overgrown with the cells (fibroblasts) over the course of 72 hours. The samples based on the both types of CNTs are not toxic for the cells and don't change its normal composition and structure. Thus the 3-D bioconstructions that are nanostructured by the pulsed and continuous laser radiation can be applied as implant materials for the recovery of the connecting tissues of the living body.

  8. The van der Waals coefficients between carbon nanostructures and small molecules: A time-dependent density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Kamal, C; Ghanty, T K; Banerjee, Arup; Chakrabarti, Aparna

    2009-10-28

    We employ all-electron ab initio time-dependent density functional theory based method to calculate the long-range dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient, namely, the van der Waals (vdW) coefficient (C(6)) between fullerenes and finite-length carbon nanotubes as well as between these structures and different small molecules. Our aim is to accurately estimate the strength of the long-range vdW interaction in terms of the C(6) coefficients between these systems and also compare these values as a function of shape and size. The dispersion coefficients are obtained via Casimir-Polder relation. The calculations are carried out with the asymptotically correct exchange-correlation potential-the statistical average of orbital potential. It is observed from our calculations that the C(6) coefficients of the carbon nanotubes increase nonlinearly with length, which implies a much stronger vdW interaction between the longer carbon nanostructures compared with the shorter ones. Additionally, it is found that the values of C(6) and polarizability are about 40%-50% lower for the carbon cages when compared with the results corresponding to the quasi-one-dimensional nanotubes with equivalent number of atoms. From our calculations of the vdW coefficients between the small molecules and the carbon nanostructures, it is observed that for H(2), the C(6) value is much larger compared with that of He. It is found that the rare gas atoms have very low values of vdW coefficient with the carbon nanostructures. In contrast, it is found that other gas molecules, including the ones that are environmentally important, possess much higher C(6) values. Carbon tetrachloride as well as chlorine molecule show very high C(6) values with themselves as well as with the carbon nanostructures. This is due to the presence of the weakly bound seven electrons in the valence state for the halogen atoms, which makes these compounds much more polarizable compared with the others.

  9. Fullerenes, PAH, Carbon Nanostructures, and Soot in Low Pressure Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grieco, William J.; Lafleur, Arthur L.; Rainey, Lenore C.; Taghizadeh, Koli; VanderSande, John B.; Howard, Jack B.

    1997-01-01

    The formation of fullerenes C60 and C7O is known to occur in premixed laminar benzene/oxygen/argon flames operated at reduced pressures. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of material collected from these flames has identified a variety of multishelled nanotubes and fullerene 'onions' as well as some trigonous structures. These fullerenes and nanostructures resemble the material that results from commercial fullerene production systems using graphite vaporization. As a result, combustion is an interesting method for fullerenes synthesis. If commercial scale operation is to be considered, the use of diffusion flames might be safer and less cumbersome than premixed flames. However, it is not known whether diffusion flames produce the types and yields of fullerenes obtained from premixed benzene/oxygen flames. Therefore, the formation of fullerenes and carbon nanostructures, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot, in acetylene and benzene diffusion flames is being studied using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  10. Carbon Nanostructure: Its Evolution During its Impact Upon Soot Growth and Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The proposed work is a ground-based study to define and quantify soot nanostructural changes in response to growth conditions, thermal and oxidative treatments and to quantify their impact upon further oxidation and growth of highly ordered carbon materials. Experimental data relating soot oxidation rates to multiple oxidizing species concentrations will directly test for additive or synergistic soot oxidation rates. Such validation is central for assessing the applicability of individual soot oxidation rates and designing oxidative strategies for controlling soot loadings in and emissions from turbulent combustion processes. Through these experiments, new insights into soot nanostructure evolution during and its impact upon oxidation by O2 and OH will be realized. It is expected that the results of this effort will spawn new research directions in future microgravity and 1g environments. Issues raised by positive or even negative demonstration of the hypotheses of this proposal have direct bearing on modelling and controlling soot formation and its destruction in nearly every combustion process producing soot.

  11. Optical properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser irradiation on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Enrique Vigueras; López, Susana Hernández; Camacho López, Marco A.; Contreras, Delfino Reyes; Farías-Mancilla, Rurik; Flores-Gallardo, Sergio G.; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia A.; Zaragoza-Contreras, E. Armando

    2016-10-01

    This research focused on the nanosecond (Nd: YAG-1064 nm) laser pulse effect on the optical and morphological properties of chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Two suspensions of MWCNT in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were prepared, one was submitted to laser pulses for 10 min while the other (blank) was only mechanically homogenized during the same time. Following the laser irradiation, the suspension acquired a yellow-amber color, in contrast to the black translucent appearance of the blank. UV-vis spectroscopy confirmed this observation, showing the blank a higher absorption. Additionally, photoluminescence measurements exhibited a broad blue-green emission band both in the blank and irradiated suspension when excited at 369 nm, showing the blank a lower intensity. However, a modification in the excitation wavelength produced a violet to green tuning in the irradiated suspension, which did not occur in the blank. Lastly, the electron microscopy analysis of the treated nanotubes showed the abundant formation of amorphous carbon, nanocages, and nanotube unzipping, exhibiting the intense surface modification produced by the laser pulse. Nanotube surface modification and the coexistence with the new carbon nanostructures were considered as the conductive conditions for optical properties modification.

  12. Magnetic amphiphilic hybrid carbon nanotubes containing N-doped and undoped sections: powerful tensioactive nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Purceno, Aluir D; Machado, Bruno F; Teixeira, Ana Paula C; Medeiros, Tayline V; Benyounes, Anas; Beausoleil, Julien; Menezes, Helvecio C; Cardeal, Zenilda L; Lago, Rochel M; Serp, Philippe

    2015-01-07

    In this work, unique amphiphilic magnetic hybrid carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized and used as tensioactive nanostructures in different applications. These CNTs interact very well with aqueous media due to the hydrophilic N-doped section, whereas the undoped hydrophobic one has strong affinity for organic molecules. The amphiphilic character combined with the magnetic properties of these CNTs opens the door to completely new and exciting applications in adsorption science and catalysis. These amphiphilic N-doped CNTs can also be used as powerful tensioactive emulsification structures. They can emulsify water/organic mixtures and by a simple magnetic separation the emulsion can be easily broken. We demonstrate the application of these CNTs in the efficient adsorption of various molecules, in addition to promoting biphasic processes in three different reactions, i.e. transesterification of soybean oil, quinoline extractive oxidation with H2O2 and a metal-catalyzed aqueous oxidation of heptanol with molecular oxygen.

  13. Geometric dependence of transport and universal behavior in three dimensional carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Leizhi; Yin, Ming; Jaroszynski, Jan; Park, Ju-Hyun; Mbamalu, Godwin; Datta, Timir

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanostructures with the spherical voids exhibit interesting temperature and magnetic field dependent transport properties. By increasing the void size, the structures are tuned from metallic to insulating; in addition, the magnetoresistance (MR) is enhanced. Our investigation in the magnetic fields (B) up to 18 T at temperatures (T) from 250 mK to 20 K shows that at high temperatures (T > 2 K), the MR crosses over from quadratic to a non-saturating linear dependence with increasing magnetic field. Furthermore, all MR data in this temperature regime collapse onto a single curve as a universal function of B/T, following Kohler's rule. Remarkably, the MR also exhibits orientation insensitivity, i.e., it displays a response independent of the direction on the magnetic field.

  14. Correlation between macro- and nano-scopic measurements of carbon nanostructured paper elastic modulus

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Yamila M.; Al Ghaferi, Amal E-mail: mchiesa@masdar.ac.ae; Chiesa, Matteo E-mail: mchiesa@masdar.ac.ae

    2015-07-20

    Extensive work has been done in order to determine the bulk elastic modulus of isotropic samples from force curves acquired with atomic force microscopy. However, new challenges are encountered given the development of new materials constructed of one-dimensional anisotropic building blocks, such as carbon nanostructured paper. In the present work, we establish a reliable framework to correlate the elastic modulus values obtained by amplitude modulation atomic force microscope force curves, a nanoscopic technique, with that determined by traditional macroscopic tensile testing. In order to do so, several techniques involving image processing, statistical analysis, and simulations are used to find the appropriate path to understand how macroscopic properties arise from anisotropic nanoscale components, and ultimately, being able to calculate the value of bulk elastic modulus.

  15. Nanostructured metal/carbon hybrids for electrocatalysis by direct carbonization of inverse micelle multilayers.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu Jin; Jang, Yoon Hee; Han, Sang-Beom; Khatua, Dibyendu; Hess, Claudia; Ahn, Hyungju; Ryu, Du Yeol; Shin, Kwanwoo; Park, Kyung-Won; Steinhart, Martin; Kim, Dong Ha

    2013-02-26

    A synthetic strategy for the fabrication of graphitic carbon nanomaterials containing highly dispersed arrays of metal nanoparticles is reported. This synthetic strategy involves successive deposition of inverse micelle monolayers containing a metal precursor and reduction of the latter, followed by direct carbonization of the obtained multilayer structure of inverse micelles containing metal nanoparticles. Thus, a "direct-carbonization" concept, in which the block copolymer simultaneously serves as soft template and as carbon source, was combined with a multilayer buildup protocol. The inner architecture of the multilayer structures consisting of carbon and metal nanoparticles was studied by X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging. The hexagonal near ordering of the metal nanoparticles in the block copolymer micelle multilayers was by and large conserved after carbonization. The resulting carbon structures containing multilayers of highly dispersed metal nanoparticles exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity in formic acid and methanol oxidation, suggesting that they are promising electrode materials for fuel cells.

  16. Magnetic amphiphilic hybrid carbon nanotubes containing N-doped and undoped sections: powerful tensioactive nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purceno, Aluir D.; Machado, Bruno F.; Teixeira, Ana Paula C.; Medeiros, Tayline V.; Benyounes, Anas; Beausoleil, Julien; Menezes, Helvecio C.; Cardeal, Zenilda L.; Lago, Rochel M.; Serp, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    In this work, unique amphiphilic magnetic hybrid carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized and used as tensioactive nanostructures in different applications. These CNTs interact very well with aqueous media due to the hydrophilic N-doped section, whereas the undoped hydrophobic one has strong affinity for organic molecules. The amphiphilic character combined with the magnetic properties of these CNTs opens the door to completely new and exciting applications in adsorption science and catalysis. These amphiphilic N-doped CNTs can also be used as powerful tensioactive emulsification structures. They can emulsify water/organic mixtures and by a simple magnetic separation the emulsion can be easily broken. We demonstrate the application of these CNTs in the efficient adsorption of various molecules, in addition to promoting biphasic processes in three different reactions, i.e. transesterification of soybean oil, quinoline extractive oxidation with H2O2 and a metal-catalyzed aqueous oxidation of heptanol with molecular oxygen.In this work, unique amphiphilic magnetic hybrid carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are synthesized and used as tensioactive nanostructures in different applications. These CNTs interact very well with aqueous media due to the hydrophilic N-doped section, whereas the undoped hydrophobic one has strong affinity for organic molecules. The amphiphilic character combined with the magnetic properties of these CNTs opens the door to completely new and exciting applications in adsorption science and catalysis. These amphiphilic N-doped CNTs can also be used as powerful tensioactive emulsification structures. They can emulsify water/organic mixtures and by a simple magnetic separation the emulsion can be easily broken. We demonstrate the application of these CNTs in the efficient adsorption of various molecules, in addition to promoting biphasic processes in three different reactions, i.e. transesterification of soybean oil, quinoline extractive oxidation with H2O2 and

  17. Carbon nanostructured materials for applications in nano-medicine, cultural heritage, and electrochemical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Valentini, F; Carbone, M; Palleschi, G

    2013-01-01

    This review covers applications of pristine and functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in nano-medicine, cultural heritage, and biosensors. The physicochemical properties of these engineered nanoparticles are similar to those of ultrafine components of airborne pollution (UF) and might have similar adverse effects. UF may impair cardiovascular autonomic control (inducing a high-risk condition for adverse cardiovascular effects), cause mammalian embryo toxicity, and increase geno-cytotoxic risk. SWCNTs coated with a biopolymer, for example polyethylenimine (PEI), become extremely biocompatible, hence are useful for in-vivo and in-vitro drug delivery and gene transfection. It is also possible to successfully immobilize a human enteric virus on PEI/SWCNT composites, suggesting application as a carrier in non-permissive media. The effectiveness of carbon nanostructured materials in the cleaning, restoration, and consolidation of deteriorated historical surfaces has been widely shown by the use of carbon nanomicelles to remove black dendritic crust from stone surfaces. The nanomicelles, here, have the twofold role of delivery and controlled release of the cleaning agents. The high biocompatibility of functionalized SWCNTs with enzymes and proteins is a fundamental feature used in the assembly of electrochemical biosensors. In particular, a third-generation protoporphyrin IX-based biosensor has been assembled for amperometric detection of nitrite, an environmental pollutant involved in the biodeterioration and black encrustation of historical surfaces.

  18. ‘Laser chemistry’ synthesis, physicochemical properties, and chemical processing of nanostructured carbon foams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation of selected coordination complexes can lead to the production of metal-carbon hybrid materials, whose composition and structure can be tailored by suitably choosing the chemical composition of the irradiated targets. This ‘laser chemistry’ approach, initially applied by our group to the synthesis of P-containing nanostructured carbon foams (NCFs) from triphenylphosphine-based Au and Cu compounds, is broadened in this study to the production of other metal-NCFs and P-free NCFs. Thus, our results show that P-free coordination compounds and commercial organic precursors can act as efficient carbon source for the growth of NCFs. Physicochemical characterization reveals that NCFs are low-density mesoporous materials with relatively low specific surface areas and thermally stable in air up to around 600°C. Moreover, NCFs disperse well in a variety of solvents and can be successfully chemically processed to enable their handling and provide NCF-containing biocomposite fibers by a wet-chemical spinning process. These promising results may open new and interesting avenues toward the use of NCFs for technological applications. PMID:23679938

  19. Flexible supercapacitors with high areal capacitance based on hierarchical carbon tubular nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haitao; Su, Hai; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Binbin; Chun, Fengjun; Chu, Xiang; He, Weidong; Yang, Weiqing

    2016-11-01

    Hierarchical structure design can greatly enhance the unique properties of primary material(s) but suffers from complicated preparation process and difficult self-assembly of materials with different dimensionalities. Here we report on the growth of single carbon tubular nanostructures with hierarchical structure (hCTNs) through a simple method based on direct conversion of carbon dioxide. Resorting to in-situ transformation and self-assembly of carbon micro/nano-structures, the obtained hCTNs are blood-like multichannel hierarchy composed of one large channel across the hCTNs and plenty of small branches connected to each other. Due to the unique pore structure and high surface area, these hCTN-based flexible supercapacitors possess the highest areal capacitance of ∼320 mF cm-2, as well as good rate-capability and excellent cycling stability (95% retention after 2500 cycles). It was established that this method can control the morphology, size, and density of hCTNs and effectively construct hCTNs well anchored to the various substrates. Our work unambiguously demonstrated the potential of hCTNs for large flexible supercapacitors and integrated energy management electronics.

  20. Plasma Enhanced Growth of Carbon Nanotubes For Ultrasensitive Biosensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Li, J.; Ye, Q.; Koehne, J.; Chen, H.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The multitude of considerations facing nanostructure growth and integration lends itself to combinatorial optimization approaches. Rapid optimization becomes even more important with wafer-scale growth and integration processes. Here we discuss methodology for developing plasma enhanced CVD growth techniques for achieving individual, vertically aligned carbon nanostructures that show excellent properties as ultrasensitive electrodes for nucleic acid detection. We utilize high throughput strategies for optimizing the upstream and downstream processing and integration of carbon nanotube electrodes as functional elements in various device types. An overview of ultrasensitive carbon nanotube based sensor arrays for electrochemical biosensing applications and the high throughput methodology utilized to combine novel electrode technology with conventional MEMS processing will be presented.

  1. Plasma Enhanced Growth of Carbon Nanotubes For Ultrasensitive Biosensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The multitude of considerations facing nanostructure growth and integration lends itself to combinatorial optimization approaches. Rapid optimization becomes even more important with wafer-scale growth and integration processes. Here we discuss methodology for developing plasma enhanced CVD growth techniques for achieving individual, vertically aligned carbon nanostructures that show excellent properties as ultrasensitive electrodes for nucleic acid detection. We utilize high throughput strategies for optimizing the upstream and downstream processing and integration of carbon nanotube electrodes as functional elements in various device types. An overview of ultrasensitive carbon nanotube based sensor arrays for electrochemical bio-sensing applications and the high throughput methodology utilized to combine novel electrode technology with conventional MEMS processing will be presented.

  2. Laser-induced synthesis of a nanostructured polymer-like metal-carbon complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelian, S.; Kutrovskaya, S.; Kucherik, A.; Osipov, A.; Povolotckaia, A.; Povolotskiy, A.; Manshina, A.

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of nanotructured metal-carbon materials by laser irradiation is an actual branch of laser physics and nanotechnology. Laser sources with different pulse duration allow changing the heating rate with realization of different transition scenarios and synthesis materials with various physical properties. We study the process of the formation of nanostructured metal-clusters and complexes using laser irradiation of colloidal systems which were consisted of carbon micro- nanoparticles and nanoparticles of noble metals. For carbon nanoparticles synthesis we use the method of laser ablation in liquid. For the realization of different regimes of laser surface modification of the target (glassycarbon and shungite) and the formation of micro- nanoparticles in a liquid the YAG:Nd laser with a pulse duration from 0.5 ms up to 20 ms (pulse energy up to 50J) was applied. We have used the CW-laser with moderate intensity in liquid (water or ethanol) for nanoparticle of noble metals synthesis. Thus, colloidal systems were obtained by using CW-laser with λ = 1.06 μm, I ~ 105-6 W/cm2, and t = 10 min. The average size of resulting particles was approximately about 10 to 100 nm. The nanoparticle obtaining was provided in the colloidal solution with different laser parameters. In this work we have investigated the mechanism of the metal-carbon cluster formation during the process of irradiation of colloidal system which were consisted of separate carbon, silver and gold nanoparticles. This system was irradiated by nanosecond laser (100 ns) with average power up to 50W.

  3. Growth and characterization of branched carbon nanostructures arrays in nano-patterned surfaces from porous silicon substrates.

    PubMed

    Solá, Francisco; Resto, Oscar; Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin; Fonseca, Luis F

    2009-01-01

    A method to grow branched carbon nanostructures arrays is presented. We employ the electron-beam-induced deposition method using a transmission electron microscope in poor vacuum conditions where hydrocarbons are present in the chamber. The hydrocarbons are attracted to the substrates by the local electric fields. Saw-tooth nano-patterns were made with a focused ion beam in porous silicon substrates with high porosity in order to create sites with high-local electric fields. We found that the adequate ion dose to create well-defined saw-tooth nano-patterns was between 8 and 10 nC/microm(2). Raman and electron energy-loss spectroscopy on the branched carbon nanostructures show a high concentration of sp(2) sites suggesting that they are made of graphite-like hydrogenated amorphous carbon. Selected area electron diffraction, high-resolution images and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) are also presented.

  4. Investigation of the properties of carbon-base nanostructures doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ high temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadras, Sedigheh; Ghavamipour, Mahshid

    2016-03-01

    In this research, we have investigated the effects of three samples of carbon-base nanostructures (carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes and silicon carbide nanoparticles) doping on the properties of Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) high temperature superconductor. The pure and doped YBCO samples were synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized by resistivity versus temperature (ρ-T), current versus voltage (I-V), through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The results confirmed that for all the samples, the orthorhombic phase of YBCO compound is formed. We found that the pinning energy and critical current density of samples increase by adding carbon nanostructures to YBCO compound. Also critical temperature is improved by adding carbon nanotubes to YBCO compound, while it does not change much for carbon and silicon carbide nanoparticles doped compounds. Furthermore, the samples were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy in 300 K and the band gap of the samples was determined. We found that the carbon nanotubes doping decreases YBCO band gap in normal state from 1.90 eV to 1.68 eV, while carbon and SiC nanoparticles doping increases it to 2.20 and 3.37 eV respectively.

  5. The interplay between nanostructured carbon-grafted chitosan scaffolds and protein adsorption on the cellular response of osteoblasts: structure-function property relationship.

    PubMed

    Depan, D; Misra, R D K

    2013-04-01

    The rapid adsorption of proteins occurs during the early stages of biomedical device implantation into physiological systems. In this regard, the adsorption of proteins is a strong function of the nature of a biomedical device, which ultimately governs the biological functions. The objective of this study was to elucidate the interplay between nanostructured carbon-modified (graphene oxide and single-walled carbon nanohorn) chitosan scaffolds and consequent protein adsorption and biological function (osteoblast function). We compare and contrast the footprint of protein adsorption on unmodified chitosan and nanostructured carbon-modified chitosan. A comparative analysis of cell-substrate interactions using an osteoblast cell line (MC3T3-E1) implied that biological functions were significantly enhanced in the presence of nanostructured carbon, compared with unmodified chitosan. The difference in their respective behaviors is related to the degree and topography of protein adsorption on the scaffolds. Furthermore, there was a synergistic effect of nanostructured carbon and protein adsorption in terms of favorably modulating biological functions, including cell attachment, proliferation and viability, with the effect being greater on nanostructured carbon-modified scaffolds. The study also underscores that protein adsorption is favored in nanostructured carbon-modified scaffolds such that bioactivity and biological function are promoted.

  6. Ultimate Osmosis Engineered by the Pore Geometry and Functionalization of Carbon Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhigong; Xu, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Osmosis is the key process in establishing versatile functions of cellular systems and enabling clean-water harvesting technologies. Membranes with single-atom thickness not only hold great promises in approaching the ultimate limit of these functions, but also offer an ideal test-bed to explore the underlying physical mechanisms. In this work, we explore diffusive and osmotic transport of water and ions through carbon nanotube and porous graphene based membranes by performing molecular dynamics simulations. Our comparative study shows that the cylindrical confinement in carbon nanotubes offers much higher salt rejection at similar permeability in osmosis compared to porous graphene. Moreover, chemical functionalization of the pores modulates the membrane performance by its steric and electrostatic nature, especially at small-size pores due to the fact that the optimal transport is achieved by ordered water transport near pore edges. These findings lay the ground for the ultimate design of forward osmosis membranes with optimized performance trade-off, given the capability of nano-engineering nanostructures by their geometry and chemistry. PMID:26037602

  7. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W-M; Trivikram, T Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J; Ayyub, P; Sheng, Z M; Krishnamurthy, M

    2015-07-08

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈ 0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2 × 10(18)  W/cm(2). However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration.

  8. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25–30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration. PMID:26153048

  9. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration.

  10. Wide-temperature range operation supercapacitors from nanostructured activated carbon fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Kaihsuan; Masarapu, Charan; Ko, Tsehao; Wei, Bingqing

    Electrochemical power sources that offer high energy and power densities and, can also withstand a harsh temperature range have become extremely desirable in applications ranging from civilian portable electronic devices to military weapons. In this report, we demonstrated a wide temperature withstanding supercapacitor which can be operated from 100 °C to -40 °C within a voltage window from -2 V to 2 V. The performance of the supercapacitor coin cells, assembled with nanostructured activated carbon fabric (ACF) as the electrode material and 1 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF 4) in polypropylene carbonate (PC) solution as the electrolyte, was systematically studied within the set temperature window. The ACF supercapacitor yielded ideal rectangular shapes in cyclic voltammograms within 0-100 °C with an average mass capacitance of 90 F g -1 and, 60 F g -1 at -25 °C. The capacitance was still over 20 F g -1 at the extremely low temperature of -40 °C. Another exciting feature of the ACF supercapacitors was that they resumed their room temperature capacitance when cooled from 100 °C and defrosted from -40 °C, demonstrating an excellent repeatability and stability. The charge-discharge behavior of the ACF supercapacitors showed long-cycle stability at extreme temperatures. These high electrochemical performances make this type of supercapacitors very promising in many practical applications.

  11. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N.; Hilty, Florentine M.; Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2016-10-01

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO3) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO3 made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO3 and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO3, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca2P2O7 with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO3) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H3PO4 calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO3 nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  12. Nanostructured Carbon Nitride Polymer-Reinforced Electrolyte To Enable Dendrite-Suppressed Lithium Metal Batteries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiulin; Tian, Jing; Li, Chilin

    2017-04-05

    Lithium metal batteries (LMBs) containing S, O2, and fluoride cathodes are attracting increasing attention owing to their much higher energy density than that of Li-ion batteries. However, current limitation for the progress of LMBs mainly comes from the uncontrolled formation and growth of Li dendrites at the anode side. In order to suppress dendrite growth, exploring novel nanostructured electrolyte of high modulus without degradation of Li-electrolyte interface appears to be a potential solution. Here we propose a lightweight polymer-reinforced electrolyte based on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) mesoporous microspheres as electrolyte filler [bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) lithium salt/di(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether mixed with g-C3N4, denoted as LiTFSI-DGM-C3N4] for the first time. This nanostructured electrolyte can effectively suppress lithium dendrite growth during cycling, benefiting from the high mechanical strength and nanosheet-built hierarchical structure of g-C3N4. The Li/Li symmetrical cell based on this slurrylike electrolyte enables long-term cycling of at least 120 cycles with a high capacity of 6 mA·h/cm(2) and small plating/stripping overpotential of ∼100 mV at a high current density of 2 mA/cm(2). g-C3N4 filling also enables a separator(Celgard)-free Li/FeS2 cell with at least 400 cycles. The 3D geometry of g-C3N4 shows advantages on interfacial resistance and Li plating/stripping stability compared to its 2D geometry.

  13. Surface-catalyzed C-C covalent coupling strategies toward the synthesis of low-dimensional carbon-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qitang; Gottfried, J Michael; Zhu, Junfa

    2015-08-18

    Carbon-based nanostructures have attracted tremendous interest because of their versatile and tunable properties, which depend on the bonding type of the constituting carbon atoms. Graphene, as the most prominent representative of the π-conjugated carbon-based materials, consists entirely of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms and exhibits a zero band gap. Recently, countless efforts were made to open and tune the band gap of graphene for its applications in semiconductor devices. One promising method is periodic perforation, resulting in a graphene nanomesh (GNM), which opens the band gap while maintaining the exceptional transport properties. However, the typically employed lithographic approach for graphene perforation is difficult to control at the atomic level. The complementary bottom-up method using surface-assisted carbon-carbon (C-C) covalent coupling between organic molecules has opened up new possibilities for atomically precise fabrication of conjugated nanostructures like GNM and graphene nanoribbons (GNR), although with limited maturity. A general drawback of the bottom-up approach is that the desired structure usually does not represent the global thermodynamic minimum. It is therefore impossible to improve the long-range order by postannealing, because once the C-C bond formation becomes reversible, graphene as the thermodynamically most stable structure will be formed. This means that only carefully chosen precursors and reaction conditions can lead to the desired (non-graphene) material. One of the most popular and frequently used organic reactions for on-surface C-C coupling is the Ullmann reaction of aromatic halides. While experimentally simple to perform, the irreversibility of the C-C bond formation makes it a challenge to obtain long-range ordered nanostructures. With no postreaction structural improvement possible, the assembly process must be optimized to result in defect-free nanostructures during the initial reaction, requiring complete

  14. Surface Anchoring of Nematic Phase on Carbon Nanotubes: Nanostructure of Ultra-High Temperature Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ogale, Amod A

    2012-04-27

    consisting of strong carbon fibers embedded in a carbon matrix are needed. Such carbon/carbon (C/C) composites have been used in aerospace industry to produce missile nose cones, space shuttle leading edge, and aircraft brake-pads. However, radiation-tolerance of such materials is not adequately known because only limited radiation studies have been performed on C/C composites, which suggest that pitch-based carbon fibers have better dimensional stability than that of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based fibers [4]. The thermodynamically-stable state of graphitic crystalline packing of carbon atoms derived from mesophase pitch leads to a greater stability during neutron irradiation [5]. The specific objectives of this project were: (i) to generating novel carbonaceous nanostructures, (ii) measure extent of graphitic crystallinity and the extent of anisotropy, and (iii) collaborate with the Carbon Materials group at Oak Ridge National Lab to have neutron irradiation studies and post-irradiation examinations conducted on the carbon fibers produced in this research project.

  15. Towards lightweight nanocomposite coatings for corrosion inhibition: Graphene, carbon nanotubes, and nanostructured magnesium as case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Robert Vincent, III

    The field of nanocomposites is a burgeoning area of research due to the interest in the remarkable properties which can be achieved through their use in a variety of applications, including corrosion resistant coatings. Lightweighting is of increasing importance in the world today due to the ever growing push towards energy efficiency and the green movement and in recent years there has been a vast amount of research performed in the area of developing lightweight nanocomposites for corrosion inhibition. Many new composite materials have been developed through the use of newly developed nanomaterials (including carbonaceous and metallic constituents) and their specialized incorporation in the coating matrix materials. We start with a general review on the development of hybrid nanostructured composites for corrosion protection of base metals from a sustainability perspective in Chapter 1. This review demonstrates the ever swelling requirements for a paradigm shift in the way that we protect metals against corrosion due to the costs and environmental concerns that exist with currently used technology. In Chapter 2, we delve into the much required understanding of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide through near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy measurements to elucidate information about the electronic structure upon incorporation of nitrogen within the structure. For successful integration of the carbonaceous nanomaterials into a composite coating, a full swath of knowledge is necessary. Within this work we have shown that upon chemical defunctionalization of graphene oxide to reduced graphene oxide by means of hydrazine treatment, nitrogen is incorporated into the structure in the form of a pyrazole ring. In Chapter 3, we demonstrate that by way of in situ polymerization, graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes can be incorporated within a polymer (polyetherimide, PEI) matrix. Two systems have been developed including graphene and

  16. Biologically-compatible gadolinium(at)(carbon nanostructures) as advanced contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitharaman, Balaji

    2005-11-01

    Paramagnetic gadolinium-based carbon nanostructures are introduced as a new paradigm in high-performance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent (CA) design. Two Gd C60-based nanomaterials, Gd C60 [C(COOH)2]10 and Gd C60(OH)x are shown to have MRI efficacies (relaxivities) 5 to 20 times larger than any current Gd3+-based CA in clinical use. The first detailed and systematic physicochemical characterization was performed on these materials using the same experimental techniques usually applied to traditional Gd 3+-based CAs. Water-proton relaxivities were measured for the first time on these materials, as a function of magnetic field (5 x 10-4--9.4 T) to elucidate the different interaction mechanisms and dynamic processes influencing the relaxation behavior. These studies attribute the observed enhanced relaxivities completely to the "outer sphere" proton relaxation mechanism. These "outer sphere" relaxation effects are the largest reported for any Gd3+-based agent without inner-sphere water molecules. The proton relaxivities displayed a remarkable pH-dependency, increasing dramatically with decreasing pH (pH: 3--12). The increase in relaxivity resulted mainly from aggregation and subsequent three-order-of-magnitude increase in tauR, the rotational correlation time. Water-soluble fullerene materials (such as the neuroprotective fullerene drug, C3) readily cross cell membranes, suggesting an application for these gadofullerenes as the first intracellular, as well as pH-responsive MRI CAs. Studies performed at 60 MHz in the presence of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, mice serum pH: 7.4) to mimic physiological conditions demonstrated that the aggregates can be disrupted by addition of salts, leading to a decrease in relaxivity. Biological fluids present a high salt concentration and should strongly modify the behavior of any fullerenes/metallofullerene-based drug in vivo. Gd C60[C(COOH)2]10 also showed enhanced relaxivity (23% increase) in the presence of the

  17. Nanostructured carbon electrocatalyst supports for intermediate-temperature fuel cells: Single-walled versus multi-walled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papandrew, Alexander B.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; Tian, Mengkun; Tennyson, Wesley D.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Geohegan, David B.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    It is unknown if nanostructured carbons possess the requisite electrochemical stability to be used as catalyst supports in the cathode of intermediate-temperature solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) based on the CsH2PO4 electrolyte. To investigate this application, single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as supports for Pt catalysts in SAFCs operating at 250 °C. SWNH-based cathodes display greater maximum activity than their MWNT-based counterparts at a cell voltage of 0.8 V, but are unstable in the SAFC cathode as a consequence of electrochemical carbon corrosion. MWNT-based cells are resistant to this effect and capable of operation for at least 160 h at 0.6 V and 250 °C. Cells fabricated with nanostructured carbon supports are more active (52 mA cm-1vs. 28 mA cm-1 at 0.8 V) than state-of-the-art carbon-free formulations while simultaneously displaying enhanced Pt utilization (40 mA mgPt-1vs. 16 mA mgPt-1 at 0.8 V). These results suggest that MWNTs are a viable support material for developing stable, high-performance, low-cost air electrodes for solid-state electrochemical devices operating above 230 °C.

  18. Etude du stockage de l'hydrogene sur des nanostructures de carbone microporeuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Le stockage de l'hydrogene par adsorption sur des adsorbants nano-structures a ete etudie sous differentes conditions de pression et de temperature. Les adsorbants etudies sont principalement des nanotubes de carbone a simple paroi ainsi que des structures metallo-organiques. Les mesures ont ete realisees a l'aide de systemes gravimetriques et volumetriques tres sensibles specialement mis au point pour de petits echantillons necessitant un degazage in situ. Les appareils developpes, au nombre de quatre, comprennent deux systemes gravimetriques et deux systemes volumetriques. Ensemble, ces systemes couvrent la plage de pressions (0-100) bars ainsi que la plage de temperatures (77-295) K. Les differentes analyses montrent que l'adsorption d'hydrogene sur les adsorbants nano-structures etudies est maximale a 77 K et varie entre environ (1.5 et 4) % masse. A temperature ambiante, l'adsorption croit lineairement avec la pression et demeure sous les 1% masse pour des pressions inferieures a 100 bars. L'adsorption d'hydrogene sur ces materiaux dans ces conditions se compare notamment a celle obtenue sur des charbons actives. La modelisation de l'adsorption a egalement ete realisee dans des conditions cryogeniques a l'aide du modele de Dubinin-Astakhov sous une forme adaptee pour l'adsorption supercritique. Les enthalpies d'adsorption calculees a partir de ce modele varient sous les 6 kJ/mole et sont donc consistantes avec des processus de physisorption. L'applicabilite du modele de Dubinin-Astakhov suggere que l'adsorption d'hydrogene puisse etre representee par un processus de remplissage des pores par un pseudo-liquide. Ces travaux s'inscrivent dans un contexte ou la capacite d'adsorption reelle des nanostructures de carbone est sujette a la controverse. En consequence, l'approche experimentale adoptee se distingue par les differentes demarches mises de l'avant pour l'obtention de mesures fiables sur des echantillons de faibles masses ainsi que par son caractere

  19. Nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Philip

    2001-03-01

    Nanostructured materials may be defined as those materials whose structural elements - clusters, crystallites or molecules - have dimensions in the 1 to 100 nm range. The explosion in both academic and industrial interest in these materials over the past decade arises from the remarkable variations in fundamental electrical, optical and magnetic properties that occur as one progresses from an `infinitely extended' solid to a particle of material consisting of a countable number of atoms. This review details recent advances in the synthesis and investigation of functional nanostructured materials, focusing on the novel size-dependent physics and chemistry that results when electrons are confined within nanoscale semiconductor and metal clusters and colloids. Carbon-based nanomaterials and nanostructures including fullerenes and nanotubes play an increasingly pervasive role in nanoscale science and technology and are thus described in some depth. Current nanodevice fabrication methods and the future prospects for nanostructured materials and nanodevices are discussed.

  20. Relaxation NMR as a tool to study the dispersion and formulation behavior of nanostructured carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, David; Cosgrove, Terence; Prescott, Stuart W

    2016-06-01

    Solvent relaxation NMR has been used to estimate the surface areas and wettability of various types of nanostructured carbon materials in a range of solvents including water, ethanol, and tetrahydrofuran. We illustrate the application of the technique through several short case studies using samples including nanocarbon blacks, graphene oxide, nanographites, and porous graphenes. The technique is shown to give a good measure of surface area, correlating well with conventional surface area estimates obtained by nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, or light scattering for the non-porous samples. NMR relaxation has advantages in terms of speed of analysis and being able to use concentrated, wet, and opaque samples. For samples that are porous, two distinct surface areas can be estimated assuming the two environments ('inner' and 'outer') have the same surface chemistry, and that there is a slow exchange of solvent molecules between them. Furthermore, we show that differences in wettability and dispersability between samples dispersed in water, ethanol, and cyclopentanone can be observed, along with changes to the surface chemistry of the interface. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  2. Flame synthesis of carbon nanostructures on stainless steel anodes for use in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamp, Jennifer L.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Naha, Sayangdev; Radavich, Katherine A.; Love, Nancy G.; Ellis, Michael W.; Puri, Ishwar K.

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer a promising alternative energy technology, but suffer from low power densities which hinder their practical applicability. In order to improve anodic power density, we deposited carbon nanostructures (CNSs) on an otherwise plain stainless steel mesh (SS-M) anode. Using a flame synthesis method that did not require pretreatment of SS-M substrates, we were able to produce these novel CNS-enhanced SS-M (CNS-M) anodes quickly (in a matter of minutes) and inexpensively, without the added costs of chemical pretreatments. During fed batch experiments with biomass from anaerobic digesters in single-chamber MFCs, the median power densities (based on the projected anodic surface area) were 2.9 mW m -2 and 187 mW m -2 for MFCs with SS-M and CNS-M anodes, respectively. The addition of CNSs to a plain SS-M anode via flame deposition therefore resulted in a 60-fold increase in the median power production. The combination of CNSs and metallic current collectors holds considerable promise for power production in MFCs.

  3. Sulfur-Modified Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanostructures as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kale, Vinayak S; Sim, Uk; Yang, Jiwoong; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chae, Sue In; Chang, Woo Je; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Ha, Heonjin; Hwang, Chan-Cuk; An, Junghyun; Hong, Hyo-Ki; Lee, Zonghoon; Nam, Ki Tae; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-02-20

    There is an urgent need to develop metal-free, low cost, durable, and highly efficient catalysts for industrially important oxygen evolution reactions. Inspired by natural geodes, unique melamine nanogeodes are successfully synthesized using hydrothermal process. Sulfur-modified graphitic carbon nitride (S-modified g-CN x ) electrocatalysts are obtained by annealing these melamine nanogeodes in situ with sulfur. The sulfur modification in the g-CN x structure leads to excellent oxygen evolution reaction activity by lowering the overpotential. Compared with the previously reported nonmetallic systems and well-established metallic catalysts, the S-modified g-CN x nanostructures show superior performance, requiring a lower overpotential (290 mV) to achieve a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) and a Tafel slope of 120 mV dec(-1) with long-term durability of 91.2% retention for 18 h. These inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and easy-to-synthesize catalysts with extraordinary performance will have a high impact in the field of oxygen evolution reaction electrocatalysis.

  4. Longitudinal vibration and instabilities of carbon nanotubes conveying fluid considering size effects of nanoflow and nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oveissi, Soheil; Eftekhari, S. Ali; Toghraie, Davood

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effects of small-scale of the both nanoflow and nanostructure on the vibrational response of fluid flowing single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated. To this purpose, two various flowing fluids, the air-nano-flow and the water nano-flow using Knudsen number, and two different continuum theories, the nonlocal theory and the strain-inertia gradient theory are studied. Nano-rod model is used to model the fluid-structure interaction, and Galerkin method of weighted residual is utilizing to solve and discretize the governing obtained equations. It is found that the critical flow velocity decreases as the wave number increases, excluding the first mode divergence that it has the least value among of the other instabilities if the strain-inertia gradient theory is employed. Moreover, it is observed that Kn effect has considerable impact on the reduction of critical velocities especially for the air-flow flowing through the CNT. In addition, by increasing a nonlocal parameter and Knudsen number the critical flow velocity decreases but it increases as the characteristic length related to the strain-inertia gradient theory increases.

  5. Tailoring Carbon Nanostructure with Diverse and Tunable Morphology by the Pyrolysis of Self-Assembled Lamellar Nanodomains of a Block Copolymer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Sen; Huang, Wei-Hua; Lin, Chien-Fu; Cheng, Shao-Liang

    2017-02-28

    The pyrolysis of a block copolymer thin film, the free surface of which was in contact with air or a capping layer of SiO2, produced four carbon nanostructures. Thin films of a diblock copolymer having perpendicularly oriented lamellar nanodomains served as carbon and nitrogen precursors. Before pyrolysis, the lamellar nanodomains were cross-linked with UV irradiation under nitrogen gas (UVIN). Without a capping layer, pyrolysis caused a structural transformation from lamellar nanodomains to short carbon nanowires or to dropletlike nanocarbons in a row via Rayleigh instability, depending on the duration of pyrolysis. When capped with a layer of SiO2 followed by pyrolysis, the lamellar nanodomains were converted to pod-like, spaghetti-like, or long worm-like carbon nanostructures. These carbon nanostructures were driven by controlling the surface or interface tension and the residual yield of solid carbonaceous species.

  6. Nanostructured biointerfacing of metals with carbon nanotube/chitosan hybrids by electrodeposition for cell stimulation and therapeutics delivery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kapil D; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Han, Cheol-Min; Lee, Ja-Yeon; Singh, Rajendra K; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-11-26

    Exploring the biological interfaces of metallic implants has been an important issue in achieving biofunctional success. Here we develop a biointerface with nanotopological features and bioactive composition, comprising a carbon nanotube (CNT) and chitosan (Chi) hybrid, via an electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The physicochemical properties, in vitro biocompatibility, and protein delivering capacity of the decorated nanohybrid layer were investigated, to address its potential usefulness as bone regenerating implants. Over a wide compositional range, the nanostructured hybrid interfaces were successfully formed with varying thicknesses, depending on the electrodeposition parameters. CNT-Chi hybrid interfaces showed a time-sequenced degradation in saline water, and a rapid induction of hydroxyapatite mineral in a simulated body fluid. The nanostructured hybrid substrates stimulated the initial adhesion events of the osteoblastic cells, including cell adhesion rate, spreading behaviors, and expression of adhesive proteins. The nanostructured hybrid interfaces significantly improved the adsorption of protein molecules, which was enabled by the surface charge interaction, and increased surface area of the nanotopology. Furthermore, the incorporated protein was released at a highly sustained rate, profiling a diffusion-controlled pattern over a couple of weeks, suggesting the possible usefulness as a protein delivery device. Collectively, the nanostructured hybrid CNT-Chi layer, implemented by an electrodeposition, is considered a biocompatible, cell-stimulating, and protein-delivering biointerface of metallic implants.

  7. Improving Osteoblast Response In Vitro by a Nanostructured Thin Film with Titanium Carbide and Titanium Oxides Clustered around Graphitic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Giovanni; Ioannidu, Caterina Alexandra; Scotto d’Abusco, Anna; Superti, Fabiana; Misiano, Carlo; Zanoni, Robertino; Politi, Laura; Mazzola, Luca; Iosi, Francesca; Mura, Francesco; Scandurra, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recently, we introduced a new deposition method, based on Ion Plating Plasma Assisted technology, to coat titanium implants with a thin but hard nanostructured layer composed of titanium carbide and titanium oxides, clustered around graphitic carbon. The nanostructured layer has a double effect: protects the bulk titanium against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time has a stimulating action on osteoblasts. Results The aim of this work is to describe the biological effects of this layer on osteoblasts cultured in vitro. We demonstrate that the nanostructured layer causes an overexpression of many early genes correlated to proteins involved in bone turnover and an increase in the number of surface receptors for α3β1 integrin, talin, paxillin. Analyses at single-cell level, by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and single cell force spectroscopy, show how the proliferation, adhesion and spreading of cells cultured on coated titanium samples are higher than on uncoated titanium ones. Finally, the chemistry of the layer induces a better formation of blood clots and a higher number of adhered platelets, compared to the uncoated cases, and these are useful features to improve the speed of implant osseointegration. Conclusion In summary, the nanostructured TiC film, due to its physical and chemical properties, can be used to protect the implants and to improve their acceptance by the bone. PMID:27031101

  8. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Bretas, R. E-mail: bretas@ufscar.br

    2015-05-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofibers´ surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X–100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fibers´ surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs.

  9. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Bretas, R.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofiberś surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X-100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fiberś surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs.

  10. Lipid bilayers covalently anchored to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-05-29

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules.

  11. Simultaneous determination of 36 pesticide residues in spinach and cauliflower by LC-MS/MS using multi-walled carbon nanotubes-based dispersive solid-phase clean-up.

    PubMed

    Fan, Sufang; Zhao, Pengyue; Yu, Chuanshan; Pan, Canping; Li, Xuesheng

    2014-01-01

    A multi-residue method based on a modified QuEChERS sample preparation with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reversed-dispersive solid-phase extraction (r-DSPE) material and LC-MS/MS determination by MRM mode was validated for 36 representative pesticides in spinach and cauliflower. It was demonstrated that MWCNTs can be used as effective r-DSPE materials with the QuEChERS method for the clean-up of extract from different matrices. However, MWCNTs could absorb pyrimethanil, diflubenzuron, and chlorbenzuron in both spinach and cauliflower, which leads to the low recoveries compared with PSA. The LODs and LOQs for 36 pesticides ranged from 0.1 to 5 μg kg(-1) and from 2 to 30 μg kg(-1), respectively. Good linearity was found for all pesticides with coefficients better than 0.995 in a range of 0.02-0.5 mg l(-1). The developed method with MWCNTs clean-up was successfully used to determine the 36 pesticides in real samples.

  12. State Estimation of the Time-Varying and Spatially Localized Concentration of Signal Molecules from the Stochastic Adsorption Dynamics on the Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors and Its Application to Tumor Cell Detection.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hong; Lee, Jay H; Braatz, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses a problem of estimating time-varying, local concentrations of signal molecules with a carbon-nanotube (CNT)-based sensor array system, which sends signals triggered by monomolecular adsorption/desorption events of proximate molecules on the surfaces of the sensors. Such sensors work on nano-scale phenomena and show inherently stochastic non-Gaussian behavior, which is best represented by the chemical master equation (CME) describing the time evolution of the probabilities for all the possible number of adsorbed molecules. In the CME, the adsorption rate on each sensor is linearly proportional to the local concentration in the bulk phase. State estimators are proposed for these types of sensors that fully address their stochastic nature. For CNT-based sensors motivated by tumor cell detection, the particle filter, which is nonparametric and can handle non-Gaussian distributions, is compared to a Kalman filter that approximates the underlying distributions by Gaussians. In addition, the second-order generalized pseudo Bayesian estimation (GPB2) algorithm and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm are incorporated into KF and PF respectively, for detecting latent drift in the concentration affected by different states of a cell.

  13. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, Lisa; Fang, Fang; Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi; Keskar, Gayatri

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  14. Nanostructured Graphene-Titanium Dioxide Composites Synthesized by a Single-Step Aerosol Process for Photoreduction of Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Jiang, Yi; Fortner, John D.; Biswas, Pratim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to hydrocarbons by using nanostructured materials activated by solar energy is a promising approach to recycling CO2 as a fuel feedstock. CO2 photoreduction, however, suffers from low efficiency mainly due to the inherent drawback of fast electron-hole recombination in photocatalysts. This work reports the synthesis of nanostructured composites of titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets via an aerosol approach. The role of synthesis temperature and TiO2/GO ratio in CO2 photoreduction was investigated. As-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated enhanced CO2 conversion performance as compared with that of pristine TiO2 NPs due to the strong electron trapping capability of the rGO nanosheets. PMID:25053879

  15. Investigation on dielectrophoretic assembly of nanostructures and its application on chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Quan

    Because of their extraordinary characteristics such as quantum confinement and large surface-tovolume ratio, semiconducting nanostructures such as nanowires or nanotubes hold great potential in sensing chemical vapors. Nanowire or nanotube based gas sensors usually possess appealing advantages such as high sensitivity, high stability, fast recovery time, and electrically controllable properties. To better predict the composition and concentration of target gas, nanostructures made from heterogeneous materials are employed to provide more predictors. In recent years, nanowires and nanotubes can be synthesized routinely through different methods. The techniques of fabricating nanowire or nanotube based sensor arrays, however, encounter obstacles and deserve further investigations. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), which refers to the motion of submicron particles inside a non-uniform electric field, has long been recognized as a nondestructive, easily implementable, and efficient approach to manipulate nanostructures onto electronic circuitries. However, due to our limited understandings, devices fabricated through DEP often end up with unpredictable number of arbitrarily aligned nanostructures. In this study, we first optimize the classical DEP formulas such that it can be applied to a more general case that a nanostructure is subjected to a non-uniform electric field with arbitrary orientation. A comprehensive model is then constructed to investigate the trajectory and alignment of DEP assembled nanostructures, which can be verified by experimental observations. The simulation results assist us to fabricate a gas sensor array with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It is then demonstrated that the device can well sense ammonia (NH3) at room temperature, which circumvents the usually required high temperature condition for nanowire based gas sensor application. An effective approach to recover the device using DC biases to locally heat up the

  16. Towards nano-organic chemistry: perspectives for a bottom-up approach to the synthesis of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercuri, Francesco; Baldoni, Matteo; Sgamellotti, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Low-dimensional carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and graphenes, represent one of the most promising classes of materials, in view of their potential use in nanotechnology. However, their exploitation in applications is often hindered by difficulties in their synthesis and purification. Despite the huge efforts by the research community, the production of nanostructured carbon materials with controlled properties is still beyond reach. Nonetheless, this step is nowadays mandatory for significant progresses in the realization of advanced applications and devices based on low-dimensional carbon nanostructures. Although promising alternative routes for the fabrication of nanostructured carbon materials have recently been proposed, a comprehensive understanding of the key factors governing the bottom-up assembly of simple precursors to form complex systems with tailored properties is still at its early stages. In this paper, following a survey of recent experimental efforts in the bottom-up synthesis of carbon nanostructures, we attempt to clarify generalized criteria for the design of suitable precursors that can be used as building blocks in the production of complex systems based on sp2 carbon atoms and discuss potential synthetic strategies. In particular, the approaches presented in this feature article are based on the application of concepts borrowed from traditional organic chemistry, such as valence-bond theory and Clar sextet theory, and on their extension to the case of complex carbon nanomaterials. We also present and discuss a validation of these approaches through first-principle calculations on prototypical systems. Detailed studies on the processes involved in the bottom-up fabrication of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures are expected to pave the way for the design and optimization of precursors and efficient synthetic routes, thus allowing the development of novel materials with controlled morphology and properties that can be used in

  17. 3D carbon/cobalt-nickel mixed-oxide hybrid nanostructured arrays for asymmetric supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhui; Jiang, Jian; Sun, Zhipeng; Luo, Jingshan; Fan, Zhanxi; Huang, Xintang; Zhang, Hua; Yu, Ting

    2014-07-23

    The electrochemical performance of supercapacitors relies not only on the exploitation of high-capacity active materials, but also on the rational design of superior electrode architectures. Herein, a novel supercapacitor electrode comprising 3D hierarchical mixed-oxide nanostructured arrays (NAs) of C/CoNi3 O4 is reported. The network-like C/CoNi3 O4 NAs exhibit a relatively high specific surface area; it is fabricated from ultra-robust Co-Ni hydroxide carbonate precursors through glucose-coating and calcination processes. Thanks to their interconnected three-dimensionally arrayed architecture and mesoporous nature, the C/CoNi3 O4 NA electrode exhibits a large specific capacitance of 1299 F/g and a superior rate performance, demonstrating 78% capacity retention even when the discharge current jumps by 100 times. An optimized asymmetric supercapacitor with the C/CoNi3 O4 NAs as the positive electrode is fabricated. This asymmetric supercapacitor can reversibly cycle at a high potential of 1.8 V, showing excellent cycling durability and also enabling a remarkable power density of ∼13 kW/kg with a high energy density of ∼19.2 W·h/kg. Two such supercapacitors linked in series can simultaneously power four distinct light-emitting diode indicators; they can also drive the motor of remote-controlled model planes. This work not only presents the potential of C/CoNi3 O4 NAs in thin-film supercapacitor applications, but it also demonstrates the superiority of electrodes with such a 3D hierarchical architecture.

  18. Cytocompatibility and biocompatibility of nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite spheres for bone repair

    PubMed Central

    CALASANS-MAIA, Mônica Diuana; de MELO, Bruno Raposo; ALVES, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; RESENDE, Rodrigo Figueiredo de Brito; LOURO, Rafael Seabra; SARTORETTO, Suelen Cristina; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; ALVES, Gutemberg Gomes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo biological responses to nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/calcium alginate (CHA) microspheres used for alveolar bone repair, compared to sintered hydroxyapatite (HA). Material and Methods The maxillary central incisors of 45 Wistar rats were extracted, and the dental sockets were filled with HA, CHA, and blood clot (control group) (n=5/period/group). After 7, 21 and 42 days, the samples of bone with the biomaterials were obtained for histological and histomorphometric analysis, and the plasma levels of RANKL and OPG were determined via immunoassay. Statistical analysis was performed by Two-Way ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test at 95% level of significance. Results The CHA and HA microspheres were cytocompatible with both human and murine cells on an in vitro assay. Histological analysis showed the time-dependent increase of newly formed bone in control group characterized by an intense osteoblast activity. In HA and CHA groups, the presence of a slight granulation reaction around the spheres was observed after seven days, which was reduced by the 42nd day. A considerable amount of newly formed bone was observed surrounding the CHA spheres and the biomaterials particles at 42-day time point compared with HA. Histomorphometric analysis showed a significant increase of newly formed bone in CHA group compared with HA after 21 and 42 days from surgery, moreover, CHA showed almost 2-fold greater biosorption than HA at 42 days (two-way ANOVA, p<0.05) indicating greater biosorption. An increase in the RANKL/OPG ratio was observed in the CHA group on the 7th day. Conclusion CHA spheres were osteoconductive and presented earlier biosorption, inducing early increases in the levels of proteins involved in resorption. PMID:26814461

  19. Nanostructured TiO2-coated activated carbon composite as an electrode material for asymmetric hybrid capacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Ok; Lee, Joong Kee

    2012-02-01

    A nanostructured TiO2-coated activated carbon (TAC) composite was synthesized by a modified sol-gel reaction and employed it as a negative electrode active material for an asymmetric hybrid capacitor. The structural characterization showed that the TiO2 nano-layer was deposited on the surface of the activated carbon and the TAC composite has a highly mesoporous structure. The evaluation of electrochemical characteristics of the TAC electrode was carried out by galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The obtained specific capacitance of the TAC composite was 42.87 F/g, which showed by 27.1% higher than that of the activated carbon (AC). The TAC composite also exhibited an excellent cycle performance and kept 95% of initial capacitance over 500 cycles.

  20. Chemically modified carbon nanostructures for electrospun thin film polymer-nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behler, Kristopher

    Various nano-structured carbon materials, most notably carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanodiamonds (NDs), are used in preparing polymer-nanocomposites. Surface-modified NDs, multi-walled (MWCNT), double-walled (DWCNT) and triple-walled (TWCNT) have been incorporated into polymer matrix systems. Treatments include vacuum annealing, thermal oxidation in air and acid treatments (nitric and sulfuric acids for the CNTs and hydrochloric acid for NDs). Acid treatments have led to carboxylic group formation on the surface of CNTs and NDs, promoting improved dispersion. As-received, thermal and acid treated MWCNTs have been incorporated into polyvinylidene fluoride and polyamide-11 and -12 electrospun nanofibers with little improvements in the electrical conductivity. To improve the electrical properties of CNT-polyamide composites, negatively charged CNTs were self-assembled on the nanofiber's surface. At a 2 wt% loading, the electrical resistance of the nanofibers decreased two orders of magnitude (to 154 O/sq) by increasing the number of MWCNT self-assembly depositions and then another three orders of magnitude by using DWCNTs (700 O/sq). Further heat treatments were used to fuse (110°C) and completely remove the nanofibers (450°C) to produce ˜150 nm coatings with improved transparency, ˜96% transmission, in the visible spectrum. HCl-purified NDs have also been successfully incorporated in polyamide 11 and polyacrylonitrile nanofibers leading to improvements in the mechanical properties of the fibers. Extremely high loadings of up to 90 wt% ND in the polymer have also been achieved. The Young's modulus of the ND-polyamide-11 composites increased by a factor of four, the hardness doubled and the scratch resistance was improved such that a load three times larger than used on the pure polymer was required to generate a scratch of the identical depth in the composite material. The ND-polymer films have shown about a 50% decrease in transmission in the UV-range, making

  1. NanoCOT: Low-Cost Nanostructured Electrode Containing Carbon, Oxygen, and Titanium for Efficient Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zhichao; Archana, Panikar Sathyaseelan; Shen, Gang; Gupta, Arunava; Bakker, Martin G; Pan, Shanlin

    2015-09-23

    Developing high-efficiency, durable, and low-cost catalysts based on earth-abundant elements for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for renewable energy conversion and energy storage devices. In this study, we report a highly active nanostructured electrode, NanoCOT, which contains carbon, oxygen, and titanium, for efficient OER in alkaline solution. The NanoCOT electrode is synthesized from carbon transformation of TiO2 in an atmosphere of methane, hydrogen, and nitrogen at a high temperature. The NanoCOT exhibits enhanced OER catalytic activity in alkaline solution, providing a current density of 1.33 mA/cm(2) at an overpotential of 0.42 V. This OER current density of a NanoCOT electrode is about 4 times higher than an oxidized Ir electrode and 15 times higher than a Pt electrode because of its nanostructured high surface area and favorable OER kinetics. The enhanced catalytic activity of NanoCOT is attributed to the presence of a continuous energy band of the titanium oxide electrode with predominantly reduced defect states of Ti (e.g., Ti(1+), Ti(2+), and Ti(3+)) formed by chemical reduction with hydrogen and carbon. The OER performance of NanoCOT can also be further enhanced by decreasing its overpotential by 150 mV at a current density of 1.0 mA/cm(2) after coating its surface electrophoretically with 2.0 nm IrOx nanoparticles.

  2. Promotion of water-mediated carbon removal by nanostructured barium oxide/nickel interfaces in solid oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Choi, YongMan; Qin, Wentao; Chen, Haiyan; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Ping; Bai, Jianming; Tyson, Trevor A.; Liu, Meilin

    2011-01-01

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C3H8, CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750°C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H2O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity. PMID:21694705

  3. Promotion of water-mediated carbon removal by nanostructured barium oxide/nickel interfaces in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Choi, YongMan; Qin, Wentao; Chen, Haiyan; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Ping; Bai, Jianming; Tyson, Trevor A; Liu, Meilin

    2011-06-21

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C(3)H(8), CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750°C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H(2)O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity.

  4. Noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 with hydrogen accumulated in a hybrid carbon nanostructure in nanosized membrane reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    Studies on the creation of nanosized membrane reactors (NMRs) of a new generation with accumulated hydrogen and a regulated volume of reaction zone were continued at the next stage. Hydrogenation was performed in the pores of ceramic membranes with hydrogen preliminarily adsorbed in mono- and multilayered orientated carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs)—a new hybrid carbon nanostructure formed on the inner pore surface. Quantitative determination of hydrogen adsorption in OCNTGs was performed using TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with D av = 50 and 90 nm and showed that hydrogen adsorption was up to ˜1.5% of the mass of OCNTG. The instrumentation and procedure for noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 at 250-350°C using hydrogen accumulated and stored in OCNTG were developed. The conversion of decene-1 into decane was ˜0.2-1.8% at hydrogenation temperatures of 250 and 350°C, respectively. The rate constants and activation energy of hydrogenation were determined. The latter was found to be 94.5 kJ/mol, which is much smaller than the values typical for noncatalytic hydrogenations and very close to the values characteristic for catalytic reactions. The quantitative distribution of the reacting compounds in each pore regarded as a nanosized membrane reactor was determined. The activity of hydrogen adsorbed in a 2D carbon nanostructure was evaluated. Possible mechanisms of noncatalytic hydrogenation were discussed.

  5. A hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Ag nanoparticles electrodeposited on natural nano-structure attapulgite modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huihui; Zhang, Zhe; Cai, Dongqing; Zhang, Shengyi; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin; Wu, Zhengyan

    2011-10-30

    A novel strategy to fabricate hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) sensor was developed by electrodepositing Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on a glassy carbon electrode modified with natural nano-structure attapulgite (ATP). The result of electrochemical experiments showed that such constructed sensor had a favorable catalytic ability to reduce H(2)O(2). The good catalytic activity of the sensor was ascribed to the ATP that facilitated the formation and homogenous distribution of small Ag NPs. The resulted sensor achieved 95% of the steady-state current within 2s and had a 2.4 μM detection limit of H(2)O(2).

  6. Controllable modification of nanostructured carbon with hollow macroporous core/mesoporous shell and its application as templates in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaona; Xia, Min; Yan, Qingzhi; Ge, Changchun

    2016-10-01

    Controllable modification of hydrophilic groups on tubular nanostructured carbon with hollow macroporous core/mesoporous shell (TNC-HMC/MS) was systematically studied and the mesoporous structure of TNC-HMC/MS has been kept. Different oxidants were used to modify the TNC-HMC/MS. Results revealed that the TNC-HMC/MS could be modified with carboxyl or hydroxy by different oxidants. More importantly, the BET/BJH results indicated that the mesoporous shell of TNC-HMC/MS has not been destroyed. In addition, water-soluble ammonium metatungstate has been encapsulated into the hollow core of TNC-HMC/MS and formed nanodot, bamboo-like and nanowire morphology.

  7. Laser Treatment of Electro-Spark Coatings Deposited in the Carbon Steel Substrate with using Nanostructured WC-Cu Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radek, Norbert; Bartkowiak, Konrad

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of laser treatment for the improving mechanical and tribological properties coatings fabricated in the C45 carbon steel by ESD process. The studies were conducted using WC-Cu electrodes produced by sintering nanostructural powders and molten with a laser beam. The tests proved that ESD WC-Cu coatings are characterized by lower hardness and friction coefficient, but higher roughness. The result of laser processing improves structure by refinement, healing of microcracks and pores of ESD coatings. Laser treated ESD coatings can be applied in sliding friction pairs and as protective coatings.

  8. Fabrication of nanostructured metal oxide films with supercritical carbon dioxide: Processing and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Eunyoung

    Nanostructured metal oxide films have many applications in catalysis, microelectronics, microfluidics, photovoltaics and other fields. Since the performance of a device depends greatly on the structure of the material, the development of methodologies that enable prescriptive control of morphology are of great interest. The focus of this work is to control the structure and properties of the nanostructured metal oxide films using novel synthetic schemes in supercritical fluids and to use those films as key building components in alternative energy applications. A supercritical fluid is a substance at a temperature and pressure above its critical point. It typically exhibits gas-like transport properties and liquid-like densities. Supercritical fluid deposition (SFD) utilizes these properties of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) to deposit chemically pure metal, oxides and alloys of metal films. SFD is a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-like process in the sense that it uses similar metal organic precursors and deposits films at elevated temperatures. Instead of vaporizing or subliming the precursors, they are dissolved in supercritical fluids. SFD has typically shown to exhibit higher precursor concentrations, lower deposition temperatures, conformal deposition of films on high aspect ratio features as compared to CVD. In2 O3, ZnO and SnO2 are attractive materials because they are used in transparent conductors. SFD of these materials were studied and In2 O3 deposition kinetics using tris(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) In (III) as precursor were determined. Growth rate dependence on the deposition temperature and the precursor concentrations were studied and the physicochemical and optical properties of In2 O3 films were characterized. Metal oxide nanochannels that can potentially be used for microfluidics have been fabricated by sequentially performing nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and SFD. NIL was used to pattern photoresist grating on substrates and SFD of TiO2

  9. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the mechanism of surface functionalization of metal/carbon nanostructures with sp-elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanova, I. N.; Terebova, N. S.; Sapozhnikov, G. V.; Kodolov, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical bond of the atoms on the surface of metal/carbon nanostructures functionalized with atoms of sp-elements, such as silicon, phosphorus, sulfur, nitrogen, fluorine, and iodine, and the effect of functionalization on the change in the atomic magnetic moment of the d-metals (Fe, Ni, and Cu) have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has been shown that the d-metal atoms form a stable covalent bond with silicon, phosphorus, and sulfur atoms, while the carbon atoms form a stable covalent bond with fluorine, nitrogen, and iodine atoms on the nanostructure surface. It has been found that the functionalization of metal/carbon nanostructures with silicon, sulfur, and phosphorus leads to an increase in the atomic magnetic moment of the d-metal.

  10. Precise 3D printing of micro/nanostructures using highly conductive carbon nanotube-thiol-acrylate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Xiong, W.; Jiang, L. J.; Zhou, Y. S.; Lu, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) is of increasing interest due to its unique combination of truly three-dimensional (3D) fabrication capability and ultrahigh spatial resolution of ~40 nm. However, the stringent requirements of non-linear resins seriously limit the material functionality of 3D printing via TPP. Precise fabrication of 3D micro/nanostructures with multi-functionalities such as high electrical conductivity and mechanical strength is still a long-standing challenge. In this work, TPP fabrication of arbitrary 3D micro/nanostructures using multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-thiolacrylate (MTA) composite resins has been developed. Up to 0.2 wt% MWNTs have been incorporated into thiol-acrylate resins to form highly stable and uniform composite photoresists without obvious degradation for one week at room temperature. Various functional 3D micro/nanostructures including woodpiles, micro-coils, spiral-like photonic crystals, suspended micro-bridges, micro-gears and complex micro-cars have been successfully fabricated. The MTA composite resin offers significant enhancements in electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, and on the same time, preserving high optical transmittance and flexibility. Tightly controlled alignment of MWNTs and the strong anisotropy effect were confirmed. Microelectronic devices including capacitors and resistors made of the MTA composite polymer were demonstrated. The 3D micro/nanofabrication using the MTA composite resins enables the precise 3D printing of micro/nanostructures of high electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, which is expected to lead a wide range of device applications, including micro/nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), integrated photonics and 3D electronics.

  11. LDRD final report on synthesis of shape-and size-controlled platinum and platinum alloy nanostructures on carbon with improved durability.

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, John Allen; Garcia, Robert M.; Song, Yujiang; Moreno, Andres M.; Stanis, Ronald J.

    2008-10-01

    This project is aimed to gain added durability by supporting ripening-resistant dendritic platinum and/or platinum-based alloy nanostructures on carbon. We have developed a new synthetic approach suitable for directly supporting dendritic nanostructures on VXC-72 carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The key of the synthesis is to creating a unique supporting/confining reaction environment by incorporating carbon within lipid bilayer relying on a hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. In order to realize size uniformity control over the supported dendritic nanostructures, a fast photocatalytic seeding method based on tin(IV) porphyrins (SnP) developed at Sandia was applied to the synthesis by using SnP-containing liposomes under tungsten light irradiation. For concept approval, one created dendritic platinum nanostructure supported on CB was fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for durability examination via potential cycling. It appears that carbon supporting is essentially beneficial to an enhanced durability according to our preliminary results.

  12. Hybrid nanostructured microporous carbon-mesoporous carbon doped titanium dioxide/sulfur composite positive electrode materials for rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegeye, Tilahun Awoke; Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Wotango, Aselefech Sorsa; Pan, Chun-Jern; Chen, Hung-Ming; Haregewoin, Atetegeb Meazah; Cheng, Ju-Hsiang; Su, Wei-Nien; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we design hybrid nanostructured microporous carbon-mesoporous carbon doped titanium dioxide/sulfur composite (MC-Meso C-doped TiO2/S) as a positive electrode material for lithium-sulfur batteries. The hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 host material is produced by a low-cost, hydrothermal and annealing process. The resulting conductive material shows dual microporous and mesoporous behavior which enhances the effective trapping of sulfur and polysulfides. The hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2/S composite material possesses rutile TiO2 nanotube structure with successful carbon doping while sulfur is uniformly distributed in the hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 composite materials after the melt-infusion process. The electrochemical measurement of the hybrid material also shows improved cycle stability and rate performance with high sulfur loading (61.04%). The material delivers an initial discharge capacity of 802 mAh g-1 and maintains it at 578 mAh g-1 with a columbic efficiency greater than 97.1% after 140 cycles at 0.1 C. This improvement is thought to be attributed to the unique hybrid nanostructure of the MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 host and the good dispersion of sulfur in the narrow pores of the MC spheres and the mesoporous C-doped TiO2 support.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of various carbon nanostructures (GO, G and nanodiamond) in Rd6G solution.

    PubMed

    Bavali, A; Parvin, P; Mortazavi, S Z; Nourazar, S S

    2015-05-01

    The effect of carbon nanostructures such as graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and nanodiamond (ND) on the spectral properties of Rhodamine 6G (Rd6G) emission due to the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated. It is shown that the addition of carbon nano- structures lead to sensible Red/Blue shifts which depend on the optical properties and surface functionality of nanoparticles. The current theories such as resonance energy transfer (RET), fluorescence quenching and photon propagation in scattering media support the experimental findings. Stern-Volmer curves for dynamic and static quenching of Rd6G molecules embedded with G, GO and nanodiamond are correlated with spectral shifts. Furthermore, time evolution of the spectral shift contributes to determine loading/release rates of fluorescent species with large S-parameter on the given nano-carriers.

  14. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of various carbon nanostructures (GO, G and nanodiamond) in Rd6G solution

    PubMed Central

    Bavali, A.; Parvin, P.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Nourazar, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of carbon nanostructures such as graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and nanodiamond (ND) on the spectral properties of Rhodamine 6G (Rd6G) emission due to the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated. It is shown that the addition of carbon nano- structures lead to sensible Red/Blue shifts which depend on the optical properties and surface functionality of nanoparticles. The current theories such as resonance energy transfer (RET), fluorescence quenching and photon propagation in scattering media support the experimental findings. Stern-Volmer curves for dynamic and static quenching of Rd6G molecules embedded with G, GO and nanodiamond are correlated with spectral shifts. Furthermore, time evolution of the spectral shift contributes to determine loading/release rates of fluorescent species with large S-parameter on the given nano-carriers. PMID:26137372

  15. Functionalization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Cysteamine for the Construction of Cnt/gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nanjundan Ashok; Kim, Sung Hun; Kim, Jong Su; Kim, Jong Tae; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    Combining hybrid nanostructures of metal nanoparticles (NPs) and carbon nanotubes could afford a novel strategy to prepare promising nanomaterials for the highly sensitive sensors and imaging science applications. Conventional acid oxidation process was used to obtain carboxylic acid bound multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) which was further acylated with thionyl chloride to give acyl chloride functionalized MWNTs. Thiol functionalized MWNTs were synthesized by amidation reaction of the acylated MWNTs with cysteamine. Further, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were successfully fabricated on the tube walls to yield the CNT/Au hybrid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray studies were used to characterize the surface chemical functionalities and composition of MWNTs, respectively. Evidence for the attachment of GNPs to thiol functionalized MWNTs was obtained from ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra. In addition, TEM images provided a vivid image of uniform decoration of GNPs on the nanotube sidewalls.

  16. A planar diamond-like carbon nanostructure for a low-voltage field emission cathode with a developed surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aban'shin, N. P.; Avetisyan, Yu. A.; Akchurin, G. G.; Loginov, A. P.; Morev, S. P.; Mosiyash, D. S.; Yakunin, A. N.

    2016-05-01

    Issues pertaining to the effective solution of problems related to the creation of durable low-voltage field emission cathodes with developed working surface and high density of emission current are considered. Results of practical implementation of the concept of multielectrode field emission planar nanostructures based on diamond-like carbon are presented. High average current density (0.1-0.3 A cm-2) is ensured by the formation of a controlled zone of electrostatic field localization at the planar-edge structure. The working life of cathode samples reaches 700-3000 h due to several positive factors, such as the stabilizing properties of a diamond-like carbon film, protection of the emitter from ion bombardment, use of a system of ballast resistors, and low-voltage operation of submicron interelectrode gaps.

  17. The durability dependence of Pt/CNT electrocatalysts on the nanostructures of carbon nanotubes: hollow- and bamboo-CNTs

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Kou, Rong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-07-01

    The electrochemical durability of Pt/CNT with hollow- and bamboo-structured carbon nanotubes as the support for PEM fuel cells was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV, 0.6-1.1V) accelerated degradation test method. Pt/CNT catalysts were characterized with cyclic voltammograms, rotating disk electrodes, and TEM images. The changes in the electrochemical surface area of Pt and the activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) before and after the degradation indicate that bamboo-structured carbon nanotubes supported Pt (Pt/B-CNT) catalyst exhibited much higher durability. TEM images indicate that the sintering of Pt nanoparticles was much less for Pt/B-CNT. These are attributed to the specific bamboo-like nanostructures which provide more “bamboo-knot” defects and edge plane-like defects. Pt-support interaction was therefore enhanced and the durability was improved.

  18. Ultrathin Carbon with Interspersed Graphene/Fullerene-like Nanostructures: A Durable Protective Overcoat for High Density Magnetic Storage

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Yeo, Reuben J.; Xu, Hai; Ping Loh, Kian; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key issues for future hard disk drive technology is to design and develop ultrathin (<2 nm) overcoats with excellent wear- and corrosion protection and high thermal stability. Forming carbon overcoats (COCs) having interspersed nanostructures by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) process can be an effective approach to achieve the desired target. In this work, by employing a novel bi-level surface modification approach using FCVA, the formation of a high sp3 bonded ultrathin (~1.7 nm) amorphous carbon overcoat with interspersed graphene/fullerene-like nanostructures, grown on magnetic hard disk media, is reported. The in-depth spectroscopic and microscopic analyses by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy support the observed findings. Despite a reduction of ~37 % in COC thickness, the FCVA-processed thinner COC (~1.7 nm) shows promising functional performance in terms of lower coefficient of friction (~0.25), higher wear resistance, lower surface energy, excellent hydrophobicity and similar/better oxidation corrosion resistance than current commercial COCs of thickness ~2.7 nm. The surface and tribological properties of FCVA-deposited COC was further improved after deposition of lubricant layer. PMID:26109208

  19. Ultrathin Carbon with Interspersed Graphene/Fullerene-like Nanostructures: A Durable Protective Overcoat for High Density Magnetic Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Yeo, Reuben J.; Xu, Hai; Ping Loh, Kian; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2015-06-01

    One of the key issues for future hard disk drive technology is to design and develop ultrathin (<2 nm) overcoats with excellent wear- and corrosion protection and high thermal stability. Forming carbon overcoats (COCs) having interspersed nanostructures by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) process can be an effective approach to achieve the desired target. In this work, by employing a novel bi-level surface modification approach using FCVA, the formation of a high sp3 bonded ultrathin (~1.7 nm) amorphous carbon overcoat with interspersed graphene/fullerene-like nanostructures, grown on magnetic hard disk media, is reported. The in-depth spectroscopic and microscopic analyses by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy support the observed findings. Despite a reduction of ~37 % in COC thickness, the FCVA-processed thinner COC (~1.7 nm) shows promising functional performance in terms of lower coefficient of friction (~0.25), higher wear resistance, lower surface energy, excellent hydrophobicity and similar/better oxidation corrosion resistance than current commercial COCs of thickness ~2.7 nm. The surface and tribological properties of FCVA-deposited COC was further improved after deposition of lubricant layer.

  20. Ultrathin Carbon with Interspersed Graphene/Fullerene-like Nanostructures: A Durable Protective Overcoat for High Density Magnetic Storage.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Yeo, Reuben J; Xu, Hai; Ping Loh, Kian; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2015-06-25

    One of the key issues for future hard disk drive technology is to design and develop ultrathin (<2 nm) overcoats with excellent wear- and corrosion protection and high thermal stability. Forming carbon overcoats (COCs) having interspersed nanostructures by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) process can be an effective approach to achieve the desired target. In this work, by employing a novel bi-level surface modification approach using FCVA, the formation of a high sp(3) bonded ultrathin (~1.7 nm) amorphous carbon overcoat with interspersed graphene/fullerene-like nanostructures, grown on magnetic hard disk media, is reported. The in-depth spectroscopic and microscopic analyses by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy support the observed findings. Despite a reduction of ~37% in COC thickness, the FCVA-processed thinner COC (~1.7 nm) shows promising functional performance in terms of lower coefficient of friction (~0.25), higher wear resistance, lower surface energy, excellent hydrophobicity and similar/better oxidation corrosion resistance than current commercial COCs of thickness ~2.7 nm. The surface and tribological properties of FCVA-deposited COC was further improved after deposition of lubricant layer.