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Sample records for carbon regimes results

  1. Changes in Soil Carbon and Enzyme Activity As a Result of Different Long-Term Fertilization Regimes in a Greenhouse Field

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Chen, Wei; Burger, Martin; Yang, Lijie; Gong, Ping; Wu, Zhijie

    2015-01-01

    In order to discover the advantages and disadvantages of different fertilization regimes and identify the best management practice of fertilization in greenhouse fields, soil enzyme activities involved in carbon (C) transformations, soil chemical characteristics, and crop yields were monitored after long-term (20-year) fertilization regimes, including no fertilizer (CK), 300 kg N ha-1 and 600 kg N ha-1 as urea (N1 and N2), 75 Mg ha-1 horse manure compost (M), and M with either 300 or 600 kg N ha-1 urea (MN1 and MN2). Compared with CK, fertilization increased crop yields by 31% (N2) to 69% (MN1). However, compared with CK, inorganic fertilization (especially N2) also caused soil acidification and salinization. In the N2 treatment, soil total organic carbon (TOC) decreased from 14.1±0.27 g kg-1 at the beginning of the long-term experiment in 1988 to 12.6±0.11 g kg-1 (P<0.05). Compared to CK, N1 and N2 exhibited higher soil α-galactosidase and β-galactosidase activities, but lower soil α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase activities (P<0.05), indicating that inorganic fertilization had different impacts on these C transformation enzymes. Compared with CK, the M, MN1 and MN2 treatments exhibited higher enzyme activities, soil TOC, total nitrogen, dissolved organic C, and microbial biomass C and N. The fertilization regime of the MN1 treatment was identified as optimal because it produced the highest yields and increased soil quality, ensuring sustainability. The results suggest that inorganic fertilizer alone, especially in high amounts, in greenhouse fields is detrimental to soil quality. PMID:25706998

  2. Changes in soil carbon and enzyme activity as a result of different long-term fertilization regimes in a greenhouse field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Chen, Wei; Burger, Martin; Yang, Lijie; Gong, Ping; Wu, Zhijie

    2015-01-01

    In order to discover the advantages and disadvantages of different fertilization regimes and identify the best management practice of fertilization in greenhouse fields, soil enzyme activities involved in carbon (C) transformations, soil chemical characteristics, and crop yields were monitored after long-term (20-year) fertilization regimes, including no fertilizer (CK), 300 kg N ha-1 and 600 kg N ha-1 as urea (N1 and N2), 75 Mg ha-1 horse manure compost (M), and M with either 300 or 600 kg N ha-1 urea (MN1 and MN2). Compared with CK, fertilization increased crop yields by 31% (N2) to 69% (MN1). However, compared with CK, inorganic fertilization (especially N2) also caused soil acidification and salinization. In the N2 treatment, soil total organic carbon (TOC) decreased from 14.1±0.27 g kg-1 at the beginning of the long-term experiment in 1988 to 12.6±0.11 g kg-1 (P<0.05). Compared to CK, N1 and N2 exhibited higher soil α-galactosidase and β-galactosidase activities, but lower soil α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase activities (P<0.05), indicating that inorganic fertilization had different impacts on these C transformation enzymes. Compared with CK, the M, MN1 and MN2 treatments exhibited higher enzyme activities, soil TOC, total nitrogen, dissolved organic C, and microbial biomass C and N. The fertilization regime of the MN1 treatment was identified as optimal because it produced the highest yields and increased soil quality, ensuring sustainability. The results suggest that inorganic fertilizer alone, especially in high amounts, in greenhouse fields is detrimental to soil quality.

  3. Fire-regime variability impacts forest carbon dynamics for centuries to millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudiburg, Tara W.; Higuera, Philip E.; Hicke, Jeffrey A.

    2017-08-01

    Wildfire is a dominant disturbance agent in forest ecosystems, shaping important biogeochemical processes including net carbon (C) balance. Long-term monitoring and chronosequence studies highlight a resilience of biogeochemical properties to large, stand-replacing, high-severity fire events. In contrast, the consequences of repeated fires or temporal variability in a fire regime (e.g., the characteristic timing or severity of fire) are largely unknown, yet theory suggests that such variability could strongly influence forest C trajectories (i.e., future states or directions) for millennia. Here we combine a 4500-year paleoecological record of fire activity with ecosystem modeling to investigate how fire-regime variability impacts soil C and net ecosystem carbon balance. We found that C trajectories in a paleo-informed scenario differed significantly from an equilibrium scenario (with a constant fire return interval), largely due to variability in the timing and severity of past fires. Paleo-informed scenarios contained multi-century periods of positive and negative net ecosystem C balance, with magnitudes significantly larger than observed under the equilibrium scenario. Further, this variability created legacies in soil C trajectories that lasted for millennia. Our results imply that fire-regime variability is a major driver of C trajectories in stand-replacing fire regimes. Predicting carbon balance in these systems, therefore, will depend strongly on the ability of ecosystem models to represent a realistic range of fire-regime variability over the past several centuries to millennia.

  4. Climatic Variability, Fire Regimes and Carbon Dynamics in Dry Forest Ecosystems of the Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessl, A. E.; McKenzie, D.

    2003-12-01

    Historical variability of fire regimes in the western Americas is associated with climatic phenomena such as ENSO. We describe the relationship between fire occurrence and interannual to decadal climatic variability (Palmer Drought Severity Index [PDSI], El Niño/Southern Oscillation [ENSO] and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation [PDO]) and explain how land use changes in the 20th century affected these relationships. Ongoing research uses these past changes to understand the influence of fire regimes on the regional carbon balance. We used 1701 fire-scarred trees collected in five study sites in central and eastern Washington to investigate current year, lagged, and low frequency relationships between composite fire histories and PDSI, PDO, and ENSO (using the Southern Oscillation Index [SOI] as a measure of ENSO variability) using superposed epoch analysis and cross-spectral analysis. Fires tended to occur during dry summers and during the positive phase of the PDO. Cross-spectral analysis indicates that percentage of trees scarred by fire and the PDO are spectrally coherent at 47 years, the approximate cycle of the PDO. Similarly, percentage scarred and ENSO are spectrally coherent at 6 years, the approximate cycle of ENSO. However other results suggest that ENSO was only a weak driver of fire occurrence in the past three centuries. While drought and fire appear to be tightly linked between 1700-1900, the relationship between drought and fire occurrence was disrupted during the 20th century as a result of land use changes. We suggest that long-term fire planning using the PDO may be possible in the PNW, potentially allowing decadal-scale management of fire regimes, prescribed fire and potentially, carbon emissions. Future work will quantify the changes in carbon emissions associated with a return to natural fire regimes and compares them with estimates of carbon emissions associated with current management. To model past, present and future emissions from fire in

  5. Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance regimes: A general theoretical model

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Ensheng; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Weile; Wang, Han; Hayes, Daniel J; McGuire, A. David; Hastings, Alan; Schimel, David

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large scale terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. We developed a model (REGIME) to quantify ecosystem carbon storage capacities (E[x]) under varying disturbance regimes with an analytical solution E[x] = U {center_dot} {tau}{sub E} {center_dot} {lambda}{lambda} + s {tau} 1, where U is ecosystem carbon influx, {tau}{sub E} is ecosystem carbon residence time, and {tau}{sub 1} is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance interval ({lambda}) and the mean disturbance severity (s). It is a Michaelis-Menten-type equation illustrating the saturation of carbon content with mean disturbance interval. This model analytically integrates the deterministic ecosystem carbon processes with stochastic disturbance events to reveal a general pattern of terrestrial carbon dynamics at large scales. The model allows us to get a sense of the sensitivity of ecosystems to future environmental changes just by a few calculations. According to the REGIME model, for example, approximately 1.8 Pg C will be lost in the high-latitude regions of North America (>45{sup o} N) if fire disturbance intensity increases around 5.7 time the current intensity to the end of the twenty-first century, which will require around 12% increases in net primary productivity (NPP) to maintain stable carbon stocks. If the residence time decreased 10% at the same time additional 12.5% increases in NPP are required to keep current C stocks. The REGIME model also lays the foundation for analytically modeling the interactions between deterministic biogeochemical processes and stochastic disturbance events.

  6. Toward an effective governance regime for geologic carbon storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, B. K.; Socolow, R. H.

    2007-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology is currently poised to play a significant role in mitigating CO2 emissions from future fossil fuel combustion, especially from coal-fired power plants, which are expected to rapidly increase in number over the next several decades. At the same time, large-scale deployment of CCS continues to be impeded by concerns about the long-term integrity of geologic storage reservoirs. In this study, we apply established concepts of learning-by-doing to the problem of reservoir leakage. Our results suggest that when learning is present, traditional measures of (initial) reservoir integrity do not sufficiently capture the time- integrated behavior of the system that is most relevant to the global CO2 problem. In one formulation, we find that when learning is explicitly incorporated into a reservoir model, total leakage is always finite and scales approximately quadratically with the learning time constant and inversely with the initial retention time constant. To highlight the policy relevance of this study, we consider the implications of these results for the larger site licensing process. We expect that an upper bound on total allowable leakage will be decided by policymakers. Armed with this number and some informed, expert-driven judgments about the rate at which learning will proceed, a regulator could use our model, or a more sophisticated variant, to calculate an upper bound on the maximum initial leakage rate. This criterion would then be one of several prerequisites to certification. The entire process could be amended over time as new data is made available. We hope that our model will provide a platform for scholars from different fields to engage one another and to work toward an acceptable, compelling and long-lasting management framework for CCS.

  7. Regime Shifts in Lakes: Organic Carbon Dynamics and Whole Ecosystem Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of using sediment records to identify regime shifts in lakes has largely focussed on biological proxies, such as diatoms and chironomids. In this approach, long-term records of rapid ecological change are compared with independent proxies of the variables driving ecosystem change, for example, climate or catchment disturbance processes (hydrological budgets, deforestation, fire etc.). One of the main problems with this approach is that the sediment cores upon which the data analyses are made are taken from the central part of lakes, often at the deepest point. As a result, the ecological changes observed reflect pelagic (open water) processes rather than whole-lake responses. As most lakes (apart from hypertrophic systems) are dominated by benthic production it is unclear whether palaeolimnological assessments of regime shifts are representative of the whole lake response. Theoretically, this question can be addressed simply by using cores from shallow water. There are a number of problems with this approach, most notably the loss of temporal resolution in shallow water cores (due to the slower sediment accumulation rate) and the different biological assemblages in the shallow water (littoral) cores. There is a strong effect of water depth on the zonation and distribution of biological remains across any lake. An alternative approach therefore is to use total organic carbon [OC] accumulation rate as a measure of the whole lake response to see if there is, in fact, a regime shift at the whole lake scale. Here I present examples of Holocene OC accumulation rate responses to external forcing from shallow eutrophic and boreal lakes and compare them to biological records of structural ecological change to determine whether there has been a whole-lake regime shift.

  8. Upper flow-regime structures in a Pleistocene carbonate ramp (Favignana, Italy): diagnostic criteria and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slootman, Arnoud; Cartigny, Matthieu; de Boer, Poppe; Moscariello, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    This work presents key diagnostic criteria for the recognition of upper flow-regime sedimentary structures in clastic cool-water carbonate accumulations, illustrated by the excellent exposures of the Pleistocene carbonate ramp succession of Favignana Island (Italy). Cool-water carbonate sedimentation has dominated Mediterranean shelves since the Early Pliocene. Of the various types of marine limestones, cool-water carbonates behave most similar to siliciclastics. They typically develop ramp morphologies with skeletal sand and gravel, consisting of the remains of heterozoan organisms. Resedimentation of this loose carbonate debris during high-energy events such as storms and, more rarely, tsunamis is the norm. Off-ramp supercritical sediment density flows are important contributors to basinward sediment transport as evidenced by the prevalence of backset-stratification bounded by composite erosion surfaces, locally defining spoon-shaped scours-fills, in beds exceeding several metres in thickness. Sedimentary structures created by upper flow-regime bedforms like antidunes, chute-and-pools and cyclic steps as seen on Favignana Island, which form in association with in-phase waves and hydraulic jumps, are not commonly mentioned in carbonate ramp depositional models. For each of the bedforms we present diagnostic criteria to explain otherwise enigmatic sedimentary structures. Thick beds deposited by supercritical sediment density flows have major implications for the distribution of porosity and permeability in carbonate sandstone bodies, especially where they host hydrocarbon and/or water accumulations. The correct identification of upper flow-regime sedimentary structures in carbonate ramp accumulations is therefore important.

  9. Effect of management and soil moisture regimes on wetland soils total carbon and nitrogen in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiri, Hellen; Kreye, Christine; Becker, Mathias

    2013-04-01

    Wetland soils play an important role as storage compartments for water, carbon and nutrients. These soils implies various conditions, depending on the water regimes that affect several important microbial and physical-chemical processes which in turn influence the transformation of organic and inorganic components of nitrogen, carbon, soil acidity and other nutrients. Particularly, soil carbon and nitrogen play an important role in determining the productivity of a soil whereas management practices could determine the rate and magnitude of nutrient turnover. A study was carried out in a floodplain wetland planted with rice in North-west Tanzania- East Africa to determine the effects of different management practices and soil water regimes on paddy soil organic carbon and nitrogen. Four management treatments were compared: (i) control (non weeded plots); (ii) weeded plots; (iii) N fertilized plots, and (iv) non-cropped (non weeded plots). Two soil moisture regimes included soil under field capacity (rainfed conditions) and continuous water logging compared side-by-side. Soil were sampled at the start and end of the rice cropping seasons from the two fields differentiated by moisture regimes during the wet season 2012. The soils differed in the total organic carbon and nitrogen between the treatments. Soil management including weeding and fertilization is seen to affect soil carbon and nitrogen regardless of the soil moisture conditions. Particularly, the padddy soils were higher in the total organic carbon under continuous water logged field. These findings are preliminary and a more complete understanding of the relationships between management and soil moisture on the temporal changes of soil properties is required before making informed decisions on future wetland soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Keywords: Management, nitrogen, paddy soil, total carbon, Tanzania,

  10. Watershed Fire Regime Effects On Particulate Organic Carbon Composition in Oregon and California Coast Range Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatten, J. A.; Goni, M. A.; Wheatcroft, R. A.; Borgeld, J. C.; Padgett, J. S.; Pasternack, G. B.; Gray, A. B.; Watson, E. B.; Warrick, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Fire causes major changes to organic carbon, converting biological organic materials to pyrogenic-derived organic carbon (Py-OC), including black carbon. Wildfire also dramatically affects hydrological and erosion processes within watersheds, potentially increasing the erosion and discharge of Py-OC as particulate organic carbon (POC). We hypothesize that the proportion of the POC being discharged as Py-OC will be affected by the watershed’s fire regime, increasing with annual proportion of the watershed burned. During the 2008 and 2009 water years, suspended sediment samples were collected from the Alsea, Umpqua, Eel, Salinas, and Arroyo Seco Rivers draining the Coast Ranges of Oregon and California. Events and discharges of various magnitudes were captured in this sample set. This sample set also included suspended sediment collected from the Arroyo Seco River after a 2008 wildfire burned through a large portion of its watershed. Fine (<63 μm) and coarse (>63 μm) particulate material was analyzed for OC and N. We used cupric oxide oxidation to determine the contribution of Py-OC and unburned organic matter to the POC load of these rivers. The area weighted mean fire return interval decreases from the Douglas fir dominated forests in the Alsea River watershed in the north to the chaparral dominated Arroyo Seco River watershed in the south (Alsea > Umpqua > Eel > Salinas > Arroyo Seco). This translated into an increase in the proportion of each watershed burned from north to south. With the increase in annual proportion of watershed burned we found that the Py-OC content of coarse and fine POC increased from north to south. These results suggest that fire plays an important role in delivering POC to long-term carbon sinks in the coastal and ocean environment.

  11. Relationships among precipitation regime, nutrient availability, and carbon turnover in tropical rain forests.

    PubMed

    Posada, Juan M; Schuur, Edward A G

    2011-03-01

    The effect of high precipitation regime in tropical forests is poorly known despite indications of its potentially negative effects on nutrient availability and carbon (C) cycling. Our goal was to determine if there was an effect of high rainfall on nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) availability and indexes of C cycling in lowland tropical rain forests exposed to a broad range of mean annual precipitation (MAP). We predicted that C turnover time would increase with MAP while the availability of N and P would decrease. We studied seven Neotropical lowland forests covering a MAP range between 2,700 and 9,500 mm. We used radiocarbon (∆(14)C) from the atmosphere and respired from soil organic matter to estimate residence time of C in plants and soils. We also used C, N, and P concentrations and the stable isotope ratio of N (δ(15)N) in live and dead plant tissues and in soils as proxies for nutrient availability. Negative δ(15)N values indicated that the wettest forests had N cycles that did not exhibit isotope-fractionating losses and were potentially N-limited. Element ratios (N:P and C:P) in senescent leaves, litter, and live roots showed that P resorption increased considerably with MAP, which points towards increasing P-limitation under high MAP regimes. Soil C content increased with MAP but C turnover time only showed a weak relationship with MAP, probably due to variations in soil parent material and age along the MAP gradient. In contrast, comparing C turnover directly to nutrient availability showed strong relationships between C turnover time, N availability (δ(15)N), and P availability (N:P) in senescent leaves and litter. Thus, an effect of MAP on carbon cycling appeared to be indirectly mediated by nutrient availability. Our results suggest that soil nutrient availability plays a central role in the dynamic of C cycling in tropical rain forests.

  12. Carbon rhizodeposition by plants of contrasting strategies for resource acquisition: responses to various nitrogen fertility regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptist, Florence; Aranjuelo, I.; Lopez-Sangil, L.; Rovia, P.; Nogués, S.

    2010-05-01

    Rhizodeposition by plants is one of the most important physiological mechanisms related to carbon and nitrogen cycling which is also believed to vary along the acquisition-conservation continuum. However, owing to methodological difficulties (i.e. narrow zone of soil around roots and rapid assimilation by soil microbes), root exudation and variations between species are one of the most poorly understood belowground process. Although previous approaches such as hydroponic culture based system, permit the chemical analysis of exudates, the fact that this protocol is qualitative, conditions its utility (see review in Phillips et al. 2008). Others techniques based on pulse-labelling approach have been developed to quantify rhizodeposition but are rarely sufficient to uniformly label all plant inputs to soil. Consequently with this typical pulse chase methods, recent assimilates are labeled but the recalcitrant carbon will not be labeled and therefore the contribution of this carbon will not be considered. Hence, traditional pulse labelling is not a quantitative means of tracing carbon due to inhomogeneous labelling and so limits greatly comparative studies of rhizodeposition fluxes at the interspecific level. In this study we developped a new protocole based on a long-term (3 months) steady state 13C labelling in order (1) to quantify rhizodeposition fluxes for six graminoid species caracterized by contrasted nutrient acquisition strategies and (2) to investigate to what extent various level of nitrogen fertility regimes modulate rhizodeposition fluxes. This method will enable to quantify under natural soil conditions both the accumulation of 13C in the soil but also the quantity that has been respired by the microorganisms during a given time and so will give an integrated picture of rhizodeposition fluxes for each species under each nitrogen fertility level. Results are currently being processed and will be presented at the conference. References: Phillips RP, Erlitz

  13. Effects of Successive Rotation Regimes on Carbon Stocks in Eucalyptus Plantations in Subtropical China Measured over a Full Rotation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqiong; Ye, Duo; Liang, Hongwen; Zhu, Hongguang; Qin, Lin; Zhu, Yuling; Wen, Yuanguang

    2015-01-01

    Plantations play an important role in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a dilemma in that most plantations are managed on short rotations, and the carbon sequestration capacities of these short-rotation plantations remain understudied. Eucalyptus has been widely planted in the tropics and subtropics due to its rapid growth, high adaptability, and large economic return. Eucalyptus plantations are primarily planted in successive rotations with a short rotation length of 6~8 years. In order to estimate the carbon-stock potential of eucalyptus plantations over successive rotations, we chose a first rotation (FR) and a second rotation (SR) stand and monitored the carbon stock dynamics over a full rotation from 1998 to 2005. Our results showed that carbon stock in eucalyptus trees (TC) did not significantly differ between rotations, while understory vegetation (UC) and soil organic matter (SOC) stored less carbon in the SR (1.01 vs. 2.76 Mg.ha(-1) and 70.68 vs. 81.08 Mg. ha(-1), respectively) and forest floor carbon (FFC) conversely stored more (2.80 vs. 2.34 Mg. ha(-1)). The lower UC and SOC stocks in the SR stand resulted in 1.13 times lower overall ecosystem carbon stock. Mineral soils and overstory trees were the two dominant carbon pools in eucalyptus plantations, accounting for 73.77%~75.06% and 20.50%~22.39%, respectively, of the ecosystem carbon pool. However, the relative contribution (to the ecosystem pool) of FFC stocks increased 1.38 times and that of UC decreased 2.30 times in the SR versus FR stand. These carbon pool changes over successive rotations were attributed to intensive successive rotation regimes of eucalyptus plantations. Our eight year study suggests that for the sustainable development of short-rotation plantations, a sound silvicultural strategy is required to achieve the best combination of high wood yield and carbon stock potential.

  14. Effects of Successive Rotation Regimes on Carbon Stocks in Eucalyptus Plantations in Subtropical China Measured over a Full Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoqiong; Ye, Duo; Liang, Hongwen; Zhu, Hongguang; Qin, Lin; Zhu, Yuling; Wen, Yuanguang

    2015-01-01

    Plantations play an important role in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a dilemma in that most plantations are managed on short rotations, and the carbon sequestration capacities of these short-rotation plantations remain understudied. Eucalyptus has been widely planted in the tropics and subtropics due to its rapid growth, high adaptability, and large economic return. Eucalyptus plantations are primarily planted in successive rotations with a short rotation length of 6~8 years. In order to estimate the carbon-stock potential of eucalyptus plantations over successive rotations, we chose a first rotation (FR) and a second rotation (SR) stand and monitored the carbon stock dynamics over a full rotation from 1998 to 2005. Our results showed that carbon stock in eucalyptus trees (TC) did not significantly differ between rotations, while understory vegetation (UC) and soil organic matter (SOC) stored less carbon in the SR (1.01 vs. 2.76 Mg.ha-1 and 70.68 vs. 81.08 Mg. ha-1, respectively) and forest floor carbon (FFC) conversely stored more (2.80 vs. 2.34 Mg. ha-1). The lower UC and SOC stocks in the SR stand resulted in 1.13 times lower overall ecosystem carbon stock. Mineral soils and overstory trees were the two dominant carbon pools in eucalyptus plantations, accounting for 73.77%~75.06% and 20.50%~22.39%, respectively, of the ecosystem carbon pool. However, the relative contribution (to the ecosystem pool) of FFC stocks increased 1.38 times and that of UC decreased 2.30 times in the SR versus FR stand. These carbon pool changes over successive rotations were attributed to intensive successive rotation regimes of eucalyptus plantations. Our eight year study suggests that for the sustainable development of short-rotation plantations, a sound silvicultural strategy is required to achieve the best combination of high wood yield and carbon stock potential. PMID:26186367

  15. The influence of hydrodynamic regime on infaunal assemblages inhabiting carbonate sediments on central Pacific seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Thomas, Cynthia L.

    1989-12-01

    We investigated the following hypotheses for deep seamounts in the central Pacific Ocean: (1) infaunal and microbial abundances are elevated in regions of current intensification, (2) infaunal lifestyles reflect variation in hydrodynamic conditions and (3) bioturbation is more intense in high-energy regimes. Our studies were carried out at three sites: the northwest perimeter of the Horizon Guyot sediment cap (1840 m), which is characterized by strong bottom currents and rippled foraminiferan sands, and the central summits of Horizon Guyot (1480 m) and Magellan Rise (3150 m), whose sediments are unrippled and finer grained. Contrary to our first hypothesis, the high-energy, Horizon perimeter sediments exhibited lower biological activity than the summit sites, as reflected in lower organic nitrogen (0.011% vs. 0.015-0.017%), higher C/N ratios (19 vs 11), lower bacterial counts (1.21 vs 2.03-2.15 × 10 8ml -1) and lower macrofaunal abundances (255 vs 388-829 m -2). Sediment organic carbon values (0.14-0.19%) and meiofaunal abundances (2866-5150 m -2) did not differ significantly among the three sites. Infaunal life habits varied among sites but sediment mixing did not. Macrofauna were found deeper in rippled perimeter sediments than in the cap sediments. Sessility and surface-feeding modes dominated among polychaetes at the higher-energy Horizon perimeter, while motility and subsurface feeding were common in the quieter, finer-grained regimes. Significant sediment mixing takes place on 100-year time scales a all three sites, probably a result of large, infaunal bioturbators at the cap sites and physical sediment instability at the perimeter site. Excess 210Pb exhibited moderately high inventories (38-59 dpm cm -2) and deep penetration (15 cm). Estimated mixing coefficients (D b) ranged from 0.6 to 3.0 cm 2y -1 at the three sites. Our findings indicate that hydrodynamic differences can lead to greater variation in sediment and faunal characteristics on a single

  16. Transient deformation regime in bending of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kutana, A; Giapis, K P

    2006-12-15

    Pure bending of single-walled carbon nanotubes between (5,5) and (50,50) is studied using molecular dynamics based on the reactive bond order potential. Unlike smaller nanotubes, bending of (15,15) and larger ones exhibits an intermediate deformation in the transition between the buckled and fully kinked configurations. This transient bending regime is characterized by a gradual and controllable flattening of the nanotube cross section at the buckling site. Unbending of a kinked nanotube bypasses the transient bending regime, exhibiting a hysteresis due to van der Waals attraction between the tube walls at the kinked site.

  17. Antecedents of Teachers Fostering Effort within Two Different Management Regimes: An Assessment-Based Accountability Regime and Regime without External Pressure on Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Knut-Andreas; Elstad, Eyvind; Turmo, Are

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the comparison of organizational antecedents of teachers' fostering of students' effort in two quite different accountability regimes: one management regime with an external-accountability system and one with no external accountability devices. The methodology involves cross-sectional surveys from two different management…

  18. Salix response to different flow regimes in controlled experiments: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, Lorenzo; Signarbieux, Constant; Buttler, Alexandre; Perona, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Dams and water management for hydropower production, agriculture and other human activities alter the natural flow regime of rivers. The new river hydrograph components depend on the type of impoundment and the policy of regulation but such a different flow regime will likely affect the riparian environment. The main challenge in order to define sustainable flow releases is to quantify hydrological effects in terms of geomorphology and ecosystem response. A considerable lack of knowledge still affects the link hydrology-ecology and inadequate flow rules (e.g., minimal or residual flows) are consequently still widespread: further research in this direction is urgently required. We present an experiment, which aims to investigate the effects of different water stage regimes on riparian vegetation (salix Viminalis cuttings) development in a temperate region (Switzerland). This work describes the installation setup, together with the first results concerning the first of the two scheduled seasons of campaign. Sixty Salix cuttings were planted in non-cohesive sandy-gravel sediment within 1 meter tall plastic pots installed outside in the EPFL campus. After grouping them in three batteries, the water level within them has been varying following three river regimes simulated by adjusting the water level within the pots by means of an automatic hydraulic system. The three water level regimes reproduce a natural flow regime, a minimum residual flow policy, which only conserves peaks during flooding conditions, and an artificial regime conserving only low frequencies (e.g., seasonality) of the natural dynamic. The natural flow regime of the first battery has been applied for two months to the entire system; the three regimes above said started in June 2012. This triggered a plant response transitory regime, which we monitored by measuring plant growth, soil and atmospheric variables. Particularly, measures concern with branches development leaves photosynthesis and

  19. Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part II: Proofs of Results*

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M.

    2010-01-01

    In this companion article to “Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part I: Main Content” [Orellana, Rotnitzky and Robins (2010), IJB, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, Art. 7] we present (i) proofs of the claims in that paper, (ii) a proposal for the computation of a confidence set for the optimal index when this lies in a finite set, and (iii) an example to aid the interpretation of the positivity assumption. PMID:20405047

  20. Dynamic regime marginal structural mean models for estimation of optimal dynamic treatment regimes, Part II: proofs of results.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M

    2010-03-03

    In this companion article to "Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part I: Main Content" [Orellana, Rotnitzky and Robins (2010), IJB, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, Art. 7] we present (i) proofs of the claims in that paper, (ii) a proposal for the computation of a confidence set for the optimal index when this lies in a finite set, and (iii) an example to aid the interpretation of the positivity assumption.

  1. Molecular systems under shock compression into the dense plasma regime: carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Cochrane, Kyle R.; Root, Seth; Carpenter, John H.

    2013-10-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) has proven remarkably accurate in predicting properties of matter under shock compression into the dense plasma regime. Materials where chemistry plays a role are of interest for many applications, including planetary science and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). As examples of systems where chemical reactions are important, and demonstration of the high fidelity possible for these both structurally and chemically complex systems, we will discuss shock- and re-shock of liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) in the range 100 to 800 GPa and shock compression of hydrocarbon polymers, including GDP (glow discharge polymer) which is used as an ablator in laser ICF experiments. Experimental results from Sandia's Z machine validate the DFT simulations at extreme conditions and the combination of experiment and DFT provide reliable data for evaluating existing and constructing future wide-range equations of state models for molecular compounds. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Improved biological phosphorus removal performance driven by the aerobic/extended-idle regime with propionate as the sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Yan; Zeng, Tianjing; Zeng, Guangming

    2012-08-01

    Our previous studies proved that biological phosphorus removal (BPR) could be achieved in an aerobic/extended-idle (AEI) process employing two typical substrates of glucose and acetate as the carbon sources. This paper further evaluated the feasibility of another important substrate, propionate, serving as the carbon source for BPR in the AEI process, and compared the BPR performance between the AEI and anaerobic/oxic (A/O) processes. Two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated, respectively, as the AEI and A/O regimes for BPR using propionate as the sole substrate. The results showed that the AEI-reactor removed 2.98 ± 0.04-4.06 ± 0.06 mg of phosphorus per g of total suspended solids during the course of the steady operational trial, and the phosphorus content of the dried sludge was reached 8.0 ± 0.4% after 56-day operation, demonstrating the good performance of phosphorus removal. Then, the efficiencies of BPR and the transformations of the intracellular storages were compared between two SBRs. It was observed that the phosphorus removal efficiency was maintained around 95% in the AEI-reactor, and about 83% in the A/O-reactor, although the latter showed much greater transformations of both polyhydroxyalkanoates and glycogen. The facts clearly showed that BPR could be enhanced by the AEI regime using propionate as the carbon source. Finally, the mechanisms for the propionate fed AEI-reactor improving BPR were investigated. It was found that the sludge cultured by the AEI regime had more polyphosphate containing cells than that by the A/O regime. Further investigation revealed that the residual nitrate generated in the last aerobic period was readily deteriorated BPR in the A/O-SBR, but a slight deterioration was observed in the AEI-SBR. Moreover, the lower glycogen transformation measured in the AEI-SBR indicated that the biomass cultured by the AEI regime contained less glycogen accumulating organisms activities than that by the A/O regime

  3. [Effects of different straw-returning regimes on soil organic carbon and carbon pool management index in Guanzhong Plain, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Li, You-bing; Wang, Shu-juan; Shi, Jiang-lan; Tian, Xiao-hong

    2015-04-01

    A four-year (2008-2012) field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of different straw-returning regimes on soil total organic carbon (TOC), labile organic carbon (LOC) and the ratio of LOC to TOC (LOC/TOC) as well as TOC stock (SCS) and soil carbon pool management index (CPMI) in a farmland with maize-wheat double cropping system in Guanzhong Plain area, Shaanxi Province, China. The results indicated that soil TOC and LOC contents and SCS were significantly increased when wheat or maize straw was returned to field, and the increasing extent showed the rising order as follows: double straw-returning > single straw-returning > no straw-returning. Compared to no straw returning, a significant increase of TOC and LOC contents and SCS was found in the treatment of wheat straw chopping retention combined with maize straw chopping subsoiling retention (WC-MM), and CPMI of WC-MM was significantly higher than in the other treatments in 0-20 cm soil layer. Compared to no wheat straw returning, soil CPMIs in 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm soil layer increased by 19.1% and 67.9% for the wheat straw chopping returning treatment, and by 22.6% and 32.4% for the maize straw chopping subsoiling treatment, respectively. Correlation analysis showed that soil CPMI was a more effective index reflecting the sequestration of soil organic carbon in 0-30 cm soil layer than the ratio of LOC to TOC. This study thus suggested that WC-MM regime is the best straw-returning regime for soil organic carbon sequestration.

  4. Thermal regime of the deep carbonate reservoir of the Po Plain (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, V.; Chiozzi, P.; Verdoya, M.

    2012-04-01

    Italy is one of the most important countries in the world with regard to high-medium enthalpy geothermal resources, a large part of which is already extracted at relatively low cost. High temperatures at shallow to medium depth occur within a wide belt, several hundred kilometre long, west of the Apennines mountain chain. This belt, affected by recent lithosphere extension, includes several geothermal fields, which are largely exploited for electricity generation. Between the Alps and Apennines ranges, the deeper aquifer, occurring in carbonate rocks of the Po Plain, can host medium enthalpy fluids, which are exploited for district heating. Such a general picture of the available geothermal resources has been well established through several geophysical investigations and drillings. Nevertheless, additional studies are necessary to evaluate future developments, especially with reference to the deep carbonate aquifer of the Po Plain. In this paper, we focus on the eastern sector of the plain and try to gain a better understanding of the thermal regime by using synergically geothermal methodologies and geological information. The analysis of the temperatures recorded to about 6 km depth in hydrocarbon wells supplies basic constraints to outline the thermal regime of the sedimentary basin and to investigate the occurrence and importance of hydrothermal processes in the carbonate layer. After correction for drilling disturbance, temperatures were analysed, together with geological information, through an inversion technique based on a laterally constant thermal gradient model. The inferred thermal gradient changes with depth; it is quite low within the carbonate layer, while is larger in the overlying, practically impermeable formations. As the thermal conductivity variation does not justify such a thermal gradient difference, the vertical change can be interpreted as due to convective processes occurring in the carbonate layer, acting as thermal reservoir. The

  5. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2013-05-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the difference in the behavior of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to that of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e., insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e., highly soluble regime) for typical atmospheric cloud life cycles.

  6. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the differences of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to the behavior of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e. insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e. highly soluble regime).

  7. Growth responses of Melastoma malabathricum to elevated carbon dioxide and water regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Wan Nur Ain Mat; Ahmad, Wan Juliana Wan; Musa, Nor Lailatul Wahidah

    2016-11-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 has significant effects on plant growth depending on the species and the interaction between treatments given. In other words, the impacts vary among species, depending on differences in photosynthetic pathways, intrinsic growth rates and other properties. In this research we studied the effects of increased carbon dioxide concentration and water regimes on a shrub species, Melastoma malabathricum in a shade house at ambient CO2 and open roof greenhouse at elevated CO2. The factor of water stress was also included, in which for each CO2 treatment, the amount of water was given once or twice daily. The treatment of elevated CO2 was at 800 ppm, when the plants were exposed daily from 0900h until 1100h. The plant growth was monitored through their biomass, height and leaf area that were recorded fortnightly for six months. The results showed that the height of M. malabathricum stem in elevated CO2 was significantly higher than those in ambient CO2. Similarly, leaf area in the elevated CO2 showed a big difference with a value of 46.24 cm2 for elevated CO2 with twice watering, but only 17.94 cm2 for ambient CO2 with twice watering. Even for once watering, we can see the values of leaf area were higher with 32.06 cm2 for elevated and 24.35 cm2 in ambient CO2. The above ground and below ground biomass differed significantly between ambient and elevated CO2. Above ground biomass in ambient CO2 was higher than that in elevated CO2 with a percentage of 25.7%. In contrast, the below ground biomass in elevated CO2 was higher than that in ambient CO2 with a percentage of 17.4%. The results suggested that the increment of CO2 concentrations and water regime in the natural environment may influence the growth and ultimately the abundance and distribution of this shrub species in urban forest.

  8. Importance of soil thermal regime in terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the circumpolar north

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yueyang; Zhuang, Qianlai; Sitch, Stephen; O'Donnell, Jonathan A.; Kicklighter, David; Sokolov, Andrei; Melillo, Jerry

    2016-07-01

    In the circumpolar north (45-90°N), permafrost plays an important role in vegetation and carbon (C) dynamics. Permafrost thawing has been accelerated by the warming climate and exerts a positive feedback to climate through increasing soil C release to the atmosphere. To evaluate the influence of permafrost on C dynamics, changes in soil temperature profiles should be considered in global C models. This study incorporates a sophisticated soil thermal model (STM) into a dynamic global vegetation model (LPJ-DGVM) to improve simulations of changes in soil temperature profiles from the ground surface to 3 m depth, and its impacts on C pools and fluxes during the 20th and 21st centuries. With cooler simulated soil temperatures during the summer, LPJ-STM estimates ~ 0.4 Pg C yr- 1 lower present-day heterotrophic respiration but ~ 0.5 Pg C yr- 1 higher net primary production than the original LPJ model resulting in an additional 0.8 to 1.0 Pg C yr- 1 being sequestered in circumpolar ecosystems. Under a suite of projected warming scenarios, we show that the increasing active layer thickness results in the mobilization of permafrost C, which contributes to a more rapid increase in heterotrophic respiration in LPJ-STM compared to the stand-alone LPJ model. Except under the extreme warming conditions, increases in plant production due to warming and rising CO2, overwhelm the e nhanced ecosystem respiration so that both boreal forest and arctic tundra ecosystems remain a net C sink over the 21st century. This study highlights the importance of considering changes in the soil thermal regime when quantifying the C budget in the circumpolar north.

  9. [Results of a Survey of Insurance Holders on Cure Regimes Performed in Foreign European Countries].

    PubMed

    Kus, S; Frisch, D; Schuh, A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reasons of the insured in Germany for taking cure regimes in foreign European countries. Health insurances conducted a survey including insurance holders in Germany who had taken a cure regime in a foreign European country in 2012 or 2011. In a paper-pencil interview, the sample was asked why they performed the cure regime abroad, how satisfied they were regarding the quality of the health professionals and the treatment, respectively, how long a positive effect lasted, where they spent their cure regime and about their plans regarding a future treatment in a health resort. In total, 443 insurance holders (60.7% female, mean age 68 years) were included. Price-performance ratio of board, lodging and treatment (75.6%), the health resorts' reputation (64.5%) and recommendations of the personal environment (56.1%) were the main reasons for taking a cure regime abroad. Most of the participants were satisfied with the quality of the health professionals and the health resort; two thirds rated the effect as lasting longer than 3 months. The study population predominantly took services of health resorts located in the Czech Republic, in Hungary and in Poland. For taking a cure in the future, most of the study participants (77%) preferred health resorts abroad, however, a gender-specific analysis revealed this trend to be more pronounced in the male study population. Based on the results of the survey one might suggest that cost factors along with high level of satisfaction regarding the quality of treatments provided at the health resorts abroad, positively influence the decision for taking a cure regime in a foreign country. In the sample of this study, the decision is rarely based on the health insurances' or the health resorts' promotion activity, respectively. However, to conclude on the total population, requires data of a representative sample. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Shear-induced lamellar ordering and interfacial sliding in amorphous carbon films: A superlow friction regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian-Bao; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Xu, Liang; Wang, Lin-Feng; Wang, Hui

    2011-10-01

    A shear-induced phase transition from disorder to lamellar ordering in amorphous carbon films are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Formation of well-separated graphene-like interfacial layers is observed with large interlayer distances, diminishing and ultimately vanishing interlayer bonds, which provides a near-frictionless sliding plane. The steady-state velocity accommodation mode after the running-in stage is interfacial sliding between the graphene-like layers, which explains the experimentally observed graphitization and formation of carbon-rich transfer layers. A superlow friction or superlubricity regime with friction coefficient of approximately 0.01 originates from the extremely large repulsive and low shear interactions across the sliding interface.

  11. Response of vegetation to carbon dioxide - effect of elevated levels of CO{sub 2} on winter wheat under two moisture regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, U.N.; Burnett, R.B.; Kanemasu, E.T.; Kirkham, M.B.

    1987-12-31

    This report deals with the second-year (1985-86) findings of an on going experiment with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) at different carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels and under two moisture regimes. The results for the first year are given in the U.S. Department of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Research Division Response of Vegetation to Carbon Dioxide. The purpose of the second year`s experiment was to verify the results of 1984-85. However, based on the performance and the results of 1984-85 experiments, a few modifications were made.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Resulting from Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawkes, S.

    An earlier paper by the author examined the links between space tourism and sustainable development. One important aspect of sustainable development is environmental impact and within that anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission is a key issue as it is linked to climate change. Space tourism operators need to consider the environmental impact of their operations and in particular measure their total carbon emissions (“carbon footprint”) and then put in place arrangements to reduce or offset them. This paper presents some initial calculations on the carbon dioxide emissions likely to result from both sub-orbital and orbital space tourism flights and discusses options and prices for carbon offsetting. The effect of scaling up the space tourism industry is also considered.

  13. The influence of climate cycles on the water regime and carbonate profile in chernozems of Central European Russia and adjacent territories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazykina, G. S.; Ovechkin, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of long-term "dry" and "wet" climatic cycles on the water regime, hydrological parameters, and carbonate profiles of chernozems in Central European Russia and adjacent territories was studied. The hydrological and carbonate profiles were found to change during the wet cycle. However, the upper part of the hydrological profile is basically unchanging, whereas in its lower part, the number of hydrological horizons and contrast in their moistening decrease in the forest-steppe chernozems and increase in the steppe chernozems. The frequency of through wetting of chernozems increases during the wet cycles. The vertical lithological heterogeneity of the parent material affects the soil moisture status. In the wet climatic cycle, the moisture content above the lithological contact increases resulting in the development of the features of soil hydromorphism. In the carbonate profile, the character of pedofeatures is changing: some carbonate neoformations disappear, while the other ones develop. Possible variations of the periodically percolative water regime were revealed in chernozems. The classification of water regime proposed by A.A. Rode may be updated based on the data obtained during the dry climatic cycle. Rode's hypothesis about cyclic variations in the soil water regime is confirmed.

  14. A Novel Method for Analyzing and Interpreting GCM Results Using Clustered Climate Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Hargrove, W. W.; Erickson, D. J.; Oglesby, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    A high-performance parallel clustering algorithm has been developed for analyzing and comparing climate model results and long time series climate measurements. Designed to identify biases and detect trends in disparate climate change data sets, this tool combines and simplifies large temporally-varying data sets from atmospheric measurements to multi-century climate model output. Clustering is a statistical procedure which provides an objective method for grouping multivariate conditions into a set of states or regimes within a given level of statistical tolerance. The groups or clusters--statistically defined across space and through time--possess centroids which represent the synoptic conditions of observations or model results contained in each state no matter when or where they occurred. The clustering technique was applied to five business-as-usual (BAU) scenarios from the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). Three fields of significance (surface temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture) were clustered from 2000 through 2098. Our analysis shows an increase in spatial area occupied by the cluster or climate regime which typifies desert regions (i.e., an increase in desertification) and a decrease in the spatial area occupied by the climate regime typifying winter-time high latitude perma-frost regions. The same analysis subsequently applied to the ensemble as a whole demonstrates the consistency and variability of trends from each ensemble member. The patterns of cluster changes can be used to show predicted variability in climate on global and continental scales. Novel three-dimensional phase space representations of these climate regimes show the portion of this phase space occupied by the land surface at all points in space and time. Any single spot on the globe will exist in one of these climate regimes at any single point in time, and by incrementing time, that same spot will trace out a trajectory or orbit among these climate regimes in phase space. When a

  15. Regimes of Scattering Behavior from Particulate Media: Implcations for Snow containing Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, C. A.; Henderson, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    As is well known from the remote sensing of minerals, absorption features in infrared spectra can change drastically with changes in particle size. These changes are the product of two competing effects: volume scattering where increasing particle size leads to a net increase in absorption, and surface scattering where increasing particle size decreases net absorption. Depending on the relative contribution of volume and surface scattering, absorption features can appear as troughs in reflectivity spectra (volume scattering), sharp peaks (surface scattering), or may disappear out right. Solid ice has a significant absorption feature near 12 microns, that is a candidate for the retrieval of snow morphology from infrared remote sensing. In this presentation, we first overview a new phenomenological theory of the reflectivity of particulate media, with an emphasize on different regimes of scattering behavior. We then investigate the 12 micron feature of pure snow and snow containing black carbon, with an emphasize on how this feature is expected to change with changes in snow grain size, and with varying amounts of black carbon.

  16. Black carbon network in Mexico. First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, Valter; Peralta, Oscar; Granado, Karen; Ortinez, Abraham; Alvarez-Ospina, Harry; Espinoza, Maria de la Luz; Castro, Telma

    2017-04-01

    After the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change celebrated in Paris 2016, many countries should adopt some mechanisms in the next years to contribute to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and support sustainable development. Mexico Government has adopted an unconditional international commitment to carry out mitigation actions that would result in the reduction of 51% in black carbon (BC) emissions by year 2030. However, many BC emissions have been calculated by factor emissions. Since optical measurements of environmental BC concentrations can vary according the different components and their subsequence wavelength measure, it's important to obtain more accurate values. BC is formally defined as an ideally light-absorbing substance composed by carbon (Bond et al., 2013), and is the second main contributor (behind Carbon Dioxide; CO2) to positive radiative forcing (Ramanathan and Carmichael, 2008). Recently, BC has been used as an additional indicator in air quality management in some cities because is emitted from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, biofuel and biomass burning in both anthropogenic and it is always emitted with other particles and gases, such as organic carbon (OC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Black Carbon, PM2.5 and pollutant gases were measured from January 2015 to December 2015 at three main cities in Mexico, and two other places to evaluate the BC concentration levels in the country. The urban background sites (Mexico City, Monterrey, Guadalajara, MXC-UB, GDL-UB, MTY-UB), a sub-urban background site (Juriquilla, Queretaro, JUR-SUB) and a regional background site (Altzomoni, ALT-RB). Results showed the relationship between BC and PM2.5 in the 3 large cities, with BC/PM2.5 ratios near 0.14 to 0.09 and a high BC-CO relationship in all the year in Mexico City, who showed that mobile sources are a common, at least in cities with a non-significant biomass burning emission related to agriculture or coal

  17. Carbon dynamics of forest in Washington, USA: 21st century projections based on climate-driven changes in fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Crystal L. Raymond; Donald. McKenzie

    2012-01-01

    During the 21st century, climate-driven changes in fire regimes will be a key agent of change in forests of the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW). Understanding the response of forest carbon (C) dynamics to increases in fire will help quantify limits on the contribution of forest C storage to climate change mitigation and prioritize forest types for...

  18. Impacts of global warming on boreal larch forest in East Siberia: simulations with a coupled carbon cycle and fire regime model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.

    2005-12-01

    Boreal forest is one of the focal areas in the study of global warming and carbon cycle. In this study, a coupled carbon cycle and fire regime model was developed and applied to a larch forest in East Siberia, near Yakutsk. Fire regime is simulated with a cellular automaton (20 km x 20 km), in which fire ignition, propagation, and extinction are parameterized in a stochastic manner, including the effects of fuel accumulation and weather condition. For each grid, carbon cycle is simulated with a 10-box scheme, in which net biome production by photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and biomass burning are calculated explicitly. Model parameters were calibrated with field data of biomass, litter stock, and fire statistics; the carbon cycle scheme was examined with flux measurement data. As a result, the model successfully captured average carbon stocks, productivity, fire frequency, and biomass burning. To assess the effects of global warming, a series of simulations were performed using climatic projections based on the IPCC-SRES emission scenarios from 1990 to 2100. The range of uncertainty among the different climate models and emission scenarios was assessed by using multi-model projection data by CCCma, CCSR/NIES, GFDL, and HCCPR corresponding to the SRES A2 and B2 scenarios. The model simulations showed that global warming in the 21st century would considerably enhance the fire regime (e.g., cumulative burnt area increased by 80 to 120 percent), leading to larger carbon emission by biomass burning. The effect was so strong that growth enhancement by elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and elongated growing period was cancelled out at landscape scale. In many cases, the larch forest was estimated to act as net carbon sources of 2 to 5 kg C m_|2 by the end of the 21st century, underscoring the importance of forest fire monitoring and management in this region.

  19. Temperature response functions introduce high uncertainty in modelled carbon stocks in cold temperature regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, H.; Bugmann, H.; Wolf, A.

    2009-08-01

    Models of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems contain formulations for the dependence of respiration on temperature, but the sensitivity of predicted carbon pools and fluxes to these formulations and their parameterization is not understood. Thus, we made an uncertainty analysis of soil organic matter decomposition with respect to its temperature dependency using the ecosystem model LPJ-GUESS. We used five temperature response functions (Exponential, Arrhenius, Lloyd-Taylor, Gaussian, Van't Hoff). We determined the parameter uncertainty ranges of the functions by nonlinear regression analysis based on eight experimental datasets from northern hemisphere ecosystems. We sampled over the uncertainty bounds of the parameters and run simulations for each pair of temperature response function and calibration site. The uncertainty in both long-term and short-term soil carbon dynamics was analyzed over an elevation gradient in southern Switzerland. The function of Lloyd-Taylor turned out to be adequate for modelling the temperature dependency of soil organic matter decomposition, whereas the other functions either resulted in poor fits (Exponential, Arrhenius) or were not applicable for all datasets (Gaussian, Van't Hoff). There were two main sources of uncertainty for model simulations: (1) the uncertainty in the parameter estimates of the response functions, which increased with increasing temperature and (2) the uncertainty in the simulated size of carbon pools, which increased with elevation, as slower turn-over times lead to higher carbon stocks and higher associated uncertainties. The higher uncertainty in carbon pools with slow turn-over rates has important implications for the uncertainty in the projection of the change of soil carbon stocks driven by climate change, which turned out to be more uncertain for higher elevations and hence higher latitudes, which are of key importance for the global terrestrial carbon budget.

  20. Sedimentary structures formed by upper-regime flows on a Pleistocene carbonate ramp (Favignana Calcarenite, Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slootman, Arnoud; Moscariello, Andrea; Cartigny, Matthieu; de Boer, Poppe

    2015-04-01

    flow. Using published experimental Froude numbers for breaking antidune waves, average flow thickness and sediment flux is computed. The ratio of bed volume and sediment flux provides an estimate for the duration of the sediment gravity flows. We show that applying hydraulic equations to upper-regime sedimentary structures in coarse-grained carbonate sandstones reveal that about half of the ramp deposits, that formed over ca. 350 thousand years, were deposited in not more than tens of hours. Our results provide renewed insight into the evolution of the Favignana Calcarenite and other carbonate ramp deposits.

  1. Dissolved organic carbon losses from grazed grasslands under different management regimes.

    PubMed

    McTiernan, K B; Jarvis, D; Scholefield, S C; Hayes, M H

    2001-07-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is fundamental to many biogeochemical processes in soils and natural waters. Despite the large number of studies reporting on DOM losses from forest soils and in surface waters there is little published data on exports from managed grasslands. The objective of our study was to determine the extent of short-term exports of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from managed grazed grasslands and to evaluate the influence of fertilizer management and drainage regime. DOC discharged from grazed grassland plots, with a range of management strategies. was determined over 2 months. Total export varied from 42 to 118 kgCha(-1), and was greater from some plots than literature estimates for annual losses from all catchment types. There was a significant (P = 0.048) positive correlation between DOC export and rates of nitrogen application for treatments with no artificial drainage. Increased dry matter production arising from increased fertilizer-N inputs is suggested as an important factor in this relationship. DOC export was significantly (P = 0.032) reduced by artificial drainage and adsorption of DOC to soil surfaces and the restriction of decomposition due to waterlogging are suggested as two possible explanations.

  2. Future hydrological regimes of the upper Indus basin: results from the PAPRIKA project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchiola, Daniele; Soncini, Andrea; Confortola, Gabriele; Nana, Ester; Bianchi, Alberto; Rosso, Renzo; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Smiraglia, Claudio; von Hardenberg, Jost; Palazzi, Elisa; Provenzale, Antonello; Giorgi, Filippo; Solmon, Fabien; Vuillermoz, Elisa

    2013-04-01

    ) hydrological cycle in the area by feeding the hydrological model with future precipitation and temperature (plus downscaling, whenever necessary) from two climate models, one global (EC-Earth), and one regional (RegCM), the latter specifically set up for SHARE-Paprika project. The projected flow duration curves, some selected flow descriptors, and the significance of modified flow regimes in the Shigar river are then evaluated. We comment upon modified snow cover, ice ablation regime and implications for future water resources and flood regime in the area. The uncertainty of the results is addressed, and future research questions are discussed. Keywords: Upper Indus basin; hydrological models; climate models; future water resources.

  3. Temperature response functions introduce high uncertainty in modelled carbon stocks in cold temperature regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, H.; Bugmann, H.; Wolf, A.

    2010-11-01

    Models of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems contain formulations for the dependence of respiration on temperature, but the sensitivity of predicted carbon pools and fluxes to these formulations and their parameterization is not well understood. Thus, we performed an uncertainty analysis of soil organic matter decomposition with respect to its temperature dependency using the ecosystem model LPJ-GUESS. We used five temperature response functions (Exponential, Arrhenius, Lloyd-Taylor, Gaussian, Van't Hoff). We determined the parameter confidence ranges of the formulations by nonlinear regression analysis based on eight experimental datasets from Northern Hemisphere ecosystems. We sampled over the confidence ranges of the parameters and ran simulations for each pair of temperature response function and calibration site. We analyzed both the long-term and the short-term heterotrophic soil carbon dynamics over a virtual elevation gradient in southern Switzerland. The temperature relationship of Lloyd-Taylor fitted the overall data set best as the other functions either resulted in poor fits (Exponential, Arrhenius) or were not applicable for all datasets (Gaussian, Van't Hoff). There were two main sources of uncertainty for model simulations: (1) the lack of confidence in the parameter estimates of the temperature response, which increased with increasing temperature, and (2) the size of the simulated soil carbon pools, which increased with elevation, as slower turn-over times lead to higher carbon stocks and higher associated uncertainties. Our results therefore indicate that such projections are more uncertain for higher elevations and hence also higher latitudes, which are of key importance for the global terrestrial carbon budget.

  4. Evaluation of the feasibility of alcohols serving as external carbon sources for biological phosphorus removal induced by the oxic/extended-idle regime.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Liao, Dexiang; Zeng, Guangming

    2013-03-01

    Recently, a novel operational regime (i.e., the oxic/extended-idle [OEI] regime) has been reported to successfully achieve enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) when employing glucose and volatile fatty acids as the sole substrate. In the OEI regime, polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) could get a selective advantage over other populations during the extended-idle period where polyphosphate released but polyhydroxyalkanoates and glycogen transformations were negligible/low, thus energy requirements for maintenance purposes in the period could be covered by polyphosphate release. This study further evaluated the feasibility of alcohols as external carbon sources for EBPR induced by the OEI regime, as the available substrate in the raw wastewater is often deficient. First, phosphorus removal in the OEI process was compared, respectively, with methanol and ethanol as the sole substrate. The results showed that the ethanol-reactor achieved 90.8 ± 2.3% of phosphorus removal, which was approximate twofold than the methanol-reactor. Further studies displayed that the cells in the ethanol-reactor contained more PAOs, and had higher activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase than those in the methanol-reactor. Also, the aerobic transformations of polyhydroxyalkanoates and glycogen in the ethanol-reactor were, respectively, higher and lower than those in the methanol-reactor, which were consistent with the reactors performances. Then, the feasibility of using ethanol as external substrate to enhance EBPR in the OEI process was confirmed for a municipal wastewater. Finally, EBPR performance and metabolic transformation values between the OEI and the anaerobic/oxic (A/O) regimes with ethanol as the sole substrate were compared. The results showed that EBPR in the ethanol-OEI reactor was higher than that in the ethanol-A/O reactor. All the above results proved that ethanol was a favorable external substrate to the OEI regime for EBPR enhancement

  5. Methane Pyrolysis and Disposing Off Resulting Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Rapp, D.; Rahotgi, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) is a leading process for producing methane and oxygen for application to Mars ISPP. One significant problem with this process is that it produces an excess of methane for combustion with the amount of oxygen that is produced. Therefore, one must discard roughly half of the methane to obtain the proper stoichiometric methane/oxygen mixture for ascent from Mars. This is a waste of hydrogen, which must be brought from Earth and is difficult to transport to Mars and store on Mars. To reduce the problem of transporting hydrogen to Mars, the S/E process can be augmented by another process which reduces overall hydrogen requirement. Three conceptual approaches for doing this are (i) recover hydrogen from the excess methane produced by the S/E process, (ii) convert the methane to a higher hydrocarbon or other organic with a lower H/C ratio than methane, and (iii) use a separate process (such as zirconia or reverse water gas shift reaction) to produce additional oxygen, thus utilizing all the methane produced by the Sabatier process. We report our results here on recovering hydrogen from the excess methane using pyrolysis of methane. Pyrolysis has the advantage that it produces almost pure hydrogen, and any unreacted methane can pass through the S/E process reactor. It has the disadvantage that disposing of the carbon produced by pyrolysis presents difficulties. The goals of a research program on recovery of hydrogen from methane are (in descending priority order): 1) Study the kinetics of pyrolysis to arrive at a pyrolysis reactor design that produces high yields in a confined volume at the lowest possible operating temperature; 2) Study the kinetics of carbon burnoff to determine whether high yields can be obtained in a confined volume at acceptable operating temperatures; and 3) Investigate catalytic techniques for depositing carbon as a fine soot which can be physically separated from the reactor. In the JPL program, we have made significant

  6. Methane Pyrolysis and Disposing Off Resulting Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Rapp, D.; Rahotgi, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) is a leading process for producing methane and oxygen for application to Mars ISPP. One significant problem with this process is that it produces an excess of methane for combustion with the amount of oxygen that is produced. Therefore, one must discard roughly half of the methane to obtain the proper stoichiometric methane/oxygen mixture for ascent from Mars. This is a waste of hydrogen, which must be brought from Earth and is difficult to transport to Mars and store on Mars. To reduce the problem of transporting hydrogen to Mars, the S/E process can be augmented by another process which reduces overall hydrogen requirement. Three conceptual approaches for doing this are (i) recover hydrogen from the excess methane produced by the S/E process, (ii) convert the methane to a higher hydrocarbon or other organic with a lower H/C ratio than methane, and (iii) use a separate process (such as zirconia or reverse water gas shift reaction) to produce additional oxygen, thus utilizing all the methane produced by the Sabatier process. We report our results here on recovering hydrogen from the excess methane using pyrolysis of methane. Pyrolysis has the advantage that it produces almost pure hydrogen, and any unreacted methane can pass through the S/E process reactor. It has the disadvantage that disposing of the carbon produced by pyrolysis presents difficulties. The goals of a research program on recovery of hydrogen from methane are (in descending priority order): 1) Study the kinetics of pyrolysis to arrive at a pyrolysis reactor design that produces high yields in a confined volume at the lowest possible operating temperature; 2) Study the kinetics of carbon burnoff to determine whether high yields can be obtained in a confined volume at acceptable operating temperatures; and 3) Investigate catalytic techniques for depositing carbon as a fine soot which can be physically separated from the reactor. In the JPL program, we have made significant

  7. Methane Pyrolysis and Disposing Off Resulting Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Rapp, D.; Rahotgi, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) is a leading process for producing methane and oxygen for application to Mars ISPP. One significant problem with this process is that it produces an excess of methane for combustion with the amount of oxygen that is produced. Therefore, one must discard roughly half of the methane to obtain the proper stoichiometric methane/oxygen mixture for ascent from Mars. This is wasteful of hydrogen, which must be brought from Earth and is difficult to transport to Mars and store on Mars. To reduced the problem of transporting hydrogen to Mars, the S/E process can be augmented by another process which reduces overall hydrogen requirement. Three conceptual approaches for doing this are (1) recover hydrogen from the excess methane produced by the S/E process, (2) convert the methane to a higher hydrocarbon or other organic with a lower H/C ratio than methane, and (3) use a separate process (such as zirconia or reverse water gas shift reaction) to produce additional oxygen, thus utilizing all the methane produced by the Sabatier process. We report our results here on recovering hydrogen from the excess methane using pyrolysis of methane. Pyrolysis has the advantage that it produces almost pure hydrogen, and any unreacted methane can pass through the S/E process reactor. It has the disadvantage that disposing of the carbon produced by pyrolysis presents difficulties. Hydrogen may be obtained from methane by pyrolysis in the temperature range 10000-12000C. The main reaction products are hydrogen and carbon, though very small amounts of higher hydrocarbons, including aromatic hydrocarbons are formed. The conversion efficiency is about 95% at 12000C. One needs to distinguish between thermodynamic equilibrium conversion and conversion limited by kinetics in a finite reactor.

  8. Methane Pyrolysis and Disposing Off Resulting Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Rapp, D.; Rahotgi, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) is a leading process for producing methane and oxygen for application to Mars ISPP. One significant problem with this process is that it produces an excess of methane for combustion with the amount of oxygen that is produced. Therefore, one must discard roughly half of the methane to obtain the proper stoichiometric methane/oxygen mixture for ascent from Mars. This is wasteful of hydrogen, which must be brought from Earth and is difficult to transport to Mars and store on Mars. To reduced the problem of transporting hydrogen to Mars, the S/E process can be augmented by another process which reduces overall hydrogen requirement. Three conceptual approaches for doing this are (1) recover hydrogen from the excess methane produced by the S/E process, (2) convert the methane to a higher hydrocarbon or other organic with a lower H/C ratio than methane, and (3) use a separate process (such as zirconia or reverse water gas shift reaction) to produce additional oxygen, thus utilizing all the methane produced by the Sabatier process. We report our results here on recovering hydrogen from the excess methane using pyrolysis of methane. Pyrolysis has the advantage that it produces almost pure hydrogen, and any unreacted methane can pass through the S/E process reactor. It has the disadvantage that disposing of the carbon produced by pyrolysis presents difficulties. Hydrogen may be obtained from methane by pyrolysis in the temperature range 10000-12000C. The main reaction products are hydrogen and carbon, though very small amounts of higher hydrocarbons, including aromatic hydrocarbons are formed. The conversion efficiency is about 95% at 12000C. One needs to distinguish between thermodynamic equilibrium conversion and conversion limited by kinetics in a finite reactor.

  9. Recent results from experimental studies on laser-plasma coupling in a shock ignition relevant regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, P.; Antonelli, L.; Atzeni, S.; Badziak, J.; Baffigi, F.; Batani, D.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Chodukowski, T.; Consoli, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; De Angelis, R.; Folpini, G.; Gizzi, L. A.; Kalinowska, Z.; Krousky, E.; Kucharik, M.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Liska, R.; Malka, G.; Maheut, Y.; Marocchino, A.; Nicolai, P.; O'Dell, T.; Parys, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Raczka, P.; Renner, O.; Rhee, Y. J.; Ribeyre, X.; Richetta, M.; Rosinski, M.; Ryc, L.; Skala, J.; Schiavi, A.; Schurtz, G.; Smid, M.; Spindloe, C.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Zaras, A.

    2013-12-01

    Shock ignition (SI) is an appealing approach in the inertial confinement scenario for the ignition and burn of a pre-compressed fusion pellet. In this scheme, a strong converging shock is launched by laser irradiation at an intensity Iλ2 > 1015 W cm-2 µm2 at the end of the compression phase. In this intensity regime, laser-plasma interactions are characterized by the onset of a variety of instabilities, including stimulated Raman scattering, Brillouin scattering and the two plasmon decay, accompanied by the generation of a population of fast electrons. The effect of the fast electrons on the efficiency of the shock wave production is investigated in a series of dedicated experiments at the Prague Asterix Laser Facility (PALS). We study the laser-plasma coupling in a SI relevant regime in a planar geometry by creating an extended preformed plasma with a laser beam at ˜7 × 1013 W cm-2 (250 ps, 1315 nm). A strong shock is launched by irradiation with a second laser beam at intensities in the range 1015-1016 W cm-2 (250 ps, 438 nm) at various delays with respect to the first beam. The pre-plasma is characterized using x-ray spectroscopy, ion diagnostics and interferometry. Spectroscopy and calorimetry of the backscattered radiation is performed in the spectral range 250-850 nm, including (3/2)ω, ω and ω/2 emission. The fast electron production is characterized through spectroscopy and imaging of the Kα emission. Information on the shock pressure is obtained using shock breakout chronometry and measurements of the craters produced by the shock in a massive target. Preliminary results show that the backscattered energy is in the range 3-15%, mainly due to backscattered light at the laser wavelength (438 nm), which increases with increasing the delay between the two laser beams. The values of the peak shock pressures inferred from the shock breakout times are lower than expected from 2D numerical simulations. The same simulations reveal that the 2D effects play a

  10. Differences in production, carbon stocks and biodiversity outcomes of land tenure regimes in the Argentine Dry Chaco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinaro, Sofía; Grau, H. Ricardo; Gasparri, Néstor Ignacio; Kuemmerle, Tobias; Baumann, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Rising global demand for agricultural products results in agricultural expansion and intensification, with substantial environmental trade-offs. The South American Dry Chaco contains some of the fastest expanding agricultural frontiers worldwide, and includes diverse forms of land management, mainly associated with different land tenure regimes; which in turn are segregated along environmental gradients (mostly rainfall). Yet, how these regimes impact the environment and how trade-offs between production and environmental outcomes varies remains poorly understood. Here, we assessed how biodiversity, biomass stocks, and agricultural production, measured in meat-equivalents, differ among land tenure regimes in the Dry Chaco. We calculated a land-use outcome index (LUO) that combines indices comparing actual vs. potential values of ‘preservation of biodiversity’ (PI), ‘standing biomass’ (BI) and ‘meat production’ (MI). We found land-use outcomes to vary substantially among land-tenure regimes. Protected areas showed a biodiversity index of 0.75, similar to that of large and medium-sized farms (0.72 in both farming systems), and higher than in the other tenure regimes. Biomass index was similar among land tenure regimes, whereas we found the highest median meat production index on indigenous lands (MI = 0.35). Land-use outcomes, however, varied more across different environmental conditions than across land tenure regimes. Our results suggest that in the Argentine Dry Chaco, there is no single land tenure regime that better minimizes the trade-offs between production and environmental outcomes. A useful approach to manage these trade-offs would be to develop geographically explicit guidelines for land-use zoning, identifying the land tenure regimes more appropriate for each zone.

  11. A Comparison of the Role of Episode Nutrient Supply on Pathways of Carbon in Upwelling Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    Nutrient supply is episode in the ocean even in regions of fairly high and continuous nutrient supply, such as coastal upwelling regimes. The structure of the ecosystem depends on nutrient availability and the different requirements of phytoplankton cells.

  12. Impacts of climate change on fire regimes and carbon stocks of the U.S. Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Brendan M.; Neilson, Ronald P.; Drapek, Ray; Lenihan, James M.; Wells, John R.; Bachelet, Dominique; Law, Beverly E.

    2011-09-01

    The diverse vegetation types and carbon pools of the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW) are tightly coupled to fire regimes that depend on climate and fire suppression. To realistically assess the effects of twenty-first-century climate change on PNW fire and carbon dynamics, we developed a new fire suppression rule for the MC1 dynamic general vegetation model that we ran under three climate change scenarios. Climate projections from the CSIRO Mk3, MIROC 3.2 medres, and Hadley CM3 general circulation models, forced by the A2 CO2 emissions scenario, were downscaled to a 30 arc-second (˜0.6 km2) grid. Future climates amplify the already strong seasonality of temperature and precipitation across the domain. Simulations displayed large increases in area burned (76%-310%) and burn severities (29%-41%) by the end of the twenty-first century. The relatively dry ecosystems east of the Cascades gain carbon in the future despite projections of more intense wildfires, while the mesic maritime forests lose up to 1.2 Pg C from increased burning. Simulated fire suppression causes overall carbon gains yet leaves ecosystems vulnerable to large future fires. Overall, our simulations suggest the Pacific Northwest has the potential to sequester ˜1 Pg C over the next century unless summer droughts severely intensify fire regimes.

  13. Changes in soil thermal regime lead to substantial shifts in carbon and energy fluxes in drained Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeckede, M.; Kwon, M. J.; Kittler, F.; Heimann, M.; Zimov, N.; Zimov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change impacts in the Arctic will not only depend on future temperature trajectories in this region. In particular, potential shifts in hydrologic regimes, e.g. linked to altered precipitation patterns or changes in topography following permafrost degradation, can dramatically modify ecosystem feedbacks to warming. Here, we analyze how severe drainage affects both biogeochemical and biogeophysical processes within a formerly wet Arctic tundra, with a special focus on the interactions between hydrology and soil temperatures, and related effects on the fluxes of carbon and energy. Our findings are based on year-round observations from a decade-long drainage experiment conducted near Chersky, Northeast Siberia. Through our multi-disciplinary observations we can document that the drainage triggered a suite of secondary changes in ecosystem properties, including e.g. adaptation processes in the vegetation community structure, or shifts in snow cover regime. Most profoundly, a combination of low heat capacity and reduced heat conductivity in dry organic soils lead to warmer soil temperatures near the surface, while deeper soil layers remained colder. These changes in soil thermal regime reduced the contribution of deeper soil layers with older carbon pools to overall ecosystem respiration, as documented through radiocarbon signals. Regarding methane, the observed steeper temperature gradient along the vertical soil profile slowed down methane production in deep layers, while promoting CH4 oxidation near the surface. Taken together, both processes contributed to a reduction in CH4 emissions up to a factor of 20 following drainage. Concerning the energy budget, we observed an intensification of energy transfer to the lower atmosphere, particularly in form of sensible heat, but the reduced energy transfer into deeper soil layers also led to systematically shallower thaw depths. Summarizing, drainage may contribute to slow down decomposition of old carbon from deep

  14. Combining charcoal and elemental black carbon analysis in sedimentary archives: Implications for past fire regimes, the pyrogenic carbon cycle, and the human-climate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevenon, Florian; Williamson, David; Bard, Edouard; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Beaufort, Luc; Cachier, Hélène

    2010-07-01

    This paper addresses the quantification of combustion-derived products in oceanic and continental sediments by optical and chemical approaches, and the interest of combining such methods for reconstructing past biomass burning activity and the pyrogenic carbon cycle. In such context, the dark particles > 0.2 µm 2 remaining after the partial digestion of organic matter are optically counted by automated image analysis and defined as charcoal, while the elemental carbon remaining after thermal and chemical oxidative treatments is quantified as black carbon (BC). The obtained pyrogenic carbon records from three sediment core-based case studies, (i) the Late Pleistocene equatorial Pacific Ocean, (ii) the mid-Holocene European Lake Lucerne, and (iii) the Late Holocene African Lake Masoko, are interpreted as proxy records of regional transportation mechanisms and biomass burning activities. The results show that the burial of dark carbon-rich particles in the 360 kyr-long record from the west equatorial Pacific is controlled by the combination of sea-level changes and low-latitude atmospheric circulation patterns (summer monsoon dynamics). However, the three fold increases in charcoal and BC sediment influxes between 53-43 and 12-10 kyr BP suggest that major shifts in fire activity occur synchronously with human colonization in the Indo/Pacific region. The coarse charcoal distribution from a 7.2 kyr record from Lake Lucerne in Switzerland closely matches the regional timing of major technical, land-use, and socio-economic changes during the Neolithic (between ca. 5.7 and 5.2 kyr BP and 4.9-4.5 kyr BP), the Bronze and Iron Ages (at ca. 3.3 and 2.4 kyr BP, respectively), and the industrialization (after AD 1838), pointing to the key impact of human activities on the sources, transportation processes and reservoirs of refractory carbon during the Holocene. In the tropical Masoko maar lake in Tanzania, where charcoal and BC records are highly sensitive to the local climate

  15. Impact of carbon to nitrogen ratio and aeration regime on mainstream deammonification.

    PubMed

    Han, M; De Clippeleir, H; Al-Omari, A; Wett, B; Vlaeminck, S E; Bott, C; Murthy, S

    While deammonification of high-strength wastewater in the sludge line of sewage treatment plants has become well established, the potential cost savings spur the development of this technology for mainstream applications. This study aimed at identifying the effect of aeration and organic carbon on the deammonification process. Two 10 L sequencing bath reactors with different aeration frequencies were operated at 25°C. Real wastewater effluents from chemically enhanced primary treatment and high-rate activated sludge process were fed into the reactors with biodegradable chemical oxygen demand/nitrogen (bCOD/N) of 2.0 and 0.6, respectively. It was found that shorter aerobic solids retention time (SRT) and higher aeration frequency gave more advantages for aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) than nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the system. From the kinetics study, it is shown that the affinity for oxygen is higher for NOB than for AerAOB, and higher dissolved oxygen set-point could decrease the affinity of both AerAOB and NOB communities. After 514 days of operation, it was concluded that lower organic carbon levels enhanced the activity of anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) over denitrifiers. As a result, the contribution of AnAOB to nitrogen removal increased from 40 to 70%. Overall, a reasonably good total removal efficiency of 66% was reached under a low bCOD/N ratio of 2.0 after adaptation.

  16. An ecological regime shift resulting from disrupted predator-prey interactions in Holocene Australia.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Thomas A A; Johnson, Christopher N; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2014-03-01

    The mass extinction events during human prehistory are striking examples of ecological regime shifts, the causes of which are still hotly debated. In Australia, human arrival approximately 50 thousand years ago was associated with the continental-scale extinction of numerous marsupial megafauna species and a permanent change in vegetation structure. An alternative stable state persisted until a second regime shift occurred during the late Holocene, when the largest two remaining marsupial carnivores, the thylacine and devil, disappeared from mainland Australia. These extinctions have been widely attributed to the human-assisted invasion of a competing predator, the dingo. In this unusual case, the simultaneous effects of human "intensification" (population growth and technological advances) and climate change (particularly increased ENSO variability) have been largely overlooked. We developed a dynamic model system capable of simulating the complex interactions between the main predators (humans, thylacines, devils, dingoes) and their marsupial prey (macropods), which we coupled with reconstructions of human population growth and climate change for late-Holocene Australia. Because the strength of important interspecific interactions cannot be estimated directly, we used detailed scenario testing and sensitivity analysis to identify robust model outcomes and investigate competing explanations for the Holocene regime shift. This approach identified human intensification as the most probable cause, while also demonstrating the potential importance of synergies with the effects of climate change. Our models indicate that the prehistoric impact of humans on Australian mammals was not limited to the late Pleistocene (i.e., the megafaunal extinctions) but extended into the late Holocene.

  17. Modeling the transition between upper plane bed regime and sheet flow without an active layer formulation. Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, E.; Hernandez Moreira, R. R.; Blom, A.

    2015-12-01

    A perusal of the literature on bedload transport revealed that, notwithstanding the large number of studies on bedform morphology performed in the past decades, the upper plane bed regime has not been thoroughly investigated and the distinction between the upper plane bed and sheet flow transport regimes is still poorly defined. Previous experimental work demonstrated that the upper plane bed regime is characterized by long wavelength and small amplitude bedforms that migrate downstream. These bedforms, however, were not observed in experiments on sheet flow transport suggesting that the upper plane bed and the sheet flow are two different regimes. We thus designed and performed experiments in a sediment feed flume in the hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of South Carolina at Columbia to study the transition from upper plane bed to sheet flow regime. Periodic measurements of water surface and bed elevation, bedform geometry and thicknesses of the bedload layer were performed by eyes, and with cameras, movies and a system of six ultrasonic probes that record the variations of bed elevation at a point over time. We used the time series of bed elevations to determine the probability functions of bed elevation. These probability functions are implemented in a continuous model of river morphodynamics, i.e. a model that does not use the active layer approximation to describe the sediment fluxes between the bedload and the deposit and that should thus be able to capture the details of the vertical and streamwise variation of the deposit grain size distribution. This model is validated against the experimental results for the case of uniform material. We then use the validated model in the attempt to study if and how the spatial distribution of grain sizes in the deposit changes from upper plane bed regime to sheet flow and if these results are influenced by the imposed rates of base level rise.

  18. Precipitation and temperature regime over Cyprus as a result of global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakopoulos, C.; Hadjinicolaou, P.; Kostopoulou, E.; Varotsos, K. V.; Zerefos, C.

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the impact of global climate change on the temperature and precipitation regime over the island of Cyprus has been investigated. The analysis is based on daily output from a regional climate model (RCM) at a high horizontal resolution (25 km) produced within the framework of the EU-funded ENSEMBLES project. The control run represents the base period 1961-1990 and is used here as reference for comparison with future predictions. Two future periods are studied, 2021-2050 and 2071-2100. For the study area and over the study period, an analysis of the changes associated with the temperature regime and the hydrological cycle, such as mean precipitation and drought duration, is presented. Variations in the mean annual and seasonal rainfall are presented. Changes in the number of hot days/warm nights as well as drought duration are also discussed. These changes should be very important to assess future possible water shortages over the island and to provide a basis for associated impacts on the agricultural sector.

  19. Response to multi-generational selection under elevated [CO2] in two temperature regimes suggests enhanced carbon assimilation and increased reproductive output in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Brix, Hans; Jørgensen, Rikke Bagger

    2013-01-01

    Functional plant traits are likely to adapt under the sustained pressure imposed by environmental changes through natural selection. Employing Brassica napus as a model, a multi-generational study was performed to investigate the potential trajectories of selection at elevated [CO2] in two different temperature regimes. To reveal phenotypic divergence at the manipulated [CO2] and temperature conditions, a full-factorial natural selection regime was established in a phytotron environment over the range of four generations. It is demonstrated that a directional response to selection at elevated [CO2] led to higher quantities of reproductive output over the range of investigated generations independent of the applied temperature regime. The increase in seed yield caused an increase in aboveground biomass. This suggests quantitative changes in the functions of carbon sequestration of plants subjected to increased levels of CO2 over the generational range investigated. The results of this study suggest that phenotypic divergence of plants selected under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration may drive the future functions of plant productivity to be different from projections that do not incorporate selection responses of plants. This study accentuates the importance of phenotypic responses across multiple generations in relation to our understanding of biogeochemical dynamics of future ecosystems. Furthermore, the positive selection response of reproductive output under increased [CO2] may ameliorate depressions in plant reproductive fitness caused by higher temperatures in situations where both factors co-occur. PMID:23762504

  20. Response to multi-generational selection under elevated [CO2] in two temperature regimes suggests enhanced carbon assimilation and increased reproductive output in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Brix, Hans; Jørgensen, Rikke Bagger

    2013-05-01

    Functional plant traits are likely to adapt under the sustained pressure imposed by environmental changes through natural selection. Employing Brassica napus as a model, a multi-generational study was performed to investigate the potential trajectories of selection at elevated [CO2] in two different temperature regimes. To reveal phenotypic divergence at the manipulated [CO2] and temperature conditions, a full-factorial natural selection regime was established in a phytotron environment over the range of four generations. It is demonstrated that a directional response to selection at elevated [CO2] led to higher quantities of reproductive output over the range of investigated generations independent of the applied temperature regime. The increase in seed yield caused an increase in aboveground biomass. This suggests quantitative changes in the functions of carbon sequestration of plants subjected to increased levels of CO2 over the generational range investigated. The results of this study suggest that phenotypic divergence of plants selected under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration may drive the future functions of plant productivity to be different from projections that do not incorporate selection responses of plants. This study accentuates the importance of phenotypic responses across multiple generations in relation to our understanding of biogeochemical dynamics of future ecosystems. Furthermore, the positive selection response of reproductive output under increased [CO2] may ameliorate depressions in plant reproductive fitness caused by higher temperatures in situations where both factors co-occur.

  1. Impact of inter-annual climatic variability on ecosystem carbon exchange in two grazed temperate grasslands with contrasting drainage regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choncubhair, Órlaith Ní; Humphreys, James; Lanigan, Gary

    2014-05-01

    Temperate grasslands constitute over 30% of the Earth's naturally-occurring biomes and make an important contribution towards the partial mitigation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions by terrestrial ecosystems. Accumulation of carbon (C) in grassland systems predominantly takes place in below-ground repositories, enhanced by the presence of a stable soil environment with low carbon turnover rates, active rhizodeposition and high levels of residue and organic inputs. Predicted future warming is expected to increase productivity in temperate zones, thereby enhancing rates of terrestrial carbon sequestration. However, the susceptibility of many ecosystems, including grasslands, to extreme climatic events and inter-annual variability has been demonstrated previously. Temperature anomalies as well as modifications in the temporal pattern and quantity of precipitation alter the balance between carbon uptake and release processes and a mechanistic understanding of ecosystem response to such changes is still lacking. In the present study, the impact of extreme inter-annual variability in summer rainfall and temperature on carbon dynamics in two rotationally-grazed grasslands in Ireland was examined. The sites experience similar temperate climatic regimes but differ in soil drainage characteristics. Eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem exchange of carbon were complemented by regular assessment of standing biomass, leaf cover, harvest exports and organic amendment inputs. The summers of 2012 and 2013 showed contrasting climatic conditions, with summer precipitation 93% higher and 25% lower respectively than long-term means. In addition, soil temperatures were 7% lower and 11% higher than expected. Cool, wet conditions in 2012 facilitated net carbon uptake for more than ten months of the year at the poorly-drained site, however the ecosystem switched to a net source of carbon in 2013 during months with significantly reduced rainfall. In contrast, net C

  2. A Numerical Study of the Effect of Periodic Nutrient Supply on Pathways of Carbon in a Coastal Upwelling Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Mary-Elena

    1998-01-01

    A size-based ecosystem model was modified to include periodic upwelling events and used to evaluate the effect of episodic nutrient supply on the standing stock, carbon uptake, and carbon flow into mesozooplankton grazing and sinking flux in a coastal upwelling regime. Two ecosystem configurations were compared: a single food chain made up of net phytoplankton and mesozooplankton (one autotroph and one heterotroph, A1H1), and three interconnected food chains plus bacteria (three autotrophs and four heterotrophs, A3H4). The carbon pathways in the A1H1 simulations were under stronger physical control than those of the A3H4 runs, where the small size classes are not affected by frequent upwelling events. In the more complex food web simulations, the microbial pathway determines the total carbon uptake and grazing rates, and regenerated nitrogen accounts for more than half of the total primary production for periods of 20 days or longer between events. By contrast, new production, export of carbon through sinking and mesozooplankton grazing are more important in the A1H1 simulations. In the A3H4 simulations, the turnover time scale of the autotroph biomass increases as the period between upwelling events increases, because of the larger contribution of slow-growing net phytoplankton. The upwelling period was characterized for three upwelling sites from the alongshore wind speed measured by the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) and the corresponding model output compared with literature data. This validation exercise for three upwelling sites and a downstream embayment suggests that standing stock, carbon uptake and size fractionation were best supported by the A3H4 simulations, while the simulated sinking fluxes are not distinguishable in the two configurations.

  3. Projected carbon stocks in the conterminous USA with land use and variable fire regimes.

    PubMed

    Bachelet, Dominique; Ferschweiler, Ken; Sheehan, Timothy J; Sleeter, Benjamin M; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) MC2 was run over the conterminous USA at 30 arc sec (~800 m) to simulate the impacts of nine climate futures generated by 3GCMs (CSIRO, MIROC and CGCM3) using 3 emission scenarios (A2, A1B and B1) in the context of the LandCarbon national carbon sequestration assessment. It first simulated potential vegetation dynamics from coast to coast assuming no human impacts and naturally occurring wildfires. A moderate effect of increased atmospheric CO2 on water use efficiency and growth enhanced carbon sequestration but did not greatly influence woody encroachment. The wildfires maintained prairie-forest ecotones in the Great Plains. With simulated fire suppression, the number and impacts of wildfires was reduced as only catastrophic fires were allowed to escape. This greatly increased the expansion of forests and woodlands across the western USA and some of the ecotones disappeared. However, when fires did occur, their impacts (both extent and biomass consumed) were very large. We also evaluated the relative influence of human land use including forest and crop harvest by running the DGVM with land use (and fire suppression) and simple land management rules. From 2041 through 2060, carbon stocks (live biomass, soil and dead biomass) of US terrestrial ecosystems varied between 155 and 162 Pg C across the three emission scenarios when potential natural vegetation was simulated. With land use, periodic harvest of croplands and timberlands as well as the prevention of woody expansion across the West reduced carbon stocks to a range of 122-126 Pg C, while effective fire suppression reduced fire emissions by about 50%. Despite the simplicity of our approach, the differences between the size of the carbon stocks confirm other reports of the importance of land use on the carbon cycle over climate change.

  4. Carbon allocation and morphology of cherrybark oak seedlings and sprouts under three light regimes

    Treesearch

    Brian Roy Lockhart; Emile S. Gardiner; John D. Hodges; Andrew W. Ezell

    2008-01-01

    Continued problems in regenerating oak forests has led to a need for more basic infomation on oak seedling biology.In the present study, carbon allocation and morphology were compared between cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings and sprouts at I -Lag grown in full, 47%, and 20% sunlight....

  5. Nonlinear response of the trap model in the aging regime: exact results in the strong-disorder limit.

    PubMed

    Monthus, Cécile

    2004-02-01

    We study the dynamics in the one-dimensional disordered trap model with a broad distribution of trapping times p(tau) approximately 1/tau(1+mu), when an external force is applied from the very beginning at t=0, or only after a waiting time t(w), in the linear as well as in the nonlinear response regime. Using a real-space renormalization procedure that becomes exact in the limit of strong disorder mu-->0, we obtain explicit results for many observables, such as the diffusion front, the mean position, the thermal width, the localization parameters and the two-particle correlation function. In particular, the scaling functions for these observables give access to the complete interpolation between the unbiased case and the directed case. Finally, we discuss in detail the various regimes that exist for the average position in terms of the two times and the external field.

  6. Optimized inorganic carbon regime for enhanced growth and lipid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Egan J; Gardner, Robert D; Pedersen, Todd; Peyton, Brent M; Cooksey, Keith E; Gerlach, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale algal biofuel production has been limited, among other factors, by the availability of inorganic carbon in the culture medium at concentrations higher than achievable with atmospheric CO2. Life cycle analyses have concluded that costs associated with supplying CO2 to algal cultures are significant contributors to the overall energy consumption. A two-phase optimal growth and lipid accumulation scenario is presented, which (1) enhances the growth rate and (2) the triacylglyceride (TAG) accumulation rate in the oleaginous Chlorophyte Chlorella vulgaris strain UTEX 395, by growing the organism in the presence of low concentrations of NaHCO3 (5 mM) and controlling the pH of the system with a periodic gas sparge of 5 % CO2 (v/v). Once cultures reached the desired cell densities, which can be "fine-tuned" based on initial nutrient concentrations, cultures were switched to a lipid accumulation metabolism through the addition of 50 mM NaHCO3. This two-phase approach increased the specific growth rate of C. vulgaris by 69 % compared to cultures sparged continuously with 5 % CO2 (v/v); further, biomass productivity (g L(-1) day(-1)) was increased by 27 %. Total biodiesel potential [assessed as total fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) produced] was increased from 53.3 to 61 % (FAME biomass(-1)) under the optimized conditions; biodiesel productivity (g FAME L(-1) day(-1)) was increased by 7.7 %. A bicarbonate salt screen revealed that American Chemical Society (ACS) and industrial grade NaHCO3 induced the highest TAG accumulation (% w/w), whereas Na2CO3 did not induce significant TAG accumulation. NH4HCO3 had a negative effect on cell health presumably due to ammonia toxicity. The raw, unrefined form of trona, NaHCO3∙Na2CO3 (sodium sesquicarbonate) induced TAG accumulation, albeit to a slightly lower extent than the more refined forms of sodium bicarbonate. The strategic addition of sodium bicarbonate was found to enhance growth and lipid accumulation rates in

  7. Widely Tunable Single-Photon Source from a Carbon Nanotube in the Purcell Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeantet, A.; Chassagneux, Y.; Raynaud, C.; Roussignol, Ph.; Lauret, J. S.; Besga, B.; Estève, J.; Reichel, J.; Voisin, C.

    2016-06-01

    The narrow emission of a single carbon nanotube at low temperature is coupled to the optical mode of a fiber microcavity using the built-in spatial and spectral matching brought by this flexible geometry. A thorough cw and time-resolved investigation of the very same emitter both in free space and in cavity shows an efficient funneling of the emission into the cavity mode together with a strong emission enhancement corresponding to a Purcell factor of up to 5. At the same time, the emitted photons retain a strong sub-Poissonian statistics. By exploiting the cavity feeding effect on the phonon wings, we locked the emission of the nanotube at the cavity resonance frequency, which allowed us to tune the frequency over a 4 THz band while keeping an almost perfect antibunching. By choosing the nanotube diameter appropriately, this study paves the way to the development of carbon-based tunable single-photon sources in the telecom bands.

  8. The role of hydrologic regimes on dissolved organic carbon composition in an agricultural watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernes, P.J.; Spencer, R.G.M.; Dyda, R.Y.; Pellerin, B.A.; Bachand, P.A.M.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Willow Slough, a seasonally irrigated agricultural watershed in the Sacramento River valley, California, was sampled weekly in 2006 in order to investigate seasonal concentrations and compositions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Average DOC concentrations nearly doubled from winter baseflow (2.75 mg L-1) to summer irrigation (5.14 mg L-1), while a concomitant increase in carbon-normalized vanillyl phenols (0.11 mg 100 mg OC-1 increasing to 0.31 mg 100 mg OC-1, on average) indicates that this additional carbon is likely vascular plant-derived. A strong linear relationship between lignin concentration and total suspended sediments (r2 = 0.79) demonstrates that agricultural management practices that mobilize sediments will likely have a direct and significant impact on DOC composition. The original source of vascular plant-derived DOC to Willow Slough appears to be the same throughout the year as evidenced by similar syringyl to vanillyl and cinnamyl to vanillyl ratios. However, differing diagenetic pathways during winter baseflow as compared to the rest of the year are evident in acid to aldehyde ratios of both vanillyl and syringyl phenols. The chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption coefficient at 350 nm showed a strong correlation with lignin concentration (r2 = 0.83). Other CDOM measurements related to aromaticity and molecular weight also showed correlations with carbon-normalized yields (e.g. specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (r2 = 0.57) and spectral slope (r2 = 0.54)). Our overall findings suggest that irrigated agricultural watersheds like Willow Slough can potentially have a significant impact on mainstem DOC concentration and composition when scaled to the entire watershed of the main tributary. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Shifts in the hydrodynamic regime determine patterns of regional changes of the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle in future climate change projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyina, T.; Heinze, M.; Li, H.; Jungclaus, J. H.; Six, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    In future projections the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle is a hotspot for changes driven by rising CO2 emissions. Concomitantly, the Arctic Ocean hydrodynamic regime undergoes substantial shifts so the net effect on the carbon cycle is not intuitively clear. In the high CO2 scenario RCP8.5 extended until 2300 in projections of the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model, the averaged Arctic Ocean surface temperature rises by 4°C in 2100 and by 10°C in 2300, respectively. The Arctic becomes free of summer sea ice in the second half of the 21st century, whereas winter sea ice disappears at the beginning of the 23rd century. Owing to increased sea ice melting and runoff, fresh water content increases gradually until the end of the 22nd century and then drops abruptly as a result of an intensification of the saline Atlantic water inflow. Accumulation of Atlantic water collapses the halocline in the central basin of the Arctic Ocean by the first half of the 23rd century. Ongoing warming enhances thermal stratification and the mixed layer shoales. In contrast, halocline erosion and the cooling of the ice free water act in concert to favor formation of convection cells in the central basin. Freshening in the Canada basin and transport of salty water into the Eurasian basin generate a dipole structure in the anomalies of surface salinity. Driven by the rising CO2, the averaged dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is growing. Changes in the averaged total alkalinity (TA) go along with the fresh water content evolution and decreasing carbonate ion concentration so that TA drops below preindustrial values. Yet, along with salinity, the Eurasian basin receives waters with higher DIC and TA from the Atlantic. As a result, the distributions of TA and DIC anomalies resemble the dipole pattern projected for salinity. We show that while future changes in the Arctic Ocean carbon cycle proceed at rates determined by atmospheric CO2 levels, the regional patterns are driven by shifts in the

  10. Optimisation of fuel reduction burning regimes for carbon, water and vegetation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gharun, Mana; Possell, Malcolm; Bell, Tina L; Adams, Mark A

    2017-12-01

    Fire plays a critical role in biodiversity, carbon balance, soil erosion, and nutrient and hydrological cycles. While empirical evidence shows that fuel reduction burning can reduce the incidence, severity and extent of unplanned fires in Australia and elsewhere, the integration of environmental values into fire management operations is not well-defined and requires further research and development. In practice, the priority for fuel reduction burning is effective mitigation of risk to life and property. Environmental management objectives, including maintenance of high quality water, reduction of CO2 emissions and conservation of biodiversity can be constrained by this priority. We explore trade-offs between fuel reduction burning and environmental management objectives and propose a framework for optimising fuel reduction burning for environmental outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A review of update clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-08-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions.

  12. A Review of Update Clinical Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions. PMID:22798685

  13. Order- N electron transport calculations from ballistic to diffusive regimes by a time-dependent wave-packet diffusion method: Application to transport properties of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji

    2010-08-01

    We present an order- N [O(N)] calculation method for the quantum electron transport of huge systems up to 80 million atoms. Based on the linear-response Kubo-Greenwood formula, we calculate the conductance through time-dependent diffusion coefficients using the time-dependent wave-packet diffusion approach, which treats the electron wave-packet motion with an O(N) and very high-speed calculation. Combining with molecular-dynamics simulations, we can study the temperature dependence of electron transport properties of materials from atomistic viewpoints from ballistic to diffusive regimes. We apply the present calculation method to transport of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with various lengths at various temperatures. In metallic CNTs, the mean-free paths are in good agreements with recent experiments, which reach about 500 nm at room temperature and increase up to several micrometers at low temperature. We find that the resistance increases almost linearly with temperature and takes larger values than expected in the quasiballistic regime. In semiconducting CNTs, the mobilities are affected strongly by the contacts with metallic electrodes through Schottky barriers. The mobilities are maximally 30000cm2/Vs and cut-off frequencies of 300 GHz at room temperature. These calculated results provide useful information to the design of CNT field-effect-transistor devices.

  14. Gunshot wounds (resulting from execution) of exhumed victims of the communist regime in Poland.

    PubMed

    Szleszkowski, Łukasz; Thannhäuser, Agata; Szwagrzyk, Krzysztof; Kawecki, Jerzy; Jurek, Tomasz

    2014-07-01

    This study presents the results of the analysis of the remains of 23 executed male individuals aged between 21 and 63 years, recovered from Osobowicki Cemetery in Wroclaw (Poland), field 83B, in 2012. In 1948 and 1949, prisoners sentenced to death by firing squad--most of them associated with the post-war anti-communist underground independence movement in Poland--were buried there. The aim of the study was to analyse fatal wounds and the method of execution, and to compare the results to data from archival documents. The results were also compared with studies concerning executions during a later period, i.e. 1949-1954. The research on the method of execution during this period of history carried out during the exhumations in Osobowicki Cemetery was the first conducted on such a scale in Poland. Forensic analysis revealed a wide variety of gunshot wounds inflicted during executions, revealing both gunshots to the head, especially single shots to the back of the head, and cases corresponding to the use of a firing squad, probably equipped with machine guns. The results of the research indicate that capital punishment by shooting was carried out in ways both similar to those the specified in the regulations and completely different. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. GPS results for Macedonia and its importance for the tectonics of the Southern Balkan extensional regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark Burchfiel, B.; King, Robert W.; Todosov, Angel; Kotzev, Valentin; Durmurdzanov, Nikola; Serafimovski, Todor; Nurce, Bilbil

    2006-02-01

    GPS results from 25 stations in Macedonia measured in 1996 and 2000 show that Macedonia moves SSE relative to Eurasia essentially as a single crustal piece along with parts of westernmost Bulgaria. Geological studies show active N-S normal faults and two NNW-striking right-lateral faults in western Macedonia, and NW-trending left-lateral faults SE Macedonia, with a region in central Macedonia essentially devoid of active faults. Distribution of seismic activity supports the geological studies. However, the GPS results cannot discriminate the active faulting, except perhaps in the northern part of Macedonia in the Skopje and adjacent areas, where active ~NS extension occurs. Slip-rates on the strike-slip faults must be low, in the range of 0-2 mm/year. There is a progressive increase in GPS velocities southward in northern Greece toward the North Anatolian fault zone, across which the velocities increase and change direction dramatically.

  16. Midpoint Distribution of Directed Polymers in the Stationary Regime: Exact Result Through Linear Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; Thiery, Thimothée

    2017-07-01

    We obtain an exact result for the midpoint probability distribution function (pdf) of the stationary continuum directed polymer, when averaged over the disorder. It is obtained by relating that pdf to the linear response of the stochastic Burgers field to some perturbation. From the symmetries of the stochastic Burgers equation we derive a fluctuation-dissipation relation so that the pdf gets given by the stationary two space-time points correlation function of the Burgers field. An analytical expression for the latter was obtained by Imamura and Sasamoto (J Stat Phys 150:908-939, 2013), thereby rendering our result explicit. In the large length limit that implies that the pdf is nothing but the scaling function f_{KPZ}(y) introduced by Prähofer and Spohn (J Stat Phys 115(1):255-279, 2004). Using the KPZ-universality paradigm, we find that this function can therefore also be interpreted as the pdf of the position y of the maximum of the Airy process minus a parabola and a two-sided Brownian motion. We provide a direct numerical test of the result through simulations of the Log-Gamma polymer.

  17. Midpoint Distribution of Directed Polymers in the Stationary Regime: Exact Result Through Linear Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; Thiery, Thimothée

    2017-09-01

    We obtain an exact result for the midpoint probability distribution function (pdf) of the stationary continuum directed polymer, when averaged over the disorder. It is obtained by relating that pdf to the linear response of the stochastic Burgers field to some perturbation. From the symmetries of the stochastic Burgers equation we derive a fluctuation-dissipation relation so that the pdf gets given by the stationary two space-time points correlation function of the Burgers field. An analytical expression for the latter was obtained by Imamura and Sasamoto (J Stat Phys 150:908-939, 2013), thereby rendering our result explicit. In the large length limit that implies that the pdf is nothing but the scaling function f_{KPZ}(y) introduced by Prähofer and Spohn (J Stat Phys 115(1):255-279, 2004). Using the KPZ-universality paradigm, we find that this function can therefore also be interpreted as the pdf of the position y of the maximum of the Airy process minus a parabola and a two-sided Brownian motion. We provide a direct numerical test of the result through simulations of the Log-Gamma polymer.

  18. Observations on a Slow Burning Regime for Hydrocarbon Droplets - N-Heptane/Air Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Mun Y.; Dryer, Frederick L.; Haggard, John B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments on n-heptane/airdroplet combustion under reduced gravity have served as a benchmark for much of the existing theoretical efforts on the modeling of sphero-synmmetric droplet burning. New experiments conducted in the NASA-Lewis Research Center 2.2 second droptower (at less than 10 exp -5 g) which emphasize the production of sphero-symmetry and low relative droplet/gas convection produce burning rates in air (for about 1 mm droplets) as much as 40-percent lower than the classical result (0.78 sq mm/s). The burning rate is proportional to the measured droplet/gas relative velocity, and the observed functional dependence is much larger than predicted by published convective correlations. New results clearly indicate that the droplet/laboratory velocity does not correspond to the relative droplet/gas velocity. Thus, the convective effects on droplet combustion is not properly characterized by droplet motion alone. Differences in the burning rates are speculated to result from the effects of the accumulated soot as well as the asymmetry (caused by convection) in the temperature and species distributions surrounding the droplet.

  19. Numerical results on noise-induced dynamics in the subthreshold regime for thermoacoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Kabiraj, Lipika

    2017-03-01

    Thermoacoustic instability is a serious issue in practical combustion systems. Such systems are inherently noisy, and hence the influence of noise on the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability is an aspect of practical importance. The present work is motivated by a recent report on the experimental observation of coherence resonance, or noise-induced coherence with a resonance-like dependence on the noise intensity as the system approaches the stability margin, for a prototypical premixed laminar flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Phys. Rev. E, 4 (2015)). We numerically investigate representative thermoacoustic models for such noise-induced dynamics. Similar to the experiments, we study variation in system dynamics in response to variations in the noise intensity and in a critical control parameter as the systems approach their stability margins. The qualitative match identified between experimental results and observations in the representative models investigated here confirms that coherence resonance is a feature of thermoacoustic systems. We also extend the experimental results, which were limited to the case of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, to the case of supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We identify that the phenomenon has qualitative differences for the systems undergoing transition via subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations. Two important practical implications are associated with the findings. Firstly, the increase in noise-induced coherence as the system approaches the onset of thermoacoustic instability can be considered as a precursor to the instability. Secondly, the dependence of noise-induced dynamics on the bifurcation type can be utilised to distinguish between subcritical and supercritical bifurcation prior to the onset of the instability.

  20. Carbon exchanges in two major river systems in Korea with a focus on the changing water regimes associated with the monsoon climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    The seasonally concentrated precipitation associated with the East Asian monsoon climate induces significant seasonal changes in water regimes in Korean rivers. To understand the monsoon effect on the riverine carbon export, carbon exchanges were investigated in two major river systems of the country, Han (drainage area of 26,120 km2) and Geum (9915 km2) Rivers. For this, river waters were sampled during low, rising, high and falling water stages respectively and analyzed for carbonate chemistry and carbon isotopic composition of DIC. Monthly river discharges increased by ~40 times during the monsoon period (high water stage, Jul.~Sep.) compared to the low water stage (Dec.~Feb.). Alkalinity and EC of the river waters decreased by ~50% during the monsoon period likely due to the dilution effect. pCO2 increased significantly during the monsoon period, which was more remarkable in the Geum river (~20,000 μatm) than in the Han river (~8,000 μatm). In both rivers, metabolic activities were the major control of the carbon isotopic composition of DIC and carbonate chemistry throughout the year. Differences were also noted between the two rivers. Carbon isotopic composition of DIC indicated an overall negative correlation (r2 = 0.56) with pCO2 in the Geum River, while the correlation was not clear in the Han River. The average DIC concentration (1124μmol/L) and pCO2 (4950 μatm) in the Geum River were much greater than those in the Han River (522 μmol/L and 850 μatm). Carbon isotope composition of DIC during the monsoon period was lower than the rest of the period in the Geum River, while it was higher during the monsoon period in the Han River. From these observations, it is expected that over 80% of the annual export of inorganic carbon from the rivers occurs during the monsoon period via degassing of CO2 and discharge of DIC. The magnitude of carbon export may also vary depending on the river dynamics. The carbon export normalized to the watershed area was greater

  1. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  2. Comparative study of selected Brazilian and Nigerian policies to promote the transfer and development of technology: the role of regime and non-regime factors, and some results from the automobile industry, 1967-80

    SciTech Connect

    Gusau, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    This study is concerned with the policies adopted by Brazil and Nigeria to promote the transfer and development of technology in industry. The objectives are two-fold: (1) to compare and analyze the policies with respect to the automobile industries in the 1967-1980 period; (2) to investigate whether their adoption was solely a function of the different ideological values and issue levels of economic development of the countries, or whether the regimes are solely an expression of the patterns of that development. The study adopted the Comparative Public Policy approach to explore the various hypotheses formulated. The findings showed that Brazil realized more significant results than Nigeria in technology development, while in other areas, such as the curtailment of imports, employment generation, etc., the results are mixed. The study concludes that both regime and industrial development factors influence the variation in the policies, although the regime factor seems to explain more of the variation.

  3. Comparison of Productivity, Plankton Types and Carbon Export Mechanisms in two Different Regimes of Subtropical North Atlantic: a Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, B.; Yumruktepe, V. C.

    2016-02-01

    Improved structure and mechanisms of carbon export and sequestration within marine ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. We have implemented a 1D lower trophic ecosystem model at long-term time-series stations (BATS and ESTOC) in the North Atlantic for the years 1996-2000. We have investigated the dynamics of the productivity and carbon export, and mechanisms regulating them. Our simulations agree with the previous observations that show similar productivity levels at both sites (126.48 gC/m2/y and 92.76 gC/m2/y at BATS and ESTOC respectively). Results indicate that intense vertical mixing at BATS maintains similar growth despite lesser nutrient availability compared to ESTOC. Results showed a similar community structure with cyanobacteria and picoeukaryotes dominating the phytoplankton biomass and supporting production at both sites. Simulations showed more diatom biomass at ESTOC with 6% of total phytoplankton biomass vs 2% at BATS. Zooplankton input to detritus through mortality and unassimilated grazing dominates the carbon export at both sites ( 46%) followed by picoeukaryotes ( 18%). Our reference simulations are successful in reproducing the carbon export at BATS (model: 6.51 gC/m2/y at 200 m), however failing to represent the 3-5 fold lower export at ESTOC (model: 4.89 gC/m2/y). Our sensitivity analyses suggest that further advancement of recycling algoritms is necessary to capture lower e-ratios at ESTOC. Variable detrital sinking rates at depth and zooplankton diel vertical migration (DVM) additions to the algorithm were applied and the DVM application increased the carbon export by 2-fold. DVM increased export rates at depths 200-300 m due to active transport, thus this increase should be balanced by variable sinking rates, or increased recycling. We have introduced enhanced recycling by increased excretion of zooplankton and observed improvements in decreasing export near the surface at ESTOC.

  4. Effect of Variation of Operational Regimes in Building Environment on Results of its Energy and Exergy Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshchuk, Volodymyr

    2017-03-01

    For further development of the dynamic exergy analysis within built environment the work proposes to take into account stochastic nature of variations of operational regimes. Using the probability theory and statistics methods, the set of parameters considered as relevant for uncertainty conditions are presented. It is shown that characteristics of buildings (insulation, window performance, heat recovery, etc.) and type of the heating system have undoubtedly a strong influence not only on the energy/exergy demand and consumption but also on the sensitivity of the energy/exergy parameters to variations of external conditions. According to the results obtained after implementations of energy efficient solutions coefficient of variation of energy/exergy-based parameters can be increased up to two times.

  5. Carbon pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandstätter, Christian Laner, David Fellner, Johann

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • 40 year old waste from an old MSW landfill was incubated in LSR experiments. • Carbon balances for anaerobic and aerobic waste degradation were established. • The transformation of carbon pools during waste degradation was investigated. • Waste aeration resulted in the formation of a new, stable organic carbon pool. • Water addition did not have a significant effect on aerobic waste degradation. - Abstract: Landfill aeration has been proven to accelerate the degradation of organic matter in landfills in comparison to anaerobic decomposition. The present study aims to evaluate pools of organic matter decomposing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using landfill simulation reactors (LSR) filled with 40 year old waste from a former MSW landfill. The LSR were operated for 27 months, whereby the waste in one pair was kept under anaerobic conditions and the four other LSRs were aerated. Two of the aerated LSR were run with leachate recirculation and water addition and two without. The organic carbon in the solid waste was characterized at the beginning and at the end of the experiments and major carbon flows (e.g. TOC in leachate, gaseous CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) were monitored during operation. After the termination of the experiments, the waste from the anaerobic LSRs exhibited a long-term gas production potential of more than 20 NL kg{sup −1} dry waste, which corresponded to the mineralization of around 12% of the initial TOC (67 g kg{sup −1} dry waste). Compared to that, aeration led to threefold decrease in TOC (32–36% of the initial TOC were mineralized), without apparent differences in carbon discharge between the aerobic set ups with and without water addition. Based on the investigation of the carbon pools it could be demonstrated that a bit more than 10% of the initially present organic carbon was transformed into more recalcitrant forms, presumably due to the formation of humic substances

  6. Long-term trends in carbon, nutrients and stoichiometry in Norwegian coastal waters: Evidence of a regime shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigstad, Helene; Andersen, Tom; Hessen, Dag O.; Jeansson, Emil; Skogen, Morten; Naustvoll, Lars-Johan; Miles, Martin W.; Johannessen, Truls; Bellerby, Richard G. J.

    2013-04-01

    A 20-year time series from the Norwegian Coastal Current was explored to examine the effects of advected nutrient supply from the southern North Sea and of large-scale climate variability on hydrography, nutrients and particulate organic matter (seston), focusing on trends in the January to April period in the upper layers (0-30 m). The interannual variability in hydrography, nutrients and seston was correlated with the NAO index, mostly through the inflow of nutrient-rich waters from the southern North Sea. There was a long-term decrease in nutrient concentrations, which according to a water mass analysis followed a reduction in nutrients advected from the German Bight and southern North Sea. The concentrations of carbon and nitrogen in seston, dissolved organic nitrogen and the estimated fraction of non-autotrophic material increased significantly and non-linearly through a sharp transition between 1998 and 2000, and have remained at this level since. Humic coagulation was suggested as the mechanism behind the increase in the non-autotrophic fraction of seston, which could be connected with the reported “darkening” of the coastal Skagerrak and Baltic Sea. Concurrent with the thresholds in suspended material, a decimation of the sugar kelp forest and recruitment failure of key carnivorous fish was reported for the same region, suggesting that a regime shift took place in the early 2000s in the coastal waters of the Norwegian Skagerrak. Our data suggests that the effects of increased freshwater runoff, especially the increased inputs of terrestrial-derived, humic material, could play an important role in the observed, coastal responses.

  7. Air filtration in the free molecular flow regime: a review of high-efficiency particulate air filters based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Chunya; Zhang, Yingying; Wei, Fei

    2014-11-01

    Air filtration in the free molecular flow (FMF) regime is important and challenging because a higher filtration efficiency and lower pressure drop are obtained when the fiber diameter is smaller than the gas mean free path in the FMF regime. In previous studies, FMF conditions have been obtained by increasing the gas mean free path through reducing the pressure and increasing the temperature. In the case of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with nanoscale diameters, it is possible to filtrate in the FMF regime under normal conditions. This paper reviews recent progress in theoretical and experimental studies of air filtration in the FMF regime. Typical structure models of high-efficiency particulate (HEPA) air filters based on CNTs are introduced. The pressure drop in air filters operated in the FMF regime is less than that predicted by the conventional air filtration theory. The thinnest HEPA filters fabricated from single-walled CNT films have an extremely low pressure drop. CNT air filters with a gradient nanostructure are shown to give a much better filtration performance in dynamic filtration. CNT air filters with a hierarchical structure and an agglomerated CNT fluidized bed air filter are also introduced. Finally, the challenges and opportunities for the application of CNTs in air filtration are discussed.

  8. Frist preliminary results of carbon dioxide retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Y.; Kim, W. V.; Lee, H.; Kim, J.; Boesch, H.

    2013-12-01

    The significant increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) over the last two hundred years represents critical variations both to the atmosphere and the global carbon cycle. Satellite measurement is one of the most effective approaches to monitor the global distributions of CO2 with high spatio-temporal resolutions and is expected to improve the accuracy of carbon source and sink estimates (Rayner and O'Brien, 2001; Houweling et al., 2004). The Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), which was launched on January 2009, is the world's first satellite dedicated to measure the atmospheric concentrations of CO2 from space. Even though many studies to develop the CO2 retrieval algorithms are performed, there have been serious limitations in spatial coverage and uncertainties due to aerosols and thin cirrus clouds. In this study, we demonstrate our retrieval algorithms of CO2 concentrations from GOSAT and show its preliminary results showing the variations CO2 concentration in global. The quality of the preliminary results in this study will be evaluated through comparison with collocated ground-based observations at several TCCON sites. In the future, we plan to investigate interferences by aerosols using our independent aerosol retrieval algorithms and improve its retrieval quality. This study would be informative to study the estimate the carbon sources and sinks in more detail.

  9. Modelling Late Cenozoic isostatic elevation changes in the Barents Sea and their implications for oceanic and climatic regimes: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Faisal A.; Drange, Helge; Elverhøi, Anders; Otterå, Odd Helge; Solheim, Anders

    2002-08-01

    Late Cenozoic isostatic changes in the elevation of the Barents Sea are simulated using a numerical model. Isopach maps of the deposits off present-day Bear Island and Storfjorden troughs made earlier are used to calculate the thickness of sediment cover removed from the respective drainages basins at various time intervals during the last 2.3 Ma. Results indicate that Barents Sea was subaerially exposed at 2.3 Ma and major parts of it became submarine after 1 Ma. Barents Sea today receives around 40% of the warm and saline North Atlantic waters flowing into the Scotland-Greenland Ridge and about half of the Atlantic water entering the Arctic Ocean. It thus has an important role to play in the present-day ocean circulation pattern in the Polar North Atlantic region and water-mass transformations that take place in the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Sea and the Arctic Ocean. The effects of an uplifted Barents Sea on the oceanic regime and the Arctic sea-ice cover under the present-day forcings fields are studied using the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model. Preliminary results indicate that a subaerial Barents Sea causes an increased input of warm Atlantic waters into the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait which results in warming of the Atlantic water masses in the Arctic Ocean, followed by a reduction in the sea-ice cover. The obtained findings can be used to explain the apparent discrepancy in the late Cenozoic record of the sub-Arctic and Arctic regions whereby Fennoscandia, Iceland and Greenland are envisaged to have been covered by major ice sheets during late Pliocene whereas high Arctic areas such as Svalbard and NE Greenland were apparently free of any major ice.

  10. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus stoichiometry of plankton and the nutrient regime in Cabo Frio Bay, SE Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kütter, Vinicius T; Wallner-Kersanach, Monica; Sella, Silvia M; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza S; Knoppers, Bastiaan A; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel V

    2014-01-01

    This long-term study, performed during the years 2003-2005 and 2008-2009, investigated the carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents of the phyto- and zooplankton communities and the nutrient regime of Cabo Frio Bay, SE Brazil. The information intends to serve as baseline of the plankton C, N, and P stoichiometry for the calibration of biogeochemical and ecological models in support to future findings related to the local and regional phenomena of climatic change. Cabo Frio Bay is a small semienclosed system set adjacent to a region subject to sporadic coastal upwelling. Zooplankton exhibited average annual C, N, and P contents of 11.6 ± 6.9 %, 2.8 ± 1.8 %, and 0.18 ± 0.08 %, and phytoplankton (>20 μm) 6.8 ± 6.0 %, 1.6 ± 1.5 %, and 0.09 ± 0.08 %, respectively. The C/N/P ratios correspond to the lowest already found to date for a marine environment. The low C contents must have been brought about by a predominance of gelatinous zooplankton, like Doliolids/ Salps and also Pteropods. Average annual nutrient concentrations in the water were 0.21 ± 0.1 μM for phosphate, 0.08 ± 0.1 μM for nitrite, 0.74 ± 1.6 μM for nitrate, and 1.27 ± 1.1 μM for ammonium. N/P ratios were around 8:1 during the first study period and 12:1 during the second. The plankton C/N/P and N/P nutrient ratios and elemental concentrations suggest that the system was oligotrophic and nitrogen limited. The sporadic intrusions of upwelling waters during the first study period had no marked effect upon the systems metabolism, likely due to dilution effects and the short residence times of water of the bay.

  11. THERMAL ESCAPE IN THE HYDRODYNAMIC REGIME: RECONSIDERATION OF PARKER's ISENTROPIC THEORY BASED ON RESULTS OF KINETIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Alexey N.; Johnson, Robert E.

    2013-03-10

    The one-dimensional steady-state problem of thermal escape from a single-component atmosphere of mon- and diatomic gases is studied in the hydrodynamic (blow-off) regime using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method for an evaporative-type condition at the lower boundary. The simulations are performed for various depths into an atmosphere, indicated by a Knudsen number, Kn{sub 0}, equal to the ratio of the mean free path of molecules to the radial position of the source surface, ranging from 10 to 10{sup -5}, and for the range of the source Jeans parameter, {lambda}{sub 0}, equal to the ratio of gravitational and thermal energies, specific to blow-off. The results of kinetic simulations are compared with the isentropic model (IM) and the Navier-Stokes model. It is shown that the IM can be simplified if formulated in terms of the local Mach number and Jeans parameter. The simulations predict that at Kn{sub 0} < {approx} 10{sup -3} the flow includes a near-surface non-equilibrium Knudsen layer, a zone where the flow can be well approximated by the IM, and a rarefied far field. The corresponding IM solutions, however, only approach Parker's critical solution as {lambda}{sub 0} approaches the upper limit for blow-off. The IM alone is not capable for predicting the flow and requires boundary conditions at the top of the Knudsen layer. For small Kn{sub 0}, the scaled escape rate and energy loss rate are found to be independent of {lambda}{sub 0}. The simulation results can be scaled to any single-component atmosphere exhibiting blow-off if the external heating above the lower boundary is negligible, in particular, to sublimation-driven atmospheres of Kuiper belt objects.

  12. Degradation of soils as a result of human-induced transformation of their water regime and soil-protective practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidel'Man, F. R.

    2009-01-01

    The adverse human-induced changes in the water regime of soils leading to their degradation are considered. Factors of the human activity related to the water industry, agriculture, and silviculture are shown to play the most active role in the soil degradation. Among them are the large-scale hydraulic works on rivers, drainage and irrigation of soils, ameliorative and agricultural impacts, road construction, and uncontrolled impacts of industry and silviculture on the environment. The reasons for each case of soil degradation related to changes in the soil water regime are considered, and preventive measures are proposed. The role of secondary soil degradation processes is shown.

  13. Order-N electron transport calculation from ballistic to diffusive regimes by time-dependent wave-packet diffusion method -Application to carbon nanotubes-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji

    2010-03-01

    Using a time-dependent wave-packet diffusion method[1], which treats the quantum electron transport problems of huge systems of up to 80 million atoms, combining with molecular dynamics simulations, we study the electron transport of carbon nanotubes from ballistic to diffusive regimes from an atomistic viewpoint in the unified way. We can simulate the effects of electron- phonon couplings on the transport properties of the nanotubes at various temperatures. We confirm that the obtained mean free path and mobility agree well with recent experimental observations and theoretical calculations, and succeed in evaluating the resistance in entire regime between ballistic and diffusive transport limits. We clarify the resistance is remarkably different from that at the two transport limits, when the length of nanotubes is comparable to the mean free path. [1]H.Ishii, N.Kobayashi, and K.Hirose, Appl.Phys.Express 1(2008) 123002.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration by Direct Mineral Carbonation: Results from Recent Studies and Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Rush, G.E.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    Direct mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO2 into a geologically stable, solid final form. The process utilizes a solution of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), sodium chloride (NaCl), and water, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg2SiO4) or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, by diffusion through the surface and gas dispersion within the aqueous phase. The process includes dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) in a single unit operation. Optimum results have been achieved using heat pretreated serpentine feed material, with a surface area of roughly 19 m2 per gram, and high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2). Specific conditions include: 155?C; PCO2=185 atm; 15% solids. Under these conditions, 78% stoichiometric conversion of the silicate to the carbonate was achieved in 30 minutes. Studies suggest that the mineral dissolution rate is primarily surface controlled, while the carbonate precipitation rate is primarily dependent on the bicarbonate concentration of the slurry. Current studies include further examination of the reaction pathways, and an evaluation of the resource potential for the magnesium silicate reactant, particularly olivine. Additional studies include the examination of various pretreatment options, the development of a continuous flow reactor, and an evaluation of the economic feasibility of the process.

  15. Results of industrial tests of carbonate additive to fuel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvereva, E. R.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Shageev, M. F.; Akhmetvalieva, G. R.

    2017-08-01

    Fuel oil plays an important role in the energy balance of our country. The quality of fuel oil significantly affects the conditions of its transport, storage, and combustion; release of contaminants to atmosphere; and the operation of main and auxiliary facilities of HPPs. According to the Energy Strategy of Russia for the Period until 2030, the oil-refining ratio gradually increases; as a result, the fraction of straight-run fuel oil in heavy fuel oils consistently decreases, which leads to the worsening of performance characteristics of fuel oil. Consequently, the problem of the increase in the quality of residual fuel oil is quite topical. In this paper, it is suggested to treat fuel oil by additives during its combustion, which would provide the improvement of ecological and economic indicators of oil-fired HPPs. Advantages of this method include simplicity of implementation, low energy and capital expenses, and the possibility to use production waste as additives. In the paper, the results are presented of industrial tests of the combustion of fuel oil with the additive of dewatered carbonate sludge, which is formed during coagulation and lime treatment of environmental waters on HPPs. The design of a volume delivery device is developed for the steady additive input to the boiler air duct. The values are given for the main parameters of the condition of a TGM-84B boiler plant. The mechanism of action of dewatered carbonate sludge on sulfur oxides, which are formed during fuel oil combustion, is considered. Results of industrial tests indicate the decrease in the mass fraction of discharged sulfur oxides by 36.5%. Evaluation of the prevented damage from sulfur oxide discharged into atmospheric air shows that the combustion of the fuel oil of 100 brand using carbonate sludge as an additive (0.1 wt %) saves nearly 6 million rubles a year during environmental actions at the consumption of fuel oil of 138240 t/year.

  16. Strategies for efficiently selecting PHA producing mixed microbial cultures using complex feedstocks: Feast and famine regime and uncoupled carbon and nitrogen availabilities.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Catarina S S; Silva, Carlos E; Carvalho, Gilda; Reis, Maria A

    2017-07-25

    Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by open mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) has been attracting increasing interest as an alternative technology to PHA production by pure cultures, due to the potential for lower costs associated with the use of open systems (eliminating the requirement for sterile conditions) and the utilisation of cheap feedstock (industrial and agricultural wastes). Such technology relies on the efficient selection of an MMC enriched in PHA-accumulating organisms. Fermented cheese whey, a protein-rich complex feedstock, has been used previously to produce PHA using the feast and famine regime for selection of PHA accumulating cultures. While this selection strategy was found efficient when operated at relatively low organic loading rate (OLR, 2g-CODL(-1)d(-1)), great instability and low selection efficiency of PHA accumulating organisms were observed when higher OLR (ca. 6g-CODL(-1)d(-1)) was applied. High organic loading is desirable as a means to enhance PHA productivity. In the present study, a new selection strategy was tested with the aim of improving selection for high OLR. It was based on uncoupling carbon and nitrogen supply and was implemented and compared with the conventional feast and famine strategy. For this, two selection reactors were fed with fermented cheese whey applying an OLR of ca. 8.5g-CODL(-1) (with 3.8g-CODL(-1) resulting from organic acids and ethanol), and operated in parallel under similar conditions, except for the timing of nitrogen supplementation. Whereas in the conventional strategy nitrogen and carbon substrates were added simultaneously at the beginning of the cycle, in the uncoupled substrates strategy, nitrogen addition was delayed to the end of the feast phase (i.e. after exogenous carbon was exhausted). The two different strategies selected different PHA-storing microbial communities, dominated by Corynebacterium and a Xantomonadaceae, respectively with the conventional and the new approaches. The new

  17. Carbon associated with clay and fine silt as an indicator for SOC evolution under different residue management regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigalet, Sylvain; Van Oost, Kristof; Roisin, Christian; Van Wesemael, Bas

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration or loss can be biased by large uncertainties deriving from temporal and spatial variability of organic carbon concentrations, even at the field level. In order to reduce these uncertainties, we used the organic carbon associated with clay and fine silt particles (stable carbon, slow pool) as an indicator for carbon changes rather than SOC in bulk soil for assessing decadal changes. We used an on-going long-term experiment in the Hesbay region in Belgium, started in 1959, with 3 contrasting management practices (3 x 6 replicates): Residue Export (RE), Farmyard manure application (FYM) and Residue Restitution (RR). After 42 years, there are no significant differences in bulk soil organic carbon concentrations between treatments (RE=9.2 gC.kg-1soil; FYM=10.4 gC.kg-1soil; RR=10.1 gC.kg-1soil). In contrast, there are significant differences (p<0.05) in stable carbon between treatments over the same time period. Moreover, we can be 99% confident that stable carbon increased between 1970 and 2012 in FYM (+19%) and RR plots (+14%). There was no significant change of stable carbon in RE plots over the same period. In 1970, no differences in stable carbon concentration were detected between management practices. Labile carbon (carbon non-associated with clay and fine silt particles) did not change significantly from 1970 to 2012 but its variability increased for plots under management. We used the Rothamsted Carbon model (RothC-26.3) to explain how sensitive and slow pools react under different management practices. For bulk soil, observed trends in SOC stocks are in line with the ones predicted. Modelled SOC stocks changes from 1962 to 2012 are -14% (RE) and +10% (FYM). We also used RothC-26.3 to understand the evolution of the sensitive and slow fractions over time. We found that RothC was not capable to simulate the interannual variability of observed SOC stocks. On the other hand, slow RothC pools are useful to

  18. Thermal regime and potential bedrock weathering in alpine rockwalls of Austria: Results from eight years of monitoring (2006-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Wecht, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Bedrock temperature at sites with a minor winter snow cover gives a good indication for the effects of air temperature anomalies on ground thermal conditions as well as for the intensity of near-surface physical weathering in bedrock. In this study we present results from an ongoing bedrock temperature monitoring program initiated in 2006. Within the framework of this program nine surface boreholes in rockwalls with different slope orientations and two additional boreholes at flat bedrock sites were drilled between August and September 2006 and subsequently instrumented. The altogether eleven rock temperature sites (RTS) are located in the alpine periglacial zone of the Austrian Alps at latitude 46°55' to 47°22' and longitude 12°44' to 14°41'. All RTS have been installed in metamorphic rock (5 x mica schist; 6 x gneiss) at elevations between 1960 and 2725 m asl (mean 2491 m asl.). Three temperature sensors (PT1000) have been inserted at each borehole site at vertical depths of 3, 10 and 30-40 cm. At each RTS the three sensors are connected to a 3-channel miniature temperature datalogger (MTD) manufactured by GeoPrecision, Germany. Our analysis focussed on (a) the variation of mean and extreme daily temperatures at the rock surface and at depth, (b) the variation of the daily temperature range, (c) the number of freeze-thaw-cycles (FTC) and (d) effective freeze-thaw cycles for frost shattering (eFTC), (e) the duration and intensity of freeze-thaw-cycles (DI-FTC), (f) the number of hours and days within the so-called frost-cracking-window (FCW), and effects of (g) aspect and (h) snow cover on the thermal regimes in the bedrock. Results show for instance that the number of FTC and eFTC varied substantially during the observation period at all eleven RTS and at all sensor depths. However, this variation differs from site to site related to snow cover condition, elevation and aspect. For instance, at one lower-elevated (2255 m asl) north exposed RTS the number of

  19. Initial second-generation PFB carbonizer pilot plant test results

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Van Hook, J. ); Froehlich, R. ); Bonk, D.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) plants promise higher efficiency with lower costs of electricity and lower stack emissions. With a l6.55 MPa/538{degree}C/538{degree}C/63.5-mm Hg(2400-psig/1000{degree} F/1000{degree}F/2.5-in.Hg) conventional steam cycle and a 3-percent sulfur Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, a 45-percent efficiency and a cost of electricity {approximately} 20 percent lower than that of a pulverized-coal-fired plant with stack gas scrubbing are being projected. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation has constructed and is operating a second-generation PFB pilot plant at the Foster Wheeler research facility (the John Blizard Research Center) in Livingston, New Jersey. Initial results of the pilot plant carbonizer test program supporting the development of this new type of plant are presented.

  20. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  1. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  2. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms.

    PubMed

    Bangert, U; Pierce, W; Boothroyd, C; Pan, C-T; Gwilliam, R

    2016-06-07

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  3. Carbon dioxide fluxes from Tifway bermudagrass: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotten, David L.; Zhang, G.; Leclerc, M. Y.; Raymer, P.; Steketee, C. J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports for the first time preliminary data on carbon uptake of warm-season turfgrass at a well-managed sod farm in south central Georgia. It examines the changes in carbon uptake from one of the most widely used warm-season turfgrass cultivars in the world, Tifway Bermudagrass. It elucidates the role of canopy density and light avalaibility on the net carbon uptake using the eddy-covariance technique. Preliminary evidence suggests that turfgrass is effective at sequestering carbon dioxide during the summer months even when the canopy is being reestablished following a grass harvest.

  4. Carbon dynamics of forests in Washington, U.S.A.: 21st century projections based on climate-driven changes in fire regimes.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Crystal L; McKenzie, Donald

    2012-07-01

    During the 21st century, climate-driven changes in fire regimes will be a key agent of change in forests of the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW). Understanding the response of forest carbon (C) dynamics to increases in fire will help quantify limits on the contribution of forest C storage to climate change mitigation and prioritize forest types for monitoring C storage and fire management to minimize C loss. In this study, we used projections of 21st century area burned to explore the consequences of changes in fire regimes on C dynamics in forests of Washington State. We used a novel empirical approach that takes advantage of chronosequences of C pools and fluxes and statistical properties of fire regimes to explore the effects of shifting age class distributions on C dynamics. Forests of the western Cascades are projected to be more sensitive to climate-driven increases in fire, and thus projected changes in C dynamics, than forests of the eastern Cascades. In the western Cascades, mean live biomass C is projected to decrease by 24-37%, and coarse woody debris (CWD) biomass C by 15-25% for the 2040s. Loss of live biomass C is projected to be lower for forests of the eastern Cascades and Okanogan Highlands (17-26%), and CWD biomass is projected to increase. Landscape mean net primary productivity is projected to increase in wet low-elevation forests of the western Cascades, but decrease elsewhere. These forests, and moist forests of the Okanogan Highlands, are projected to have the greatest percentage increases in consumption of live biomass. Percentage increases in consumption of CWD biomass are greater than 50% for all regions and up to four times greater than increases in consumption of live biomass. Carbon sequestration in PNW forests will be highly sensitive to increases in fire, suggesting a cautious approach to managing these forests for C sequestration to mitigate anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  5. Amazon Forest Response to Changes in Rainfall Regime: Results from an Individual-Based Dynamic Vegetation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Marcos

    The Amazon is the largest tropical rainforest in the world, and thus plays a major role on global water, energy, and carbon cycles. However, it is still unknown how the Amazon forest will respond to the ongoing changes in climate, especially droughts, which are expected to become more frequent. To help answering this question, in this thesis I developed and improved the representation of biophysical processes and photosynthesis in the Ecosystem Demography model (ED-2.2), an individual-based land ecosystem model. I also evaluated the model biophysics against multiple data sets for multiple forest and savannah sites in tropical South America. Results of this comparison showed that ED-2.2 is able to represent the radiation and water cycles, but exaggerates heterotrophic respiration seasonality. Also, the model generally predicted correct distribution of biomass across different areas, although it overestimated biomass in subtropical savannahs. To evaluate the forest resilience to droughts, I used ED-2.2 to simulate the plant community dynamics at two sites in Eastern Amazonia, and developed scenarios by resampling observed annual rainfall but increasing the probability of selecting dry years. While the model predicted little response at French Guiana, results at the mid-Eastern Amazonia site indicated substantial biomass loss at modest rainfall reductions. Also, the response to drier climate varied within the plant community, with evergreen, early-successional, and larger trees being the most susceptible. The model also suggests that competition for water during prolonged periods of drought caused the largest impact on larger trees, when insufficient wet season rainfall did not recharge deeper soil layers. Finally, results suggested that a decrease in return period of long-lasting droughts could prevent ecosystem recovery. Using different rainfall datasets, I defined vulnerability based on the change in climate needed to reduce the return period of long droughts. The

  6. Optimizing management regimes for carbon storage and other benefits in uneven-aged stands dominated by Norway spruce, with a derivation of the economic supply of carbon storage

    Treesearch

    Joseph Buongiorno; Espen Andreas Halvorsen; Ole Martin Bollandsas; Terje Gobakken; Ole Hofstad

    2012-01-01

    This study sought optimal sustainable management regimes of uneven-aged Norway spruce-dominated stands with multiple objectives. The criteria were financial returns, CO2 sequestration and diversity of tree size and species. At prevailing timber prices, harvest and transport costs, and interest rates, uneven-aged management for timber alone was...

  7. Were fossil spring-associated carbonates near Zaca Lake, Santa Barbara, California deposited under an ambient or thermal regime?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Yadira; Corsetti, Frank A.; Cheetham, Michael I.; Feakins, Sarah J.

    2014-03-01

    A previously undescribed succession of currently-inactive spring-associated carbonates located near Zaca Lake, Southern California, was investigated in order to determine the nature of deposition (ambient temperature or hydrothermal water, as both are found within the region). The carbonate deposits are up to ~ 1 m thick and formed discontinuously for over 200 m in a narrow valley between two ridges that drain Miocene Monterey Formation bedrock. Depositional facies along the presently dry fluvial path include barrage deposits, narrow fluvial channels, and cascade deposits. The carbonates are mesoscopically banded and contain ubiquitous micro- to macrophyte calcite encrusted fabrics. All of the depositional facies contain alternating bands (~ .05 mm to 5 mm thick) of dark brown and light brown isopachous calcite; the dark brown bands are composed of dense isopachous bladed calcite, whereas the light brown bands are composed of bundles of calcite tubules interpreted as the biosignature of the desmid microalgae Oocardium stratum. Oxygen isotope thermometry utilizing modern water δ18O values from the piped spring reveal depositional water temperature estimates that collectively range from ~ 11 to 16 °C. Stable isotope carbon values exhibit a mean δ13C value of - 9.01 ± 0.62‰ (1σ, n = 27). Our petrographic and geochemical data demonstrate that (1) inactive carbonates were likely sourced from ambient temperature water with a strong soil-zone δ13C signal, (2) the Oocardium calcite biosignature can be used to infer depositional temperature and flow conditions, and (3) the occurrence of extensive carbonates (especially the presence of a perched cascade deposit) indicate the carbonates formed when conditions were much wetter.

  8. Post-fire management regimes affect carbon sequestration and storage in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Elizabeth M. Powers; John D. Marshall; Jianwei Zhang; Liang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Forests mitigate climate change by sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere and accumulating it in biomass storage pools. However, in dry conifer forests, fire occasionally returns large quantities of CO2 to the atmosphere. Both the total amount of carbon stored and its susceptibility to loss may be altered by post-fire land...

  9. Relationship between starch degradation and carbon demand for maintenance and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana in different irradiance and temperature regimes.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Sarah M; Encke, Beatrice; Krohn, Nicole; Höhne, Melanie; Stitt, Mark; Pyl, Eva-Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were designed to compare the relationship between starch degradation and the use of carbon for maintenance and growth in Arabidopsis in source-limited and sink-limited conditions. It is known that starch degradation is regulated by the clock in source-limited plants, which degrade their starch in a linear manner such that it is almost but not completely exhausted at dawn. We asked whether this response is maintained under an extreme carbon deficit. Arabidopsis was subjected to a sudden combination of a day of low irradiance, to decrease starch at dusk, and a warm night. Starch was degraded in a linear manner through the night, even though the plants became acutely carbon starved. We conclude that starch degradation is not increased to meet demand in carbon-limited plants. This network property will allow stringent control of starch turnover in a fluctuating environment. In contrast, in sink-limited plants, which do not completely mobilize their starch during the night, starch degradation was accelerated in warm nights to meet the increased demand for maintenance and growth. Across all conditions, the rate of growth at night depends on the rate of starch degradation, whereas the rate of maintenance respiration decreases only when starch degradation is very slow. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Carbon pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Christian; Laner, David; Fellner, Johann

    2015-06-01

    Landfill aeration has been proven to accelerate the degradation of organic matter in landfills in comparison to anaerobic decomposition. The present study aims to evaluate pools of organic matter decomposing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using landfill simulation reactors (LSR) filled with 40 year old waste from a former MSW landfill. The LSR were operated for 27 months, whereby the waste in one pair was kept under anaerobic conditions and the four other LSRs were aerated. Two of the aerated LSR were run with leachate recirculation and water addition and two without. The organic carbon in the solid waste was characterized at the beginning and at the end of the experiments and major carbon flows (e.g. TOC in leachate, gaseous CO2 and CH4) were monitored during operation. After the termination of the experiments, the waste from the anaerobic LSRs exhibited a long-term gas production potential of more than 20 NL kg(-1) dry waste, which corresponded to the mineralization of around 12% of the initial TOC (67 g kg(-1) dry waste). Compared to that, aeration led to threefold decrease in TOC (32-36% of the initial TOC were mineralized), without apparent differences in carbon discharge between the aerobic set ups with and without water addition. Based on the investigation of the carbon pools it could be demonstrated that a bit more than 10% of the initially present organic carbon was transformed into more recalcitrant forms, presumably due to the formation of humic substances. The source of anaerobic degradation could be identified mainly as cellulose which played a minor role during aerobic degradation in the experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Compilation of reinforced carbon-carbon transatlantic abort landing arc jet test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milhoan, James D.; Pham, Vuong T.; Yuen, Eric H.

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of the entire test database generated to support the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Transatlantic Abort Landing Study. RCC components used for orbiter nose cap and wing leading edge thermal protection were originally designed to have a multi-mission entry capability of 2800 F. Increased orbiter range capability required a predicted increase in excess of 3300 F. Three test series were conducted. Test series #1 used ENKA-based RCC specimens coated with silicon carbide, treated with tetraethyl orthosilicate, sealed with Type A surface enhancement, and tested at 3000-3400 F with surface pressure of 60-101 psf. Series #2 used ENKA- or AVTEX-based RCC, with and without silicon carbide, Type A or double Type AA surface enhancement, all impregnated with TEOS, and at temperatures from 1440-3350 F with pressures from 100-350 psf. Series #3 tested ENKA-based RCC, with and without silicon carbide coating. No specimens were treated with TEOS or sealed with Type A. Surface temperatures ranged from 2690-3440 F and pressures ranged from 313-400 psf. These combined test results provided the database for establishing RCC material single-mission-limit temperature and developing surface recession correlations used to predict mass loss for abort conditions.

  12. Estimated values of carbon sequestration resulting from forest management scenarios

    Treesearch

    R. Bluffstone; J. Coulston; R.G. Haight; J. Kline; S. Polasky; D.N. Wear; K. Zook

    2017-01-01

    Recent USDA policies, such as the Building Blocks for Climate Smart Agriculture and Forestry, aim to sequester and mitigate greenhouse gases in the forestry and agriculture sectors in the United States. To make informed decisions, the USDA will need to evaluate the carbon benefits of various potential policies. In this paper, we use detailed forest inventory data to...

  13. Comparing resolved-sideband cooling and measurement-based feedback cooling on an equal footing: Analytical results in the regime of ground-state cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kurt; Nurdin, Hendra I.; Strauch, Frederick W.; James, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    We show that in the regime of ground-state cooling, simple expressions can be derived for the performance of resolved-sideband cooling—an example of coherent feedback control—and optimal linear measurement-based feedback cooling for a harmonic oscillator. These results are valid to leading order in the small parameters that define this regime. They provide insight into the origins of the limitations of coherent and measurement-based feedback for linear systems, and the relationship between them. These limitations are not fundamental bounds imposed by quantum mechanics, but are due to the fact that both cooling methods are restricted to use only a linear interaction with the resonator. We compare the performance of the two methods on an equal footing—that is, for the same interaction strength—and confirm that coherent feedback is able to make much better use of the linear interaction than measurement-based feedback. We find that this performance gap is caused not by the back-action noise of the measurement but by the projection noise. We also obtain simple expressions for the maximal cooling that can be obtained by both methods in this regime, optimized over the interaction strength.

  14. Primary carbonates and Ca-chloride brines as monitors of a paleo-hydrological regime in the Dead Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Nicolas; Starinsky, Abraham; Stein, Mordechai

    2007-09-01

    Lakes Samra, Lisan and the Dead Sea occupied the Dead Sea basin during the Last Interglacial (˜140-75 ka BP), last glacial (˜70-14 ka BP) and Holocene periods, respectively. The age of Lake Lisan and Samra was determined by U-Th dating of primary aragonites comprising parts of the lacustrine sedimentary sequences. The lakes have periodically deposited sequences of layered calcitic marls (Lake Samra) or laminated primary aragonite (Lake Lisan). The deposition of aragonite as the primary carbonate phase reflects the contribution of the incoming freshwater (loaded with bi-carbonate) and high Mg-, Ca-chloride brine that originated from the subsurface vicinity of the Dead Sea basin. Deposition of calcitic marls suggests a minor effect of the brines. The Ca-chloride subsurface brine has been migrating in and out of the wall rocks of the Dead Sea basin, reflecting the regional hydrological conditions. During most of the last glacial period and during the late Holocene, sufficient precipitation above the Judea Mountains pushed the subsurface Ca-chloride brines into the lakes causing the deposition of aragonite. During the Last Interglacial period the rain that precipitated above the Judea Mountains was insufficient to induce brine flow toward Lake Samra. It appears that sporadic floods provided calcium, bicarbonate and detritus to produce the Samra calcitic marls. Travertines deposited at the Samra-Lisan boundary indicate the early stage in the resumption of groundwater (springs) activity that led to the resurgence of Ca-chloride brine and rise of Lake Lisan. Similar variations in the regional rain precipitation and hydrological activity probably characterized the long-term geochemical evolution of Pleistocene lacustrine water-bodies in the Dead Sea basin, enabling the use of the carbonates as paleo-hydrological monitors.

  15. 75 FR 44766 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey: Final Results of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey: Final Results of...) order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipe from Turkey for the January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2008, period of review (POR). See Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From...

  16. 78 FR 21107 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Turkey: Preliminary Results of Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Turkey: Preliminary Results... carbon steel pipes and tubes from Turkey (pipes and tubes from Turkey) for the period of review (POR) of... welded carbon steel pipe and tube with an outside diameter of 0.375 inch or more, but not over 16...

  17. Brown Carbon: Results From Ground and Airborne Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Forrister, H.; Liu, J.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    Brown carbon (BrC) is directly measured with high sensitivity by isolating it from black carbon in aerosol extracts and using long path wave-guide spectrophotometry. Ambient measurements by this approach show that BrC is pervasive and can be found in almost all locations, ranging from urban environments to remote continental sites and upper reaches of the free troposphere. Biomass burning appears to be the major source in many urban and rural locations, but other sources of incomplete combustion, such as vehicle emissions in urban environments also play a role. Secondary aerosols not associated with combustion sources may also contribute, but are likely of lesser importance. Studies of ambient wildfire smoke plumes show that BrC levels decrease as it ages, with a half-life of approximately 10 hours. However, a small fraction of the emitted BrC is stable and may account for much of the BrC observed throughout the atmosphere due to widely dispersed and ubiquitous smoke. A radiative transfer model indicates that this background BrC reduced US continental TOA forcing by 20 percent. Human health studies point to similar chemical components linked to BrC (i.e., HULIS), of this same ubiquitous smoke, as a significant source of adverse cardiorespiratory effects. This talk will summarize findings on BrC sources, transformations and estimates of environmental effects based on bulk measurements.

  18. Ireland's deep-water coral carbonate mounds: multidisciplinary research results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozachenko, M.; Wheeler, A.; Beyer, A.; Blamart, D.; Masson, D.; Olu-Le Roy, K.

    2003-04-01

    Recent international research activity, involving a strong Irish collaboration, has shown that coral reefs are not exclusively associated with warm tropical waters but are also present in the deeper and colder Northeast Atlantic. In the Porcupine Seabight west of Ireland, coral-colonised carbonate mounds (up to 350m high) are present at 600-900m water depth. The corals Lophelia pertusa L. and Madrepora oculata L. contribute to this diverse ecosystem that may also play a significant role in expanding deep-water fisheries. New side-scan sonar, multibeam echosounder, sub-bottom profiler and underwater video imagery supplemented with sedimentological sample material were used to map the seabed in the environs of the Belgica Carbonate Mound province, eastern Porcupine Seabight. The data were integrated in a GIS and provides information on sediment pathways and benthic current patterns within the study area. A facies map of the study area highlights differing sedimentary processes showing evidences for strong northward bottom currents whose interaction has an influence on mounds growth and morphology. This survey revealed mound flanks dominated by sediment waves that give way to coral banks towards the mound summits. A form of coral accumulation was also documented. Detailed analyses of sediment properties from long cores through sediment drifts have generated a high-resolution palaeoclimate record revealing temporal patterns in bottom current strength variations. An accurate assessment of this influence on mound through a comparison with coral growth rates is ongoing.

  19. Increase of Carbon Cycle Feedback with Climate Sensitivity: Results from a coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect

    Govindasamy, B; Thompson, S; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Caldeira, K; Delire, C

    2004-04-01

    Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling studies have shown that the feedback between global warming and the carbon cycle, in particular the terrestrial carbon cycle, could accelerate climate change and result in larger warming. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of this feedback for year-2100 global warming in the range of 0 K to 8 K. Differing climate sensitivities to increased CO{sub 2} content are imposed on the carbon cycle models for the same emissions. Emissions from the SRES A2 scenario are used. We use a fully-coupled climate and carbon cycle model, the INtegrated Climate and CArbon model (INCCA) the NCAR/DOE Parallel Coupled Model coupled to the IBIS terrestrial biosphere model and a modified-OCMIP ocean biogeochemistry model. In our model, for scenarios with year-2100 global warming increasing from 0 to 8 K, land uptake decreases from 47% to 29% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. Due to competing effects, ocean uptake (16%) shows almost no change at all. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration increases were 48% higher in the run with 8 K global climate warming than in the case with no warming. Our results indicate that carbon cycle amplification of climate warming will be greater if there is higher climate sensitivity to increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; the carbon cycle feedback factor increases from 1.13 to 1.48 when global warming increases from 3.2 to 8 K.

  20. Do dam constructions in a Vietnamese river basin result in change points in hydrologic regime and how reliable are different methods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Tinh Thi; Kiesel, Jens; Guse, Bjoern; Fohrer, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    The damming of rivers causes one of the most considerable impacts of our society on the riverine environment. More than 50% of the world's streams and rivers are currently impounded by dams before reaching the oceans. The construction of dams is of high importance in developing and emerging countries, i.e. for power generation and water storage. In the Vietnamese Vu Gia - Thu Bon Catchment (10,350 km2), about 23 dams were built during the last decades and store approximately 2,156 billion m3 of water. The water impoundment in 10 dams in upstream regions amounts to 17 % of the annual discharge volume. It is expected that impacts from these dams have altered the natural flow regime. However, up to now it is unclear how the flow regime was altered. For this, it needs to be investigated at what point in time these changes became significant and detectable. Many approaches exist to detect changes in stationary or consistency of hydrological records using statistical analysis of time series for the pre- and post-dam period. The objective of this study is to reliably detect and assess hydrologic shifts occurring in the discharge regime of an anthropogenically influenced river basin, mainly affected by the construction of dams. To achieve this, we applied nine available change-point tests to detect change in mean, variance and median on the daily and annual discharge records at two main gauges of the basin. The tests yield conflicting results: The majority of tests found abrupt changes that coincide with the damming-period, while others did not. To interpret how significant the changes in discharge regime are, and to which different properties of the time series each test responded, we calculated Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHAs) for the time period before and after the detected change points. From the results, we can deduce, that the change point tests are influenced in different levels by different indicator groups (magnitude, duration, frequency, etc) and that

  1. Extracting seismological parameters from laboratory data: results from high velocity friction experiments in the melt-lubricated regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, A. R.; di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic inversion methods using ground motions records can potentially help in understanding earthquake physics but the lack of resolution in the seismological data does not allow to retrieve the detail of the slip function, which is related to the co-seismic friction evolution on the fault. An alternative approach to understanding earthquake physics is the application of high velocity friction experiments that reproduce seismic deformation conditions. Here, we report results from such a study using a newly developed high velocity friction apparatus (Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus, SHIVA), recently installed at INGV, Rome. Our apparatus extends the range of normal stresses previously studied and allows for a precise control of the slip velocity function applied to the sample. We performed experiments on hollow rings (30/50 mm inside/outside diameter) of gabbroic rocks at normal stresses from 1-45 MPa and symmetric (i.e., triangular and trapezoid) slip velocity functions with peak (steady state) velocities of 1 to 6.5 m/s and accelerations/decelerations of 2 to 65 m/s2. Like in previous experiments, we observe an almost instantaneous initial peak in friction, followed by weakening curving over into strengthening until a second peak occurs. After the second peak, friction drops dramatically, approximately following an exponential decay until a steady state value is reached. By recording the experiments with a high-speed infra-red camera, we associate the strengthening towards the second peak in friction with the occurrence of discontinuous patches of melt in the slipping zone, and the exponential decay to steady state with the formation of a continuous melt layer. We determined a number of seismological parameters such as the breakdown or slip weakening distance, the breakdown work, the amount of re-strengthening (“healing”) and associated stress drop from our shear stress curves. The slip distance until the onset of bulk melting and the magnitude of the second

  2. 76 FR 67142 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Final Results... China (``PRC'').\\1\\ We gave interested parties an opportunity to comment on the Preliminary Results...\\ See Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of the Third...

  3. Marine cycling of the climate relevant trace gases carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2) in the Peruvian upwelling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz, Sinikka; von Hobe, Marc; Booge, Dennis; Gonçalves-Araujo, Rafael; Bracher, Astrid; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Ksionzek, Kerstin B.; Koch, Boris P.; Fischer, Tim; Bittig, Henry; Quack, Birgit; Krüger, Kirstin; Marandino, Christa A.

    2017-04-01

    The ocean is a major source for the climate relevant trace gases carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2). While the greenhouse gas CS2 quickly oxidizes to OCS in the atmosphere, the atmospheric lifetime of OCS of 2-7 years leads to an accumulation of this gas and makes it the most abundant reduced sulfur compound in the atmosphere. OCS has a counteracting effect on the climate: in the troposphere, it acts as a greenhouse gas causing warming, whereas it also sustains the stratospheric aerosol layer, and thus increases Earth's albedo causing cooling. To better constrain the important oceanic source of these trace gases, the marine cycling needs to be well understood and quantified. For OCS, the production and consumption processes are identified, but photoproduction and light-independent production rates remain to be quantified across different regions. In contrast, the processes that influence the oceanic cycling of CS2 are less well understood. Here we present new data from a cruise to the Peruvian upwelling regime and relate measurements of OCS and CS2 to key parameters, such as dissolved organic sulfur, chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter. We use a 1D water column model to further constrain their production and degradation rates. A focus is set on the influence of oxygen on the marine cycling of these two gases in oxygen depleted zones in the ocean, which are expected to expand in the future.

  4. National assessment of geologic carbon dioxide storage resources: results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of the technically accessible storage resources (TASR) for carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations underlying the onshore and State waters area of the United States. The formations assessed are at least 3,000 feet (914 meters) below the ground surface. The TASR is an estimate of the CO2 storage resource that may be available for CO2 injection and storage that is based on present-day geologic and hydrologic knowledge of the subsurface and current engineering practices. Individual storage assessment units (SAUs) for 36 basins were defined on the basis of geologic and hydrologic characteristics outlined in the assessment methodology of Brennan and others (2010, USGS Open-File Report 2010–1127) and the subsequent methodology modification and implementation documentation of Blondes, Brennan, and others (2013, USGS Open-File Report 2013–1055). The mean national TASR is approximately 3,000 metric gigatons (Gt). The estimate of the TASR includes buoyant trapping storage resources (BSR), where CO2 can be trapped in structural or stratigraphic closures, and residual trapping storage resources, where CO2 can be held in place by capillary pore pressures in areas outside of buoyant traps. The mean total national BSR is 44 Gt. The residual storage resource consists of three injectivity classes based on reservoir permeability: residual trapping class 1 storage resource (R1SR) represents storage in rocks with permeability greater than 1 darcy (D); residual trapping class 2 storage resource (R2SR) represents storage in rocks with moderate permeability, defined as permeability between 1 millidarcy (mD) and 1 D; and residual trapping class 3 storage resource (R3SR) represents storage in rocks with low permeability, defined as permeability less than 1 mD. The mean national storage resources for rocks in residual trapping classes 1, 2, and 3 are 140 Gt, 2,700 Gt, and 130 Gt, respectively. The known recovery

  5. Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Peter E; Doney, Scott C.; Lindsay, Keith; Moore, Jefferson Keith; Mahowald, Natalie; Randerson, James T; Fung, Inez; Lamarque, Jean-Francois H; Feddema, Johan J.

    2009-01-01

    Inclusion of fundamental ecological interactions between carbon and nitrogen cycles in the land component of an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) leads to decreased carbon uptake associated with CO{sub 2} fertilization, and increased carbon uptake associated with warming of the climate system. The balance of these two opposing effects is to reduce the fraction of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} predicted to be sequestered in land ecosystems. The primary mechanism responsible for increased land carbon storage under radiatively forced climate change is shown to be fertilization of plant growth by increased mineralization of nitrogen directly associated with increased decomposition of soil organic matter under a warming climate, which in this particular model results in a negative gain for the climate-carbon feedback. Estimates for the land and ocean sink fractions of recent anthropogenic emissions are individually within the range of observational estimates, but the combined land plus ocean sink fractions produce an airborne fraction which is too high compared to observations. This bias is likely due in part to an underestimation of the ocean sink fraction. Our results show a significant growth in the airborne fraction of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions over the coming century, attributable in part to a steady decline in the ocean sink fraction. Comparison to experimental studies on the fate of radio-labeled nitrogen tracers in temperate forests indicates that the model representation of competition between plants and microbes for new mineral nitrogen resources is reasonable. Our results suggest a weaker dependence of net land carbon flux on soil moisture changes in tropical regions, and a stronger positive growth response to warming in those regions, than predicted by a similar AOGCM implemented without land carbon-nitrogen interactions. We expect that the between-model uncertainty in predictions of future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and

  6. An Integrated Spatially Dynamic Disturbance and Forest Soil Carbon Model: Preliminary Results from Willow Creek Experimental Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, R. M.; Hua, D.; Bolstad, P. V.

    2008-12-01

    Total forest carbon (C) storage is determined by forest succession, multiple interacting disturbances, climate and the edaphic properties of a site or region, including soil texture and depth. How these complex processes interact will determine forest carbon dynamics at landscape and regional scales. We have developed a new succession extension for the LANDIS-II forest landscape simulation model that incorporates the belowground soil C dynamics of the Century soil model. This extension simulates three primary soil organic matter (SOM) pools (fast, slow, passive), litter dynamics, and nitrogen (N) feedbacks to overstory production. The extension was validated against data from the Willow Creek experimental forest in Wisconsin, USA. We subsequently initialized the full model to simulate forest dynamics of 10,000 ha of the surrounding forest landscape. We simulated a representative harvest regime and a historic wind throw regime (50 year wind rotation period, including light, moderate, and extreme events), two common disturbances in mesic forests of the Lake States. We also simulated forest change and total C storage assuming no atmospheric N deposition and N deposition equivalent to 2008 rates. Our results indicate a strong feedback from harvesting to litter C and the fast and slow SOM pools. The passive SOM pool was not significantly altered. Wind disturbance had a negligible effect on all pools. Simulations without N deposition significantly underestimated contemporary forest productivity and the system was more sensitive to disturbances when N deposition was excluded. In conclusion, we have developed a robust model of above and belowground C and N cycling that can readily plug into an existing forest modeling framework to simulate landscape and regional scale forest dynamics and the interactions among forest disturbances, climate change, and soil processes.

  7. Changes in Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as a Result of Cultivation

    DOE Data Explorer

    Post, Wilfred M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mann, L. K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2005-01-01

    We assembed and analyzed a data base of soil organic carbon and nitrogen information from over 1100 profiles in order to explore factors related to the changes in storage of soil organic matter resulting from land conversion. The relationship between cultivated and uncultivated organic carbon and nitrogen storage in soils can be described by regression lines with uncultivated storage on the abscissa, and cultivated storage on the ordinate. The slope of the regression lines is less than 1 indicating that the amount of carbon or nitrogen lost is an increasing fraction of the intial amount stored in the soil. Average carbon loss for soils with high initial carbon is 23% for 1-meter depth. Average nitrogen loss for the same depth is 6%. In addition, for soils with very low uncultivated carbon or nitrogen storage, cultivation results in increases in storage. In soils with the same uncultivated carbon contents, profiles with higher C:N ratios lost more carbon than those with low C:N ratios, suggesting that decomposition of organic matter may, in general, be more limited by microbial ability to break carbon bonds than by nitrogen deficiency.

  8. Carbon savings resulting from the cooling effect of green areas: a case study in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenqi; Wu, Tinghai; Zhang, Chengguo; Yu, Ting

    2011-01-01

    Green areas cool the climate of a city, reduce the energy consumption caused by the urban heat island (UHI) effect, and bring along carbon savings. However, the calculation of carbon savings due to the cooling effect of green areas is still not well understood. We have used a Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) image of Beijing, to identify the cooled areas, compute the possible energy used to maintain the temperature differences between cooled areas and their surrounding heated areas, and calculate the carbon savings owing to the avoidance of energy use. Results show that a total amount of 14315.37 tons carbon savings was achieved in the study area and the amount was related to the biomass, the size and the shape of green areas. These results demonstrate the importance of carbon savings resulting from green areas' cooling effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stepwise drowning of the urgonian carbonate platform and the sedimentary regime during the Mid-Cretaceous environmental crisis: new evidence from the Helvetic Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, P.; Weissert, H.; Funk, H.; Föllmi, K. B.

    2003-04-01

    In the region of Anzeindaz (Ct. Vaud, Switzerland) the sedimentary succession of the so-called "Urgonian" of the Schrattenkalk Formation (late Barremian to early Aptian in age) and of the Garschella Formation (early Aptian to late Cenomanian in age) is well developed. These outcrops in the helvetic Morcles nappe are particularly appropriate to study the drowning events that lead to the disappearance of the urgonian carbonate platform and the subsequent development towards a sedimentary regime of condensation and authigenesis. Cavities with infillings of Garschella Formation sediments penetrating the Schrattenkalk limestone up to 20 meters deep are interpreted as karstic erosional cavities and/or neptunian dikes. The most interesting finding was the special way in which the drowning of the urgonian carbonate platform is documented. At one outcrop (La Corde) thin relics of a bed interpreted as the Upper Orbitolina Bed seem to be integrated in the Garschella Formation since it separates relics of at least two phosphoritic beds, probably the Luitere Bed but also an older bed that was not described by Föllmi and Ouwehand (1987). In fact a diploma student at the University of Neuchâtel, François Gainon (2001) just recently rediscovered and correctly interpreted a similar but less condensed succession in the nearby Rawil region that was first described (but misinterpreted) by Schaub (1936). Gainon named this older phosphoritic horizon of the Rawil region "Plaine Morte Bed" and he was able to date it with an ammonite of the earliest Aptian Weissi/Tuarkyricus Zones. In both the Rawil and Anzeindaz regions the whole ensemble is deposited over an erosive unconformity cutting off the Schrattenkalk limestone. The sedimentary succession of the Garschella Formation in the Anzeindaz region contains equivalents of nearly all beds described and defined in the type outcrops of eastern Switzerland and Austria (Föllmi &Ouwehand 1987). The study of these sediments revealed new

  10. NON-DESTRUCTIVE IN SITU SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: PRINCIPLE AND RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.; MITRA, S.; HENDREY, G.; ROGERS, H.; TORBERT, A.; PRIOR, S.

    2003-05-05

    Global warming is promoted by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere, while at the same time it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems. However, improvement in the understanding and monitoring of below ground carbon processes is essential for evaluating strategies for carbon sequestration including quantification of carbon stores for credits. A system for non-destructive in situ carbon monitoring in soil, based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS), is described. The system can be operated in stationary or scanning mode and measures soil to depth of approximately 30 cm. There is a good agreement between results obtained from INS and standard chemical analysis of soil cores collected from the same study site.

  11. Carbon dioxide-induced anesthesia results in a rapid increase in plasma levels of vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Reed, Brian; Varon, Jack; Chait, Brian T; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2009-06-01

    Brief anesthesia, such as after exposure to high levels of carbon dioxide, prior to decapitation is considered a more humane alternative for the euthanasia of rodents, compared with use of decapitation alone. Studies of the levels of certain stress hormones in plasma such as corticosterone and ACTH have supported the use of this method of euthanasia in endocrinological and molecular studies. In the current study, rats were briefly exposed to a chamber filled with carbon dioxide until recumbent (20-25 sec), immediately killed via decapitation, and trunk blood collected; findings were compared with rats killed via decapitation with no exposure to carbon dioxide. RIAs were used to measure arginine vasopressin (AVP) and ACTH immunoreactivity (ir) in plasma. Whereas ACTH-ir levels remained steady after brief exposure to carbon dioxide (in accordance with results of other investigators), AVP-ir levels were increased by more than an order of magnitude. These results were confirmed by quantitative capillary-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, indicating this observation of rapid increase in plasma AVP-ir levels is not due to nonspecific recognition by the antibody used in the RIA. Likewise, using capillary-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we observed a rapid increase in plasma oxytocin levels after carbon dioxide exposure. These surprising findings have important implications for the design and interpretation of studies involving brief carbon dioxide exposure prior to decapitation as well as those with euthanasia resulting from carbon dioxide-induced asphyxiation.

  12. Increases in the mean and variability of thermal regimes result in differential phenotypic responses among genotypes during early ontogenetic stages of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens).

    PubMed

    Dammerman, Kari J; Steibel, Juan P; Scribner, Kim T

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is affecting thermal conditions worldwide. Understanding organismal responses associated with predicted changes are essential for predicting population persistence. Few studies have examined the effects of both increased mean and variance in temperature on organismal traits, particularly during early life stages. Using lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) from Black Lake, MI, we tested whether phenotypic variation differed among families reared in two constant (10 and 18°C) and two fluctuating-temperature treatments (10-19°C) representing temperatures experienced in the river and a simulated anthropogenic disturbance. Body length, body area, and yolk-sac area were quantified at hatch. Family-by-treatment interactions explained up to 50% of the variance observed among families in offspring hatch traits. Families incubated in 18°C and the fluctuating anthropogenic treatment had 6-10 times higher variance in traits than those incubated at 10°C. Hatched larvae were placed in raceways with ambient river water. Emergence body length, emergence timing, and growth were quantified upon emergence. Families differed in time to emergence and growth with the greatest range observed in the 18°C treatment. Results demonstrate that differential responses among genotypes to changes in the mean and variability of thermal incubation regimes can affect traits at hatch as well as a subsequent ontogenetic stage.

  13. Carbon fluxes resulting from land-use changes in the Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Návar-Chaidez, Jose de Jesus

    2008-09-30

    Information on carbon stock and flux resulting from land-use changes in subtropical, semi-arid ecosystems are important to understand global carbon flux, yet little data is available. In the Tamaulipan thornscrub forests of northeastern Mexico, biomass components of standing vegetation were estimated from 56 quadrats (200 m2 each). Regional land-use changes and present forest cover, as well as estimates of soil organic carbon from chronosequences, were used to predict carbon stocks and fluxes in this ecosystem.For the period of 1980-1996, the Tamaulipan thornscrub is presenting an annual deforestation rate of 2.27% indicating that approximately 600 km2 of this plant community are lost every year and that 60% of the original Mexican Tamaulipan thornscrub vegetation has been lost since the 1950's. On the other hand, intensive agriculture, including introduced grasslands increased (4,000 km2) from 32 to 42% of the total studied area, largely at the expense of the Tamaulipan thornscrub forests. Land-use changes from Tamaulipan thornscrub forest to agriculture contribute 2.2 Tg to current annual carbon emissions and standing biomass averages 0.24 +/- 0.06 Tg, root biomass averages 0.17 +/- 0.03 Tg, and soil organic carbon averages 1.80 +/- 0.27 Tg. Land-use changes from 1950 to 2000 accounted for Carbon emissions of the order of 180.1 Tg. Projected land-use changes will likely contribute to an additional carbon flux of 98.0 Tg by the year 2100. Practices to conserve sequester, and transfer carbon stocks in semi-arid ecosystems are discussed as a means to reduce carbon flux from deforestation practices.

  14. Carbon fluxes resulting from land-use changes in the Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Návar-Chaidez, Jose de Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Information on carbon stock and flux resulting from land-use changes in subtropical, semi-arid ecosystems are important to understand global carbon flux, yet little data is available. In the Tamaulipan thornscrub forests of northeastern Mexico, biomass components of standing vegetation were estimated from 56 quadrats (200 m2 each). Regional land-use changes and present forest cover, as well as estimates of soil organic carbon from chronosequences, were used to predict carbon stocks and fluxes in this ecosystem. For the period of 1980–1996, the Tamaulipan thornscrub is presenting an annual deforestation rate of 2.27% indicating that approximately 600 km2 of this plant community are lost every year and that 60% of the original Mexican Tamaulipan thornscrub vegetation has been lost since the 1950's. On the other hand, intensive agriculture, including introduced grasslands increased (4,000 km2) from 32 to 42% of the total studied area, largely at the expense of the Tamaulipan thornscrub forests. Land-use changes from Tamaulipan thornscrub forest to agriculture contribute 2.2 Tg to current annual carbon emissions and standing biomass averages 0.24 ± 0.06 Tg, root biomass averages 0.17 ± 0.03 Tg, and soil organic carbon averages 1.80 ± 0.27 Tg. Land-use changes from 1950 to 2000 accounted for Carbon emissions of the order of 180.1 Tg. Projected land-use changes will likely contribute to an additional carbon flux of 98.0 Tg by the year 2100. Practices to conserve sequester, and transfer carbon stocks in semi-arid ecosystems are discussed as a means to reduce carbon flux from deforestation practices. PMID:18826617

  15. Targeting carbonic anhydrase to treat diabetic retinopathy: Emerging evidences and encouraging results

    SciTech Connect

    Weiwei, Zhang; Hu, Renming

    2009-12-18

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age populations in developed countries. Current treatment options are limited to tight glycemic, blood pressure control and destructive laser surgery. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes involving in the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Emerging evidences reveal CA inhibitors hold the promise for the treatment of DR. This article summarizes encouraging results from clinical and animal studies, and reviews the possible mechanisms.

  16. Results of a 1000-hour wear test of 30-cm carbon-carbon ion optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John Steven; Brophy, John R.; Anderson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a 1000-hour wear test intended to determine the erosion resistance and voltage standoff capability of the optics in a relevant environment, i.e. duration testing on an NSTAR-like thruster.

  17. North American Carbon Balance: Results from the Regional Synthesis Project of the North America Carbon Program (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, M.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Davis, K. J.; Raczka, B. M.; Hayes, D. J.; Michalak, A. M.; Wei, Y.; Jacobson, A. R.; Cook, R. B.; Nacp Regional-Interim Synthesis Participants

    2010-12-01

    Past studies have documented continental scale carbon balances for North America but there are large differences among the results. Recent improvements in the amount and quality of available observation-based data, and application of comparative analyses among approach methods, may allow us to reduce disagreement and resolve sources of discrepancies among flux estimates. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) regional interim synthesis project has brought together a large number of spatial data sets, and terrestrial biogeochemistry model (TBM) and atmospheric inversion simulation results to construct a holistic assessment of North America carbon fluxes for the years 2000 to 2005. One of the goals of the interim synthesis project has been to investigate the magnitude and potential causes of the large differences in estimated component and net fluxes over regional scales. Although the results to date have not resolved the disparity in estimates of NA carbon fluxes, they have lead to insights into the ability of various types of data and analysis approaches to understand some of the flux discrepancies among the different estimation approaches. Regional TBM results were compared with inversion and inventory-based estimates, as well as modeled and observed flux estimates from eddy covariance sites. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) estimates range from -2.9 to 0.68 PgC/yr (inversions) and -1.64 to 0.52 PgC/yr (TBMs) for temperate NA. In boreal NA, TBMs, on average, estimate slightly greater uptake than inversions (-0.12 PgC/yr versus -0.07 PgC/yr), but both methods have similar range in estimates. In Temperate NA, inversions, on average, estimate twice the uptake of TBMs (-0.96 PgC/yr versus -0.41 PgC/yr) and have a greater range in estimates. A comparison of NEE estimates for TBMs with both regional drivers and site-specific data indicates that a component for TBM uncertainty is the quality of reanalysis data used as weather forcing in the regional simulations

  18. Evaluating Carbon Sequestration and Solar Forcing Feedbacks Resulting from North American Afforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykleby, P.; Snyder, P. K.; Twine, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    The planting of trees and forests has long been accepted as a practical and efficient method to sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Assertive measures are now needed to ensure that atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) do not continue to rise and cause additional planetary warming. However, recent studies have detected inadvertent biophysical feedbacks associated with land cover changes, especially in higher northern latitudes. The changes in surface reflectivity that occur when converting a lighter, more reflective surface, such as a grassland or bare soil, into a darker conifer forest, can result in surface warming due to the forest absorbing more shortwave radiation. This warming counteracts the cooling effect resulting from a reduction in atmospheric CO2 with increased vegetation productivity. This effect is further intensified in the higher northern latitudes where snow cover is prevalent during the long winter; the planting of trees can significantly decrease the reflectivity compared with white snow. The goal of this study is to determine whether the amount of carbon sequestered exceeds the carbon equivalent of the radiative forcing due to the change in surface reflectivity. This study uses the IBIS dynamic vegetation model with modified carbon dynamics for conifer forests validated with numerous Ameriflux and Fluxnet Canada field sites with varying stand ages and species compositions. We present results of model performance based on validation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net radiation observations. Results from this study will be used to assess not only the net effect of conifer forest establishment on the long term carbon storage, but also the duration of time that a given location would remain a carbon sink during the lifetime of the forest. Only then, can policymakers begin to discuss the efficacy of afforestation as a sound climate mitigation strategy.

  19. 76 FR 63902 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of... preliminary results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan, 76 FR 33210 (June 8, 2011) (Preliminary Results)....

  20. Influence of mesophase activation conditions on the specific capacitance of the resulting carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, E.; Ruiz, V.; Santamaría, R.; Blanco, C.; Granda, M.; Menéndez, R.; Juarez-Galán, J. M.; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F.

    Mesophase pitch AR24 was directly activated with KOH using different proportions of the activating agent and activation temperatures, to study the effect on the textural characteristics of the resultant activated carbons and how these characteristics influence their behaviour as electrodes in supercapacitors. The textural properties of the activated carbons were studied by gas adsorption and immersion calorimetry. The results indicate that all the carbons produced were mainly microporous, with pore size around 1 nm. The behaviour of these carbons as electrodes in supercapacitors was studied from galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles. The specific capacitance values obtained were very high, reaching 400 and 200 F g -1 at low and high current densities respectively, for the sample activated with (5:1) KOH to mesophase ratio. Nevertheless, the reasons for this high capacitance values cannot be explained only on the basis of the textural characteristics of the activated carbons, as the results indicated that other factors might be also playing a significant role in their electrochemical behaviour.

  1. Allometry, nitrogen status, and carbon stable isotope composition of Pinus ponderosa seedlings in two growing media with contrasting nursery irrigation regimes

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Robert E. Brown

    2011-01-01

    Nursery irrigation regimes that recharged container capacity when target volumetric water content reached 72%, 58%, and 44% (by volume) influenced Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson & C. Lawson growth more than either a 1:1 (by volume) Sphagnum peat - vermiculite (PV) or a 7:3 (by volume) Sphagnum peat - sawdust (PS) medium. Exponential fertilization avoided...

  2. Monitoring changes in soil carbon resulting from intensive production, a non-traditional agricultural methodology.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Brian P.

    2013-03-01

    New Mexico State University and a group of New Mexico farmers are evaluating an innovative agricultural technique they call Intensive Production (IP). In contrast to conventional agricultural practice, IP uses intercropping, green fallowing, application of soil amendments and soil microbial inocula to sequester carbon as plant biomass, resulting in improved soil quality. Sandia National Laboratories role was to identify a non-invasive, cost effective technology to monitor soil carbon changes. A technological review indicated that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) best met the farmers objectives. Sandia partnered with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to analyze farmers test plots using a portable LIBS developed at LANL. Real-time LIBS field sample analysis was conducted and grab samples were collected for laboratory comparison. The field and laboratory results correlated well implying the strong potential for LIBS as an economical field scale analytical tool for analysis of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  3. Results of JET operation with continuous carbon and beryllium X-point target plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, C. G.; Ady, W. N.; Campbell, D. J.; Carman, P.; Clement, S.; Deksnis, E. B.; Gondhalekar, A.; Harbour, P. J.; Horton, L.; Janeschitz, G.; Lesourd, M.; Lingertat, J.; Pick, M. A.; Saibene, G.; Summers, D. D. R.; Thomas, P. R.

    1992-12-01

    The 1991/92 JET experimental campaign assessed the performance of three different toroidally continuous X-point target plates. The main differences were in the tile material, beryllium and carbon, and the presence of exposed edges. These three configurations have been tested up to power levels in excess of 22 MW and with gas fuelling at the X-point and in the midplane. With the beryllium a radiating divertor was achieved by puffing deuterium into the X-point region, while rapid ELMs resulted from deuterium puffing on the carbon target. The investigation into the importance of small edges, up to 1.5 mm, yielded some interesting results. Although the surface temperature rise was substantially reduced by eliminating exposed tile edges, the onset of the carbon bloom was not delayed by a similar amount. In this paper a model is presented which can explain this and other features of the bloom.

  4. Lateral expansion and carbon exchange of a boreal peatland in Finland resulting in 7000 years of positive radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathijssen, Paul J. H.; Kähkölä, Noora; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Lohila, Annalea; Minkkinen, Kari; Laurila, Tuomas; Väliranta, Minna

    2017-03-01

    Data on past peatland growth patterns, vegetation development, and carbon (C) dynamics during the various Holocene climate phases may help us to understand possible future climate-peatland feedback mechanisms. In this study, we analyzed and radiocarbon dated several peat cores from Kalevansuo, a drained bog in southern Finland. We investigated peatland succession and C dynamics throughout the Holocene. These data were used to reconstruct the long-term atmospheric radiative forcing, i.e., climate impact of the peatland since initiation. Kalevansuo peat records revealed a general development from fen to bog, typical for the southern boreal zone, but the timing of ombrotrophication varied in different parts of the peatland. Peat accumulation patterns and lateral expansion through paludification were influenced by fires and climate conditions. Long-term C accumulation rates were overall lower than the average values found from literature. We suggest the low accumulation rates are due to repeated burning of the peat surface. Drainage for forestry resulted in a nearly complete replacement of typical bog mosses by forest species within 40 years after drainage. The radiative forcing reconstruction suggested positive values (warming) for the first 7000 years following initiation. The change from positive to negative forcing was triggered by an expansion of bog vegetation cover and later by drainage. The strong relationship between peatland area and peat type with radiative forcing suggests a possible feedback for future changing climate, as high-latitude peatlands may experience prominent regime shifts, such as fen to bog transitions.

  5. 75 FR 4529 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes (pipes and tubes) from Thailand. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Review, 74...

  6. 77 FR 72818 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Final Results of... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Turkey.\\1\\ This review covers four producers and... section entitled ``Final Results of Review.'' \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes...

  7. 75 FR 62366 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  8. 78 FR 28190 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Final Results of... carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Mexico. The period of review (POR) is October 1... (the Act). \\1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results...

  9. Carbon Fixation Driven by Molecular Hydrogen Results in Chemolithoautotrophically Enhanced Growth of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Lisa G.; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Bayyareddy, Krishnareddy; Johnson, Darryl; Orlando, Ron; Evans, Alexandra L.; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A molecular hydrogen (H2)-stimulated, chemolithoautotrophic growth mode for the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is reported. In a culture medium containing peptides and amino acids, H2-supplied cells consistently achieved 40 to 60% greater growth yield in 16 h and accumulated 3-fold more carbon from [14C]bicarbonate (on a per cell basis) in a 10-h period than cells without H2. Global proteomic comparisons of cells supplied with different atmospheric conditions revealed that addition of H2 led to increased amounts of hydrogenase and the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACC), as well as other proteins involved in various cellular functions, including amino acid metabolism, heme synthesis, or protein degradation. In agreement with this result, H2-supplied cells contained 3-fold more ACC activity than cells without H2. Other possible carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation enzymes were not up-expressed under the H2-containing atmosphere. As the gastric mucus is limited in carbon and energy sources and the bacterium lacks mucinase, this new growth mode may contribute to the persistence of the pathogen in vivo. This is the first time that chemolithoautotrophic growth is described for a pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many pathogens must survive within host areas that are poorly supplied with carbon and energy sources, and the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori resides almost exclusively in the nutritionally stringent mucus barrier of its host. Although this bacterium is already known to be highly adaptable to gastric niches, a new aspect of its metabolic flexibility, whereby molecular hydrogen use (energy) is coupled to carbon dioxide fixation (carbon acquisition) via a described carbon fixation enzyme, is shown here. This growth mode, which supplements heterotrophy, is termed chemolithoautotrophy and has not been previously reported for a pathogen. PMID:26929299

  10. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: Geochemical modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-07-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  11. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: geochemical modeling and experimental results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  12. Organic and Elemental Carbon Filter Sets: Preparation Method and Interlaboratory Results

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ming; Birch, M. Eileen; Deye, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in climate, visibility, air quality, and human health effects, and they have been routinely monitored in workplace and environmental settings. Different thermal analysis methods have been applied to determine the carbon content of carbonaceous aerosols. Good agreement between results for total carbon (TC) generally has been found, but the organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) fractions determined by different methods often disagree. Measurement uncertainty is mainly due to pyrolysis and charring of OC sample components. Lack of reference materials has impeded progress on method standardization and understanding method biases. A relatively simple method for generating matched filter sets having known OC–EC contents is reported. After generation and analysis of each set to confirm agreement between filters, the filter sets were distributed to six laboratories for an interlaboratory comparison. Analytical results indicate a uniform carbon distribution for the filter sets and good agreement between the participating laboratories. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for mean TC (OC + EC), OC, and EC results for seven laboratories were <10, 11, and 12% (respectively). Except for one EC result (RSD = 16%), RSDs reported by individual laboratories for TC, OC, and EC were <12%. The method of filter generation is generally applicable and reproducible. Depending on the application, different filter loadings and types of OC materials can be employed. Matched filter sets prepared by the described approach can be used for determining the accuracy of OC–EC methods and thereby contribute to method standardization. PMID:22459320

  13. Organic and elemental carbon filter sets: preparation method and interlaboratory results.

    PubMed

    Chai, Ming; Birch, M Eileen; Deye, Greg

    2012-10-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in climate, visibility, air quality, and human health effects, and they have been routinely monitored in workplace and environmental settings. Different thermal analysis methods have been applied to determine the carbon content of carbonaceous aerosols. Good agreement between results for total carbon (TC) generally has been found, but the organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) fractions determined by different methods often disagree. Measurement uncertainty is mainly due to pyrolysis and charring of OC sample components. Lack of reference materials has impeded progress on method standardization and understanding method biases. A relatively simple method for generating matched filter sets having known OC-EC contents is reported. After generation and analysis of each set to confirm agreement between filters, the filter sets were distributed to six laboratories for an interlaboratory comparison. Analytical results indicate a uniform carbon distribution for the filter sets and good agreement between the participating laboratories. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for mean TC (OC + EC), OC, and EC results for seven laboratories were <10, 11, and 12% (respectively). Except for one EC result (RSD = 16%), RSDs reported by individual laboratories for TC, OC, and EC were <12%. The method of filter generation is generally applicable and reproducible. Depending on the application, different filter loadings and types of OC materials can be employed. Matched filter sets prepared by the described approach can be used for determining the accuracy of OC-EC methods and thereby contribute to method standardization.

  14. The effects of a variable temperature regime on the physiology of the reef-building coral Seriatopora hystrix: results from a laboratory-based reciprocal transplant.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Anderson B; Chan, Pei-Hsun; Putnam, Hollie M; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Fan, Tung-Yung

    2012-12-01

    To understand the effects of global climate change on reef-building corals, a thorough investigation of their physiological mechanisms of acclimatization is warranted. However, static temperature manipulations may underestimate the thermal complexity of the reefs in which many corals live. For instance, corals of Houbihu, Taiwan, experience changes in temperature of up to 10°C over the course of a day during spring-tide upwelling events. To better understand the phenotypic plasticity of these corals, a laboratory-based experiment was conducted whereby specimens of Seriatopora hystrix from an upwelling reef (Houbihu) and conspecifics from a non-upwelling reef (Houwan) were exposed to both a stable seawater temperature (26°C) regime and a regime characterized by a 6°C fluctuation (23-29°C) over a 12 h period for 7 days. A suite of physiological and molecular parameters was measured in samples of both treatments, as well as in experimental controls, to determine site of origin (SO) and temperature treatment (TT) responses. Only chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration and growth demonstrated the hypothesized trend of higher levels when exposed to a TT that mimicked SO conditions. In contrast, chl a, maximum dark-adapted quantum yield of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)), and Symbiodinium ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcL), photosystem I (psI, subunit III) and phosphoglycolate phosphatase (pgpase) mRNA expression demonstrated significant TT effects. Specifically, levels of these response variables were higher in samples exposed to a variable temperature regime, suggesting that S. hystrix may acclimate to fluctuating temperatures by increasing its capacity for photosynthesis.

  15. 78 FR 16247 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea; Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from the Republic of Korea... section entitled ``Final Results of Review.'' \\1\\ See Certain Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel...

  16. 75 FR 69626 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative... review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India... duty order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India. See Certain...

  17. 78 FR 65272 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand. This review covers two... carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand.\\1\\ We invited interested parties to comment on...

  18. 76 FR 27987 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Amended Final... on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand, which covered Saha Thai Steel Pipe... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

  19. 75 FR 64254 - Certain Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon Quality Steel Products From Brazil; Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon Quality Steel Products From Brazil... order on certain hot-rolled, flat-rolled carbon quality steel products (hot-rolled steel) from Brazil. See Certain Hot- Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon Quality Steel Products From Brazil: Preliminary Results of...

  20. 76 FR 42679 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of... certain hot- rolled carbon steel flat products from India manufactured by Essar Steel Limited (``Essar...\\ of this review. \\2\\ See Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Notice...

  1. 75 FR 43488 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of... duty (CVD) order on certain hot-rolled carbon steel flat products (hot-rolled carbon steel) from India for the period of review (POR) January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2008. See Certain...

  2. Tree-fall gaps and carbon cycling in the Brazilian Amazon: results from two large forest plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espirito-Santo, F.; Keller, M.; Linder, E.; De Oliveira, R., Jr.; Pereira, C.; Oliveira, C. G.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of gaps play a role in the regimes of tree mortality and production of coarse woody debris (CWD) in forests. Few studies have attempted to map the distribution of gaps in tropical forest and the production of CWD, a large pool of ecosystem carbon. Here we linked gap formation with carbon cycling through analysis of the CWD inside of gaps. We surveyed two large forest inventory plots of 114 and 53 ha of the Tapajós National Forest (TNF) in the Brazilian Amazon during 2008 and 2009, respectively. We mapped all gaps and collected data on light availability, CWD stocks and tree mortality in the field. Gap location, canopy opening (CO) and leaf area index (LAI) estimated in the field were compared with two IKONOS-2 high-resolution satellite images acquired approximately at the time of the field measurements. We provide the first statistics of CWD production based on gap size in the tropical forest literature. In the two large plots (167 ha total area) we found 96 gaps. The gaps represented 1.42% of the total area and gaps < 1 year old accounted for 0.81% of the plot area. In TNF, the production of CWD in recent gaps was 0.76 Mg C ha-1 year-1 and the mean tree mortality was 2.38 stems ha-1 year 1. The area of gaps estimated by using thresholds of light intensity measured by remote sensing optical instruments was twice as large as the gap areas measured on the ground. We found no significant correlation between spectral remote sensing images and CO and LAI, likely because the high faction of shadow in high-resolution satellite images. We conclude that less than 30% of the annual tree mortality and CWD flux was associated with gaps and the detection of gaps with high resolution optical remote sensing remains a challenge because of the high proportion of shadow in the those images. These results highlight the need for permanent plots for long-term carbon studies.

  3. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological ...

  4. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological ...

  5. Carbon and Water Flux Observations from AmeriFlux and Fluxnet: Some Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. E.

    2001-12-01

    Flux networks provide a means for scientists to make common measurements of carbon, water, and energy exchange, to share advancements in methods, and synthesize results across the network. AmeriFlux objectives are to: Determine how environmental factors and climate regulate ecosystem CO2 and H2O exchange over the short- and long-term, evaluate impacts of anthropogenic factors, and provide data and new understanding for incorporation into models. AmeriFlux is part of the larger international network, Fluxnet. Among Fluxnet sites, we investigated seasonal and annual CO2 and water vapor exchange, and relations with environmental variables to elucidate generalities within and among biomes. The data showed a strong linkage between carbon gain and water loss, with the highest water-use efficiency values for grasslands, and lowest values for tundra. Ecosystem respiration was only weakly correlated with mean annual temperature across biomes, in spite of sensitivity within site over shorter temporal scales. Mean annual temperature and site water balanced explained much of the variation in gross photosynthesis, whereby water availability limits LAI over the long-term, and inter-annual climate variability limits carbon uptake below the potential of the leaf area available for photosynthesis. We compared BIOME-BGC model results among AmeriFlux coniferous forests, and the model showed that variation in net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) is mostly a function of disturbance history, with important secondary effects from site climate, ecophysiology, and changing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen deposition.

  6. Assessing Error in Modelled Ocean Carbon Uptake Resulting From Uncertainty in Biogeochemical Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, V.; Kettle, H.; Merchant, C. J.; Hankin, R. K.

    2008-12-01

    Estimates of the air-sea CO2 flux produced by ocean biogeochemical models are uncertain due to poorly constrained model parameters. Here, we present the results of an analysis into the biochemical parameters that influence air-sea CO2 flux, and the error that results from uncertainties in these parameters in GCMs. A sensitivity analysis is performed on the Hadley centre Ocean Carbon Cycle (HadOCC) NPZD biogeochemical model used in the HadCM3 GCM. This uses a 1D test bed with forcing from different locations and identifies the parameters that control phytoplankton growth, formation of calcite and the sinking of organic matter to have greatest effect on the calculated air-sea CO2 flux. These parameters are tuned to data at sites with very different biochemical cycles and are then used to explore the resulting error in global ocean carbon fluxes within GCMs.

  7. Preliminary results on estimating permeability characteristics of carbonate rocks using pore microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Keehm, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation on pore microstructures from X-ray microtomography is regarded as a good tool to determine and characterize the physical properties of rocks, especially for sandstone. When the same approach is considered for carbonate rocks, we face many difficulties mostly from the heterogeneous nature of carbonates. In this study, we report preliminary results on permeability estimation of carbonate rocks from X-ray tomographic pore microstructures. Since carbonate rocks have quite different types of pore geometry depending on depositional and diagenetic environments, we choose three rock samples with different porosity types: interparticle; vuggy/moldic; and fracture, and obtain high-resolution 3D pore microstructures using X-ray microtomography technique. From the original 3D pore geometry (typically 2,000^3 voxels), we choose various digital sub-blocks to determine local variation and length dependency, and calculate permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method. For the interparticle case, the calculated permeability values show very similar trends to clastic sediments, and we can determine a porosity-permeability relation for a given formation as we do with the Koneny-Carman relation. On the other hand, for vuggy or fracture cases, we cannot observe any significant dependence of permeability on porosity. Thus we focus more on the local variation and scale variation of permeability. We perform analyses on percolation probability; local porosity distribution; and direction/length/width of fractures. And we present preliminary conceptual models to determine permeability characteristics. Although the results are from a few limited samples and more detailed researches will be required, our approach will be helpful to estimate and characterize permeability of carbonate rocks, and to investigate scaling and representativeness issues. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Basic Research Project of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and

  8. Redox freezing and melting in the Earth's deep mantle resulting from carbon-iron redox coupling.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, Arno; Schmidt, Max W

    2011-04-14

    Very low seismic velocity anomalies in the Earth's mantle may reflect small amounts of melt present in the peridotite matrix, and the onset of melting in the Earth's upper mantle is likely to be triggered by the presence of small amounts of carbonate. Such carbonates stem from subducted oceanic lithosphere in part buried to depths below the 660-kilometre discontinuity and remixed into the mantle. Here we demonstrate that carbonate-induced melting may occur in deeply subducted lithosphere at near-adiabatic temperatures in the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle. We show experimentally that these carbonatite melts are unstable when infiltrating ambient mantle and are reduced to immobile diamond when recycled at depths greater than ∼250 kilometres, where mantle redox conditions are determined by the presence of an (Fe,Ni) metal phase. This 'redox freezing' process leads to diamond-enriched mantle domains in which the Fe(0), resulting from Fe(2+) disproportionation in perovskites and garnet, is consumed but the Fe(3+) preserved. When such carbon-enriched mantle heterogeneities become part of the upwelling mantle, diamond will inevitably react with the Fe(3+) leading to true carbonatite redox melting at ∼660 and ∼250 kilometres depth to form deep-seated melts in the Earth's mantle.

  9. Moisture-temperature interactions in soil carbon fluxes as a result of substrate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, Fernando; Vasilyeva, Nadezda; Menichetti, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    Soil carbon fluxes are complex and often non-linear with respect to their drivers. Mechanistic soil carbon models have the capacity to simulate such non-linear responses, but identifying optimal model structures and parameterizations remains a challenge. In this study we focus on the combined effects of temperature and moisture on two soils contrasting in carbon content. We applied a data driven modelling approach to study the interactive effects of temperature and moisture on soil microbial CO2 production. Using a process-based model we found that substrate and enzyme dynamics create interactive effects that occurring in both directions. The observed interactions emerge in model simulations that combine diffusion with non-linear reaction kinetics. Diffusion limitations lead to a decoupling of respiration and decomposition fluxes and to differences in the response to temperature that occurs at all moisture levels but are more pronounced under drier, colder and generally low substrate conditions. Our model also demonstrates the time-dependent nature of temperature and moisture responses, a result that has implications for predictions at different time scales. The findings highlight the importance of moisture for understanding and predicting both short and long term soil carbon dynamics.

  10. Physiological changes of the lichen Parmotrema tinctorum as result of carbon nanotubes exposition.

    PubMed

    Viana, Camila de O; Vaz, Raissa P; Cano, Abraham; Santos, Adelina P; Cançado, Luiz G; Ladeira, Luiz O; Junior, Ary Corrêa

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) is one of the more abundant nanomaterial produced in the world. Therefore, it is desirable to access its effects in all environment compartments, in order to mitigate environmental distress. This study aims to verify the potential use of lichens - classical atmospheric pollution indicators - as biomonitors of carbon nanotubes aerosols. To examine cause-effect relationships, preserving environmental microclimatic parameters, the lichen Parmotrema tinctorum (Nyl.) Hale was transplanted to open top chambers where aerosols of CNT were daily added. Physiological parameters such as cell viability, photosynthetic efficiency, cell permeability as well as nanoparticle internalization were assessed. Carbon nanotubes exposure led to reduction on the cell viability of P. tinctorum. The treatment with 100µg/mL of MWCNT-COOH resulted in intracellular ion leakage, probably due to changes in membrane permeability. No alterations on photosynthetic efficiency were detected. Carbon nanotubes entrapment and internalization into the lichen thallus were observed. Short term exposition of CNT produced measurable physiological changes in P. tinctorum lichen. This suggests the possibility of use of lichens as models to assess the environmental impact (air related) of engineered nanomaterials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of resource availability and hydrological regime on autochthonous and allochthonous carbon in the food web of a large cross-border river (China).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanyuan; Niu, Jiangong; Zhou, Qiong; Xie, Congxin; Ke, Zhixin; Li, Dapeng; Gao, Yongwen

    2017-08-30

    Resource availability and flooding disturbance restrict the amount of energy available to the upper trophic level consumers and thus determine the trophic structure and energy mobilization in river food webs. In this study, we evaluated the availability of primary and secondary food resources, food web structure (determined by δ(13)C and δ(15)N) and relative contributions of autochthonous and allochthonous particulate carbon to aquatic consumers in the Irtysh River, which spans from northwest China to Kazakhstan and suffers from a long frozen period. Despite higher density and biomass, epilithic algae did not make large contributions to aquatic consumers due to the restriction of flow velocity, water depth and turbidity. Aquatic invertebrates specialized in utilization of terrestrial carbon sources, whereas fish varied from aquatic to riparian plants. Different resource use of aquatic consumers across the three reaches in the Irtysh River was ascribed to the spatial distribution of species and resource availability determined by flooding, flood scouring and dam construction. The trophic positions and food chain length at the upper reach were higher than those at the middle and lower reaches. These findings suggest that allochthonous carbon had an advantage over autochthonous carbon in supporting aquatic food webs of the Irtysh River. Higher availability of allochthonous particulate carbon might be relevant to intensive forest cover and high energy flood events in the Irtysh River. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer for IPDA Measurements of Tropospheric CO2: Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council's decadal survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space[1] recommended the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission for launch in 2013-2016 as a logical follow-on to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) which is scheduled for launch in late 2008 [2]. The use of a laser absorption measurement technique provides the required ability to make day and night measurements of CO2 over all latitudes and seasons. As a demonstrator for an approach to meeting the instrument needs for the ASCENDS mission we have developed the airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) which uses the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Spectrometer [3] technique operating in the 2 micron wavelength region.. During 2006 a short engineering checkout flight of the CO2LAS was conducted and the results presented previously [4]. Several short flight campaigns were conducted during 2007 and we report results from these campaigns.

  13. Carbon fiber composites inspection and defect characterization using active infrared thermography: numerical simulations and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Henrique; Zhang, Hai; Figueiredo, Alisson; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Guimarares, Gilmar; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Composite materials are widely used in the aeronautic industry. One of the reasons is because they have strength and stiffness comparable to metals, with the added advantage of significant weight reduction. Infrared thermography (IT) is a safe nondestructive testing technique that has a fast inspection rate. In active IT, an external heat source is used to stimulate the material being inspected in order to generate a thermal contrast between the feature of interest and the background. In this paper, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers are inspected using IT. More specifically, carbon/PEEK (polyether ether ketone) laminates with square Kapton inserts of different sizes and at different depths are tested with three different IT techniques: pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and line scan thermography. The finite element method is used to simulate the pulsed thermography experiment. Numerical results displayed a very good agreement with experimental results.

  14. The Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (CDR-MIP) Initial Results and Future Experiment Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, D. P.; Scott, V.; Lenton, A.; Vaughan, N.

    2016-12-01

    Continued anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are changing the climate threatening "severe, pervasive and irreversible" impacts. Inadequate emissions reduction is resulting in increased attention on Climate Intervention (CI) - deliberate interventions to counter climate change that seek to either modify the Earth's radiation budget, or remove the primary greenhouse gas from the atmosphere - Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR). The majority of future scenarios that do not exceed 2°C warming by 2100 include CDR methods. At present, there is little consensus on the efficacy and impacts of CDR and proposed CDR methods. In response, the Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (or CDR-MIP) has been initiated. This project brings together a suite of Earth System Models (ESMs) and Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICS) in a common framework to explore the potential, risks, and challenges of CDR and different proposed CDR methods. The first set of CDR-MIP experiments investigate climate "reversibility" and the response of the Earth system to idealized engineered permanent CO2 removal. Here we present early results of these experiments and also discuss the design and implementation of the next experiments that explore CDR via land use change and ocean alkalinization. In particular we will highlight which components of the simulated climate system exhibit "reversibility", when CO2 increases and then decreases, and the time scales over which this occurs. Many of the trends are similar in different models; however, there is some disagreement in the response of the simulated carbon cycle.

  15. Purification and sidewall functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and resulting bioactivity in two macrophage models

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Raymond F.; Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Ming; Ka, Ibrahima; Yang, Feng; Ma, Dongling; Porter, Dale W.; Wu, Nianqiang; Holian, Andrij

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the consequences of surface carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) on bioactivity. Since commercial raw MWCNT contain impurities that may affect their bioactivity, HCl refluxing was exploited to purify raw “as-received” MWCNT by removing the amorphous carbon layer on the MWCNT surface and reducing the metal impurities (e.g. Ni). The removal of amorphous carbon layer was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Furthermore, the HCl-purified MWCNT provided more available reaction sites, leading to enhanced sidewall functionalization. The sidewall of HCl-purified MWCNT was further functionalized with the −COOH moiety by HNO3 oxidation. This process resulted in four distinct MWCNT: raw, purified, −COOH-terminated raw MWCNT, and −COOH-terminated purified MWCNT. Freshly isolated alveolar macrophages from C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to these nanomaterials to determine the effects of the surface chemistry on the bioactivity in terms of cell viability and inflammasome activation. Inflammasome activation was confirmed using inhibitors of cathepsin B and Caspase-1. Purification reduced the cell toxicity and inflammasome activation slightly compared to raw MWCNT. In contrast, functionalization of MWCNT with the −COOH group dramatically reduced the cytotoxicity and inflammasome activation. Similar results were seen using THP-1 cells supporting their potential use for high-throughput screening. This study demonstrated that the toxicity and bioactivity of MWCNT were diminished by removal of the Ni contamination and/or addition of −COOH groups to the sidewalls. PMID:23480196

  16. Organic breakdown products resulting from hydrothermal carbonization of brewer's spent grain.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Koehler, R; Kopinke, F-D

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization of brewer's spent grain resulted in a solid hydrochar and an aqueous phase rich in macromolecular dissolved organic matter. Both phases were analyzed with regard to low molecular weight organic compounds (MW<500 Da) in lyophilized form by exhaustive solvent extraction followed by pre-chromatographic derivatization and GC/MS-analysis. Low molecular weight acids, O-functionalized phenols, cyclopentenone derivatives, and benzenediols accounted for the majority of organic analytes in both hydrothermal carbonization product streams while being absent in solvent extracts of the pristine biomass. The pattern of short chain functionalized acids in the pristine biomass and in the hydrothermally produced matrices turned out very different. Acylglycerines as the most abundant lipids in pristine brewer's spent grain were quantitatively hydrolyzed under hydrothermal conditions. The recovery of total fatty acids present in the pristine biomass amounted to 19%. The major fraction of hydrophobic breakdown products including fatty acids, fatty alcohols, and sterols was sorbed onto the hydrochar.

  17. Scattering of sulfur ions by carbon: Classical-trajectory Monte Carlo results

    SciTech Connect

    Slabkowska, Katarzyna; Polasik, Marek; Janowicz, Maciej

    2003-01-01

    We analyze classically the scattering of sulfur ions by carbon using the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method. It is assumed that the scatterer and scattered nuclei are coupled to each other as well as to all electrons, but there is no coupling between electrons themselves. To initialize the state of both atoms, quasiexact energies are used that are obtained from the Dirac-Fock method. Effective charges are used to partially take into account the intra-atomic interactions between electrons. We concentrate on the cross sections for production of vacancies in the K and L shells and capture of electrons to K, L, and M shells of the sulfur ions. The dependence of these cross sections on the energy of the projectile sulfur ions and on the initial charge states of these ions is analyzed. Our results will be helpful in the interpretation of x-ray spectra from highly ionized fast sulfur projectiles passing through a carbon foil.

  18. Basal insulin regime change from Lantus to Toujeo resulted in fewer hypoglycaemic episodes in a 28-year-old man with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shields, Alexandra; Sankaranarayanan, Sailesh

    2016-06-15

    An active 28-year-old man with type 1 diabetes mellitus reported a reduced number of hypoglycaemic episodes following change in basal regime insulin glargine from U100 Lantus to U300 Toujeo. Consequently, an improved quality of life was also reported. Flash-based glucose monitoring was utilised to record 24-hour continuous glucose levels throughout two comparable 60-day periods before and after the change in regimen. Low blood glucose was most likely between 03:00 and 08:00. Nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes (≤3.9 mmol/L) reduced by an average of 2.5 episodes per week. Severe hypoglycaemic episodes (≤2.9 mmol/L) reduced to an average of 0.4 per week, down from 1.5 per week. Nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes reduced in frequency and severity. Furthermore, nocturnal hypoglycaemia episodes occurred in a more predictable time window. This was especially important in the reported reduction of impact on the patient's quality of life, as the episodes tended to be associated with anxiety and low mood. Patient education needed to facilitate this change was minimal, and benefits to the patient were great, including decreased sleep disturbances and reduced risk of associated anxiety symptoms.

  19. 75 FR 32911 - Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  20. 76 FR 33210 - Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  1. The impact of subgrid-scale vegetation distribution on the results of terrestrial carbon cycle modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Dennis; Eliseev, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    To understand the behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under changing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and climate it is essential to integrate and improve an interactive carbon cycle in all climate models, including Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs). Vegetation distribution and dynamics in each grid cell of these models due to their coarse resolution remains the key area of uncertainty. The present paper focuses on the impact of different mosaic approaches implemented in climate model on the main carbon cycle parameters, such as primary production and carbon stocks. In this study we use the new version of the A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS) climate model (CM) [1], which terrestrial carbon cycle module was improved by implementing subgrid-scale heterogeneity of plant functional types (PFT). Moreover, two additional PFTs were added: natural wetlands and bare land/deserts. The model was also extended by including the nitrogen limitation for plant photosynthesis. Different scenarios of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing described in the EMIC AR5 protocol [http://climate.uvic.ca/EMICAR5], were considered in simulations for the period of time from 850 to 2300 yr. In the 21st-23rd centuries simulations external forcing was prescribed according to the RCP (Representative Concentration Pathways) scenarios [2]. Natural vegetation in each 4.5°×6° grid cell was arranged in two different ways: 1) with a dominant PFT, spread on the whole grid cell space (mosaic-1), and 2) with all PFTs that are may be present in a grid cell (mosaic-2). In addition to natural vegetation, changes in agricultural area prescribed by CMIP5 scenarios were taken into account. Numerical experiments show that consideration of subgrid-scale PFT inhomogeneities results in 3 PgC yr-1 increase in global gross primary production (GPP) during the preindustrial period and the early 20th century. This growth is more

  2. Ecosystem Model Performance at Wetlands: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulman, B. N.; Desai, A. R.; Schroeder, N. M.; NACP Site Synthesis Participants

    2011-12-01

    Northern peatlands contain a significant fraction of the global carbon pool, and their responses to hydrological change are likely to be important factors in future carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. Global-scale carbon cycle modeling studies typically use general ecosystem models with coarse spatial resolution, often without peatland-specific processes. Here, seven ecosystem models were used to simulate CO2 fluxes at three field sites in Canada and the northern United States, including two nutrient-rich fens and one nutrient-poor, sphagnum-dominated bog, from 2002-2006. Flux residuals (simulated - observed) were positively correlated with measured water table for both gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) at the two fen sites for all models, and were positively correlated with water table at the bog site for the majority of models. Modeled diurnal cycles at fen sites agreed well with eddy covariance measurements overall. Eddy covariance GEP and ER were higher during dry periods than during wet periods, while model results predicted either the opposite relationship or no significant difference. At the bog site, eddy covariance GEP had no significant dependence on water table, while models predicted higher GEP during wet periods. All models significantly over-estimated GEP at the bog site, and all but one over-estimated ER at the bog site. Carbon cycle models in peatland-rich regions could be improved by incorporating better models or measurements of hydrology and by inhibiting GEP and ER rates under saturated conditions. Bogs and fens likely require distinct treatments in ecosystem models due to differences in nutrients, peat properties, and plant communities.

  3. First results from Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) and prospects for OCO-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldering, Annmarie; Basilio, Ralph; Schimel, David; O'Dell, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Since September 6, 2014, NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) instrument has been routinely returning almost one million soundings of the column averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, over the sunlit hemisphere each day. On monthly time scales, 7 to 21% of these soundings are sufficiently cloud free to yield full-column estimates of XCO2 of the with single sounding random errors near 0.5 parts per million (ppm) at solar zenith angles as large as 70 degrees. These XCO2 estimates are being validated against results obtained from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and other standards to assess their accuracy and correct regional scale biases. After correction, the median bias between OCO-2 and TCCON XCO2 estimates is less than 0.5 ppm, and root-mean-square (RMS) differences are typically less than 1.5 ppm. The OCO-2 data are now being used to investigate the impacts of the 2015/2016 El Nino on the carbon cycle, as well as examples of local emission enhancements and the seasonal patterns of solar induced fluorescence. Highlights of the latest science findings will be presented. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3 (OCO-3) instrument will explore, for the first time, daily variations in the release and uptake of carbon dioxide by plants and trees in the major tropical rainforests of South America, Africa, and Southeast Asia, the largest stores of aboveground carbon on our planet. NASA will develop and assemble the instrument using spare materials from OCO-2 and host the instrument on the International Space Station (ISS) (earliest launch readiness in early 2018.) The low-inclination ISS orbit lets OCO-3 sample the tropics and sub-tropics across the full range of daylight hours with dense observations at northern and southern mid-latitudes (+/- 52°). At the same time, OCO-3 will also collect measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) over these areas. The instrument utilizes an agile, 2-axis pointing mechanism (PMA), providing

  4. 77 FR 61738 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... preliminary results of administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel... (Pacific Pipe) and Saha Thai Steel Pipe (Public) Company, Ltd. (Saha Thai). Based on our analysis of...

  5. 78 FR 79665 - Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... order on welded carbon steel standard pipe and tube products (welded pipe and tube) from Turkey.\\1\\ The... Tube Products from Turkey: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2011-2012,...

  6. Advancements for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, M. D.; Nehrir, A. R.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Kooi, S. A.; Choi, Y.; Plant, J.; Yang, M. M.; Antill, C.; Campbell, J. F.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E. V.; Meadows, B.; Dobler, J. T.; Zaccheo, T. S.; Moore, B., III; Crowell, S.

    2014-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave lidar system recently developed at NASA Langley Research Center that seeks to advance technologies and techniques critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. These advancements include: (1) increasing the power-aperture product to approach ASCENDS mission requirements by implementing multi-aperture telescopes and multiple co-aligned laser transmitters; (2) incorporating high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) developing and incorporating a high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration operation on Global Hawk aircraft, and (4) advancing algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument architecture is being developed for operation on high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. ACES simultaneously transmits five laser beams: three from commercial EDFAs operating near 1571 nm, and two from the Exelis oxygen (O2) Raman fiber laser amplifier system operating near 1260 nm. The Integrated-Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar approach is used at both wavelengths to independently measure the CO2 and O2 column number densities and retrieve the average column CO2 mixing ratio. The outgoing laser beams are aligned to the field of view of ACES' three fiber-coupled 17.8-cm diameter athermal telescopes. The backscattered light collected by the three telescopes is sent to the detector/TIA subsystem, which has a bandwidth of 4.7 MHz and operates service-free using a tactical dewar and cryocooler. Two key laser modulation approaches are being tested to significantly mitigate the effects of thin clouds on the retrieved CO2 column amounts. Full instrument development concluded in the

  7. A comparison of simulation results from two terrestrial carbon cycle models using three climate data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Akihiko; Sasai, Takahiro

    2006-11-01

    This study addressed how different climate data sets influence simulations of the global terrestrial carbon cycle. For the period 1982-2001, we compared the results of simulations based on three climate data sets (NCEP/NCAR, NCEP/DOE AMIP-II and ERA40) employed in meteorological, ecological and biogeochemical studies and two different models (BEAMS and Sim-CYCLE). The models differed in their parameterizations of photosynthetic and phenological processes but used the same surface climate (e.g. shortwave radiation, temperature and precipitation), vegetation, soil and topography data. The three data sets give different climatic conditions, especially for shortwave radiation, in terms of long-term means, linear trends and interannual variability. Consequently, the simulation results for global net primary productivity varied by 16%-43% only from differences in the climate data sets, especially in these regions where the shortwave radiation data differed markedly: differences in the climate data set can strongly influence simulation results. The differences among the climate data set and between the two models resulted in slightly different spatial distribution and interannual variability in the net ecosystem carbon budget. To minimize uncertainty, we should pay attention to the specific climate data used. We recommend developing an accurate standard climate data set for simulation studies.

  8. Preliminary results of carbon cycling in southwestern ecosystems: Implications for climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Klopatek, C.C. |; Murphy, K.L.; Klopatek, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    By determining the C pool sizes, cycling and relative sequestering rates, the authors intend to estimate the effects of a vegetation change caused by a temperature increase and available moisture decrease. A predominant source of C for the soil compartment is the plant litter and its subsequent decomposition. The resulting effect of temperature and moisture on decomposition will vary according to the biome and litter quality of that biome. Litter quality, referring to the carbon and other nutrient fractions, strongly influences the potential rate of decomposition. The preliminary findings indicate that litter quality and moisture, not temperature, are the major controlling variables in decomposition.

  9. Carbonated Eclogite Solidus Between 14 and 20 GPa: Results from the Model CMAS-CO2 System and Contrasting Solidus Behavior to Carbonated Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshav, S.; Gudfinnsson, G. H.

    2007-12-01

    , and magnesite. From average calculated melting reactions along these isobarically univariant curves, stishovite is produced upon melting at all pressures investigated. Significantly, cpx at 14 and 16 GPa and capv at 20 GPa are the dominant contributors toward melt production/composition, in contrast to lower pressures (3-8 GPa) where carbonate dominantly contributes toward melt generation/composition at the solidus. The solidus of model carbonated eclogite at 14, 16, and 20 GPa, lies at 1350, 1450, and 1600 degrees C, respectively, and is nearly linear in P-T space. Melts in equilibrium with all the crystalline phases are highly calcic (Ca no.-0.70), resembling calcio-carbonatites. When magnesite is exhausted from the crystalline assemblage, the melts become slightly less calcic (Ca no.-65). The model carbonated eclogite solidus is always lower than the model carbonated peridotite solidus in the same pressure range. The most remarkable feature of this work is the absence of a drop in the solidus of model carbonated eclogite between 14 and 16 GPa, a result that is in stark contrast to that observed for the model carbonated peridotite at identical pressures. Therefore, even though the solidus temperatures in both carbonated peridotite and eclogite are strongly influenced by the presence of crystalline carbonate, melt compositions and the shape of the solidus in the pressure range investigated seem to be dominantly controlled by the silicate component of the rock in question. Given these results, it is fair to say that a wide range of petrological and geochemical processes operate at these depths in the mantle, and that we have barely scratched the surface in our investigation.

  10. Analysis of State and Federal Regulatory Regimes Potentially Governing the Extraction of Water from Carbon Storage Reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Jenna N.; Harto, Christopher B.; Clark, Corrie E.

    2016-11-01

    Extracted water—water brought to the surface of the ground during carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects to create additional room for carbon dioxide injection—exists in a murky legal environment. As part of a broader attempt to identify the complex interactions between water resource policies and CCS, an analysis was undertaken at both the state and the federal level to scope the policy environments surrounding extracted water policies and laws. Six states (California, Illinois, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, and Texas) were chosen for this analysis because either active CCS work is currently underway, or the potential exists for future work. Although regulation of extracted waters could potentially occur at many points along the CCS life cycle, this paper focuses on regulation that may apply when the water is withdrawn—that is, accessed and removed from the saline aquifer—and when it is re-injected in a close but unconnected aquifer. It was found that no regulations exist for this source specifically. In addition, greater input is needed from regulators and policy makers in terms of defining this resource. In particular, regulation of extracted waters (and CCS activities broadly) often overlaps with the management of fluids produced during oil and gas development. Many regulations would apply to extracted waters if they were classified as such. Therefore, correct categorization is key as the industry in this space continues to grow.

  11. Sequential growth of deformation bands in carbonate grainstones in the hangingwall of an active growth fault: Implications for deformation mechanisms in different tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotevatn, Atle; Thorsheim, Elin; Bastesen, Eivind; Fossmark, Heidi S. S.; Torabi, Anita; Sælen, Gunnar

    2016-09-01

    Deformation bands in porous sandstones have been extensively studied for four decades, whereas comparatively less is known about deformation bands in porous carbonate rocks, particularly in extensional settings. Here, we investigate porous grainstones of the Globigerina Limestone Formation in Malta, which contain several types of deformation bands in the hangingwall of the Maghlaq Fault: (i) bed-parallel pure compaction bands (PCB); (ii) pressure solution-dominated compactive shear bands (SCSB) and iii) cataclasis-dominated compactive shear bands (CCSB). Geometric and kinematic analyses show that the bands formed sequentially in the hangingwall of the evolving Maghlaq growth fault. PCBs formed first due to fault-controlled subsidence and vertical loading; a (semi-)tectonic control on PCB formation is thus documented for the first time in an extensional setting. Pressure solution (dominating SCSBs) and cataclasis (dominating CCSBs) appear to have operated separately, and not in concert. Our findings therefore suggest that, in some carbonate rocks, cataclasis within deformation bands may develop irrespective of whether pressure solution processes are involved. We suggest this may be related to stress state, and that whereas pressure solution is a significant facilitator of grain size reduction in contractional settings, grain size reduction within deformation bands in extensional settings is less dependent on pressure solution processes.

  12. Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

    2005-02-17

    In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

  13. Carbon dioxide removal system for closed loop atmosphere revitalization, candidate sorbents screening and test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, E. M.; Knox, J. C.; Bardot, D. M.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the difficulty and expense it costs to resupply manned-spacecraft habitats, a goal is to create a closed loop atmosphere revitalization system, in which precious commodities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water are continuously recycled. Our aim is to test other sorbents for their capacity for future spacecraft missions, such as on the Orion spacecraft, or possibly lunar or Mars mission habitats to see if they would be better than the zeolite sorbents on the 4-bed molecular sieve. Some of the materials being tested are currently used for other industry applications. Studying these sorbents for their specific spacecraft application is different from that for applications on earth because in space, there are certain power, mass, and volume limitations that are not as critical on Earth. In manned-spaceflight missions, the sorbents are exposed to a much lower volume fraction of CO2 (0.6% volume CO2) than on Earth. LiLSX was tested for its CO2 capacity in an atmosphere like that of the ISS. Breakthrough tests were run to establish the capacities of these materials at a partial pressure of CO2 that is seen on the ISS. This paper discusses experimental results from benchmark materials, such as results previously obtained from tests on Grade 522, and the forementioned candidate materials for the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) system.

  14. 77 FR 20782 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes have been made below normal value (NV) during the March...

  15. 75 FR 16439 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From Turkey: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Countervailing Duty Administrative Review AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipe from Turkey... carbon steel pipe and tube products from Turkey. See Countervailing Duty Order: Certain Welded Carbon...

  16. 78 FR 26748 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary... duty order on certain activated carbon from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') for the period of... The merchandise subject to the order is certain activated carbon.\\1\\ The products are...

  17. Results from the CCSM Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Thornton, P.; Lee, Y. J.; Covey, C. C.

    2007-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Biogeochemistry Working Group has initiated an intercomparison of terrestrial biosphere models running within the CCSM framework. Called the CCSM Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), its purpose is to allow the U.S. scientific community to evaluate the performance of biogeochemical cycling models within CCSM and to identify the most important processes for inclusion in future versions of CCSM. Two terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to CCSM---CLM3-CASA' and CLM3-CN---have been evaluated following a set of carefully crafted experiments that build upon the C4MIP Phase 1 protocol. In Experiment 1, the models were forced with an improved NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set, while in Experiment 2, the models were coupled to the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3) with carbon, water, and energy exchanges over the 20th century. Unlike with most model intercomparisons, for C-LAMP a model performance methodology based on comparison against best-available observational data sets has been developed. Scalar metrics for each model are derived from comparisons against measurements of net primary production, leaf area index, the seasonal cycle of CO2, carbon stocks, and energy. Results from both experiments for CLM3- CASA' and CLM3-CN will be presented, along with recommendations for future evaluations of terrestrial models. C-LAMP model output will be made available by the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) via the Earth System Grid (ESG). C-LAMP is a sub-project of the Computational Climate Science End Station headed by Dr. Warren Washington, using computing resources at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS).

  18. 78 FR 19210 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea...) has completed its administrative review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant...\\ See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results...

  19. 78 FR 286 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Amended Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-03

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative... and tubes from Turkey for the period of review (POR) May 1, 2010, through April 30, 2011.\\1\\ We are..., as amended (the Act). \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Turkey; Final...

  20. 75 FR 1495 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Preliminary Results of Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... governments of Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Karnataka. On July 30, 2009, the... Review: Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate from the Republic of Korea, 71 FR 38861 (July 10..., 2008) (Preliminary Results of Fourth HRS Review) and Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From...

  1. Whole-canopy carbon gain as a result of selection on individual performance of ten genotypes of a clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Peter J; Anten, Niels P R; Stuefer, Josef F; During, Heinjo J

    2013-06-01

    Game theoretical models predict that plant competition for light leads to reduced productivity of vegetation stands through selection for traits that maximize carbon gains of individuals. Using empirical results from a 5-year competition experiment with 10 genotypes of the clonal plant Potentilla reptans, we tested this prediction by analyzing the effects of the existing leaf area values on the carbon gain of the different genotypes and the consequent whole canopy carbon gain. We focused on specific leaf area (SLA) due to its role in the trade-off between light capture area and photosynthetic capacity per unit area. By combining a canopy model based on measured leaf area and light profiles with a game theoretical approach, we analyzed how changes in the SLA affected genotypic and whole-stand carbon gain. This showed that all genotypes contributed to reduced stand productivity. The dominant genotype maximized its share of total carbon gain, resulting in lower than maximal absolute gain. Other genotypes did not maximize their share. Hypothetical mutants of the dominant genotype were not able to achieve a higher carbon gain. Conversely, in other genotypes, some mutations did result in increased carbon gain. Hence, genotypic differences in the ability to maximize performance may determine genotype frequency. It shows how genotypic selection may result in lower carbon gains of the whole vegetation, and of the individual genotypes it consists of, through similar mechanisms as those that lead to the tragedy of the commons.

  2. 77 FR 66954 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results of... on carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Mexico. The period of review is October 1... certain alloy steel wire rod. The product is currently classified under the Harmonized Tariff Schedule...

  3. 77 FR 69790 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From the People's Republic of China: Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From the People's Republic of... Results of the 2010-2011 administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain hot- rolled carbon steel flat products (``hot-rolled steel'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). The period...

  4. Nano-hillock formation in diamond-like carbon induced by swift heavy projectiles in the electronic stopping regime: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwen, D.; Bringa, E.; Krauser, J.; Weidinger, A.; Trautmann, C.; Hofsaess, H.

    2012-09-10

    The formation of surface hillocks in diamond-like carbon is studied experimentally and by means of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} atoms combined with a thermal spike model. The irradiation experiments with swift heavy ions cover a large electronic stopping range between {approx}12 and 72 keV/nm. Both experiments and simulations show that beyond a stopping power threshold, the hillock height increases linearly with the electronic stopping, and agree extremely well assuming an efficiency of approximately 20% in the transfer of electronic energy to the lattice. The simulations also show a transition of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding along the tracks with the hillocks containing almost no sp{sup 3} contribution.

  5. [Tribological properties of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic. Experimental and clinical results].

    PubMed

    Früh, H J; Ascherl, R; Hipp, E

    1997-02-01

    Wear of the articulating components (especially PE-UHMW) of total hip endoprostheses is the most important technical factor limiting the functional lifetime. To minimize wear debris, ceramic heads, according to ISO 6474 (Al2O3), have been used, from 1969 paired with Al2O3 and since 1975 paired with PE-UHMW. Al2O3 balls articulating with cups made from CFRP have been in clinical use since 1988. Laboratory experiments and in-vivo testing showed minimized wear debris and mild biological response to wear products using CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) instead of PE-UHMW as the cup material. The articulating surfaces of retrieved ceramic heads (Al2O3-Biolox) and cementless CFRP cups (carbon fiber reinforced plastic, Caproman) were compared using sphericity measurement techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and roughness measurements (including advanced roughness parameters Rvk or Rpk according to ISO 4287). Altogether, the first results of the clinical study showed that the combination Al2O3-ball/CFRP-cup came up to the expected lower wear rates compared with the conventional combinations. The wear rates are comparable with the combination Al2O3/Al2O3 without the material-related problems of ceramic components in all ceramic combinations.

  6. A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from Global Data Analysis Project (GLODAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Robert; Kozyr, Alexander; Sabine, Chris; Lee, K.; Wanninkhof, R.; Bullister, J.L.; Feely, R. A.; Millero, F. J.; Mordy, C.; Peng, T.-H.

    2004-01-01

    During the 1990s, ocean sampling expeditions were carried out as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS), and the Ocean Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study (OACES). Subsequently, a group of U.S. scientists synthesized the data into easily usable and readily available products. This collaboration is known as the Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP). Results were merged into a common format data set, segregated by ocean. For comparison purposes, each ocean data set includes a small number of high-quality historical cruises. The data were subjected to rigorous quality control procedures to eliminate systematic data measurement biases. The calibrated 1990s data were used to estimate anthropogenic CO{sub 2}, potential alkalinity, CFC watermass ages, CFC partial pressure, bomb-produced radiocarbon, and natural radiocarbon. These quantities were merged into the measured data files. The data were used to produce objectively gridded property maps at a 1{sup o} resolution on 33 depth surfaces chosen to match existing climatologies for temperature, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients. The mapped fields are interpreted as an annual mean distribution in spite of the inaccuracy in that assumption. Both the calibrated data and the gridded products are available from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. Here we describe the important details of the data treatment and the mapping procedure, and present summary quantities and integrals for the various parameters.

  7. Granular Activated Carbon Treatment May Result in Higher Predicted Genotoxicity in the Presence of Bromide.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Stuart W; Lee, Tiffany Chih Fen; Westerhoff, Paul; Fischer, Natalia; Hanigan, David; Karanfil, Tanju; Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Taylor-Edmonds, Liz; Andrews, Robert C

    2016-09-06

    Certain unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are more of a health concern than regulated DBPs. Brominated species are typically more cytotoxic and genotoxic than their chlorinated analogs. The impact of granular activated carbon (GAC) on controlling the formation of regulated and selected unregulated DBPs following chlorine disinfection was evaluated. The predicted cyto- and genotoxicity of DBPs was calculated using published potencies based on the comet assay for Chinese hamster ovary cells (assesses the level of DNA strand breaks). Additionally, genotoxicity was measured using the SOS-Chromotest (detects DNA-damaging agents). The class sum concentrations of trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, and unregulated DBPs, and the SOS genotoxicity followed the breakthrough of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), however the formation of brominated species did not. The bromide/DOC ratio was higher than the influent through much of the breakthrough curve (GAC does not remove bromide), which resulted in elevated brominated DBP concentrations in the effluent. Based on the potency of the haloacetonitriles and halonitromethanes, these nitrogen-containing DBPs were the driving agents of the predicted genotoxicity. GAC treatment of drinking or reclaimed waters with appreciable levels of bromide and dissolved organic nitrogen may not control the formation of unregulated DBPs with higher genotoxicity potencies.

  8. Results and Discussion on Physical Property Calculation from Pore Microstructures of Carbonate Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Keehm, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report results and discussion on the physical properties estimation of carbonate rocks using pore microstructures. We obtained high-resolution 3D microstructures with different porosity-types (inter-particle, vuggy/moldic, and fracture) from the X-ray microtomography technique. We calculated permeability, electrical conductivity, and P-wave velocity using the Lattice-Boltzmann method and finite element methods. We also applied the pore-scale simulation techniques to different sub-blocks from the original 3D pore geometry (2,0003 voxels) to determine the heterogeneity of pore geometry. For the inter-particle porosity-type, the calculated transport properties (permeability and electrical conductivity) show very similar trends to clastic sediments. These relations can be modeled by common empirical relations such as Kozeny-Carman relation for porosity-permeability or Archie's equation for porosity-formation factor. For the vuggy or fracture porosity-type, it is difficult to determine any consistent relations; therefore we tried to build conceptual models with cracks or vugs to establish quantitative relations. On the other hand, P-wave velocity showed very little dependence on the porosity-types, due to high frame stiffness of carbonate rocks. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Basic Research Project of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy of Korea (GP2012-029).

  9. Incorporation of inorganic carbon by Antarctic cryptoendolithic fungi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J. Jr; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Fungi isolated from the cryptoendolithic community of the Ross Desert are capable of fixing inorganic carbon. Results suggest that lichen mycobionts and parasymbionts are adapted to different water regimes in the cryptoendolithic environment.

  10. Incorporation of inorganic carbon by Antarctic cryptoendolithic fungi.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R J; Friedmann, E I

    1988-01-01

    Fungi isolated from the cryptoendolithic community of the Ross Desert are capable of fixing inorganic carbon. Results suggest that lichen mycobionts and parasymbionts are adapted to different water regimes in the cryptoendolithic environment.

  11. Incorporation of inorganic carbon by Antarctic cryptoendolithic fungi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J. Jr; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Fungi isolated from the cryptoendolithic community of the Ross Desert are capable of fixing inorganic carbon. Results suggest that lichen mycobionts and parasymbionts are adapted to different water regimes in the cryptoendolithic environment.

  12. Preliminary Results from the CCSM Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C- LAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Fung, I.; Randerson, J.; Thornton, P.; Stöckli, R.; Heinsch, F.; Running, S.; Hibbard, K.; John, J.; Covey, C.; Foley, J.; Post, W. M.; Hargrove, W. W.; Erickson, D. J.; Mahowald, N.

    2006-12-01

    The Biogeochemistry Working Group for the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) has initiated an intercomparison of terrestrial biosphere models running within the CCSM framework. Called the CCSM Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), its purpose is to allow the U.S. scientific community to evaluate the performance of biogeochemical cycling models within CCSM and to identify the most important processes for inclusion in a biosphere model participating in simulations supporting the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Three terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to CCSM---CLM3-CASA', CLM3-CN, and LSX-IBIS---will be evaluated following a set of carefully crafted experiments that build upon the C4MIP Phase 1 protocol. In Experiment 1, the models will be forced with an improved NCAR/NCAR reanalysis data set, while in Experiment 2, the models will be coupled to the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3) with carbon, water, and energy exchanges over the 20th century. In order to quickly verify and validate the performance of these biogeochemistry models against high quality observations, a set of offline runs for Fluxnet tower sites have been performed using observed meteorology. Certain biogeochemical, hydrological, physiological, and radiation fields have been saved hourly for intercomparison across models and with high frequency tower measurements. An analysis of the offline flux tower runs will be presented along with preliminary results from the global experiments run within the CCSM framework. Model results will be made available by the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) via the Earth System Grid (ESG), and this presentation will include an invitation for community participation in the analysis and evaluation of the model results. C-LAMP is a subproject of the Computational Climate Science End Station headed by Dr. Warren Washington, using computing resources at the

  13. Effects of free air carbon dioxide enrichment and drought stress on the feed value of maize silage fed to sheep at different thermal regimes.

    PubMed

    Lohölter, Malte; Meyer, Ulrich; Manderscheid, Remy; Weigel, Hans-Joachim; Erbs, Martin; Flachowsky, Gerhard; Dänicke, Sven

    2012-08-01

    Information about the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration and drought on the feed value of maize silage and interactions with the thermal environment during feeding is limited. A free air carbon dioxide enrichment facility was operated in a maize field to generate an elevated CO2 concentration of 550 ppm. Drought was induced by the exclusion of precipitation in one half of all experimental plots. Plants were harvested, chopped and ensiled. In a balance experiment on sheep, the nutrient digestibility was determined for three climatic treatments (temperate, temperature humidity index (THI) 57-63; mild heat, THI 68-71; severe heat, THI 75-80). The CO2 concentration and drought did not alter the crude nutrient content of silage dry matter (DM) or nutrient and organic matter (OM) digestibility. Drought increased the concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON, p < 0.001). The drought-associated increase of DON was reduced by CO2 enrichment (p = 0.003). The lowest digestibility of acid detergent fibre (p = 0.024) and neutral detergent fibre (p = 0.005) was observed during the coldest climate. OM digestibility increased during mild heat (p = 0.023). This study did not indicate considerable alterations of the feed value of maize silage due to increased atmospheric CO2 and drought. Enriched CO2 may decrease DON contaminations during drought. The thermal environment during the balance experiment did not interact with feeding maize silage grown under elevated CO2, but may affect cell wall and OM digestibility.

  14. Radiative Forcing associated with Particulate Carbon Emissions resulting from the Use of Mercury Control Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, H.; Penner, J. E.; Lin, G.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury is a persistent, toxic metal that bio-accumulates within the food web and causes neurological damage and fetal defects in humans. The U.S. was the first country to regulate the leading anthropogenic source of mercury into the atmosphere: coal combustion for electric power generation. The U.S. EPA's 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) was replaced and further tightened in 2012 by the Mercury and Air Toxics Standard (MATS), which required existing coal-fired utilities to reduce their mercury emissions by approximately 90% by 2015. Outside the U.S., the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has passed the legally binding Minamata global mercury treaty that compels its signatory countries to prevent and reduce the emission and release of mercury. The most mature technology for controlling mercury emissions from coal combustion is the injection into the flue gas of powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbents having chemically treated surfaces designed to rapidly oxidize and adsorb mercury. However, such PAC is known to have electrical properties that make it difficult to remove from flue gas via electrostatic precipitation, by far the most common particulate control technology used in countries such as the U.S., India, and China which rely heavily on coal for power generation. As a result, PAC used to control mercury emissions can be emitted into the atmosphere, the sub-micron fraction of which may result in unintended radiative forcing similar to black carbon (BC). Here, we estimate the potential increases in secondary BC emissions, those not produced from combustion but arising instead from the use of injected PAC for mercury emission reduction. We also calculate the radiative forcing associated with these secondary BC emissions by using a global atmospheric chemical transport model coupled with a radiative transfer model.

  15. A Terrestrial Ecosystem Full Verified Carbon Accounting for Russian Land: Results and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvidenko, A.; Schepaschenko, D.; Maksyutov, S.

    2010-12-01

    We present a terrestrial full carbon account (FCA) for Russian land in a spatially explicit form for 2009 and aggregated country-wide annual estimates for 2004-2008. The integrated methodology of the FCA takes into account the fuzzy character of the studied systems. IIASA’s landscape-ecosystem approach (LEA) is used for designing the account boundaries and assessment of major pools and fluxes. An Integrated Land Information System (ILIS) serves as the information background of the FCA. The ILIS is based on a system integration of all available ground data and multi-sensor remote sensing applications. The ILIS includes a georeferenced hybrid land cover (~500 land classes, resolution 1 x 1 km), corresponding attributive datasets and sets of empirical and semi-empirical ecosystem and landscape models. The latter are based on long-period measurements of ecological parameters with corrections - if necessary - due to weather specifics of individual growth seasons. On average, terrestrial ecosystems of Russia served as a sink of roughly 0.6 Pg C yr-1 during the last five years which exceeds the technosphere’s emissions of the country by about one third. Two major fluxes (net primary production and heterotrophic respiration) for all productive lands of the country are estimated at 323 and 204 g C yr-1 m-2, respectively. Disturbance and consumption of plant products comprise from 15 to 20% of the net primary production. Forests serve as a major component of the sink (~85% of the country’s total). Disturbed forests and peatlands, as well as cultivated agricultural lands, are a relatively small carbon source. The interannual variability of the net ecosystem carbon balance are mostly driven by climatic conditions and natural disturbance (fire, insects) of the growth periods and is in limits of 10-15% for the country as a whole, but could exceed 25-30% for large regions with weather anomalies of the vegetation periods. Uncertainty within the LEA was assessed for all

  16. Woody plant encroachment effect on soil organic carbon dynamics: results from a latitudinal gradient in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellis, Guido; Chiti, Tommaso; Moscatelli, Maria Cristina; Marinari, Sara; Papale, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Woody plant encroachment into pastures and grasslands represents a significant land cover change phenomenon, with a considerable impact on carbon dynamics at an ecosystem level. It was estimated that 7.64% of the Southern Europe land was subject to that process between 1950 to 2010. As a result of woody encroachment, changes in vegetation composition can produce substantial changes to the soil organic carbon (SOC) cycle. Despite the numerous papers published on land-use change, an evaluation of the IPCC terrestrial carbon pools changes occurring during woody encroachment on abandoned pastures and grasslands is still lacking, particularly for the Italian territory. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of woody encroachment on carbon sequestration over abandoned pastures and grasslands in Alpine and Apennine ecosystems, with a particular focus on the SOC. We applied a chronosequence approach to seven selected sites located along a latitudinal gradient in Italy. Each chronosequence consisted of a pasture currently managed, three sites abandoned at different times in the past and, finally, a mature forest stand representing the last phase of the succession. The European Commission sampling protocols to certify SOC changes was adopted to estimate the variations following woody encroachment. Soil samples were collected at different depths in the topsoil (0-30 cm) and subsoil (30-70 cm), despite the original protocol formulation being limited to the topsoil only. In addition, aboveground living biomass (AGB), dead wood and litter were also measured following international protocols. Considering all C pools together, woody plant encroachment leads to a progressive C stock accumulation in all the chronosequences. The total C stock of mature forest stands ranges from 1.78±0.11 times (Eastern Alps) to 2.48±0.31 times (central Apennine) the initial value on pastures. Unsurprisingly, the C stocks of AGB, dead wood and litter all increase during the

  17. 78 FR 21105 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary... tubes from Thailand. This review covers two producers/exporters of the subject merchandise, Saha Thai... The products covered by the antidumping order are certain circular welded carbon steel pipes and...

  18. Carbon sequestration resulting from bottomland hardwood afforestation in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Treesearch

    Bertrand F. Nero; Richard P. Maiers; Janet C. Dewey; Andrew J. Londo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing abandonment of marginal agricultural lands in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV) and rising global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels create a need for better options of achieving rapid afforestation and enhancing both below and aboveground carbon sequestration. This study examines the responses of six mixtures of bottomland hardwood species...

  19. Low CO2 results in a rearrangement of carbon metabolism to support C4 photosynthetic carbon assimilation in Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Kustka, Adam B; Milligan, Allen J; Zheng, Haiyan; New, Ashley M; Gates, Colin; Bidle, Kay D; Reinfelder, John R

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms of carbon concentration in marine diatoms are controversial. At low CO2 , decreases in O2 evolution after inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases (PEPCs), and increases in PEPC transcript abundances, have been interpreted as evidence for a C4 mechanism in Thalassiosira pseudonana, but the ascertainment of which proteins are responsible for the subsequent decarboxylation and PEP regeneration steps has been elusive. We evaluated the responses of T. pseudonana to steady-state differences in CO2 availability, as well as to transient shifts to low CO2 , by integrated measurements of photosynthetic parameters, transcript abundances and quantitative proteomics. On shifts to low CO2 , two PEPC transcript abundances increased and then declined on timescales consistent with recoveries of Fv /Fm , non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and maximum chlorophyll a-specific carbon fixation (Pmax ), but transcripts for archetypical decarboxylation enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and malic enzyme (ME) did not change. Of 3688 protein abundances measured, 39 were up-regulated under low CO2 , including both PEPCs and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), whereas ME abundance did not change and PEPCK abundance declined. We propose a closed-loop biochemical model, whereby T. pseudonana produces and subsequently decarboxylates a C4 acid via PEPC2 and PYC, respectively, regenerates phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from pyruvate in a pyruvate phosphate dikinase-independent (but glycine decarboxylase (GDC)-dependent) manner, and recuperates photorespiratory CO2 as oxaloacetate (OAA).

  20. Parameter space exploration of ocean carbon cycle climate sensitivity: a Quaternary maximum, and hopefully some novel results too.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldblatt, C.

    2016-12-01

    Past changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide are a major driver in changes in past climate. But atmospheric CO2 is only 2% of the ocean-atmosphere CO2 at present. Changes in this partitioning will affect climate sensitivity through the past. This partitioning depends on alkalinity in total atmosphere ocean carbon. Here, I explore that parameter space. A somewhat obvious feature is a maximum in carbon cycle climate sensitivity near Quaternary values, which seemed very exciting until I realized that it had already been done [Goodwin et al., doi:10.1038/NGEO416 ]. Thus, I will try to squeeze something novel from my results, or else present something totally different.

  1. SO{sub 2} removal and CO{sub 2} capture by limestone resulting from calcination/sulfation/carbonation cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Li; Steve Buchi; John R. Grace; C. Jim Lim

    2005-10-01

    Experiments were conducted in a dual-environment thermogravimetric reactor to investigate the interaction between calcination, sulfation, and carbonation for a limestone that had previously been shown to sulfate primarily in an unreacted core manner. The results indicate that carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) can reactivate partially sulfated sorbent particles, contributing to an increase in overall calcium utilization efficiency. The ability of sorbents to recapture CO{sub 2} decreases when cycles of calcination and carbonation are performed, following a pattern similar to sulfation/hydration cycling. 16 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. CO2-brine-mineral Reactions in Geological Carbon Storage: Results from an EOR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, H.; Wigley, M.; Bickle, M.; Kampman, N.; Dubacq, B.; Galy, A.; Ballentine, C.; Zhou, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Dissolution of CO2 in brines and reactions of the acid brines ultimately dissolving silicate minerals and precipitating carbonate minerals are the prime long-term mechanisms for stabilising the light supercritical CO2 in geological carbon storage. However the rates of dissolution are very uncertain as they are likely to depend on the heterogeneity of the flow of CO2, the possibility of convective instability of the denser CO2-saturated brines and on fluid-mineral reactions which buffer brine acidity. We report the results of sampling brines and gases during a phase of CO2 injection for enhanced oil recovery in a small oil field. Brines and gases were sampled at production wells daily for 3 months after initiation of CO2 injection and again for two weeks after 5 months. Noble gas isotopic spikes were detected at producing wells within days of initial CO2 injection but signals continued for weeks, and at some producers for the duration of the sampling period, attesting to the complexity of gas-species pathways. Interpretations are complicated by the previous history of the oil field and re-injection of produced water prior to injection of CO2. However water sampled from some producing wells during the phase of CO2 injection showed monotonic increases in alkalinity and in concentrations of major cations to levels in excess of those in the injected water. The marked increase in Na, and smaller increases in Ca, Mg, Si, K and Sr are interpreted primarily to result from silicate dissolution as the lack of increase in S and Cl concentrations preclude additions of more saline waters. Early calcite dissolution was followed by re-precipitation. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the waters apparently exceed the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of acetic and hydrochloric acid leaches of carbonate fractions of the reservoir rocks and the silicate residues from the leaching. This may indicate incongruent dissolution of Sr or larger scale isotopic heterogeneity of the reservoir. This is being investigated

  3. Organic compounds in olive mill wastewater and in solutions resulting from hydrothermal carbonization of the wastewater.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Baskyr, I

    2013-09-01

    Organic components in olive mill wastewater (OMW) were analyzed by exhaustive solvent extraction of the lyophilisate followed by pre-chromatographic derivatization techniques and GC/MS-analysis of the extracts. Simple biophenols including tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (OH-Tyr) and homovanillic alcohol as well as complex biophenols including decarbomethoxy ligostride aglycon and decarbomethoxy oleuropein aglycon proved most abundant analytes. Hydroxylated benzoic and cinnamic acids are less abundant, which may indicate a humification process to have occurred. The pattern of organic components obtained from native OMW was compared with that obtained from hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of the waste product. Former results provided strong evidence that HTC of OMW at 220°C for 14h results in an almost complete hydrolysis of complex aglycons. However, simple biophenols were not decomposed on hydrothermal treatment any further. Phenol and benzenediols as well as low molecular weight organic acids proved most abundant analytes which were generated due to HTC. Similarly to aglycons, lipids including most abundant acylglycerines and less abundant wax esters were subjected almost quantitatively to hydrolysis under hydrothermal conditions. Fatty acids (FAs) released from lipids were further decomposed. The pathways of volatile analytes in both native OMW and aqueous HTC solutions were studied by solventless headspace-Solid Phase Micro Extraction. Basically, a wide array low molecular alcohols and ketones occurring in native OMW survived the HTC process.

  4. An intercomparison of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, and hydroxyl measurement techniques - Overview of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M.; Gregory, G. L.; Carroll, M. A.; Mcfarland, M.; Ridley, B. A.; Davis, D. D.; Bradshaw, J.; Rodgers, M. O.; Torres, A. L.; Condon, E. P.

    1984-01-01

    Results from an intercomparison of methods to measure carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and the hydroxyl radical (OH) are discussed. The intercomparison was conducted at Wallops Island, Virginia, in July 1983 and included a laser differential absorption and three grab sample/gas chromatograph methods for CO, a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and two chemiluminescence methods for NO, and two LIF methods and a radiocarbon tracer method for OH. The intercomparison was conducted as a field measurement program involving ambient measurements of CO (150-300 ppbv) and NO (10-180 pptv) from a common manifold with controlled injection of CO in incremental steps from 20 to 500 ppbv and NO in steps from 10 to 220 pptv. Only ambient measurements of OH were made. The agreement between the techniques was on the order of 14 percent for CO and 17 percent for NO. Hardware difficulties during the OH tests resulted in a data base with insufficient data and uncertanties too large to permit a meaningful intercomposition.

  5. From carbon numbers to ecosystem services: usable results comparing natural versus managed lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, D. M.; Ferschweiler, K.; Sheehan, T.; Sleeter, B. M.; Zhu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We ran the MC2 dynamic vegetation model for the conterminous US at 30 arc sec with and without land use and fire suppression for several climate change scenarios. We translated model results into key ecosystem services (ES) such as climate regulation through carbon uptake and sequestration (global climate) or through transpiration (regional climate) as well as water provision through runoff and throughflow. We also projected timber production and gauged the risk of production lost to fire and/or drought by simulating fuel loads and forest vigor annually through the 21st century. We calculated the rising irrigation demand for agricultural land which, coupled with available information on groundwater resources, could help plan for future cropping systems. By combining these results we can evaluate land cover value across the country in terms of quantity and quality of services rendered. By comparing projections with and without landuse and fire suppression we can illustrate differences in regulating and provisioning services between managed and natural lands.

  6. Effects of copyrolysis of sludge with calcium carbonate and calcium hydrogen phosphate on chemical stability of carbon and release of toxic elements in the resultant biochars.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuebin; Hu, Xin; Ding, Zhuhong; Chen, Yijun

    2017-09-08

    The potential release of toxic elements and the stability of carbon in sludge-based biochars are important on their application in soil remediation and wastewater treatment. In this study, municipal sludge was co-pyrolyzed with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and calcium dihydrogen phosphate [Ca(H2PO4)2] under 300 and 600 °C, respectively. The basic physicochemical properties of the resultant biochars were characterized and laboratory chemical oxidation and leaching experiments of toxic elements were conducted to evaluate the chemical stability of carbon in biochars and the potential release of toxic elements from biochars. Results show that the exogenous minerals changed the physico-chemical properties of the resultant biochars greatly. Biochars with exogenous minerals, especially Ca(H2PO4)2, decreased the release of Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu, Pb, and As and the release ratios were less than 1%. Tessier's sequential extraction analysis revealed that labile toxic elements were transferred to residual fraction in the biochars with high pyrolysis temperature (600 °C) and exogenous minerals. Low risks for biochar-bound Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Cr, and Cu were confirmed according to risk assessment code (RAC) while the potential ecological risk index (PERI) revealed that the exogenous Ca(H2PO4)2 significantly decreased the risks from considerable to moderate level. Moreover, the exogenous minerals significantly increased the chemical stability of carbon in 600 °C-pyrolyzed biochars by 10-20%. These results indicated that the copyrolysis of sludge with phosphate and carbonate, especially phosphate, were effective methods to prepare the sludge-based biochars with immobilized toxic elements and enhanced chemical stability of carbon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Does Iron Fertilization Lead to Enhanced Carbon Sequestration? A Synthesis of Polar Star Results.

    SciTech Connect

    Buesseler, K.O.

    2002-12-01

    This research synthesized activities related to work conducted as part of the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) which investigated the effects of iron fertilization on enhanced carbon sequestration. The primary interest was in the fate of sinking particles which carry carbon to the deep ocean, where it can be sequestered from the atmosphere for >100-1000 year time scales. This was accomplished through direct measurements of thorium-234, a naturally occurring particle reactive radionuclide that traces shallow particle export; SF6 measurements to track the position of the Fe fertilized region; and the collection of ancillary data and samples to augment the study of major C, nutrient and elemental budgets as well as appropriate samples for biological study. Results of this work show a small, but progressively increasing flux of particulate organic C to depth as a consequence of Fe fertilization. This is the first data set to show any effect of Fe fertilization on C sequestration in the Southern Ocean. The changes in particle export during SOFeX are significant, but only possible to detect given what is arguably the largest 234Th data set ever collected as part of an oceanographic experiment. Most prior 234Th studies, simply use a steady-state approximation and ignore advective and diffusive fluxes in the calculation of 234Th fluxes. High resolution time-series of average 0-50m 234Th activities in and out of the Southern patch find a clear steady decrease in 234Th flux that is slightly larger in vs. out of the Fe fertilized patch. This decrease must be included in the full 234Th flux calculation and the deliberate tagging of this water mass with SF6 combined with time-series sampling allowed for a careful evaluation of this non-steady state (NSS) term. Likewise, the addition of SF6 allows for the evaluation of vertical exchange (via the gradient of SF6 below the patch) and dilution effects (after correction for atmospheric losses). In most set tings these physical

  8. Changes in Carbon Isotope Composition of Methyl Halides Resulting from Biological and Chemical Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.; Oremland, R. S.

    2003-12-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr), methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl iodide (MeI) are reactive trace gases that are produced and released to the atmosphere at the Earths surface. These methyl halides have the potential to influence ozone levels in the stratosphere. Current estimates of the relative contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources of these methyl halides are the subject of considerable debate. In addition, there is uncertainty in the magnitude of some of the largest sinks for these compounds. Hence, the atmospheric budgets of MeBr, MeCl and MeI, while uncertain at present, may be better constrained using stable isotope ratio (13C/12C) mass balances of sources and sinks. Our work has focused on characterizing the effects upon δ 13C values of methyl halides released after reactions which discriminate in favor of 12C during removal processes. Previously, we determined very large fractionations of carbon isotopes by pure cultures of soil bacteria. Further, we have documented large fractionations (kinetic isotope effects or KIEs) of methyl halides in live soils. In the case of MeBr and MeI, substantial fractionation also occurred in heat-killed soil, suggesting that chemical degradation resulted in a shift in the stable isotopic composition. At elevated concentrations, for instance during agricultural soil fumigations, the δ 13C value of MeBr or MeI released from soil can be determined by flux measurements or soil profiles. However, more information is needed regarding the processes responsible for isotope fractionation to be able to extrapolate to areas where the concentration is low or direct measurement is not otherwise possible. We report here on measurements of the fractionation of carbon isotopes in methyl halides during degradation by chemical processes that are likely to occur in soil or seawater. These processes include aqueous hydrolysis and halide exchange and the methylation of organic matter using humic acid as the model methyl acceptor. Results are

  9. A dense Black Carbon network in the region of Paris, France: Implementation, objectives, and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciare, Jean; Petit, Jean-Eudes; Sarda-Esteve, Roland; Bonnaire, Nicolas; Gros, Valérie; Pernot, Pierre; Ghersi, Véronique; Ampe, Christophe; Songeur, Charlotte; Brugge, Benjamin; Debert, Christophe; Favez, Olivier; Le Priol, Tiphaine; Mocnik, Grisa

    2013-04-01

    Motivations. Road traffic and domestic wood burning emissions are two major contributors of particulate pollution in our cities. These two sources emit ultra-fine, soot containing, particles in the atmosphere, affecting health adversely, increasing morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory conditions and casing lung cancer. A better characterization of soot containing aerosol sources in our major cities provides useful information for policy makers for assessment, implementation and monitoring of strategies to tackle air pollution issues affecting human health with additional benefits for climate change. Objectives. This study on local sources of primary Particulate Matter (PM) in the megacity of Paris is a follow-up of several programs (incl. EU-FP7-MEGAPOLI) that have shown that fine PM - in the Paris background atmosphere - is mostly secondary and imported. A network of 14 stations of Black Carbon has been implemented in the larger region of Paris to provide highly spatially resolved long term survey of local combustion aerosols. To our best knowledge, this is the first time that such densely BC network is operating over a large urban area, providing novel information on the spatial/temporal distribution of combustion aerosols within a post-industrialized megacity. Experimental. As part of the PRIMEQUAL "PREQUALIF" project, a dense Black Carbon network (of 14 stations) has been installed over the city of Paris beginning of 2012 in order to produce spatially resolved Equivalent Black Carbon (EBC) concentration maps with high time resolution through modeling and data assimilation. This network is composed of various real-time instruments (Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer, MAAP by THERMO; Multi-wavelength Aethalometers by MAGEE Scientific) implemented in contrasted sites (rural background, urban background, traffic) complementing the regulated measurements (PM, NOx) in the local air quality network AIRPARIF (http

  10. DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON TRENDS RESULTING FROM CHANGES IN ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain recent, widespread increases in concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the surface waters of glaciated landscapes across eastern North America and northern and central Europe. Some invoke anthropogenic forcing through ...

  11. DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON TRENDS RESULTING FROM CHANGES IN ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain recent, widespread increases in concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the surface waters of glaciated landscapes across eastern North America and northern and central Europe. Some invoke anthropogenic forcing through ...

  12. Interactions Between Mineral Surfaces, Substrates, Enzymes, and Microbes Result in Hysteretic Temperature Sensitivities and Microbial Carbon Use Efficiencies and Weaker Predicted Carbon-Climate Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.

    2014-12-01

    We hypothesize that the large observed variability in decomposition temperature sensitivity and carbon use efficiency arises from interactions between temperature, microbial biogeochemistry, and mineral surface sorptive reactions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a numerical model that integrates the Dynamic Energy Budget concept for microbial physiology, microbial trait-based community structure and competition, process-specific thermodynamically ­­based temperature sensitivity, a non-linear mineral sorption isotherm, and enzyme dynamics. We show, because mineral surfaces interact with substrates, enzymes, and microbes, both temperature sensitivity and microbial carbon use efficiency are hysteretic and highly variable. Further, by mimicking the traditional approach to interpreting soil incubation observations, we demonstrate that the conventional labile and recalcitrant substrate characterization for temperature sensitivity is flawed. In a 4 K temperature perturbation experiment, our fully dynamic model predicted more variable but weaker carbon-climate feedbacks than did the static temperature sensitivity and carbon use efficiency model when forced with yearly, daily, and hourly variable temperatures. These results imply that current earth system models likely over-estimate the response of soil carbon stocks to global warming.

  13. Catabolite responsive element deficiency of xyl operon resulting in carbon catabolite derepression in Lactobacillus fermentum 1001.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Guo, T; Xin, Y; Gao, X; Kong, J

    2016-01-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of the carbon catabolite derepression in Lactobacillus fermentum 1001 when this strain consumed xylose and glucose simultaneously. The transcriptional level of ccpAf was measured by real-time qPCR, revealing that ccpAf transcribed mRNA normally in Lact. fermentum 1001. The ccpAf gene could complement the ccpA-deficiency of a Lactococcus lactis mutant. Moreover, when the phosphofructokinase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 was expressed in Lact. fermentum 1001, the recombinant preferred glucose to fructose rather than to xylose. All data suggested that CcpAf was functional in Lact. fermentum 1001. In addition, the promoter (Plx) activity of the xyl operon from Lact. fermentum 1001 was further test in Lactobacillus casei BL23, and it could drive the expression of green fluorescent protein in the presence of glucose. The ability of Lact. fermentum 1001 to co-utilize xylose and glucose resulted from the deficiency of catabolite responsive element in P1x rather than the null mutation of the ccpAf gene. Lactobacillus fermentum 1001 is a potential candidate as a CCR-absent cell factory to transform biomass to high-value-added products. P1x was provided for engineering LAB to enhance fermentation efficiency by avoiding CCR. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Effect of petroleum coke expanding by perchloric acid on the performance of the resulted activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mei-Gen; Wang, Ren-Qing

    2014-10-01

    Petroleum coke (PC) was expanded by using KMnO4 as oxidant and HClO4 as intercalator so as to decrease the amount of KOH needed for the successive activation. Activated carbon (AC) was prepared by activation of the expanded PC (EPC) at KOH/coke mass ratio of 3:1 (denoted as EAC-3). As a comparison, AC was also made by activation of PC at KOH/coke mass ratio of 3:1, 4:1 and 5:1 (denoted as AC-3, AC-4 and AC-5). Influence of expanding modification on the structure and performance of PC and AC was investigated. The results revealed that the expanding treatment increased the interplanar distance of PC microcrystalline from 0.344 to 0.362 nm and decreased the microcrystalline thickness from 2.34 to 1.57 nm. The specific surface area of EAC-3 and AC-5 was 3461 and 3291 m2ṡg-1, respectively. The average pore size of EAC-3 was 2.19 nm, which is 0.11 nm larger than that of AC-5. At a scan rate of 0.5 mVṡs-1, EAC-3 and AC-5 achieved a specific gravimetric capacitance of 486 and 429 Fṡg-1, respectively. Supercapacitor based on EAC-3 possessed lower resistance and better power performance.

  15. Analysis of results of biomass forest inventory in northeastern Amazon for development of REDD+ carbon project.

    PubMed

    Mello, Leonel N C; Sales, Marcio H R; Rosa, Luiz P

    2016-03-01

    In Brazil, a significant reduction in deforestation rates occurred during the last decade. In spite of that fact, the average annual rates are still too high, approximately 400.000 ha/year (INPE/Prodes). The projects of emissions reduction through avoided deforestation (REED+) are an important tool to reduce deforestation rates in Brazil. Understanding the amazon forest structure, in terms of biomass stock is key to design avoided deforestation strategies. In this work, we analyze data results from aboveground biomass of 1,019.346,27 hectares in the state of Pará. It was collected data from 16,722 trees in 83 random independent plots. It was tested 4 allometric equations, for DBH > 10cm: Brown et al. (1989), Brown and Lugo (1999), Chambers et al. (2000), Higuchi et al. (1998). It revealed that the biggest carbon stock of above ground biomass is stocked on the interval at DBH between 30cm and 80cm. This biomass compartment stocks 75.70% of total biomass in Higuchi et al. (1998) equation, 75.56% of total biomass in Brown et al. (1989) equation, 78.83% of total biomass in Chambers et al. (2000) equation, and 73.22% in Brown and Lugo (1999) equation.

  16. Fire regime zonation under current and future climate over eastern Canada.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Yan; Gauthier, Sylvie; Gray, David R; Le Goff, Héloïse; Lefort, Patrick; Morissette, Jacques

    2013-06-01

    Fire is a major disturbance in Canadian forests. Along with fuel and ignition characteristics, climatic conditions are seen as one of the main drivers of fire regimes. Projected changes in climate are expected to significantly influence fire regimes in Canada. As fire regime greatly shapes large-scale patterns in biodiversity, carbon, and vegetation, as well as forest and fire management strategies, it becomes necessary to define regions where current and future fire regimes are homogeneous. Random Forests (RF) modeling was used to relate fire regime attributes prevailing between 1961 and 1990 in eastern Canada with climatic/fire-weather and environmental variables. Using climatic normals outputs from the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM), we delineated current (1961-1990) and future (2011-2040, 2040-2070, 2071 2100) homogeneous fire regime (HFR) zones. Heterogeneous response of fire regime to climate changes is projected for eastern Canada with some areas (e.g., western Quebec) experiencing very small alterations while others (e.g., southeastern Ontario) are facing great shifts. Overall, models predicted a 2.2- and 2.4-fold increase in the number of fires and the annual area burned respectively mostly as a result of an increase in extreme fire-weather normals and mean drought code. As extreme fire danger would occur later in the fire season on average, the fire season would shift slightly later (5-20 days) in the summer for much of the study area while remaining relatively stable elsewhere. Although fire regime values would change significantly over time, most zone boundaries would remain relatively stable. The information resulting from HFR zonations is clearly of interest for forest and fire management agencies as it reveals zones with peculiar fire regimes that would have been hidden otherwise using predefined administrative or ecological stratifications.

  17. A Regime Diagram for Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegman, D. R.; Farrington, R.; Capitanio, F. A.; Schellart, W. P.

    2009-12-01

    Regime diagrams and associated scaling relations have profoundly influenced our understanding of planetary dynamics. Previous regime diagrams characterized the regimes of stagnant-lid, small viscosity contrast, transitional, and no-convection for temperature-dependent (Moresi and Solomatov, 1995), and non-linear power law rheologies (Solomatov and Moresi, 1997) as well as stagnant-lid, sluggish-lid, and mobile-lid regimes once the finite strength of rock was considered (Moresi and Solomatov, 1998). Scalings derived from such models have been the cornerstone for parameterized models of thermal evolution of rocky planets and icy moons for the past decade. While such a theory can predict the tectonic state of a planetary body, it is still rather incomplete in regards to predicting tectonics. For example, the mobile-lid regime is unspecific as to how continuous lithospheric recycling should occur on a terrestrial planet. Towards this goal, Gerya et al., (2008) advanced a new regime diagram aiming to characterize when subduction would manifest itself as a one-sided or two-sided downwelling and either symmetric or asymmetric. Here, we present a regime diagram for the case of a single-sided, asymmetric type of subduction (most Earth-like type). Using a 3-D numerical model of a free subduction, we describe a total of 5 different styles of subduction that can possibly occur. Each style is distinguished by its upper mantle slab morphology resulting from the sinking kinematics. We provide movies to illustrate the different styles and their progressive time-evolution. In each regime, subduction is accommodated by a combination of plate advance and slab rollback, with associated motions of forward plate velocity and trench retreat, respectively. We demonstrate that the preferred subduction mode depends upon two essential controlling factors: 1) buoyancy of the downgoing plate and 2) strength of plate in resisting bending at the hinge. We propose that a variety of subduction

  18. Arctic circulation regimes

    PubMed Central

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. PMID:26347536

  19. Arctic circulation regimes.

    PubMed

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2015-10-13

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. © 2015 The Authors.

  20. Differences in Chemical Composition of Soil Organic Carbon Resulting From Long-Term Fertilization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zengqiang; Zhao, Bingzi; Wang, Qingyun; Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jiabao

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is central to soil fertility. We hypothesize that change in SOC content resulting from various long-term fertilization strategies accompanies the shift in SOC chemical structure. This study examined the effect of fertilization strategies along with the time of fertilizer application on the SOC composition by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The soils (Aquic Inceptisol) subjected to seven fertilizer treatments were collected in 1989, 1999 and 2009, representing 0, 10 and 20 years of fertilization, respectively. The seven fertilizer treatments were (1–3) balanced fertilization with application of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) including organic compost (OM), half organic compost plus half chemical fertilizer (1/2OM), and pure chemical NPK fertilizer (NPK); (4–6) unbalanced chemical fertilization without application of one of the major elements including NP fertilizer (NP), PK fertilizer (PK), and NK fertilizer (NK); and (7) an unamended control (CK). The SOC content in the balanced fertilization treatments were 2.3–52.6% and 9.4–64.6% higher than in the unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999 and 2009, respectively, indicating significant differences in SOC content with time of fertilizer application between the two treatment groups. There was a significantly greater proportion of O-alkyl C and a lower proportion of aromatic C in the balanced fertilization than in unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999, but not in 2009, because their proportions in the former treatments approached the latter in 2009. Principal component analysis further showed that the C functional groups from various fertilization strategies tended to become compositionally similar with time. The results suggest that a shift in SOC chemical composition may be firstly dominated by fertilization strategies, followed by fertilization duration. PMID:25884713

  1. Testing and Results of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, Summer D.; Broerman, Craig D.; Swickrath, Michael; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A principal concern for extravehicular activity (EVA) spacesuits is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O) for the crewmember. The release of CO2 in a confined or unventilated area is dangerous for human health and leads to asphyxiation; therefore, CO2 and H2O control become leading factors in the design and development of the spacesuit. An amine-based CO2 and H2O vapor sorbent for use in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand. The application of solidamine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to concurrently manage CO2 and H2O levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating mission constraints imposed with nonregenerative technologies. Two prototype solid amine-based systems, known as rapid cycle amine (RCA), were designed to continuously remove CO2 and H2O vapor from a flowing ventilation stream through the use of a two-bed amine based, vacuum-swing adsorption system. The Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG) RCA implements radial flow paths, whereas the Hamilton Sundstrand RCA was designed with linear flow paths. Testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment and a reduced-pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads in a closed-loop configuration. This paper presents the experimental results of laboratory testing for a full-size and a sub-scale test article. The testing described here characterized and evaluated the performance of each RCA unit at the required Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) operating conditions. The test points simulated a range of crewmember metabolic rates. The experimental results demonstrated the ability of each RCA unit to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O from a closed loop ambient or sub-ambient atmosphere.

  2. Differences in chemical composition of soil organic carbon resulting from long-term fertilization strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Zengqiang; Zhao, Bingzi; Wang, Qingyun; Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jiabao

    2015-01-01

    Chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is central to soil fertility. We hypothesize that change in SOC content resulting from various long-term fertilization strategies accompanies the shift in SOC chemical structure. This study examined the effect of fertilization strategies along with the time of fertilizer application on the SOC composition by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The soils (Aquic Inceptisol) subjected to seven fertilizer treatments were collected in 1989, 1999 and 2009, representing 0, 10 and 20 years of fertilization, respectively. The seven fertilizer treatments were (1-3) balanced fertilization with application of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) including organic compost (OM), half organic compost plus half chemical fertilizer (1/2OM), and pure chemical NPK fertilizer (NPK); (4-6) unbalanced chemical fertilization without application of one of the major elements including NP fertilizer (NP), PK fertilizer (PK), and NK fertilizer (NK); and (7) an unamended control (CK). The SOC content in the balanced fertilization treatments were 2.3-52.6% and 9.4-64.6% higher than in the unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999 and 2009, respectively, indicating significant differences in SOC content with time of fertilizer application between the two treatment groups. There was a significantly greater proportion of O-alkyl C and a lower proportion of aromatic C in the balanced fertilization than in unbalanced fertilization/CK treatments in 1999, but not in 2009, because their proportions in the former treatments approached the latter in 2009. Principal component analysis further showed that the C functional groups from various fertilization strategies tended to become compositionally similar with time. The results suggest that a shift in SOC chemical composition may be firstly dominated by fertilization strategies, followed by fertilization duration.

  3. Testing and Results of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig; Swickrath, Mike; Anderson, Molly

    2010-01-01

    A principal concern for extravehicular activity (EVA) space suits is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O) for the crewmember. The release of CO2 in a confined or unventilated area is dangerous for human health and leads to asphyxiation; therefore, CO2 and H2O become leading factors in the design and development of the spacesuit. An amine-based CO2 and H2O vapor sorbent for use in pressure-swing re-generable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand. The application of solid-amine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to concurrently manage CO2 and H2O levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating mission constraints imposed with non-regenerative technologies. Two prototype solid amine-based systems, known as rapid cycle amine (RCA), were designed to continuously remove CO2 and H2O vapor from a flowing ventilation stream through the use of a two-bed amine based, vacuum-swing adsorption system. The Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG) RCA is the first RCA unit implementing radial flow paths, whereas the Hamilton Sundstrand RCA was designed with linear flow paths. Testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment and a reduced-pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads in a closed-loop configuration. This paper presents the experimental results of laboratory testing for a full-size and a sub-scale test article. The testing described here characterized and evaluated the performance of each RCA unit at the required Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) operating conditions. The test points simulated a range of crewmember metabolic rates. The experimental results demonstrate the ability of each RCA unit to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O from a closed loop ambient or subambient atmosphere.

  4. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and

  5. The impact of peatland drain-blocking on dissolved organic carbon loss: results from a national survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Alona; Holden, Joseph; Kay, Paul; Francis, Brian; Foulger, Miles; Gledhill, Sarah; McDonald, Adrian; Walker, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Peatlands are important terrestrial carbon stores and consequently it is necessary to ensure they are well managed. Many peatlands were drained using open ditches and this has been associated with an increase in dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Therefore, recent peatland restoration schemes include blocking these open drains using a variety of methods. Previous studies examining the impact of drain-blocking on dissolved organic carbon concentration are limited in their spatial and temporal coverage. Consequently, it is uncertain if drain-blocking consistently reduces dissolved organic carbon concentrations and the longer term impacts are unknown. This study combines an extensive UK-wide survey across 32 study sites and intensive monitoring of six drains, three of which were unblocked and three of which were blocked seven years prior to data collection. The UK-wide survey indicated that dissolved organic carbon concentrations were significantly lower in blocked drains: the mean dissolved organic carbon concentration of water sampled from blocked drains was 28% less than that sampled from unblocked drains. However, this pattern was not evident at all sites. Quasi-continuous monitoring of an unblocked and blocked drain at the intensive monitoring site indicated no significant differences in total dissolved organic carbon flux: the blocked drain exported 31,592 kg km-2 yr-1 and the unblocked drain 30,123 kg km-2 yr-1. Fortnightly grab samples from three blocked and three unblocked drains at the intensively monitored site, however, did conform to the general national pattern of lower dissolved organic carbon in blocked drains. These results demonstrate that drain-blocking can be an effective management strategy for reducing DOC loss in disturbed peat catchments. The caveat remains, however, that there will be a number of sites where no significant change will occur.

  6. Modeling of the Ablation of Fibrous Materials in the Knudsen Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachaud, J.; Mansour, N. N.

    2008-01-01

    During atmospheric entry of planetary probes, the thermal protection system (TPS) of the probe is exposed to high temperatures under low pressures. In these conditions, carbonous TPS materials undergo gasification in the Knudsen regime leading to mass loss and wall recession called ablation. This work aims to improve the understanding of materiaVenvironment interactions through a study of the coupling between carbon dioxide transport in the Knudsen regime, heterogeneous oxidation of carbon, and sutface recession. A 3D Monte-Carlo simulation tool is used for this study. The fibrous architecture of the materiils, consisting of high porosity random array of carbon fibers, is numerically reproduced on a 3D Cartesian grid. Mass transport in the Knudsen regime from the boundary layer to the surface, and inside this porous material is simulated by random walk. A reaction probability is used to simulate the heterogeneous oxidation reaction. The surface recession is followed by front tracking using a simplified marching cube approach. The output data of the simulations are ablation velocity and dynamic evolution of the material porosity. A parametric study is carried out to analyze the material behavior as a function of Knudsen number for the porous media (length of the mean free path compared to the mean pore diameter) and the intrinsic reactivity of the carbon fibers. The results enable extrapolation of laboratory experimental data to actual entry conditions.

  7. Stable Isotopic Variability in the Carbon Cycle: Reconciling Ocean Model Results with Atmospheric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, C. B.; White, J. W.; Miller, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    In the face of rising sea levels, species extinction, unpredictable precipitation changes, and other potential impacts of anthropogenic climate change, there is a push for the scientific community to expand our current understanding of the major sources and sinks of global warming’s most implicated culprit, CO2. Knowing the mechanisms controlling CO2 sinks and sources will be vital for policy-makers to make informed decisions regarding its mitigation. The stable carbon isotope, 13C, can be used to partition CO2 fluxes into land and ocean components. The major fluxes of this gas (fossil fuel, ocean and land) impose distinctive and predictable fractionation patterns upon the stable isotope ratio, making it an ideal tool for distinguishing between them. One drawback to this method is that photosynthesis and respiration are not contemporaneous, and because the 13C of atmospheric CO2 is being continuously depleted through the burning of 12C-rich fossil fuels (the Suess effect), there is an isotopic “disequilibrium flux” between CO2 moving into and out of the ocean and land reservoirs. In this study, we take a new approach and seek to reconcile independent estimates of time histories of ocean fluxes with atmospheric observations. We use a combination of atmospheric CO2 and 13CO2 data, fossil fuel emission estimates, and recent ocean model results (from two different approaches) for the ocean CO2 flux, within a box-inverse model as well as a 2D transport model. We calculate time series of land flux, disequilibrium flux and photosynthetic fractionation from 1991 through 2008. Our findings reveal that if ocean variability is as small as is suggested by the ocean model, and the isotopic variability is forced into the disequilibrium flux, then the resulting disequilibrium flux has very large interannual variability (~35 PgC‰/yr). While large interannual variability in DIS seems incompatible with the Suess effect alone, it could be explained by interannual variations

  8. Regime Shifts in the Anthropocene: Drivers, Risks, and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D.; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  9. Regime shifts in the anthropocene: drivers, risks, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers.

  10. 75 FR 8301 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... of China: Final Results of the 2007-2008 Administrative Review of the Antidumping Duty Order AGENCY... From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty... review of certain cut- to-length carbon steel plate (``CTL plate'') from the People's Republic of China...

  11. 77 FR 73616 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping... plate'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') covering the period of review (``POR'') November... Republic of China: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Administrative Review and Preliminary Determination...

  12. Jellyfish blooms result in a major microbial respiratory sink of carbon in marine systems.

    PubMed

    Condon, Robert H; Steinberg, Deborah K; del Giorgio, Paul A; Bouvier, Thierry C; Bronk, Deborah A; Graham, William M; Ducklow, Hugh W

    2011-06-21

    Jellyfish blooms occur in many estuarine and coastal regions and may be increasing in their magnitude and extent worldwide. Voracious jellyfish predation impacts food webs by converting large quantities of carbon (C), fixed by primary producers and consumed by secondary producers, into gelatinous biomass, which restricts C transfer to higher trophic levels because jellyfish are not readily consumed by other predators. In addition, jellyfish release colloidal and dissolved organic matter (jelly-DOM), and could further influence the functioning of coastal systems by altering microbial nutrient and DOM pathways, yet the links between jellyfish and bacterioplankton metabolism and community structure are unknown. Here we report that jellyfish released substantial quantities of extremely labile C-rich DOM, relative to nitrogen (25.6 ± 31.6 C:1N), which was quickly metabolized by bacterioplankton at uptake rates two to six times that of bulk DOM pools. When jelly-DOM was consumed it was shunted toward bacterial respiration rather than production, significantly reducing bacterial growth efficiencies by 10% to 15%. Jelly-DOM also favored the rapid growth and dominance of specific bacterial phylogenetic groups (primarily γ-proteobacteria) that were rare in ambient waters, implying that jelly-DOM was channeled through a small component of the in situ microbial assemblage and thus induced large changes in community composition. Our findings suggest major shifts in microbial structure and function associated with jellyfish blooms, and a large detour of C toward bacterial CO(2) production and away from higher trophic levels. These results further suggest fundamental transformations in the biogeochemical functioning and biological structure of food webs associated with jellyfish blooms.

  13. Thermostructural Analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolics "Ply Lifting" and Correlation to LHMEL Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Louie

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a discussion of the history of Carbon Cloth Phenolic (CCP) ply lifting in the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Program, a brief presentation of theoretical methods used for analytical evaluation, and results of parametric analyses of CCP material subject to test conditions of the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory. CCP ply lift can occur in regions of the RSRM nozzle where ply angle to flame surface is generally less than about 20 degrees. There is a heat rate dependence on likelihood and severity of the condition with the higher heating rates generally producing more ply lift. The event occurs in-depth, near the heated surface, where the load necessary to mechanically separate the CCP plies is produced by the initial stages of pyrolysis gas generation due to the thermal decomposition of the phenolic resin matrix. Due to the shallow lay-up angle of the composite, normal components of the indepth mechanical load, due to "pore pressure", are imparted primarily as a cross-ply tensile force on the interlaminar ply boundaries. Tensile capability in the cross-ply (out of plane) direction is solely determined by the matrix material capability. The elevated temperature matrix material capabilities are overcome by pressure induced mechanical normal stress and ply-lift occurs. A theoretical model used for CCP in-depth temperature, pressure, and normal stress prediction, based on first principles, is briefly discussed followed by a parametric evaluation of response variables subject to boundary conditions typical of on-going test programs at the LHMEL facility. Model response demonstrates general trends observed in test and provides insight into the interactivity of material properties and constitutive relationships.

  14. Thermostructural Analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolics "Ply Lifting" and Correlation to LHMEL Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Louie

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a discussion of the history of Carbon Cloth Phenolic (CCP) ply lifting in the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Program, a brief presentation of theoretical methods used for analytical evaluation, and results of parametric analyses of CCP material subject to test conditions of the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory. CCP ply lift can occur in regions of the RSRM nozzle where ply angle to flame surface is generally less than about 20 degrees. There is a heat rate dependence on likelihood and severity of the condition with the higher heating rates generally producing more ply lift. The event occurs in-depth, near the heated surface, where the load necessary to mechanically separate the CCP plies is produced by the initial stages of pyrolysis gas generation due to the thermal decomposition of the phenolic resin matrix. Due to the shallow lay-up angle of the composite, normal components of the indepth mechanical load, due to "pore pressure", are imparted primarily as a cross-ply tensile force on the interlaminar ply boundaries. Tensile capability in the cross-ply (out of plane) direction is solely determined by the matrix material capability. The elevated temperature matrix material capabilities are overcome by pressure induced mechanical normal stress and ply-lift occurs. A theoretical model used for CCP in-depth temperature, pressure, and normal stress prediction, based on first principles, is briefly discussed followed by a parametric evaluation of response variables subject to boundary conditions typical of on-going test programs at the LHMEL facility. Model response demonstrates general trends observed in test and provides insight into the interactivity of material properties and constitutive relationships.

  15. Soil carbon sequestration resulting from long-term application of biosolids for land reclamation.

    PubMed

    Tian, G; Granato, T C; Cox, A E; Pietz, R I; Carlson, C R; Abedin, Z

    2009-01-01

    Investigations on the impact of application of biosolids for land reclamation on C sequestration in soil were conducted at Fulton County, Illinois, where 41 fields (3.6-66 ha) received biosolids at a cumulative loading rate from 455 to 1654 dry Mg ha(-1) for 8 to 23 yr in rotation from 1972 to 2004. The fields were cropped with corn, wheat, and sorghum and also with soybean and grass or fallowed. Soil organic carbon (SOC) increased rapidly with the application of biosolids, whereas it fluctuated slightly in fertilizer controls. The peak SOC in the 0- to 15-cm depth of biosolids-amended fields ranged from 4 to 7% and was greater at higher rates of biosolids. In fields where biosolids application ceased for 22 yr, SOC was still much higher than the initial levels. Over the 34-yr reclamation, the mean net soil C sequestration was 1.73 (0.54-3.05) Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) in biosolids-amended fields as compared with -0.07 to 0.17 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) in fertilizer controls, demonstrating a high potential of soil C sequestration by the land application of biosolids. Soil C sequestration was significantly correlated with the biosolids application rate, and the equation can be expressed as y = 0.064x - 0.11, in which y is the annual net soil C sequestration (Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1)), and x is annual biosolids application in dry weight (Mg ha(-1) yr(-1)). Our results indicate that biosolids applications can turn Midwest Corn Belt soils from current C-neutral to C-sink. A method for calculating SOC stock under conditions in which surface soil layer depth and mass changes is also described.

  16. Jellyfish blooms result in a major microbial respiratory sink of carbon in marine systems

    PubMed Central

    Condon, Robert H.; Steinberg, Deborah K.; del Giorgio, Paul A.; Bouvier, Thierry C.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Graham, William M.; Ducklow, Hugh W.

    2011-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms occur in many estuarine and coastal regions and may be increasing in their magnitude and extent worldwide. Voracious jellyfish predation impacts food webs by converting large quantities of carbon (C), fixed by primary producers and consumed by secondary producers, into gelatinous biomass, which restricts C transfer to higher trophic levels because jellyfish are not readily consumed by other predators. In addition, jellyfish release colloidal and dissolved organic matter (jelly-DOM), and could further influence the functioning of coastal systems by altering microbial nutrient and DOM pathways, yet the links between jellyfish and bacterioplankton metabolism and community structure are unknown. Here we report that jellyfish released substantial quantities of extremely labile C-rich DOM, relative to nitrogen (25.6 ± 31.6 C:1N), which was quickly metabolized by bacterioplankton at uptake rates two to six times that of bulk DOM pools. When jelly-DOM was consumed it was shunted toward bacterial respiration rather than production, significantly reducing bacterial growth efficiencies by 10% to 15%. Jelly-DOM also favored the rapid growth and dominance of specific bacterial phylogenetic groups (primarily γ-proteobacteria) that were rare in ambient waters, implying that jelly-DOM was channeled through a small component of the in situ microbial assemblage and thus induced large changes in community composition. Our findings suggest major shifts in microbial structure and function associated with jellyfish blooms, and a large detour of C toward bacterial CO2 production and away from higher trophic levels. These results further suggest fundamental transformations in the biogeochemical functioning and biological structure of food webs associated with jellyfish blooms. PMID:21646531

  17. Carbon-monoxide poisoning resulting from exposure to ski-boat exhaust--Georgia, June 2002.

    PubMed

    2002-09-20

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas produced from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels such as gasoline or wood. In the United States, CO poisoning causes approximately 500 unintentional deaths each year. Although CO poisonings often have been reported to occur in enclosed and semi-enclosed environments, they can also occur in open-air environments. This report describes two related cases of CO poisoning that occurred in children who were participating in recreational activities on a ski boat. Recreational boaters should be aware of the dangers of open-air CO poisoning, and engineering solutions are needed to reduce the amount of CO in boat exhaust.

  18. Hall effect in hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-02-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO.

  19. Carbon Dioxide-Based versus Saline Tissue Expansion for Breast Reconstruction: Results of the XPAND Prospective, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ascherman, Jeffrey A; Zeidler, Kamakshi; Morrison, Kerry A; Appel, James Z; Berkowitz, R L; Castle, John; Colwell, Amy; Chun, Yoon; Johnson, Debra; Mohebali, Khashayar

    2016-12-01

    AeroForm is a new type of remote-controlled, needle-free, carbon dioxide-based expander involving a potentially faster method of tissue expansion. Results are presented here from the AirXpanders Patient Activated Controlled Tissue Expander pivotal trial comparing AeroForm to saline tissue expanders. Women undergoing two-stage breast reconstruction were randomized at 17 U.S. sites in this U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved investigational device exemption trial. Expansion in the investigational arm was performed by the patient in 10-cc increments up to 30 cc/day of carbon dioxide and in the control arm by the physician with periodic bolus injections of saline. Safety endpoints, expansion and reconstruction times, pain, and satisfaction were assessed. One hundred fifty women were treated: 98 with carbon dioxide expanders (n = 168) and 52 with saline expanders (n = 88). The treatment success rate (all breasts exchanged successfully excluding non-device-related failures) was 96.1 percent for carbon dioxide and 98.8 percent for saline. Median time to full expansion and completion of the second-stage operation was 21.0 and 108.5 days (carbon dioxide) versus 46.0 and 136.5 days (saline), respectively, with a similar rate of overall complications. Ease of use for the carbon dioxide expander was rated high by patients (98 percent) and physicians (90 percent). The AirXpanders Patient Activated Controlled Tissue Expander trial results demonstrate that a carbon dioxide-based expander is an effective method of tissue expansion with a similar overall adverse event rate compared to saline expanders, and provides a more convenient and expedient expansion. Therapeutic, I.

  20. Soot on snow in Iceland: First results on black carbon and organic carbon in Iceland 2016 snow and ice samples, including the glacier Solheimajökull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinander, Outi; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Gritsevich, Maria; Aurela, Minna; Arnalds, Olafur; Dragosics, Monika; Virkkula, Aki; Svensson, Jonas; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Kontu, Anna; Kivekäs, Niku; Leppäranta, Matti; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Laaksonen, Ari; Lihavainen, Heikki; Arslan, Ali N.; Paatero, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    New results on black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) on snow and ice in Iceland in 2016 will be presented in connection to our earlier results on BC and OC on Arctic seasonal snow surface, and in connection to our 2013 and 2016 experiments on effects of light absorbing impurities, including Icelandic dust, on snow albedo, melt and density. Our sampling included the glacier Solheimajökull in Iceland. The mass balance of this glacier is negative and it has been shrinking during the last 20 years by 900 meters from its southwestern corner. Icelandic snow and ice samples were not expected to contain high concentrations of BC, as power generation with domestic renewable water and geothermal power energy sources cover 80 % of the total energy consumption in Iceland. Our BC results on filters analyzed with a Thermal/Optical Carbon Aerosol Analyzer (OC/EC) confirm this assumption. Other potential soot sources in Iceland include agricultural burning, industry (aluminum and ferroalloy production and fishing industry), open burning, residential heating and transport (shipping, road traffic, aviation). On the contrary to low BC, we have found high concentrations of organic carbon in our Iceland 2016 samples. Some of the possible reasons for those will be discussed in this presentation. Earlier, we have measured and reported unexpectedly low snow albedo values of Arctic seasonally melting snow in Sodankylä, north of Arctic Circle. Our low albedo results of melting snow have been confirmed by three independent data sets. We have explained these low values to be due to: (i) large snow grain sizes up to 3 mm in diameter (seasonally melting snow); (ii) meltwater surrounding the grains and increasing the effective grain size; (iii) absorption caused by impurities in the snow, with concentration of elemental carbon (black carbon) in snow of 87 ppb, and organic carbon 2894 ppb. The high concentrations of carbon were due to air masses originating from the Kola Peninsula, Russia

  1. Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, P.; Allen, B.; Fang, Y.; Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Kusche, K.; Fedurin, M.; Vieira, J.; Martins, J.; Silva, L.

    2012-12-01

    Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction can in principle be reached at the ATF depending on the relative transverse and longitudinal size of the electron bunch when compared to the cold plasma collisionless skin depth c?ωpe: the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-modulation instability (SMI), and the current filamentation instability (CFI) regime. In addition, by choosing the bunch density, the linear, quasi-nonlinear and non linear regime of the PWFA can be reached. In the case of the two instabilities, the bunch density determines the growth rate and therefore the occurrence or not of the instability. We briefly describe these three regimes and outline results demonstrating that all these regime have or will be reached experimentally. We also outline planned and possible follow-on experiments.

  2. Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Allen, B.; Fang, Y.; Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Kusche, K.; Fedurin, M.; Vieira, J.; Martins, J.; Silva, L.

    2012-12-21

    Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction can in principle be reached at the ATF depending on the relative transverse and longitudinal size of the electron bunch when compared to the cold plasma collisionless skin depth c?{omega}{sub pe}: the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-modulation instability (SMI), and the current filamentation instability (CFI) regime. In addition, by choosing the bunch density, the linear, quasi-nonlinear and non linear regime of the PWFA can be reached. In the case of the two instabilities, the bunch density determines the growth rate and therefore the occurrence or not of the instability. We briefly describe these three regimes and outline results demonstrating that all these regime have or will be reached experimentally. We also outline planned and possible follow-on experiments.

  3. Effects of forest management on soil carbon: results of some long-term resampling studies

    Treesearch

    D.W. Johnson; Jennifer D. Knoepp; Wayne T. Swank; J. Shan; L.A. Morris; David H. D.H. van Lear; P.R. Kapeluck

    2002-01-01

    The effects of harvest intensity (sawlog, SAW; whole tree, WTH; and complete tree, CTH) on biomass and soil carbon (C) were studied in four forested sites in the Southeastern United States: (mixed deciduous forests at Oak Ridge, TN and Coweeta, NC; Pinus taeda at Clemson, SC; and P. eliottii at Bradford, FL). In general, harvesting had no lasting...

  4. Net Carbon Emissions from Deforestation in Bolivia during 1990-2000 and 2000-2010: Results from a Carbon Bookkeeping Model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lykke E; Doyle, Anna Sophia; del Granado, Susana; Ledezma, Juan Carlos; Medinaceli, Agnes; Valdivia, Montserrat; Weinhold, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimates of global carbon emissions are critical for understanding global warming. This paper estimates net carbon emissions from land use change in Bolivia during the periods 1990-2000 and 2000-2010 using a model that takes into account deforestation, forest degradation, forest regrowth, gradual carbon decomposition and accumulation, as well as heterogeneity in both above ground and below ground carbon contents at the 10 by 10 km grid level. The approach permits detailed maps of net emissions by region and type of land cover. We estimate that net CO2 emissions from land use change in Bolivia increased from about 65 million tons per year during 1990-2000 to about 93 million tons per year during 2000-2010, while CO2 emissions per capita and per unit of GDP have remained fairly stable over the sample period. If we allow for estimated biomass increases in mature forests, net CO2 emissions drop to close to zero. Finally, we find these results are robust to alternative methods of calculating emissions.

  5. Net Carbon Emissions from Deforestation in Bolivia during 1990-2000 and 2000-2010: Results from a Carbon Bookkeeping Model

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lykke E.; Doyle, Anna Sophia; del Granado, Susana; Ledezma, Juan Carlos; Medinaceli, Agnes; Valdivia, Montserrat; Weinhold, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimates of global carbon emissions are critical for understanding global warming. This paper estimates net carbon emissions from land use change in Bolivia during the periods 1990–2000 and 2000–2010 using a model that takes into account deforestation, forest degradation, forest regrowth, gradual carbon decomposition and accumulation, as well as heterogeneity in both above ground and below ground carbon contents at the 10 by 10 km grid level. The approach permits detailed maps of net emissions by region and type of land cover. We estimate that net CO2 emissions from land use change in Bolivia increased from about 65 million tons per year during 1990–2000 to about 93 million tons per year during 2000–2010, while CO2 emissions per capita and per unit of GDP have remained fairly stable over the sample period. If we allow for estimated biomass increases in mature forests, net CO2 emissions drop to close to zero. Finally, we find these results are robust to alternative methods of calculating emissions. PMID:26990865

  6. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundstrom, Shana M.; Eason, Tarsha; Nelson, R. John; Angeler, David G.; Barichievy, Chris; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Graham, Nicholas A.J.; Granholm, Dean; Gunderson, Lance; Knutson, Melinda; Nash, Kirsty L.; Spanbauer, Trisha; Stow, Craig A.; Allen, Craig R.

    2017-01-01

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological potential (i.e. potential vegetation), and often fail to account for ongoing changes due to stressors such as land use change and climate change and their effects on plant and animal communities. We use Fisher information, an information theory-based method, on both terrestrial and aquatic animal data (U.S. Breeding Bird Survey and marine zooplankton) to identify ecological boundaries, and compare our results to traditional early warning indicators, conventional ecoregion maps and multivariate analyses such as nMDS and cluster analysis. We successfully detected spatial regimes and transitions in both terrestrial and aquatic systems using Fisher information. Furthermore, Fisher information provided explicit spatial information about community change that is absent from other multivariate approaches. Our results suggest that defining spatial regimes based on animal communities may better reflect ecological reality than do traditional ecoregion maps, especially in our current era of rapid and unpredictable ecological change.

  7. Regimes of DNA confined in a nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Scaling regimes for polymers confined to tubular channels are well established when the channel cross-sectional dimension is either very small (Odjik regime) or large (classic de Gennes regime) relative to the polymer Kuhn length. In the literature, there is no clear consensus regarding the intermediate region and if subregimes even exist to connect these two classic bounding regimes. The confluence of emerging single DNA mapping technologies and a resurged interest in the fundamental properties of confined polymers has led to extensive research in this area using DNA as a model system. Due to the DNA molecule's properties and limitations of nanofabrication, most experiments are performed in this intermediate regime with channel dimensions of a few Kuhn lengths. Here we use simulations and theory to reconcile conflicting theories and show that there are indeed extended de Gennes, partial alignment and hairpin regimes located between the two classic regimes. Simulations results for both chain extension and free energy support the existence of these regimes. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's research program in BioSystems and Micromechanics, the National Science Foundation (CBET-1335938).

  8. Regimes of Helium Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmes, F. X.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2000-07-01

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and Zeldovich von Neumann Döring (ZND) detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts that start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star and to the thin-shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial direction encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamelet regime at a density of ~108 g cm-3. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than ~106 g cm-3. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations traveling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarly, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at ~107 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. In the thin helium shell case, turbulent deflagrations traveling in the lateral or radial direction encounter the distributed regime at densities below ~107 g cm-3 and the flamelet regime at larger densities. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than ~104 g cm-3, indicating that steady state laminar deflagrations cannot form below this density. The planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at ~5×104 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction.

  9. Regimes of Helium Burning

    SciTech Connect

    Timmes, F. X.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2000-07-10

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and Zeldovich von Neumann Doering [ZND] detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts that start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star and to the thin-shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial direction encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamelet regime at a density of {approx}108 g cm-3. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}106 g cm-3. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations traveling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarly, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}107 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. In the thin helium shell case, turbulent deflagrations traveling in the lateral or radial direction encounter the distributed regime at densities below {approx}107 g cm-3 and the flamelet regime at larger densities. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}104 g cm-3, indicating that steady state laminar deflagrations cannot form below this density. The planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}5x10{sup 4} g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  10. Prediction Rules for Regime Changes and Length in a New Regime for the Lorenz Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar Yadav, Rama; Dwivedi, Suneet; Mittal, Ashok Kumar

    2005-07-01

    Despite the widespread use of the Lorenz model as a conceptual model for predictability studies in meteorology, only Evans et al. seem to have studied the prediction of occurrence of regime changes and their duration. In this paper, simpler rules are presented for forecasting regime changes and their lengths, with near-perfect forecasting accuracy. It is found that when |x(t)| is greater than a critical value xc, the current regime will end after it completes the current orbit. Moreover, the length n of the new regime increases monotonically with the maximum value xm of |x(t)| in the previous regime. A best-fit cubic expression provides a very good estimate of n for the next regime, given xm for the previous regime.Similar forecasting rules are also obtained for regime changes in the forced Lorenz model. This model was introduced by Palmer and used as a conceptual model to explore the effects of sea surface temperature on seasonal mean rainfall. It was found that for the forced Lorenz model, the critical value xc changed linearly with the forcing parameter providing bias to one of the regimes. Similar regime prediction rules have been found in some other two-regime attractors. It seems these forecasting rules are a generic property of a large class of two-regime attractors. Although as a conceptual model, the Lorenz model cannot be taken very literally, these results suggest a relationship between magnitudes of maximum anomaly in one regime, for example, the active spell, and duration of the subsequent break spell.

  11. How does carbon dioxide permeate cell membranes? A discussion of concepts, results and methods

    PubMed Central

    Endeward, Volker; Al-Samir, Samer; Itel, Fabian; Gros, Gerolf

    2013-01-01

    We review briefly how the thinking about the permeation of gases, especially CO2, across cell and artificial lipid membranes has evolved during the last 100 years. We then describe how the recent finding of a drastic effect of cholesterol on CO2 permeability of both biological and artificial membranes fundamentally alters the long-standing idea that CO2—as well as other gases—permeates all membranes with great ease. This requires revision of the widely accepted paradigm that membranes never offer a serious diffusion resistance to CO2 or other gases. Earlier observations of “CO2-impermeable membranes” can now be explained by the high cholesterol content of some membranes. Thus, cholesterol is a membrane component that nature can use to adapt membrane CO2 permeability to the functional needs of the cell. Since cholesterol serves many other cellular functions, it cannot be reduced indefinitely. We show, however, that cells that possess a high metabolic rate and/or a high rate of O2 and CO2 exchange, do require very high CO2 permeabilities that may not be achievable merely by reduction of membrane cholesterol. The article then discusses the alternative possibility of raising the CO2 permeability of a membrane by incorporating protein CO2 channels. The highly controversial issue of gas and CO2 channels is systematically and critically reviewed. It is concluded that a majority of the results considered to be reliable, is in favor of the concept of existence and functional relevance of protein gas channels. The effect of intracellular carbonic anhydrase, which has recently been proposed as an alternative mechanism to a membrane CO2 channel, is analysed quantitatively and the idea considered untenable. After a brief review of the knowledge on permeation of O2 and NO through membranes, we present a summary of the 18O method used to measure the CO2 permeability of membranes and discuss quantitatively critical questions that may be addressed to this method. PMID

  12. CarboxyHemoglobin Formation Due to Transient Exposure to High Level Carbon Monoxide: Experimental Results and an Explanatory Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-30

    W. B. Saunders, 1986. Hauk, H . and Neuberger, M. Carbon monoxide uptake and the resulting carboxyhe- moglobin in man. Eur. J. Apo2l. Physiol. 53: 186...190, 1984. Jones, R. H ., Ellicott, M. F., Cadigan, J. B. and Gaensler, E. A. The relationship between alveolar and blood carbon monoxide...1987a. Tikuisis, P., Madill, H . D., Gill, B. J., Lewis, W. F., Cox, K. M. and Kane, D. M. A critical an_:ys:, of the use of the CFK equation in

  13. Fracture trace map and single-well aquifer test results in a carbonate aquifer in Berkeley County, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, Kurt J.; Podwysocki, Melvin H.; Crider, E. Allen; Weary, David J.

    2005-01-01

    These data contain information on the results of single-well aquifer tests, lineament analysis, and a bedrock geologic map compilation for the low-lying carbonate and shale areas of eastern Berkeley County, West Virginia. Efforts have been initiated by management agencies of Berkeley County in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey to further the understanding of the spatial distribution of fractures in the carbonate regions and their correlation with aquifer properties. This report presents transmissivity values from about 200 single-well aquifer tests and a map of fracture-traces determined from aerial photos and field investigations. Transmissivity values were compared to geologic factors possibly affecting its magnitude.

  14. 78 FR 60850 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the... certain alloy steel wire rod (wire rod) from Brazil would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence... Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Brazil, 67 FR 55805 (August 30, 2002). \\2\\ See Initiation of...

  15. 75 FR 63439 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Extension of the Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Extension of the Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of...

  16. JPL Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer Data Processing Results for the 2010 Flight Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph C.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzie, Robert T.; Christensen, Lance E.

    2011-01-01

    As a precursor to and validation of the core technology necessary for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days,and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission, we flew JPL's Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) in a campaign of five flights onboard NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in July 2010. This is the latest in a series of annual flight campaigns that began in 2006, and our first on the DC-8 aircraft.

  17. Solid and Gas-Phase Spectroscopy of Cosmic Carbon Analogs: Results and Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The laboratory studies of interstellar carbon materials analogs (PAHs, Fullerenes, chains) will be discussed with their advantages and limitations from the point of view of the application to astrophysical processes. The discussion will focus on the newest generation of laboratory experiments that has been developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions. The astrophysical implications and future perspectives will be stressed.

  18. Carbon isotope analysis of conodont organic material--Procedure and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Over, D.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Grossman, E.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Conodonts, the phosphatic microfossil remains of an extinct pelagic animal, are well suited for isotopic studies of Paleozoic marine organic carbon. The author report here what they believe are the first delta C-13 data for the organic matrix of conodont elements. Conodont delta C-13 values (PDB) for Upper Devonian Palmatolepis platform elements from a single interval of the Chappel Limestones in Texas range from [minus]24.5 to [minus]25.6 [per thousand] (n = 5). Lower Carboniferous Siphonodella platform elements from the same interval in the Chappel Limestone range from [minus]26.3 to [minus]27.3 [per thousand] (n = 2). Upper Carboniferous Streptognathodus elegantulus platform elements from four intervals in a 3.9 m section of the Necessity Shale in Texas range from [minus]23.0 to [minus]24.0 [per thousand] (n = 4). delta C-13 values also differ significantly between the three sample groups. Average values were [minus]4.7, [minus]7.1, and [minus]8.3 [per thousand] respectively, however, the relevance of these values is unclear. The conodont organic carbon isotopic values are within the range of delta C-13 values in sedimentary organic matter of late Paleozoic age. Although the data are limited, they show that significant isotopic differences occur between genera and between stratigraphically separate units. These isotopic differences in delta C-13 may be related to local changes in source of organic carbon, global changes in the carbon budget, or to dietary differences among conodont animals. Future study is directed toward evaluating the importance of each of these factors.

  19. Solid and Gas-Phase Spectroscopy of Cosmic Carbon Analogs: Results and Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The laboratory studies of interstellar carbon materials analogs (PAHs, Fullerenes, chains) will be discussed with their advantages and limitations from the point of view of the application to astrophysical processes. The discussion will focus on the newest generation of laboratory experiments that has been developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions. The astrophysical implications and future perspectives will be stressed.

  20. Carbon, oxygen and biological productivity in the Southern Ocean in and out the Kerguelen plume: CARIOCA drifter results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlivat, L.; Boutin, J.; d'Ovidio, F.

    2015-06-01

    The Kerguelen Plateau region in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean supports annually a large-scale phytoplankton bloom which is naturally fertilized with iron. As part of the second Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2) in austral spring (October-November 2011), one CARbon Interface OCean Atmosphere (CARIOCA) buoy was deployed east of the Kerguelen Plateau. It drifted eastward downstream along the Kerguelen plume. Hourly surface measurements of pCO2, O2 and ancillary observations were collected between 1 November 2011 and 12 February 2012 with the aim of characterizing the spatial and temporal variability of the biological net community production, NCP, downstream the Kerguelen Plateau, assessing the impact of iron-induced productivity on the biological inorganic carbon consumption and consequently on the CO2 flux exchanged at the air-sea interface. The trajectory of the buoy up to mid-December was within the longitude range 72-83° E, close to the polar front and then in the polar frontal zone, PFZ, up to 97° E. From 17 November to 16 December, the buoy drifted within the Kerguelen plume following a filament carrying dissolved iron, DFe, for a total distance of 700 km. In the first part of the trajectory of the buoy, within the iron plume, the ocean surface waters were always a sink for CO2 and a source for O2, with fluxes of respective mean values equal to -8 mmol CO2 and +38 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. To the east, as the buoy escaped the iron-enriched filament, the fluxes were in the opposite direction, with respective mean values of +5 mmol CO2 and -48 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. These numbers clearly indicate the strong impact of biological processes on the biogeochemistry in the surface waters within the Kerguelen plume in November-mid-December, while it is undetectable to the east in the PFZ from mid- December to mid-February. While the buoy follows the Fe-enriched filament, simultaneous observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and

  1. CO2 release due to impact devolatilization of carbonate: Results of shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Mary Sue

    2016-04-01

    A study of pure, single crystal calcite shocked to pressures from 9.0 to 60.8 GPa was conducted to address contradictory data for carbonate shock behavior. The recovered materials were analyzed optically and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as by thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman-spectroscopy. In thin section, progressive comminution of calcite is observed although grains remain birefringent to at least 60.8 GPa. TGA analysis reveals a positive correlation between percent of mass loss due to shock and increasing shock pressure (R = 0.77) and suggests that shock loading leads to the modest removal of structural volatiles in this pressure range. XRD patterns of shocked Iceland spar samples produce peaks that are qualitatively and quantitatively less intense, more diffuse, and shift to lower o2θ. However, the regularity observed in these shocked powder patterns suggests that structures with very uniform unit cell separations persist to shock pressures as high as 60.8 GPa. Raman spectral analyses indicate no band asymmetry and no systematic peak shifting or broadening. TEM micrographs display progressively diminishing crystallite domain sizes. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns reveal no signatures of amorphous material. These data show that essentially intact calcite is recovered at shock pressures up to 60.8 GPa with only slight mass loss (~7%). This work suggests that the amount of CO2 gas derived from shock devolatilization of carbonate by large meteorite impacts into carbonate targets has been (substantially) overestimated.

  2. Radiative forcing associated with particulate carbon emissions resulting from the use of mercury control technology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guangxing; Penner, Joyce E; Clack, Herek L

    2014-09-02

    Injection of powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbents into the flue gas of coal fired power plants with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is the most mature technology to control mercury emissions for coal combustion. However, the PAC itself can penetrate ESPs to emit into the atmosphere. These emitted PACs have similar size and optical properties to submicron black carbon (BC) and thus could increase BC radiative forcing unintentionally. The present paper estimates, for the first time, the potential emission of PAC together with their climate forcing. The global average maximum potential emissions of PAC is 98.4 Gg/yr for the year 2030, arising from the assumed adoption of the maximum potential PAC injection technology, the minimum collection efficiency, and the maximum PAC injection rate. These emissions cause a global warming of 2.10 mW m(-2) at the top of atmosphere and a cooling of -2.96 mW m(-2) at the surface. This warming represents about 2% of the warming that is caused by BC from direct fossil fuel burning and 0.86% of the warming associated with CO2 emissions from coal burning in power plants. Its warming is 8 times more efficient than the emitted CO2 as measured by the 20-year-integrated radiative forcing per unit of carbon input (the 20-year Global Warming Potential).

  3. Changes in mineralogical and leaching properties of converter steel slag resulting from accelerated carbonation at low CO2 pressure.

    PubMed

    van Zomeren, André; van der Laan, Sieger R; Kobesen, Hans B A; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Comans, Rob N J

    2011-11-01

    Steel slag can be applied as substitute for natural aggregates in construction applications. The material imposes a high pH (typically 12.5) and low redox potential (Eh), which may lead to environmental problems in specific application scenarios. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of accelerated steel slag carbonation, at relatively low pCO2 pressure (0.2 bar), to improve the environmental pH and the leaching properties of steel slag, with specific focus on the leaching of vanadium. Carbonation experiments are performed in laboratory columns with steel slag under water-saturated and -unsaturated conditions and temperatures between 5 and 90 °C. Two types of steel slag are tested; free lime containing (K3) slag and K1 slag with a very low free lime content. The fresh and carbonated slag samples are investigated using a combination of leaching experiments, geochemical modelling of leaching mechanisms and microscopic/mineralogical analysis, in order to identify the major processes that control the slag pH and resulting V leaching. The major changes in the amount of sequestered CO2 and the resulting pH reduction occurred within 24h, the free lime containing slag (K3-slag) being more prone to carbonation than the slag with lower free lime content (K1-slag). While carbonation at these conditions was found to occur predominantly at the surface of the slag grains, the formation of cracks was observed in carbonated K3 slag, suggesting that free lime in the interior of slag grains had also reacted. The pH of the K3 slag (originally pH±12.5) was reduced by about 1.5 units, while the K1 slag showed a smaller decrease in pH from about 11.7 to 11.1. However, the pH reduction after carbonation of the K3 slag was observed to lead to an increased V-leaching. Vanadium leaching from the K1 slag resulted in levels above the limit values of the Dutch Soil Quality Decree, for both the untreated and carbonated slag. V-leaching from the carbonated K3 slag remained

  4. Edge effects resulting from forest fragmentation enhance carbon uptake and its vulnerability to climate change in temperate broadleaf forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinmann, A.; Hutyra, L.

    2016-12-01

    Forest fragmentation resulting from land use and land cover change is a ubiquitous, ongoing global phenomenon with profound impacts on the growing conditions of the world's remaining forest. However, our understanding of forest carbon dynamics and their response to climate largely comes from unfragmented forest systems, which presents an important mismatch between the landscapes we study and those we aim to characterize. The temperate broadleaf forest makes a large contribution to the global terrestrial carbon sink, but is also the most heavily fragmented forest biome in the world. We use field measurements and geospatial analyses to characterize carbon dynamics in temperate broadleaf forest fragments. We show that forest growth and biomass increase by 89 ± 17% and 64 ± 12%, respectively, from the forest interior to edge. These ecosystem edge enhancements are not currently captured by models or approaches to quantifying regional C balance, but across southern New England, USA it increases carbon uptake and storage by 12.5 ± 2.9% and 9.6 ± 1.4%, respectively. However, we also find that forest growth near the edge declines three times faster than in the interior in response to heat stress during the growing season. Using climate projections, we show that future heat stress could reduce the forest edge growth enhancement by one-third by the end of the century. These findings contrast studies of edge effects in the world's other major forest biomes and indicate that the strength of the temperate broadleaf forest carbon sink and its capacity to mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions may be stronger, but also more sensitive to climate change than previous estimates suggest.

  5. Overview of the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report Process, results and next steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, N.; Shrestha, G.; Najjar, R.; Romero-Lankao, P.; Mayes, M. A.; Reed, S.; Birdsey, R.; Zhu, Z.; Shrestha, G.; Cavallaro, N.; Zhu, Z.; Cavallaro, N.; Zhu, Z.; Shrestha, G.

    2016-12-01

    With official kick-off in public engagement and writing in the early Spring of 2016, the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) is now set to be completed and published by the U.S. Government as a Highly Influential Scientific (Interagency) Assessment, a product of the Sustained National Climate Assessment, in late 2017. This presentation will highlight the planning process, the achievements so far, public engagement needs and the scientific community's contribution in the production of SOCCR-2.

  6. A quantitative comparison of Soil Development in four climatic regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, J.W.; Taylor, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A new quantitative Soil Development Index based on field data has been applied to chronosequences formed under different climatic regimes. The four soil chronosequences, developed primarily on sandy deposits, have some numeric age control and are located in xeric-inland (Merced, Calif.), xeric-coastal (Ventura, Calif.), aridic (Las Cruces, N. Mex.), and udic (Susquehanna Valley, Pa.) soil-moisture regimes. To quantify field properties, points are assigned for developmental increases in soil properties in comparison to the parent material. Currently ten soil-field properties are quantified and normalized for each horizon in a given chronosequence, including two new properties for carbonate-rich soils in addition to the eight properties previously defined. When individual properties or the combined indexes are plotted as a function of numeric age, rates of soil development can be compared in different climates. The results demonstrate that (1) the Soil Development Index can be applied to very different soil types, (2) many field properties develop systematically in different climatic regimes, (3) certain properties appear to have similar rates of development in different climates, and (4) the Profile Index that combines different field properties increases significantly with age and appears to develop at similar rates in different climates. The Soil Development Index can serve as a preliminary guide to soil age where other age control is lacking and can be used to correlate deposits of different geographical and climatic regions. ?? 1983.

  7. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser for cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses. Part I: Technique and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Roth, J E; Nixon, A J; Gantz, V A; Meyer, D; Mohammed, H

    1991-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser, used in a rapidly pulsed mode, was evaluated for intra-articular use in horses. Under arthroscopic guidance, a lensed 5 mm laser probe attached directly to a hand-held carbon dioxide laser was inserted into one intercarpal joint of eight horses. In four horses, a cartilage crater 1 cm in diameter was created to the level of the subchondral bone of the articular surface of the third carpal bone. In four horses, the laser was directed perpendicular to the articular surface of the third carpal bone and activated to penetrate the cartilage and subchondral bone. The intercarpal joint of the opposite carpus in each horse was subjected to arthroscopic examination and insertion of the laser probe for an equivalent time. The laser was not activated and these joints served as sham operated controls. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, then euthanatized, and the joints were examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser vaporized cartilage readily but penetrated bone poorly. Cartilage vaporization resulted in no greater swelling, heat, pain on flexion, lameness, or synovial fluid reaction than the sham procedure. Laser drilling resulted in a shallow, charred hole with a tenacious carbon residue, and in combination with the thermal damage to deeper bone, resulted in increased swelling, mild lameness and a low-grade, but persistent synovitis. The carbon dioxide laser is a useful intra-articular instrument for removal of cartilage and has potential application in inaccessible regions of diarthrodial joints. It does not penetrate bone sufficiently to have application in subchondral drilling.

  8. Diagenesis of bank margin carbonates monitors glacio-eustacy: modeling and core study results

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.K.; Al-Saqri, K.; Frohlich, C.

    1985-01-01

    Subsiding bank margin carbonates provide a monitoring system for high frequency sea level fluctuations. When sea level rises, new reefs and skeletal sands accumulate to near high-stand sea level. When sea level falls, subaerial exposure and related meteoric and mixed water diagenesis rapidly impart their mineralogic, isotopic, chemical, and petrographic signature on the strata. The authors model the interaction of fluctuating sea level (Milankovitch frequencies) and subsiding bank margin carbonates. Characteristic diagenetic lithologies occur seemingly randomly interbedded and unrelatable to specific subaerial exposure surfaces. This is similar to the pattern observed in Eocene bank margin skeletal sands of Kirkuk Field, Iraq. Meteoric diagenesis dominates the upper 35 meters of the authors core. The next 85 meters contain randomly alternating beds of meteoric limestone, mixed water dolomite, and limestone with well-preserved skeletal grains. This sequence is consistent with rapid glacio-eustatic fluctuations of Late Eocene sea level followed by a 35 to 50 meter glacio-eustatic lowering of average sea level at or near Eocene/Oligocene boundary.

  9. Expression of human dopamine receptor in potato (Solanum tuberosum) results in altered tuber carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Skirycz, Aleksandra; Swiedrych, Anna; Szopa, Jan

    2005-02-09

    Even though the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine) have been detected in plants their role is poorly documented. Correlations between norepinephrine, soluble sugars and starch concentration have been recently reported for potato plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase, the enzyme mediating the first step of catecholamine synthesis. More recently norepinephrine level was shown to significantly increase after osmotic stress, abscisic acid treatment and wounding. Therefore, it is possible that catecholamines might play a role in plant stress responses by modulating primary carbon metabolism, possibly by a mechanism similar to that in animal cells. Since to date no catecholamine receptor has been identified in plants we transformed potato plants with a cDNA encoding human dopamine receptor (HD1). Tuber analysis of transgenic plants revealed changes in the activities of key enzymes mediating sucrose to starch conversion (ADP-glucose phosphorylase and sucrose synthase) and sucrose synthesis (sucrose phosphate synthase) leading to altered content of both soluble sugars and starch. Surprisingly the catecholamine level measured in transgenic plants was significantly increased; the reason for this is as yet unknown. However the presence of the receptor affected a broader range of enzyme activities than those affected by the massive accumulation of norepinephrine reported for plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase. Therefore, it is suggested that the presence of the exogenous receptor activates catecholamine cAMP signalling in plants. Our data support the possible involvement of catecholamines in regulating plant carbon metabolism via cAMP signalling pathway.

  10. Health effects of carbon-containing particulate matter: focus on sources and recent research program results.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Annette; McDonald, Jacob

    2016-02-01

    Air pollution is a complex mixture of gas-, vapor-, and particulate-phase materials comprised of inorganic and organic species. Many of these components have been associated with adverse health effects in epidemiological and toxicological studies, including a broad spectrum of carbonaceous atmospheric components. This paper reviews recent literature on the health impacts of organic aerosols, with a focus on specific sources of organic material; it is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all the available literature. Specific emission sources reviewed include engine emissions, wood/biomass combustion emissions, biogenic emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), resuspended road dust, tire and brake wear, and cooking emissions. In addition, recent findings from large toxicological and epidemiological research programs are reviewed in the context of organic PM, including SPHERES, NPACT, NERC, ACES, and TERESA. A review of the extant literature suggests that there are clear health impacts from emissions containing carbon-containing PM, but difficulty remains in apportioning responses to certain groupings of carbonaceous materials, such as organic and elemental carbon, condensed and gas phases, and primary and secondary material. More focused epidemiological and toxicological studies, including increased characterization of organic materials, would increase understanding of this issue.

  11. Results of a European interlaboratory comparison on CO2 sorption on activated carbon and coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Busch, Andreas; Krooss, Bernhard; de Weireld, Guy; Billemont, Pierre; van Hemert, Patrick; Wolf, Karl-Heinz

    2013-04-01

    For the assessment of CO2 storage in coal seams or enhanced coalbed methane production (ECBM), the sorption properties of natural coals are important parameters. Since more and more laboratories worldwide are concerned with measurements of gas sorption on coal it is indispensable to establish quality standards for such experiments. The first two interlaboratory studies on CO2 sorption on coal (Goodman et al. 2004, 2007) revealed a poor agreement of sorption isotherms among the participating laboratories, particularly in the high-pressure range. During the MOVECBM (http://www.movecbm.eu/) project funded by the European Commission (6th framework), an interlaboratory comparison of CO2 sorption on selected coals and activated carbon was initiated. Measurements were performed on dry samples at 45° C using the manometric and the gravimetric method. up to a final pressure of 15 MPa. The first set of high-pressure sorption measurements was performed on a Filtrasorb 400 activated carbon sample in order to minimise heterogeneity effects and to optimize the experimental procedures for the individual (manometric or gravimetric) methods (Gensterblum et al. 2009). Since comparability for the activated carbon was excellent, the measurements were continued using natural coals of various rank (anthracite, bituminous coal and lignite) to study the influence of heterogeneities and varying starting conditions on the CO2 sorption properties (Gensterblum et al. 2010). Compared to the poor reproducibility observed in previous interlaboratory studies (Goodman et al., 2004, 2007) this European study showed excellent agreement (<5 % deviation) among the participating laboratories with good repeatability. The sorption data and technical information on the different experimental setups have been used to investigate errors and potential pitfalls in the assessment of high-pressure CO2 sorption isotherms. References Gensterblum Y., P. van Hemert, P. Billemont, A. Busch, B.M. Krooss, G. de

  12. Modelling the role of fires in the terrestrial carbon balance by incorporating SPITFIRE into the global vegetation model ORCHIDEE - Part 1: simulating historical global burned area and fire regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Cadule, P.; Thonicke, K.; Archibald, S.; Poulter, B.; Hao, W. M.; Hantson, S.; Mouillot, F.; Friedlingstein, P.; Maignan, F.; Viovy, N.

    2014-11-01

    Fire is an important global ecological process that influences the distribution of biomes, with consequences for carbon, water, and energy budgets. Therefore it is impossible to appropriately model the history and future of the terrestrial ecosystems and the climate system without including fire. This study incorporates the process-based prognostic fire module SPITFIRE into the global vegetation model ORCHIDEE, which was then used to simulate burned area over the 20th century. Special attention was paid to the evaluation of other fire regime indicators such as seasonality, fire size and fire length, next to burned area. For 2001-2006, the simulated global spatial extent of fire agrees well with that given by satellite-derived burned area data sets (L3JRC, GLOBCARBON, GFED3.1), and 76-92% of the global burned area is simulated as collocated between the model and observation, depending on which data set is used for comparison. The simulated global mean annual burned area is 346 Mha yr-1, which falls within the range of 287-384 Mha yr-1 as given by the three observation data sets; and is close to the 344 Mha yr-1 by the GFED3.1 data when crop fires are excluded. The simulated long-term trend and variation of burned area agree best with the observation data in regions where fire is mainly driven by climate variation, such as boreal Russia (1930-2009), along with Canada and US Alaska (1950-2009). At the global scale, the simulated decadal fire variation over the 20th century is only in moderate agreement with the historical reconstruction, possibly because of the uncertainties of past estimates, and because land-use change fires and fire suppression are not explicitly included in the model. Over the globe, the size of large fires (the 95th quantile fire size) is underestimated by the model for the regions of high fire frequency, compared with fire patch data as reconstructed from MODIS 500 m burned area data. Two case studies of fire size distribution in Canada and US

  13. The relationship between void waves and flow regime transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Drew, D.A.; Kalkach-Navarro, S.; Park, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    The results of an extensive experimental and analytical study on the relationship between void waves and flow regime transition are presented, in particular, the bubbly/slug flow regime transition. It is shown that void wave instability signals a flow regime transition.

  14. Climate change impacts on the vegetation carbon cycle of the Iberian Peninsula—Intercomparison of CMIP5 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparício, Sara; Carvalhais, Nuno; Seixas, Júlia

    2015-04-01

    The vulnerability of a water-limited region like the Iberian Peninsula (IP) to climate changes drives a great concern and interest in understanding its impacts on the carbon cycle, namely, in terms of biomass production. This study assesses the effects of climate change and rising CO2 on forest growth, carbon sequestration, and water-use efficiency on the IP by late 21st century using 12 models from the CMIP5 project (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5). We find a strong agreement among the models under representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) scenario, mostly regarding projected forest growth and increased primary production (13, 9% of gross primary production (GPP) increase projected by the models ensemble). Under RCP8.5 scenario, the results are less conclusive, as seven models project both GPP and net primary production to increase (up to 83% and 69%, respectively), while the remaining four models project the IP as a potential carbon source by late century. Divergences in carbon mass in wood predictions could be attributed to model structures, such as the N cycle, land model component, land cover data and parameterization, and distinct clusters of Earth System Models (ESMs). ESMs divergences in carbon feedbacks are likely being highly impacted by parameterization divergences and susceptibility to climate change and CO2 fertilization effect. Despite projected rainfall reductions, we observe a strong agreement between models regarding the increase of water-use efficiency (by 21% and 34%) under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, respectively. Results suggest that rising CO2 has the potential to partially alleviate the adverse effects of drought.

  15. Preliminary Results from the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, D.; Eldering, A.; Gunson, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory - 2 (OCO-2) was successfully launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 9:56:44 UTC on July 2, 2014. After a series of spacecraft checkout activities and orbit raising maneuvers, OCO-2 was inserted at the front of the 705-km Afternoon constellation (A-Train) on August 3rd. This presentation will summarize the science objectives, review the measurement approach, and introduce some preliminary data from the first few months of operation. OCO-2 was designed to return estimates of the column-averaged atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) dry air mole fraction (XCO2) with the precision, resolution, and coverage needed to quantify CO2 surface fluxes on regional scales. To meet these goals, it carries and points a 3-channel grating spectrometer that collects high resolution, co-bore-sighted spectra of reflected sunlight in the 765 nm O2 A-band and in the CO2 bands centered near 1610 and 2060 nm. Each channel records 24 spectra per second along a narrow (< 0.8-degree) track, returning about one million soundings each day. At least 10% of these soundings are expected to be sufficiently cloud free to yield full-column estimates of XCO2with single-sounding accuracies of 0.25 % on regional scales at monthly intervals. The instrument is calibrated using on-board sources and targets, the Moon, well-characterized surface sites (Pollock et al. this session), and comparisons with nearly-coincident observations from the Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT; Kuze et al. this session). Cloudy soundings are identified and screened out (Taylor et al. this session) and the remaining soundings are analyzed to yield spatially-resolved estimates of XCO2 and other geophysical products (c.f. Frankenberg et al. this session). OCO-2 XCO2 estimates are then validated against those from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) to assess their accuracy and precision (Wennberg et al. this session). Preliminary products from each step of this

  16. Carbon, oxygen and biological productivity in the Southern Ocean in and out the Kerguelen plume: CARIOCA drifter results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlivat, L.; Boutin, J.; d'Ovidio, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Kerguelen Plateau region in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean supports annually a large-scale phytoplankton bloom which is naturally fertilized with iron. As part of the second Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study expedition (KEOPS2) in austral spring (October-November 2011), one Carioca buoy was deployed east of the Kerguelen plateau. It drifted eastward downstream in the Kerguelen plume. Hourly surface measurements of pCO2, O2 and ancillary observations were collected between 1 November 2011 to 12 February 2012 with the aim of characterizing the spatial and temporal variability of the biological Net Community Production (NCP) downstream the Kerguelen plateau, assess the impact of iron-induced productivity on the biological carbon consumption and consequently on the CO2 flux exchanged at the air-sea interface. The trajectory of the buoy until mid-December was within the longitude range, 72-83° E, close to the polar front and then in the polar frontal zone, PFZ, until 97° E. From 17 November to 16 December, the buoy drifted within the Kerguelen plume following a filament carrying dissolved iron, DFe, for a total distance of 700 km. In the first part of the trajectory, the ocean surface waters are a sink for CO2 and a source for CO2, with fluxes of respective mean values equal to -8 and +38 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1. Eastward, as the buoy escapes the iron enriched filament, the fluxes are in opposite direction, with respective mean values of +5 and -48 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. These numbers clearly indicate the strong impact of biological processes on the biogeochemistry in the surface waters within the Kerguelen plume in November-mid-December, while it is undetectable eastward in the PFZ from mid-December to mid-February. While the buoy follows the Fe enriched filament, simultaneous observations of dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC, and dissolved oxygen, O2, highlight biological events lasting from 2 to 4 days. Stoichiometric ratios, O2/C, between 1.1 and 1.4 are

  17. First results on stable isotopes in fluid inclusions in cryogenic carbonates from Ural Mountains (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublyansky, Yuri; Luetscher, Mark; Spötl, Christoph; Töchterle, Paul; Kadebskaya, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Cryogenic cave carbonates (CCC) were found in a number of caves in the Ural. In contrast to the CCC previously reported from Central Europe, the Uralian CCC have larger sizes (up to 4-5 cm), which allows for more detailed petrographic and geochemical studies. CCCs from Uralian caves commonly show spherulitic shapes due to crystal splitting, supporting the model of calcite precipitating in a freezing water pond. δ18O values of studied CCCs are lower by 1 to 14 o compared to noncryogenic speleothems of Pleistocene and Holocene age from the same caves. δ18O and δ13C values are inversely correlated and typically show a fractionation between the core and the rim of individual samples. These trends are similar to those reported for CCCs from European caves (Žák et al., 2004). Petrographic observations performed on doubly polished, 100-150 micron-thick sections revealed abundant fluid inclusions, trapped between fibres of the spherulites. Petrographic relationships suggest that these inclusions are primary. The isotopic composition of water trapped in fluid inclusions in CCCs from two caves was analyzed following mechanical crushing at 120 °C, cryo-trapping of released water, pyrolysis on glassy carbon at 1400 °C (TC/EA device; Thermo), and analysis of the evolved gases on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Delta V Advantage; Thermo Fisher). The lack of peaks on the m/z 2 trace during the heating of the loaded crushing cell attests for a good sealing of the fluid inclusions. The measured δD values range between -136 o and -145 o VSMOW. The values measured in CCCs are more negative than the typical values of fluid inclusion water measured in the Holocene stalagmites from central Ural (-99 to -108 ). This shift toward more negative values is attributed to the isotopic fractionation between ice and water during the freezing. Reference: Žák et al., 2004, Chemical Geology, 2006, 119-136.

  18. Cryogenic cave carbonates as an archive of Late Pleistocene permafrost in the Ural Mountains: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dublyansky, Yuri; Kadebskaya, Olga; Cheng, Hai; Luetscher, Mark; Spötl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    A specific type of cave deposits, cryogenic cave carbonates (CCCs), was discovered in the late 1980s in several caves of Central Europe. Unlike 'common' speleothems that form primarily due to degassing of CO2 from Ca2+ and HCO3- -rich waters, CCCs form by freezing-induced segregation (Žák et al., 2004). The formation of CCCs, hence, requires the presence of both liquid water and freezing temperatures. The latter combination may occur in caves in two situations: (1) freezing-thawing cycles in cave entrance zones; and (2) degrading permafrost conditions, when the active layer reaches the cave ceiling, whilst the deeper parts of the cave remain frozen. The latter situation is associated with a particular type of CCCs, which can be used as a marker for permafrost conditions. Because cave carbonates can be accurately dated using the U/Th method, CCCs may be used to identify events of (degrading) palaeo-permafrost conditions. In this study, CCCs were identified and sampled in four caves, located along a 1000 km-long transect from the northern to the southern Ural Associating the CCCs to permafrost conditions was possible on the basis of field observations (locations deep inside the cave, far from entrance zones) and stable isotope properties (strongly depleted δ18O values, inverse correlation between δ18O and δ13C). Chaikovskiy et al. (2014) reported five U/Th analyses of CCC from three caves: 16.7 ka and 104.8 ka (Divja Cave, northern Ural); and 13.4 ka, 86.5 ka and 125.3 ka (Rossijskaya and Usvinskaya Caves, central Ural). In this study we report 25 additional U/Th ages from northern and central Ural, as well as the first CCC age from southern Ural (Shulgan-Tash Cave). Most of the younger ages (

  19. Gas flaring and resultant air pollution: A review focusing on black carbon.

    PubMed

    Fawole, Olusegun G; Cai, X-M; MacKenzie, A R

    2016-09-01

    Gas flaring is a prominent source of VOCs, CO, CO2, SO2, PAH, NOX and soot (black carbon), all of which are important pollutants which interact, directly and indirectly, in the Earth's climatic processes. Globally, over 130 billion cubic metres of gas are flared annually. We review the contribution of gas flaring to air pollution on local, regional and global scales, with special emphasis on black carbon (BC, "soot"). The temporal and spatial characteristics of gas flaring distinguishes it from mobile combustion sources (transport), while the open-flame nature of gas flaring distinguishes it from industrial point-sources; the high temperature, flame control, and spatial compactness distinguishes gas flaring from both biomass burning and domestic fuel-use. All of these distinguishing factors influence the quantity and characteristics of BC production from gas flaring, so that it is important to consider this source separately in emissions inventories and environmental field studies. Estimate of the yield of pollutants from gas flaring have, to date, paid little or no attention to the emission of BC with the assumption often being made that flaring produces a smokeless flame. In gas flares, soot yield is known to depend on a number of factors, and there is a need to develop emission estimates and modelling frameworks that take these factors into consideration. Hence, emission inventories, especially of the soot yield from gas flaring should give adequate consideration to the variation of fuel gas composition, and to combustion characteristics, which are strong determinants of the nature and quantity of pollutants emitted. The buoyant nature of gas flaring plume, often at temperatures in the range of 2000 K, coupled with the height of the stack enables some of the pollutants to escape further into the free troposphere aiding their long-range transport, which is often not well-captured by model studies.

  20. A methodology for elemental and organic carbon emission inventory and results for Lombardy region, Italy.

    PubMed

    Caserini, Stefano; Galante, Silvia; Ozgen, Senem; Cucco, Sara; de Gregorio, Katia; Moretti, Marco

    2013-04-15

    This paper presents a methodology and its application for the compilation of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) emission inventories. The methodology consists of the estimation of EC and OC emissions from available total suspended particulate matter (TSP) emission inventory data using EC and OC abundances in TSP derived from an extensive literature review, by taking into account the local technological context. In particular, the method is applied to the 2008 emissions of Lombardy region, Italy, considering 148 different activities and 30 types of fuels, typical of Western Europe. The abundances estimated in this study may provide a useful basis to assess the emissions also in other emission contexts with similar prevailing sources and technologies. The dominant sources of EC and OC in Lombardy are diesel vehicles for EC and the residential wood combustion (RWC) for OC which together account for about 83% of the total emissions of both pollutants. The EC and OC emissions from industrial processes and other fuel (e.g., gasoline, kerosene and LPG) combustion are significantly lower, while non-combustion sources give an almost negligible contribution. Total EC+OC contribution to regional greenhouse gas emissions is positive for every sector assuming whichever GWP100 value within the range proposed in literature. An uncertainty assessment is performed through a Monte Carlo simulation for RWC, showing a large uncertainty range (280% of the mean value for EC and 70% for OC), whereas for road transport a qualitative analysis identified a narrower range of uncertainty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Black Carbon Emissions from In-use Ships: Results from CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffaloe, Gina Marise

    Black carbon (BC) mass emission factors (EFBC; g-BC (kg-fuel)--1) from a variety of ocean going vessels have been determined from measurements of BC and CO2 concentrations in ship plumes intercepted by the R/V Atlantis during the 2010 California Nexus (CalNex) campaign. The ships encountered were all operating within 24 nautical miles of the California coast and were utilizing relatively low sulphur fuels. Black carbon concentrations within the plumes, from which EFBC values are determined, were measured using four independent instruments: a photoacoustic spectrometer and a particle soot absorption photometer, which measure light absorption, and a single particle soot photometer and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer, which measure the mass concentration of refractory BC directly. The measured EFBC have been divided into vessel type categories and engine type categories, from which averages have been determined. The geometric average EFBC, determined from over 71 vessels and 135 plumes encountered, was 0.31 g-BC (kg-fuel)--1. The most frequent engine type encountered was the slow speed diesel (SSD), and the most frequent SSD vessel type was the cargo ship sub-category. Average and median EF BC values from these two categories are compared to previous observations from the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) in 2006, in which the ships encountered were predominately operating high sulphur fuels. There is some indication that the EFBC values for SSD vessels during CalNex were lower than during TexAQS, although ship-to-ship variability in these data sets makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the influence of fuel quality on EFBC.

  2. Carbon emissions as a result of land use change and accelerated soil erosion: perspectives in time & space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Oost, K.; Verstraeten, G.; Notebaert, B.; Broothaerts, N.; Doetterl, S.; Wiaux, F.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon emissions as a result of anthropogenic land use have drastically altered the global C cycle. Analyses reported that land use change has released 156 Pg C from vegetation and soils to the atmosphere in the period 1850-2000, equivalent to c. 50% of fossil fuel emissions. More recently, longer-term analysis of human-induced land cover change have highlighted the importance of past land use changes, with estimates of pre-industrial Holocene carbon emissions ranging between 50 and 357 Pg C. Current global vegetation models represent well the net terrestrial C exchange from both vegetation and soils accompanying land use change. In contrast, C exchange associated with accelerated soil erosion following the conversion of land to agricultural use is not accounted for. Large amounts of C have been exposed to mineralization and burial as a result of agricultural erosion and deposition but its significance for both current and past fluxes of carbon due to changes in land use remains poorly quantified. Here, we present an overview of the key controls on soil erosion-induced changes in C exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. We provide evidence of how erosion processes increase the stabilization potential of soils by advecting mineral surfaces through the soil column. Accelerated erosion provides fresh mineral surfaces to the biologically active soil layer where it can stabilize organic matter inputs from plants at sites of erosion. In combination with the deep burial of allochthonous and autochtonous carbon and the inhibited decomposition upon burial, this acts as a sink mechanism. The conditions under which accelerated erosion leads to the chemical and physical breakdown of soil and a biomass reduction following soil degradation, resulting in a net source are also identified. We also present the integrated biotic flux of carbon for the Holocene as a result of both anthropogenic land use change and accelerated erosion for a large coupled upland

  3. Changes in Snow Albedo Resulting from Snow Darkening Caused by Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, J.; Kloster, S.; Bourgeois, Q.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the potential impact of snow darkening caused by pre-industrial and present-day black carbon (BC) emissions on snow albedo and subsequently climate. To assess this impact, we implemented the effect of snow darkening caused by BC emitted from natural as well as anthropogenic sources into the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model (MPI-M ESM). Considerable amounts of BC are emitted e.g. from fires and are transported through the atmosphere for several days before being removed by rain or snow precipitation in snow covered regions. Already very small quantities of BC reduce the snow reflectance significantly, with consequences for snow melting and snow spatial coverage. We implemented the snow albedo reduction caused by BC contamination and snow aging in the one layer land surface component (JSBACH) of the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6, developed at MPI-M. For this we used the single-layer simulator of the SNow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR-Online (Flanner et al., 2007); http://snow.engin.umich.edu) model to derive snow albedo values for BC in snow concentrations ranging between 0 and 1500 ng(BC)/g(snow) for different snow grain sizes for the visible (0.3 - 0.7 μm) and near infrared range (0.7 - 1.5 μm). As snow grains grow over time, we assign different snow ages to different snow grain sizes (50, 150, 500, and 1000 μm). Here, a radius of 50 μm corresponds to new snow, whereas a radius of 1000 μm corresponds to old snow. The deposition rates of BC on snow are prescribed from previous ECHAM6-HAM simulations for two time periods, pre-industrial (1880-1889) and present-day (2000-2009), respectively. We perform a sensitivity study regarding the scavenging of BC by snow melt. To evaluate the newly implemented albedo scheme we will compare the modeled black carbon in snow concentrations to observed ones. Moreover, we will show the impact of the BC contamination and snow aging on the simulated snow albedo. The

  4. Preliminary results on the effects of afforestation of maize soils with Populus alba L., on carbon metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Campos, Elena; Zorita, Félix; Gil-Sotres, Fernando; Leirós, Mā Carmen; Trasar-Cepeda, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Transformation of a natural soil to agricultural land is generally assumed to be accompanied by increased mineralization of the organic matter and increased CO2emissions; in contrast, afforestation of agricultural soil is thought to lead to sequestration of carbon and incorporation of atmospheric CO2 into the organic matter. In other words the type of management and land use determine whether soils act as carbon sinks or sources, so that transformation of agricultural land to forest land is generally considered to be accompanied by an increase in edaphic carbon, although it is not clear whether this effect is always produced or if it depends on the agricultural history of the land being afforested. In light of the recognised importance of forest land in sequestering C, and therefore in regulating climate change, in 1992 the EU established Regulation 2080 to promote the afforestation of marginal agricultural land. This had strong repercussions in regions such as Galicia (NW Spain) as the afforestation was mainly applied to good quality agricultural land rather than to marginal land. Although, as a result, large areas of agricultural land have been afforested in Galicia, the associated effects on edaphic carbon have not been widely investigated. The present study involves analysis of large number of afforested soils, planted with different trees and located in different areas throughout Galicia (NW Spain), with the aim of investigating the effects on carbon metabolism in agricultural soils transformed for forestry use. Here we report the preliminary results concerning the observed effects on carbon metabolism in six soils afforested with poplar, Populus alba L., of age between 4 and 8 years. In addition to the six soils planted with poplars, adjacent agricultural soils (x6) were analyzed. In each case the adjacent soil was the same as the original soil prior to afforestation, and all were maize soils. Samples of the soils were collected in autumn, after harvesting

  5. Plant interspecific differences in arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization as a result of soil carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Eschen, René; Müller-Schärer, Heinz; Schaffner, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Soil nutrient availability and colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are important and potentially interacting factors shaping vegetation composition and succession. We investigated the effect of carbon (C) addition, aimed at reducing soil nutrient availability, on arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Seedlings of 27 plant species with different sets of life-history traits (functional group affiliation, life history strategy and nitrophilic status) were grown in pots filled with soil from a nutrient-rich set-aside field and amended with different amounts of C. Mycorrhizal colonization was progressively reduced along the gradient of increasing C addition in 17 out of 27 species, but not in the remaining species. Grasses had lower colonization levels than forbs and legumes and the decline in AM fungal colonization was more pronounced in legumes than in other forbs and grasses. Mycorrhizal colonization did not differ between annual and perennial species, but decreased more rapidly along the gradient of increasing C addition in plants with high Ellenberg N values than in plants with low Ellenberg N values. Soil C addition not only limits plant growth through a reduction in available nutrients, but also reduces mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots. The effect of C addition on mycorrhizal colonization varies among plant functional groups, with legumes experiencing an overproportional reduction in AM fungal colonization along the gradient of increasing C addition. We therefore propose that for a better understanding of vegetation succession on set-aside fields one may consider the interrelationship between plant growth, soil nutrient availability and mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots.

  6. Experimental Results in Support of Simulating Progressive Crush in Carbon-Fiber Textile Composites

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Allison, L M; Cunningham, B J; Freeman, DC; Saculla, M D; Sanchez, R J; Winchester, S W

    2001-04-02

    This report summarizes the findings of an experimental program conducted to support the modeling of the crush behavior of triaxial braid carbon fiber composites. The matrix material as well as braided panels and tubes were characterized in order to determine material properties, to assess failure modes, and to provide a test bed for new analytical and numerical tools developed specifically for braided composites. The matrix material selected by the ACC was an epoxy vinyl ester (Ashland Hetron 922). Tensile tests were used to compare two formulations-one used by the ACC and one recommended by the resin supplier. The latter was a faster reacting system and gelled in one-third the time of the ACC formulation. Both formulations had an average elongation at failure that was only half of the resin supplier's reported value. Only one specimen of each type came close to the reported elongation value and it was shown that failure invariably initiated at both surface and internal defects. Overall, the tensile properties of the two formulations were nearly identical, but those of the ACC system were more consistent. The properties of the ACC matrix formulation were measured in tension, shear, and compression and the average properties obtained in these tests are summarized.

  7. Seasonal Dynamics of Water, Carbon, and Energy Flux in Mesquite Forest: Project Overview and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. G.; Scott, R.; Lin, G.; Martens, D.; Watts, C.; Goodrich, D.; Garatuza, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Edwards, E.; Hultine, K.; Yepez, E.; Ellsworth, P.; Cable, W.; vanHaren, J.; Pierce, D.

    2001-12-01

    Mesquite is the dominant woody plant in floodplain environments of warm deserts in the southwestern US and thus plays a central role in biogeochemical cycling and energy exchange at landscape and potentially regional scales. Our project investigates the biotic and abiotic controls over seasonal dynamics of energy exchange, CO2 uptake and release, and evapotranspiration within a mature mesquite forest on the San Pedro River floodplain in southeastern Arizona. The growing season in the upper San Pedro River basin is punctuated by a very hot, dry period in early summer followed by monsoon rains that stimulate prolific growth of under story C4 grasses. Our general objectives are to determine the impact of summer rains on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), evapotranspiration (ET), energy fluxes and soil nutrient cycling, and to understand and model component fluxes in these two-layered canopies. We are continuously monitoring NEE and ET using an eddy covariance system mounted on a 14-m tall tower at the site. Three intensive field campaigns (pre-, mid-, and post-monsoon) included measurements of eddy fluxes beneath the mesquite canopy, mesquite sap flow, mesquite leaf area index, mesquite and grass water sources and stomatal conductance, soil moisture distribution, soil respiration, soil carbon and nitrogen pools, and isotopic composition of CO2 and water vapor within and above the canopy boundary layer. This talk will highlight some of the important findings from the first year of this project. >http://www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/~russell/mesquitehome.htm

  8. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  9. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  10. Effect of moisture regime on the redistribution of heavy metals in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shunan; Zhang, Mingkui

    2011-01-01

    Sequential extraction procedure was applied to assess the dynamics of solid-phase transformation of added Cu, Pb, Cd, and Hg in a typical Chinese paddy soil incubated under three moisture regimes (75% field capacity, wetting-drying cycle, and flooding). The heavy metals spiked in the soil were time-dependently transferred from the easily extractable fraction (the exchangeable fraction) into less labile fractions (Fe-Mn oxide- and organic matter-bound fractions), and thus reduced lability of the metals. No significant changes were found for the carbonate-bound and residual fractions of the heavy metals in the soil during the whole incubation. Change rate of the mobility factor (MF), a proportion of weakly bound fractions (exchangeable and carbonate-bound) in the total metal of soil, reflected the transformation rate of metal speciation from the labile fractions toward stable fractions. It was found that soil moisture regime did not change the direction and pathways of transformation of metal speciation, but it significantly affected the transformation rate. In general, the paddy soil under flooding regime had higher metal reactivity compared with 75% field capacity and wetting-drying cycle regimes, resulting in the more complete movement of metals toward stable fractions. This might be related to the increased pH, precipitation of the metals with sulfides and higher concentration of amorphous Fe oxides under submerged condition.

  11. Flow regimes during immiscible displacement

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Mcclure, James; Berrill, Mark A.; ...

    2017-02-01

    Fractional ow of immiscible phases occurs at the pore scale where grain surfaces and phases interfaces obstruct phase mobility. However, the larger scale behavior is described by a saturation-dependent phenomenological relationship called relative permeability. As a consequence, pore-scale parameters, such as phase topology and/ or geometry, and details of the flow regime cannot be directly related to Darcy-scale flow parameters. It is well understood that relative permeability is not a unique relationship of wetting-phase saturation and rather depends on the experimental conditions at which it is measured. Herein we use fast X-ray microcomputed tomography to image pore-scale phase arrangements duringmore » fractional flow and then forward simulate the flow regimes using the lattice-Boltzmann method to better understand the underlying pore-scale flow regimes and their influence on Darcy-scale parameters. We find that relative permeability is highly dependent on capillary number and that the Corey model fits the observed trends. At the pore scale, while phase topologies are continuously changing on the scale of individual pores, the Euler characteristic of the nonwetting phase (NWP) averaged over a sufficiently large field of view can describe the bulk topological characteristics; the Euler characteristic decreases with increasing capillary number resulting in an increase in relative permeability. Lastly, we quantify the fraction of NWP that flows through disconnected ganglion dynamics and demonstrate that this can be a significant fraction of the NWP flux for intermediate wetting-phase saturation. Furthermore, rate dependencies occur in our homogenous sample (without capillary end effect) and the underlying cause is attributed to ganglion flow that can significantly influence phase topology during the fractional flow of immiscible phases.« less

  12. Global net land carbon sink: Results from the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntzinger, D. N.; Schwalm, C. R.; Michalak, A. M.; Cook, R. B.; Jacobson, A. R.; Schaefer, K. M.; Dasgupta, A.; Poco, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Multi-scale Synthesis and Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. Here we present results from the terrestrial biospheric models participating in the MsTMIP effort, focusing on global and regional model estimates of the net land carbon sink. When compared to estimates of the residual net land sink inferred from atmospheric CO2 observations (i.e., fossil fuel emission + land use land cover change - atmospheric increase - ocean uptake), MsTMIP models predict, on average, a weaker global net land uptake of carbon. There is a large spread in MsTMIP estimates of the net land sink (e.g., -2.5 to 5.0 Pg C/yr in 2010, where a negative flux represents a net release to the atmosphere). Some models consistently show the land surface as a net source of carbon to the atmosphere, which is inconsistent with the atmospheric record. In addition, we examine how model estimates of the cumulative global net sink diverge over the period 1900 to 2010, and the degree to which model sensitivity to forcing factors and fundamental differences in model formulation contribute to this divergence. We link differences in estimates of the cumulative land sink back to each model's sensitivity to key forcing factors including climate variability, CO2 fertilization, nitrogen limitation, and land cover / land-use change. For example, the strength of carbon uptake in most models appears to be strongly coupled with atmospheric CO2 concentrations (CO2 fertilization effect). The strength of this relationship, however, varies across models with some models exhibiting a very strong CO2 fertilization effect (e.g., ORCHIDEE), while others not so (e.g., CLM). To inform the comparison across models, structural differences (i.e., which processes are included and how those processes are parameterized) among the participating models are evaluated using hierarchical

  13. Sources of Respired Carbon in a Northern Minnesota Ombrotrophic Spruce Bog: Preliminary 14C Results from the SPRUCE Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilderson, T. P.; McNicol, G.; Machin, A.; Hanson, P. J.; McFarlane, K. J.; Osuna, J. L.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Singleton, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    A significant uncertainty in future land-surface carbon budgets is the response of wetlands to climate change. A corollary and related question is the future net climate (radiative) forcing impact from wetlands. Active wetlands emit both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. CH4 is, over a few decades, a much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2. CO2 has a longer atmospheric lifetime and a longer 'tail' to its radiative influence. Whether wetlands are a net source or sink of atmospheric carbon under future climate change will depend on ecosystem response to rising temperatures and elevated CO2. The largest uncertainty in future wetland C-budgets, and their climate forcing is the stability of the large below-ground carbon stocks, often in the form of peat, and the partitioning of CO2 and CH4 released via ecosystem respiration. In advance of a long-term experimental warming and elevated CO2 manipulation at the DOE Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change (SPRUCE) site in the Marcell Experimental Forest, we have characterized the source of respired carbon used for both the production of CO2 and CH4. Samples were collected in early June, late July, and will be collected in early September from three large (~1.1 m2, ~0.5m3) chambers from the control plot, and two of the experimental plots selected for heating (+9°C, +4.5°C). Early June fluxes from the three chambers were ~5500 mgC-m-2-d-1 and ~16 mgC-m-2-d-1 for CO2 and CH4 respectively. Radiocarbon analysis of CO2 and CH4 indicate that the source for the respired carbon is for the most part recent, with most 14C values between 30 and 40‰ - i.e., carbon that was photosynthetically fixed in the last few years. In concert with rising air and ground temperatures fluxes in late July increased to ~6500 mgC-m-2-d-1 and ~86 mgC-m-2-d-1. Although deep-heating was initiated in mid to late June we hypothesize that the July respiration signal is dominated by the regular seasonal cycle of natural warming

  14. Effect of carbon taxes and subsidies on optimal forest rotation age and supply of carbon services

    SciTech Connect

    Kooten, G.C. van; Binkley, C.S.; Delcourt, G.

    1995-05-01

    Carbon taxes and subsidies will affect the optimal forest rotation and, consequently, the carbon stored in forests. Unlike the Hartman rotation, where externality benefits are a function of the volume of timber growing on a site at any time, carbon benefits are a function of the change in biomass. Theoretical and empirical results (for coastal British Columbia and northern Alberta) indicate that, under some tax regimes, it may be socially optimal never to harvest the trees. In general, inclusion of the external benefits from carbon uptake results in rotation ages only a bit longer than the financial (Faustmann) rotation age. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. 78 FR 34340 - Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... did not. The preliminary results are listed below in the section titled ``Preliminary Results of... produced by Borusan and Erbosan for which these companies did not know that the merchandise was destined...

  16. Option pricing with regime switching by trinomial tree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Fei Lung; Yang, Hailiang

    2010-02-01

    We present a fast and simple tree model to price simple and exotic options in Markov Regime Switching Model (MRSM) with multi-regime. We modify the trinomial tree model of Boyle (1986) [12] by controlling the risk neutral probability measure in different regime states to ensure that the tree model can accommodate the data of all different regimes at the same time preserving its combining tree structure. In MRSM, the market might not be complete, therefore we provide some ideas and discussions on managing the regime switching risk in support of our results.

  17. Drought effects on litterfall, wood production and belowground carbon cycling in an Amazon forest: results of a throughfall reduction experiment.

    PubMed

    Brando, Paulo M; Nepstad, Daniel C; Davidson, Eric A; Trumbore, Susan E; Ray, David; Camargo, Plínio

    2008-05-27

    The Amazon Basin experiences severe droughts that may become more common in the future. Little is known of the effects of such droughts on Amazon forest productivity and carbon allocation. We tested the prediction that severe drought decreases litterfall and wood production but potentially has multiple cancelling effects on belowground production within a 7-year partial throughfall exclusion experiment. We simulated an approximately 35-41% reduction in effective rainfall from 2000 through 2004 in a 1ha plot and compared forest response with a similar control plot. Wood production was the most sensitive component of above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) to drought, declining by 13% the first year and up to 62% thereafter. Litterfall declined only in the third year of drought, with a maximum difference of 23% below the control plot. Soil CO2 efflux and its 14C signature showed no significant treatment response, suggesting similar amounts and sources of belowground production. ANPP was similar between plots in 2000 and declined to a low of 41% below the control plot during the subsequent treatment years, rebounding to only a 10% difference during the first post-treatment year. Live aboveground carbon declined by 32.5Mgha-1 through the effects of drought on ANPP and tree mortality. Results of this unreplicated, long-term, large-scale ecosystem manipulation experiment demonstrate that multi-year severe drought can substantially reduce Amazon forest carbon stocks.

  18. New constraints on the formation history of carbonates in the CI chondrite Ivuna from the Mn-53-Cr-53 chronometer: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endress, M.; Zinner, E.; Weber, D.; Bischoff, A.

    1994-07-01

    Carbonates and sulfates are common in CI chondrites and are believed to have resulted from aqueous alteration processes on the CI parent body. The carbonates occur mostly either as single grains or as polycrystalline chunks and are dominated by dolomites with varying Fe, Mg, and Mn contents. Calcites and breunnerites are less abundant. Since dolomites have MnO contents of up to 15 wt% and generally low Cr2O3 contents, we carried our exploratory SIMS analyses on dolomites in order to determine, whether a Mn-53-Cr-53 chronometer could provide constraints on the formation times of carbonates in CIs. We focused on carbonate fragments in Ivuna, since they can be easily recognized in thin sections, but also measured one carbonate from Orgueil. Our data indicate that aqueous alteration must have occurred soon after formation of the Ivuna parent body, perhaps even before accretion and accumulation was completed. Our results are similar to, but more stringent than, those obtained from Sr isotope data on carbonates in Orgueil, which imply that Ca-Mg carbonate precipitation was completed within 50 m.y. after formation of the Orgueil parent body. Further Mn-Cr studies, now underway, are disigned to determine whether or not carbonate fragments and carbonate grains in distinct lithic units of Ivuna, and different carbonate phases like dolomites and breunnerites precipitated at the same time.

  19. Diffusivity of carbon in iron and steels at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbetts, Gary G.

    1980-09-01

    Although the literature contains many measurements of the diffusivity of carbon in Fe and steels, recent progress in plasma carburizing has made this regime around 1050 °C and over 1% carbon concentration of great interest. We have measured the diffusivity of carbon in steel from 975 to 1075 °C up to 1.3% carbon concentration by the steady-state method. Our results are in agreement with previous measurements of Smith and Wells, Batz, and Mehl in the regime of low temperatures and carbon concentrations. Using activation energies determined over a wider temperature range by the latter authors, we derive as an empirical expression for D throughout the range of temperatures and concentrations investigated, D=0.47 exp (-1.6 C) ×exp[-(37 000-6600 C)/RT] cm2/sec. Here, C is expressed in weight percent carbon and the energies are in cal/mole.

  20. QuickStats: Number of Deaths Resulting from Unintentional Carbon Monoxide Poisoning,* by Month and Year - National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    2017-03-03

    During 2010-2015, a total of 2,244 deaths resulted from unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning, with the highest numbers of deaths each year occurring in winter months. In 2015, a total of 393 deaths resulting from unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning occurred, with 36% of the deaths occurring in December, January, or February.

  1. Acid rain and weathering damage to carbonate building stone: Results of material loss measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.M.; Youngdahl, C.A.

    1986-11-01

    Marble and limestone specimens were exposed to atmospheric conditions at four eastern US sites. A number of methods were employed for damage assessment; this paper describes the results of chemical and physical measurements of material loss. Good agreement was observed among results obtained with different methods. A rate of surface recession near 15 ..mu..m/y was observed for skyward surfaces of marble tested in North Carolina, and comparable results were obtained at the other test sites. Response of the porous limestone was assessed with greater difficulty; a rate of loss similar to that of marble was inferred. Initial correlations of material loss with environmental factors are briefly discussed.

  2. Acid rain and weathering damage to carbonate building stone: Results of material loss measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.; Youngdahl, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Marble and limestone specimens were exposed to atmospheric conditions at four eastern U.S. sites. A number of methods were employed for damage assessment; this paper describes the results of chemical and physical measurements of material loss. Good agreement was observed among results obtained with different methods. A rate of surface recession near 15 ..mu..m/y was observed for skyward surfaces of marble tested in North Carolina, and comparable results were obtained at the other test sites. Response of the porous limestone was assessed with greater difficulty; a rate of loss similar to that of marble was inferred. Initial correlations of material loss with environmental factors are briefly discussed.

  3. Nitrogen as a factor for enhanced carbon sequestration: Results from four NitroEurope-IP forest supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrom, A.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization, both intended and unintended, interacts with carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, because the major processes of carbon (C) turnover depend on enzymes and thus on N availability. Comparisons between annual carbon dioxide flux (CO2) budgets and wet N deposition in forests showed a very strong linear increase of CO2 sequestration with increased N deposition. After considering total rather than only wet N deposition the ratios between increased carbon uptake and atmospheric N input were closer to C/N that can be found in wood. This suggested that the observed ecosystems responses to enhanced N inputs were mainly driven by plant responses. Finally, looking at changes in soil organic matter changes indicated even lower sensitivities of carbon sequestration to N addition. The objective of this study is to describe the mechanisms of the responses and the fate of the N in the ecosystem based on results from intensively investigated forest sites. Within the European NitroEuope-IP project the annual fluxes and pool sizes of C and N were estimated in four so-called forest supersites, including temperate coniferous forests in Southern Germany (Höglwald) and in the Netherlands (Speulderbos), one temperate beech forest close to Sorø on Zealand in Denmark and a boreal pine forest (Hyytiälä, Southern Finland). Due to differences in vegetation, bedrock and climate history, soils differed in acidity, organic matter content and biological activity; the levels of atmospheric N deposition varied from very low (Hyytiälä) to high (the other sites). Comparisons of N and C budgets of plants and soils confirmed a simple and stoichiometric effect dCuptake/dNdep = constant and in the order of magnitude of (C/N)wood for plants but not for soils and thus not for the forest ecosystems as a whole. Differences in soil processes as indicated by the differing C/N of SOM, differing amounts of N stored in the soil and considerable differences in N leaching rates

  4. Second Generation International Space Station (ISS) Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) Verification Testing and On-Orbit Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, Nicole L.; Thomas, Evan A.; VanWie, Michael; Morrison, Chad; Stinson, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    The Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOGA) is designed to autonomously determine recovered water quality as a function of TOC. The current TOGA has been on the International Space Station since November 2008. Functional checkout and operations revealed complex operating considerations. Specifically, failure of the hydrogen catalyst resulted in the development of an innovative oxidation analysis method. This method reduces the activation time and limits the hydrogen produced during analysis, while retaining the ability to indicate TOC concentrations within 25% accuracy. Subsequent testing and comparison to archived samples returned from the Station and tested on the ground yield high confidence in this method, and in the quality of the recovered water.

  5. Identifying natural flow regimes using fish communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fi-John; Tsai, Wen-Ping; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Chen, Hung-kwai; Herricks, Edwin E.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryModern water resources management has adopted natural flow regimes as reasonable targets for river restoration and conservation. The characterization of a natural flow regime begins with the development of hydrologic statistics from flow records. However, little guidance exists for defining the period of record needed for regime determination. In Taiwan, the Taiwan Eco-hydrological Indicator System (TEIS), a group of hydrologic statistics selected for fisheries relevance, is being used to evaluate ecological flows. The TEIS consists of a group of hydrologic statistics selected to characterize the relationships between flow and the life history of indigenous species. Using the TEIS and biosurvey data for Taiwan, this paper identifies the length of hydrologic record sufficient for natural flow regime characterization. To define the ecological hydrology of fish communities, this study connected hydrologic statistics to fish communities by using methods to define antecedent conditions that influence existing community composition. A moving average method was applied to TEIS statistics to reflect the effects of antecedent flow condition and a point-biserial correlation method was used to relate fisheries collections with TEIS statistics. The resulting fish species-TEIS (FISH-TEIS) hydrologic statistics matrix takes full advantage of historical flows and fisheries data. The analysis indicates that, in the watersheds analyzed, averaging TEIS statistics for the present year and 3 years prior to the sampling date, termed MA(4), is sufficient to develop a natural flow regime. This result suggests that flow regimes based on hydrologic statistics for the period of record can be replaced by regimes developed for sampled fish communities.

  6. Preliminary Results of the Permafrost Carbon Study in the Lower Kolyma Lowland (Eastern Siberia) Based on Drilling Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spektor, V. V.; Kholodov, A. L.; Bulygina, E. B.; Andreeva, V.; Broderick, D.; Spawn, S.; Natali, S.; Davydova, A.

    2012-12-01

    In 2012, the Polaris Project (thepolarisproject.org, Director R.M. Holmes) has conducted the permafrost drilling on the Kolyma Lowland for a complex study of permafrost carbon as a potential source for microbial decomposition. In July 2012, the first two boreholes, 15.1 and 13.4 m in depth, were drilled. The first borehole (BH 12/1) was drilled in the stratum of ice complex (yedoma) on the local watershed near the Schuch'e lake in the vicinity of the town Chersky (N68°44.7' E161°23'). The depth of active layer is 45 cm. The permafrost to the depth of 15.1 m represents grey and brown silts with predominant homogeneous structure. Silts contain numerous thread-like roots, scarce plant macrofossils, and in places are colored with unclear spots of ferrugination. Cryostructure is mainly pore ice or thin lense-like ice layers. Wedge ice is observed in the interval 12.5-12.9 m. The moisture volumetric percentage of silts varies along the stratum, mainly, between 40-50%. The organic content, defined in every 20 cm of the core as a loss on ignition, varies between 2-4%. The second borehole (BH 12/2), located in the Pleistocene Park (N68°30.8' E161°30') was drilled through modern floodplain sediments (0-0.6 m) of the Kolyma River with polygonal network at the surface, underlain by peat (0.6-1.3 m), silt deposits of thermokarst lake (1.3-12.0 m), and river grey sands (12.0-13.4 m). The active layer thickness is 65 cm. The cryostructure is predominantly lattice-like. Silts contain modern wedge ice at the depth of 2.5-2.7 m. Mollusk shells and large amount of plant macrofossils are observed in the interval 5.7-8.0 m. The organic content in the thermokarst deposits varies in average within 2-3 %, but is about 1% in the underlying river sands. To investigate permafrost carbon, samples for microbial and enzyme activities, as well as samples of trapped gases were collected from different horizons of frozen cores. Samples for palynological, diatom, and lithological analyses, as

  7. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  8. Studies of the influence of external hydrocarbon injection on local plasma conditions and resulting carbon transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, R.; Kirschner, A.; Tokar, M. Z.; Koltunov, M.; Borodin, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Kreter, A.; Chen, J. L.; Li, J. G.; Luo, G.-N.

    2011-08-01

    A one-dimensional fluid model, which calculates the modification of density and temperature along the magnetic field and the parallel electrical field in the presence of local impurity sources, has been implemented into the ERO code. The influence of impurity source strength on the local plasma parameters and resulting changes in impurity transport and deposition has been studied. Dedicated TEXTOR experiments of 13CH4 injection through roof-like test limiters are modelled for comparison. Modelling with high injection rates (larger than about 4 × 1018 s-1) results in too localized light emission pattern near to the injection hole, and therefore indicates an underestimation of the reduction of electron temperature in the model. Besides, the preliminary results indicate that possible modification of local plasma conditions cannot significantly reduce the modelled 13C deposition and therefore cannot explain the measured low 13C deposition efficiency.

  9. An Assessment of Fire Regime Changes in the Northern Rocky Mountain Region Using Simulated Historical Fire Maps and Remotely Sensed Current Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, F.; Zhu, Z.; Huang, C.

    2011-12-01

    Wildland fire is a primary ecosystem process that shapes the landscape of Western United States. Changes in fire regime can therefore have profound impact on ecosystem functions and services, including carbon cycling, habitat conditions, and biodiversity. This poster presents a study on current fire regime and changes in the Northern Rocky Mountain region assessed using contemporary and historical fire regimes. Contemporary fire records from 1984 to 2008 were obtained from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) project. Historical (pre-EuroAmerican settlement) fire regimes and fire regime condition class (FRCC), produced by the LANDFIRE project, were simulated using a Landscape Succession Model (LANDSUM). We extracted historical fire frequency (Mean Fire Interval) and fire severity (percentage of severe fire) data from LANDFIRE, and calculated current fire frequency and severity using MTBS data by following the FRCC definition, to evaluate changes in fire regimes in Northern Rocky Mountain area. Preliminary results reveal that the current fire regime in Northern Rocky Mountains may exhibit a general pattern of longer return intervals and more severe fires. Biophysical Setting (BpS) map units from LANDFIRE are used as study units to describe environmental gradients and will be used to further examine whether the observed fire regime changes are controlled by land cover or biophysical settings. The findings of this study will help reveal contemporary fire dynamics in this region and serve for future fire studies and other forest management applications.

  10. Hydrothermal replacement of biogenic and abiogenic aragonite by Mg-carbonates - Relation between textural control on effective element fluxes and resulting carbonate phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Laura; Müller, Thomas; Dohmen, Ralf; Immenhauser, Adrian; Putlitz, Benita

    2017-01-01

    Dolomitization, i.e., the secondary replacement of calcite or aragonite (CaCO3) by dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2), is one of the most volumetrically important carbonate diagenetic processes. It occurs under near surface and shallow burial conditions and can significantly modify rock properties through changes in porosity and permeability. Dolomitization fronts are directly coupled to fluid pathways, which may be related to the initial porosity/permeability of the precursor limestone, an existing fault network or secondary porosity/permeability created through the replacement reaction. In this study, the textural control on the replacement of biogenic and abiogenic aragonite by Mg-carbonates, that are typical precursor phases in the dolomitization process, was experimentally studied under hydrothermal conditions. Aragonite samples with different textural and microstructural properties exhibiting a compact (inorganic aragonite single crystal), an intermediate (bivalve shell of Arctica islandica) and open porous structure (skeleton of coral Porites sp.) were reacted with a solution of 0.9 M MgCl2 and 0.015 M SrCl2 at 200 °C. The replacement of aragonite by a Ca-bearing magnesite and a Mg-Ca carbonate of non-stoichiometric dolomitic composition takes place via a dissolution-precipitation process and leads to the formation of a porous reaction front that progressively replaces the aragonite precursor. The reaction leads to the development of porosity within the reaction front and distinctive microstructures such as gaps and cavities at the reaction interface. The newly formed reaction rim consists of chemically distinct phases separated by sharp boundaries. It was found that the number of phases and their chemical variation decreases with increasing initial porosity and reactive surface area. This observation is explained by variations in effective element fluxes that result in differential chemical gradients in the fluid within the pore space of the reaction rim. Observed

  11. Dynamic regime marginal structural mean models for estimation of optimal dynamic treatment regimes, Part I: main content.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic treatment regimes are set rules for sequential decision making based on patient covariate history. Observational studies are well suited for the investigation of the effects of dynamic treatment regimes because of the variability in treatment decisions found in them. This variability exists because different physicians make different decisions in the face of similar patient histories. In this article we describe an approach to estimate the optimal dynamic treatment regime among a set of enforceable regimes. This set is comprised by regimes defined by simple rules based on a subset of past information. The regimes in the set are indexed by a Euclidean vector. The optimal regime is the one that maximizes the expected counterfactual utility over all regimes in the set. We discuss assumptions under which it is possible to identify the optimal regime from observational longitudinal data. Murphy et al. (2001) developed efficient augmented inverse probability weighted estimators of the expected utility of one fixed regime. Our methods are based on an extension of the marginal structural mean model of Robins (1998, 1999) which incorporate the estimation ideas of Murphy et al. (2001). Our models, which we call dynamic regime marginal structural mean models, are specially suitable for estimating the optimal treatment regime in a moderately small class of enforceable regimes of interest. We consider both parametric and semiparametric dynamic regime marginal structural models. We discuss locally efficient, double-robust estimation of the model parameters and of the index of the optimal treatment regime in the set. In a companion paper in this issue of the journal we provide proofs of the main results.

  12. Consistent Methodologies for Determining, Relating and Disseminating Light Stable Isotopic Measurement Results: The Carbon Dioxide Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinedinst, D. B.; Verkouteren, R. M.

    2001-05-01

    In conjunction with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Atmospheric Chemistry Group (ACG) of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has coordinated an international CO2 isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) intercomparison exercise. The results of this exercise, specifically designed to overcome inherent deficiencies revealed by previous intercomparisons, achieved a 2 to 3 fold reduction (improvement) in the reproducibility of reported results across laboratories. Concurrently, the ACG developed and deployed an interactive Web-based data processing interface [http://www.nist.gov/widps-co2]. The interface has open architecture and a transparent, downloadable source code. This data processing system leverages the results of the intercomparison exercise and provides a consistent means by which raw CO2 measurement results are related to the internationally accepted Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB) scale. Prominent features of the CO2 intercomparison exercise included: mandatory chemical and operational procedures, reporting of discretionary factors, direct determination of the cross contamination effect within the ion source, the reporting of raw measurement results and centralized data processing. The data reduction interface uses IAEA defined standard procedures for stable isotope measurements and data processing. It incorporates currently defined reference values for selected IAEA and NIST CO2 Reference Materials (RMs). On a routine basis, users can also determine and use assigned values for secondary laboratory standards as input. One or two point (i.e., normalized) realization of the VPDB scale is provided as are optional inputs for the oxygen isotope fractionation factor(α ). We attribute the success of the CO2 intercomparison exercise primarily to the centralized data processing using raw measurements rather than customary result-based data. The centralized processing, in essence, eliminates inconsistencies between integrated

  13. Biological and physical forcing of carbonate chemistry in an upwelling filament off northwest Africa: Results from a Lagrangian study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loucaides, Socratis; Tyrrell, Toby; Achterberg, Eric P.; Torres, Ricardo; Nightingale, Philip D.; Kitidis, Vassilis; Serret, Pablo; Woodward, Malcolm; Robinson, Carol

    2012-09-01

    The Mauritanian upwelling system is one of the most biologically productive regions of the world's oceans. Coastal upwelling transfers nutrients to the sun-lit surface ocean, thereby stimulating phytoplankton growth. Upwelling of deep waters also supplies dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), high levels of which lead to low calcium carbonate saturation states in surface waters, with potentially adverse effects on marine calcifiers. In this study an upwelled filament off the coast of northwest Africa was followed using drifting buoys and sulphur hexafluoride to determine how the carbonate chemistry changed over time as a result of biological, physical and chemical processes. The initial pHtot in the mixed layer of the upwelled plume was 7.94 and the saturation states of calcite and aragonite were 3.4 and 2.2, respectively. As the plume moved offshore over a period of 9 days, biological uptake of DIC (37 μmol kg-1) reduced pCO2 concentrations from 540 to 410 μatm, thereby increasing pHtot to 8.05 and calcite and aragonite saturation states to 4.0 and 2.7 respectively. The increase (25 μmol kg-1) in total alkalinity over the 9 day study period can be accounted for solely by the combined effects of nitrate uptake and processes that alter salinity (i.e., evaporation and mixing with other water masses). We found no evidence of significant alkalinity accumulation as a result of exudation of organic bases by primary producers. The ongoing expansion of oxygen minimum zones through global warming will likely further reduce the CaCO3 saturation of upwelled waters, amplifying any adverse consequences of ocean acidification on the ecosystem of the Mauritanian upwelling system.

  14. Sevelamer versus calcium carbonate in incident hemodialysis patients: results of an open-label 24-month randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Biagio; Molony, Donald; Bell, Cynthia; Cucciniello, Emanuele; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Russo, Domenico; Bellasi, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Whether the use of sevelamer rather than a calcium-containing phosphate binder improves cardiovascular (CV) survival in patients receiving dialysis remains to be elucidated. Open-label randomized controlled trial with parallel groups. 466 incident hemodialysis patients recruited from 18 centers in Italy. Study participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 fashion to receive either sevelamer or a calcium-containing phosphate binder (although not required by the protocol, all patients in this group received calcium carbonate) for 24 months. All individuals were followed up until completion of 36 months of follow-up or censoring. CV death due to cardiac arrhythmias was regarded as the primary end point. Blind event adjudication. At baseline, patients allocated to sevelamer had higher serum phosphorus (mean, 5.6 ± 1.7 [SD] vs 4.8 ± 1.4 mg/dL) and C-reactive protein levels (mean, 8.8 ± 13.4 vs 5.9 ± 6.8 mg/dL) and lower coronary artery calcification scores (median, 19 [IQR, 0-30] vs 30 [IQR, 7-180]). At study completion, serum phosphate levels were lower in the sevelamer arm (median dosages, 4,800 and 2,000 mg/d for sevelamer and calcium carbonate, respectively). After a mean follow-up of 28 ± 10 months, 128 deaths were recorded (29 and 88 due to cardiac arrhythmias and all-cause CV death). Sevelamer-treated patients experienced lower CV mortality due to cardiac arrhythmias compared with patients treated with calcium carbonate (HR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01-0.25; P < 0.001). Similar results were noted for all-cause CV mortality and all-cause mortality, but not for non-CV mortality. Adjustments for potential confounders did not affect results. Open-label design, higher baseline coronary artery calcification burden in calcium carbonate-treated patients, different mineral metabolism control in sevelamer-treated patients, overall lower than expected mortality. These results show that sevelamer compared to a calcium-containing phosphate binder improves survival in a cohort of

  15. Validation and Intercomparison of a 'Bottom-up' and 'Top-Down' modeling paradigm for estimating energy and carbon fluxes over a variety of vegetative regimes across the U.S.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An accurate quantification of energy and carbon fluxes is of great importance for a wide range of ecological, agricultural, and meteorological applications. Two contrasting modeling strategies are currently used widely to retrieve this goal. ‘Bottom-up’ models of land-atmosphere carbon exchange are ...

  16. Fire regime in Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Guido; Casula, Paolo; D'Andrea, Mirko; Fiorucci, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of burnt areas time series in Mediterranean regions suggests that ecosystems characterising this area consist primarily of species highly vulnerable to the fire but highly resilient, as characterized by a significant regenerative capacity after the fire spreading. In a few years the area burnt may once again be covered by the same vegetation present before the fire. Similarly, Mediterranean conifer forests, which often refers to plantations made in order to reforest the areas most severely degraded with high erosion risk, regenerate from seed after the fire resulting in high resilience to the fire as well. Only rarely, and usually with negligible damages, fire affects the areas covered by climax species in relation with altitude and soil types (i.e, quercus, fagus, abies). On the basis of these results, this paper shows how the simple Drossel-Schwabl forest fire model is able to reproduce the forest fire regime in terms of number of fires and burned area, describing whit good accuracy the actual fire perimeters. The original Drossel-Schwabl model has been slightly modified in this work by introducing two parameters (probability of propagation and regrowth) specific for each different class of vegetation cover. Using model selection methods based on AIC, the model with the optimal number of classes with different fire behaviour was selected. Two different case studies are presented in this work: Regione Liguria and Regione Sardegna (Italy). Both regions are situated in the center of the Mediterranean and are characterized by a high number of fires and burned area. However, the two regions have very different fire regimes. Sardinia is affected by the fire phenomenon only in summer whilst Liguria is affected by fires also in winter, with higher number of fires and larger burned area. In addition, the two region are very different in vegetation cover. The presence of Mediterranean conifers, (Pinus Pinaster, Pinus Nigra, Pinus halepensis) is quite spread in

  17. Results from Carbon Dioxide Washout Testing Using a Suited Manikin Test Apparatus with a Space Suit Ventilation Test Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer; Vonau, Walt; Kanne, Bryan; Korona, Adam; Swickrath, Mike

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing an advanced portable life support system (PLSS) to meet the needs of a new NASA advanced space suit. The PLSS is one of the most critical aspects of the space suit providing the necessary oxygen, ventilation, and thermal protection for an astronaut performing a spacewalk. The ventilation subsystem in the PLSS must provide sufficient carbon dioxide (CO2) removal and ensure that the CO2 is washed away from the oronasal region of the astronaut. CO2 washout is a term used to describe the mechanism by which CO2 levels are controlled within the helmet to limit the concentration of CO2 inhaled by the astronaut. Accumulation of CO2 in the helmet or throughout the ventilation loop could cause the suited astronaut to experience hypercapnia (excessive carbon dioxide in the blood). A suited manikin test apparatus (SMTA) integrated with a space suit ventilation test loop was designed, developed, and assembled at NASA in order to experimentally validate adequate CO2 removal throughout the PLSS ventilation subsystem and to quantify CO2 washout performance under various conditions. The test results from this integrated system will be used to validate analytical models and augment human testing. This paper presents the system integration of the PLSS ventilation test loop with the SMTA including the newly developed regenerative Rapid Cycle Amine component used for CO2 removal and tidal breathing capability to emulate the human. The testing and analytical results of the integrated system are presented along with future work.

  18. Calcification of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides and carbonate ion concentration: Results from the Santa Barbara Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Emily B.; Thunell, Robert C.; Marshall, Brittney J.; Holm, Jessica A.; Tappa, Eric J.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Cai, Wei-Jun; Chen, Baoshan

    2016-08-01

    Planktonic foraminiferal calcification intensity, reflected by shell wall thickness, has been hypothesized to covary with the carbonate chemistry of seawater. Here we use both sediment trap and box core samples from the Santa Barbara Basin to evaluate the relationship between the calcification intensity of the planktonic foraminifera species Globigerina bulloides, measured by area density (µg/µm2), and the carbonate ion concentration of seawater ([CO32-]). We also evaluate the influence of both temperature and nutrient concentration ([PO43-]) on foraminiferal calcification and growth. The presence of two G. bulloides morphospecies with systematically different calcification properties and offset stable isotopic compositions was identified within sampling populations using distinguishing morphometric characteristics. The calcification temperature and by extension calcification depth of the more abundant "normal" G. bulloides morphospecies was determined using δ18O temperature estimates. Calcification depths vary seasonally with upwelling and were used to select the appropriate [CO32-], temperature, and [PO43-] depth measurements for comparison with area density. Seasonal upwelling in the study region also results in collinearity between independent variables complicating a straightforward statistical analysis. To address this issue, we use additional statistical diagnostics and a down core record to disentangle the respective roles of each parameter on G. bulloides calcification. Our results indicate that [CO32-] is the primary variable controlling calcification intensity while temperature influences shell size. We report a modern calibration for the normal G. bulloides morphospecies that can be used in down core studies of well-preserved sediments to estimate past [CO32-].

  19. Experimental floods cause ecosystem regime shift in a regulated river.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher T; Uehlinger, Urs

    2008-03-01

    Reservoirs have altered the flow regime of most rivers on the globe. To simulate the natural flow regime, experimental floods are being implemented on regulated rivers throughout the world to improve their ecological integrity. As a large-scale disturbance, the long-term sequential use of floods provides an excellent empirical approach to examine ecosystem regime shifts in rivers. This study evaluated the long-term effects of floods (15 floods over eight years) on a regulated river. We hypothesized that sequential floods over time would cause a regime shift in the ecosystem. The floods resulted in little change in the physicochemistry of the river, although particulate organic carbon and particulate phosphorus were lower after the floods. The floods eliminated moss cover on bed sediments within the first year of flooding and maintained low periphyton biomass and benthic organic matter after the third year of flooding. Organic matter in transport was reduced after the third year of flooding, although peaks were still observed during rain events due to tributary inputs and side slopes. The floods reduced macroinvertebrate richness and biomass after the first year of floods, but density was not reduced until the third year. The individual mass of invertebrates decreased by about one-half after the floods. Specific taxa displayed either a loss in abundance, or an increase in abundance, or an increase followed by a loss after the third year. The first three flood years were periods of nonequilibrium with coefficients of variation in all measured parameters increasing two to five times from those before the floods. Coefficients of variation decreased after the third year, although they were still higher than before the floods. Analysis of concordance using Kendall's W confirmed the temporal changes observed in macroinvertebrate assemblage structure. An assessment of individual flood effects showed that later floods had approximately 30% less effect on macroinvertebrates

  20. Determination of the Hall Thruster Operating Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; V. Semenov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-04-09

    A quasi one-dimensional (1-D) steady-state model of the Hall thruster is presented. For the same discharge voltage two operating regimes are possible -- with and without the anode sheath. For given mass flow rate, magnetic field profile and discharge voltage a unique solution can be constructed, assuming that the thruster operates in one of the regimes. However, we show that for a given temperature profile the applied discharge voltage uniquely determines the operating regime: for discharge voltages greater than a certain value, the sheath disappears. That result is obtained over a wide range of incoming neutral velocities, channel lengths and widths, and cathode plane locations. It is also shown that a good correlation between the quasi 1-D model and experimental results can be achieved by selecting an appropriate electron mobility and temperature profile.

  1. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-10-06

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions--regime shifts--are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water-vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts.

  2. 77 FR 13093 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea... administrative review of the countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat... Review'' below. \\1\\ See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of...

  3. 75 FR 27297 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products from India: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products from India: Notice of Final... antidumping duty administrative review for certain hot-rolled carbon steel flat products from India (``Indian Hot-Rolled''). See Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products from India: Notice of Preliminary...

  4. 78 FR 55057 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from the Republic of Korea.... See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from Germany and the Republic of Korea: Revocation...

  5. 75 FR 4779 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From Italy: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From Italy... duty order on certain cut-to-length carbon- quality steel plate products from Italy. This review covers... antidumping duty order on certain cut-to-length carbon- quality steel plate products (steel plate) from...

  6. 76 FR 22868 - Certain Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil... certain hot-rolled flat-rolled carbon- quality steel products (HRS) from Brazil for the period January 1...: Background Since the issuance of Certain Hot-Rolled Flat-Rolled Carbon-Quality Steel Products From Brazil...

  7. 78 FR 44525 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate From the People's Republic of China... on certain cut-to- length carbon steel plate (``CTL plate'') from the People's Republic of China... certain cut-to-length carbon steel plate from the PRC.\\2\\ This merchandise is currently classified in the...

  8. 76 FR 65497 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Amended Final Results of Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Amended Final... of the countervailing duty order on certain hot-rolled carbon steel flat products (HRCS) from India..., to reflect the CIT's decision in Essar. See Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products from...

  9. 75 FR 33262 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube from Turkey: Notice of Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube from Turkey: Notice of Preliminary... order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube (``welded pipe and tube'') from Turkey. See... tube from Turkey. See Antidumping Duty Order; Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From...

  10. 77 FR 33420 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... obtained by ``activating'' with heat and steam various materials containing carbon, including but not... peat. The thermal and steam treatments remove organic materials and create an internal pore structure in the ] carbon material. The producer can also use carbon dioxide gas (CO 2 ) in place of steam in...

  11. The Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) FTS: Results From the 2012/13 Alaska Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosu, Thomas P.; Miller, Charles E.; Dinardo, Stephen J.

    2014-05-01

    The Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) is an aircraft-based Earth Venture 1 mission to study the carbon balance of the Alaskan Arctic ecosystem, with a particular focus on carbon release from melting permafrost. Operating from its base in Fairbanks, AK, the CARVE aircraft covers a range of principle flight paths in the Alaskan interior, the Yukon River valley, and the northern Alaska coast around Barrow and Dead Horse. Flight paths are chosen to maximize ecosystem variability and cover burn-recovery/regrowth sequences. CARVE observations cover the Arctic Spring/Summer/Fall seasons, with multiple flights per season and principle flight path. Science operations started in May 2012 and are currently envisaged to continue until 2015. The CARVE suite of instruments includes flask measurements, in situ gas analyzers for CO2, CH4 and CO observations, and a three-band polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) for column measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, their interfering species (e.g., H2O), and O2. The FTS covers the spectral regions of 4,200-4,900 cm-1, 5,800-6,400 cm-1, and 12,900-13,200 cm-1, with a spectral resolution of 0.2 cm-1. Aircraft-based FTS science observations in Alaska have been performed since 23-05-2012. First-version data products from all CARVE instruments derived from observations during the 2012 campaign were publicly released earlier in 2013. The FTS has performed well during flight conditions, particularly with respect to vibration damping. Outstanding challenges include the need for improved spectral and radiometric calibration, as well as compensating for low signal-to-noise spectra acquired under Alaskan flight conditions. We present results from FTS column observations of CO2, CH4, and CO, observed during the 2012 and 2013 campaigns, including preliminary comparisons of CARVE FTS measurements with satellite observations of CO2 from TANSO/GOSAT and CO from MOPITT.

  12. Microbial biogeochemistry of coastal upwelling regimes in a changing ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Douglas G.; Hutchins, David A.

    2013-09-01

    Coastal upwelling regimes associated with eastern boundary currents are the most biologically productive ecosystems in the ocean. As a result, they play a disproportionately important role in the microbially mediated cycling of marine nutrients. These systems are characterized by strong natural variations in carbon dioxide concentrations, pH, nutrient levels and sea surface temperatures on both seasonal and interannual timescales. Despite this natural variability, changes resulting from human activities are starting to emerge. Carbon dioxide derived from fossil fuel combustion is adding to the acidity of upwelled low-pH waters. Low-oxygen waters associated with coastal upwelling systems are growing in their extent and intensity as a result of a rise in upper ocean temperatures and productivity. And nutrient inputs to the coastal ocean continue to grow. Coastal upwelling systems may prove more resilient to changes resulting from human activities than other ocean ecosystems because of their ability to function under extremely variable conditions. Nevertheless, shifts in primary production, fish yields, nitrogen gain and loss, and the flux of climate-relevant gases could result from the perturbation of these highly productive and dynamic ecosystems.

  13. Local-scale fluxes of carbon dioxide in urban environments: methodological challenges and results from Chicago.

    PubMed

    Grimmond, C S B; King, T S; Cropley, F D; Nowak, D J; Souch, C

    2002-01-01

    Much attention is being directed to the measurement and modeling of surface-atmosphere exchanges of CO2 for different surface types. However, as yet, few measurements have been conducted in cities, even though these environments are widely acknowledged to be major sources of anthropogenic CO2. This paper highlights some of the challenges facing micrometeorologists attempting to use eddy covariance techniques to directly monitor CO2 fluxes in urban environments, focusing on the inherent variability within and between urban areas, and the importance of scale and the appropriate height of measurements. Results from a very short-term study of CO2 fluxes, undertaken in Chicago, Illinois in the summer of 1995, are presented. Mid-afternoon minimum CO2 concentrations and negative fluxes are attributed to the strength of biospheric photosynthesis and strong mixing of local anthropogenic sources in a deep mixed layer. Poor night-time atmospheric mixing, lower mixed layer depths, biospheric respiration, and continued missions from mobile and fixed anthropogenic sources, account for the night-time maxima in CO2 concentrations. The need for more, longer-term, continuous eddy covariance measurements is stressed.

  14. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  15. Chapter 5. Borderlands fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Margot Wilkinson-Kaye; Thomas Swetnam; Christopher R. Baisan

    2006-01-01

    Fire is a keystone process in most natural, terrestrial ecosystems. The vital role that fire plays in controlling the structure of an ecosystem underscores the need for us to increase our knowledge of past and current fire regimes (Morgan and others 1994). Dendrochronological reconstructions of fire histories provide descriptions of past fire regimes across a range of...

  16. Fault Interactions in Extensional Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streepey, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2001-12-01

    Fault Interactions in Extensional Regimes M. Streepey and C. Lithgow-Bertelloni Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Studies have shown that faults generally tend to reactivate over long histories of deformation, often in spite of less favorable orientations or changing stress regimes in the region. Reactivation of faults suggests that rheology is a key determining factor in the localization of intense deformation in orogenic belts. It is evident in these studies that stresses are preferentially partitioned into pre-existing weak zones of the crust. This is shown commonly in orogenic belts, where thrust faults reactivate as normal faults during syn- to post-orogenic extension. Therefore, the interaction of faults might be an important element in the deformation of the lithosphere during pre- and post-orogenic tectonics. On shorter timescales, it has been suggested that fault interactions are commonplace in areas of active seismicity, and that those interactions can be related to earthquake triggering and therefore may be critically important in assessing the behavior of the lithosphere during deformation. We investigate this problem concentrating on the time evolution of faults in extensional regimes. Geologic evidence in ancient orogenic belts shows periods of protracted normal fault motion over timescales of hundreds of millions of years after orogenesis. This motion is likely episodic rather than continuous; however, this is not constrained by field and geochronological studies. Fault evolution on these timescales is modeled using the finite element code ABAQUS. Our elastic results show, as expected from dislocation theory, that stress shadows produced by motion along faults can be linearly superposed and that faults do not have a high degree of interaction. We have constructed new models of two-dimensional finite elements that represent a block of crust under extensional stresses. Sited in these blocks are weak zones

  17. Thermophoretic force on nanocylinders in the free molecule regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Shuang; Xia, Guodong

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically investigate the thermophoresis of nanocylinders in the free molecule regime, wherein the nonrigid-body effect is taken into account. The analytical formulas of the thermophoretic forces on cylinders suspended in both simple gases and binary gas mixtures are derived for the two limiting collision models, i.e., specular and diffuse scatterings, based on the gas kinetic theory. In the limit of the rigid-body collision, the expressions can be reduced to the theoretical results of Garcia-Ybarra and Rosner [AIChE J. 35, 139 (1989), 10.1002/aic.690350115]. The thermophoretic velocities of the nanocylinders (including carbon nanotubes and long-chain n -alkanes) have been evaluated and it is found that the influence of the nonrigid-body effect on thermophoresis is significant for the case of small cylinder radius and low temperatures.

  18. A Phillips-Tikhonov Based Carbon Dioxide Retrieval Algorithm: Technique and First Validation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, A.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Frankenberg, C.; Aben, I.

    2007-12-01

    Space borne remote sensing measurements of the atmospheric CO2 column have become feasible recently through the SCIAMACHY instrument aboard ESA's Envisat platform. Nadir observations of near-infrared solar radiation backscattered from the Earth's surface and atmosphere allow for CO2 column retrievals with sensitivity down to surface level. In the near future, dedicated space missions such as the OCO and GOSAT instruments aim at retrieving atmospheric CO2 columns with an accuracy that facilitates the determination of CO2 sources and sinks on regional scales. We present a retrieval algorithm based on a Phillips-Tikhonov regularization scheme that targets at the retrieval of CO2 column abundances from these different remote sensing platforms. The algorithm retrieves the vertical profile of CO2 by minimizing the least-squares difference between the observed spectrum and the forward model given the norm of the retrieved profile as side-constraint. In a first exercice, we retrieved CO2 abundances with 1 to 2 degrees of freedom from nadir measurements of SCIAMACHY in the near-infrared spectral range assuming a non-scattering atmosphere. These satellite retrievals are compared to coinciding direct sun observations over Park Falls, Wisconsin, USA, performed at very high spectral resolution by a ground-based FTS within the TCCON network. Applying our retrieval algorithm to the ground-based FTS spectra yields the vertical CO2 profile with 3 to 4 degrees of freedom. Our approach provides a full characterization of ground-based and satellite retrievals through the respective averaging kernel matrices making thorough validation studies possible. Preliminary results show promising agreement between the CO2 columns retrieved from both sensors. In the future, we plan to refine our algorithm by simultaneously retrieving CO2 abundances and aerosol properties in a scattering atmosphere. More extensive validation studies are necessary to improve the algorithm and to gain an estimate of

  19. Dynamic treatment regimes: technical challenges and applications

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, Daniel J.; Qian, Min; Pelham, William E.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic treatment regimes are of growing interest across the clinical sciences because these regimes provide one way to operationalize and thus inform sequential personalized clinical decision making. Formally, a dynamic treatment regime is a sequence of decision rules, one per stage of clinical intervention. Each decision rule maps up-to-date patient information to a recommended treatment. We briefly review a variety of approaches for using data to construct the decision rules. We then review a critical inferential challenge that results from nonregularity, which often arises in this area. In particular, nonregularity arises in inference for parameters in the optimal dynamic treatment regime; the asymptotic, limiting, distribution of estimators are sensitive to local perturbations. We propose and evaluate a locally consistent Adaptive Confidence Interval (ACI) for the parameters of the optimal dynamic treatment regime. We use data from the Adaptive Pharmacological and Behavioral Treatments for Children with ADHD Trial as an illustrative example. We conclude by highlighting and discussing emerging theoretical problems in this area. PMID:25356091

  20. Preliminary Results of the Carbon, Heat, and Moisture Turbulent Measurements over a Pasture in Eastern Amazon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, R. K.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Moraes, O. M.; Staebler, R.; Acevedo, O. C.; Czikowsky, M.; Silva, R.

    2001-12-01

    This study presents preliminary results from a 10 years old pasture site located in the Amazon Region as a part of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). In this location a 20 m tower was installed to monitor micrometeorological and trace gases measurements. An eddy covariance system was installed at 8.75 m, composed by a 3D sonic anemometer (SATI/3K), and a CO2/H2O gas analyzer (licor 6262). Wind (CATI/2 - 12.25, 5.73, and 3.12 m), temperature and humidity (Vaysala Humitter, CS500, at 6.09, 4.14, 2.20 m), and CO2 (licor 6262 at 11.81, 5.29, 2.71, and 0.5 m) profiles have also been measured. At the top of the tower (17.76 m) upward and downward solar (Kipp and Zonen, CM11/14) and terrestrial (CG2) radiation is also collected. Soil temperatures (Campbell 108 at 0.10, 0.24, 0.50,1.50, and 2.0 m), soil heat flux (Campbell HFT3 at 0.30 m), and soil moisture (Campbell CS615 at 0.30 m) have also been installed. A Linux based PC machine records all data, and the are processed and stored at nearly real time. The site is powered by a solar panel that can provide continuously 500 W/m2. The data have been collected since September 2000. In eastern Amazon the climate can be divided in dry (about July to December) and wet (about December to June) seasons. We present the seasonal changes of the turbulent fluxes (momentum, heat, moisture, and CO2). Also, we are going to present the seasonal differences for other related parameters such as albedo, bowen ratio, and the canopy photosynthesis as a function of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) curves for both seasons. The turbulent kinetic energy budget and the surface energy are evaluated to determine the accuracy of flux measurements.

  1. Aging of Black Carbon during Atmospheric Transport: Understanding Results from the DOE's 2010 CARES and 2012 ClearfLo Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, R.; Mazzoleni, Claudio

    2016-08-31

    Over the course of this project, we have analyzed data and samples from the CARES and ClearfLo campaigns, as well as conducted or participated in laboratory experiments designed to better understand black carbon mixing state and climate-relevant properties. The laboratory campaigns took place at PNNL and CMU to study various climate-relevant aerosol properties of different sources of soot mixing with secondary organic aerosol precursors. The DMT photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAXs) procured by CMU through this grant were deployed for these experiments, as well as experiments characterizing the optical properties of cookstove soot emissions at Colorado State University (CSU). Results from some of these activities were summarized in the previous progress report. This final report presents the manuscripts that have been published (many in the period since the last progress report), lists presentations at different conferences based on grant-related activities, and presents some results that are likely to be submitted for publication in 2016.

  2. An analytical study of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions in hydrocarbon combustion with added nitrogen - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of ground-based gas turbine combustor operating conditions and fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) found in coal-derived liquid fuels on the formation of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide is investigated. Analytical predictions of NOx and CO concentrations are obtained for a two-stage, adiabatic, perfectly-stirred reactor operating on a propane-air mixture, with primary equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.7, secondary equivalence ratios of 0.5 or 0.7, primary stage residence times from 12 to 20 msec, secondary stage residence times of 1, 2 and 3 msec and fuel nitrogen contents of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 wt %. Minimum nitrogen oxide but maximum carbon monoxide formation is obtained at primary zone equivalence ratios between 1.4 and 1.5, with percentage conversion of FBN to NOx decreasing with increased fuel nitrogen content. Additional secondary dilution is observed to reduce final pollutant concentrations, with NOx concentration independent of secondary residence time and CO decreasing with secondary residence time; primary zone residence time is not observed to affect final NOx and CO concentrations significantly. Finally, comparison of computed results with experimental values shows a good semiquantitative agreement.

  3. An analytical study of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions in hydrocarbon combustion with added nitrogen - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of ground-based gas turbine combustor operating conditions and fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) found in coal-derived liquid fuels on the formation of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide is investigated. Analytical predictions of NOx and CO concentrations are obtained for a two-stage, adiabatic, perfectly-stirred reactor operating on a propane-air mixture, with primary equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.7, secondary equivalence ratios of 0.5 or 0.7, primary stage residence times from 12 to 20 msec, secondary stage residence times of 1, 2 and 3 msec and fuel nitrogen contents of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 wt %. Minimum nitrogen oxide but maximum carbon monoxide formation is obtained at primary zone equivalence ratios between 1.4 and 1.5, with percentage conversion of FBN to NOx decreasing with increased fuel nitrogen content. Additional secondary dilution is observed to reduce final pollutant concentrations, with NOx concentration independent of secondary residence time and CO decreasing with secondary residence time; primary zone residence time is not observed to affect final NOx and CO concentrations significantly. Finally, comparison of computed results with experimental values shows a good semiquantitative agreement.

  4. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  5. On the regimes of charge reversal.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2008-05-07

    Charge reversal of the planar electrical double layer is studied by means of a well known integral equation theory. By a numerical analysis, a diagram is constructed with the onset points of charge reversal in the space of the fundamental variables of the system. Within this diagram, two regimes of charge reversal are identified, which are referred to as oscillatory and nonoscillatory. We found that these two regimes can be distinguished through a simple formula. Furthermore, a symmetry between electrostatic and size correlations in charge reversal is exhibited. Agreement of our results with other theories and molecular simulations data is discussed.

  6. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τ_{A}(t) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τ_{A}(t) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  7. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τA(t ) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τA(t ) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  8. The Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) FTS: Results From the 2012/13 Alaska Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kurosu, T. P.; Miller, C. E.; Dinardo, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) is an aircraft-based Earth Venture 1 mission to study the carbon balance of the Alaskan Arctic ecosystem, with a particular focus on carbon release from melting permafrost. Operating from its base in Fairbanks, AK, the CARVE aircraft covers a range of principle flight paths in the Alaskan interior, the Yukon River valley, and northern Alaska coast around Barrow and Dead Horse. Flight paths are chosen to maximize ecosystem variability and and cover burn-recovery/regrowth sequences. CARVE observations cover the Arctic Spring/Summer/Fall seasons, with multiple flights per season and principle flight paths. Science operations started in 05/2012 and are currently envisaged to continue until 2015. The CARVE suite of instruments includes flask measurements and in situ gas analyzers for CO2, CH4 and CO observations, an active/passive L-band radar for surface conditions (freeze/thaw state), and a three-band polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) for column measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, and interfering species (e.g., H2O). The FTS covers the spectral regions of 4,200-4,900 cm-1 (CH4, CO), 5,800-6,400 cm-1 (CO2), and 12,900-13,200 cm-1 (O2), with a spectral resolution of 0.2 cm-1. Aircraft-based FTS science observations in Alaska have been performed since 23-05-2012. First-version data products from all CARVE instruments derived from observations during the 2012 campaign were publicly released earlier in 2013. The FTS has performed well during flight conditions, particularly with respect to vibration damping. Outstanding challenges include the need for improved spectral and radiometric calibration, as well as compensating for low signal-to-noise spectra acquired under Alaskan flight conditions. We present results from FTS column observations of CO2, CH4, and CO, observed during the 2012 and 2013 campaigns, including preliminary comparisons of CARVE FTS measurements with satellite observations of CO2

  9. Carbon sink activity is stronger under grazing than under mowing: results from a paired eddy flux towers experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintér, Krisztina; Balogh, János; Koncz, Péter; Hidy, Dóra; Cserhalmi, Dóra; Papp, Marianna; Fóti, Szilvia; Nagy, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Effect of grazing vs. mowing on carbon balance of a grassland was investigated by a paired eddy towers (one of them measuring the grazed, the another the mowed treatment) experiment at the Bugacpuszta sandy grassland site (HU-Bug, 46.69° N, 19.6° E, 114m asl, 10.4 ° C annual mean temperature, 562 mm annual precipitation sum) located in the Hungarian Plain. Eddy covariance measurements started in July, 2002. The area of the mowed treatment is 1 ha, it is located within the grazed treatment (500 ha). Electric fence was set up around the selected area in spring of 2011. Study years include 2011, 2012 and 2013. The pasture is managed extensively (average grazing pressure of 0.5 cattle per hectare), the cattle herd regularly took several kilometres during a grazing day. Annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of the grassland is strongly limited by precipitation, there were 2 source years within the 11 years (2003-2013) of measurements, during which the average annual balance was -109 gCm-2year-1 with standard deviation of 106 gCm-2year-1. Carbon sink activity of the grassland was stronger in the grazed treatment than in the mowed treatment during the three year study period (paired t-test, P=0.058). In the grazed treatment the average sink strength was -142.8 ±40 gCm-2year-1, while in the mowed treatment the average sink strength was -61.5 ±46.5 gCm-2year-1. Differences of carbon balances between the treatments were positively correlated to the annual sum of evapotranspiration (ET), while ETs of the treatments were almost identical (differences within a 10mm year-1 range) in each study year. Water use efficiency in the mowed treatment was 44% of that in the grazed treatment (P=0.045) as a result of the differences in sink capacity. The higher sensitivity to drought by the mowed treatment manifested in decreased sink capacity during summer and in decreased regeneration capacity during autumn rains as shown by the cumulative NEE in the different years. Minor but

  10. Optical and Thermo-optical Properties of Polyimide-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films: Experimental Results and Empirical Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Connell, John W.; Watson, Kent A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the bulk of space environmentally durable polymers at loading levels greater than or equal to 0.05 wt % has afforded thin films with surface and volume resistivities sufficient for electrostatic charge mitigation. However, the optical transparency at 500 nm decreased and the thermo-optical properties (solar absorptivity and thermal emissivity) increased with increaed SWNT loading. These properties were also dependent on film thickness. The absorbance characteristics of the films as a function of SWNT loading and film thickness were measured and determined to follow the classical Beer-Lambert law. Based on these results, an empirical relationship was derived and molar absorptivities determined for both the SWNTs and polymer matrix to provide a predictive approximation of these properties. The molar absorptivity determined for SWNTs dispersed in the polymer was comparable to reported solution determined values for HiPco SWNTs.

  11. An analytical study of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions in hydrocarbon combustion with added nitrogen, preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of combustor operating conditions on the conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) to nitrogen oxides NO sub x was analytically determined. The effect of FBN and of operating conditions on carbon monoxide (CO) formation was also studied. For these computations, the combustor was assumed to be a two stage, adiabatic, perfectly-stirred reactor. Propane-air was used as the combustible mixture and fuel-bound nitrogen was simulated by adding nitrogen atoms to the mixture. The oxidation of propane and formation of NO sub x and CO were modeled by a fifty-seven reaction chemical mechanism. The results for NO sub x and CO formation are given as functions of primary and secondary stage equivalence ratios and residence times.

  12. Magnetostratigraphy of Mesozoic shallow-water carbonates: Preliminary results from the Middle Jurassic of the Paris basin

    SciTech Connect

    Aissaoui, D.M.; Kirschvink, J.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The use of sedimentary paleomagnetism has enhanced greatly our understanding of the timing of deposition and diagenesis of Cenozoic platform and reefal carbonates. Its application to similar but older deposits will have direct implications for economic exploration and development. The authors report here preliminary paleomagnetic results from the Middle Jurassic limestones of the Paris basin (France). The samples consist mainly of bioclastic and oolitic limestones deposited in ancient counterpart of the shallow-water environments of the Bahama platform. The Jurassic samples are stable to progressive, incremental demagnetization and exhibit magnetization patterns identical to Cenozoic rocks from the Bahama platform or Mururoa Atoll. The natural remanent magnetization of these limestones is weak and comprised between 7.7 x 10{sup {minus}9} to 1.8 x 10{sup {minus}8} AM{sup 2}/kg. Magnetic components of both normal and reversed polarity are observed. Paired isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and alternating field demagnetization experiments show that most of the remanence is lost between 20 and 45 mT, which is typical of single-domain biogenic magnetite or maghemite. The ratio of IRM at H{sub RG} to the saturation IRM ranges from 35 to 42% indicating a moderate to low interparticle interaction. This is confirmed by the anhysteretic remanent magnetization as compared with intact, freeze-dried cells of magnetotactic bacteria and chiton teeth. Magnetic minerals extracted from the Jurassic samples are examined to further confirm the occurrence of SD magnetite within the Middle Jurassic limestones of the Paris basin. The preliminary results suggest that the strata should be good for the paleomagnetic investigation of Mesozoic shallow-water carbonates.

  13. Carbon dioxide production in surface sediments of temporarily anoxic basins (Baltic Sea) and resulting sediment-water interface fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, M. E.; Al-Raei, A. M.; Winde, V.; Lenz, C.; Dellwig, O.; Leipe, T.; Segl, M.; Struck, U.

    2009-04-01

    Organic matter is mineralized in marine sediments by microbial activity using predominantly oxygen, sulfate, and metal oxides as electron acceptors. Modern euxinic basins as found in the Baltic Sea or the Black Sea are of particular importance because they may serve as type systems for anoxia in Earth's history. We present here results from biogeochemical investigations carried out in the Baltic deeps (Gotland Basin, Landsort Deep) during the first scientific cruise of RV M.S. MERIAN in 2006, additionally during RV Prof. Penck cruises in 2006 and 2007. Short sediment cores were obtained with a multi-corer and analyzed for particulate and dissolved main, minor and trace elements, pH, DIC, methane alkalinity, besides the stable carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Microsensors were applied to analyze steep gradients of oxygen, sulphide and sulphate. Pore water profiles are evaluated in terms of process rates and associated element fluxes using the PROFILE software (Berg et al., 1998, L&O). Gross and net anaerobic mineralization rates were additionally obtained from core incubations with 35S. Steep gradients in DIC are associated with a strong enrichment of the light stable isotope resulting in the Gotland basin from oxidized OM. Element fluxes across the sediment-water interface are compared with literature data and show for the Baltic Sea a dependence from bottom water redox conditions, and sediment compositions and formation conditions (e.g., accumulation rates). DIC in the anoxic part of the water column in the Landsort Deep and the Gotland Deep show relatively similar isotope values, close to the bottom water value, but steep gradients towards heavier values above the pelagic redoxcline. Acknowledgements: The research was supported by Leibniz IO Warnemünde, DFG (Cruise RV MSM MERIAN 01), and MPG. Thanks to B. Schneider and F. Pollehne stimulating discussions, and S. Lage and A. Schipper for technical support.

  14. Barium in Twilight Zone suspended matter as a potential proxy for particulate organic carbon remineralization: Results for the North Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Dehairs, F.; Jacquet, S.; Savoye, N.; Van Mooy, B.A.S.; Buesseler, K.; Bishop, J.K.B.; Lamborg, C.H.; Elskens, M.; Baeyens, W.; Boyd, P.W.; Casciotti, K.L.; Monnin, C.

    2008-04-10

    This study focuses on the fate of exported organic carbon in the twilight zone at two contrasting environments in the North Pacific: the oligotrophic ALOHA site (22 degrees 45 minutes N 158 degrees W; Hawaii; studied during June-July 2004) and the mesotrophic Subarctic Pacific K2 site (47 degrees N, 161 degrees W; studied during July-August 2005). Earlier work has shown that non-lithogenic, excess particulate Ba (Ba{sub xs}) in the mesopelagic water column is a potential proxy of organic carbon remineralization. In general Ba{sub xs} contents were significantly larger at K2 than at ALOHA. At ALOHA the Ba{sub xs} profiles from repeated sampling (5 casts) showed remarkable consistency over a period of three weeks, suggesting that the system was close to being at steady state. In contrast, more variability was observed at K2 (6 casts sampled) reflecting the more dynamic physical and biological conditions prevailing in this environment. While for both sites Ba{sub xs} concentrations increased with depth, at K2 a clear maximum was present between the base of the mixed layer at around 50m and 500m, reflecting production and release of Ba{sub xs}. Larger mesopelagic Ba{sub xs} contents and larger bacterial production in the twilight zone at the K2 site indicate that more material was exported from the upper mixed layer for bacterial degradation deeper, compared to the ALOHA site. Furthermore, application of a published transfer function (Dehairs et al., 1997) relating oxygen consumption to the observed Ba{sub xs} data indicated that the latter were in good agreement with bacterial respiration, calculated from bacterial production. These results corroborate earlier findings highlighting the potential of Ba{sub xs} as a proxy for organic carbon remineralization. The range of POC remineralization rates calculated from twilight zone excess particulate Ba contents did also compare well with the depth dependent POC flux decrease as recorded by neutrally buoyant sediment traps

  15. The First Eighteen Months of NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2): Mission Status, Error Characterization, and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    OCO-2 began taking science data in September 2014 and continues to operate well, returning nearly 1 million observations per day. Approximately 10% of these are sufficiently free of cloud and aerosol contamination to allow for an accurate determination of the column mean carbon dioxide dry air mole fraction, XCO2. The measurements have relatively low noise, of order 0.5-1.0 ppm for most nadir soundings over land and sun-glint geometry soundings over water surfaces. A number of changes have been made to the observing strategy to maintain performance and enhance the science quality of the data: change in glint yaw angle in October 2014, change in nadir glint cycling in July 2015, change to nadir yaw and glint orbit optimization in late 2015, in addition to periodic instrument cyclings. In this presentation, we will summarize the data quality enabled via comparison to a number of validation metrics, discuss the current health and long-term prospects for the instrument, and give an overview of some early science results from the first 18 months of observations. While XCO2 and other products are still being validated to identify and correct biases, OCO-2's XCO2 observations are starting to reveal the most robust features of the atmospheric carbon cycle. At regional scales, fluxes from the eastern U.S. and China are most clear in the fall, when the north-south XCO2 gradient is small. Enhanced XCO2 coincident with biomass burning in the some parts of the tropics, in particular central Africa, is also obvious in the fall. The annual growth rate of CO2 was anomalously high in 2015 according to OCO-2, consistent with NOAA surface measurements and in accord with the warmer annual average surface temperature that year. This was also apparent in the decreased northern hemisphere summer uptake, likely due to anomalously warm boreal temperatures in the northern hemisphere summer of 2015.

  16. Film thickness for different regimes of fluid-film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    Film thickness equations are provided for four fluid-film lubrication regimes found in elliptical contacts. These regimes are isoviscous-rigid; viscous-rigid; elastohydrodynamic lubrication of low-elastic-modulus materials (soft EHL), or isoviscous-elastic; and elastohydrodynamic lubrication of high-elastic-modulus materials (hard EHL), or viscous-elastic. The influence or lack of influence of elastic and viscous effects is the factor that distinguishes these regimes. The results are presented as a map of the lubrication regimes, with film thickness contours on a log-log grid of the viscosity and elasticity for three values of the ellipticity parameter.

  17. The influence of temperature calibration on the OC–EC results from a dual-optics thermal carbon analyzer

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sunset Laboratory Dual-Optical Carbonaceous Analyzer that simultaneously measures transmission and reflectance signals is widely used in thermal-optical analysis of particulate matter samples. Most often this instrument is used to measure total carbon (TC), organic carbon (O...

  18. 75 FR 73033 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Amended Final... steel pipes and tubes (pipes and tubes) from Thailand, covering the period March 1, 2008 through... published in the Federal Register on October 20, 2010. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes...

  19. 76 FR 31938 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Notice of Preliminary Results of 2009...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Notice of... antidumping duty order on certain hot-rolled carbon steel flat products from India (``hot-rolled steel... on Indian hot-rolled steel. See Notice of Amended Final Antidumping Duty Determination of Sales at...

  20. 76 FR 2344 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Notice of Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Notice of... order on certain hot-rolled carbon steel flat products from India (``Indian Hot-Rolled'') manufactured... December 3, 2001, the Department published in the Federal Register the antidumping duty order on Indian Hot...

  1. Results of rainfall simulation to estimate sediment-bound carbon and nitrogen loss from an Atlantic Coastal Plain (USDA) ultisol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of erosion on soil and carbon loss and redistribution within landscapes is an important component for developing estimates of carbon sequestration potential, management plans to maintain soil quality, and transport of sediment bound agrochemicals. Soils of the Southeastern U.S. Coastal Pl...

  2. 77 FR 47593 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate From the People's Republic of China... review of the antidumping duty order on certain cut-to- length carbon steel plate (``CTL plate'') from... to request an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on CTL plate from the PRC.\\2\\ On...

  3. The influence of temperature calibration on the OC–EC results from a dual-optics thermal carbon analyzer

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sunset Laboratory Dual-Optical Carbonaceous Analyzer that simultaneously measures transmission and reflectance signals is widely used in thermal-optical analysis of particulate matter samples. Most often this instrument is used to measure total carbon (TC), organic carbon (O...

  4. Changes in constituent equilibrium leaching and pore water characteristics of a Portland cement mortar as a result of carbonation.

    PubMed

    Garrabrants, A C; Sanchez, F; Kosson, D S

    2004-01-01

    Two equilibrium-based characterization protocols were applied to ground samples of a cement-based material containing metal oxide powders in both noncarbonated and carbonated states. The effects of carbonation were shown through comparison of (i) material buffering capacity, (ii) constituent equilibrium as a function of leachate pH, and (iii) constituent solubility and release as a function of liquid-to-solid (LS) ratio. As expected, the material alkalinity was significantly neutralized during carbonation. In addition, carbonation of the cement material led to the formation of calcium carbonate and a corresponding increase in arsenic release across the entire pH range. The solubility as a function of pH for lead and copper was lower in the alkaline pH range (pH>9) for carbonated samples compared with the parent material. When solubility and release as a function of LS ratio was compared, carbonation was observed to decrease calcium solubility, sodium and potassium release, and ionic strength. In response to carbonate solid formation, chloride and sulfate release as a function of LS ratio was observed to increase. Trends in constituent concentration as a function of LS ratio were extrapolated to estimate pore water composition at a 0.06 mL/g LS ratio. Significant differences were observed upon comparison of estimated pore water composition to leachate concentrations extracted at LS ratio of 5 mL/g. These differences show that practical laboratory extractions cannot be assumed directly representative of pore water concentrations.

  5. 76 FR 76939 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... or cold-rolled mechanical tubing, pipe and tube hollows for redraws, finished scaffolding, and... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Final... welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey. The administrative review covers the Borusan Group \\1\\...

  6. Impact of land use change on the land atmosphere carbon flux of South and South East Asia: A Synthesis of Dynamic Vegetation Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervarich, M.; Shu, S.; Jain, A. K.; Poulter, B.; Stocker, B.; Arneth, A.; Viovy, N.; Kato, E.; Wiltshire, A.; Koven, C.; Sitch, S.; Zeng, N.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding our present day carbon cycle and possible solutions to recent increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide is dependent upon quantifying the terrestrial carbon budget. Currently, global land cover and land use change is estimated to emit 0.9 PgC yr-1 compared to emissions due to fossil fuel combustion and cement production of 8.4 PgC yr-1. South and Southeast Asia (India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia, Pakistan, Myanmar, and Singapore) is a region of rapid land cover and land use change due to the continuous development of agriculture, deforestation, reforestation, afforestation, and the increased demand of land for people to live. In this study, we synthesize outputs of nine models participated in Global Carbon Budget Project to identify the carbon budget of South and southeast Asia, diagnose the contribution of land cover and land use change to carbon emissions and assess areas of uncertainty in the suite of models. Uncertainty is determined using the standard deviation and the coefficient of variation of net ecosystem exchange and its component parts. Results show the region's terrestrial biosphere was a source of carbon emissions from the 1980 to the early 1990s. During the same time period, land cover and land use change increasingly contributed to carbon emission. In the most recent two decades, the region became a carbon sink since emission due to land cover land use changes. Spatially, the greatest total emissions occurred in the tropical forest of Southeast Asia. Additionally, this is the subregion with the greatest uncertainty and greatest biomass. Model uncertainty is shown to be proportional to total biomass. The atmospheric impacts of ENSO are shown to suppress the net biosphere productivity in South and Southeast Asia leading to years of increased carbon emissions.

  7. Understanding the fate of black (pyrogenic) carbon in soil: Preliminary results from a long term field trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Will; Ascough, Philippa; Bird, Michael; Large, David; Shen, Licheng; Snape, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Black carbon (BC, also known as pyrogenic carbon) is an 'inert' form of carbon and has been proposed as a means of long-term carbon sequestration, particularly by amending soils and sediments with BC known as biochar. While there is abundant anecdotal evidence of biochar stability over extended timescales it is essential to gain a greater understanding of the degree and mechanisms of biochar degradation in the environment. This study aims to quantitatively assess the stability of biochar by investigating samples from field degradation trials first buried during 2009 in a tropical soil, and recovered after 12 and 36 month intervals. Catalytic hydropyrolysis (HyPy) is a novel analytical tool for the isolation of BC [1] in which high hydrogen pressure (150 bar) and a sulphided Mo catalyst reductively remove the non-BC fraction of the chars, and so isolate the most stable portion of the biochar, defined as BC(HyPy). This method also allows for the non-BC(HyPy) fraction of a sample, which from charcoal is known to include small ring PAHs (<7 rings) of pyrogenic origin to be recovered for molecular characterisation by GC-MS [2]. Biochars made from algae, sugarcane bagasse, and beech wood at 305, 414 and 512°C were emplaced under a variety of conditions allowing variables such as leaf cover, soil depth and pH to be investigated. Char stability (as measured by BC(HyPy) content) is dependent on both the feedstock and temperature of formation. HyPy is known to discriminate (in terms of BC isolation) against low temperature chars, composed of relatively small aromatic clusters [1], resulting in the low BC(HyPy) contents reported for the 305°C chars. Fresh charcoals, and those not subject to environmental degradation have display a similar distribution of aromatic clusters in the non-BC(HyPy) fraction, with 2 to 7 ring PAHs abundant [2]. However, environmentally degraded charcoals such as that from a Chinese river sediment, and an Australian river estuary [3] show a more

  8. Delinating Thermohaline Double-Diffusive Rayleigh Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, T.; Walther, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liedl, R.

    2013-12-01

    In natural systems, convective flow induced from density differences may occur in near-coastal aquifers, atmospheric boundary layers, oceanic streams or within the earth crust. Whether an initially stable, diffusive regime evolves into a convective (stable or chaotic) regime, or vice versa, depends on the system's framing boundary conditions. A conventional parameter to express the relation between diffusive and convective forces of such a density-driven regime is Rayleigh number (Ra). While most systems are mainly dominated by only a single significant driving force (i.e. only temperature or salinity), some systems need to consider two boundary processes (e.g. deep, thus warm, haline flow in porous media). In that case, a two-dimensional, 'double-diffusive' Rayleigh system can be defined. Nield (1998) postulated a boundary between diffusive and convective regime at RaT + RaC = 4pi^2 in the first quadrant (Q1), with Rayleigh numbers for temperature and concentration respectively. The boundary in the forth quadrant (Q4) could not exactly be determined, yet the approximate position estimated. Simulations with HydroGeoSphere (Therrien, 2010) using a vertical, quadratic, homogeneous, isotropic setup confirmed the existence of the 4pi^2-boundary and revealed additional regimes (diffusive, single-roll, double-roll, chaotic) in Q1. Also, non-chaotic, oscillating patterns could be identified in Q4. More detailed investigations with OpenGeoSys (Kolditz, 2012) confirmed the preceding HGS results, and, using a 1:10-scaled domain (height:length), uncovered even more distinctive regimes (diffusive, minimum ten roles, supposely up to 25 roles, and chaotic?) in Q1, while again, oscillating patterns were found in the transition zone between diffusive and chaotic regimes in Q4. Output of numerical simulations from Q1 and Q4 show the mentioned regimes (diffusive, stable-convective, stable-oscillatory, chaotic) while results are displayed in context of a possible delination between

  9. Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments

    DOE Data Explorer

    Smith, P. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; Powlson, D. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; Glendining, M. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; Smith, J. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK

    2003-01-01

    One of the main options for carbon mitigation identified by the IPCC is the sequestration of carbon in soils. In this paper we use statistical relationships derived from European long-term experiments to explore the potential for carbon sequestration in soils in the European Union. We examine five scenarios, namely (a) the amendment of arable soils with animal manure, (b) the amendment of arable soils with sewage sludge, (c) the incorporation of cereal straw into the soils in which it was grown, (d) the afforestation of surplus arable land through natural woodland regeneration, and (e) extensification of agriculture through ley-arable farming. Our calculations suggest only limited potential to increase soil carbon stocks over the next century by addition of animal manure, sewage sludge or straw (<15 Tg C y–1), but greater potential through extensification of agriculture (~40 Tg C y–1) or through the afforestation of surplus arable land (~50 Tg C y–1). We estimate that extensification could increase the total soil carbon stock of the European Union by 17%. Afforestation of 30% of present arable land would increase soil carbon stocks by about 8% over a century and would substitute up to 30 Tg C y–1 of fossil fuel carbon if the wood were used as biofuel. However, even the afforestation scenario, with the greatest potential for carbon mitigation, can sequester only 0.8% of annual global anthropogenic CO2-carbon. Our figures suggest that, although efforts in temperate agriculture can contribute to global carbon mitigation, the potential is small compared to that available through reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions by halting tropical and sub-tropical deforestation or by reducing fossil fuel burning.

  10. Modelling the role of fires in the terrestrial carbon balance by incorporating SPITFIRE into the global vegetation modelORCHIDEE - Part 1: Simulating historical global burned area and fire regimes

    Treesearch

    C. Yue; P. Ciais; P. Cadule; K. Thonicke; S. Archibald; B. Poulter; W. M. Hao; S. Hantson; F. Mouillot; P. Friedlingstein; F. Maignan; N. Viovy

    2014-01-01

    Fire is an important global ecological process that influences the distribution of biomes, with consequences for carbon, water, and energy budgets. Therefore it is impossible to appropriately model the history and future of the terrestrial ecosystems and the climate system without including fire. This study incorporates the process-based prognostic fire module SPITFIRE...

  11. Technology Advancement for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space Using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Kooi, Susan; Choi, Yonghoon; Plant, James; Yang, Melissa; Antill, Charles; Campbell, Joel; hide

    2015-01-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is a newly developed lidar developed at NASA Langley Research Center and funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) that seeks to advance technologies critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The technology advancements targeted include: (1) increasing the power-aperture product to approach ASCENDS mission requirements by implementing multi-aperture telescopes and multiple co-aligned laser transmitters; (2) incorporating high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) developing and incorporating a high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration autonomous operation on Global Hawk aircraft, and (4) advancing algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument architecture is being developed for operation on high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. These technologies are critical towards developing not only spaceborne instruments but also their airborne simulators, with lower platform requirements for size, mass, and power, and with improved instrument performance for the ASCENDS mission. ACES transmits five laser beams: three from commercial EDFAs operating near 1.57 microns, and two from the Exelis oxygen (O2) Raman fiber laser amplifier system operating near 1.26 microns. The three EDFAs are capable of transmitting up to 10 watts average optical output power each and are seeded by compact, low noise, stable, narrow-linewidth laser sources stabilized with respect to a CO2 absorption line using a multi-pass gas absorption cell. The Integrated-Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar approach is used at both wavelengths to independently measure the CO2 and O2 column number

  12. The impact of peatland drain-blocking on dissolved organic carbon loss and discolouration of water; results from a national survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, A.; Holden, J.; Kay, P.; Francis, B.; Foulger, M.; Gledhill, S.; McDonald, A. T.; Walker, A.

    2010-02-01

    SummaryPeatlands are important terrestrial carbon stores but their environmental degradation has led to concerns of increased carbon loss. Many peatlands have been drained using open ditches and this practice has been associated with enhanced dissolved organic carbon loss and water discolouration. Recent peatland restoration schemes have therefore included the blocking of peatland drains as a strategy for environmental improvement. However, it is not clear whether drain-blocking consistently reduces dissolved organic carbon loads and water discolouration because many peats undergo significant physical and chemical change when they are disturbed. Previous studies investigating the impact of drain-blocking on water colour and dissolved organic carbon have been restricted to a limited spatial and temporal research framework. This study combines an extensive UK-wide survey of blocked and unblocked drains across 32 study sites and intensive monitoring of a peat drain system that has been blocked for 7 years. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations and water discolouration were significantly lower in blocked drains: the mean dissolved organic carbon concentration of water sampled from blocked drains was 28% less than that sampled from unblocked drains. However, this pattern was not consistent at all sites. At the intensive monitoring site no significant differences could be observed in total dissolved organic carbon flux from the fully instrumented blocked and unblocked drains: the blocked drain exported 31,592 kg km -2 yr -1 and the unblocked drain 30,123 kg km -2 yr -1. Results from bi-weekly grab samples from other drains at the intensively monitored site, however, did conform to the general national pattern of lower dissolved organic carbon and discolouration in blocked drains. The results demonstrate that drain-blocking can be an effective management strategy for reducing DOC loss and water discolouration in disturbed peat catchments. The caveat remains, however

  13. Estimation of metabolic heat production and methane emission in Sahiwal and Karan Fries heifers under different feeding regimes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, S. V.; Pandey, Priyanka; Kumar, Narendra; Hooda, O. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was designed to estimate the metabolic heat production and methane emission in Sahiwal and Karan Fries (Holstein-Friesian X Tharparkar) heifers under two different feeding regimes, i.e., feeding regime-1 as per the National Research Council (NRC) (2001) and feeding regime-2 having 15% higher energy (supplementation of molasses) than NRC (2001). Materials and Methods: Six (n = 6) healthy heifers of Sahiwal and Karan Fries with 18-24 months of age were selected from Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. An initial 15 days was maintained under feeding regime-1 and feeding regime-2 as adaptation period; actual experiment was conducted from 16th day onward for next 15 days. At the end of feeding regimes (on day 15th and 16th), expired air and volume were collected in Douglas bag for two consecutive days (morning [6:00 am] and evening [4:00 pm]). The fraction of methane and expired air volume were measured by methane analyzer and wet test meter, respectively. The oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured by iWorx LabScribe2. Results: The heat production (kcal/day) was significantly (p<0.05) higher in feeding regime-2 as compared to feeding regimen-1 in both breeds. The heat production per unit metabolic body weight was numerically higher in feeding regime-1 than feeding regime-2; however, the values were found statistically non-significant (p>0.05). The energy loss as methane (%) from total heat production was significantly (p<0.05) higher in feeding regime-1. The body weight (kg), metabolic body weight (W0.75), and basal metabolic rate (kcal/kg0.75) were significantly (p<0.05) higher in feeding regime-2 in both breeds. Conclusions: This study indicates that higher energy diet by supplementing molasses may reduce energy loss as methane and enhance the growth of Sahiwal and Karan Fries heifers. PMID:27284226

  14. Adsorption of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme on carbon nanotubes: how to get accurate results for the cytotoxicity of these nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Forest, Valérie; Figarol, Agathe; Boudard, Delphine; Cottier, Michèle; Grosseau, Philippe; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2015-03-31

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) cytotoxicity is frequently investigated using in vitro classical toxicology assays. However, these cellular tests, usually based on the use of colorimetric or fluorimetric dyes, were designed for chemicals and may not be suitable for nanosized materials. Indeed, because of their unique physicochemical properties CNT can interfere with the assays and bias the results. To get accurate data and draw reliable conclusions, these artifacts should be carefully taken into account. The aim of this study was to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the interferences occurring between CNT and the commonly used lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Experiments under cell-free conditions were performed, and it was clearly demonstrated that artifacts occurred. They were due to the intrinsic absorbance of CNT on one hand and the adsorption of LDH at the CNT surface on the other hand. The adsorption of LDH on CNT was modeled and was found to fit the Langmuir model. The K(ads) and n(eq) constants were defined, allowing the correction of results obtained from cellular experiments to get more accurate data and lead to proper conclusions on the cytotoxicity of CNT.

  15. Carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane for high electron mobility transistor applications: Growth and device results

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Nilsson, D.; Danielsson, Ö.; Pedersen, H.; Janzén, E.; Forsberg, U.; Bergsten, J.; Rorsman, N.

    2015-12-28

    The creation of a semi insulating (SI) buffer layer in AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) devices is crucial for preventing a current path beneath the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). In this investigation, we evaluate the use of a gaseous carbon gas precursor, propane, for creating a SI GaN buffer layer in a HEMT structure. The carbon doped profile, using propane gas, is a two stepped profile with a high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) epitaxial layer closest to the substrate and a lower doped layer (3 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}) closest to the 2DEG channel. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurement shows a uniform incorporation versus depth, and no memory effect from carbon doping can be seen. The high carbon doping (1.5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) does not influence the surface morphology, and a roughness root-mean-square value of 0.43 nm is obtained from Atomic Force Microscopy. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements show very sharp peaks and no structural degradation can be seen related to the heavy carbon doped layer. HEMTs are fabricated and show an extremely low drain induced barrier lowering value of 0.1 mV/V, demonstrating an excellent buffer isolation. The carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane gas is compared to samples using carbon from the trimethylgallium molecule, showing equally low leakage currents, demonstrating the capability of growing highly resistive buffer layers using a gaseous carbon source.

  16. Carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane for high electron mobility transistor applications: Growth and device results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Bergsten, J.; Nilsson, D.; Danielsson, Ö.; Pedersen, H.; Rorsman, N.; Janzén, E.; Forsberg, U.

    2015-12-01

    The creation of a semi insulating (SI) buffer layer in AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) devices is crucial for preventing a current path beneath the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). In this investigation, we evaluate the use of a gaseous carbon gas precursor, propane, for creating a SI GaN buffer layer in a HEMT structure. The carbon doped profile, using propane gas, is a two stepped profile with a high carbon doping (1.5 × 1018 cm-3) epitaxial layer closest to the substrate and a lower doped layer (3 × 1016 cm-3) closest to the 2DEG channel. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry measurement shows a uniform incorporation versus depth, and no memory effect from carbon doping can be seen. The high carbon doping (1.5 × 1018 cm-3) does not influence the surface morphology, and a roughness root-mean-square value of 0.43 nm is obtained from Atomic Force Microscopy. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements show very sharp peaks and no structural degradation can be seen related to the heavy carbon doped layer. HEMTs are fabricated and show an extremely low drain induced barrier lowering value of 0.1 mV/V, demonstrating an excellent buffer isolation. The carbon doped GaN buffer layer using propane gas is compared to samples using carbon from the trimethylgallium molecule, showing equally low leakage currents, demonstrating the capability of growing highly resistive buffer layers using a gaseous carbon source.

  17. Radiative Effects of Global MODIS Cloud Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oraiopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dong Min; Kato, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    We update previously published MODIS global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 dataset. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux datasets. Our results clearly show the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance datasets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR, and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  18. Modeling the spatiotemporal variability in subsurface thermal regimes across a low-relief polygonal tundra landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Collier, Nathan; Bisht, Gautam; Mills, Richard T.; Thornton, Peter E.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Vast carbon stocks stored in permafrost soils of Arctic tundra are under risk of release to the atmosphere under warming climate scenarios. Ice-wedge polygons in the low-gradient polygonal tundra create a complex mosaic of microtopographic features. This microtopography plays a critical role in regulating the fine-scale variability in thermal and hydrological regimes in the polygonal tundra landscape underlain by continuous permafrost. Modeling of thermal regimes of this sensitive ecosystem is essential for understanding the landscape behavior under the current as well as changing climate. We present here an end-to-end effort for high-resolution numerical modeling of thermal hydrology at real-world field sites, utilizing the best available data to characterize and parameterize the models. We develop approaches to model the thermal hydrology of polygonal tundra and apply them at four study sites near Barrow, Alaska, spanning across low to transitional to high-centered polygons, representing a broad polygonal tundra landscape. A multiphase subsurface thermal hydrology model (PFLOTRAN) was developed and applied to study the thermal regimes at four sites. Using a high-resolution lidar digital elevation model (DEM), microtopographic features of the landscape were characterized and represented in the high-resolution model mesh. The best available soil data from field observations and literature were utilized to represent the complex heterogeneous subsurface in the numerical model. Simulation results demonstrate the ability of the developed modeling approach to capture - without recourse to model calibration - several aspects of the complex thermal regimes across the sites, and provide insights into the critical role of polygonal tundra microtopography in regulating the thermal dynamics of the carbon-rich permafrost soils. Areas of significant disagreement between model results and observations highlight the importance of field-based observations of soil thermal and

  19. Regime Dependant Microphysical Variability in Darwin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, B.; Rutledge, S. A.; Lang, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Of utmost importance for global precipitation estimates from satellites such as TRMM and the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is to understand processes that lead to variability in precipitation on sub-seasonal, seasonal, and climatological scales. Many studies have linked differences in rainfall characteristics such as mean diameter (D0) to sub-seasonal regime variability forced by large scale wind shifts, topography, and continental and maritime convection, across various regions of the globe. Several analyses have tied differences between regimes to differing microphysical processes that drive changes in the drop-size distributions occurring in convective rainfall. For example, decreased ice mass aloft and smaller mean diameters are indicative of warm rain processes, while vigorous ice formation leads to large, melting ice to create large drops. If the microphysical variability in different regimes is characterized and understood, the results could be used to improve satellite precipitation algorithms. The polarimetric, Doppler C-band radar, CPOL, located near Darwin, Australia provides a unique platform to study differences in microphysics between land and ocean, as well as variability between monsoon and break periods. The focus of this study is to examine the microphysical processes occurring in four distinct regimes around Darwin (monsoon-land, monsoon-ocean, break-land, break-ocean), using polarimetric data from CPOL. Analyses such as contoured frequency by altitude (CFADs) diagrams, cumulative distribution functions, and mean profiles of precipitation water mass, precipitation ice mass, reflectivity, differential reflectivity and specific differential phase will aide in understanding the physics of precipitation in these regimes. The formation of precipitation ice aloft, warm rain processes, and the contributions of warm rain and cold cloud processes including melting of ice into large drops, will be linked to differences in D0, rain

  20. Increased iron availability resulting from increased CO2 enhances carbon and nitrogen metabolism in the economical marine red macroalga Pyropia haitanensis (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Chen, Binbin; Zou, Dinghui; Yang, Yufeng

    2017-04-01

    Ocean acidification caused by rising CO2 is predicted to increase the concentrations of dissolved species of Fe(II) and Fe(III), leading to the enhanced photosynthetic carbon sequestration in some algal species. In this study, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism in responses to increased iron availability under two CO2 levels (390 μL L(-1) and 1000 μL L(-1)), were investigated in the maricultivated macroalga Pyropia haitanensis (Rhodophyta). The results showed that, elevated CO2 increased soluble carbonhydrate (SC) contents, resulting from enhanced photosynthesis and photosynthetic pigment synthesis in this algae, but declined its soluble protein (SP) contents, resulting in increased ratio of SC/SP. This enhanced photosynthesis performance and carbon accumulation was more significant under iron enrichment condition in seawater, with higher iron uptake rate at high CO2 level. As a key essential biogenic element for algae, Fe-replete functionally contributed to P. haitanensis photosynthesis. Increased SC fundamentally provided carbon skeletons for nitrogen assimilation. The significant increase of carbon and nitrogen assimilation finally contributed to enhanced growth in this alga. This was also intuitively reflected by respiration that provided energy for cellular metabolism and algal growth. We propose that, in the predicted scenario of rising atmospheric CO2, P. haitanensis is capable to adjust its physiology by increasing its carbon and nitrogen metabolism to acclimate the acidified seawater, at the background of global climate change and simultaneously increased iron concentration due to decreased pH levels.

  1. Comparison of Global Model Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) with Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Manipulation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Forrest M; Randerson, Jim; Fung, Inez; Thornton, Peter E; Covey, Curtis; Bonan, Gordon; Running, Steven; Norby, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulation experiments have been carried out at a handful of sites to gauge the response of the biosphere to significant increases in atmospheric [CO{sub 2}]. Early synthesis results from four temperate forest sites suggest that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) is conserved across a broad range of productivity with a stimulation at the median of 23 {+-} 2% when the surrounding air [CO{sub 2}] was raised to 550{approx}ppm. As a part of the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), a community-based model-data comparison activity, the authors have performed a global FACE modeling experiment using two terrestrial biogeochemistry modules, CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN, coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The two models were forced with an improved NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set and reconstructed atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] and N deposition data through 1997. At the beginning of 1997 in the transient simulations, global atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] was abruptly raised to 550{approx}ppm, the target value used at the FACE sites. In the control runs, [CO{sub 2}] continued to rise following observations until 2004, after which it was held constant out to year 2100. In both simulations, the last 25 years of reanalysis forcing and a constant N deposition were applied after year 2004. Across all forest biomes, the NPP responses from both models are weaker than those reported for the four FACE sites. Moreover, model responses vary widely geographically with a decreasing trend of NPP increases from 40{sup o}N to 70{sup o}N. For CLM3-CASA, the largest responses occur in arid regions of western North America and central Asia, suggesting that responses are most strongly influenced by increased water use efficiency for this model. CLM3-CN exhibits consistently weaker responses than CLM3-CASA' with the strongest responses in central Asia, but significantly constrained by N

  2. Comparison of Global Model Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) with Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Manipulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Thornton, P.; Covey, C.; Bonan, G.; Running, S.; Norby, R.

    2008-12-01

    Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) manipulation experiments have been carried out at a handful of sites to gauge the response of the biosphere to significant increases in atmospheric [CO2]. Early synthesis results from four temperate forest sites suggest that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) is conserved across a broad range of productivity with a stimulation at the median of 23±2% when the surrounding air [CO2] was raised to 550~ppm. As a part of the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), a community-based model-data comparison activity, the authors have performed a global FACE modeling experiment using two terrestrial biogeochemistry modules, CLM3-CASA' and CLM3-CN, coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The two models were forced with an improved NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set and reconstructed atmospheric [CO2] and N deposition data through 1997. At the beginning of 1997 in the transient simulations, global atmospheric [CO2] was abruptly raised to 550~ppm, the target value used at the FACE sites. In the control runs, [CO2] continued to rise following observations until 2004, after which it was held constant out to year 2100. In both simulations, the last 25 years of reanalysis forcing and a constant N deposition were applied after year 2004. Across all forest biomes, the NPP responses from both models are weaker than those reported for the four FACE sites. Moreover, model responses vary widely geographically with a decreasing trend of NPP increases from 40°N to 70°N. For CLM3- CASA', the largest responses occur in arid regions of western North America and central Asia, suggesting that responses are most strongly influenced by increased water use efficiency for this model. CLM3-CN exhibits consistently weaker responses than CLM3-CASA' with the strongest responses in central Asia, but significantly constrained by N limitation. C-LAMP is a sub-project of the Computational

  3. Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Sergey; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Roebber, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We simulate the seasonal cycle of the Great Lakes' water temperature and lake ice using an idealized coupled lake-atmosphere-ice model. Under identical seasonally varying boundary conditions, this model exhibits more than one seasonally varying equilibrium solutions, which we associate with distinct regional climate regimes. Colder/warmer regimes are characterized by abundant/scarce amounts of wintertime ice and cooler/warmer summer temperatures, respectively. These regimes are also evident in the observations of the Great Lakes' climate variability over recent few decades, and are found to be most pronounced for Lake Superior, the deepest of the Great Lakes, consistent with model predictions. Multiple climate regimes of the Great Lakes also play a crucial role in the accelerated warming of the lakes relative to the surrounding land regions in response to larger-scale global warming. We discuss the physical origin and characteristics of multiple climate regimes over the lakes, as well as their implications for a longer-term regional climate variability.

  4. Elevated CO2 and O3 Alter Productivity and Carbon Storage in Northern Temperate Forests: Results from Aspen FACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talhelm, A. F.; Pregitzer, K.; Kubiske, M.; Zak, D.; Campany, C.; Burton, A.

    2013-12-01

    Three northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and/or tropospheric ozone (O3) for 11 years, advancing from open-grown seedlings <0.25 m in height at the beginning to the experiment to closed-canopy stands that were >8 m tall. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment. In addition, we estimated cumulative net primary productivity (NPP) during the experiment and used these data to gain further insight into forest C cycling in two ways. First, we tested several canopy productivity models to understand variation in cumulative NPP. Second, we compared cumulative NPP to ecosystem C storage. Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem carbon (C) storage by 11%, but elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C storage by 9%. There was little variation in treatment effects on C storage across communities and no significant interactions between CO2 and O3 for any major C pools. Tree C storage increased 44% under elevated CO2 and decreased 15% under elevated O3. Neither CO2 nor O3 affected the total amount of C in the top 1 m of mineral soil. However, soil C content within the top 0.1 m of mineral soil was lower under elevated O3, whereas soil C at 0.1 to 0.2 m and 0.4 to 0.5 m in depth were lower under elevated CO2. Cumulative NPP was 42% greater under elevated CO2, 11% lower under elevated O3, and was a strong predictor of variation in C storage in plants and organic soil (n = 36, r2 = 0.96). Tree productivity comprised 95% of cumulative NPP. Stands with more cumulative canopy N (g foliar N m-2 of ground area) had greater cumulative tree productivity, but N productivity (tree productivity per canopy N) decreased as canopy N accrued. Thus, elevated CO2 increased cumulative NPP because of a 28% increase in canopy N and a 28% increase in N productivity, while elevated O3 did not impact N productivity and lowered tree

  5. Reactivity of Hontomín carbonate rocks to acidic solution injection: reactive "push-pull" tracer tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaspari, Francesca; Cabeza, Yoar; Luquot, Linda; Rötting, Tobias; Saaltink, Maarten W.; Carrera, Jesus

    2014-05-01

    Several field tests will be carried out in order to characterize the reservoir for CO2 injection in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) as part of the Compostilla project of "Fundación Ciudad de la Energía" (CIUDEN). Once injected, the dissolution of the CO2 in the resident brine will increase the acidity of the water and lead to the dissolution of the rocks, constituted mainly by carbonates. This mechanism will cause changes in the aquifer properties such as porosity and permeability. To reproduce the effect of the CO2 injection, a reactive solution with 2% of acetic acid is going to be injected in the reservoir and extracted from the same well (reactive "push-pull" tracer tests) to identify and quantify the geochemical reactions occurring into the aquifer. The reactivity of the rock will allow us also to evaluate the changes of its properties. Previously, theoretical calculations of Damkhöler numbers were done to determine the acid concentrations and injection flow rates needed to generate ramified-wormholes patterns, during theses "push-pull" experiments. The aim of this work is to present the results and a preliminary interpretation of the field tests.

  6. Epidemiological Study of the Incidence of Cancers Eligible for Proton or Carbon Ions Therapy: Methodology and Results of Recruitment Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Patin, Stéphanie; Pommier, Pascal; Yi, Hu; Baron, Marie Hélène; Balosso, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Context. Hadrontherapy is an innovative form of radiotherapy using beams of protons or carbon ions able to destroy some radio-resistant tumours. Because these tumours are highly specific amongst all cancerous tumours, it is impossible to determine the incidence of these diseases from surveillance registries. Goal. To assess, within the Rhône-Alpes region, the incidence of cancers being hadrontherapy indications. Method. Prospective, multicentre continuous data collection during 1 year, by practitioners participating to multidisciplinary tumor board. Tumours are inoperable, radio resistant, at primary stage of development, or locally recurrent, with low metastatic potential. Results. Study involved 27 healthcare centres, 52 groups of specialist practitioners. The estimated incidence of cancers eligible for hadrontherapy in the Rhône-Alpes region in 2010, that is, for 34 locations in all, is of 8.5/100 000 inhabitants. Appraisal of the low potential of metastatic progression is impeded, because these are rare diseases, whose outcome is unfamiliar to investigators. Conclusion. Future epidemiological studies will need to focus on prognosis and on the metastatic progression rate of these diseases. Indeed, there are few information available on this subject in the literature that could be used to improve preventive measures, medical care, and the surveillance of these rare cancers. PMID:23864858

  7. Cost-effective choices of marine fuels in a carbon-constrained world: results from a global energy model.

    PubMed

    Taljegard, Maria; Brynolf, Selma; Grahn, Maria; Andersson, Karin; Johnson, Hannes

    2014-11-04

    The regionalized Global Energy Transition model has been modified to include a more detailed shipping sector in order to assess what marine fuels and propulsion technologies might be cost-effective by 2050 when achieving an atmospheric CO2 concentration of 400 or 500 ppm by the year 2100. The robustness of the results was examined in a Monte Carlo analysis, varying uncertain parameters and technology options, including the amount of primary energy resources, the availability of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies, and costs of different technologies and fuels. The four main findings are (i) it is cost-effective to start the phase out of fuel oil from the shipping sector in the next decade; (ii) natural gas-based fuels (liquefied natural gas and methanol) are the most probable substitutes during the study period; (iii) availability of CCS, the CO2 target, the liquefied natural gas tank cost and potential oil resources affect marine fuel choices significantly; and (iv) biofuels rarely play a major role in the shipping sector, due to limited supply and competition for bioenergy from other energy sectors.

  8. Long-Term Efficacy and Safety Profile of Lanthanum Carbonate: Results for up to 6 Years of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Alastair J.; Barnett, M. Edwina; Krause, Rolfdieter; Kwan, Jonathan T.C.; Siami, Ghodrat A.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims Lanthanum carbonate (LC, FOSRENOL®) is an effective phosphate binder for which tolerability and a safety profile have been reported in haemodialysis patients. Patients from previous studies entered a 2-year extension, enabling assessment of efficacy and safety for up to 6 years of LC monotherapy. Methods Patients from four previous trials entered this study. Results Ninety-three patients started the extension, with 22 entering a sixth year of LC treatment. Two-thirds of all patients received LC doses of 2,250 or 3,000 mg/day. Reductions in serum phosphate and calcium × phosphate product were maintained for up to 6 years. There were no new or unexpected adverse events (AEs), and no increase in the incidence of events with increasing treatment exposure. Over the complete duration of therapy, treatment-related AEs occurred in 25.8% of patients and were primarily gastrointestinal in nature. No clinically relevant changes in liver function tests were observed and there was no evidence of adverse effects on the liver, bone or the central nervous system. Conclusions LC monotherapy was effective and well tolerated for up to 6 years with no evidence of safety concerns or increased frequency of AEs. PMID:18667837

  9. Dissolved organic carbon concentration controls benthic primary production: results from in situ chambers in north-temperate lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godwin, Sean C.; Jones, Stuart E.; Weidel, Brian C.; Solomon, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated several potential drivers of primary production by benthic algae (periphyton) in north-temperate lakes. We used continuous dissolved oxygen measurements from in situ benthic chambers to quantify primary production by periphyton at multiple depths across 11 lakes encompassing a broad range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total phosphorous (TP) concentrations. Light-use efficiency (primary production per unit incident light) was inversely related to average light availability (% of surface light) in 7 of the 11 study lakes, indicating that benthic algal assemblages exhibit photoadaptation, likely through physiological or compositional changes. DOC alone explained 86% of the variability in log-transformed whole-lake benthic production rates. TP was not an important driver of benthic production via its effects on nutrient and light availability. This result is contrary to studies in other systems, but may be common in relatively pristine north-temperate lakes. Our simple empirical model may allow for the prediction of whole-lake benthic primary production from easily obtained measurements of DOC concentration.

  10. Epidemiological study of the incidence of cancers eligible for proton or carbon ions therapy: methodology and results of recruitment estimation.

    PubMed

    Patin, Stéphanie; Pommier, Pascal; Yi, Hu; Baron, Marie Hélène; Balosso, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Context. Hadrontherapy is an innovative form of radiotherapy using beams of protons or carbon ions able to destroy some radio-resistant tumours. Because these tumours are highly specific amongst all cancerous tumours, it is impossible to determine the incidence of these diseases from surveillance registries. Goal. To assess, within the Rhône-Alpes region, the incidence of cancers being hadrontherapy indications. Method. Prospective, multicentre continuous data collection during 1 year, by practitioners participating to multidisciplinary tumor board. Tumours are inoperable, radio resistant, at primary stage of development, or locally recurrent, with low metastatic potential. Results. Study involved 27 healthcare centres, 52 groups of specialist practitioners. The estimated incidence of cancers eligible for hadrontherapy in the Rhône-Alpes region in 2010, that is, for 34 locations in all, is of 8.5/100 000 inhabitants. Appraisal of the low potential of metastatic progression is impeded, because these are rare diseases, whose outcome is unfamiliar to investigators. Conclusion. Future epidemiological studies will need to focus on prognosis and on the metastatic progression rate of these diseases. Indeed, there are few information available on this subject in the literature that could be used to improve preventive measures, medical care, and the surveillance of these rare cancers.

  11. Scaling Fire Regimes in Space and Time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability are important properties of the forest fire regimes of coniferous forests of southwestern North America. We use a variety of analytical techniques to examine scaling in a surface fire regime in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico, USA, based on an original data set collected from Monument Canyon Research Natural Area (MCN). Spatio-temporal scale dependence in the fire regime can be analyzed quantitatively using statistical descriptors of the fire regime, such as fire frequency and mean fire interval. We describe a theory of the event-area (EA) relationship, an extension of the species-area relationship for events distributed in space and time; the interval-area (IA) relationship, is a related form for fire intervals. We use the EA and IA to demonstrate scale dependence in the MCN fire regime. The slope and intercept of these functions are influenced by fire size, frequency, and spatial distribution, and thus are potentially useful metrics of spatio-temporal synchrony of events in the paleofire record. Second, we outline a theory of fire interval probability, working from first principles in fire ecology and statistics. Fires are conditional events resulting from the interaction of multiple contingent factors that must be satisfied for an event to occur. Outcomes of this kind represent a multiplicative process for which a lognormal model is the limiting distribution. We examine the application of this framework to two probability models, the Weibull and lognormal distributions, which can be used to characterize the distribution of fire intervals over time. Lastly, we present a general model for the collector's curve, with application to the theory and effects of sample size in fire history. Sources of uncertainty in fire history can be partitioned into an error typology; analytical methods used in fire history (particularly the formation of composite fire records) are designed to minimize certain types of error in inference

  12. Comparison of two thermal-optical methods for the determination of organic carbon and elemental carbon: Results from the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan; Zheng, Mei; He, Ke-bin; Chen, Yingjun; Yan, Bo; Russell, Armistead G.; Shi, Wenyan; Jiao, Zheng; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Edgerton, Eric S.

    2011-02-01

    A total of 333 PM 2.5 samples were collected at four sites in the southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization Study (SEARCH) network during four seasons from 2003 to 2005 and were simultaneously analyzed by two common thermal-optical methods, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method and the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) method. The concentrations of total carbon measured by the two methods were comparable, whereas the split of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) was significantly different. The NIOSH-defined EC was lower (up to 80%) than that defined by IMPROVE since the NIOSH method applied the transmittance charring correction and a much higher peak inert mode temperature. The discrepancy between NIOSH- and IMPROVE-defined EC showed distinct seasonal and spatial variations. Potential factors contributing to this discrepancy besides the analytical method were investigated. The discrepancy between NIOSH- and IMPROVE-defined EC was larger in the spring compared to winter due to the influence of biomass burning, which is known to emit significant amount of brown carbon that would complicate the split of OC and EC. The NIOSH-defined EC to IMPROVE-defined EC ratio reached its minimum (0.2-0.5) in the summer, when the largest discrepancy was observed. This was most likely to be attributed to the influence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Moreover, the discrepancy between NIOSH- and IMPROVE-defined EC was larger in the coastal and the rural sites where the presence of abundant SOA was found based on previous studies in this region, providing supporting evidence that SOA could contribute to the observed discrepancy in summer.

  13. Density functional theory of the Seebeck coefficient in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kaike; Perfetto, Enrico; Kurth, Stefan; Stefanucci, Gianluca; D'Agosta, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The Seebeck coefficient plays a fundamental role in identifying the efficiency of a thermoelectric device. Its theoretical evaluation for atomistic models is routinely based on density functional theory calculations combined with the Landauer-Büttiker approach to quantum transport. This combination, however, suffers from serious drawbacks for devices in the Coulomb blockade regime. We show how to cure the theory through a simple correction in terms of the temperature derivative of the exchange correlation potential. Our results compare well with both rate equations and experimental findings on carbon nanotubes.

  14. Determination of the Kinetic Oxidation Constants of Carbon Materials on the Basis of Analysis of Experiments on Their Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorskii, V. V.; Koval‧skii, M. G.; Olenicheva, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A new approach to the determination of the ablation properties of a heat-shield carbon material on the basis of analysis of the results of an experimental investigation of its ablation in the jet of an electric-arc plant in the nonstationary regime has been formulated. Original data on the kinetic constants of oxidation of carbon by atomic oxygen have been obtained.

  15. Leaf life span plasticity in tropical seedlings grown under contrasting light regimes.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Gregoire

    2006-02-01

    The phenotypic plasticity of leaf life span in response to low resource conditions has a potentially large impact on the plant carbon budget, notably in evergreen species not subject to seasonal leaf shedding, but has rarely been well documented. This study evaluates the plasticity of leaf longevity, in terms of its quantitative importance to the plant carbon balance under limiting light. Seedlings of four tropical tree species with contrasting light requirements (Alstonia scholaris, Hevea brasiliensis, Durio zibethinus and Lansium domesticum) were grown under three light regimes (full sunlight, 45 % sunlight and 12 % sunlight). Their leaf dynamics were monitored over 18 months. All species showed a considerable level of plasticity with regard to leaf life span: over the range of light levels explored, the ratio of the range to the mean value of life span varied from 29 %, for the least plastic species, to 84 %, for the most. The common trend was for leaf life span to increase with decreasing light intensity. The plasticity apparent in leaf life span was similar in magnitude to the plasticity observed in specific leaf area and photosynthetic rate, implying that it has a significant impact on carbon gain efficiency when plants acclimate to different light regimes. In all species, median survival time was negatively correlated with leaf photosynthetic capacity (or its proxy, the nitrogen content per unit area) and leaf emergence rate. Longer leaf life spans under low light are likely to be a consequence of slower ageing as a result of a slower photosynthetic metabolism.

  16. Cloud regimes as phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, Samuel N.; Hottovy, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Clouds are repeatedly identified as a leading source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Of particular importance are stratocumulus clouds, which can appear as either (i) closed cells that reflect solar radiation back to space or (ii) open cells that allow solar radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Here we show that these clouds regimes -- open versus closed cells -- fit the paradigm of a phase transition. In addition, this paradigm characterizes pockets of open cells as the interface between the open- and closed-cell regimes, and it identifies shallow cumulus clouds as a regime of higher variability. This behavior can be understood using an idealized model for the dynamics of atmospheric water as a stochastic diffusion process. With this new conceptual viewpoint, ideas from statistical mechanics could potentially be used for understanding uncertainties related to clouds in the climate system and climate predictions.

  17. Tracing Nitrate Contributions to Streams During Varying Flow Regimes at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Shanley, J. B.; Boyer, E. W.; Ohte, N.; Doctor, D. H.; Kendall, C.

    2003-12-01

    Quantifying sources and transformations of nitrate in headwater catchments is fundamental to understanding the movement of nitrogen to streams. At the Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont (USA), we are using multiple chemical tracer and mixing model approaches to quantify sources and transport of nitrate to streams under varying flow regimes. We sampled streams, lysimeters, and wells at nested locations from the headwaters to the outlet of the 41 ha W-9 watershed under the entire range of flow regimes observed throughout 2002-2003, including baseflow and multiple events (stormflow and snowmelt). Our results suggest that nitrogen sources, and consequently stream nitrate concentrations, are rapidly regenerated during several weeks of baseflow and nitrogen is flushed from the watershed by stormflow events that follow baseflow periods. Both basic chemistry data (anions, cations, & dissolved organic carbon) and isotopic data (nitrate, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved inorganic carbon) indicate that nitrogen source contributions vary depending upon the extent of saturation in the watershed, the initiation of shallow subsurface water inputs, and other hydrological processes. Stream nitrate concentrations typically peak with discharge and are higher on the falling than the rising limb of the hydrograph. Our data also indicate the importance of terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical processes, in addition to hydrological connectivity in controlling how nitrate moves from the terrestrial landscape to streams. Our detailed sampling data from multiple flow regimes are helping to identify and quantify the "hot spots" and "hot moments" of biogeochemical and hydrological processes that control nitrogen fluxes in streams.

  18. Photoelectron circular dichroism in different ionization regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollenhaupt, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) describes an asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) from photoionization of randomly oriented enantiomers with circularly polarized light. Beaulieu et al present a comprehensive set of measured PADs from multiphoton ionization of limonene and fenchone in different ionization regimes (multiphoton and tunneling) and analyze the resulting PECD (Beaulieu et al 2016 New J. Phys. 18 102002). From their observations the authors conclude that the PECD is universal in the sense that the molecular chirality is encoded in the PAD independent of the ionization regime. The analysis is supplemented by a classical model based on electron scattering in a chiral potential. The paper presents beautiful data and is an important step towards a more complete physical picture of PECD. The results and their interpretation stimulate the ongoing vivid debate on the role of resonances in multiphoton PECD.

  19. Flamelet Regime Diagram for Turbulent Combustion Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wai Lee; Ihme, Matthias; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    The flamelet model has been widely used in numerical combustion investigations, particularly for the closure of large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent reacting flows. In most cases, the simulation results demonstrated good agreements with their experimental counterparts. However, a systematic analysis of the flamelet model's applicability, as well as its potential limitations, is seldom conducted, and the model performance is usually based only on a-posteriori comparisons. The objective of this work is to derive a metric that can formally quantify the suitability of the flamelet model in different flame configurations. For this purpose, a flamelet regime diagram has been developed and studied in the context of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a turbulent lifted jet flame. The implementation of the regime diagram in LES has been investigated through explicit filtering of the DNS results.

  20. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological potential (i.e. potential vegetation), and often fail to account for ongoing changes due to stressors such as land use change and climate change and their effects on plant and animal communities. We use Fisher information, an information theory based method, on both terrestrial and aquatic animal data (US Breeding Bird Survey and marine zooplankton) to identify ecological boundaries, and compare our results to traditional early warning indicators, conventional ecoregion maps, and multivariate analysis such as nMDS (non-metric Multidimensional Scaling) and cluster analysis. We successfully detect spatial regimes and transitions in both terrestrial and aquatic systems using Fisher information. Furthermore, Fisher information provided explicit spatial information about community change that is absent from other multivariate approaches. Our results suggest that defining spatial regimes based on animal communities may better reflect ecological reality than do traditional ecoregion maps, especially in our current era of rapid and unpredictable ecological change. Use an information theory based method to identify ecological boundaries and compare our results to traditional early warning

  1. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems | Science Inventory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological potential (i.e. potential vegetation), and often fail to account for ongoing changes due to stressors such as land use change and climate change and their effects on plant and animal communities. We use Fisher information, an information theory based method, on both terrestrial and aquatic animal data (US Breeding Bird Survey and marine zooplankton) to identify ecological boundaries, and compare our results to traditional early warning indicators, conventional ecoregion maps, and multivariate analysis such as nMDS (non-metric Multidimensional Scaling) and cluster analysis. We successfully detect spatial regimes and transitions in both terrestrial and aquatic systems using Fisher information. Furthermore, Fisher information provided explicit spatial information about community change that is absent from other multivariate approaches. Our results suggest that defining spatial regimes based on animal communities may better reflect ecological reality than do traditional ecoregion maps, especially in our current era of rapid and unpredictable ecological change. Use an information theory based method to identify ecological boundaries and compare our results to traditional early warning

  2. Results of the TTF-TCNQ and the calcium carbonate crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1992-01-01

    Experiment A0139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and TTF-TCNQ. Although temperature data was lost, the experimental program had been working since the valves in all containers had been opened. All four experiments produced crystals of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals will be presented. Comparisons will be made with our previous space solution growth experiments. The TTF-TCNQ crystals are no longer of the highest interest, so this activity has been terminated in favor of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate crystallizations.

  3. Modelling Behaviour of a Carbon Epoxy Composite Exposed to Fire: Part II—Comparison with Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Tranchard, Pauline; Samyn, Fabienne; Duquesne, Sophie; Estèbe, Bruno; Bourbigot, Serge

    2017-01-01

    Based on a phenomenological methodology, a three dimensional (3D) thermochemical model was developed to predict the temperature profile, the mass loss and the decomposition front of a carbon-reinforced epoxy composite laminate (T700/M21 composite) exposed to fire conditions. This 3D model takes into account the energy accumulation by the solid material, the anisotropic heat conduction, the thermal decomposition of the material, the gas mass flow into the composite, and the internal pressure. Thermophysical properties defined as temperature dependant properties were characterised using existing as well as innovative methodologies in order to use them as inputs into our physical model. The 3D thermochemical model accurately predicts the measured mass loss and observed decomposition front when the carbon fibre/epoxy composite is directly impacted by a propane flame. In short, the model shows its capability to predict the fire behaviour of a carbon fibre reinforced composite for fire safety engineering. PMID:28772836

  4. Results of the TTF-TCNQ and the calcium carbonate crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1992-01-01

    Experiment A0139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and TTF-TCNQ. Although temperature data was lost, the experimental program had been working since the valves in all containers had been opened. All four experiments produced crystals of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals will be presented. Comparisons will be made with our previous space solution growth experiments. The TTF-TCNQ crystals are no longer of the highest interest, so this activity has been terminated in favor of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate crystallizations.

  5. Modelling Behaviour of a Carbon Epoxy Composite Exposed to Fire: Part II-Comparison with Experimental Results.

    PubMed

    Tranchard, Pauline; Samyn, Fabienne; Duquesne, Sophie; Estèbe, Bruno; Bourbigot, Serge

    2017-04-28

    Based on a phenomenological methodology, a three dimensional (3D) thermochemical model was developed to predict the temperature profile, the mass loss and the decomposition front of a carbon-reinforced epoxy composite laminate (T700/M21 composite) exposed to fire conditions. This 3D model takes into account the energy accumulation by the solid material, the anisotropic heat conduction, the thermal decomposition of the material, the gas mass flow into the composite, and the internal pressure. Thermophysical properties defined as temperature dependant properties were characterised using existing as well as innovative methodologies in order to use them as inputs into our physical model. The 3D thermochemical model accurately predicts the measured mass loss and observed decomposition front when the carbon fibre/epoxy composite is directly impacted by a propane flame. In short, the model shows its capability to predict the fire behaviour of a carbon fibre reinforced composite for fire safety engineering.

  6. Attitudes about Carbon Monoxide Safety in the United States: Results from the 2005 and 2006 HealthStyles Survey

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael E; Damon, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to identify attitudes and behaviors related to carbon monoxide (CO) safety that can be targeted with public health prevention strategies in the U.S. Methods. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention added questions about (1) proper placement of gas-powered generators, (2) maintenance of fuel-burning appliances, and (3) use of CO detectors to the 2005 and 2006 HealthStyles national health marketing surveys. Results. In 2005, 63.3% of HealthStyles respondents agreed with or were uncertain about the incorrect statement, “It is safe to run a generator in a garage as long as the door is open,” while 43.1% agreed with or were uncertain about the incorrect statement, “It is safe to run a generator in the basement.” Most of the 2006 respondents (63.5%) agreed that it is important to have their furnace inspected annually. However, fewer than half of the 2006 respondents (42.0%)—most of whom were homeowners—reported owning a CO detector. Conclusions. A large proportion of adults in the U.S. reported attitudes and behaviors that may place them at increased risk for unintentional, non-fire-related CO poisoning, suggesting that current safety messages may not be reaching much of the public. Prevention messages should continue to promote proper generator placement, maintenance of fuel-burning appliances, and use of CO detectors. Development of a comprehensive national strategy for CO surveillance and communication may help identify populations at increased risk and prevent future poisonings. PMID:21563717

  7. Calcium carbonate, but not sevelamer, is associated with better outcomes in hemodialysis patients: results from the French ARNOS study.

    PubMed

    Jean, Guillaume; Lataillade, Dominique; Genet, Leslie; Legrand, Eric; Kuentz, François; Moreau-Gaudry, Xavier; Fouque, Denis

    2011-10-01

    A favorable survival effect of phosphate binders (PBs) on incident hemodialysis (HD) patients was recently reported, but no definitive advantages of calcium-based or noncalcium-based PBs have been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the prescription of PBs using calcium carbonate (CaCO(3) ) or sevelamer HCl (SV) on survival. Baseline PB prescription was recorded using a cross-sectional analysis of prevalent HD patients from the regional Association Régionale des Néphrologues OStéodystrophie French cohort. A prospective 42-month survival analysis study was performed. In July 2005, 1347 HD patients were included. CaCO(3) , SV, and mixed PBs were prescribed in 55%, 42%, and 24% of cases, respectively, and 26% were not prescribed PBs. Using a Cox proportional model adjusted for several parameters, CaCO(3) use was found to be associated with less mortality (HR, 0.64 [0.4-0.78]), but not in the case of SV use (HR, 1.13 [0.92-1.3]). SV prescription was associated with higher mortality than CaCO(3) (HR, 1.46 [1.1-1.9]). CaCO3, but not sevelamer prescription, is associated with a favorable effect on survival in a French HD population. This novel result can be partly accounted for by the differences in mineral metabolism disorder management that exist between randomized controlled trials and "real life" conditions. © 2011 The Authors; Hemodialysis International © 2011 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  8. Regime shifts driven by dynamic correlations in gene expression noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Yogita; Dutta, Partha Sharathi

    2017-08-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process that leads to regime shifts between alternative steady states among individual living cells, inducing phenotypic variability. The effects of white noise on the regime shift in bistable systems have been well characterized, however little is known about such effects of colored noise (noise with nonzero correlation time). Here, we show that noise correlation time, by considering a genetic circuit of autoactivation, can have a significant effect on the regime shift between distinct phenotypic states in gene expression. We demonstrate this theoretically, using stochastic potential, stationary probability density function, and first-passage time based on the Fokker-Planck description, where the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is used to model colored noise. We find that an increase in noise correlation time in the degradation rate can induce a regime shift from a low to a high protein concentration state and enhance the bistable regime, while an increase in noise correlation time in the basal rate retains the bimodal distribution. We then show how cross-correlated colored noises in basal and degradation rates can induce regime shifts from a low to a high protein concentration state, but reduce the bistable regime. We also validate these results through direct numerical simulations of the stochastic differential equation. In gene expression understanding the causes of regime shift to a harmful phenotype could improve early therapeutic intervention in complex human diseases.

  9. Global regime shift dynamics of catastrophic sea urchin overgrazing

    PubMed Central

    Ling, S. D.; Scheibling, R. E.; Rassweiler, A.; Johnson, C. R.; Shears, N.; Connell, S. D.; Salomon, A. K.; Norderhaug, K. M.; Pérez-Matus, A.; Hernández, J. C.; Clemente, S.; Blamey, L. K.; Hereu, B.; Ballesteros, E.; Sala, E.; Garrabou, J.; Cebrian, E.; Zabala, M.; Fujita, D.; Johnson, L. E.

    2015-01-01

    A pronounced, widespread and persistent regime shift among marine ecosystems is observable on temperate rocky reefs as a result of sea urchin overgrazing. Here, we empirically define regime-shift dynamics for this grazing system which transitions between productive macroalgal beds and impoverished urchin barrens. Catastrophic in nature, urchin overgrazing in a well-studied Australian system demonstrates a discontinuous regime shift, which is of particular management concern as recovery of desirable macroalgal beds requires reducing grazers to well below the initial threshold of overgrazing. Generality of this regime-shift dynamic is explored across 13 rocky reef systems (spanning 11 different regions from both hemispheres) by compiling available survey data (totalling 10 901 quadrats surveyed in situ) plus experimental regime-shift responses (observed during a total of 57 in situ manipulations). The emergent and globally coherent pattern shows urchin grazing to cause a discontinuous ‘catastrophic’ regime shift, with hysteresis effect of approximately one order of magnitude in urchin biomass between critical thresholds of overgrazing and recovery. Different life-history traits appear to create asymmetry in the pace of overgrazing versus recovery. Once shifted, strong feedback mechanisms provide resilience for each alternative state thus defining the catastrophic nature of this regime shift. Importantly, human-derived stressors can act to erode resilience of desirable macroalgal beds while strengthening resilience of urchin barrens, thus exacerbating the risk, spatial extent and irreversibility of an unwanted regime shift for marine ecosystems.

  10. Land degradation and property regimes

    Treesearch

    Paul M. Beaumont; Robert T. Walker

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses the relationship between property regimes and land degradation outcomes, in the context of peasant agriculture. We consider explicitly whether private property provides for superior soil resource conservation, as compared to common property and open access. To assess this we implement optimization algorithms on a supercomputer to address resource...

  11. Towards Extreme Field Physics: Relativistic Optics and Particle Acceleration in the Transparent-Overdense Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel

    2011-10-01

    A steady increase of on-target laser intensity with also increasing pulse contrast is leading to light-matter interactions of extreme laser fields with matter in new physics regimes which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transperent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a0 >10), ultra high contrast laser pulse [1] with a solid density target, turning it transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons. Thus, the interactions becomes volumetric, increasing the energy coupling from laser to plasma, facilitating a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration [3], highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime [4], and the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. Experiments at the LANL 130TW Trident laser facility successfully reached the TOR, and show relativistic pulse shaping beyond the Fourier limit, the acceleration of mono-energetic ~40 MeV electron bunches from solid targets, forward directed coherent relativistic high harmonic generation >1 keV Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) ion acceleration of Carbon to >1 GeV and Protons to >100 MeV. Carbon ions were accelerated with a conversion efficiency of >10% for ions >20 MeV and monoenergetic carbon ions with an energy spread of <20%, have been accelerated at up to ~500 MeV, demonstrating 3 out of 4 for key requirements for ion fast ignition. The shown results now approach or exceed the limits set by many applications from ICF diagnostics over ion fast ignition to medical physics. Furthermore, TOR targets traverse a wide range of HEDP parameter space during the interaction ranging from WDM conditions (e.g. brown dwarfs) to energy densities of ~1011 J/cm3 at peak, then dropping back to the underdense but extremely hot parameter range of gamma-ray bursts. Whereas today this regime can

  12. An Experimental Investigation of Swelling and Elastic Property Changes Resulting from Carbon Dioxide Injection into Prismatic Coal Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlamini, Bongani

    The world currently relies heavily on fossil fuels to meet its energy needs. The demand from a growing population for energy continues to increase and cannot be met solely by renewable sources of energy. As a result of this high dependence on fossil fuels, various methods of reducing emissions are under investigation. Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) has been identified as a potential technique that can be employed to reduce emissions. Unmineable coal seams have been identified as a possible carbon dioxide geologic storage formation. The behavior of coal in response to CO 2 injection is not yet fully understood or well documented. There is a need to understand and quantify the physical changes of coal in response to CO2 injection. These physical changes include properties such as strain (swelling), sonic velocity (compressional and shear velocity), and elastic moduli. Understanding the physical changes undergone by coal during CO2 injection is crucial in evaluating the efficiency and integrity of coal as a potential geologic storage formation. To study and quantify the effect of CO2 injection on adsorption induced strain (swelling) and coal elastic properties, specifically ultrasonic velocity (compressional and shear velocity) and elastic moduli, an experimental approach was followed. Two prismatic coal samples with approximate dimensions of 25cm (9.8 inches) x 17cm (6.7 inches) x 6cm (2.4 inches) were prepared. The coal samples used were from the Lower Sunnyside Coal Seam of the Books Cliffs Coalfields in Utah. A specially designed steel frame was used to contain the samples. Two extreme cases were tested using the samples. For case one, a high (4 MPa) injection pressure and high confining pressure (12 MPa) was used and in case two, both injection pressure and confining pressure were dramatically decreased. The conventional pulse transmission method was used to determine sonic velocities. This method uses transducers to send an ultrasonic wave through the

  13. Vegetation management with fire modifies peatland soil thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee E; Palmer, Sheila M; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Holden, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Vegetation removal with fire can alter the thermal regime of the land surface, leading to significant changes in biogeochemistry (e.g. carbon cycling) and soil hydrology. In the UK, large expanses of carbon-rich upland environments are managed to encourage increased abundance of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) by rotational burning of shrub vegetation. To date, though, there has not been any consideration of whether prescribed vegetation burning on peatlands modifies the thermal regime of the soil mass in the years after fire. In this study thermal regime was monitored across 12 burned peatland soil plots over an 18-month period, with the aim of (i) quantifying thermal dynamics between burned plots of different ages (from <2 to 15 + years post burning), and (ii) developing statistical models to determine the magnitude of thermal change caused by vegetation management. Compared to plots burned 15 + years previously, plots recently burned (<2-4 years) showed higher mean, maximum and range of soil temperatures, and lower minima. Statistical models (generalised least square regression) were developed to predict daily mean and maximum soil temperature in plots burned 15 + years prior to the study. These models were then applied to predict temperatures of plots burned 2, 4 and 7 years previously, with significant deviations from predicted temperatures illustrating the magnitude of burn management effects. Temperatures measured in soil plots burned <2 years previously showed significant statistical disturbances from model predictions, reaching +6.2 °C for daily mean temperatures and +19.6 °C for daily maxima. Soil temperatures in plots burnt 7 years previously were most similar to plots burned 15 + years ago indicating the potential for soil temperatures to recover as vegetation regrows. Our findings that prescribed peatland vegetation burning alters soil thermal regime should provide an impetus for further research to understand the consequences of thermal regime

  14. Changes in mineralogical and leaching properties of converter steel slag resulting from accelerated carbonation at low CO{sub 2} pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zomeren, Andre van; Laan, Sieger R. van der; Kobesen, Hans B.A.; Huijgen, Wouter J.J.; Comans, Rob N.J.

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Accelerated carbonation studied to improve environmental properties of steel slag. > Carbonation found to occur predominantly at surface of the steel slag grains. > Combined geochemical modelling and mineral analysis revealed controlling processes. > Enhanced V-leaching with di-Ca silicate (C2S) dissolution identified as major source. > Identified mineral transformations provide guidance for further quality improvement. - Abstract: Steel slag can be applied as substitute for natural aggregates in construction applications. The material imposes a high pH (typically 12.5) and low redox potential (Eh), which may lead to environmental problems in specific application scenarios. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of accelerated steel slag carbonation, at relatively low pCO{sub 2} pressure (0.2 bar), to improve the environmental pH and the leaching properties of steel slag, with specific focus on the leaching of vanadium. Carbonation experiments are performed in laboratory columns with steel slag under water-saturated and -unsaturated conditions and temperatures between 5 and 90 {sup o}C. Two types of steel slag are tested; free lime containing (K3) slag and K1 slag with a very low free lime content. The fresh and carbonated slag samples are investigated using a combination of leaching experiments, geochemical modelling of leaching mechanisms and microscopic/mineralogical analysis, in order to identify the major processes that control the slag pH and resulting V leaching. The major changes in the amount of sequestered CO{sub 2} and the resulting pH reduction occurred within 24 h, the free lime containing slag (K3-slag) being more prone to carbonation than the slag with lower free lime content (K1-slag). While carbonation at these conditions was found to occur predominantly at the surface of the slag grains, the formation of cracks was observed in carbonated K3 slag, suggesting that free lime in the interior of slag grains had also reacted

  15. Dominant takeover regimes for genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Baskaran, Subbiah

    1995-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a machine-based optimization routine which connects evolutionary learning to natural genetic laws. The present work addresses the problem of obtaining the dominant takeover regimes in the GA dynamics. Estimated GA run times are computed for slow and fast convergence in the limits of high and low fitness ratios. Using Euler's device for obtaining partial sums in closed forms, the result relaxes the previously held requirements for long time limits. Analytical solution reveal that appropriately accelerated regimes can mark the ascendancy of the most fit solution. In virtually all cases, the weak (logarithmic) dependence of convergence time on problem size demonstrates the potential for the GA to solve large N-P complete problems.

  16. 78 FR 55241 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea...) is conducting an administrative review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Scope of the Order The merchandise covered by this Order \\2\\ is certain...

  17. Using a Class to Conduct a Carbon Inventory: A Case Study with Practical Results at Macalester College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Christopher W.; Savanick, Suzanne; Manning, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the practical realities of using a college seminar to fulfill the carbon audit requirement for signatories to the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) and presents evidence of this approach's advantages as an educational and practical tool.…

  18. Re-Evaluation of Results in NUREG/CR-6674 for Carbon and Low-Alloy Steel Components (MRP-76)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Deardorff; D. Harris; D. Dedhia

    2002-11-30

    This report evaluates the conservatisms and uncertainties reported in NUREG/CR-6674 that lead to high probabilities of cracking in carbon and low-alloy steel for reactor piping. The report uses additional data generated since the completion of the report to eliminate uncertainties and show lower probabilities of cracking.

  19. 75 FR 55745 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea... Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce..., Office 3, Import Administration, International Trade Administration, ] U.S. Department of Commerce, Room...

  20. 75 FR 1031 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products from India: Notice of Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Doc No: 2010-128] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration (A-533-820) Certain Hot... hot-rolled carbon steel flat products from India (``Indian Hot-Rolled'') manufactured by Essar Steel... on Indian Hot-Rolled. See Notice of Amended Final Antidumping Duty Determination of Sales at Less...

  1. Using a Class to Conduct a Carbon Inventory: A Case Study with Practical Results at Macalester College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Christopher W.; Savanick, Suzanne; Manning, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the practical realities of using a college seminar to fulfill the carbon audit requirement for signatories to the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) and presents evidence of this approach's advantages as an educational and practical tool.…

  2. 76 FR 62039 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of 2009-2010 Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... referred to as interstitial-free (``IF'')) steels, high-strength low-alloy (``HSLA'') steels, and the... levels of elements such as titanium or niobium (also commonly referred to as columbium), or both, added... of example, are outside or specifically excluded from the scope of the order: Alloy hot-rolled carbon...

  3. The influence of temperature calibration on the OC-EC results from a dual optics thermal carbon analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, J.; Kinsey, J. S.; Hays, M. D.

    2014-04-01

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is a widely used technique that fractionates carbonaceous aerosol particles into organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), or carbonate. Thermal sub-fractions of evolved OC and EC are also used for source identification and apportionment; thus, oven temperature accuracy during TOA analysis is essential. Evidence now indicates that the "actual" sample (filter) temperature and the temperature measured by the built-in oven thermocouple (or set-point temperature) can differ by as much as 50 °C. This difference can affect the OC-EC split point selection and consequently the OC and EC fraction and sub-fraction concentrations being reported, depending on the sample composition and in-use TOA method and instrument. The present study systematically investigates the influence of an oven temperature calibration procedure for TOA. A dual-optical carbon analyzer that simultaneously measures transmission and reflectance (TOT and TOR) is used, functioning under the conditions of both the NIOSH 5040 and IMPROVE protocols. Application of the oven calibration procedure to our dual optics instrument significantly changed NIOSH 5040 carbon fractions (OC and EC) and the IMPROVE OC fraction. In addition, the well-known OC-EC split difference between NIOSH and IMPROVE methods is even further perturbed following the instrument calibration. Further study is needed to determine if the wide-spread application of this oven temperature calibration procedure will indeed improve accuracy and our ability to compare among carbonaceous aerosol studies that use TOA.

  4. Carbon stores, sinks, and sources in forests of northwestern Russia: can we reconcile forest inventories with remote sensing results?

    Treesearch

    Olga N. Krankina; Mark E. Harmon; Warren B. Cohen; Doug R. Oetter; Olga Zyrina; Maureen V. Duane

    2004-01-01

    Forest inventories and remote sensing are the two principal data sources used to estimate carbon (C) stocks and fluxes for large forest regions. National governments have historically relied on forest inventories for assessments but developments in remote sensing technology provide additional opportunities for operational C monitoring. The estimate of total C stock in...

  5. Constructing an interdisciplinary flow regime recommendation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally agreed that river rehabilitation most often relies on restoring a more natural flow regime, but credibly defining the desired regime can be problematic. I combined four distinct methods to develop and refine month-by-month and event-based flow recommendations to protect and partially restore the ecological integrity of the Cache la Poudre River through Fort Collins, Colorado. A statistical hydrologic approach was used to summarize the river's natural flow regime and set provisional monthly flow targets at levels that were historically exceeded 75% of the time. These preliminary monthly targets were supplemented using results from three Poudre-specific disciplinary studies. A substrate maintenance flow model was used to better define the high flows needed to flush accumulated sediment from the river's channel and help sustain the riparian zone in this snowmelt-dominated river. A hydraulic/habitat model and a water temperature model were both used to better define the minimum flows necessary to maintain a thriving cool water fishery. The result is a range of recommended monthly flows and daily flow guidance illustrating the advantage of combining a wide range of available disciplinary information, supplemented by judgment based on ecological principles and a general understanding of river ecosystems, in a highly altered, working river. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  6. Electron dynamics in an elliptical bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Atefeh; Sedaghatizadeh, Mahmoud; Kordbacheh, Amir Hossein Ahmadkhan

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of the electron in an elliptical bubble regime is investigated. In this regime, a high intensity laser pulse in a plasma creates an electron cavity called the blow-out (bubble or cavitation) regime which is usually considered to be in a spherical shape at rest. Through balancing the ponderomotive potential of a non-plane laser pulse and bubble electrostatic potential, the shape of the bubble is analyzed to be elliptical in contrast to most available theories which indicate the spherical bubble. Thus, the present model introduces a different dynamics for the electron compared with the spherical one. The longitudinal electric field experienced by the electron and also the electron energy gain in the elliptical model is investigated to be more than that in the spherical model. Moreover, it is found that the shape of the bubble will influence the electron trapping range so that the electron is bounded more in the spherical bubble. As a result, it is crucially important to take the shape of the bubble influence on the electron acceleration process into account. The results indicate that the distribution of the electromagnetic fields inside the bubble in the ellipse model is more close to particle-in-cell simulation compared to the spherical one [Kostyukov et al., Phys. Plasmas 11(11), 5256 (2004)].

  7. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; Kayler, Zachary E; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-05-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. (13)C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions.

  8. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; E. Kayler, Zachary; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. 13C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions. PMID:26902802

  9. Differentially Rotating White Dwarfs I: Regimes of Internal Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    Most viable models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) require the thermonuclear explosion of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf that has evolved in a binary system. Rotation could be an important aspect of any model for SNe Ia, whether single or double degenerate, with the white dwarf mass at, below, or above the Chandrasekhar limit. Differential rotation is specifically invoked in attempts to account for the apparent excess mass in the super-Chandrasekhar events. Some earlier work has suggested that only uniform rotation is consistent with the expected mechanisms of angular momentum transport in white dwarfs, while others have found pronounced differential rotation. We show that if the baroclinic instability is active in degenerate matter and the effects of magnetic fields are neglected, both nearly uniform rotation and strongly differential rotation are possible. We classify rotation regimes in terms of the Richardson number, Ri. At small values of Ri ≤slant 0.1, we find both the low-viscosity Zahn regime with a nonmonotonic angular velocity profile and a new differential rotation regime for which the viscosity is high and scales linearly with the shear, σ. Employment of Kelvin–Helmholtz viscosity alone yields differential rotation. Large values of Ri ≫ 1 produce a regime of nearly uniform rotation for which the baroclinic viscosity is of intermediate value and scales as {σ }3. We discuss the gap in understanding of the behavior at intermediate values of Ri and how observations may constrain the rotation regimes attained by nature.

  10. Regimes of Internal Rotation in Differentially Rotating White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Ghosh, Pranab

    2017-01-01

    Most viable models of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) require the thermonuclear explosion of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf that has evolved in a binary system. Rotation could be an important aspect of any model for SN Ia, whether single or double degenerate, with the white dwarf mass at, below, or above the Chandrasekhar limit. Differential rotation is specifically invoked in attempts to account for the apparent excess mass in the super--Chandrasekhar events. Some earlier work has suggested that only uniform rotation is consistent with the expected mechanisms of angular momentum transport in white dwarfs, while others have found pronounced differential rotation. We show that if the baroclinic instability is active in degenerate matter and the effects of magnetic fields are neglected, both nearly-uniform and strongly-differential rotation are possible. We classify rotation regimes in terms of the Richardson number, Ri. At small values of Ri < 0.1, we find both the low-viscosity Zahn regime with a non-monotonic angular velocity profile and a new differential rotation regime for which the viscosity is high and scales linearly with the shear, σ. Employment of Kelvin-Helmholtz viscosity alone yields differential rotation. Large values of Ri >> 1 produce a regime of nearly-uniform rotation for which the baroclinic viscosity is of intermediate value and scales as σ3. We discuss the gap in understanding of the behavior at intermediate values of Ri and how observations may constrain the rotation regimes attained by nature.

  11. Anterior cervical corpectomy: review and comparison of results using titanium mesh cages and carbon fibre reinforced polymer cages.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed M R; Alabi, J; Rezajooi, Kia; Casey, Adrian T H

    2010-10-01

    Different types of cages have recently become available for reconstruction following anterior cervical corpectomy. We review the results using titanium mesh cages (TMC) and stackable CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced polymer) cages. Forty-two patients who underwent anterior cervical corpectomy between November 2001 and September 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Pathologies included cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), cervical radiculopathy, OPLL (ossified posterior longitudinal ligament), metastasis/primary bone tumour, rheumatoid arthritis and deformity correction. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically. Outcome was assessed on the basis of the Odom's criteria, neck disability index (NDI) and myelopathy disability index (MDI). Mean age was 60 years and mean follow-up was 1½ years. Majority of the patients had single-level corpectomy. Twenty-three patients had TMC cages while 19 patients had CFRP cages. The mean subsidence noted with TMC cage was 1.91 mm, while with the stackable CFRP cage it was 0.5 mm. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant correlation noted between subsidence and clinical outcome (p > 0.05) or between subsidence and post-operative sagittal alignment (p > 0.05) in either of the groups. Three patients had significant subsidence (> 3 mm), one of whom was symptomatic. There were no hardware-related complications. On the basis of the Odom's criterion, 9 patients (21.4%) had an excellent outcome, 14 patients (33.3%) had a good outcome, 9 patients (21.4%) had a fair outcome and 5 patients (11.9%) had a poor outcome, i.e. symptoms and signs unchanged or exacerbated. Mean post-operative NDI was 26.27% and mean post-operative MDI was 19.31%. Fusion was noted in all 42 cases. Both TMC and stackable CFRP cages provide solid anterior column reconstruction with good outcome following anterior cervical corpectomy. However, more subsidence is noted with TMC cages though

  12. Spatial variation of ultrafine particles and black carbon in two cities: results from a short-term measurement campaign.

    PubMed

    Klompmaker, Jochem O; Montagne, Denise R; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard; Brunekreef, Bert

    2015-03-01

    Recently, short-term monitoring campaigns have been carried out to investigate the spatial variation of air pollutants within cities. Typically, such campaigns are based on short-term measurements at relatively large numbers of locations. It is largely unknown how well these studies capture the spatial variation of long term average concentrations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the within-site temporal and between-site spatial variation of the concentration of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and black carbon (BC) in a short-term monitoring campaign. In Amsterdam and Rotterdam (the Netherlands) measurements of number counts of particles larger than 10nm as a surrogate for UFP and BC were performed at 80 sites per city. Each site was measured in three different seasons of 2013 (winter, spring, summer). Sites were selected from busy urban streets, urban background, regional background and near highways, waterways and green areas, to obtain sufficient spatial contrast. Continuous measurements were performed for 30 min per site between 9 and 16 h to avoid traffic spikes of the rush hour. Concentrations were simultaneously measured at a reference site to correct for temporal variation. We calculated within- and between-site variance components reflecting temporal and spatial variations. Variance ratios were compared with previous campaigns with longer sampling durations per sample (24h to 14 days). The within-site variance was 2.17 and 2.44 times higher than the between-site variance for UFP and BC, respectively. In two previous studies based upon longer sampling duration much smaller variance ratios were found (0.31 and 0.09 for UFP and BC). Correction for temporal variation from a reference site was less effective for the short-term monitoring campaign compared to the campaigns with longer duration. Concentrations of BC and UFP were on average 1.6 and 1.5 times higher at urban street compared to urban background sites. No significant differences between the other

  13. Carbon export fluxes in the Southern Ocean: results from inverse modeling and comparison with satellite-based estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlitzer, Reiner

    The use of dissolved nutrients and carbon for photosynthesis in the euphotic zone and the subsequent downward transport of particulate and dissolved organic material strongly affect carbon concentrations in surface water and thus the air-sea exchange of CO 2. Efforts to quantify the downward carbon flux for the whole ocean or on basin-scales are hampered by the sparseness of direct productivity or flux measurements. Here, a global ocean circulation, biogeochemical model is used to determine rates of export production and vertical carbon fluxes in the Southern Ocean. The model exploits the existing large sets of hydrographic, oxygen, nutrient and carbon data that contain information on the underlying biogeochemical processes. The model is fitted to the data by systematically varying circulation, air-sea fluxes, production, and remineralization rates simultaneously. Use of the adjoint method yields model property simulations that are in very good agreement with measurements. In the model, the total integrated export flux of particulate organic matter necessary for the realistic reproduction of nutrient data is significantly larger than export estimates derived from primary productivity maps. Of the 10,000 TgC yr -1(10 GtC yr -1) required globally, the Southern Ocean south of 30°S contributes about 3000 TgC yr -1 (33%), most of it occurring in a zonal belt along the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and in the Peru, Chile and Namibia coastal upwelling regions. The export flux of POC for the area south of 50°S amounts to 1000±210 TgC yr -1, and the particle flux in 1000 m for the same area is 115±20 TgC yr -1. Unlike for the global ocean, the contribution of the downward flux of dissolved organic carbon is significant in the Southern Ocean in the top 500 m of the water column. Comparison with satellite-based productivity estimates (CZCS and SeaWiFS) shows a relatively good agreement over most of the ocean except for the Southern Ocean south of 50°S, where the model

  14. Dynamical Response of Continuum Regime Langmuir Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, H. L.

    2009-11-01

    Probe dynamic response is sometimes used as a way to increase the amount of information obtained from Langmuir probes [1]. In this poster, the effects of frequency dependent probe capacitance and coupling of probe fields to damped Langmuir waves and damped ion acoustic waves are considered. In the continuum regime, with small Debye length to spherical probe radius ratio, the probe DC current vs. voltage characteristic displays a hard saturation at sufficiently large probe potential [2]. In this regime, the sheath thickness varies little with the applied voltage although the plasma response can still be measured. A goal of the present investigation is to show that the probe dynamical response is richer as a result of modulation of sheath thickness or shielding particularly in the larger Debye length to probe radius ratio regime. Inertia inhibits ion response at sufficiently high frequency and deviation from the DC characteristic is shown.[4pt] [1] D. N. Walker, R.F. Fernsler, D.D. Blackwell, and W.E. Amatucci, Phys. Plasmas 15, 123506 (2008).[0pt] [2] E. Baum and R.L. Chapkis, AIAA J. 8, 1073 (1970).

  15. Ocean Modeling in an Eddying Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Matthew W.; Hasumi, Hiroyasu

    This monograph is the first to survey progress in realistic simulation in a strongly eddying regime made possible by recent increases in computational capability. Its contributors comprise the leading researchers in this important and constantly evolving field. Divided into three parts, • Oceanographic Processes and Regimes: Fundamental Questions • Ocean Dynamics and State: From Regional to Global Scale, and • Modeling at the Mesoscale: State of the Art and Future Directions the volume details important advances in physical oceanography based on eddy resolving ocean modeling. It captures the state of the art and discusses issues that ocean modelers must consider in order to effectively contribute to advancing current knowledge, from subtleties of the underlying fluid dynamical equations to meaningful comparison with oceanographic observations and leading-edge model development. It summarizes many of the important results which have emerged from ocean modeling in an eddying regime, for those interested broadly in the physical science. More technical topics are intended to address the concerns of those actively working in the field.

  16. Utilizing Surface Sensors to Identify Wake Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengying; Hemati, Maziar S.

    2016-11-01

    Marine swimmers often exploit external flow structures to reduce locomotive effort. To achieve this advantage, these swimmers utilize mechanosensory organs on the surface of their bodies to detect hydrodynamic signals from the surrounding fluid, which can then be used to inform the control task. Recently, there has been a growing interest in developing similar flow sensing systems to achieve enhanced propulsive efficiency and maneuverability in human-engineered underwater vehicles. In particular, much attention has been given to the problem of wake sensing; however, these investigations have concentrated on a restricted class of wakes-i.e., Kármán-type vortex streets-whereas more complicated wake structures can arise in practice. In this talk, we will explore the possibility of identifying wake regimes through the use of surface sensors. Potential flow theory is adopted to simulate the interactions of various wakes with a fish-like body. Wakes in different dynamical regimes impart distinct hydrodynamic signatures on the body, which permits these regimes to be distinguished from one another in an automated fashion. Our results can provide guidance for improving flow sensing capabilities in human-engineered systems and hint at how marine swimmers may sense their hydrodynamic surroundings.

  17. Impacts of altered precipitation regimes on soil communities and biogeochemistry in arid and semi-arid ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Uffe N; Ball, Becky A

    2015-04-01

    Altered precipitation patterns resulting from climate change will have particularly significant consequences in water-limited ecosystems, such as arid to semi-arid ecosystems, where discontinuous inputs of water control biological processes. Given that these ecosystems cover more than a third of Earth's terrestrial surface, it is important to understand how they respond to such alterations. Altered water availability may impact both aboveground and belowground communities and the interactions between these, with potential impacts on ecosystem functioning; however, most studies to date have focused exclusively on vegetation responses to altered precipitation regimes. To synthesize our understanding of potential climate change impacts on dryland ecosystems, we present here a review of current literature that reports the effects of precipitation events and altered precipitation regimes on belowground biota and biogeochemical cycling. Increased precipitation generally increases microbial biomass and fungal:bacterial ratio. Few studies report responses to reduced precipitation but the effects likely counter those of increased precipitation. Altered precipitation regimes have also been found to alter microbial community composition but broader generalizations are difficult to make. Changes in event size and frequency influences invertebrate activity and density with cascading impacts on the soil food web, which will likely impact carbon and nutrient pools. The long-term implications for biogeochemical cycling are inconclusive but several studies suggest that increased aridity may cause decoupling of carbon and nutrient cycling. We propose a new conceptual framework that incorporates hierarchical biotic responses to individual precipitation events more explicitly, including moderation of microbial activity and biomass by invertebrate grazing, and use this framework to make some predictions on impacts of altered precipitation regimes in terms of event size and frequency as

  18. Demystifying optimal dynamic treatment regimes.

    PubMed

    Moodie, Erica E M; Richardson, Thomas S; Stephens, David A

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic regime is a function that takes treatment and covariate history and baseline covariates as inputs and returns a decision to be made. Murphy (2003, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B 65, 331-366) and Robins (2004, Proceedings of the Second Seattle Symposium on Biostatistics, 189-326) have proposed models and developed semiparametric methods for making inference about the optimal regime in a multi-interval trial that provide clear advantages over traditional parametric approaches. We show that Murphy's model is a special case of Robins's and that the methods are closely related but not equivalent. Interesting features of the methods are highlighted using the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and through simulation.

  19. River flow regimes and vegetation dynamics along a river transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulatyari, Behnam; Basso, Stefano; Schirmer, Mario; Botter, Gianluca

    2014-11-01

    Ecohydrological processes occurring within fluvial landscapes are strongly affected by natural streamflow variability. In this work the patterns of vegetation biomass in two rivers characterized by contrasting flow regimes were investigated by means of a comprehensive stochastic model which explicitly couples catchment-scale hydroclimatic processes, morphologic attributes of the river transect and in-stream bio-ecological features. The hydrologic forcing is characterized by the probability distribution (pdf) of streamflows and stages resulting from stochastic precipitation dynamics, rainfall-runoff transformation and reach scale morphologic attributes. The model proved able to reproduce the observed pdf of river flows and stages, as well as the pattern of exposure/inundation along the river transect in both regimes. Our results suggest that in persistent regimes characterized by reduced streamflow variability, mean vegetation biomass is chiefly controlled by the pattern of groundwater availability along the transect, leading to a marked transition between aquatic and terrestrial environments. Conversely, erratic regimes ensure wider aquatic-terrestrial zones in which optimal elevation ranges for species with different sensitivity to flooding and access to groundwater are separated. Patterns of mean biomass in erratic regimes were found to be more sensitive to changes in the underlying hydroclimatic conditions, notwithstanding the reduced responsiveness of the corresponding flow regimes. The framework developed highlights the important role played by streamflow regimes in shaping riverine environments, and may eventually contribute to identifying the influence of landscape, climate and morphologic features on in-stream ecological dynamics.

  20. The influence of temperature calibration on the OC-EC results from a dual-optics thermal carbon analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, J.; Kinsey, J. S.; Hays, M. D.

    2014-09-01

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is a widely used technique that fractionates carbonaceous aerosol particles into organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), or carbonate. Thermal sub-fractions of evolved OC and EC are also used for source identification and apportionment; thus, oven temperature accuracy during TOA analysis is essential. Evidence now indicates that the "actual" sample (filter) temperature and the temperature measured by the built-in oven thermocouple (or set-point temperature) can differ by as much as 50 °C. This difference can affect the OC-EC split point selection and consequently the OC and EC fraction and sub-fraction concentrations being reported, depending on the sample composition and in-use TOA method and instrument. The present study systematically investigates the influence of an oven temperature calibration procedure for TOA. A dual-optical carbon analyzer that simultaneously measures transmission and reflectance (TOT and TOR) is used, functioning under the conditions of both the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Method 5040 (NIOSH) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) protocols. The application of the oven calibration procedure to our dual-optics instrument significantly changed NIOSH 5040 carbon fractions (OC and EC) and the IMPROVE OC fraction. In addition, the well-known OC-EC split difference between NIOSH and IMPROVE methods is even further perturbed following the instrument calibration. Further study is needed to determine if the widespread application of this oven temperature calibration procedure will indeed improve accuracy and our ability to compare among carbonaceous aerosol studies that use TOA.

  1. Results of the TTF-TCNQ- and the calcium carbonate-crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1991-01-01

    Experiment AO139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit for five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and tetra thiafulvalene- tetra cyanoquino methane (TTF-TCNQ). The LDEF was in excellent condition after the long orbital stay, and although the temperature data was lost, the experiment program had been working since the valves in all containers were opened. All four experiments produced crystals; however, they were of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X-ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on the long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals are presented, and pictures of the calcium carbonate are shown. Comparisons are made with previous space solution growth experiments on the European Spacelab Mission and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

  2. Results of the TTF-TCNQ- and the calcium carbonate-crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1991-01-01

    Experiment AO139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit for five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and tetra thiafulvalene- tetra cyanoquino methane (TTF-TCNQ). The LDEF was in excellent condition after the long orbital stay, and although the temperature data was lost, the experiment program had been working since the valves in all containers were opened. All four experiments produced crystals; however, they were of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X-ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on the long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals are presented, and pictures of the calcium carbonate are shown. Comparisons are made with previous space solution growth experiments on the European Spacelab Mission and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

  3. Measurement of contemporary and fossil carbon contents of PM2.5 aerosols: results from Turtleback Dome, Yosemite National Park.

    PubMed

    Bench, Graham

    2004-04-15

    The impact of aerosol particulate matter of mean mass aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm (PM2.5 aerosols) on health, visibility, and compliance with the U.S. EPA's regional haze regulations is a growing concern. Techniques that can help better characterize particulate matter are required to better understand the constituents, causes, and sources of PM2.5 aerosols. Measurement of the 14C/C ratio of the PM2.5 aerosols, the absence of 14C in fossil carbon materials, and the known 14C/C levels in contemporary carbon materials allow the use of a two-component model to derive contemporary and fossil carbon contents of the particulate matter. Such data can be used to estimate the relative contributions of fossil fuels and biogenic aerosols to the total aerosol loading. Here, the methodology for performing such an assessment using total suspended particulate hi-vol aerosol samplers to collect PM2.5 aerosols on quartz fiber filters and the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry to measure 14C/C ratios is presented and illustrated using PM2.5 aerosols collected at Yosemite National Park.

  4. Measurement of contemporary and fossil carbon contents of PM 2.5 aerosols: results from Turtleback Dome, Yosemite National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G

    2003-10-17

    The impact of aerosol particulate matter of mean mass aerodynamic diameter {le} 2.5 {proportional_to}m (PM 2.5 aerosols), on health, visibility, and compliance with EPA's regional haze regulations is a growing concern. Techniques that can help better characterize particulate matter are required to better understand the constituents, causes and sources of PM 2.5 aerosols. Measurement of the {sup 14}C/C ratio of the PM 2.5 aerosols, the absence of {sup 14}C in fossil carbon materials and the known {sup 14}C/C levels in contemporary carbon materials allow