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Sample records for carbon soil distribution

  1. Soil organic carbon distribution in roadside soils of Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhadip; Scharenbroch, Bryant C; Ow, Lai Fern

    2016-12-01

    Soil is the largest pool of organic carbon in terrestrial systems and plays a key role in carbon cycle. Global population living in urban areas are increasing substantially; however, the effects of urbanization on soil carbon storage and distribution are largely unknown. Here, we characterized the soil organic carbon (SOC) in roadside soils across the city-state of Singapore. We tested three hypotheses that SOC contents (concentration and density) in Singapore would be positively related to aboveground tree biomass, soil microbial biomass and land-use patterns. Overall mean SOC concentrations and densities (0-100 cm) of Singapore's roadside soils were 29 g kg(-1) (4-106 g kg(-1)) and 11 kg m(-2) (1.1-42.5 kg m(-2)) with median values of 26 g kg(-1) and 10 kg m(-2), respectively. There was significantly higher concentration of organic carbon (10.3 g kg(-1)) in the top 0-30 cm soil depth compared to the deeper (30-50 cm, and 50-100 cm) soil depths. Singapore's roadside soils represent 4% of Singapore's land, but store 2.9 million Mg C (estimated range of 0.3-11 million Mg C). This amount of SOC is equivalent to 25% of annual anthropogenic C emissions in Singapore. Soil organic C contents in Singapore's soils were not related to aboveground vegetation or soil microbial biomass, whereas land-use patterns to best explain variance in SOC in Singapore's roadside soils. We found SOC in Singapore's roadside soils to be inversely related to urbanization. We conclude that high SOC in Singapore roadside soils are probably due to management, such as specifications of high quality top-soil, high use of irrigation and fertilization and also due to an optimal climate promoting rapid growth and biological activity.

  2. Distribution of calcium carbonate in desert soils: A model

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L.; McFadden, L.D.; Harden, J.W.

    1988-04-01

    A model that describes the distribution of calcium carbonate in desert soils as a function of dust flux, time, climate, and other soil-forming factors shows which factors most strongly influence the accumulation of carbonate and can be used to evaluate carbonate-based soil age estimates or paleoclimatic reconstructions. Models for late Holocene soils have produced carbonate distributions that are very similar to those of well-dated soils in New Mexico and southern California. These results suggest that (1) present climate is a fair representation of late Holocene climate, (2) carbonate dust flux can be approximated by its Holocene rate, and (3) changes in climate and/or dust flux at the end of the Pleistocene effected profound and complex changes in soil carbonate distributions. Both higher carbonate dust flux and greater effective precipitation are required during the latest Pleistocene-early Holocene to explain carbonate distributions in latest Pleistocene soils. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. processes controlling the depth distribution of soil organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brian; Wilson, Brian; Koen, Terry

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the processes controlling the depth distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) has two major purposes: A. Providing insights into the dynamics of SOC) that can be used for managing soil organic carbon and improving soil carbon sequestration B. The prediction of SOC stocks from surface measurements of soil carbon. We investigated the depth distributions of SOC in a range of soils under a number of land management practices tested how various mathematical models fitted these distributions. The mathematical models included exponential, power functions, inverse functions and multiphase exponential functions. While spline functions have been shown to fit depth distributions of SOC, the use of these functions is largely a data fitting exercise and does not necessarily provide insight into the processes of SOC dynamics. In general soils that were depleted of SOC (under traditional tillage and land management practices that deplete the soil of SOC) had depth distributions that were fitted closely by a number of mathematical functions, including the exponential function. As the amount of SOC in the soil increased, especially in the surface soils, it became clear that the only mathematical function that could reasonably fit the depth distribution of SOC was the multiphase exponential model. To test the mathematical models further, several of the depth distributions were tested with semi-log plots of depth v log (SOC). These plots clearly showed that there were definite phases in the distribution of SOC with depth. The implication is that different processes are occurring in the addition and losses of SOC within each of these phases, and the phases identified by the semi-log plots appear to be equivalent to the zones of SOC cycling postulated by Eyles et al. (2015). The identification of these zones has implications for the management and sequestration of carbon in soils. Eyles, A, Coghlan, G, Hardie, M, Hovenden, M and Bridle, K (2015). Soil carbon sequestration

  4. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stocks in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. P.; Wattenbach, M.; Smith, P.; Meersmans, J.; Jolivet, C.; Boulonne, L.; Arrouays, D.

    2010-11-01

    Soil organic carbon plays a major role in the global carbon budget, and can act as a source or a sink of atmospheric carbon, whereby it can influence the course of climate change. Changes in soil organic soil stocks (SOCS) are now taken into account in international negotiations regarding climate change. Consequently, developing sampling schemes and models for estimating the spatial distribution of SOCS is a priority. The French soil monitoring network has been established on a 16 km × 16 km grid and the first sampling campaign has recently been completed, providing circa 2200 measurements of stocks of soil organic carbon, obtained through an in situ composite sampling, uniformly distributed over the French territory. We calibrated a boosted regression tree model on the observed stocks, modelling SOCS as a function of other variables such as climatic parameters, vegetation net primary productivity, soil properties and land use. The calibrated model was evaluated through cross-validation and eventually used for estimating SOCS for the whole of metropolitan France. Two other models were calibrated on forest and agricultural soils separately, in order to assess more precisely the influence of pedo-climatic variables on soil organic carbon for such soils. The boosted regression tree model showed good predictive ability, and enabled quantification of relationships between SOCS and pedo-climatic variables (plus their interactions) over the French territory. These relationship strongly depended on the land use, and more specifically differed between forest soils and cultivated soil. The total estimate of SOCS in France was 3.260 ± 0.872 PgC for the first 30 cm. It was compared to another estimate, based on the previously published European soil organic carbon and bulk density maps, of 5.303 PgC. We demonstrate that the present estimate might better represent the actual SOCS distributions of France, and consequently that the previously published approach at the European

  5. Thermokarst terrain: pan-Arctic distribution and soil carbon vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olefeldt, D.; Goswami, S.; Grosse, G.; Hayes, D. J.; Hugelius, G.; Kuhry, P.; McGuire, A. D.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Sannel, B.; Schuur, E.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Development of thermokarst landforms through the thawing of ice-rich permafrost soils is expected to accelerate in the northern hemisphere due to ongoing climate change. This can damage infrastructure but also drastically impact landscape soil carbon storage and greenhouse gas emissions. Here we present a first circumpolar assessment of the spatial extent and distribution of thermokarst terrain, defined as landscapes where thermokarst landforms either have developed or potentially can develop. We differentiate between wetland, lake and hillslope thermokarst terrain types, and assess regional coverage of each type using geographical information of landscape characteristics, including ground ice content, soil type, topography, biome, and permafrost zone. Each thermokarst terrain type is estimated to occupy 5 to 8% of the northern boreal and tundra permafrost region, but otherwise differ markedly in their spatial distribution and projected exposure to climate change. With high soil organic carbon content, thermokarst terrain is estimated to store a disproportionate 30% of the total permafrost region soil organic carbon stock in the upper 3 meters of soil, and potentially more than half when accounting for deeper carbon stores. This first-order estimate of the distribution of northern thermokarst terrain is an essential step for assessing soil carbon vulnerability to thaw and the magnitude of the permafrost carbon feedback.

  6. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stocks in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. P.; Wattenbach, M.; Smith, P.; Meersmans, J.; Jolivet, C.; Boulonne, L.; Arrouays, D.

    2011-05-01

    Soil organic carbon plays a major role in the global carbon budget, and can act as a source or a sink of atmospheric carbon, thereby possibly influencing the course of climate change. Changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks are now taken into account in international negotiations regarding climate change. Consequently, developing sampling schemes and models for estimating the spatial distribution of SOC stocks is a priority. The French soil monitoring network has been established on a 16 km × 16 km grid and the first sampling campaign has recently been completed, providing around 2200 measurements of stocks of soil organic carbon, obtained through an in situ composite sampling, uniformly distributed over the French territory. We calibrated a boosted regression tree model on the observed stocks, modelling SOC stocks as a function of other variables such as climatic parameters, vegetation net primary productivity, soil properties and land use. The calibrated model was evaluated through cross-validation and eventually used for estimating SOC stocks for mainland France. Two other models were calibrated on forest and agricultural soils separately, in order to assess more precisely the influence of pedo-climatic variables on SOC for such soils. The boosted regression tree model showed good predictive ability, and enabled quantification of relationships between SOC stocks and pedo-climatic variables (plus their interactions) over the French territory. These relationships strongly depended on the land use, and more specifically, differed between forest soils and cultivated soil. The total estimate of SOC stocks in France was 3.260 ± 0.872 PgC for the first 30 cm. It was compared to another estimate, based on the previously published European soil organic carbon and bulk density maps, of 5.303 PgC. We demonstrate that the present estimate might better represent the actual SOC stock distributions of France, and consequently that the previously published approach at the

  7. Distribution of soil organic carbon in the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, Norman B.; Waltman, Sharon W.; West, Larry T.; Neale, Anne; Mehaffey, Megan; Hartemink, Alfred E.; McSweeney, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) database provides detailed soil mapping for most of the conterminous United States (CONUS). These data have been used to formulate estimates of soil carbon stocks, and have been useful for environmental models, including plant productivity models, hydrologic models, and ecological models for studies of greenhouse gas exchange. The data were compiled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) from 1:24,000-scale or 1:12,000-scale maps. It was found that the total soil organic carbon stock in CONUS to 1 m depth is 57 Pg C and for the total profile is 73 Pg C, as estimated from SSURGO with data gaps filled from the 1:250,000-scale Digital General Soil Map. We explore the non-linear distribution of soil carbon on the landscape and with depth in the soil, and the implications for sampling strategies that result from the observed soil carbon variability.

  8. Atypical soil carbon distribution across a tropical steepland forest catena

    Treesearch

    Kristofer D. Johnson; F.N. Scatena; Whendee L. Silver

    2011-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) in a humid subtropical forest in Puerto Rico is higher at ridge locations compared to valleys, and therefore opposite to what is commonly observed in other forested hillslope catenas. To better understand the spatial distribution of SOC in this system, plots previously characterized by topographic position, vegetation type and stand age were...

  9. [Vertical distribution of soil active carbon and soil organic carbon storage under different forest types in the Qinling Mountains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Geng, Zeng-Chao; She, Diao; He, Wen-Xiang; Hou, Lin

    2014-06-01

    Adopting field investigation and indoor analysis methods, the distribution patterns of soil active carbon and soil carbon storage in the soil profiles of Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata (Matoutan Forest, I), Pinus tabuliformis (II), Pinus armandii (III), pine-oak mixed forest (IV), Picea asperata (V), and Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata (Xinjiashan Forest, VI) of Qinling Mountains were studied in August 2013. The results showed that soil organic carbon (SOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and easily oxidizable carbon (EOC) decreased with the increase of soil depth along the different forest soil profiles. The SOC and DOC contents of different depths along the soil profiles of P. asperata and pine-oak mixed forest were higher than in the other studied forest soils, and the order of the mean SOC and DOC along the different soil profiles was V > IV > I > II > III > VI. The contents of soil MBC of the different forest soil profiles were 71.25-710.05 mg x kg(-1), with a content sequence of I > V > N > III > II > VI. The content of EOC along the whole soil profile of pine-oak mixed forest had a largest decline, and the order of the mean EOC was IV > V> I > II > III > VI. The sequence of soil organic carbon storage of the 0-60 cm soil layer was V > I >IV > III > VI > II. The MBC, DOC and EOC contents of the different forest soils were significanty correlated to each other. There was significant positive correlation among soil active carbon and TOC, TN. Meanwhile, there was no significant correlation between soil active carbon and other soil basic physicochemical properties.

  10. [Reserves and spatial distribution characteristics of soil organic carbon in Guangdong Province].

    PubMed

    Gan, Haihua; Wu, Shunhui; Fan, Xiudan

    2003-09-01

    Soil organic carbon is the main part of terrestrial carbon reservoir and important part of soil fertility. The spatial distribution and reserves of soil organic carbon are very important for studying soil carbon cycle. According to the data from the second soil survey, soil organic carbon reserves was estimated and its spatial distribution was analysed by using GIS technique. The results showed that the total amount of soil organic carbon is about 17.52 x 10(8) t. The carbon density of laterite, lateritic red soil and red soil in Guangdong Province is 8.83, 10.31, 9.15 kg.m-2, respectively; lower than the mean carbon density of China. The carbon density of yellow soil and rice soil is 12.08, 12.17 kg.m-2, respectively; higher than the mean carbon density of China. Soil carbon density is about 10.44 kg.m-2 in Guangdong. The spatial distribution characteristic of soil organic carbon density in Guangdong is that the carbon density in south Guangdong Province is higher than that in north Guangdong Province, in that soil organic carbon density in north and middle Guangdong Province is 5-10 kg.m-2 and in east Guangdong Province is 10-15 kg.m-2. Soil organic carbon density mostly vary among 5-15 kg.m-2.

  11. Soil carbon distribution in Alaska in relation to soil-forming factors

    Treesearch

    Kristofer D. Johnson; Jennifer Harden; A. David McGuire; Norman B. Bliss; James G. Bockheim; Mark Clark; Teresa Nettleton-Hollingsworth; M. Torre Jorgenson; Evan S. Kane; Michelle Mack; Johathan ODonnell; Chien-Lu Ping; Edward A.G. Schuur; Merritt R. Turetsky; David W. Valentine

    2011-01-01

    The direction and magnitude of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes in response to climate change remain unclear and depend on the spatial distribution of SOC across landscapes. Uncertainties regarding the fate of SOC are greater in high-latitude systems where data are sparse and the soils are affected by sub-zero temperatures. To address these issues in Alaska, a first-...

  12. [Distribution of soil organic carbon in surface soil along a precipitation gradient in loess hilly area].

    PubMed

    Sun, Long; Zhang, Guang-hui; Luan, Li-li; Li, Zhen-wei; Geng, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Along the 368-591 mm precipitation gradient, 7 survey sites, i.e. a total 63 investigated plots were selected. At each sites, woodland, grassland, and cropland with similar restoration age were selected to investigate soil organic carbon distribution in surface soil (0-30 cm), and the influence of factors, e.g. climate, soil depth, and land uses, on soil organic carbon distribution were analyzed. The result showed that, along the precipitation gradient, the grassland (8.70 g . kg-1) > woodland (7.88 g . kg-1) > farmland (7.73 g . kg-1) in concentration and the grassland (20.28 kg . m-2) > farmland (19.34 kg . m-2) > woodland (17.14 kg . m-2) in density. The differences of soil organic carbon concentration of three land uses were not significant. Further analysis of pooled data of three land uses showed that the surface soil organic carbon concentration differed significantly at different precipitation levels (P<0.00 1). Significant positive relationship was detected between mean annual precipitation and soil organic carbon concentration (r=0.838, P<0.001) in the of pooled data. From south to north (start from northernmost Ordos), i.e. along the 368-591 mm precipitation gradient, the soil organic carbon increased with annual precipitation 0. 04 g . kg-1 . mm-1, density 0.08 kg . m-2 . mm-1. The soil organic carbon distribution was predicted with mean annual precipitation, soil clay content, plant litter in woodland, and root density in farmland.

  13. The Impact of Buried Horizons and Deep Soil Pedogenesis on Soil Carbon Content and Vertical Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. N.; Dietzen, C.; Harrison, R. B.; Gross, C.; Kirpach, A.

    2015-12-01

    The lower boundary of soil has been a point of contention among soil scientists for decades. Recent evidence suggests that soil is much deeper than is measured by many ecological studies and that arbitrary definitions of maximum soil depth unnecessarily exclude important regions of the soil profile. This paper provides illustrated examples of soil profiles that have important deep soil characteristics or buried horizons. Soil pits were excavated with a backhoe to at least 2.5 m depth at 35 sites throughout the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) ecoregion of the Pacific Northwest. These soils cover four orders - Andisol, Inceptisol, Alfisol, and Ultisol - and highlight the hidden diversity of subsoil characteristics throughout the region. The roots of trees and understory species often extended deep into the C horizons of soil. Despite experiencing less pedogenic development than surface horizons, C horizons are important as the frontier of soil formation, as an important resource for plant growth, and as a repository of diffuse but significant carbon storage. On average, there was 188.1 Mg C ha-1 total across all 35 sites, of which 76.3 Mg ha-1 (40.5%) was found below 0.5 m and 44.4 Mg ha-1 (23.6%) was found below 1 m. There was substantial variability in the vertical distribution of C with as little as 8.0% and as much as 58.0% of total C below 1 m. In some cases, B horizons are far deeper than the 1 or 2 m depth arbitrarily assumed to represent the whole soil. In other cases, subsoil hides buried profiles that can significantly impact total soil carbon stocks as well as aboveground plant growth. These buried horizons are important repositories of nutrients and carbon that are poorly understood and rarely sampled. Ignoring subsoil precludes incorporating soil burial or deep soil processes into biogeochemical and global carbon cycle models, and limits mechanistic understanding of carbon sequestration and mobilization in soil.

  14. [Effects of gaps on distribution of soil aggregates and organic carbon in Pinus massoniana plantation].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Dan-Ju; Zhang, Jian; Li, Jian-Ping; Deng, Chang-Chun; Deng, Chao

    2014-11-01

    The effects of forest gap size on the distribution of soil aggregates, organic carbon and labile organic carbon were investigated in a 39-year-old Pinus massoniana plantation in Yibin, Sichuan Province. The results showed that the composition of soil aggregates was dominated by particles > 2 mm, which accounted for 51.7%-78.7% of the whole soil samples under different sized forest gaps and beneath P. massoniana plantation. Soil organic carbon content and labile organic carbon content in > 5 mm aggregates were significantly positively correlated with the soil organic carbon and labile organic carbon contents. Furthermore, the amounts of organic carbon and labile organic carbon storage > 5 mm particles were higher than those in other size particles. Therefore, particles > 5 mm of aggregates dominated the soil carbon pool. Compared with those P. massoniana plantations, the contents of organic carbon in aggregates and total topsoil decreased during the formation of forest gaps, whereas the soil organic carbon storage under 1225 m2 gap was higher. In addition, the soil labile organic carbon content under 225 and 400 m2 gaps and the labile organic carbon storage under 225, 400, 900 and 1225 m2 gaps were higher than those the plantations, but were lower than under the other gaps. It was suggested that an appropriate size of forest gap would increase the accumulation of soil organic carbon and labile organic carbon content. The size of forest gap had significant effects on the distribution of soil aggregates, organic carbon and labile organic carbon. The soil sample under 1225 m2 gap had the highest organic carbon content and storage and a better aggregate proportion, and the higher labile organic carbon storage. Therefore, it was suggested that 1225 m2 gap might be an optimal logging gap size.

  15. Topographic Controls on Soil Carbon Distribution in Iowa Croplands, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, Greg; Li, Xia

    2017-04-01

    Topography is a key factor affecting soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution (erosion or deposition) because it influences several hydrological indices including soil moisture dynamics, runoff velocity and acceleration, and flow divergence and convergence. In this study, we examined the relationship between 15 topographic metrics derived from Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) data and SOC redistribution in agricultural fields. We adopted the fallout 137Cesium (137Cs) technique to estimate SOC redistribution rates across 560 sampling plots in Iowa. Then, using stepwise ordinarily least square regression (SOLSR) and stepwise principle component analysis (SPCA), topography-based SOC models were developed to simulate spatial patterns of SOC content and redistribution. Results suggested that erosion and deposition of topsoil SOC were regulated by topography with SOC gain in lowland areas and SOC loss in sloping areas. Topographic wetness index (TWI) and slope were the most influential variables controlling SOC content and redistribution. The topography-based models exhibited good performances in simulating SOC content and redistribution across two crop sites with intensive samplings. SPCA models had slightly lower coefficients of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency values compared to SOLSR models at the field scale. However, significantly SPCA outperformed SOLAR in predicting SOC redistribution patterns at the watershed scale. Results of this study suggest that the topography-based SPCA model was more robust for scaling up models to the watershed scale because SPCA models may better represent the landscapes and are less subject to over fitting. This work suggests an improved method to sample and characterize landscapes for better prediction of soil property distribution.

  16. The spatial distribution of soil organic carbon in tidal wetland soils of the continental United States.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Audra L; Feagin, Rusty A; Eriksson, Marian; Najjar, Raymond G; Herrmann, Maria; Bianchi, Thomas S; Kemp, Michael; Hutchings, Jack A; Crooks, Steve; Boutton, Thomas

    2017-08-17

    Tidal wetlands contain large reservoirs of carbon in their soils and can sequester carbon dioxide (CO2 ) at a greater rate per unit area than nearly any other ecosystem. The spatial distribution of this carbon influences climate and wetland policy. To assist with international accords such as the Paris Climate Agreement, national-level assessments such as the United States (U.S.) National Greenhouse Gas Inventory, and regional, state, local, and project-level evaluation of CO2 sequestration credits, we developed a geodatabase (CoBluCarb) and high-resolution maps of soil organic carbon (SOC) distribution by linking National Wetlands Inventory data with the U.S. Soil Survey Geographic Database. For over 600,000 wetlands, the total carbon stock and organic carbon density was calculated at 5-cm vertical resolution from 0 to 300 cm of depth. Across the continental United States, there are 1,153-1,359 Tg of SOC in the upper 0-100 cm of soils across a total of 24 945.9 km(2) of tidal wetland area, twice as much carbon as the most recent national estimate. Approximately 75% of this carbon was found in estuarine emergent wetlands with freshwater tidal wetlands holding about 19%. The greatest pool of SOC was found within the Atchafalaya/Vermilion Bay complex in Louisiana, containing about 10% of the U.S. total. The average density across all tidal wetlands was 0.071 g cm(-3) across 0-15 cm, 0.055 g cm(-3) across 0-100 cm, and 0.040 g cm(-3) at the 100 cm depth. There is inherent variability between and within individual wetlands; however, we conclude that it is possible to use standardized values at a range of 0-100 cm of the soil profile, to provide first-order quantification and to evaluate future changes in carbon stocks in response to environmental perturbations. This Tier 2-oriented carbon stock assessment provides a scientific method that can be copied by other nations in support of international requirements. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Soil carbon distribution in Alaska in relation to soil-forming factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.D.; Harden, J.; McGuire, A.D.; Bliss, N.B.; Bockheim, James G.; Clark, M.R.; Nettleton-Hollingsworth, T.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Kane, E.S.; Mack, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Ping, C.-L.; Schuur, E.A.G.; Turetsky, M.R.; Valentine, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    The direction and magnitude of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes in response to climate change remain unclear and depend on the spatial distribution of SOC across landscapes. Uncertainties regarding the fate of SOC are greater in high-latitude systems where data are sparse and the soils are affected by sub-zero temperatures. To address these issues in Alaska, a first-order assessment of data gaps and spatial distributions of SOC was conducted from a recently compiled soil carbon database. Temperature and landform type were the dominant controls on SOC distribution for selected ecoregions. Mean SOC pools (to a depth of 1-m) varied by three, seven and ten-fold across ecoregion, landform, and ecosystem types, respectively. Climate interactions with landform type and SOC were greatest in the uplands. For upland SOC there was a six-fold non-linear increase in SOC with latitude (i.e., temperature) where SOC was lowest in the Intermontane Boreal compared to the Arctic Tundra and Coastal Rainforest. Additionally, in upland systems mineral SOC pools decreased as climate became more continental, suggesting that the lower productivity, higher decomposition rates and fire activity, common in continental climates, interacted to reduce mineral SOC. For lowland systems, in contrast, these interactions and their impacts on SOC were muted or absent making SOC in these environments more comparable across latitudes. Thus, the magnitudes of SOC change across temperature gradients were non-uniform and depended on landform type. Additional factors that appeared to be related to SOC distribution within ecoregions included stand age, aspect, and permafrost presence or absence in black spruce stands. Overall, these results indicate the influence of major interactions between temperature-controlled decomposition and topography on SOC in high-latitude systems. However, there remains a need for more SOC data from wetlands and boreal-region permafrost soils, especially at depths > 1 m in

  18. Determining organic carbon distributions in soil particle size fractions as a precondition of lateral carbon transport modeling at large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Seher, Wiebke; Pfeffer, Eduard; Schultze, Nico; Amorim, Ricardo S. S.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The erosional transport of organic carbon has an effect on the global carbon budget, however, it is uncertain, whether erosion is a sink or a source for carbon in the atmosphere. Continuous erosion leads to a massive loss of top soils including the loss of organic carbon historically accumulated in the soil humus fraction. The colluvial organic carbon could be protected from further degradation depending on the depth of the colluvial cover and local decomposing conditions. Another part of eroded soils and organic carbon will enter surface water bodies and might be transported over long distances. The selective nature of soil erosion results in a preferential transport of fine particles while less carbonic larger particles remain on site. Consequently organic carbon is enriched in the eroded sediment compared to the origin soil. As a precondition of process based lateral carbon flux modeling, carbon distribution on soil particle size fractions has to be known. In this regard the present study refers to the determination of organic carbon contents on soil particle size separates by a combined sieve-sedimentation method for different tropical and temperate soils Our results suggest high influences of parent material and climatic conditions on carbon distribution on soil particle separates. By applying these results in erosion modeling a test slope was simulated with the EROSION 2D simulation software covering certain land use and soil management scenarios referring to different rainfall events. These simulations allow first insights on carbon loss and depletion on sediment delivery areas as well as carbon gains and enrichments on deposition areas on the landscape scale and could be used as a step forward in landscape scaled carbon redistribution modeling.

  19. Clay minerals, metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides and soil organic carbon distribution within soil aggregates in temperate forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartzia-Bengoetxea, Nahia; Fernández-Ugalde, Oihane; Virto, Iñigo; Arias-González, Ander

    2017-04-01

    Soil mineralogy is of primary importance for key environmental services provided by soils like carbon sequestration. However, current knowledge on the effects of clay mineralogy on soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization is based on limited and conflicting data. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clay minerals, metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides and SOC distribution within soil aggregates in mature Pinus radiata D.Don forest plantations. Nine forest stands located in the same geographical area of the Basque Country (North of Spain) were selected. These stands were planted on different parent material (3 on each of the following: sandstone, basalt and trachyte). There were no significant differences in climate and forest management among them. Moreover, soils under these plantations presented similar content of clay particles. We determined bulk SOC storage, clay mineralogy, the content of Fe-Si-Al-oxides and oxyhydroxides and the distribution of organic C in different soil aggregate sizes at different soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-20 cm). The relationship between SOC and abiotic factors was investigated using a factor analysis (PCA) followed by stepwise regression analysis. Soils developed on sandstone showed significantly lower concentration of SOC (29 g C kg-1) than soils developed on basalts (97 g C kg-1) and trachytes (119 g C kg-1). The soils on sandstone presented a mixed clay mineralogy dominated by illite, with lesser amounts of hydroxivermiculite, hydrobiotite and kaolinite, and a total absence of interstratified chlorite/vermiculite. In contrast, the major crystalline clay mineral identified in the soils developed on volcanic rocks was interstratified chlorite/vermiculite. Nevertheless, no major differences were observed between basaltic and trachytic soils in the clay mineralogy. The selective extraction of Fe showed that the oxalate extractable iron was significantly lower in soils on sandstone (3.7%) than on basalts (11.2%) and

  20. Soil type-depending effect of paddy management: Organic carbon distribution and stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kölbl, Angelika; Drechsler, Susanne; Wissing, Livia; Schad, Peter; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Cao, Zhihong; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2013-04-01

    Paddy soils may originate from many different types of soil but are highly modified by human activities. These soils are mostly managed under submerged conditions, a management which is assumed to favour carbon sequestration. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the impact of paddy management on soil organic carbon distributions and stocks in major soil types that are typically used for rice cultivation in Asia. Fluvisol and Acrisol sites (sub-tropical monsoon climate, PR China) as well as Andosol, Vertisol and Ferralsol sites (tropical climate of Java, Indonesia) were compared, as they represent a large range of soil properties to be expected in Asian paddy fields. Paddy rice at all of these sites is cultivated under flooded conditions followed by an upland crop. To evaluate the impact of paddy management, paddy soils as well as adjacent agricultural soils which are not used for paddy rice production (non-paddy soils) were chosen. At each site, three soil profiles of paddy and non-paddy soils were sampled horizontally. All samples were analysed for bulk density and organic carbon (OC) concentrations, and the corresponding OC stocks were calculated. Paddy soils derived from Fluvisols and Acrisols(PR China) showed clearly higher OC concentrations in the topsoils, leading to higher cumulative OC stocks in paddy soils compared to the respective non-paddy soils. However, other soil types did not show the expected higher OC sequestration under paddy management. For example, paddy soils derived from Ferralsols and Vertisols of Java are characterised by very similar OC concentrations and OC stocks as compared to their respective non-paddy soils. Also paddy and non-paddy soils derived from Andosols (Java) showed similar OC concentrations and depth distributions; only the slightly higher bulk density values under paddy management lead to slightly higher OC stocks in these soils. As clearly shown by our results, we cannot necessarily assume that rice production

  1. Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) distribution in two differents soil types (Podzol and Andosol) under natural forest cover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Romero, Marta; Papa, Stefania; Verstraeten, Arne; Cools, Nathalie; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Coppola, Elio

    2017-04-01

    Andosols are young soils that shall know a successive evolution towards pedological types where the dominant pedogenetic processes are more evident. Vegetation and climate influence Andosols evolution to other order of soils. In cold and wet climates or on acid vulcanite under heavy leaching young Andosols could change into Podzols (Van Breemn and Buurman, 1998). Were investigated a Podzol soil (World References Base, 2014) at Zoniën (Belgium), were and an Andosol soil (World References Base, 2014) at Lago Laceno (Avellino, Italy). This study shows the data on the SOC (Soil Organic Carbon) fractionation in two profiles from two natural pine forest soils. Together with the conventional activities of sampling and analysis of soil profile were examined surveys meant to fractionation and characterization of SOC, in particular: Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Total Extractable Carbon (TEC) soil contents were determined by Italian official method of soil analysis (Mi.P.A.F. (2000)). Different soil C fractions were also determined: Humic Acid Carbon (HAC), Fulvic Acid Carbon (FAC), Not Humic Carbon (NHC) and Humin Carbon (Huc) fractions were obtained by difference. In the whole profile, therefore, were also assayed cellulose and lignin contents. The aim of this work was to compare the distribution of different soil organic components in a podzol and a soil with andic properties. The data show great similarity, among the selected profiles, in the organic components distribution estudied. References: - Mi.P.A.F. - Ministero per le Politiche Agricole e Forestali - Osservatorio Nazionale Pedologico e per la Qualità del Suolo (2000): Metodi Ufficiali di Analisi Chimica del Suolo. In: Franco Angeli (Editor), Collana di metodi analitici per l'agricoltura diretta da Paolo Sequi, n. 1124.2, Milano, Italy. - Van Breemn N. and Buurman P. (1998) Chapter 12 Formation of Andisols. In: Soil formation. Kluwer Ed., Wageningen, The Netherlands, 271-289. -Ussiri D.A.N., Johnson C

  2. A deeper look at the relationship between root carbon pools and the vertical distribution of the soil carbon pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzel, Ranae; Liebman, Matt; Archontoulis, Sotirios

    2017-08-01

    Plant root material makes a substantial contribution to the soil organic carbon (C) pool, but this contribution is disproportionate below 20 cm where 30 % of root mass and 50 % of soil organic C is found. Root carbon inputs changed drastically when native perennial plant systems were shifted to cultivated annual plant systems. We used the reconstruction of a native prairie and a continuous maize field to examine both the relationship between root carbon and soil carbon and the fundamental rooting system differences between the vegetation under which the soils developed versus the vegetation under which the soils continue to change. In all treatments we found that root C : N ratios increased with depth, and this plays a role in why an unexpectedly large proportion of soil organic C is found below 20 cm. Measured root C : N ratios and turnover times along with modeled root turnover dynamics showed that in the historical shift from prairie to maize, a large, structural-tissue-dominated root C pool with slow turnover concentrated at shallow depths was replaced by a small, nonstructural-tissue-dominated root C pool with fast turnover evenly distributed in the soil profile. These differences in rooting systems suggest that while prairie roots contribute more C to the soil than maize at shallow depths, maize may contribute more C to soil C stocks than prairies at deeper depths.

  3. [Profile distribution of soil aggregates organic carbon in primary forests in Karst cluster-peak depression region].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-Xiao; Song, Tong-Qing; Peng, Wan-Xia; Zeng, Fu-Ping; Wang, Ke-Lin; Xu, Yun-Lei; Yu, Zi; Liu, Yan

    2012-05-01

    Soil profiles were collected from three primary forests (Itoa orientalis, Platycladus orientalis, and Radermachera sinica) in Karst cluster-peak depression region to study the composition of soil aggregates, their organic carbon contents, and the profile distribution of the organic carbon. In the three forests, >2 mm soil aggregates were dominant, occupying about 76% of the total. The content of soil total organic carbon ranged from 12.73 to 68.66 g x kg(-1), with a significant difference among the forests. The organic carbon content in <1 mm soil aggregates was slightly higher than that in >2 mm soil aggregates, but most of soil organic carbon was stored in the soil aggregates with greater particle sizes. About 70% of soil organic carbon came from >2 mm soil aggregates. There was a significant positive relationship between the contents of 2-5 and 5-8 mm soil aggregates and the content of soil organic carbon. To increase the contents of 2-8 mm soil aggregates could effectively improve the soil carbon sequestration in Karst region. In Itoa orientalis forest, 2-8 mm soil aggregates accounted for 46% of the total, and the content of soil total organic carbon reached to 37.62 g x kg(-1), which implied that Itoa orientalis could be the suitable tree species for the ecological restoration in Karst region.

  4. Soil Aggregates and Organic Carbon Distribution in Red Soils after Long-term Fertilization with Different Fertilizer Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Red soils, a typical Udic Ferrosols, widespread throughout the subtropical and tropical region in southern China, support the majority of grain production in this region. The red soil is naturally low in pH values, cation exchange capacity, fertility, and compaction, resulting in low organic matter contents and soil aggregation. Application of chemical fertilizers and a combination of organic-chemical fertilizers are two basic approaches to improve soil structure and organic matter contents. We studied the soil aggregation and the distribution of aggregate-associated organic carbon in red soils with a long-term fertilization experiment during 1988-2009. We established treatments including 1) NPK and NK in the chemical fertilizer plots, 2) CK (Control), and 3) CK+ Peanut Straw (PS), CK+ Rice Straw (RS), CK+ Fresh Radish (FR), and CK + Pig Manure (PM) in the organic-chemical fertilizer plots. Soil samples were fractionated into 6 different sized aggregate particles through the dry-wet sieving method according to the hierarchical model of aggregation. Organic carbon in the aggregate/size classes was analyzed. The results showed that the distribution of mechanically stable aggregates in red soils after long-term fertilization decreased with the size, from > 5mm, 5 ~ 2 mm, 2 ~ 1 mm, 1~ 0.25 mm, to < 0.25 mm, but the distribution of water-stable aggregates did not follow this pattern. Compared with the chemical fertilizer application alone, the addition of pig manure and green manure can significantly improve the distribution of aggregates in the 5-2 mm, 2-1 mm and 1-0.25 mm classes. The organic carbon (OC) contents in red soils were all increased after the long-term fertilization. Compared with Treatment NK, soil OC in Treatment NPK was increased by 45.4%. Compared with Treatment CK (low chemical fertilizer), organic fertilizer addition increased soil OC. The OC in the different particle of water-stable aggregates were all significantly increased after long

  5. Organic carbon distribution, speciation, and elementalcorrelations within soil microaggregates: applications of STXM and NEXAFSspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2007-03-15

    Soils contain the largest inventory of organic carbon on the Earth's surface. Therefore, it is important to understand how soil organic carbon (SOC) is distributed in soils. This study directly measured SOC distributions within soil microaggregates and its associations with major soil elements from three soil groups (Phaeozem, Cambisol, and Ultisol), using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at a spatial resolution of 30 nm. Unlike previous studies, small intact soil microaggregates were examined directly in order to avoid preparatory procedures that might alter C speciation. We found that SOC exists as distinct particles (tens to hundreds of nm) and as ubiquitous thin coatings on clay minerals and iron-oxides coatings. The distinct SOC particles have higher fractions of aromatic C than the coatings. NEXAFS spectra of the C coatings within individual microaggregates were relatively similar. In the Phaeozem soil, the pervasive spectral features were those of phenolic and carboxylic C, while in the Cambisol soil the most common spectral feature was the carboxyl peak. The Ultisol soil displayed a diffuse distribution of aromatic, phenolic, and carboxylic C peaks over all surfaces. In general, a wide range of C functional groups coexist within individual microaggregates. In this work we were able to, for the first time, directly quantify the major mineral elemental (Si, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Ti) compositions simultaneously with C distribution and speciation at the nm to {mu}m scale. These direct microscale measurements will help improve understanding on SOC-mineral associations in soil environments.

  6. [Distribution characteristics of soil organic carbon and its composition in Suaeda salsa wetland in the Yellow River delta].

    PubMed

    Dong, Hong-Fang; Yu, Jun-Bao; Guan, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Applying the method of physical fractionation, distribution characteristics of soil organic carbon and its composition in Suaeda salsa wetland in the Yellow River delta were studied. The results showed that the heavy fraction organic carbon was the dominant component of soil organic carbon in the studied region. There was a significantly positive relationship between the content of heavy fraction organic carbon, particulate organic carbon and total soil organic carbon. The ranges of soil light fraction organic carbon ratio and content were 0.008% - 0.15% and 0.10-0.40 g x kg(-1), respectively, and the range of particulate organic carbon ratio was 8.83% - 30.58%, indicating that the non-protection component of soil organic carbon was low and the carbon pool was relatively stable in Suaeda salsa wetland of the Yellow River delta.

  7. Biophysical controls over concentration and depth distribution of soil organic carbon and nitrogen in desert playas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Owen P.; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2016-12-01

    Playa wetlands are important areas of soil organic carbon and nutrient storage in drylands. We conducted this study to assess how catchment biophysical variables control soil organic carbon and nitrogen in playas and how playas function differently than upland ecosystems. We found that playa organic carbon and nitrogen corresponded primarily with catchment vegetation cover and secondarily with catchment area, slope, and soil texture. The effect of increased organic matter production associated with high catchment vegetation cover overshadowed the potential effect of reduced run-on. We also found soil carbon and nitrogen profiles to be significantly shallower in playas than uplands. This trend is correlated with evidence of sedimentation and shallow-rooted plants in playas. Upland soils had a deeper carbon and nitrogen profile, which correlated with organic matter being generated by deeply rooted vegetation. In playas, C:N ratios remained constant through depth but in uplands, C:N ratios increased through depth. We found evidence that differences in rooting depth distributions and soil texture may explain these C:N variations between uplands and playas. In uplands, clay concentration increased with depth, whereas in playas, clay concentration did not change with depth, which highlighted the important role of sedimentation in these ecosystems. Our results suggest that small changes in playa catchment vegetation cover in response to climate change or grazing intensity would greatly impact playa soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. This effect would be due to the playa soils dependence on allochthonous organic matter and the large upland area that drains into playas.

  8. A Molecular Investigation of Soil Organic Carbon Composition, Variability, and Spatial Distribution Across an Alpine Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, H. T.; Lawrence, C. R.; Winnick, M.; Druhan, J. L.; Williams, K. H.; Maher, K.; Rainaldi, G. R.; McCormick, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    The cycling of carbon through soils is one of the least understood aspects of the global carbon cycle and represents a key uncertainty in the prediction of land-surface response to global warming. Thus, there is an urgent need for advanced characterization of soil organic carbon (SOC) to develop and evaluate a new generation of soil carbon models. We hypothesize that shifts in SOC composition and spatial distribution as a function of soil depth can be used to constrain rates of transformation between the litter layer and the deeper subsoil (extending to a depth of approximately 1 m). To evaluate the composition and distribution of SOC, we collected soil samples from East River, a shale-dominated watershed near Crested Butte, CO, and characterized relative changes in SOC species as a function of depth using elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk C X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our results show that total organic carbon (TOC) decreases with depth, and high total inorganic carbon (TIC) content was found in deeper soils (after 75 cm), a characteristic of the bedrock (shale). The distribution of aliphatic C relative to the parent material generally decreases with depth and that polysaccharide can be a substantial component of SOC at various depths. On the other hand, the relative distribution of aromatic C, traditionally viewed as recalcitrant, only makes up a very small part of SOC regardless of depth. These observations confirm that molecular structure is not the only determinant of SOC turnover rate. To study other contributors to SOC decomposition, we studied changes in the spatial correlation of SOC and minerals using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). We found that aromatics mostly locate on the surface of small soil aggregates (1-10 μm). Polysaccharides and proteins, both viewed as labile traditionally, are more evenly distributed over the interior of the

  9. Impact of land use on soil organic carbon distribution in toposequences of the Central Rif, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesrar, Haytam; Sadiki, Abdelhamid; Faleh, Ali; Quijano, Laura; Gaspar, Leticia; Navas, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Mediterranean mountain agroecosystems are sensitive areas to soil degradation mainly due to erodible soils, occasional heavy rainfalls and anthropogenic activities that have transformed large surfaces of natural forest into croplands. In the mountains of the central Rif (Morocco) the anthropogenic pressure by intensive agriculture on steep slopes and grazing practices is causing large impacts on soils. In the region soil losses have further indirect impact on water resources due to siltation of water bodies from canals, small check dams to large reservoirs. Besides the loss of the upper rich organic soil horizons containing the largest amounts of organic matter is causing decreases in soil fertility and losses in crop productivity. Soil erosion affects the spatial variability of soil nutrients of which soil organic carbon (SOC) is one of the most important because is directly linked to soil quality and soil functions. The artificially emitted 137Cs has been found to effectively trace soil redistribution because of its associated movement with fine soil particles including the organic matter. To assess the contents of SOC under different land uses a set of transects were set up in the Sahla catchment that holds a reservoir and is representative of the Rif mountain agroecosystems. Along the transects soil sampling was done to collect soil cores extending until a depth of 25 cm that were sectioned at 5cm depth intervals. The SOC content (%) was measured by the oxidation method in the < 2mm fraction of the interval subsamples. The lateral and vertical variations of SOC contents were examined in combination with the 137Cs profiles to gain information on the nutrient content in the soils under the most characteristic land uses existing in the catchment. In general the SOC contents are low but the mean contents in the croplands are much lower than in the uncultivated lands that present the highest variations in the SOC percentages. In croplands the depth distribution of

  10. Carbon amendment and soil depth affect the distribution and abundance of denitrifiers in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M; Khalil, M I; Jahangir, M M R; Lee, C; Cardenas, L M; Collins, G; Richards, K G; O'Flaherty, V

    2016-04-01

    The nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) and nitrous oxide reductase-encoding (nosZ) genes of denitrifying populations present in an agricultural grassland soil were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Samples from three separate pedological depths at the chosen site were investigated: horizon A (0-10 cm), horizon B (45-55 cm), and horizon C (120-130 cm). The effect of carbon addition (treatment 1, control; treatment 2, glucose-C; treatment 3, dissolved organic carbon (DOC)) on denitrifier gene abundance and N2O and N2 fluxes was determined. In general, denitrifier abundance correlated well with flux measurements; nirS was positively correlated with N2O, and nosZ was positively correlated with N2 (P < 0.03). Denitrifier gene copy concentrations per gram of soil (GCC) varied in response to carbon type amendment (P < 0.01). Denitrifier GCCs were high (ca. 10(7)) and the bac:nirK, bac:nirS, bac:nir (T) , and bac:nosZ ratios were low (ca. 10(-1)/10) in horizon A in all three respective treatments. Glucose-C amendment favored partial denitrification, resulting in higher nir abundance and higher N2O fluxes compared to the control. DOC amendment, by contrast, resulted in relatively higher nosZ abundance and N2 emissions, thus favoring complete denitrification. We also noted soil depth directly affected bacterial, archaeal, and denitrifier abundance, possibly due to changes in soil carbon availability with depth.

  11. Global assessment of soil organic carbon stocks and spatial distribution of histosols: the Machine Learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengl, Tomislav

    2016-04-01

    Preliminary results of predicting distribution of soil organic soils (Histosols) and soil organic carbon stock (in tonnes per ha) using global compilations of soil profiles (about 150,000 points) and covariates at 250 m spatial resolution (about 150 covariates; mainly MODIS seasonal land products, SRTM DEM derivatives, climatic images, lithological and land cover and landform maps) are presented. We focus on using a data-driven approach i.e. Machine Learning techniques that often require no knowledge about the distribution of the target variable or knowledge about the possible relationships. Other advantages of using machine learning are (DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0125814): All rules required to produce outputs are formalized. The whole procedure is documented (the statistical model and associated computer script), enabling reproducible research. Predicted surfaces can make use of various information sources and can be optimized relative to all available quantitative point and covariate data. There is more flexibility in terms of the spatial extent, resolution and support of requested maps. Automated mapping is also more cost-effective: once the system is operational, maintenance and production of updates are an order of magnitude faster and cheaper. Consequently, prediction maps can be updated and improved at shorter and shorter time intervals. Some disadvantages of automated soil mapping based on Machine Learning are: Models are data-driven and any serious blunders or artifacts in the input data can propagate to order-of-magnitude larger errors than in the case of expert-based systems. Fitting machine learning models is at the order of magnitude computationally more demanding. Computing effort can be even tens of thousands higher than if e.g. linear geostatistics is used. Many machine learning models are fairly complex often abstract and any interpretation of such models is not trivial and require special multidimensional / multivariable plotting and data mining

  12. Soil carbonates and soil water

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The presence of soil carbonates occurring as solidified masses or dispersed particles can alter soil water dynamics from what would be expected based on non-carbonate soil properties. Carbonate minerals in the soil can be derived from high carbonate parent material, additions in the form of carbonat...

  13. [Spatial distribution characteristics of organic carbon in the soil-plant systems in the Yellow River estuary tidal flat wetland].

    PubMed

    Dong, Hong-Fang; Yu, Jun-Bao; Sun, Zhi-Gao; Mu, Xiao-Jie; Chen, Xiao-Bing; Mao, Pei-Li; Wu, Chun-Fa; Guan, Bo

    2010-06-01

    Well-understand the organic carbon status in the Yellow River delta is the most important for studying the biogeochemical processes of the muddy-sandy coastal wetland and ecological restoration. The spatial distribution characteristics and its impact factors of organic carbon in the plant-soil systems of new-born tidal flat wetland in the Yellow River estuary were studied. The results showed that the difference of plant organic carbon content in different plant communities were not obvious, however significant difference of the plant organic carbon density was observed. Moreover, the M-shaped spatial distribution of the plant organic carbon density, which was similar to the plant biomass, was found in the study. The organic carbon contents in top soils were varied from 0.75 to 8.35 g x kg(-1), which was much lower than that in the typical freshwater marsh wetlands ecosystem. The spatial distribution trend of soil organic carbon density was similar to the soil organic carbon. The correlation analysis showed that soil organic carbon density was negatively correlated with pH, and positively correlated with TN, C/N and salinity. However, the correlations of plant organic carbon density with the soil organic carbon density, TN, C/N, pH and salinity were not significant.

  14. Soil Organic Carbon distribution in three contrasting olive orchards in Southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguas, Encarnación V.; Burguet, María; Guzmán, Gema; Pedrera-Parrila, Aura; Vanderlinden, Karl; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Pérez, Rafael; Ayuso, José L.; Gómez, José A.

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) shows a considerable spatial variability at the field, farm or catchment scales. This complicates its use as an indicator for soil quality, and is an important drawback for the efficient evaluation of carbon sequestration schemes, or for the certification of carbon sequestration potential of agricultural soils at these scales. This is especially significant for olive orchards in Mediterranean environments. We hypothesize that the typical row crop configuration of olive orchards, with cover crops or bare soil in the inter-row areas,can explain a vast proportion of this variability. In addition agricultural activities and topography-driven erosion processes at different scales contribute to SOC variability. Given the complexity of this problem and the important experimental effort required to address it, there are to our knowledgefew studies that have addressed this issue, specifically in agriculturalsoils under Mediterranean conditions. We present an analysis of SOC data obtained during 2011 and 2012 at three small (6-8 ha) catchmentsin Southern Spain, with contrasting soils (Vertisol, Luvisol and Cambisol) and covered by olive groves with different managements (conventional tillage, minimum tillage with mulch and non tillage with spontaneous grass cover). Soil organic carbon is analysed across tree rows, inter-row areas, and for different depths. The spatial SOC distribution is evaluated against the topography of the catchments and the intensity of the water erosion processes. The differences among the catchments are discussed and guidelines are provided for further exploring the sources of SOC variability and to improve SOC estimation at the field scale.

  15. The Global Turnover Time Distribution of Soil Carbon Derived from a Meta-analysis of Radiocarbon Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Allison, S. D.; Torn, M. S.; Harden, J. W.; Smith, L. J.; van der Voort, T.; Trumbore, S.

    2015-12-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial carbon reservoir and may influence the sign and magnitude of carbon cycle feedbacks under climate change. Soil carbon turnover times provide information about the sensitivity of carbon pools to changes in inputs and warming. The spatial and vertical distribution of soil carbon turnover times emerges from the interplay between climate, vegetation, and soil properties. Radiocarbon levels of soil organic matter can be used to estimate soil carbon turnover using models that take into account radioactive decay over centuries to millennia and inputs of 14C from atmospheric weapons testing ("bomb carbon") during the second half of the 20th century. By synthesizing more than 200 soil radiocarbon profiles from all major biomes and soil orders, we 1) explored the major controlling factors for soil carbon turnover times of surface and deeper soil layers; 2) developed predictive models (tree-based regression, support vector regression and linear regression models) of ∆14C that depends on depth, climate, vegetation, and soil types; and 3) extrapolated the predictive model to produce the first global distribution of soil carbon turnover times to the depth of 1m. Preliminary results indicated that climate and depth were primary controls of the vertical distribution of ∆14C, contributing to about 70% of the variability in our model. Vegetation and soil order exerted similar level of controls (about 15% each). The predictive model performed reasonably well with an R2 of 0.81 and RMSE (root-mean-squared error) of about 50‰ for topsoil and 100‰ for subsoil, as estimated using cross-validation. Extrapolation of the predictive model to the globe in combination with existing soil carbon information (e.g., Harmonized World Soil Database) indicated that more than half of the global total soil carbon in the top 1m had a turnover time of less than 500 years. Subsoils (30-100cm) had millennium-scale turnover times, with the majority (70%) turning over

  16. Vertical Soil Carbon Distributions in the Contiguous United States: Effects of Land Cover and History of Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulman, B. N.; Nave, L. E.; Treat, C. C.; He, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain the largest pool of carbon in most terrestrial ecosystems. The vertical distribution of these large carbon pools contains important information about the factors affecting soil formation and soil organic matter preservation. In addition, the depth distribution of organic matter is associated with its stability and resilience to climatic and ecological changes. We fit the vertical distribution soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration using an exponential model in order to calculate empirical parameters Z*, representing the characteristic vertical scale of the decline in SOC concentration with depth, and Csurf, representing the approximate SOC concentration in the uppermost layer of mineral soil. A higher value of Z* indicates a longer vertical scale, and therefore a slower decline with depth. This calculation was applied to a set of over 28,000 soil profiles in the coterminous United States. Limiting the analysis to fits with an r2>0.9 yielded more than 15,000 estimates of Z* and Csurf from soil profiles representing a variety of different ecosystems. We used this large dataset to test hypotheses related to the impacts of soil type, ecosystem type, and land use history on soil carbon stocks and vertical distributions. SOC concentration near the surface and its rate of decline with depth were both strongly dependent on land use, with cultivated soils having the lowest Csurf and highest Z* and forest soils having the highest Csurf and lowest Z*. These effects were more pronounced in forest soil orders (alfisols and spodosols) than in prairie soil orders (mollisols). Cultivation lowered SOC concentrations throughout the soil profile, and these effects were visible in currently forested ecosystems with a history of cultivation, indicating that the effects were persistent after reforestation. These results will be useful for both assessing land use effects on soil carbon stocks and evaluating ecosystem

  17. Watershed Scale Stable Isotope Distribution and Implications on Soil Organic Carbon Loss Monitoring under Hydrologic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, I.; Karim, A.; Boutton, T. W.; Strom, K.; Fox, J.

    2013-12-01

    The thematic focus of this 3-year period multidisciplinary USDA-CBG collaborative applied research is integrated monitoring of soil organic carbon (SOC) loss from multi-use lands using state-of-the-art stable isotope science under uncertain hydrologic influences. In this study, SOC loss and water runoff are being monitored on a 150 square kilometer watershed in Houston, Texas, using natural rainfall events, and total organic carbon/nitrogen concentration (TOC/TN) and stable isotope ratio (δ13C, δ15N) measurements with different land-use types. The work presents the interdisciplinary research results to uncover statistically valid and scientifically sound ways to monitor SOC loss by (i) application of Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo statistical models to assess the relationship between rainfall-runoff and SOC release during soil erosion in space and time, (ii) capturing the episodic nature of rainfall events and its role in the spatial distribution of SOC loss from water erosion, (iii) stable isotope composition guided fingerprinting (source and quantity) of SOC by considering various types of erosion processes common in a heterogeneous watershed, to be able to tell what percentage of SOC is lost from various land-use types (Fox and Papanicolaou, 2008), (iv) creating an integrated watershed scale statistical soil loss monitoring model driven by spatial and temporal correlation of flow and stable isotope composition (Ahmed et. al., 2013a,b), and (v) creation of an integrated decision support system (DSS) for sustainable management of SOC under hydrologic uncertainty to assist the end users. References: Ahmed, I., Karim, A., Boutton, T.W., and Strom, K.B. (2013a). 'Monitoring Soil Organic Carbon Loss from Erosion Using Stable Isotopes.' Proc., Soil Carbon Sequestration, International Conference, May 26-29, Reykjavik, Iceland. Ahmed, I, Bouttom, T.W., Strom, K. B., Karim, A., and Irvin-Smith, N. (2013b). 'Soil carbon distribution and loss monitoring in the

  18. Black carbon in soils and sediments: Analysis, distribution, implications, and current challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Noack, Angela G.

    2000-09-01

    This review highlights the ubiquity of black carbon (BC) produced by incomplete combustion of plant material and fossil fuels in peats, soils, and lacustrine and marine sediments. We examine various definitions and analytical approaches and seek to provide a common language. BC represents a continuum from partly charred material to graphite and soot particles, with no general agreement on clear-cut boundaries. Formation of BC can occur in two fundamentally different ways. Volatiles recondense to highly graphitized soot-BC, whereas the solid residues form char-BC. Both forms of BC are relatively inert and are distributed globally by water and wind via fluvial and atmospheric transport. We summarize, chronologically, the ubiquity of BC in soils and sediments since Devonian times, differentiating between BC from vegetation fires and from fossil fuel combustion. BC has important implications for various biological, geochemical and environmental processes. As examples, BC may represent a significant sink in the global carbon cycle, affect the Earth's radiative heat balance, be a useful tracer for Earth's fire history, build up a significant fraction of carbon buried in soils and sediments, and carry organic pollutants. On land, BC seems to be abundant in dark-colored soils, affected by frequent vegetation burning and fossil fuel combustion, thus probably contributing to the highly stable aromatic components of soil organic matter. We discuss challenges for future research. Despite the great importance of BC, only limited progress has been made in calibrating analytical techniques. Progress in the quantification of BC is likely to come from systematic intercomparison using BCs from different sources and in different natural matrices. BC identification could benefit from isotopic and spectroscopic techniques applied at the bulk and molecular levels. The key to estimating BC stocks in soils and sediments is an understanding of the processes involved in BC degradation on a

  19. [Profile distribution and storage of soil organic carbon in a black soil as affected by land use types].

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiang-xiang; Han, Xiao-zeng; Li, Lu-jun; Zou, Wen-xiu; Lu, Xin-chun; Qiao, Yun-fa

    2015-04-01

    Taking soils in a long-term experimental field over 29 years with different land uses types, including arable land, bare land, grassland and larch forest land as test materials, the distribution and storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the profile (0-200 cm) in typical black soil (Mollisol) region of China were investigated. The results showed that the most significant differences in SOC content occurred in the 0-10 cm surface soil layer among all soils with the order of grassland > arable land > larch forest land > bare land. SOC contents at 10-120 cm depth were lower in arable land as compared with the other land use types. Compared with arable land, grassland could improve SOC content obviously. SOC content down to a depth of 60 cm in grassland was significantly higher than that in arable land. The content of SOC at 0-10 cm in bare land was significantly lower than that in arable land. Although there were no significant differences in SOC content at 0-20 cm depth between larch forestland and arable land, the SOC contents at 20-140 cm depth were generally higher in larch forestland than that in arable land. In general, SOC content showed a significantly negative relationship with soil pH, bulk density, silt and clay content and an even stronger significantly positive relationship with soil total N content and sand content. The SOC storage in arable land at 0-200 cm depth was significantly lower than that in the other three land use types, which was 13.6%, 11.4% and 10.9% lower than in grassland, bare land and larch forest land, respectively. Therefore, the arable land of black soil has a great potential for sequestering C in soil and improving environmental quality.

  20. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stock in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaolu; Xia, Mingpeng; Pérez-Cruzado, César; Guan, Fengying; Fan, Shaohui

    2017-02-01

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla (Carr.) Mitford cv. Pubescens) is an important timber substitute in China. Site specific stand management requires an accurate estimate of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock for maintaining stand productivity and understanding global carbon cycling. This study compared ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW) approaches to study the spatial distribution of SOC stock within 0-60 cm using 111 soil samples in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China. Similar spatial patterns but different spatial distribution ranges of SOC stock from OK and IDW highlighted the necessity to apply different approaches to obtain accurate and consistent results of SOC stock distribution. Different spatial patterns of SOC stock suggested the use of different fertilization treatments in Moso bamboo forests across the study area. SOC pool within 0-60 cm was 6.46 and 6.22 Tg for OK and IDW; results which were lower than that of conventional approach (CA, 7.41 Tg). CA is not recommended unless coordinates of the sampling locations are missing and the spatial patterns of SOC stock are not required. OK is recommended for the uneven distribution of sampling locations. Our results can improve methodology selection for investigating spatial distribution of SOC stock in Moso bamboo forests.

  1. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stock in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaolu; Xia, Mingpeng; Pérez-Cruzado, César; Guan, Fengying; Fan, Shaohui

    2017-01-01

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla (Carr.) Mitford cv. Pubescens) is an important timber substitute in China. Site specific stand management requires an accurate estimate of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock for maintaining stand productivity and understanding global carbon cycling. This study compared ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW) approaches to study the spatial distribution of SOC stock within 0–60 cm using 111 soil samples in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China. Similar spatial patterns but different spatial distribution ranges of SOC stock from OK and IDW highlighted the necessity to apply different approaches to obtain accurate and consistent results of SOC stock distribution. Different spatial patterns of SOC stock suggested the use of different fertilization treatments in Moso bamboo forests across the study area. SOC pool within 0–60 cm was 6.46 and 6.22 Tg for OK and IDW; results which were lower than that of conventional approach (CA, 7.41 Tg). CA is not recommended unless coordinates of the sampling locations are missing and the spatial patterns of SOC stock are not required. OK is recommended for the uneven distribution of sampling locations. Our results can improve methodology selection for investigating spatial distribution of SOC stock in Moso bamboo forests. PMID:28195207

  2. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stock in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaolu; Xia, Mingpeng; Pérez-Cruzado, César; Guan, Fengying; Fan, Shaohui

    2017-02-14

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla (Carr.) Mitford cv. Pubescens) is an important timber substitute in China. Site specific stand management requires an accurate estimate of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock for maintaining stand productivity and understanding global carbon cycling. This study compared ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW) approaches to study the spatial distribution of SOC stock within 0-60 cm using 111 soil samples in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China. Similar spatial patterns but different spatial distribution ranges of SOC stock from OK and IDW highlighted the necessity to apply different approaches to obtain accurate and consistent results of SOC stock distribution. Different spatial patterns of SOC stock suggested the use of different fertilization treatments in Moso bamboo forests across the study area. SOC pool within 0-60 cm was 6.46 and 6.22 Tg for OK and IDW; results which were lower than that of conventional approach (CA, 7.41 Tg). CA is not recommended unless coordinates of the sampling locations are missing and the spatial patterns of SOC stock are not required. OK is recommended for the uneven distribution of sampling locations. Our results can improve methodology selection for investigating spatial distribution of SOC stock in Moso bamboo forests.

  3. Distribution of organic carbon and chemicals in agricultural soils (BET method)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzler, F.; Séquaris, J.-M.; Berns, A. E.; Burauel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Modelling the dynamics of soil organic carbon and chemicals in soils requires compartmentalisation in pools or fractions. The determination of organic carbon and chemical concentration in all fractions is often time-consuming or not realisable due to low amount of soil fractions. Therefore, we developed an analytical method to calculate distributions of organic carbon and chemicals in soil without any chemical extraction method. Two sets of experiments were conducted with undisturbed soil columns under field-like conditions. In the first set, maize straw was incorporated into the topsoil and after three months incubation, the 14C-labelled chemicals benazolin or benzo[a]pyrene were applied. The second set was treated equally, but without maize addition. After a total incubation time of six months, the topsoil layers were fractionated with a physical aggregate size fractionation procedure[1]. The content of organic carbon and the distribution of the chemicals were detected in the gained soil fractions. Furthermore, the BET method was used to determine the specific surface area (SSA) of selected soil fractions. It can be shown that a fraction of organic carbon and chemicals is dependent on the SSA. The slopes of these linear relationships have been used for the estimation of the organic carbon[2] or chemicals associated to the clay fraction. Thus, mass concentrations of organic carbon or chemicals located in the clay and silt+sand fraction can be calculated. It has been found that the influence of the incorporated maize straw on the amount of organic carbon in the fractions is low due to strong mineralisation processes. In general, the amount of organic carbon in the silt+sand fraction is higher than in the clay fraction. In contrary, the 14C-activity of the chemicals is higher in the clay fraction than in the silt+sand fraction. However, the addition of maize straw increases the amount of 14C-activity in the silt+sand fraction. The calculated distribution

  4. Understanding the Spatial Distribution and Quantity of Soil Organic Carbon in Depressional Landscapes of Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, A.; Bell, J. C.; Nater, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Human disturbance has dramatically affected organic carbon cycling in soils. The Des Moines Lobe region of Minnesota is a young glaciated region with closed depressions and a deranged drainage network. Native prairie and forests in this region were nearly all converted to cropland following European settlement circa 1840s. It has generally been assumed that intensive tillage intensifies soil erosion and increases the rate of oxidation of soil organic carbon (SOC) and the subsequent release of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, more recent studies suggest that tillage simply redistributes sediments and SOC to concave and low-lying areas, and that dynamic replacement of SOC at erosional sites and burial of SOC in poorly-aerated depressional wetlands may serve as a soil carbon sink in this region. The spatial distribution of SOC in these depressional landscapes following tillage and subsequent erosion/deposition is not well understood. We aim to understand the distribution of SOC in relation to topographic controls at the landscape scale and to quantify SOC contents at the regional extent. While spatial distribution of SOC can be modeled by terrain analysis, topographic characteristics used to predict soil properties including SOC have been mostly limited to local neighborhoods (i.e. attributes calculated using three by three cell-sized windows in gridded datasets). Relevant topographic characteristics in the upslope contributing area (UCA) were rarely applied in soil-landscape models, possibly due to technical complexity. Our objectives in this study were: 1. To develop variables that represent UCA terrain attributes for soil-landscape modeling, 2. to predict SOC distribution and mass contents from the best-fit spatial SOC models with model validation for use in this depressional landscape region, and 3. to interpret SOC processes under the impact of agriculture-induced erosion and deposition since the settlement in this region. We took soil samples by

  5. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  6. The Effects of Tree Species on Soil Organic Carbon Content and Distribution in South Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, N. H.; Cha, J. Y.; Cha, Y. K.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) content of forests is controlled by the dynamic balance between photosynthesis and respiration. Changes of tree species can affect the SOC content both directly by alteration in quantity and quality of newly photosynthesized inputs, and indirectly by changes in soil conditions such as root distribution and soil microbial communities. Although many studies have been conducted on the effects of tree species on SOC, the results are mixed possibly due to the locality and the scales of the studies. This can be overcome by systematic analysis on extensively collected samples of forest floors and soils. We investigated the impacts of tree species, dominantly pines (Pinus) and oaks (Quercus), on SOC stock and distribution in South Korea by conducting ANOVA and GLM analyses using the Korean National Forest Inventory data collected from 640 plots during 2007-2010. The trees used in the data were relatively young with 67% of them being less than 40 years old because of a nation-wide reforestation program started in the 1970s. The results demonstrated a clear contrast between Pinus and Quercus, depending on soil horizons. Forest floor SOC under Pinus was 6.98 ton C/ha, significantly higher than 5.30 ton C/ha under Quercus. In contrast, SOC in mineral soils was 51.31 ton C/ha under Pinus, significantly lower than 64.76 ton C/ha under Quercus. The total SOC content including both forest floor and mineral soils was significantly higher under Quercus than Pinus, suggesting that Quercus has a potential to sequester more atmospheric CO2 in the forests in Korea.

  7. [Soil organic carbon content and its distribution pattern in Hangzhou Bay coastal wetlands].

    PubMed

    Shao, Xue-xin; Yang, Wen-ying; Wu, Ming; Jiang, Ke-yi

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the soil organic carbon (SOC) content and its distribution pattern in the natural intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands of Hangzhou Bay were studied, aimed to explore the effects of vegetation succession, exotic species invasion, and reclamation on the SOC in costal wetlands of the Bay. In intertidal zones, the surface SOC content ranged from 4.41 to 8.58 g x kg(-1), with an average of 6.45 g x kg(-1), and differed significantly under different vegetations, with a tendency of under Phragmites australis (8.56 +/- 0.04 g x kg(-1)) > Spartina alterniflora (7.31 +/- 0.08 g x kg(-1)) > Scirpus mariqueter (5.48 +/- 0.29 g x kg(-1)) > mudflats (4.47 +/- 0.09 g x kg(-1)); in reclaimed wetlands, the surface SOC content was 7.46 +/- 0.25 g x kg(-1) in the 1960s, 1.96 +/- 0.46 g x kg(-1) in the 1980s, and 5.12 +/- 0.16 g x kg(-1) in 2003, showing a trend of increased after an initial decrease with increasing reclamation year. The SOC in the profiles all showed a decreasing trend from the surface to the bottom. The SOC in intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands was significantly negatively correlated with soil pH, and positively correlated with soil total nitrogen (TN), suggesting a large reserve of organic nitrogen in TN. The correlation between SOC and soil C/N ratio was not obvious in intertidal zones, but significantly positive in reclaimed wetlands, indicating that reclamation affected soil C/N ratio to a certain extent. This study showed that in the intertidal zones, soil carbon sequestration capacity increased gradually with plant community succession. However, the invasion of exotic species Spartina alternflora might decrease the capacity of carbon sequestration in intertidal zones. It was also found that the changes of soil moisture content, particle composition, vegetation coverage, and reclamation history were the main factors affecting the SOC distribution in reclaimed wetlands.

  8. [Distribution and transferring of carbon in kast soil system of peak forest depression in humid subtropical region].

    PubMed

    Pan, G; Sun, Y; Teng, Y; Tao, Y; Han, F

    2000-02-01

    Taking Guilin Yaji Karst Experiment Site as an exemple and with the methods of field monitoring and laboratory analysis, this paper studied the distribution and transferring of carbon in the karst soil system of peak forest depression in the humid subtropical region of China. The carbon pools in biomass, litters and soil organic matter(SOM) and their mobility as expressed by oxidizability and decomposition rate of SOM, the concentration of soil CO2 and the emission rate of CO2 from soil were investigated. The mobile carbon pool in the system supplied a rich source of CO2, which drived the karst process. When active karst process happened in Spring and Summer, over 60% of carbon in the output water was derived from soil CO2, as traced by delta 13 C distribution in the system. Therefore, owing to the carbon transfer in the pathway of air-plant-soil-water, karst process took place rather under soil-rock-water interface than under air-rock-water interface. Thus, the epigenetic karst process was driven and accelerated by soil as an interface of carbon environmental geochemistry.

  9. Distribution of organic carbon in physical fractions of soils as affected by agricultural management

    SciTech Connect

    Sindhu, Jagadamma; Lal, Dr. Rattan

    2010-08-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is distributed heterogeneously among different-sized primary particles and aggregates. Further, the SOC associated with different physical fractions respond differently to managements. Therefore, this study was conducted with the objective to quantify the SOC associated with all the three structural levels of SOC (particulate organic matter, soil separates and aggregate-size fractions) as influenced by long-term change in management. The study also aims at reevaluating the concept that the SOC sink capacity of individual size-fractions is limited. Long-term tillage and crop rotation effects on distribution of SOC among fractions were compared with soil from adjacent undisturbed area under native vegetation for the mixed, mesic, Typic Fragiudalf of Wooster, OH. Forty five years of no-till (NT) management resulted in more SOC accumulation in soil surface (0 7.5 cm) than in chisel tillage and plow tillage (PT) treatments. However, PT at this site resulted in a redistribution of SOC from surface to deeper soil layers. The soils under continuous corn accumulated significantly more SOC than those under corn soybean rotation at 7.5 45 cm depth. Although soil texture was dominated by the silt-sized particles, most of the SOC pool was associated with the clay fraction. Compared to PT, the NT treatment resulted in (i) significantly higher proportion of large macroaggregates (>2,000 m) and (ii) 1.5 2.8 times higher SOC concentrations in all aggregate-size classes. A comparative evaluation using radar graphs indicated that among the physical fractions, the SOC associated with sand and silt fractions quickly changed with a land use conversion from native vegetation to agricultural crops. A key finding of this study is the assessment of SOC sink capacity of individual fractions, which revealed that the clay fraction of agricultural soils continues to accumulate more SOC, albeit at a slower rate, with progressive increase in total SOC concentration

  10. Spatial 3D distribution of soil organic carbon under different land use types.

    PubMed

    Amirian Chakan, A; Taghizadeh-Mehrjardi, R; Kerry, R; Kumar, S; Khordehbin, S; Yusefi Khanghah, S

    2017-03-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) has been assessed in three dimension (3D) in several studies, but little is known about the combined effects of land use and soil depth on SOC stocks in semi-arid areas. This paper investigates the 3D distribution of SOC to a depth of 1 m in a 4600-ha area in southeastern Iran with different land uses under the irrigated farming (IF), dry farming (DF), orchards (Or), range plants on the Gachsaran formation (RaG), and range plants on a quaternary formation (RaQ). Predictions were made using the artificial neural networks (ANNs), regression trees (RTs), and spline functions with auxiliary covariates derived from a digital elevation model (DEM), the Landsat 8 imagery, and land use types. Correlation analysis showed that the main predictors for SOC in the topsoil were covariates derived from the imagery; however, for the lower depths, covariates derived from both the DEM and imagery were important. ANNs showed more efficiency than did RTs in predicting SOC. The results showed that 3D distribution of SOC was significantly affected by land use types. SOC stocks of soils under Or and IF were significantly higher than those under DF, RaG, and RaQ. The SOC below 30 cm accounted for about 59% of the total soil stock. Results showed that depth functions combined with digital soil mapping techniques provide a promising approach to evaluate 3D SOC distribution under different land uses in semi-arid regions and could be used to assess changes in time to determine appropriate management strategies.

  11. Depth distribution of soil organic carbon fractions and AMS 14C concentrations at different landscape positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugoß, V.; Fiener, P.; Schneider, K.

    2012-04-01

    On sloped arable land soil redistribution has a great impact on spatial patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and on the lateral and vertical carbon fluxes between soil and atmosphere. While most studies focus on total SOC, the investigation of the impact of soil redistribution on SOC fractions and thus on different SOC quality can improve the knowledge about the processes controlling an erosion induced C sink or source. Some studies indicate that the labile SOC pool might be preferentially transported by water erosion, however others indicate that black carbon being considered as an inert pool is preferentially redistributed. Preferential erosion and/or deposition of specific SOC fractions must lead to a spatial differentiation of the SOC pool composition in areas prone to erosion. In this study we analysed differences in the depth distribution of particle-size SOC fractions and AMS 14C concentrations in relation to these fractions at different slope positions within an arable field in western Germany. Based on modelled soil redistribution, two soil profiles representing depositional, erosional and reference (with ignorable erosion or deposition) sites were analysed. Soil cores were taken to a maximum depth of 1.6 m and were divided into 0.05 m increments except for the actual tillage depth (0-0.15 m). For every second depth increment starting with the topsoil layer total SOC, particle-size SOC fractions and AMS 14C concentrations were determined. The fractionation scheme of Amelung et al. (1998) was applied resulting in three particulate organic carbon fractions (POC 1: 250 - 2000 µm, POC 2: 53-250 µm, POC 3: 20 -53 µm) and the remaining fine sized fraction (< 20 µm). Combining POC 1 and 2, which are often assumed to represent the labile carbon pool shows a decline of SOC in these fractions from reference to erosional to depositional sites. This indicates (i) a preferential detachment of these fractions at erosional sites, while (ii) the more

  12. Erosional distribution of metal oxides and its implication for soil carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhe, A. A.; Newman, A.; Hunsaker, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) and Aluminum (Al) oxides are common minerals in the soil system that can constitute 0.5 to 50% of soil mass. Fe and Al oxides occur in both crystalline and poorly crystalline forms, typically as <150nm in diameter nano-particles that have high specific surface area, high degree of hydration, and are very reactive with a variable charge. Fe and Al oxides have a tendency to form strong organic matter (OM)-mineral bonds through anion and inner-sphere ligand exchange reactions that enable them to be critical for persistence of OM in the soil system. Currently, we lack basic measurements and understanding of rates of lateral distribution of metal oxides with soil erosion; factors regulating transport of reactive soil minerals; and its implications for SOM dynamics. In this study, we determined concentration in soils and the rate of sediment and carbon erosional export from catchments within the Kings River Experimental Watersheds of California (Sierra National Forest in the southern part of the Sierra Nevada). In addition, we determined soil concentrations and rate of erosion of three classes of Fe and Al oxides (total pedogenic Fe, poorly crystalline Fe and Al oxides, and Fe and Al complexed with organic matter). Our results show that considerable variability exists in the concentration and transport rates of Fe and Al oxides in the study watersheds, but slope is strongly associated with rate of oxide transport across the three years (2009-2011) that we studied. We also found that the crystalline and poorly crystalline species of Fe and Al were transported at higher rates than the metal oxides that were complexed with iron oxides.

  13. Spatial and vertical distribution of soil organic carbon at the catchment scale in Mediterranean ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, Haithem; Mekki, Insaf; Annabi, Mohamed; Jacob, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in enhancing crop production and mitigating additional greenhouse gas emissions. In fact, the assessment of the amount of SOC at the regional scale is important to better understand the role of the SOC reservoir in global climate and environmental issues. Besides, the vertical SOC profile may be of great importance for SOC cycling, both on short time scale, due to interactions with the soil temperature and moisture profile, as well as on long time scale because of depth-specific stabilization mechanisms of organic matter. The objective of this study is: i) to characterize the spatial variability of SOC in a catchment at different soil depths and ii) to assess the contributions of factors controlling this variability. The studied catchment, named Lebna, is located in the Cap Bon north-eastern Tunisia and it covers about 218 km². We used a dataset from a survey provided by the IAO (Instituto Agronomico per l'Oltremare) 20th course professional master "remote sensing and natural resources evaluation" field survey staff from 2 to 28 April 2000 (IAO, 2002). Ninety-one profiles with 345 soil horizons were described according to the IAO framework and the total carbon was determined using the combustion method with the Carlo Erba Analyser 1500. The results showed the high spatial variation of SOC content depending on soil types and land use. In fact, agricultural practices mainly crop residues management and tillage influence SOC dynamic. Concerning vertical distribution, SOC content is higher in topsoil compared to subsoil. The results suggest that further work is required to better characterize the quality of the SOC at different depths.

  14. Soil organic carbon distribution in an agricultural catchment in Southern Brazil: from hillslope to catchment scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigalet, Sylvain; Chartin, Caroline; Van Oost, Kristof; van Wesemael, Bas

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the soil organic carbon (SOC) distribution a few decades after conversion to cropland and plantations in a hilly catchment in southern Brazil is challenging due to scale-dependent controlling factors. Firstly, SOC, bulk density (BD) and texture were measured by depth intervals along 18 soil profiles located in three topographical positions (sloping plateau, central back slope and concave foot slope) in cropland and forest with contrasting slopes. SOC stocks in concave footslope position were not significantly different between fields on steep (11.1 kg C m-2) and gentle slopes (12.8 kg C m-2). However, in eroding profiles, SOC stocks are twice as high in fields on gentle slopes (17.6/12.6 kg C m-2) compared to steep slopes (8.3/7.1 kg C m-2). SOC stocks on steep slope on cropland (8.8 kg C m-2) are three times lower than SOC stocks on steep slope under undisturbed forest (23.7 kg C m-2). On gentle slopes, the effect of deforestation on SOC stocks was not so drastic (14.3 and 14.4 kg C m-2). Therefore, contrasting topography generates different patterns of SOC redistribution in the catchment. The effect of conversion to cropland is probably due to soil redistribution by water and tillage erosion aggravated by the steep terrain. Secondly, in order to assess the heterogeneity of SOC distribution at catchment scale, samples were collected at 10-20; 40-50 and 75-85 cm in 167 soil profiles sampled with an auger. SOC concentrations (gC kg-1 ) in numerous bulk soil samples (n = 378) were predicted by VIS-NIR spectroscopy and partial least-square regression models. SOC stocks were assessed by a mass preserving spline tool by interpolating SOC mass at the three non-contiguous depth intervals. Samples of calibration-validation dataset (n = 95) were used for physical SOC fractionation allowing the measurement of carbon associated with < 20 μm fraction. Multivariate linear regression models and Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the influence of

  15. [Determination of major, minor and trace elements in soils by polarized energy X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and the application to vertical distribution characteristics of soil organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya-Ting

    2012-11-01

    It is difficult to get accurate, precise and reliable analytical data when using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) to determinate sulfur in geological sample. The possible ways to improve sulfur determination accuracy are discussed. Sulfur, and the major, minor and trace elements in soils were determined by polarization energy dispersion XRF (EDXRF) spectrometry and the element profiles and vertical distribution were obtained. Based on this, replacement of two short-term vegetation soil profiles was studied. Significant correlations among the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon content (TOC), organic carbon stable carbon isotopes (delta13C) and several elements were found. The study showed that the EDXRF method can be well applied to element soil geochemical cycle and carbon cycle researches.

  16. Age distribution of permfrost soil & surface water particulate organic carbon in the Lena Delta, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeld, M.; Flerus, R.; Koch, B.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2012-04-01

    Since several millennia huge amounts of organic carbon (OC) are stored frozen in circumarctic permafrost soils making up almost twice the amount of carbon currently present in the atmosphere. During the course of a proposed rapid climate change in the Arctic large quantities of this old OC are expected to be remobilized in dissolved (DOC) and particulate phases (POC) and exported to the Arctic shelf seas. Previous studies have shown that at present, DOC in Arctic river runoff is predominantly composed of relatively fresh organic material likely derived from the uppermost soil horizons. POC age data are scarce and where present show that it is substantially older than DOC. With our study we want to add information on the riverine POC exported by the Lena River to the Laptev Sea. Permafrost soil samples and surface water particulate matter (SPM) were collected in July/August 2009/2010 throughout the delta. Additional SPM samples were taken May/June 2011 during the spring flood and shortly after off the Island of Samoylov within the delta. Particulate organic carbon (POC) contents for 2009 vary between 280µg/L and 2155µg/L with an average of 918µg/L which is within the range of previously reported values. The Δ14C concentrations for POC of the same year show a broad range from -262‰ to -55‰ (average -158‰), which translates into ages of 2380±30yrs BP and 395±35yrs BP respectively (average ca. 1300yrs BP). The POC Δ14C concentrations reflect the age distribution found in the upper 1.4m of a permafrost peat cliff on Samoylov Island (-274‰ or 2510±30yrs BP). Karlsson et al (2011) found that POC samples in the SE Laptev Sea just off the Lena Delta contain young and bioavailable material interpreted to be derived from surface soils, which is in agreement with our late summer data. With the surface water POC contents in the Lena Delta of three consecutive years including one spring flood event presented here we improve our understanding of the interannual

  17. Global distribution of soil organic carbon - Part 1: Masses and frequency distributions of SOC stocks for the tropics, permafrost regions, wetlands, and the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köchy, M.; Hiederer, R.; Freibauer, A.

    2015-04-01

    The global soil organic carbon (SOC) mass is relevant for the carbon cycle budget and thus atmospheric carbon concentrations. We review current estimates of SOC stocks and mass (stock × area) in wetlands, permafrost and tropical regions and the world in the upper 1 m of soil. The Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) v.1.2 provides one of the most recent and coherent global data sets of SOC, giving a total mass of 2476 Pg when using the original values for bulk density. Adjusting the HWSD's bulk density (BD) of soil high in organic carbon results in a mass of 1230 Pg, and additionally setting the BD of Histosols to 0.1 g cm-3 (typical of peat soils), results in a mass of 1062 Pg. The uncertainty in BD of Histosols alone introduces a range of -56 to +180 Pg C into the estimate of global SOC mass in the top 1 m, larger than estimates of global soil respiration. We report the spatial distribution of SOC stocks per 0.5 arcminutes; the areal masses of SOC; and the quantiles of SOC stocks by continents, wetland types, and permafrost types. Depending on the definition of "wetland", wetland soils contain between 82 and 158 Pg SOC. With more detailed estimates for permafrost from the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (496 Pg SOC) and tropical peatland carbon incorporated, global soils contain 1325 Pg SOC in the upper 1 m, including 421 Pg in tropical soils, whereof 40 Pg occurs in tropical wetlands. Global SOC amounts to just under 3000 Pg when estimates for deeper soil layers are included. Variability in estimates is due to variation in definitions of soil units, differences in soil property databases, scarcity of information about soil carbon at depths > 1 m in peatlands, and variation in definitions of "peatland".

  18. LFERs for soil organic carbon-water distribution coefficients (Koc) at environmentally relevant sorbate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Grathwohl, Peter; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2009-05-01

    Organic carbon-water distribution coefficients, Koc, for organic compounds at environmentally relevant, low sorbate concentrations may substantially differ from those at higher concentrations due to nonlinear sorption to soil organic matter. However, prediction methods for Koc such as linear free energy relationships (LFERs) are currently only available for high sorbate concentrations (i.e., near solubility limits), reflecting the lack of a set of consistent experimental data in an environmentally more relevant concentration range (i.e., orders of magnitude lower than solubilities). In this study, we determined Koc for two model sorbents of soil organic matter, peat and lignite, at sorbate concentrations of 4.3 and 19 mg/kg-organic-carbon, respectively, in batch suspensions. The measured Koc values for organic sorbates (51 for peat, 58 for lignite) of varying sizes and polarities were modeled successfully with polyparameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). The resulting PP-LFER for peat was significantly different from the PP-LFERs in the literature determined at near aqueous solubility limits of sorbates. The literature PP-LFERs were found to underestimate the measured Koc values for peat at the low concentration by up to 1 order of magnitude. The extent of underestimation highly depends on the sorbate properties and can be explained by differing sorption nonlinearities of the sorbates as predicted by a reported empirical relationship between the nonlinearity in peat and the sorbate dipolarity/polarizability parameter S. Lignite appearsto be a stronger sorbent toward many sorbates than typical soil organic matter irrespective of the concentration range and thus may not be representative for organic matter with regard to the magnitude of Koc. The present study offers the first PP-LFER equation for log Koc in soil organic matter at typical environmental sorbate concentrations.

  19. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database: spatially distributed datasets of soil coverage and soil carbon storage in the northern permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugelius, G.; Tarnocai, C.; Broll, G.; Canadell, J. G.; Kuhry, P.; Swanson, D. K.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude terrestrial ecosystems are key components in the global carbon (C) cycle. Estimates of global soil organic carbon (SOC), however, do not include updated estimates of SOC storage in permafrost-affected soils or representation of the unique pedogenic processes that affect these soils. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) was developed to quantify the SOC stocks in the circumpolar permafrost region (18.7 × 106 km2). The NCSCD is a polygon-based digital database compiled from harmonized regional soil classification maps in which data on soil order coverage have been linked to pedon data (n = 1778) from the northern permafrost regions to calculate SOC content and mass. In addition, new gridded datasets at different spatial resolutions have been generated to facilitate research applications using the NCSCD (standard raster formats for use in geographic information systems and Network Common Data Form files common for applications in numerical models). This paper describes the compilation of the NCSCD spatial framework, the soil sampling and soil analytical procedures used to derive SOC content in pedons from North America and Eurasia and the formatting of the digital files that are available online. The potential applications and limitations of the NCSCD in spatial analyses are also discussed. The database has the doi:10.5879/ecds/00000001. An open access data portal with all the described GIS-datasets is available online at: http://www.bbcc.su.se/data/ncscd/.

  20. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database: spatially distributed datasets of soil coverage and soil carbon storage in the northern permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugelius, G.; Tarnocai, C.; Broll, G.; Canadell, J. G.; Kuhry, P.; Swanson, D. K.

    2012-08-01

    High latitude terrestrial ecosystems are key components in the global carbon (C) cycle. Estimates of global soil organic carbon (SOC), however, do not include updated estimates of SOC storage in permafrost-affected soils or representation of the unique pedogenic processes that affect these soils. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) was developed to quantify the SOC stocks in the circumpolar permafrost region (18.7 × 106 km2). The NCSCD is a polygon-based digital database compiled from harmonized regional soil classification maps in which data on soil order coverage has been linked to pedon data (n = 1647) from the northern permafrost regions to calculate SOC content and mass. In addition, new gridded datasets at different spatial resolutions have been generated to facilitate research applications using the NCSCD (standard raster formats for use in Geographic Information Systems and Network Common Data Form files common for applications in numerical models). This paper describes the compilation of the NCSCD spatial framework, the soil sampling and soil analyses procedures used to derive SOC content in pedons from North America and Eurasia and the formatting of the digital files that are available online. The potential applications and limitations of the NCSCD in spatial analyses are also discussed. The database has the doi:10.5879/ecds/00000001. An open access data-portal with all the described GIS-datasets is available online at: http://dev1.geo.su.se/bbcc/dev/ncscd/.

  1. The distribution and fluvial redistribution of soil organic carbon in semiarid rangelands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, Andrew; Puttock, Alan; Anderson, Karen; Brazier, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Compared to other terrestrial biomes, the carbon dynamics of drylands have attracted relatively little attention, perhaps due to their characteristically low primary productivity, low soil organic carbon (OC) contents and slow OC turnover rates. However, covering approximately 40% of the land surface, drylands represent a significant component of the global terrestrial carbon sink. Our study examines the distribution and fluvial redistribution of particulate-associated OC over a dynamic grass to shrub ecotone in semiarid central New Mexico, USA. Surface soil (0-0.05 m) samples from beneath different vegetation covers across the ecotone were collected and physically fractionated by density (>1 g ml) and particle size (one phi intervals from <0.0625 to >4 mm, with no deliberate dispersion of aggregates). There were significant (P<0.05) differences in OC concentration between different particle-size fractions, with peaks in the silt-clay (<0.0625 mm) fraction, and, unexpectedly, in the three coarse-medium sand (2-1, 1-0.5, and 0.5-0.25 mm) fractions. As soil erosion by runoff is particle size-selective, this suggests estimating erosional carbon fluxes as a function of total sediment flux may be overly simplistic. Given that many soil erosion models already explicitly consider the transport of several particle size classes, we believe that the results presented here justify the particle-size variant parameterisation of OC concentration, which we are currently working to implement. Importantly, both of the coarsest (>4 and 4-2 mm) fractions had OC concentrations comparable to the <2 mm average, attributed to the aggradation of finer primary particles which suggests that, in dryland soils at least, the current practice of ignoring the >2 mm fraction may underestimate the magnitude of the soil OC sink. In addition to topsoil characterisation, we monitored natural erosion events from four 300 m2 runoff plots over four monsoon seasons, capturing all eroded sediment which

  2. Spatially distributed modeling of soil organic carbon across China with improved accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi-quan; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Xin-ye; Luo, Youlin; Wang, Chang-quan; Yue, Tian-xiang; Li, Bing; Gao, Xue-song

    2017-06-01

    There is a need for more detailed spatial information on soil organic carbon (SOC) for the accurate estimation of SOC stock and earth system models. As it is effective to use environmental factors as auxiliary variables to improve the prediction accuracy of spatially distributed modeling, a combined method (HASM_EF) was developed to predict the spatial pattern of SOC across China using high accuracy surface modeling (HASM), artificial neural network (ANN), and principal component analysis (PCA) to introduce land uses, soil types, climatic factors, topographic attributes, and vegetation cover as predictors. The performance of HASM_EF was compared with ordinary kriging (OK), OK, and HASM combined, respectively, with land uses and soil types (OK_LS and HASM_LS), and regression kriging combined with land uses and soil types (RK_LS). Results showed that HASM_EF obtained the lowest prediction errors and the ratio of performance to deviation (RPD) presented the relative improvements of 89.91%, 63.77%, 55.86%, and 42.14%, respectively, compared to the other four methods. Furthermore, HASM_EF generated more details and more realistic spatial information on SOC. The improved performance of HASM_EF can be attributed to the introduction of more environmental factors, to explicit consideration of the multicollinearity of selected factors and the spatial nonstationarity and nonlinearity of relationships between SOC and selected factors, and to the performance of HASM and ANN. This method may play a useful tool in providing more precise spatial information on soil parameters for global modeling across large areas.

  3. Association of Soil Aggregation with the Distribution and Quality of Organic Carbon in Soil along an Elevation Gradient on Wuyi Mountain in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liguang; Vogel, Jason; He, Zhenli; Zou, Xiaoming; Ruan, Honghua; Huang, Wei; Wang, Jiashe; Bianchi, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Forest soils play a critical role in the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 and subsequent attenuation of global warming. The nature and properties of organic matter in soils have an influence on the sequestration of carbon. In this study, soils were collected from representative forestlands, including a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (EBF), a coniferous forest (CF), a subalpine dwarf forest (DF), and alpine meadow (AM) along an elevation gradient on Wuyi Mountain, which is located in a subtropical area of southeastern China. These soil samples were analyzed in the laboratory to examine the distribution and speciation of organic carbon (OC) within different size fractions of water-stable soil aggregates, and subsequently to determine effects on carbon sequestration. Soil aggregation rate increased with increasing elevation. Soil aggregation rate, rather than soil temperature, moisture or clay content, showed the strongest correlation with OC in bulk soil, indicating soil structure was the critical factor in carbon sequestration of Wuyi Mountain. The content of coarse particulate organic matter fraction, rather than the silt and clay particles, represented OC stock in bulk soil and different soil aggregate fractions. With increasing soil aggregation rate, more carbon was accumulated within the macroaggregates, particularly within the coarse particulate organic matter fraction (250–2000 μm), rather than within the microaggregates (53–250μm) or silt and clay particles (< 53μm). In consideration of the high instability of macroaggregates and the liability of SOC within them, further research is needed to verify whether highly-aggregated soils at higher altitudes are more likely to lose SOC under warmer conditions. PMID:26964101

  4. Association of Soil Aggregation with the Distribution and Quality of Organic Carbon in Soil along an Elevation Gradient on Wuyi Mountain in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Liguang; Vogel, Jason; He, Zhenli; Zou, Xiaoming; Ruan, Honghua; Huang, Wei; Wang, Jiashe; Bianchi, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Forest soils play a critical role in the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 and subsequent attenuation of global warming. The nature and properties of organic matter in soils have an influence on the sequestration of carbon. In this study, soils were collected from representative forestlands, including a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (EBF), a coniferous forest (CF), a subalpine dwarf forest (DF), and alpine meadow (AM) along an elevation gradient on Wuyi Mountain, which is located in a subtropical area of southeastern China. These soil samples were analyzed in the laboratory to examine the distribution and speciation of organic carbon (OC) within different size fractions of water-stable soil aggregates, and subsequently to determine effects on carbon sequestration. Soil aggregation rate increased with increasing elevation. Soil aggregation rate, rather than soil temperature, moisture or clay content, showed the strongest correlation with OC in bulk soil, indicating soil structure was the critical factor in carbon sequestration of Wuyi Mountain. The content of coarse particulate organic matter fraction, rather than the silt and clay particles, represented OC stock in bulk soil and different soil aggregate fractions. With increasing soil aggregation rate, more carbon was accumulated within the macroaggregates, particularly within the coarse particulate organic matter fraction (250-2000 μm), rather than within the microaggregates (53-250μm) or silt and clay particles (< 53μm). In consideration of the high instability of macroaggregates and the liability of SOC within them, further research is needed to verify whether highly-aggregated soils at higher altitudes are more likely to lose SOC under warmer conditions.

  5. Land-use affects the radiocarbon age, storage and depth distribution of soil organic carbon in Eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, Eleanor; Wilson, Brian; Hua, Quan

    2015-04-01

    Land-use has been shown to affect soil organic carbon (SOC) storage, with natural systems generally storing larger quantities of SOC than anthropogenically managed systems in surface soils. However, these effects are often difficult to detect deeper in the soil profile. Little is known regarding the effects of land-use on the radiocarbon age of SOC, both at the surface and deeper in the soil profile. We investigated the storage, radiocarbon content and depth distribution of soil organic carbon from across the state of NSW, Australia. A total of 100 profiles were analysed for total SOC concentration at numerous depths (up to 1 m) and a machine learning approach implementing tree ensemble methods was used to identify the key drivers of SOC depth distribution. Surface SOC storage was strongly associated with climate (predominately precipitation, to a lesser degree relative humidity and temperature), whereas SOC depth distribution was predominately influenced by land-use, soil type and to a lesser extent temperature. A subset of 12 soil profiles from a range of climate zones were analysed for radiocarbon content with a view to contrasting three land-use systems: natural, cleared/grazed and cropped. Radiocarbon content was affected strongly by land-use, with effects most pronounced at depth. Native systems appeared to have the youngest carbon throughout the profile, with cropped and grazed systems having older SOC. Radiocarbon content was also strongly associated with SOC content. Our results indicate that natural systems act as a carbon pump into the soil, injecting young, fresh organic carbon which is vertically distributed throughout the profile. In contrast, managed systems are deprived of this input and are depleted in SOC at all depths, leading to higher radiocarbon ages throughout the profile.

  6. Distribution characteristics of dissolved organic carbon in annular wetland soil-water solutions through soil profiles in the Sanjiang Plain, northeast China.

    PubMed

    Xi, Min; Lu, Xian-Guo; Li, Yue; Kong, Fan-Long

    2007-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence reveals that concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have increased in streams which brings negative environmental impacts. DOC in stream flow is mainly originated from soil-water solutions of watershed. Wetlands prove to be the most sensitive areas as an important DOC reserve between terrestrial and fluvial biogeosystems. This reported study was focused on the distribution characteristics and the controlling factors of DOC in soil-water solutions of annular wetland, i.e., a dishing wetland and a forest wetland together, in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China. The results indicate that DOC concentrations in soil-water solutions decreased and then increased with increasing soil depth in the annular wetland. In the upper soil layers of 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm, DOC concentrations in soil-water solutions linearly increased from edge to center of the annular wetland (R2 = 0.3122 and R2 = 0.443). The distribution variations were intimately linked to DOC production and utilization and DOC transport processes in annular wetland soil-water solutions. The concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total carbon (TC) and Fe(II), DOC mobility and continuous vertical and lateral flow affected the distribution variations of DOC in soil-water solutions. The correlation coefficients between DOC concentrations and TOC, TC and Fe(II) were 0.974, 0.813 and 0.753 respectively. These distribution characteristics suggested a systematic response of the distribution variations of DOC in annular wetland soil-water solutions to the geometry of closed depressions on a scale of small catchments. However, the DOC in soil pore water of the annular wetland may be the potential source of DOC to stream flow on watershed scale. These observations also implied the fragmentation of wetland landscape could bring the spatial-temporal variations of DOC distribution and exports, which would bring negative environmental impacts in watersheds of the Sanjiang Plain.

  7. Study on the distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ashim

    2010-05-01

    STUDY ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL FRACTIONS AND ITS REACTION POTENTIAL OF BINDING THE PESTICIDES **SUMITRA ROY1, SANKHAJIT ROY1, *ASHIM CHOWDHURY2, SASWATI PRADHAN2 and PETER BURAUEL3 1Department of Agricultural Chemicals, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalay, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India. 3Institute of Chemical Dynamics & Geosphere, FZ-Juelich, Germany. *Correspondence: ashimkly@hotmail.com **Research work carried out as DAAD Sandwich research fellow at FZ- Juelich, Germany Soil is the ultimate sink of all selectively applied pesticides. In addition to the basic physicochemical data of an active ingredient, the fate of the various compounds is largely determined by the type of application. Finally, pesticide and their metabolites, as well as structural elements, remain in the native carbon reserves of the soil or are sorbed & fixed to clay minerals and clay- humus complexes. Soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil microbial community are the crucial components which regulate soil processes and contribute towards the stability of the soil ecosystem. It is an energy source for biological mineralization processes, functions as a buffer and participates in chemical reaction. Knowledge is essential to understand the extent to which the SOM influences the mobilization and immobilization processes of foreign substance in soil and the substance transport and pollutant decomposition in soil. The freshly incorporated organic matter undergoes mineralization and the non mineralized carbon fraction is of special relevance with respect to soil stability in general and decisive for the fate and particular the persistence of xenobiotics in soil. The biological and physicochemical interactions establishing equilibrium between the organic matter bound, fixed or complexed to the soil matrix and that dissolve in the soil solution must be understood in detail to realize

  8. Drying-induced decomposition and associated changes in aggregation and carbon distribution in subalpine meadow soils: implication of drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhe, A. A.; Arnold, C. L.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    While peatlands are garnering much attention for their greenhouse gas feedback potential in a warming climate, the coupled biogeochemical and hydrological impact of structural and physical changes in these types of systems as a result of drought-induced drying and desiccation has not been studied in detail. The cyclic drawdown/recharge of the water table that exists in most peatland systems impose important controls on organic matter storage and decomposition as well as soil physical properties. In order to better understand how high elevation peatlands will respond to increasingly dry years, we incubated meadow soils collected along a hydrologic gradient at 5 different water potentials and measured the CO2 flux at intervals for over one year to determine how desiccation of meadow soils (from the Harvey Monroe Hall Research Natural Area at the crest of the Sierra Nevada) influences gaseous fluxes of C, as well as aggregation of the organic-rich soils and distribution of the soil C in different physical pools (macro- vs. micro-aggregate, and silt+ clay fractions). We found that the cumulative carbon mineralization was greatest at the highest (0.1 bar) and lowest (4 bar) water potential, across all regions of the meadow, indicating the presence of two separate pools of labile carbon that can be accessed only after a threshold of drying is reached in the soil. We also observe important changes associated with aggregate size distributions and fraction of total carbon distributed in three distinct pools.

  9. [Effects of land use type on the distribution of organic carbon in different sized soil particles effects of land use type on the distribution of organic carbon in different sized soil particles and its relationships to herb biomass in hilly red soil region of South China].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Wu; Guo, Wang; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Shen, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Xue; Chen, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Yue-Nan

    2012-04-01

    The changes in organic carbon content in different sized soil particles under different land use patterns partly reflect the variation of soil carbon, being of significance in revealing the process of soil organic carbon cycle. Based on the long-term monitoring of soil erosion, and by the methods of soil particle size fractionation, this paper studied the effects of different land use types (wasteland, pinewood land, and grassland) on the distribution of organic carbon content in different sized soil particles and its relationships to the herb biomass. Land use type and slope position had obvious effects on the organic carbon content in different sized soil particles, and the organic carbon content was in the order of grassland > pinewood land > wasteland. The proportion of the organic carbon in different sized soil particles was mainly depended on the land use type, and had little relationships with slope position. According to the analysis of the ratio of particle-associated organic carbon to mineral-associated organic carbon (POC/MOC), the soil organic carbon in grassland was easily to be mineralized, whereas that in wasteland and pinewood land was relatively stable. On the slopes mainly in hilly red soil region, the soil organic carbon in sand fraction had great effects on herb biomass.

  10. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; ...

    2015-02-05

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global carbon cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to changing climatic conditions. Inmore » this review, we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils, and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this organic carbon to permafrost thaw under a warming climate. Overall, frozen conditions and cryopedogenic processes, such as cryoturbation, have slowed decomposition and enhanced the sequestration of organic carbon in permafrost-affected soils over millennial timescales. Due to the low temperatures, the organic matter in permafrost soils is often less humified than in more temperate soils, making some portion of this stored organic carbon relatively vulnerable to mineralization upon thawing of permafrost.« less

  11. Spatial distributions and sequestrations of organic carbon and black carbon in soils from the Chinese Loess Plateau.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changlin; Cao, Junji; Han, Yongming; Huang, Shaopeng; Tu, Xiaming; Wang, Ping; An, Zhisheng

    2013-11-01

    Concentrations of soil organic carbon (SOC), black carbon (BC), char, and soot in topsoils (0-20 cm) and vertical soil profiles (0-100 cm) from the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) were investigated. Objectives of the study were to establish the spatial distributions and estimate the sequestrations of these substances. The SOC, BC, char and soot concentrations were higher in the eastern and southeastern parts of the plateau and lower in the north, which is consistent with the patterns of economic development and energy consumption. The highest average SOC concentration was found in the clayey loess zone, followed by the loess and sandy loess zones. Similar trends were observed for BC, char and soot, suggesting interactions with clay and silt are potentially important influences on OC and BC. The SOC contents in topsoils varied from 0.31 to 51.81 g kg(-1), with a mean value of 6.54 g kg(-1), while BC and char concentrations were 0.02 to 5.5 g kg(-1) and 0.003 to 4.19 g kg(-1), respectively, and soot ranged from 0.01 to 1.32 g kg(-1). Unlike SOC, both BC and char decreased with soil depth, whereas soot showed little variation with depth. BC and char were correlated in the topsoils, and both correlated moderately well with SOC (R(2)=0.60) and soot (R(2)=0.53). The SOC pools sequestered in the 0 to 20 cm and 0 to 100 cm depths were estimated to be 0.741 and 3.63 Pg, respectively, and the BC pools sequestered in the 0 to 20 cm and 0 to 100 cm depths were 0.073 and 0.456 Pg, respectively. Therefore the quantity of carbon stored in the sediments of the CLP evidently exceeds 10(9) tons. The char contained in the upper 20 cm layer was 0.053 Pg, which amounted to 72.5% of the BC in that layer.

  12. Distribution of black carbon in Ponderosa pine litter and soils following the High Park wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, C. M.; Haddix, M.; Paustian, K.; Cotrufo, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), the heterogeneous product of burned biomass, is a critical component in the global carbon cycle, yet timescales and mechanisms for incorporation into the soil profile are not well understood. The High Park Fire, which took place in northwestern Colorado in the summer of 2012, provided an opportunity to study the effects of both fire intenstiy and geomorphology on properties of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and BC in the Cache La Poudre River drainage. We sampled montane Ponderosa pine litter, 0-5 cm soils, and 5-15 cm soils four months post-fire in order to examine the effects of slope and burn intensity on %C, C stocks, %N and black carbon (g kg-1 C, and g m-2). We developed and implemented the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method for quantifying BC. With regard to slope, we found that steeper slopes had higher C : N than shallow slopes, but that there was no difference in black carbon content or stocks. BC content was greatest in the litter in burned sites (19 g kg-1 C), while BC stocks were greatest in the 5-15 cm subsurface soils (23 g m-2). At the time of sampling, none of the BC deposited on the land surface post-fire had been incorporated into to either the 0-5 cm or 5-15 cm soil layers. The ratio of B5CA : B6CA (less condensed to more condensed BC) indicated there was significantly more older, more processed BC at depth. Total BC soil stocks were relatively low compared to other fire-prone grassland and boreal forest systems, indicating most of the BC produced in this system is likely transported off the surface through erosion events. Future work examining mechanisms for BC transport will be required for understanding the role BC plays in the global carbon cycle.

  13. Soil organic carbon stock and distribution in cultivated land converted to grassland in a subtropical region of China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J H; Li, F C; Wang, Y; Xiong, D H

    2014-02-01

    Land-use change from one type to another affects soil carbon (C) stocks which is associated with fluxes of CO2 to the atmosphere. The 10-years converted land selected from previously cultivated land in hilly areas of Sichuan, China was studied to understand the effects of land-use conversion on soil organic casrbon (SOC) sequestration under landscape position influences in a subtropical region of China. The SOC concentrations of the surface soil were greater (P\\0.001) for converted soils than those for cultivated soils but lower (P\\0.001) than those for original uncultivated soils. The SOC inventories (1.90–1.95 kg m-2) in the 0–15 cm surface soils were similar among upper, middle, and lower slope positions on the converted land, while the SOC inventories (1.41–1.65 kg m-2) in this soil layer tended to increase from upper to lower slope positions on the cultivated slope. On the whole, SOC inventories in this soil layer significantly increased following the conversion from cultivated land to grassland (P\\0.001). In the upper slope positions, converted soils (especially in 0–5 cm surface soil) exhibited a higher C/N ratio than cultivated soils (P = 0.012), implying that strong SOC sequestration characteristics exist in upper slope areas where severe soil erosion occurred before land conversion. It is suggested that landscape position impacts on the SOC spatial distribution become insignificant after the conversion of cultivated land to grassland, which is conducive to the immobilization of organic C. We speculate that the conversion of cultivated land to grassland would markedly increase SOC stocks in soil and would especially improve the potential for SOC sequestration in the surface soil over a moderate period of time (10 years).

  14. Soil carbon distribution and site characteristics in hyper-arid soils of the Atacama Desert: A site with Mars-like soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Fletcher, Lauren; Perez-Montaño, Saúl; Condori-Apaza, Reneé; Mckay, Christopher P.

    2012-07-01

    The soil carbon content and its relation to site characteristics are important in evaluating current local, regional, and global soil C storage and projecting future variations in response to climate change. In this study we analyzed the concentration of organic and inorganic carbon and their relationship with in situ climatic and geological characteristics in 485 samples of surface soil and 17 pits from the hyper-arid area and 51 samples with 2 pits from the arid-semiarid region from the Atacama Desert located in Peru and Chile. The soil organic carbon (SOC) in hyperarid soils ranged from 1.8 to 50.9 μg C per g of soil for the 0-0.1 m profile and from 1.8 to 125.2 μg C per g of soil for the 0-1 m profile. The analysis of climatic (temperature and precipitation), elevation, and some geologic characteristics (landforms) associated with hyper-arid soils explained partially the SOC variability. On the other hand, soil inorganic carbon (SIC) contents, in the form of carbonates, ranged from 200 to 1500 μg C per g of soil for the 0-0.1 m profile and from 200 to 3000 μg C per g of soil for the 0-1.0 m profile in the driest area. The largest accumulations of organic and inorganic carbon were found near to arid-semiarid areas. In addition, the elemental carbon concentrations show that the presence of other forms of inorganic carbon (e.g. graphite, etc.) was negligible in these hyperarid soils. Overall, the top 1 m soil layer of hyperarid lands contains ˜11.6 Tg of organic carbon and 344.6 Tg of carbonate carbon. The total stored carbon was 30.8-fold the organic carbon alone. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the total budget carbon on the surface and shallow subsurface on ˜160,000 km2 of hyperarid soils.

  15. Effect of Crop cultivation after Mediterranean maquis on soil carbon stock, δ13C spatial distribution and root turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Santoro, Antonino; La Mantia, Tommaso

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was investigate the effect of land use change on soil organic carbon (SOC) stock and distribution in a Mediterranean succession. A succession composed by natural vegetation, cactus pear crop and olive grove, was selected in Sicily. The land use change from mediterranena maquis (C3 plant) to cactus pear (C4 plant) lead to a SOC decrease of 65% after 28 years of cultivation, and a further decrease of 14% after 7 years since the land use from cactus pear to olive grove (C3 plant). Considering this exchange and decrease as well as the periods after the land use changes we calculated the mean residence time (MRT) of soil C of different age. The MRT of C under Mediterranean maquis was about 142 years, but was 10 years under cactus pear. Total SOC and δ13 C were measured along the soil profile (0-75cm) and in the intra-rows in order to evaluate the distribution of new and old carbon derived and the growth of roots. After measuring of weight of cactus pear root, an approach was developed to estimate the turnover of root biomass. Knowledge of root turnover and carbon input are important to evaluate the correlation between carbon input accumulation and SOC stock in order to study the ability of C sink of soils with different use and managements.

  16. Distribution of black carbon in ponderosa pine forest floor and soils following the High Park wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, C. M.; Haddix, M.; Paustian, K.; Cotrufo, M. F.

    2015-05-01

    Biomass burning produces black carbon (BC), effectively transferring a fraction of the biomass C from an actively cycling pool to a passive C pool, which may be stored in the soil. Yet the timescales and mechanisms for incorporation of BC into the soil profile are not well understood. The High Park fire (HPF), which occurred in northwestern Colorado in the summer of 2012, provided an opportunity to study the effects of both fire severity and geomorphology on properties of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and BC in the Cache La Poudre River drainage. We sampled montane ponderosa pine forest floor (litter plus O-horizon) and soils at 0-5 and 5-15 cm depth 4 months post-fire in order to examine the effects of slope and burn severity on %C, C stocks, %N and BC. We used the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method for quantifying BC. With regard to slope, we found that steeper slopes had higher C : N than shallow slopes but that there was no difference in BPCA-C content or stocks. BC content was greatest in the forest floor at burned sites (19 g BPCA-C kg-1 C), while BC stocks were greatest in the 5-15 cm subsurface soils (23 g BPCA-C m-2). At the time of sampling, unburned and burned soils had equivalent BC content, indicating none of the BC deposited on the land surface post-fire had been incorporated into either the 0-5 or 5-15 cm soil layers. The ratio of B6CA : total BPCAs, an index of the degree of aromatic C condensation, suggested that BC in the 5-15 cm soil layer may have been formed at higher temperatures or experienced selective degradation relative to the forest floor and 0-5 cm soils. Total BC soil stocks were relatively low compared to other fire-prone grassland and boreal forest systems, indicating most of the BC produced in this system is likely lost, either through erosion events, degradation or translocation to deeper soils. Future work examining mechanisms for BC losses from forest soils will be required for understanding the role BC plays in the global

  17. Global distribution of soil organic carbon, based on the Harmonized World Soil Database - Part 1: Masses and frequency distribution of SOC stocks for the tropics, permafrost regions, wetlands, and the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köchy, M.; Hiederer, R.; Freibauer, A.

    2014-09-01

    The global soil organic carbon (SOC) mass is relevant for the carbon cycle budget. We review current estimates of soil organic carbon stocks (mass/area) and mass (stock × area) in wetlands, permafrost and tropical regions and the world in the upper 1 m of soil. The Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) v.1.2 provides one of the most recent and coherent global data sets of SOC, giving a total mass of 2476 Pg. Correcting the HWSD's bulk density of organic soils, especially Histosols, results in a mass of 1062 Pg. The uncertainty of bulk density of Histosols alone introduces a range of -56 to +180 Pg for the estimate of global SOC in the top 1 m, larger than estimates of global soil respiration. We report the spatial distribution of SOC stocks per 0.5 arc minutes, the areal masses of SOC and the quantiles of SOC stocks by continents, wetland types, and permafrost types. Depending on the definition of "wetland", wetland soils contain between 82 and 158 Pg SOC. Incorporating more detailed estimates for permafrost from the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Data Base (496 Pg SOC) and tropical peatland carbon, global soils contain 1324 Pg SOC in the upper 1 m including 421 Pg in tropical soils, whereof 40 Pg occur in tropical wetlands. Global SOC amounts to just under 3000 Pg when estimates for deeper soil layers are included. Variability in estimates is due to variation in definitions of soil units, differences in soil property databases, scarcity of information about soil carbon at depths > 1 m in peatlands, and variation in definitions of "peatland".

  18. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon and its influencing factors in desert grasslands of the Hexi Corridor, northwest China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Su, Yongzhong; Yang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) and factors that influence these patterns is crucial for understanding the carbon cycle. The objectives of this study were to determine the spatial distribution pattern of soil organic carbon density (SOCD) and the controlling factors in arid desert grasslands of northwest China. The above- and belowground biomass and SOCD in 260 soil profiles from 52 sites over 2.7×10(4) km2 were investigated. Combined with a satellite-based dataset of an enhanced vegetation index during 2011-2012 and climatic factors at different sites, the relationships between SOCD and biotic and abiotic factors were identified. The results indicated that the mean SOCD was 1.20 (SD:+/- 0.85), 1.73 (SD:+/- 1.20), and 2.69 (SD:+/- 1.91) kg m(-2) at soil depths of 0-30 cm, 0-50 cm, and 0-100 cm, respectively, which was smaller than other estimates in temperate grassland, steppe, and desert-grassland ecosystems. The spatial distribution of SOCD gradually decreased from the southeast to the northwest, corresponding to the precipitation gradient. SOCD increased significantly with vegetation biomass, annual precipitation, soil moisture, clay and silt content, and decreased with mean annual temperature and sand content. The correlation between BGB and SOCD was closer than the correlation between AGB and SOCD. Variables could together explain about 69.8%, 74.4%, and 78.9% of total variation in SOCD at 0-30 cm, 0-50 cm, and 0-100 cm, respectively. In addition, we found that mean annual temperature is more important than other abiotic factors in determining SOCD in arid desert grasslands in our study area. The information obtained in this study provides a basis for accurately estimating SOC stocks and assessing carbon (C) sequestration potential in the desert grasslands of northwest China.

  19. [Vertical distribution patterns of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen and related affecting factors along northern slope of Qilian Mountains].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Nian-lai

    2009-03-01

    With the shady and sunny northern slopes of Qilian Mountains along an altitude gradient from 2600 m to 3600 m as test objectives, this paper studied the vertical distribution patterns of surface soil (0-20 cm) organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN), and their relations to the altitude, landform, and vegetation. The results indicated that SOC and TN contents were significantly higher on shady than on sunny slope, and all increased with increasing altitude. The SOC and TN contents under different vegetation types were in the order of alpine bush > Picea crassifolia forest > alpine meadow > Sabina przewalskii forest, and alpine bush > alpine meadow > P. crassifolia forest > S. przewalskii forest, respectively. SOC had significant positive correlations with altitude, annual precipitation, soil moisture, and soil TN, and significant negative correlations with soil pH and annual temperature. Soil C/N ratio along the gradient was within the range of 6.7-23.3, being favorable to the nutrient release during organic matter decomposition. Among the factors affecting SOC, the annual temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture content constituted the first principal component, and soil C/N ratio constituted the second principal component. These two principal components accounted for 71% of the variance of SOC content, suggesting that climate factors controlled the vertical distribution patterns of SOC and TN along the altitude gradient.

  20. [Distribution characteristics of soil organic carbon under different forest restoration modes on opencast coal mine dump].

    PubMed

    Wen, Yue-rong; Dang, Ting-hui; Tang, Jun; Li, Jun-chao

    2016-01-01

    The content and storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) were compared in six wood restoration modes and adjacent abandoned land on opencast coal mine dump, and the mechanisms behind the differences and their influencing factors were analyzed. Results showed that the contents of SOC in six wood lands were significantly higher (23.8%-53.2%) than that of abandoned land (1.92 g · kg⁻¹) at 0-10 cm soil depth, the index were significantly higher (5.8%-70.4%) at 10-20 cm soil depth than the abandoned land (1.39 g · kg⁻¹), and then the difference of the contents of SOC in the deep soil (20-100 cm) were not significant. The contents of SOC decreased with increase of soil depth, but the decreasing magnitude of the topsoil (0-20 cm) was higher than that of the deep soil (20-100 cm). Compared with the deep soil, the topsoil significant higer storage of SOC in different woods, the SOC storage decreased with the soil depth. Along the 0-100 cm soil layer, the storage of SOC in six wood lands higher (18.1%-42.4%) than that of the abandoned land (17.52 t · hm⁻²). The SOC storage of Amorpha fruticosa land (24.95 t · hm⁻²) was obviously higher than that in the other wood lands. The SOC storage in the shrub lands was 12.4% higher than that of the arbor woods. There were significantly positive correlations among forest litter, fine root biomass, soil water content and SOC on the dump. Consequently, different plantation restorations significantly improved the SOC level on the dump in 0-100 cm soil, especially the topsoil. But there was still a big gap about SOC level between the wood restoration lands and the original landform. To improve the SOC on opencast coal mine dump, A. fruticosa could be selected as the main wood vegetation.

  1. Thermally Altered Biomass (Black Carbon) in Soils: Formation, Analysis, Distribution, and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.

    2002-12-01

    Black Carbon (BC), formed during biomass burning, is a chemically heterogeneous, biologically refractory class of carbon compounds (1, 5). BC is purely terrestrial in origin and occurs ubiquitously in soils and terrestrial sediments and is coupled to a common marine fate via atmospheric and fluvial transport, potentially representing a significant reservoir of extremely slowly cycling carbon (1). However, because of its physicochemical heterogeneity and a lack of established analytical techniques, the geochemistry and quantitative importance of BC in the global carbon cycle remains largely undescribed. Existing methods rely on operational definitions with clear-cut but different boundaries inherently designed to analytically determine different parts of the BC continuum (1, 2, 3). In a set of German chernozemic soils, BC from biomass burning makes up 15 to 45 percent of the soil organic carbon (SOC), as determined via UV-high energy photooxidation combined with 13C NMR (4, 6). High resolution microscopy and spectroscopy unambiguously confirmed the presence of submicron BC particles with short-range variability in elemental composition, and two sometimes coexisting modifications, i. e. amorphous char-BC from pyrolized cellulose and graphitic soot-BC. BC, up to 3990 years older than bulk SOC, is 1160 to 5040 carbon-14 years old, indicating significant residence times of BC in soils. These results suggest three major implications: First, it seems that besides climate, vegetation and ioturbation, fire also plays an important role in the pedogenesis of Chernozems (4, 5). Second, BC can be a useful tracer for prehistoric human slash-and-burn activities, and thus represent a novel type of archaeological evidence (7). Third, the concept that BC from biomass burning is the source of the chemically stable aromatic components of soil organic matter, and point toward a different understanding of the large quantitative importance and longevity of BC in the terrestrial system (3

  2. On-farm assessment of tillage impact on the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon and structural soil properties in a semiarid region in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Jemai, Imene; Ben Aissa, Nadhira; Ben Guirat, Saida; Ben-Hammouda, Moncef; Gallali, Tahar

    2012-12-30

    In semiarid areas, low and erratic rainfall, together with the intensive agricultural use of soils, has depleted soil organic carbon and degraded the soil's chemical, biological and physical fertility. To develop efficient soil-management practices for the rapid restoration of severely degraded soils, no-till, mulch-based cropping systems have been adopted. Thus, a study was conducted on a farm to evaluate the effect of a no-tillage system (NT) versus conventional tillage (CT) on the vertical (0-50 cm) distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC), bulk density (BD), total porosity (TP), structural instability (SI), stable aggregates and infiltration coefficient (Ks) in a clay loam soil under rain-fed conditions in a semiarid region of north-western Tunisia. CT consisting of moldboard plowing to a depth of 20 cm was used for continuous wheat production. NT by direct drilling under residue was used for 3 (NT3) and 7 (NT7) years in wheat/fava bean and wheat/sulla crop rotations, respectively. SOC was more significantly increased (p < 0.05) by NT3 and NT7 than by CT at respective depths of 0-10 and 0-20 cm, but a greater increase in the uppermost 10 cm of soil was observed in the NT7 field. NT3 management decreased BD and consequently increased TP at a depth of 0-10 cm. The same trend was observed for the NT7 treatment at a depth of 0-30 cm. Ks was not affected by the NT3 treatment but was improved at a depth of 0-30 cm by the NT7 treatment. Changes in BD, TP and Ks in the NT7 plot were significant only in the first 10 cm of the soil. Both NT3 and NT7 considerably reduced SI (p < 0.1) and enhanced stable aggregates (p < 0.05) across the soil profile. These differences were most pronounced under NT7 at a depth of 0-10 cm. The stratification ratio (SR) of the selected soil properties, except that of SI, showed significant differences between the CT and NT trials, indicating an improvement in soil quality. NT management in the farming systems of north-western Tunisia was

  3. Influence of particle size distribution, organic carbon, pH and chlorides on washing of mercury contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Kleja, Dan B; Biester, Harald; Lagerkvist, Anders; Kumpiene, Jurate

    2014-08-01

    Feasibility of soil washing to remediate Hg contaminated soil was studied. Dry sieving was performed to evaluate Hg distribution in soil particle size fractions. The influence of dissolved organic matter and chlorides on Hg dissolution was assessed by batch leaching tests. Mercury mobilization in the pH range of 3-11 was studied by pH-static titration. Results showed infeasibility of physical separation via dry sieving, as the least contaminated fraction exceeded the Swedish generic guideline value for Hg in soils. Soluble Hg did not correlate with dissolved organic carbon in the water leachate. The highest Hg dissolution was achieved at pH 5 and 11, reaching up to 0.3% of the total Hg. The pH adjustment was therefore not sufficient for the Hg removal to acceptable levels. Chlorides did not facilitate Hg mobilization under acidic pH either. Mercury was firmly bound in the studied soil thus soil washing might be insufficient method to treat the studied soil. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Carbon nitrogen ratio, δ13C, δ15N distribution in eroded and buried soil profiles along a small catena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakab, Gergely; Hegyi, István; Fullen, Michael; Szalai, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    In addition to the serious environmental hazard soil erosion forms and reforms the soil surface. The intensity of these degrading and burial processes is highly variable, it fluctuates in time. One can only get a single view of the current status by the spatial analysis of soil depth and properties. Present study aims to estimate the dynamics of the former driving processes in detail those resulted the recent form of the landscape. Soil samples were taken along two intensively cultivated catenas from the surface to the parent material in vertical and from the ridge to the toe in horizontal direction. A non disturbed soil profile under continuous forest was also sampled as the initial, control status. Soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), carbon nitrogen ratio (C/N), 13C and 15N stable isotope ratios were measured. Soil redistribution was supposed to be started right after the forest clearance 300 years before. Results indicated that the whole amount of solum (1 m) was taken by erosion in some local spots. Most of the soil loss was deposited at the toe, while vertical SOC and δ13C distributions (peaks) in the deposited profiles indicated the original soil surface at various depth. SOC peak in the profile indicated deeper in situ solum compared to the vertical peaks of the C/N and δ13C values. Presumably the layer of the highest SOC values in the sedimentation profiles is also formed by the deposition of initial soil loss from the upper parts of the catena. At this initial phase the selectivity of erosion was supposed to be quite effective for SOC that resulted the highest value. Therefore C/N and δ13C peaks fingerprint the original, in situ soil surface more adequately. The most effective erosion and deposition period was immediately after forest clearance. This emphasized that continuous tillage erosion had subordinate role compared to that of relief. Moreover, SOC erosion and burial in the present case was a sink in terms of mitigation of the

  5. Soil organic matter persistence as a stochastic process: age and transit time distributions of carbon in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    The question of why some organic matter is more persistent than other that decomposes quickly in soils has sparkled a large amount of research in recent years. Persistence is commonly characterized as the turnover or mean residence time of specific compounds or soil organic matter (SOM) pools. However, turnover and residence times are ambiguous measures of persistence, which is better characterized by the probability distribution of ages in the system and in particular pools. We calculated age distributions for a wide range of SOM models, which showed long-tail distributions far from the mean value. Age and transit time distributions from a variety of models also showed: 1) transit times are lower than ages of SOM, 2) turnover times differ significantly from mean ages in slow cycling pools, 3) change in the inputs, without changes in the allocation of photosynthetic products, has no effect on transit times, but does affect system and pool ages. We propose an index to assess persistence of C in soils that can be derived from observations alone or from models. We also ask whether random chance is an important contributor to the persistence of SOM.

  6. Lateral and vertical distribution of soil organic carbon in recently deglaciated areas of Elephant Point (Livingstone island, Maritime Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Ana; Oliva, Marc; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Quijano, Laura; Gaspar, Leticia; Lizaga, Iván

    2017-04-01

    In Maritime Antarctica important environmental changes are affecting ice-free environments of the South Shetland Islands and the northern Antarctica Peninsula. In the Elephant Point Peninsula (Livingstone Island) a rapid glacier retreat during the last decades has exposed already around 20% of its 1.16 km2 surface. Despite soil development is taken place in these new created lands little is known on the characteristics and properties of soils on different parent materials and landforms. One of the main soil properties is the organic carbon but the SOC pool dynamics in Antarctica environments is still poorly understood. This work aims to gain knowledge on the lateral and vertical variations of soil organic carbon (SOC) and organic carbon fractions in surface profiles that have been exposed succeeding the phases of glacier retreat. To this purpose a sampling scheme following the direction of the glacier retreat was established along a moraine extending from the western to the eastern coastlines and a sequence of Holocene marine terraces in Elephant Point. To assess the lateral and vertical variations of SOC and SOC fractions a total of 10 sites were sampled until a depth of 12 cm then sectioned at 3 cm depth intervals. According to its chemical stability and turnover times, SOC can be divided into the active carbon fraction (ACF) composed of labile aliphatic and carboxyl groups with turnover rates of days to few years and a more stable refractory aromatic carbon fraction (SCF) with turnover rates from few years to centuries, highly resistant to microbial and chemical decomposition. The SOC content (%) was measured at 550 °C by the dry combustion method using a LECO, RC-612 multiphase carbon analyser. For the characterization of the active and stable carbon fractions the temperature of the furnace was stepped at 350 °C and 550 °C, respectively. Estimates of SOC and SOC fractions inventories (kg m-2) were done to assess their stocks on the different landforms. SOC

  7. Carbonic anhydrase distribution across organisms and environments: genomic predictors for soil enzymatic fluxes of carbon cycle tracers δ18O and COS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, L. K.; Singer, E.

    2016-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of CO2 are potential tools for differentiating the contributions of photosynthesis and respiration to the balance of global carbon cycling. These processes are coupled at the leaf level via the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which hydrolyzes CO2 in the first biochemical step of the photosynthetic pathway (CO2 + H2O ⇌ HCO3- + H+) and correspondingly structural analogue COS (COS + H2O → CO2 + H2S). CA also accelerates the exchange of oxygen isotopes between CO2 and H2O leading to a distinct isotopic imprint. The biogeochemical cycles of these tracers include significant, yet poorly characterized soil processes that challenge their utility for probing the carbon cycle. In soils, microbial CA also hydrolyze COS and accelerate O isotope exchange between CO2 and soil water. Genomic predictors of microbial CA activity may help account and predict for these soil fluxes. Using a bioinformatics approach, we assess the distribution of the six known CA classes (α, β, γ, δ, η, ζ) in organisms ranging from fungi and plants to archaea and bacteria, and ask whether CA diversity is linked to soil microbial diversity. We survey the diversity and relative abundance of CA in a wide variety of environments and estimate the sensitivity of CA to biome and land use. Finally, we compare the CA distribution in soils to measurements (oxygen isotope and COS fluxes) and models of CA activity to develop genomic predictors for CA activity. This work provides the first survey of CA in soils, a step towards understanding the significant role of CA in microbial ecology and microbe-mediated biogeochemical cycles.

  8. Carbon and 14C distribution in tropical and subtropical agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prastowo, Erwin; Grootes, Pieter; Nadeau, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management affects, through the alternating anoxic and oxic conditions it creates, the transport and stabilisation of soil organic matter (SOM). Irrigation water may percolate more organic materials - dissolved (DOM) and colloidal - into the subsoil during anoxic conditions. Yet a developed ploughpan tends to prevent C from going deeper in the subsoil and partly decouple C distribution in top and sub soil. We investigate the influence of different soil type and environment. We observed the C and 14C distribution in paddy and non-paddy soil profiles in three different soil types from four different climatic regions of tropical Indonesia, and subtropical China. Locations were Sukabumi (Andosol, ca. 850 m a.s.l), Bogor (clayey Alisol, ca. 240 m a.s.l), and Ngawi (Vertisol, ca. 70 m a.s.l) in Jawa, Indonesia, and Cixi (Alisol(sandy), ca. 4 - 6 m a.s.l) in Zhejiang Province, China. We compared rice paddies with selected neighbouring non-paddy fields and employed AMS 14C as a tool to study C dynamics from bulk, alkali soluble-humic, and insoluble humin samples, and macrofossils (plant remains, charcoal). Our data suggest that vegetation type determines the quantity and quality of biomass introduced as litter and root material in top and subsoil, and thus contributes to the soil C content and profile, which fits the 14C signal distribution, as well as 13C in Ngawi with C4 sugar cane as upland crop. 14C concentrations for the mobile humic acid fraction were generally higher than for bulk samples from the same depth, except when recent plant and root debris led to high 14C levels in near-surface samples. The difference in sampling, - averaged layer for bulk sample and 1-cm layer thickness for point sample - shows gradients in C and 14C across the layers, which could be a reason for discrepancies between the two. High 14C concentrations - in Andosol Sukabumi up to 111 pMC - exceed the atmospheric 14CO2concentration in the sampling year in 2012 (˜ 103 pMC) and

  9. Distribution of light and heavy fractions of soil organic carbon as related to land use and tillage practice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tan, Zhengxi; Lal, R.; Owens, L.; Izaurralde, R. C.

    2007-01-01

    Mass distributions of different soil organic carbon (SOC) fractions are influenced by land use and management. Concentrations of C and N in light- and heavy fractions of bulk soils and aggregates in 0–20 cm were determined to evaluate the role of aggregation in SOC sequestration under conventional tillage (CT), no-till (NT), and forest treatments. Light- and heavy fractions of SOC were separated using 1.85 g mL−1 sodium polytungstate solution. Soils under forest and NT preserved, respectively, 167% and 94% more light fraction than those under CT. The mass of light fraction decreased with an increase in soil depth, but significantly increased with an increase in aggregate size. C concentrations of light fraction in all aggregate classes were significantly higher under NT and forest than under CT. C concentrations in heavy fraction averaged 20, 10, and 8 g kg−1 under forest, NT, and CT, respectively. Of the total SOC pool, heavy fraction C accounted for 76% in CT soils and 63% in forest and NT soils. These data suggest that there is a greater protection of SOC by aggregates in the light fraction of minimally disturbed soils than that of disturbed soil, and the SOC loss following conversion from forest to agriculture is attributed to reduction in C concentrations in both heavy and light fractions. In contrast, the SOC gain upon conversion from CT to NT is primarily attributed to an increase in C concentration in the light fraction.

  10. The Effect of Clay Chemistry and Particle Size Distribution on Carbon Storage from Two Forest Types in Piedmont Soils in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walvoort, A.; Werts, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    In most soils, there is a general positive correlation between clay and carbon content laterally through the landscape. Clay serves to both physically and chemically protect carbon from decompositional processes. However, in some of the highly weathered, naturally acidic soils, such as those located in the southern piedmont area of the US, these trends do not necessarily hold true. We conducted two transects through a clay rich soil dominated by montmorillonite and another through a soil dominated by non-active clays and iron oxides in order to compare trends in both particle size distributions and carbon and nitrogen content using both a laser particle size distribution system and an elemental analyzer. The montmorillonite rich soils contain a higher pH due to the alkaline nature of the parent rock (gabbro) and reveal a negative correlation between clay content and carbon storage. The trends also hold true for the non-active clay soils suggesting that the negative correlations are not necessarily linked to clay chemistry. The absence of a difference in nitrogen and carbon percentages within the different clays proves to be significant because it shows that the clay chemistry is not solely responsible for a positive correlation between clay and carbon content. These results reiterate the complexity of carbon storage processes within the piedmont soil system.

  11. Different organic carbon status in soil and its influence on the distribution of 14C-labelled xenobiotics in soil fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzler, Frauke; Séquaris, Jean-Marie; Berns, Anne E.; Burauel, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Aggregate size fractionation in combination with chemical extraction was used to assess pesticide interactions with soil organic matter under different soil management practices [1]. In this study, surface area measurements (BET-N2) were established as a method to calculate the distribution of organic carbon (OC) and xenobiotics in clay and combined silt+sand fractions. It was shown that concentrations of OC associated with clay can be determined from linear relationships between OC and mineral specific surface area [2]. Two sets of experiments were conducted with undisturbed soil columns under field-like conditions. In the first set, maize straw was incorporated into the topsoil and after three months incubation the 14C-labelled xenobiotics benazolin or benzo[a]pyrene were applied. The second set was treated equally, but without maize addition. The calculated distribution coefficients Kd indicated a stronger sorption of benzo[a]pyrene than benazolin derivates. Furthermore, the binding capacity for the xenobiotics was higher in the clay than in the silt+sand fraction due to the relative high specific surface area in the clay fraction. Incorporation of maize straw led to a significant retention and decrease of mobility of the acidic benazolin. The hydrophobic benzo[a]pyrene was less affected by the addition of organic amendment and remained in the topsoil. [1] Schnitzler, F., Lavorenti, A., Berns, A.E., Drewes, N., Vereecken, H., Burauel, P., 2007. The influence of maize residues on the mobility and binding of benazolin: Investigating physically extracted soil fractions. Environmental Pollution 147, 4-13. [2] Séquaris, J.-M., Guisado, M., Moreno, C., Burauel, P., Narres, H.-D., Vereecken, H., 2010. Organic carbon fractions in an agricultural topsoil assessed by the determination of the soil mineral surface area. Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, in press

  12. Tillage and liming effects on aggregate distribution and associated carbon and nitrogen in acid soils of SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Paccard, Clara; Zabaleta, Javier; Benito, Marta; León, Paloma; Mariscal-Sancho, Ignacio; Espejo, Rafael; Hontoria, Chiquinquirá

    2013-04-01

    Beneficial effects of conservation tillage are well known on a wide variety of environmental aspects. The lack of ploughing in no till systems conserves soil structure, enhances the accumulation of organic carbon in the surface layer and promotes the development of soil microorganisms. On the other hand, liming is a common practice in acid soils. Lime raises the pH, reduces Al toxicity enhancing root development, but controversial results have been found about the effects of liming on soil structure. Ultisols from SW of Spain present severe chemical constraints as poor nutrient availability and high Al contents in the exchange complex. On the other hand, traditional practices as conventional tillage led to a dramatic decrease on soil organic carbon and a degraded soil structure. No till plus liming might be recommendable to achieve a sustainable and productive agriculture in these particular soils, but little is known about the effect of these practices on soil structure when applied together. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of traditional tillage (TT) versus no tillage (NT), and liming versus no liming on aggregate size distribution and associated carbon and nitrogen. The study was conducted on a Plinthic Palexerult (Soil Survey Staff, 1999) in the Cañamero's Raña (SW Spain) under Mediterranean climate (mean annual temperature: 15.0° C; mean annual precipitation: 869 mm). The experimental design was a split-plot with four replications. The main factor was tillage (no till versus traditional till) while the second was the inclusion or not of Ca-amendment (sugar foam plus red gypsum). Samples were collected in 2011 after six years of treatment at a 0-5, 5-10 and 10-25 cm depths. The aggregate distribution was determined by wet sieving method to separate four aggregate size classes: (i) >2000 µm (large macroaggregates), (ii) 250-2000 µm (small macroaggregates), (iii) 53-250 µm (microaggregates), (iv) <53 µm (silt and clay fraction). Soil

  13. Assessing Impacts of Land Use Change on Carbon Dynamics via Soil Organic Matter Distribution and Stable Isotopic Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, S.

    2004-12-01

    The conversion of vast amounts of land in Midwestern North America from native tallgrass prairie to agricultural uses promoted the loss of large amounts of soil carbon (C) from this region. Largely due to fire suppression in the region, much rural land not used for crops is comprised of successional forests; many other parcels consist of non-native, cool season grasses. In an effort to assess the status of soil C recovery following agricultural use on these lands, this study explores the C distribution and dynamics in soils supporting two land cover types - cool season grasslands and successional forests. Soil from the top 15 cm in the mineral profile were collected from eight sites representing the same soil type and similar land use histories at the University of Kansas' Nelson Environmental Study Area, within the Kansas Field Station and Ecological Reserves. Four of the sites support cool-season grasses that are maintained by mowing; the remaining four sites support successional forest that has developed for at least 35 y. Soils were subjected to size fractionation, and all fractions as well as bulk soil were analyzed for total C, total nitrogen (N), and C and N isotopic signatures. Soils also underwent long-term incubations, during which cumulative respiration and net N mineralization were assessed. There was no difference between land cover types in bulk soil C or N. The largest size fraction (212 to 2000 mm) from grassland soil had higher total C (45.5\\pm8.67 vs. 29.4\\pm3.36 mg g-1) and higher total N (3.0\\pm0.4 vs. 2.3\\pm0.2 mg g-1) than forested soils' largest fraction; for soil aggregates sized 63 to 212 mm, grassland soil exhibited a near-significant trend of lower total C (P=0.06) and significantly lower total N (2.3\\pm0.2 vs. 3.0\\pm0.3 mg g-1) than the corresponding forest soil fraction. The smallest size fraction (<63 mm) exhibited no difference in total C and N between land cover types. The largest size fractions from both land cover types

  14. Pyrogenic carbon in Australian soils.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fangjie; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi S; Dong, Zhaomin; Yan, Yubo; Lamb, Dane; Bucheli, Thomas D; Choppala, Girish; Duan, Luchun; Semple, Kirk T

    2017-02-16

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC), the combustion residues of fossil fuel and biomass, is a versatile soil fraction active in biogeochemical processes. In this study, the chemo-thermal oxidation method (CTO-375) was applied to investigate the content and distribution of PyC in 30 Australian agricultural, pastoral, bushland and parkland soil with various soil types. Soils were sampled incrementally to 50cm in 6 locations and at another 7 locations at 0-10cm. Results showed that PyC in Australian soils typically ranged from 0.27-5.62mg/g, with three Dermosol soils ranging within 2.58-5.62mg/g. Soil PyC contributed 2.0-11% (N=29) to the total organic carbon (TOC), with one Ferrosol as high as 26%. PyC was concentrated either in the top (0-10cm) or bottom (30-50cm) soil layers, with the highest PyC:TOC ratio in the bottom (30-50cm) soil horizon in all soils. Principal component analysis - multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) suggested the silt-associated organic C factor accounted for 38.5% of the variation in PyC. Our findings suggest that PyC is an important fraction of the TOC (2.0-11%, N=18) and chemically recalcitrant organic C (ROC) obtained by chemical C fractionation method accounts for a significant proportion of soil TOC (47.3-84.9%, N=18). This is the first study comparing these two methods, and it indicates both CTO-375 and C speciation methods can determine a fraction of recalcitrant organic C. However, estimated chemically recalcitrant organic carbon pool (ROC) was approximately an order of magnitude greater than that of thermally stable organic carbon (PyC).

  15. Spatially governed climate factors dominate management in determining the quantity and distribution of soil organic carbon in dryland agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Frances C.; O'Leary, Rebecca A.; Murphy, Daniel V.

    2016-08-01

    Few studies describe the primary drivers influencing soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the distribution of carbon (C) fractions in agricultural systems from semi-arid regions; yet these soils comprise one fifth of the global land area. Here we identified the primary drivers for changes in total SOC and associated particulate (POC), humus (HOC) and resistant (ROC) organic C fractions for 1347 sample points in the semi-arid agricultural region of Western Australia. Total SOC stock (0-0.3 m) varied from 4 to 209 t C ha-1 with 79% of variation explained by measured variables. The proportion of C in POC, HOC and ROC fractions averaged 28%, 45% and 27% respectively. Climate (43%) and land management practices (32%) had the largest relative influence on variation in total SOC. Carbon accumulation was constrained where average daily temperature was above 17.2 °C and annual rainfall below 450 mm, representing approximately 42% of the 197,300 km2 agricultural region. As such large proportions of this region are not suited to C sequestration strategies. For the remainder of the region a strong influence of management practices on SOC indicate opportunities for C sequestration strategies associated with incorporation of longer pasture phases and adequate fertilisation.

  16. Spatially governed climate factors dominate management in determining the quantity and distribution of soil organic carbon in dryland agricultural systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, Frances C.; O’Leary, Rebecca A.; Murphy, Daniel V.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies describe the primary drivers influencing soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the distribution of carbon (C) fractions in agricultural systems from semi-arid regions; yet these soils comprise one fifth of the global land area. Here we identified the primary drivers for changes in total SOC and associated particulate (POC), humus (HOC) and resistant (ROC) organic C fractions for 1347 sample points in the semi-arid agricultural region of Western Australia. Total SOC stock (0–0.3 m) varied from 4 to 209 t C ha−1 with 79% of variation explained by measured variables. The proportion of C in POC, HOC and ROC fractions averaged 28%, 45% and 27% respectively. Climate (43%) and land management practices (32%) had the largest relative influence on variation in total SOC. Carbon accumulation was constrained where average daily temperature was above 17.2 °C and annual rainfall below 450 mm, representing approximately 42% of the 197,300 km2 agricultural region. As such large proportions of this region are not suited to C sequestration strategies. For the remainder of the region a strong influence of management practices on SOC indicate opportunities for C sequestration strategies associated with incorporation of longer pasture phases and adequate fertilisation. PMID:27530805

  17. Distribution characteristic of soil organic carbon fraction in different types of wetland in Hongze Lake of China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Xu, Hongwen

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon fractions included microbial biomass carbon (MBC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and labile organic carbon (LOC), which was investigated over a 0-20 cm depth profile in three types of wetland in Hongze Lake of China. Their ecoenvironmental effect and the relationships with soil organic carbon (SOC) were analyzed in present experiment. The results showed that both active and SOC contents were in order reduced by estuarine wetland, flood plain, and out-of-lake wetland. Pearson correlative analysis indicated that MBC and DOC were positively related to SOC. The lowest ratios of MBC and DOC to SOC in the estuarine wetland suggested that the turnover rate of microbial active carbon pool was fairly low in this kind of wetland. Our results showed that estuarine wetland had a strong carbon sink function, which played important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions; besides, changes of water condition might affect the accumulation and decomposition of organic carbon in the wetland soils.

  18. Impact of deforestation on soil carbon stock and its spatial distribution in the Western Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kucuker, Mehmet Ali; Guney, Mert; Oral, H Volkan; Copty, Nadim K; Onay, Turgut T

    2015-01-01

    Land use management is one of the most critical factors influencing soil carbon storage and the global carbon cycle. This study evaluates the impact of land use change on the soil carbon stock in the Karasu region of Turkey which in the last two decades has undergone substantial deforestation to expand hazelnut plantations. Analysis of seasonal soil data indicated that the carbon content decreased rapidly with depth for both land uses. Statistical analyses indicated that the difference between the surface carbon stock (defined over 0-5 cm depth) in agricultural and forested areas is statistically significant (Agricultural = 1.74 kg/m(2), Forested = 2.09 kg/m(2), p = 0.014). On the other hand, the average carbon stocks estimated over the 0-1 m depth were 12.36 and 12.12 kg/m(2) in forested and agricultural soils, respectively. The carbon stock (defined over 1 m depth) in the two land uses were not significantly different which is attributed in part to the negative correlation between carbon stock and bulk density (-0.353, p < 0.01). The soil carbon stock over the entire study area was mapped using a conditional kriging approach which jointly uses the collected soil carbon data and satellite-based land use images. Based on the kriging map, the spatially soil carbon stock (0-1 m dept) ranged about 2 kg/m(2) in highly developed areas to more than 23 kg/m(2) in intensively cultivated areas as well as the averaged soil carbon stock (0-1 m depth) was estimated as 10.4 kg/m(2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Data-mining analysis of the global distribution of soil carbon in observational databases and Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Shoji; Nanko, Kazuki; Ťupek, Boris; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2017-03-01

    Future climate change will dramatically change the carbon balance in the soil, and this change will affect the terrestrial carbon stock and the climate itself. Earth system models (ESMs) are used to understand the current climate and to project future climate conditions, but the soil organic carbon (SOC) stock simulated by ESMs and those of observational databases are not well correlated when the two are compared at fine grid scales. However, the specific key processes and factors, as well as the relationships among these factors that govern the SOC stock, remain unclear; the inclusion of such missing information would improve the agreement between modeled and observational data. In this study, we sought to identify the influential factors that govern global SOC distribution in observational databases, as well as those simulated by ESMs. We used a data-mining (machine-learning) (boosted regression trees - BRT) scheme to identify the factors affecting the SOC stock. We applied BRT scheme to three observational databases and 15 ESM outputs from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and examined the effects of 13 variables/factors categorized into five groups (climate, soil property, topography, vegetation, and land-use history). Globally, the contributions of mean annual temperature, clay content, carbon-to-nitrogen (CN) ratio, wetland ratio, and land cover were high in observational databases, whereas the contributions of the mean annual temperature, land cover, and net primary productivity (NPP) were predominant in the SOC distribution in ESMs. A comparison of the influential factors at a global scale revealed that the most distinct differences between the SOCs from the observational databases and ESMs were the low clay content and CN ratio contributions, and the high NPP contribution in the ESMs. The results of this study will aid in identifying the causes of the current mismatches between observational SOC databases and ESM outputs

  20. Spatial distribution of glomalin-related soil protein and its relationship with sediment carbon sequestration across a mangrove forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Lu, Haoliang; Chen, Jingyan; Hong, Hualong; Liu, Jingchun; Li, Junwei; Yan, Chongling

    2017-09-16

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi produce a recalcitrant glycoprotein, (glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP)), which can contribute to soil carbon sequestration. Here we made a first study to characterize the spatial distribution of GRSP fractions in a mangrove forest at Zhangjiang Estuary, Southeastern China and to explore potential contributions of GRSP to sediment organic carbon (SOC) in this forest. We identified GRSP fractions in surface sediments, as well as those at a depth of 50 cm. The contents of easily extractable GRSP (EE-GRSP), total GRSP (T-GRSP), GRSP in particulate organic matter (POM-GRSP) and GRSP in pore water (PW-GRSP) ranged between 1.20-2.22mgg(-1), 1.38-2.61mgg(-1), 1.45-10.78mgg(-1) and 10.35-39.65mgL(-1) respectively, and these four GRSPs are significantly affected by sample sites and sediment layers. Carbon in GRSP accounted for 2.8-5.9% of SOC and its contributions can far exceed that of microbial biomass carbon (0.21-0.73%) in the 0-50cm sediment layers. Our data indicate that GRSP could be transported by pore water and accumulated in sediment profiles. The non-linear regression analysis revealed that as SOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) contents decrease, GRSP proportions increase, indicating the increase of the recalcitrant carbon offsetting the effects of mangrove carbon loss, especially labile C. Regression and ordination analyses indicated that GRSP fractions were mainly positively correlated with sediment carbon fractions and spore density but were negatively correlated with sand, pH. Strikingly, the unfavorable environmental factors for microbial organisms, especially AM fungi, prove to be able to promote the production or accumulation of GRSP. We propose that there are two different pathways for affecting the pool size of GRSP in mangrove ecosystems: (i) directly via indigenous AM fungi propagules; (ii) or via the GRSP transport and deposition by pore water and tides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Distribution and Dynamics of Cropland Soil Organic Carbon in Jianghan Plain: A Case Study of Qianjiang City].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-zhu; Xiao, He-ai; Zhou, Ping; Tong, Cheng-li; Ge, Ti-da; Zeng, Guan-jun; Wu, Jin-shui

    2015-09-01

    Taking an example of Qianjiang City in Jianghan Plain, the distribution and dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) in croplands was studied in present study. The cropland included both paddy field and dry land. SOC contents were analyzed by taking soil samples of topsoil (0-20 cm) in 2011 according to land uses and soil types, and then compared with the initial SOC conducted in the period of the second soil survey (1983). The results showed that SOC density and storage in 2011 was 30.50 t . hm-2and 452. 82 x 10(4) t, respectively. During the past 28 years, the cropland SOC density was decreased at a rate of 0. 10 t . (hm2.a)-1, and SOC storage was reduced by 9% with the decreasing rate of 1. 53 t.a-1. SOC density and storage in paddy field was about 1. 6 and 1. 3 times over that in dry land in the two selected periods. However, the dynamics of SOC in paddy field and dry land were quite the opposite. In paddy field, SOC was lost by 16% (52. 83 x 10(4) t), with a decreasing rate of 0. 23 t . (hm2.a)-1; whereas in dry land, SOC was increased by 5% (8. 57 x 10(4) t), with an increasing rate of 0. 05 t . (hm2.a)-1. The loss of SOC in paddy field was mainly resulted from gleyed paddy soil, which suffered a fast decrease of SOC density and accounted for 80% of SOC lost in paddy field. In addition, Hydromorphic paddy soil, accounting for 50% of the area of paddy field, tended to loss another 15% of SOC in paddy field. While in dry land, the minor SOC storage increased was dominantly attributed to grey fluvo aquic soil, which accounted for 96% of the area of dry land. Thus, the dynamics of cropland SOC in Jianghan Plain was dominantly controlled by SOC changes in paddy field. Our findings suggest that effective management should be considered to enhance the capacity of SOC accumulation and sequestration in the low-yield paddy field and the types of soils that are large in area.

  2. Soil carbon in the hyperarid soils from the Atacama Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Fletcher, Lauren; Perez, Saul; Condori, Rene; Conley, Catharine; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Chris

    Soil carbon content and its relation to site characteristics are important in evaluating current regional, continental, and global soil C stores and projecting future changes. Data from 485 soil samples were compiled for 6 different types of hyperarid soils of the Atacama desert located in South America, along the western slopes of the Andes and the Pacific Ocean from 16° S to 30° S. The soil organic carbon (SOC) of sandy soil ranged from 0.004 to 0.012% C/gr of soil, which is normally distributed in the study (mean = 0.136 g C m-2) for the 0-0.1 m profile and 0.001 to 0.029% C/gr of soil (mean = 2.998 g C m-2) for the 0-0.9 m profile. Variability in SOC contents and bulk density contributed substantially to SOC variation. Regression analysis of climatic and pedological characteristics associated with hyperarid soils with respect to their SOC indicated that combinations of site characteristics explained up to 90% of the SOC variability. The SOC increased with precipitation, and decreasing evaporation and temperature. Climatic zones, and carbonate carbon were noted for different desert soil types. The largest accumulations of carbonates (SIC) were found in calcic soils and in warm, arid areas. SIC contents ranged from 0.017 to 0.14% C/gr of soil (mean = 1.93 g C m-2) for the 0-0.1 m profile and 0.02 to 0.48% Carbon/g of soil (mean = 6.66 g C m-2) for the 0-0.9 m profile. The top 1.0-m soil layer of hyperarid lands contains some 1.13 Tg of organic carbon and 3.1 Tg of carbonate carbon. The total stored carbon was 3.7-fold the organic carbon alone. Thus, the carbon stored in soil carbonates in desertification prone lands in Atacama Desert is an important factor affecting changes in concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Key words: Soil organic carbon, carbonates, hyperarid soils, Atacama Desert.

  3. Comparison of different interpolation methods for spatial distribution of soil organic carbon and some soil properties in the Black Sea backward region of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göl, Ceyhun; Bulut, Sinan; Bolat, Ferhat

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to compare the spatial variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) in four adjacent land uses including the cultivated area, the grassland area, the plantation area and the natural forest area in the semi - arid region of Black Sea backward region of Turkey. Some of the soil properties, including total nitrogen, SOC, soil organic matter, and bulk density were measured on a grid with a 50 m sampling distance on the top soil (0-15 cm depth). Accordingly, a total of 120 samples were taken from the four adjacent land uses. Data was analyzed using geostatistical methods. The methods used were: Block kriging (BK), co - kriging (CK) with organic matter, total nitrogen and bulk density as auxiliary variables and inverse distance weighting (IDW) methods with the power of 1, 2 and 4. The methods were compared using a performance criteria that included root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and the coefficient of correlation (r). The one - way ANOVA test showed that differences between the natural (0.6653 ± 0.2901) - plantation forest (0.7109 ± 0.2729) areas and the grassland (1.3964 ± 0.6828) - cultivated areas (1.5851 ± 0.5541) were statistically significant at 0.05 level (F = 28.462). The best model for describing spatially variation of SOC was CK with the lowest error criteria (RMSE = 0.3342, MAE = 0.2292) and the highest coefficient of correlation (r = 0.84). The spatial structure of SOC could be well described by the spherical model. The nugget effect indicated that SOC was moderately dependent on the study area. The error distributions of the model showed that the improved model was unbiased in predicting the spatial distribution of SOC. This study's results revealed that an explanatory variable linked SOC increased success of spatial interpolation methods. In subsequent studies, this case should be taken into account for reaching more accurate outputs.

  4. [Impact of Land Utilization Pattern on Distributing Characters of Labile Organic Carbon in Soil Aggregates in Jinyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2015-09-01

    Four land utilization patterns were selected for this study in Jinyun mountain, including subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (abbreviation: forest), sloping farmland, orchard and abandoned land. Soil samples were taken every 10 cm in the depth of 60 cm soil and proportions of large macroaggregates (> 2 mm), small macroaggregates (0. 25-2 mm), microaggregates (0. 053 - 0. 25 mm) and silt + clay (<0. 053 mm) were obtained by wet sieving method to measure the content of organic carbon and labile organic carbon in each aggregate fraction and analyze impacts of land uses on organic carbon and labile organic carbon of soil aggregates. LOC content of four soil aggregates were significantly reduced with the increase of soil depth; in layers of 0-60 cm soil depth, our results showed that LOC contents of forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland. Reserves of labile organic carbon were estimated by the same soil quality, it revealed that forest (3. 68 Mg.hm-2) > abandoned land (1. 73 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (1. 43 Mg.hm-2) >sloping farmland (0.54 Mg.hm-2) in large macroaggregates, abandoned land (7.77, 5. 01 Mg.hm-2) > forest (4. 96, 2.71 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (3. 33, 21. 10 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (1. 68, 1. 35 Mg.hm-2) in small macroaggregates and microaggregates, and abandoned land(4. 32 Mg.hm-2) > orchard(4. 00 Mg.hm-2) > forest(3. 22 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (2.37 Mg.hm-2) in silt + clay, forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland in other three soil aggregates except silt + clay. It was observed that the level of organic carbon and labile organic carbon were decreased when bringing forest under cultivation to orchard or farmland, and augments on organic carbon and labile organic carbon were found after exchanging farmland to abandoned land. The most reverses of forest and abandoned land emerged in small macroaggregates, orchard and sloping farmland were in microaggregates. That was, during the

  5. Spatial Patterns of Soil Organic Carbon Relative to Tree Size and Canopy Distribution in a Semi-Desert Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, H. L.; Archer, S.

    2004-12-01

    The abundance of woody species in grasslands and savannas has increased globally over the past century. Recent estimates suggest that this proliferation of woody plants may account for a significant fraction of the Northern Hemisphere C sink, although a large degree of uncertainty exists in the magnitude and spatial distribution of these plant and soil pools. While field-based inventories have made progress in assessing the role of aboveground woody growth in ecosystem C inventories, the effect of woody proliferation on soil organic carbon (SOC) remains controversial, despite the fact that the majority of ecosystem C in these systems is typically belowground. Elevated levels of SOC underneath woody plant canopies have been widely reported, but little is known about the spatial distribution of SOC relative to tree canopies. Understanding the spatial distribution of SOC is critical, however, to developing accurate landscape-scale assessments of woody proliferation impacts on ecosystem C pools. We quantified the influence of encroaching mesquite trees (Fabaceae: Prosopis velutina) on the concentration of SOC and total nitrogen (TN) in a semi-desert grassland in southern Arizona. SOC concentrations near the boles of large trees (basal diameter 85-102 cm) were approximately double that of SOC in intercanopy zones (0.9% vs. 0.4% SOC by weight). SOC declined moving out from the bole to the canopy edge, at which point it was equivalent to inter-canopy spaces. Small to medium-sized trees (basal diameters less than 85 cm) had minimal influence on SOC concentrations. Patterns of TN values mirrored those of SOC in all cases, although TN values were roughly an order of magnitude lower than SOC values. These data suggest that accurate accounting of landscape-level SOC stocks will require developing area-weighting algorithms that account for tree size and bole-to-canopy gradients.

  6. STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    SciTech Connect

    Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

    2005-04-01

    Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

  7. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; ...

    2014-10-30

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon (OC) stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous OC stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global C cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil OC stocks to changing climatic conditions. In this review,more » we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of OC stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this OC to permafrost thaw under a warming climate.« less

  8. Deep Soil: Quantifying and Modeling Subsurface Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. N.; Devine, W.; Harrison, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Some soil carbon datasets that are spatially rich, such as the USDA Forest Service Inventory and Analysis National Program dataset, sample soil to only 20 cm (8 inches), despite evidence that substantial stores of soil C can be found deeper in the soil profile. The maximum extent of tree rooting is typically many meters deep and provides: direct exchange with the soil solution; redistribution of water from deep horizons toward the surface during times of drought; resources for active microbial communities in deep soil around root channels; and direct carbon inputs through exudates and root turnover. This study examined soil carbon to a depth of 2.5 meters across 22 soils in Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests. Excavations at 20 additional sites took place in summer 2014, greatly expanding the spatial coverage and extent of the data set. Forest floor and mineral soil bulk density samples were collected at depths of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 meters. Pool estimates from systematic sampling depths shallower than 1.5 m yielded significantly smaller estimates than the total soil stock to 2.5 meters (P<0.01). On average, only 5% of soil C was found in the litter layer, 35% was found below 0.5 meter, and 21% was found below 1.0 meter. Due to the difficulty of excavating and measuring deep soil carbon, a series of nonlinear mixed effect models were fit to the data to predict deep soil carbon stocks given sampling to 1.0 meter. A model using an inverse polynomial function predicted soil carbon to 2.5 meters with -5.6% mean error. The largest errors occurred in Andisols with non-crystalline minerals, which can adsorb large quantities of carbon on mineral surfaces and preserve it from decomposition. An accurate spatial dataset of soil depth to bedrock would be extremely useful to constrain models of the vertical distribution of soil carbon. Efforts to represent carbon in spatial models would benefit from considering the vertical distribution of carbon in soil. Sampling

  9. [Effect of straw-returning on the storage and distribution of different active fractions of soil organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hul; Wang, Xu-dong; Tian, Xiao-hong

    2014-12-01

    The impacts of straw mulching and returning on the storage of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral associated organic carbon (MOC), and their proportions to the total organic carbon (TOC) were studied based on a field experiment. The results showed that compared to the treatment of wheat straw soil-returning (WR), the storage of TOC and MOC decreased by 4.1% and 9.7% respectively in 0-20 cm soil in the treatment with wheat straw mulching (WM), but the storage of DOC and POC increased by 207.7% and 11.9%, and TOC and POC increased significantly in 20-40 cm soil. Compared to the treatment with maize straw soil-returning (MR), the storage of TOC and MOC in the plough pan soil of the treatment with maize straw mulching (MM) increased by 13.6% and 14.6% , respectively. Compared to the WR-MR treatment, the storage of TOC and MOC in top soil (0-20 icm) significantly decreased by 8.5% and 10.3% respectively in WM-MM treatment. The storage of TOC, and POC in top soil was significantly higher in the treatments with maize straw soil-returning or mulching than that with wheat straw. Compared to the treatment without straw (CK), the storage of TOC in top soil increased by 5.2% to 18.0% in the treatments with straw returning or mulching in the six modes (WM, WR, MM, MR, WM-MM,WR-MR) (P<0.05), but the storage of TOC in the plough pan soil decreased by 8.0% to 11.5% (P<0.05) except for the treatments of WM and MM. The storage of DOC and DOC/TOC ratio decreased significantly in top soil in the treatments with straw mulching or returning in six modes. The storage of POC and POC/TOC ratio in WM and WM-MM treatments, MOC and MOC/TOC ratio in WR treatment, increased significantly in top soil. In the other three treatments with straw mulching and returning (MM, MR, WR-MR), the storage of POC and MOC increased significantly in top soil. These results suggested that straw mulching had the potential to accumulate active organic carbon fraction

  10. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy for mapping nano-scale distribution of organic carbon forms in soil: Application to black carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Johannes; Liang, Biqing; Solomon, Dawit; Lerotic, Mirna; LuizãO, Flavio; Kinyangi, James; SchäFer, Thorsten; Wirick, Sue; Jacobsen, Chris

    2005-03-01

    Small-scale heterogeneity of organic carbon (C) forms in soils is poorly quantified since appropriate analytical techniques were not available up to now. Specifically, tools for the identification of functional groups on the surface of micrometer-sized black C particles were not available up to now. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) using synchrotron radiation was used in conjunction with Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate nano-scale distribution (50-nm resolution) of C forms in black C particles and compared to synchrotron-based FTIR spectroscopy. A new embedding technique was developed that did not build on a C-based embedding medium and did not pose the risk of heat damage to the sample. Elemental sulfur (S) was melted to 220°C until it polymerized and quenched with liquid N2 to obtain a very viscous plastic S in which the black C could be embedded until it hardened to a noncrystalline state and was ultrasectioned. Principal component and cluster analysis followed by singular value decomposition was able to resolve distinct areas in a black carbon particle. The core of the studied biomass-derived black C particles was highly aromatic even after thousands of years of exposure in soil and resembled the spectral characteristics of fresh charcoal. Surrounding this core and on the surface of the black C particle, however, much larger proportions of carboxylic and phenolic C forms were identified that were spatially and structurally distinct from the core of the particle. Cluster analysis provided evidence for both oxidation of the black C particle itself as well as adsorption of non-black C. NEXAFS spectroscopy has great potential to allow new insight into black C properties with important implications for biogeochemical cycles such as mineralization of black C in soils and sediments, and adsorption of C, nutrients, and pollutants as well as transport in the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere.

  11. Dynamics of soil GHG emissions shaped by hydration state, aggregate size distribution and carbon placement: Column experiments using artificial soil aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    Dynamics of soil hydration affect microbial community dynamics and various biogeochemical processes (soil respiration, denitrification, methane production). Evidence suggests that anoxic conditions may persist in soil aggregates (long after bulk soil is aerated) thereby providing niches for anaerobic microbial communities (hot spots). Despite their recognized role in mediating soil biogeochemical fluxes, systematic studies of the impact of different environmental conditions on CO2, N2O and CH4 emissions from soil aggregates remain rare. We constructed artificial aggregates using a silt loam soil of different sizes and different carbon configurations (mixed, core, no addition) to study effects of hydration, aggregate size and carbon source configuration on GHG emissions. An assembly of aggregates of three sizes (18, 12, and 6 mm aggregates) was embedded in sand columns at four distinct layers (3 replicates for each aggregate-carbon source, 9 columns) and the water level was varied periodically to quantify effects of wetting/drying and submersion on GHG fluxes. Several gas samples were taken from the headspaces of each column (after closure) and analyzed using GC with the proper detectors to resolve fluxes. Results illustrate the critical role of hydration states on GHG emission, for example, lowering the water table (unsaturated conditions) decreases CH4 emissions while increasing N2O flux. We observe links between aerobic processes (e.g., nitrification) and anaerobic denitrification presumably by promoting alternative pathways (e.g., ammonia and nitrite oxidation). Methane production was activated under highly anoxic conditions (prolonged inundation). N2O production was highest form aggregates with carbon placed in the (anoxic) core whereas CO2 production rates were comparable from mixed and centered carbon sources (at rates that fluctuated with hydration conditions). Experimental results of artificial soil aggregates are of interest for improvement of physically

  12. Soil Carbon Sequestration: Perspectives from Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderman, J.; Macdonald, L.; Baldock, J.

    2011-12-01

    Australia is currently embarking upon an unparalleled program to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by engaging farmers and landholders to reduce emissions and store carbon in the soil. Currently, the magnitude of a potential soil carbon sink in Australian agricultural soils is largely unknown. The oft repeated rubric that adoption of recommended management practices (RMP) can raise soil carbon levels to 50-66% of pre-clearing levels has lead many to conclude that soil carbon sequestration can offset a large portion of Australia's current greenhouse gas emissions. Is there evidence in Australia (and abroad) to support these sequestration rates? In this presentation, we will present findings from both a retrospective analysis of existing field trial data and preliminary results from a national scale assessment of current soil carbon stocks under different agricultural management practices. A comprehensive review of field-trial data in Australia suggests that most management shifts within a given agricultural system (i.e. tillage, stubble management, fertilizer application, etc...) result in modest relative gains of 0.1 to 0.3 tC ha-1 yr-1. Importantly, whenever time series data was available, we found that the relative improvement in soil carbon stocks under RMPs was due to a reduction in the rate of loss of soil carbon and not in an actual increase in soil carbon. This finding has important repercussions for both how we think about soil carbon sequestration and how we can account for it in an accounting framework. Current research within the National Soil Carbon Research Program looks to assess the potential for agricultural management to influence soil carbon content and its distribution within various measurable carbon pools (particulate, humus, charcoal-like). For example, 200 randomly selected farms have been sampled in two major agricultural regions in South Australia based on a soil-type by rainfall stratification. In addition to measuring carbon content and

  13. Distribution and biodegradability of water soluble organic carbon and nitrogen in subarctic Alaskan soils under three different land uses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) contains labile organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) and is sensitive to soil management. However, knowledge about quantitative changes of water soluble organic C (WSOC) and N (WSON) impacted by land use conversion is still limited. In this chapter, the level a...

  14. Depth-distribution patterns and control of soil organic carbon in coastal salt marshes with different plant covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Junhong; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Jia, Jia; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2016-10-01

    This study was carried out in three kinds of salt marshes according to the vegetation covers, including Phragmites australis salt marsh (PSM), Suaeda salus salt marsh (SSM) and Tamarix chinensis-Suaeda salus salt marsh (TSSM). We applied allometric function, exponential function and logistic function to model the depth distribution of the SOCv and SOCc for each salt marsh, respectively. The results showed that the exponential function fits the depth distribution of the SOCv more well than other two functions. The SOCc can be fitted very well by all three functions for three salt marsh (Adj. R2 > 0.99), of which the allometric function was the best one. The mean topsoil concentration factors (TCFs) of three salt marshes were beyond 0.1, which means the SOC enrichment in surface soils due to plant cycling, but TCFs in PSM were significantly higher than those in SSM (P < 0.05). Nearly 30% of SOC was concentrated in the top 20 cm soils. The results of general linear model (GLM) suggested that four soil properties (soil water content, pH, soil salt content and silt+clay) and their interactive effects explained about 80% of the total variation of SOC stock in the top 20 cm soils and the 20-100 cm soil layers.

  15. Depth-distribution patterns and control of soil organic carbon in coastal salt marshes with different plant covers

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Junhong; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Jia, Jia; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out in three kinds of salt marshes according to the vegetation covers, including Phragmites australis salt marsh (PSM), Suaeda salus salt marsh (SSM) and Tamarix chinensis-Suaeda salus salt marsh (TSSM). We applied allometric function, exponential function and logistic function to model the depth distribution of the SOCv and SOCc for each salt marsh, respectively. The results showed that the exponential function fits the depth distribution of the SOCv more well than other two functions. The SOCc can be fitted very well by all three functions for three salt marsh (Adj. R2 > 0.99), of which the allometric function was the best one. The mean topsoil concentration factors (TCFs) of three salt marshes were beyond 0.1, which means the SOC enrichment in surface soils due to plant cycling, but TCFs in PSM were significantly higher than those in SSM (P < 0.05). Nearly 30% of SOC was concentrated in the top 20 cm soils. The results of general linear model (GLM) suggested that four soil properties (soil water content, pH, soil salt content and silt+clay) and their interactive effects explained about 80% of the total variation of SOC stock in the top 20 cm soils and the 20–100 cm soil layers. PMID:27708421

  16. Depth-distribution patterns and control of soil organic carbon in coastal salt marshes with different plant covers.

    PubMed

    Bai, Junhong; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Jia, Jia; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2016-10-06

    This study was carried out in three kinds of salt marshes according to the vegetation covers, including Phragmites australis salt marsh (PSM), Suaeda salus salt marsh (SSM) and Tamarix chinensis-Suaeda salus salt marsh (TSSM). We applied allometric function, exponential function and logistic function to model the depth distribution of the SOCv and SOCc for each salt marsh, respectively. The results showed that the exponential function fits the depth distribution of the SOCv more well than other two functions. The SOCc can be fitted very well by all three functions for three salt marsh (Adj. R(2) > 0.99), of which the allometric function was the best one. The mean topsoil concentration factors (TCFs) of three salt marshes were beyond 0.1, which means the SOC enrichment in surface soils due to plant cycling, but TCFs in PSM were significantly higher than those in SSM (P < 0.05). Nearly 30% of SOC was concentrated in the top 20 cm soils. The results of general linear model (GLM) suggested that four soil properties (soil water content, pH, soil salt content and silt+clay) and their interactive effects explained about 80% of the total variation of SOC stock in the top 20 cm soils and the 20-100 cm soil layers.

  17. Vertical distribution of total carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in riparian soils of Walnut Creek, southern Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Palmer, J.A.; Bettis, E. Arthur; Jacobson, P.; Schultz, R.C.; Isenhart, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Subsurface lithology plays an important role in many riparian zone processes, but few studies have examined how sediment nutrient concentrations vary with depth. In this study, we evaluated concentrations of nutrients (N, C and P) with depth in a riparian zone of the glaciated Midwest. A total of 146 sediment samples were collected from 24 cores that extended to a maximum depth of 3.6??m at eight sites in the riparian zone of Walnut Creek. Subsurface deposits were predominantly silt loam, becoming coarser and more variable with depth. Nitrogen and carbon content ranged from < 0.01 to 0.42% and < 0.01 to 7.08%, respectively, and exhibited a strong trend of decreasing nutrient content with depth. In contrast, P concentrations averaged 574??mg/kg and did not vary systematically. Systematic variations in texture and nutrient content with depth largely corresponded to stratigraphic differentiation among the Camp Creek, Roberts Creek and Gunder members of the regionally recognized Holocene-age DeForest Formation. Variations in subsurface nutrient content were not found to be significantly related to present land cover, but land cover may have influenced nutrient content at the time of original sediment accumulation. Subsurface lithology and stratigraphy should be considered an important component in riparian zone studies where nutrient losses to streams via streambank erosion or groundwater discharge are assessed. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Storages and distributed patterns of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen during the succession of artificial sand-binding vegetation in arid desert ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Hong; Li, Xin-Rong; Zhou, Yu-Yan; Li, Yuan-Shou

    2012-03-01

    Soil carbon pool acts as the largest one of carbon pools in the terrestrial ecosystem. The storages and distributed patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) evaluated accurately are helpful to predict the feedback between the terrestrial ecosystem and climate changes. Based on the data about bulk density, content of SOC and TN at 0-100 cm soil profile, the density of SOC and TN at the temporal (chronosequence of artificial vegetation) and spatial (vertical) distributed patterns have been estimated. The results indicated that storages of SOC and TN at 0-100 cm depth increased with the chronosequence of artificial vegetation. The storages of SOC and TN showed the same tendency with the succession time of artificial vegetation. Storages of SOC and TN significantly increased at the early stage of banding sand by artificially vegetation (< 16 a), then piled up at the mid-stage (16-25 a), and markedly increased at the late stage (> 25 a). The variation of storages mainly occurred in the 0-20 cm depth. The storages decreased with the soil vertical depth. At the early stage of banding sand, increase in storage included every depth (0-100 cm). Whereas, at the later stage, increase in storage at 0-20 cm depth was main, and increase in the 20-100 cm was inconspicuous. The accumulation of storage at the shallow soil depth was more notability with the succession of artificial vegetation. The distributed pattern of storage in SOC and TN has been confirmed in arid desert regions below 200 mm annual precipitation. This was beneficial to understand the carbon cycle and to predict the feedback relationship between desert ecosystem and climate changes.

  19. Soil carbon pools and world life zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Wilfred M.; Emanuel, William R.; Zinke, Paul J.; Stangenberger, Alan G.

    1982-07-01

    Soil organic carbon in active exchange with the atmosphere constitutes approximately two-thirds of the carbon in terrestrial ecosystems1,2. The relatively large size and long residence time of this pool (of the order of 1,200 yr) make it a potentially important sink for carbon released to the atmosphere by fossil fuel combustion; however, in many cases, human disturbance has caused a decrease in soil carbon storage3,4. Various recent estimates place the global total of soil carbon between 700 (ref. 2) and 2,946 × 1015 g (ref. 5) with several intermediate estimates: 1,080 (ref. 1), 1,392 (ref. 6), 1,456 (ref. 3), and 2,070 × 1015g (ref. 7). Schlesinger's3 estimate seems to be based on the most extensive data base (~200 observations, some of which are mean values derived from large studies in particular areas) and is widely cited in carbon cycle studies. In addition to estimating the world soil carbon pool, it is important to establish the relationships between the geographical distribution of soil carbon and climate, vegetation, human development and other factors as a basis for assessing the influence of changes in any of these factors on the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of 2,700 soil profiles, organized on a climate basis using the Holdridge life-zone classification system8, indicates relationships between soil carbon density and climate, a major soil forming factor. Soil carbon density generally increases with increasing precipitation, and there is an increase in soil carbon with decreasing temperature for any particular level of precipitation. When the potential evapotranspiration equals annual precipitation, soil carbon density9 is ~10 kg m-2, exceptions to this being warm temperate and subtropical soils. Based on recent estimates of the areal extent of major ecosystem complexes9,10 which correspond well with climatic life zones, the global soil organic carbon pool is estimated to be ~1,395 × 1015g.

  20. Amount, determining factors and spatial distribution of soil organic carbon storage in the Dano catchment (Southwest Burkina-Faso)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounkpatin, O.; Op de Hipt, F.; Bossa, A. Y.; Welp, G.; Amelung, W.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to project and to mitigate the impacts of climate change is closely related to the evaluation of soil organic carbon (SOC) content and stock across different types of land use and soil groups. Therefore, this study aimed at estimating the surface and subsoil organic carbon stocks in different land use systems and across various soil groups. A further aim was to assess the spatial variability of SOC content and stocks and how this is controlled by climate and site properties. The Random Forest (RF) modelling was used and compared to Ordinary Kriging interpolation (OK) for the topsoil SOC and stock. About 70 soil profiles were described along 16 transects with 197 samples collected from different horizons up to 1 m depth where possible. In addition, 1205 samples were collected within an intensive auger grid mapping. Mid-infrared spectroscopy and partial least-squares analysis were used as a fast and low-cost technique to handle the large amount of samples for the SOC estimation. The natural/semi natural vegetation recorded the highest SOC stock in the topsoil (28.6 t C ha-1) as compared to the cropland (25.5 t C ha-1). Over 1 m depth, Gleysols (87.4 t C ha-1) stored the highest amount of SOC stock followed by the Cambisols (76. t C ha-1) and the Plinthosols (73.1 t C ha-1) while the lowest were found in the Lixisols (57.8 t C ha-1). For the topsoil, the RF model revealed soil properties such as cation exchange capacity (CEC) and stone content as main factors affecting SOC content variability while CEC and bulk density were the major drivers for the subsoil. The carbon stock variability was mainly affected by the CEC and the reference soil group in the topsoil while horizon thickness and bulk density constituted the main factors for the subsoil. The geostatistical evaluation proved that the SOC content in the Dano catchment has a moderate spatial autocorrelation while the carbon stock was strongly spatially dependent. The RF gave a better prediction for

  1. Vertical distribution of soil organic carbon originated from a prior peatland in Greece and impacts on the landscape, after conversion to arable land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayrotis, Theodore; Charoulis, A.; Vavoulidou, E.; Tziouvalekas, M.

    2010-05-01

    The vertical distribution and the status of soil organic carbon (Corg.) in 66 surface and subsurface soil samples were investigated. These soils originated mainly from organic deposits of Philippoi (northern Greece) have been classified as Histosols and belong to the suborder of Saprists. The present study consisted of an area of 10,371 ha where about 90% of the soils are organic. The main crops are maize (Zea mays L.), sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).The surface horizons consist mainly of well-humified organic materials mixed with mineral soil particles. Usually, they have moderate or insufficient drainage regime and conditions become favorable for microbial growth. Microbes decompose and transform the soil organic compounds into mineral forms, which are then available as nutrients for the crop. The organic matter was derived primarily from Cyperaceae (Cladium mariscus, various Carex species, etc.) and from decomposed residues of arable crops. The dominant features of these soils are the high content of organic matter and the obvious stratification of soil horizons. In contrast, most arable soils in Greece are characterized by low organic matter content. The stratification differentiates the physical and chemical properties and the groundwater table even during dry summers lies at depths,150 cm beneath surface. The Corg. content was high and varied greatly among the examined samples. In the surface layers ranged between 3.57 and 336.50 g kg2 (mean 199.26 g kg2) and between 22.10 and 401.10 g kg2 in the subsurface horizons (mean 258.89 g kg2). It can be argued that surface layers are drier and part of soil organic matter was seriously affected by the process of oxidation. At drier sites, soil subsidence was appeared as a consequence of soil organic matter oxidation. Increased contents were found in the northern part of the

  2. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the Indus River catchment area, Pakistan: Status, soil-air exchange and black carbon mediated distribution.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Anam; Ali, Usman; Mahmood, Adeel; Chaudhry, Muhammad Jamshed Iqbal; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Jones, Kevin C; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-06-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were investigated in passive air and soil samples from the catchment area of the Indus River, Pakistan. ∑15OCPs ranged between 0.68 and 13.47 ng g(-1) in soil and 375.1-1975 pg m-(3) in air. HCHs and DDTs were more prevalent in soil and air compartments. Composition profile indicated that β-HCH and p,p'-DDE were the dominant of all metabolites among HCHs and DDTs respectively. Moreover, fBC and fTOC were assessed and evaluated their potential role in the distribution status of OCPs. The fTOC and fBC ranged between 0.77 and 2.43 and 0.04-0.30% respectively in soil. Regression analysis showed the strong influence of fBC than fTOC on the distribution of OCPs in the Indus River catchment area soil. Equilibrium status was observed for β-HCH, δ-HCH, p,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDT, TC, HCB and Heptachlor with ff ranged between 0.3 and 0.59 while assessing the soil-air exchange of OCPs.

  3. Rapid High Spatial Resolution Chemical Characterization of Soil Structure to Illuminate Nutrient Distribution Mechanisms Related to Carbon Cycling Using Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Alexander, M. L. L.; Newburn, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    of the temporal and spatial distribution of chemical species, illuminating carbon dynamics in soil and the rhizosphere and their role in the global carbon cycle.

  4. Is soil carbon storage underestimated?

    PubMed

    Díaz-Hernández, José Luis

    2010-06-01

    An accurate evaluation of the carbon stored in soils is essential to fully understand the role of soils as source or sink of atmospheric CO(2), as well as the feedback processes involved in soil-atmosphere CO(2) exchange. Depth and strategies of sampling have been, and still are, sources of uncertainties, because most current estimates of carbon storage in soils are based on conventional soil surveys and data sets compiled primarily for agricultural purposes. In a study of the Guadix-Baza basin, a semiarid area of southern Spain, sizeable amounts of carbon have been found stored in the subsoil. Total carbon estimated within 2-m was 141.3 kg Cm(-2) compared to 36.1 kg Cm(-2) if estimates were based solely on conventional soil depths (e.g. 40-cm in Regosols and 100-cm in Fluvisols). Thus, the insufficient sampling depth could lead to considerable underestimation of global soil carbon. In order to correctly evaluate the carbon content in world soils, more specific studies must be planned and carried out, especially in those soils where caliche and other carbonated cemented horizons are present.

  5. A Reactive Transport Model for the Distribution and Age of Carbon in Soils and Sediments Through Direct Simulation of the Stable and Radiogenic Isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhan, J. L.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a reactive transport (RT) approach to link hydrologic transport, geochemical transformations and microbial activity influencing the magnitude and residence time of different carbon pools under variably saturated conditions. This model explicitly simulates the simultaneous transport, transformation, fractionation and decay of the three isotopes of carbon (12C, 13C and 14C) through a mechanistic framework. This is demonstrated with a modification of the CrunchTope multi-component RT software to extend the isotope-specific versions of both microbially-mediated and transition state theory (TST) rate laws to accommodate a three-isotope system. In addition both aqueous and solid phase decay of 14C are tracked, yielding in an implicit means of accounting for the 13C/12C correction in normalized radiocarbon ages. The capacity of this approach to quantify the storage and flux of carbon through subsurface compartments is demonstrated using two examples distinguished by timescale. The first considers a simplified flow path in which an influent containing labile organic carbon is distributed by biogenic reduction and mineralization into a suite of reaction products. The residence time of these pools and their characteristic stable isotope ratios are tracked through a variety of transient processes occurring at short timescales (e.g. months). These include a change in fluid flow rate, a limitation of ammonium supporting anabolic growth and an influx of oxygenated fluid. The second example considers the distribution of carbon over the timescale of soil development (e.g., millennia), using a dataset of stable isotope ratios and radiocarbon ages of organic and inorganic carbon present in both dissolved and solid phases from a soil chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. The results of these model simulations suggest the promise of this tool for improving our understanding of coupling between hydrologic transport and biogeochemical reactions in soils.

  6. Extensive sorption of organic compounds to black carbon, coal, and kerogen in sediments and soils: mechanisms and consequences for distribution, bioaccumulation, and biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Gustafsson, Orjan; Bucheli, Thomas D; Jonker, Michiel T O; Koelmans, Albert A; van Noort, Paul C M

    2005-09-15

    Evidence is accumulating that sorption of organic chemicals to soils and sediments can be described by "dual-mode sorption": absorption in amorphous organic matter (AOM) and adsorption to carbonaceous materials such as black carbon (BC), coal, and kerogen, collectively termed "carbonaceous geosorbents" (CG). Median BC contents as a fraction of total organic carbon are 9% for sediments (number of sediments, n approximately 300) and 4% for soils (n = 90). Adsorption of organic compounds to CG is nonlinear and generally exceeds absorption in AOM by a factor of 10-100. Sorption to CG is particularly extensive for organic compounds that can attain a more planar molecular configuration. The CG adsorption domain probably consists of surface sites and nanopores. In this review it is shown that nonlinear sorption to CG can completely dominate total sorption at low aqueous concentrations (<10(-6) of maximum solid solubility). Therefore, the presence of CG can explain (i) sorption to soils and sediments being up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected on the basis of sorption to AOM only (i.e., "AOM equilibrium partitioning"), (ii) low and variable biota to sediment accumulation factors, and (iii) limited potential for microbial degradation. On the basis of these consequences of sorption to CG, it is advocated that the use of generic organic carbon-water distribution coefficients in the risk assessment of organic compounds is not warranted and that bioremediation endpoints could be evaluated on the basis of freely dissolved concentrations instead of total concentrations in sediment/soil.

  7. Abundance, Distribution and Cycling of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in University Valley (McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica) Permafrost Soils with Differing Ground Thermal and Moisture Conditions: Analogue to C-N Cycle on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, B. F.; Lacelle, D. L.; Davila, A. D.; Pollard, W. P.; McKay, C. P. M.

    2016-05-01

    High elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are key Mars analogue sites. Our investigation focuses on the link between ground ice origin, distribution and cycling of organic carbon and nitrogen in University Valley, and its soil habitability.

  8. Soil organic carbon distribution in Mediterranean areas under a climate change scenario via multiple linear regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Olaya-Abril, Alfonso; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Obregón-Romero, Rafael

    2017-08-15

    Over time, the interest on soil studies has increased due to its role in carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems, which could contribute to decreasing atmospheric CO2 rates. In many studies, independent variables were related to soil organic carbon (SOC) alone, however, the contribution degree of each variable with the experimentally determined SOC content were not considered. In this study, samples from 612 soil profiles were obtained in a natural protected (Red Natura 2000) of Sierra Morena (Mediterranean area, South Spain), considering only the topsoil 0-25cm, for better comparison between results. 24 independent variables were used to define it relationship with SOC content. Subsequently, using a multiple linear regression analysis, the effects of these variables on the SOC correlation was considered. Finally, the best parameters determined with the regression analysis were used in a climatic change scenario. The model indicated that SOC in a future scenario of climate change depends on average temperature of coldest quarter (41.9%), average temperature of warmest quarter (34.5%), annual precipitation (22.2%) and annual average temperature (1.3%). When the current and future situations were compared, the SOC content in the study area was reduced a 35.4%, and a trend towards migration to higher latitude and altitude was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequestration of Soil Carbon as Secondary Carbonates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, R.

    2013-12-01

    , activity and species diversity of soil biota, management of soil fertility and application of Ca-bearing amendments (e.g., lime, single and triple super phosphate, manure), and adoption of conservation-effective measures which trap alluvial and aeolian sediments. Even the low rate of formation of secondary carbonates at 2-5 kg C/ha/yr has implications to aggregation, and microbiological and regolith properties. The isotropic composition of secondary carbonates is a useful tool for reconstructing paleoecological conditions. Researchable priorities include: 1) assessment of the depth distribution of CO2 concentration in soil air and its spatial and temporal variation in relation to tillage systems, crop residue management, fertilizer and manuring, irrigation, cover cropping, agroforestry, etc., 2) understanding the effects of micro and meso-climate (e.g., rainfall, evapotranspiration, air and soil temperatures) on CO2 concentration in soil air, 3) determination of the relation between soil profile characteristics (texture, structure, horizonation, hydrology) and secondary carbonates at present and under paleoecological conditions, 4) establishing the relationship between SOC and SIC pools, 5) determination of the impacts of deforestation, biomass burning, wild fires, drought, inundation, etc., on SIC dynamics, and 6) evaluating the effects of secondary carbonates on soil aggregation and water retention.

  10. Litter quality and pH are strong drivers of carbon turnover and distribution in alpine grassland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budge, K.; Leifeld, J.; Hiltbrunner, E.; Fuhrer, J.

    2010-08-01

    Alpine soils are expected to contain large amounts of labile carbon (C) which may become a further source of atmospheric CO2 as a of global warming. However, there is little data available on these soils, and understanding of the influence of environmental factors on soil organic matter (SOM) turnover is limited. We extracted 30 cm deep cores from five grassland sites along a small elevation gradient from 2285 to 2653 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the central Swiss Alps. Our aim was to determine the quantity, degree of stabilization and mean residence time (MRT) of SOM in relation to site factors such as temperature, soil pH, vegetation, and organic matter (OM) structure. Soil fractions obtained by size and density fractionation revealed a high proportion of labile particulate organic matter C (POM C %) mostly in the uppermost soil layers. POM C in the top 20 cm across the gradient ranged from 39.6-57.6% in comparison to 7.2-29.6% reported in previous studies for lower elevation soils (810-1960 m a.s.l.). At the highest elevation, MRTs measured by means of radiocarbon dating and turnover modelling, increased between fractions of growing stability from 90 years in free POM (fPOM) to 534 years in the mineral-associated fraction (mOM). Depending on elevation and pH, plant community data indicated considerable variation in the quantity and quality of litter input, and these patterns could be reflected in the dynamics of soil C. 13C NMR data confirmed the direct relationship of OM composition to MRT. While temperature is likely to be a major cause for the slow turnover rate observed, other factors such as litter quality and soil pH, as well as the combination of all factors, play an important role in causing small-scale variability of SOM turnover. Ignoring this interplay of controlling factors may impair the performance of models to project SOM responses to environmental change.

  11. The distribution of secondary mineral phases along an eroding hillslope and its effect on carbon stabilization mechanisms and the fate of soil carbon fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetterl, Sebastian; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Opfergelt, Sophie; Boeckx, Pascal; Bodé, Samuel; Six, Johan; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    Soil redistribution processes can change soil carbon (C) dynamics drastically by moving carbon from high decomposition and re-sequestration environments at the eroding hillslope to low decomposition and burial at the depositional footslope and valley basin. This leads to not only spatially diverse soil carbon storage throughout the landscape, but also to qualitative changes of the transported carbon and the mineral phase. The interaction between those parameters and the effect on stabilization mechanisms for soil C are still a matter of debate. Here, we present an analysis that aims to clarify the bio/geo-chemical and mineralogical components involved in stabilizing C at various depths along an eroding cropped slope and how this affects the abundance of microbial derived carbon. We use the results of an incubation experiment combined with the abundance of amino sugars in different isolated soil C fractions as a tracer for the stability of the respective fraction. We applied further (i) a sequential extraction of the reactive soil phase using pyrophosphate, oxalate and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate, and (ii) a qualitative analysis of the clay mineralogy, to analyze the changes in the mineral phase for the different isolated fractions along the slope transect. Our results emphasize the importance of physical protection within microaggregates to stabilize buried, chemically labile C. Our data further indicates that the stability of these aggregates is related to the presence of organo-mineral associations and poorly crystalline minerals. However, decreasing contents of these minerals with depth indicate a temporal limitation of this stabilization mechanism. Non-expandable clay minerals experience a relative enrichment at the depositional site while expandable clay minerals experience the same at the eroding site. These changes in clay mineralogy along the slope are partly responsible for the abundance of silt and clay associated C and the effectiveness of the clay

  12. Differential long-term effects of climate change and management on stocks and distribution of soil organic carbon in productive grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bruijn, A. M. G.; Calanca, P.; Ammann, C.; Fuhrer, J.

    2012-06-01

    We studied the impact of climate change on the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in productive grassland systems undergoing two types of management, an intensive type with frequent harvests and fertilizer applications and an extensive system without fertilization and fewer harvests. Simulations were conducted with a dedicated newly developed model, the Oensingen Grassland Model. It was calibrated using measurements taken in a recently established permanent sward in Central Switzerland, and run to simulate SOC dynamics over 2001-2100 under various climate change scenarios assuming different elements of IPCC A2 emission scenarios. We found that: (1) management intensity dominates SOC until approximately 20 years after grassland establishment. Differences in SOC between climate scenarios become significant after 20 years and climate effects dominate SOC dynamics from approximately 50 years after establishment. (2) Carbon supplied through manure contributes about 60 % to measured organic C increase in fertilized grassland. (3) Soil C accumulates particularly in the top 10 cm of the soil until 5 years after establishment. In the long-term, C accumulation takes place in the top 15 cm of the soil profile, while C content decreases below this depth. The transitional depth between gains and losses of C mainly depends on the vertical distribution of root senescence and root biomass. We discuss the importance of previous land use on carbon sequestration potentials that are much lower at the Oensingen site under ley-arable rotation with much higher SOC stocks than most soils under arable crops. We further discuss the importance of biomass senescence rates, because C balance estimations indicate that these may differ considerably between the two management systems.

  13. Differential long-term effects of climate change and management on stocks and distribution of soil organic carbon in productive grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijn, A. M. G.; Calanca, P.; Ammann, C.; Fuhrer, J.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the impact of climate change on the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in productive grassland systems undergoing two types of management, an intensive type with frequent harvests and fertilizer applications and an extensive system where fertilization is omitted and harvests are fewer. The Oensingen Grassland Model was explicitly developed for this study. It was calibrated using measurements taken in a recently established permanent sward in Central Switzerland, and run to simulate SOC dynamics over 2001-2100 under three climate change scenarios assuming different elements of IPCC A2 emission scenarios. We found that: (1) management intensity dominates SOC until approximately 20 yr after grassland establishment. Differences in SOC between climate scenarios become significant after 20 yr and climate effects dominate SOC dynamics from approximately 50 yr after establishment, (2) carbon supplied through manure contributes about 60% to measured organic C increase in fertilized grassland. (3) Soil C accumulates particularly in the top 10 cm soil until 5 yr after establishment. In the long-term, C accumulation takes place in the top 15 cm of the soil profile, while C content decreases below this depth. The transitional depth between gains and losses of C mainly depends on the vertical distribution of root senescence and root biomass. We discuss the importance of previous land use on carbon sequestration potentials that are much lower at the Oensingen site under ley-arable rotation and with much higher SOC stocks than most soils under arable crops. We further discuss the importance of biomass senescence rates, because C balance estimations indicate that these may differ considerably between the two management systems.

  14. Global distribution of soil organic carbon, based on the Harmonized World Soil Database - Part 2: Certainty of changes related to land-use and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köchy, M.; Don, A.; van der Molen, M. K.; Freibauer, A.

    2014-09-01

    Global biosphere models vary greatly in their projections of future changes of global soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and aggregated global SOC masses in response to climate change. We estimated the certainty (likelihood) and quantity of increases and decreases on a half-degree grid. We assessed the effect of changes in controlling factors, including net primary productivity (NPP), litter quality, soil acidity, water-saturation, depth of permafrost, land use, temperature, and aridity, in a temporally implicit model that uses categorized driver variables associated by probabilities (Bayesian Network). The probability-weighted results show that, globally, climate effects on NPP had the strongest impact on SOC stocks and the certainty of change after 75 years. Actual land use had the greatest effect locally because the assumed certainty of land use change per unit area was small. The probability-weighted contribution of climate to decomposition was greatest in the humid tropics because of greater absolute effects on decomposition fractions at higher temperatures. In contrast, climate effects on decomposition fractions were small in cold regions. Differences in decomposition rates between contemporary and future climate were greatest in arid subtropical regions because of projected strong increases in precipitation. Warming in boreal and arctic regions increased NPP, balancing or outweighing potential losses from thawing of permafrost. Across contrasting NPP scenarios tropical mountain forests were identified as hotspots of future highly certain C losses. Global soil C mass will increase by 1% with a certainty of 75% if NPP increases due to carbon-dioxide fertilization. At a certainty level of 75%, soil C mass will not change if CO2-induced increase of NPP is limited by nutrients.

  15. Distribution of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in coastal wetland soil related land use in the Modern Yellow River Delta

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junbao; Zhan, Chao; Li, Yunzhao; Zhou, Di; Fu, Yuqin; Chu, Xiaojing; Xing, Qinghui; Han, Guangxuan; Wang, Guangmei; Guan, Bo; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The delivery and distribution of nutrients in coastal wetland ecosystems is much related to the land use. The spatial variations of TOC, TN, NH4+-N, NO3−-N and TP and associated soil salinity with depth in 9 kinds land uses in coastal zone of the modern Yellow River Delta (YRD) was evaluated based on monitoring data in field from 2009 to 2015. The results showed that the average contents of soil TOC, TN, NO3−-N, NH4+-N and TP were 4.21 ± 2.40 g kg−1, 375.91 ± 213.44, 5.36 ± 9.59 and 7.20 ± 5.58 and 591.27 ± 91.16 mg kg−1, respectively. The high N and C contents were found in cropland in southern part and low values in natural wetland, while TP was relatively stable both in profiles and in different land uses. The land use, land formation age and salinity were important factors influencing distributions of TOC and N. Higher contents of TOC and N were observed in older formation age lands in whole study region, while the opposite regulation were found in new-born natural wetland, indicating that the anthropogenic activities could greatly alter the original distribution regulations of nutrients in coastal natural wetlands by changing the regional land use. PMID:27892492

  16. Distribution of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in coastal wetland soil related land use in the Modern Yellow River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Junbao; Zhan, Chao; Li, Yunzhao; Zhou, Di; Fu, Yuqin; Chu, Xiaojing; Xing, Qinghui; Han, Guangxuan; Wang, Guangmei; Guan, Bo; Wang, Qing

    2016-11-01

    The delivery and distribution of nutrients in coastal wetland ecosystems is much related to the land use. The spatial variations of TOC, TN, NH4+-N, NO3‑-N and TP and associated soil salinity with depth in 9 kinds land uses in coastal zone of the modern Yellow River Delta (YRD) was evaluated based on monitoring data in field from 2009 to 2015. The results showed that the average contents of soil TOC, TN, NO3‑-N, NH4+-N and TP were 4.21 ± 2.40 g kg‑1, 375.91 ± 213.44, 5.36 ± 9.59 and 7.20 ± 5.58 and 591.27 ± 91.16 mg kg‑1, respectively. The high N and C contents were found in cropland in southern part and low values in natural wetland, while TP was relatively stable both in profiles and in different land uses. The land use, land formation age and salinity were important factors influencing distributions of TOC and N. Higher contents of TOC and N were observed in older formation age lands in whole study region, while the opposite regulation were found in new-born natural wetland, indicating that the anthropogenic activities could greatly alter the original distribution regulations of nutrients in coastal natural wetlands by changing the regional land use.

  17. Mechanisms of Soil Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Rattan

    2015-04-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration in soil is one of the several strategies of reducing the net emission of CO2 into the atmosphere. Of the two components, soil organic C (SOC) and soil inorganic C (SIC), SOC is an important control of edaphic properties and processes. In addition to off-setting part of the anthropogenic emissions, enhancing SOC concentration to above the threshold level (~1.5-2.0%) in the root zone has numerous ancillary benefits including food and nutritional security, biodiversity, water quality, among others. Because of its critical importance in human wellbeing and nature conservancy, scientific processes must be sufficiently understood with regards to: i) the potential attainable, and actual sink capacity of SOC and SIC, ii) permanence of the C sequestered its turnover and mean residence time, iii) the amount of biomass C needed (Mg/ha/yr) to maintain and enhance SOC pool, and to create a positive C budget, iv) factors governing the depth distribution of SOC, v) physical, chemical and biological mechanisms affecting the rate of decomposition by biotic and abiotic processes, vi) role of soil aggregation in sequestration and protection of SOC and SIC pool, vii) the importance of root system and its exudates in transfer of biomass-C into the SOC pools, viii) significance of biogenic processes in formation of secondary carbonates, ix) the role of dissolved organic C (DOC) in sequestration of SOC and SIC, and x) importance of weathering of alumino-silicates (e.g., powered olivine) in SIC sequestration. Lack of understanding of these and other basic processes leads to misunderstanding, inconsistencies in interpretation of empirical data, and futile debates. Identification of site-specific management practices is also facilitated by understanding of the basic processes of sequestration of SOC and SIC. Sustainable intensification of agroecosystems -- producing more from less by enhancing the use efficiency and reducing losses of inputs, necessitates thorough

  18. Extensive sorption of organic compounds to black carbon, coal, and kerogen in sediments and soils: mechanisms and consequences for distribution, bioaccumulation, and biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard Cornelissen; Oerjan Gustafsson; Thomas D. Bucheli; Michiel T. O. Jonker; Albert A. Koelmans; Paul C. M. van Noort

    2005-09-15

    Evidence is accumulating that sorption of organic chemicals to soils and sediments can be described by 'dual-mode sorption': absorption in amorphous organic matter (AOM) and adsorption to carbonaceous materials such as black carbon (BC), coal, and kerogen, collectively termed 'carbonaceous geosorbents' (CG). Median BC contents as a fraction of total organic carbon are 9% for sediments (number of sediments, n {approx} 300) and 4% for soils (n = 90). Adsorption of organic compounds to CG is nonlinear and generally exceeds absorption in AOM by a factor of 10-100. Sorption to CG is particularly extensive for organic compounds that can attain a more planar molecular configuration. The CG adsorption domain probably consists of surface sites and nanopores. In this review it is shown that nonlinear sorption to CG can completely dominate total sorption at low aqueous concentrations ({lt}10{sup -6} of maximum solid solubility). Therefore, the presence of CG can explain (i) sorption to soils and sediments being up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected on the basis of sorption to AOM only (i.e., 'AOM equilibrium partitioning'), (ii) low and variable biota to sediment accumulation factors, and (iii) limited potential for microbial degradation. On the basis of these consequences of sorption to CG, it is advocated that the use of generic organic carbon-water distribution coefficients in the risk assessment of organic compounds is not warranted and that bioremediation endpoints could be evaluated on the basis of freely dissolved concentrations instead of total concentrations in sediment/soil. The study was funded by the European Union (the ABACUS project). 186 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Global Distribution of Pyrogenic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisser, Moritz; Abiven, Samuel; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

    2016-04-01

    Pyrogenic Carbon (PyC) is ubiquitous in the environment and represents presumably one of the most stable compounds of the total organic carbon. Due to its persistence in the soil, it might play an important role in the global carbon cycle. In order to model future CO2 emissions from soils it is thus crucial to know where and how much of PyC exists on a global scale. Yet, only rough estimates for global PyC stocks in soils could be made, and even less is known about the distribution across ecosystems. Therefore we propose here literature analysis of data on PyC concentrations and stocks worldwide. We extracted PyC values in soils from the literature (n = 600) and analysed the percentage of PyC in the soil organic carbon (SOC) as a function of climate (temperature, precipitation), soil parameters (pH, clay content), fire characteristics (fire frequency and fire regime) and land use. Overall, the average contribution of PyC to SOC was 13 %, ranging from 0.1 % up to 60 %. We observed that the PyC content was significantly higher with high clay content, higher pH, and in cultivated land as compared to forest and grassland. We did not observe any relationships between fire activity, frequency or intensity and PyC % at a global scale. When the fire regime was monitored on site (only 12 % of the data we collected), we observed higher PyC concentrations with higher fire frequencies. We hypothesise that the resolution of global fire datasets is neither temporally nor spatially high enough to explain the very local fire history of the soil samples. Data points were not homogeneously distributed on the globe, but rather aggregated in places like Central Europe, the Russian Steppe or North America. Therefore, a global interpolation is not directly possible. We modelled PyC concentrations, based on the five most significant parameters, which were clay content, pH, mean annual temperature and precipitation as well as land use. We then predicted worldwide PyC using global datasets

  20. An Alaska Soil Carbon Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kristofer; Harden, Jennifer

    2009-05-01

    Database Collaborator's Meeting; Fairbanks, Alaska, 4 March 2009; Soil carbon pools in northern high-latitude regions and their response to climate changes are highly uncertain, and collaboration is required from field scientists and modelers to establish baseline data for carbon cycle studies. The Global Change Program at the U.S. Geological Survey has funded a 2-year effort to establish a soil carbon network and database for Alaska based on collaborations from numerous institutions. To initiate a community effort, a workshop for the development of an Alaska soil carbon database was held at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The database will be a resource for spatial and biogeochemical models of Alaska ecosystems and will serve as a prototype for a nationwide community project: the National Soil Carbon Network (http://www.soilcarb.net). Studies will benefit from the combination of multiple academic and government data sets. This collaborative effort is expected to identify data gaps and uncertainties more comprehensively. Future applications of information contained in the database will identify specific vulnerabilities of soil carbon in Alaska to climate change, disturbance, and vegetation change.

  1. Soil carbon determination by thermogravimetrics.

    PubMed

    Pallasser, Robert; Minasny, Budiman; McBratney, Alex B

    2013-01-01

    Determination of soil constituents and structure has a vital role in agriculture generally. Methods for the determination of soil carbon have in particular gained greater currency in recent times because of the potential that soils offer in providing offsets for greenhouse gas (CO2-equivalent) emissions. Ideally, soil carbon which can also be quite diverse in its makeup and origin, should be measureable by readily accessible, affordable and reliable means. Loss-on-ignition is still a widely used method being suitably simple and available but may have limitations for soil C monitoring. How can these limitations be better defined and understood where such a method is required to detect relatively small changes during soil-C building? Thermogravimetric (TGA) instrumentation to measure carbonaceous components has become more interesting because of its potential to separate carbon and other components using very precise and variable heating programs. TGA related studies were undertaken to assist our understanding in the quantification of soil carbon when using methods such as loss-on-ignition. Combining instrumentation so that mass changes can be monitored by mass spectrometer ion currents has elucidated otherwise hidden features of thermal methods enabling the interpretation and evaluation of mass-loss patterns. Soil thermogravimetric work has indicated that loss-on-ignition methods are best constrained to temperatures from 200 to 430 °C for reliable determination for soil organic carbon especially where clay content is higher. In the absence of C-specific detection where mass only changes are relied upon, exceeding this temperature incurs increasing contributions from inorganic sources adding to mass losses with diminishing contributions related to organic matter. The smaller amounts of probably more recalcitrant organic matter released at the higher temperatures may represent mineral associated material and/or simply more refractory forms.

  2. Soil carbon determination by thermogravimetrics

    PubMed Central

    Pallasser, Robert; McBratney, Alex B.

    2013-01-01

    Determination of soil constituents and structure has a vital role in agriculture generally. Methods for the determination of soil carbon have in particular gained greater currency in recent times because of the potential that soils offer in providing offsets for greenhouse gas (CO2-equivalent) emissions. Ideally, soil carbon which can also be quite diverse in its makeup and origin, should be measureable by readily accessible, affordable and reliable means. Loss-on-ignition is still a widely used method being suitably simple and available but may have limitations for soil C monitoring. How can these limitations be better defined and understood where such a method is required to detect relatively small changes during soil-C building? Thermogravimetric (TGA) instrumentation to measure carbonaceous components has become more interesting because of its potential to separate carbon and other components using very precise and variable heating programs. TGA related studies were undertaken to assist our understanding in the quantification of soil carbon when using methods such as loss-on-ignition. Combining instrumentation so that mass changes can be monitored by mass spectrometer ion currents has elucidated otherwise hidden features of thermal methods enabling the interpretation and evaluation of mass-loss patterns. Soil thermogravimetric work has indicated that loss-on-ignition methods are best constrained to temperatures from 200 to 430 °C for reliable determination for soil organic carbon especially where clay content is higher. In the absence of C-specific detection where mass only changes are relied upon, exceeding this temperature incurs increasing contributions from inorganic sources adding to mass losses with diminishing contributions related to organic matter. The smaller amounts of probably more recalcitrant organic matter released at the higher temperatures may represent mineral associated material and/or simply more refractory forms. PMID:23638398

  3. Distribution, Sources, and Association of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Black Carbon, and Total Organic Carbon in Size-Segregated Soil Samples Along a Background–Urban–Rural Transect

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sharmila; Khillare, Pandit Sudan; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Brown, Richard J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Soil samples were collected over a year-long period along a background–urban–rural transect in Delhi, India for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), black carbon (BC), and total organic carbon (TOC) in five grain size fractions, x, in μm of 0≤x<53 (I), 53≤x<250 (II), 250≤x<500 (III), 500≤x<2000 (IV), and their sum (total: T). Maximum concentrations of PAH, BC, and TOC were observed in the smallest fraction (I) comprising silt and clay, irrespective of site or season. Results of the molecular diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis (PCA) identified coal, wood, biomass burning, and vehicular emissions as major sources of PAHs at all the three sites, while BC/TOC ratios pointed toward biomass combustion as the chief source of carbonaceous species. This work presents the first such rural-urban transect study considering PAH, BC, and TOC in soil. PMID:23133309

  4. Stability of organic carbon in deep soil layers controlled by fresh carbon supply.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sébastien; Barot, Sébastien; Barré, Pierre; Bdioui, Nadia; Mary, Bruno; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2007-11-08

    The world's soils store more carbon than is present in biomass and in the atmosphere. Little is known, however, about the factors controlling the stability of soil organic carbon stocks and the response of the soil carbon pool to climate change remains uncertain. We investigated the stability of carbon in deep soil layers in one soil profile by combining physical and chemical characterization of organic carbon, soil incubations and radiocarbon dating. Here we show that the supply of fresh plant-derived carbon to the subsoil (0.6-0.8 m depth) stimulated the microbial mineralization of 2,567 +/- 226-year-old carbon. Our results support the previously suggested idea that in the absence of fresh organic carbon, an essential source of energy for soil microbes, the stability of organic carbon in deep soil layers is maintained. We propose that a lack of supply of fresh carbon may prevent the decomposition of the organic carbon pool in deep soil layers in response to future changes in temperature. Any change in land use and agricultural practice that increases the distribution of fresh carbon along the soil profile could however stimulate the loss of ancient buried carbon.

  5. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos A; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christoph; Griffiths, Robert I; Mellado-Vázquez, Perla G; Malik, Ashish A; Roy, Jacques; Scheu, Stefan; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Thomson, Bruce C; Trumbore, Susan E; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-07

    Plant diversity strongly influences ecosystem functions and services, such as soil carbon storage. However, the mechanisms underlying the positive plant diversity effects on soil carbon storage are poorly understood. We explored this relationship using long-term data from a grassland biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment) and radiocarbon ((14)C) modelling. Here we show that higher plant diversity increases rhizosphere carbon inputs into the microbial community resulting in both increased microbial activity and carbon storage. Increases in soil carbon were related to the enhanced accumulation of recently fixed carbon in high-diversity plots, while plant diversity had less pronounced effects on the decomposition rate of existing carbon. The present study shows that elevated carbon storage at high plant diversity is a direct function of the soil microbial community, indicating that the increase in carbon storage is mainly limited by the integration of new carbon into soil and less by the decomposition of existing soil carbon.

  6. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen based on GIS and geostatistics in a small watershed in a hilly area of northern China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Gao; Bing, Wang; Guangpo, Geng; Guangcan, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The spatial variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (STN) levels is important in both global carbon-nitrogen cycle and climate change research. There has been little research on the spatial distribution of SOC and STN at the watershed scale based on geographic information systems (GIS) and geostatistics. Ninety-seven soil samples taken at depths of 0-20 cm were collected during October 2010 and 2011 from the Matiyu small watershed (4.2 km(2)) of a hilly area in Shandong Province, northern China. The impacts of different land use types, elevation, vegetation coverage and other factors on SOC and STN spatial distributions were examined using GIS and a geostatistical method, regression-kriging. The results show that the concentration variations of SOC and STN in the Matiyu small watershed were moderate variation based on the mean, median, minimum and maximum, and the coefficients of variation (CV). Residual values of SOC and STN had moderate spatial autocorrelations, and the Nugget/Sill were 0.2% and 0.1%, respectively. Distribution maps of regression-kriging revealed that both SOC and STN concentrations in the Matiyu watershed decreased from southeast to northwest. This result was similar to the watershed DEM trend and significantly correlated with land use type, elevation and aspect. SOC and STN predictions with the regression-kriging method were more accurate than those obtained using ordinary kriging. This research indicates that geostatistical characteristics of SOC and STN concentrations in the watershed were closely related to both land-use type and spatial topographic structure and that regression-kriging is suitable for investigating the spatial distributions of SOC and STN in the complex topography of the watershed.

  7. Influence of landscape position and transient water table on soil development and carbon distribution in a steep, headwater catchment

    Treesearch

    Scott W. Bailey; Patricia A. Brousseau; Kevin J. McGuire; Donald S. Ross

    2014-01-01

    Upland headwater catchments, such as those in the AppalachianMountain region, are typified by coarse textured soils, flashy hydrologic response, and low baseflow of streams, suggesting well drained soils and minimal groundwater storage. Model formulations of soil genesis, nutrient cycling, critical loads and rainfall/runoff response are typically based on vertical...

  8. Application of Geant4 simulation for analysis of soil carbon inelastic neutron scattering measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) was applied to determine soil carbon content. Due to non-uniform soil carbon depth distribution, the correlation between INS signals with some soil carbon content parameter is not obvious; however, a proportionality between INS signals and average carbon weight per...

  9. Soil Carbon 4 per mille

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasny, Budiman; van Wesemael, Bas

    2017-04-01

    The '4 per mille Soils for Food Security and Climate' was launched at the COP21 aiming to increase global soil organic matter stocks by 4 per mille (or 0.4 %) per year as a compensation for the global emissions of greenhouse gases by anthropogenic sources. This paper surveyed the soil organic carbon (SOC) stock estimates and sequestration potentials from 20 regions in the world (New Zealand, Chile, South Africa, Australia, Tanzania, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, India, China Taiwan, South Korea, China Mainland, United States of America, France, Canada, Belgium, England & Wales, Ireland, Scotland, and Russia) and asked whether the 4 per mille initiative is feasible. This study highlights region specific efforts and scopes for soil carbon sequestration. Reported soil C sequestration rates generally show that under best management practices, 4 per mille or even higher sequestration rates can be accomplished. High C sequestration rates (up to 10 per mille) can be achieved for soils with low initial SOC stock (topsoil less than 30 t C ha-1), and at the first twenty years after implementation of best management practices. In addition, areas that have reached equilibrium but not at their saturation level will not be able to further increase their sequestration. We found that most studies on SOC sequestration globally only consider topsoil (up to 0.3 m depth), as it is considered to be most affected by management techniques. The 4 per mille initiative was based on a blanket calculation of the whole global soil profile C stock, however the potential to increase SOC is mostly on managed agricultural lands. If we consider 4 per mille on global topsoil of agricultural land, SOC sequestration is about 3.6 Gt C per year, which effectively offset 40% of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. As a strategy for climate change mitigation, soil carbon sequestration buys time over the next ten to twenty years while other effective sequestration and low carbon technologies become

  10. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G.; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  11. Soil organic carbon dynamics jointly controlled by climate, carbon inputs, soil properties and soil carbon fractions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongkui; Feng, Wenting; Luo, Yiqi; Baldock, Jeff; Wang, Enli

    2017-10-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics are regulated by the complex interplay of climatic, edaphic and biotic conditions. However, the interrelation of SOC and these drivers and their potential connection networks are rarely assessed quantitatively. Using observations of SOC dynamics with detailed soil properties from 90 field trials at 28 sites under different agroecosystems across the Australian cropping regions, we investigated the direct and indirect effects of climate, soil properties, carbon (C) inputs and soil C pools (a total of 17 variables) on SOC change rate (rC , Mg C ha(-1)  yr(-1) ). Among these variables, we found that the most influential variables on rC were the average C input amount and annual precipitation, and the total SOC stock at the beginning of the trials. Overall, C inputs (including C input amount and pasture frequency in the crop rotation system) accounted for 27% of the relative influence on rC , followed by climate 25% (including precipitation and temperature), soil C pools 24% (including pool size and composition) and soil properties (such as cation exchange capacity, clay content, bulk density) 24%. Path analysis identified a network of intercorrelations of climate, soil properties, C inputs and soil C pools in determining rC . The direct correlation of rC with climate was significantly weakened if removing the effects of soil properties and C pools, and vice versa. These results reveal the relative importance of climate, soil properties, C inputs and C pools and their complex interconnections in regulating SOC dynamics. Ignorance of the impact of changes in soil properties, C pool composition and C input (quantity and quality) on SOC dynamics is likely one of the main sources of uncertainty in SOC predictions from the process-based SOC models. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Biogeochemistry: Soil carbon in a beer can

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Eric A.

    2015-10-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter could be an important positive feedback to climate change. Geochemical properties of soils can help determine what fraction of soil carbon may be protected from climate-induced decomposition.

  13. Mineral control of soil organic carbon storage and turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torn, Margaret S.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Vitousek, Peter M.; Hendricks, David M.

    1997-09-01

    A large source of uncertainty in present understanding of the global carbon cycle is the distribution and dynamics of the soil organic carbon reservoir. Most of the organic carbon in soils is degraded to inorganic forms slowly, on timescales from centuries to millennia. Soil minerals are known to play a stabilizing role, but how spatial and temporal variation in soil mineralogy controls the quantity and turnover of long-residence-time organic carbon is not well known. Here we use radiocarbon analyses to explore interactions between soil mineralogy and soil organic carbon along two natural gradients-of soil-age and of climate-in volcanic soil environments. During the first ~150,000 years of soil development, the volcanic parent material weathered to metastable, non-crystalline minerals. Thereafter, the amount of non-crystalline minerals declined, and more stable crystalline minerals accumulated. Soil organic carbon content followed a similar trend, accumulating to a maximum after 150,000 years, and then decreasing by 50% over the next four million years. A positive relationship between non-crystalline minerals and organic carbon was also observed in soils through the climate gradient, indicating that the accumulation and subsequent loss of organic matter were largely driven by changes in the millennial scale cycling of mineral-stabilized carbon, rather than by changes in the amount of fast-cycling organic matter or in net primary productivity. Soil mineralogy is therefore important in determining the quantity of organic carbon stored in soil, its turnover time, and atmosphere-ecosystem carbon fluxes during long-term soil development; this conclusion should be generalizable at least to other humid environments.

  14. [Relationships between soil organic carbon and environmental factors in gully watershed of the Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Rong; Shao, Ming-An; Gao, Jian-Lun

    2008-10-01

    Understanding the distribution of organic carbon fractions in soils and their relationships with environmental factors are very important for appraising soil organic carbon status and assessing carbon cycling in the Loess Plateau. In this research, through field investigation and laboratory analysis, we studied the relationships between soil organic carbon and environmental factors in a gully watershed of the Loess Plateau. The environmental factors are landforms, land use conditions and soil types. The results showed that total soil organic carbon presented less variance, while high labile organic carbon presented greater variance. The variation coefficients of them are 34% and 43%, respectively, indicating that the variability of organic carbon in soils increased with the increasing of their activities. Total soil organic carbon, labile organic carbon, middle and high labile organic carbon were highly interrelated and presented similar distribution trend with environmental factors. Among different landforms, land uses, and soil types, the highest contents of organic carbon in different fractions were observed in plateau land, forest and farm lands, and black loessial soils, while the lowest contents of them were observed in gully bottom, grass land, and rubified soils, respectively. The relationships between organic carbon and environmental factors indicate that environmental factors not only directly influence the distribution of soil organic carbon, but also indirectly influence them through affecting the relationships among organic carbon fractions. The relationship between total organic carbon and labile organic carbon responses rapidly to environmental factors, while that between middle labile organic carbon and high labile organic carbon responses slowly to environmental factors.

  15. Measuring Carbon Sequestration in Pasture Soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conversion of croplands to pasture can greatly increase sequestration of carbon in soil organic matter, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and helping to reduce the impacts of climate change. The measurement of soil carbon, and its limitations, could impact future carbon credit programs. ...

  16. Carbon distribution profiles in lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    Radial distribution profiles of elemental carbon in lunar soils consisting of particles in the size range of 50 to 150 microns were investigated. Initial experiments on specimen preparation and the analysis of prepared specimens by Auger electron spectrometry (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are described. Results from splits of samples 61501,84 and 64421,11, which were mounted various ways in several specimen holders, are presented. A low carbon content was observed in AES spectra from soil particles that were subjected to sputter-ion cleaning with 960eV argon ions for periods of time up to a total exposure for one hour. This ion charge was sufficient to remove approximately 70 nm of material from the surface. All of the physically adsorbed carbon (as well as water vapor, etc.) would normally be removed in the first few minutes, leaving only carbon in the specimen, and metal support structure, to be detected thereafter.

  17. Soil organic carbon covariance with soil water content; a geostatistical analysis in cropland fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, H. R.; Berg, A. A.; von Bertoldi, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil texture has traditionally represented the rate of soil water drainage influencing soil water content (WC) in the soil characteristic curves, hydrological models and remote sensing field studies. Although soil organic carbon (OC) has been shown to significantly increase the water holding capacity of soil in individual field studies, evidence is required to consider soil OC as a significant factor in soil WC variability at the scale of a remote sensing footprint (25 km2). The relationship of soil OC to soil WC was evaluated over 50 fields during the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil WC field sampling campaign over southern Manitoba, Canada. On each field, soil WC was measured at 16 sample points, at 100 m spacing to 5 cm depth with Stevens hydra probe sensors on 16 sampling dates from June 7 to July 19, 2012. Soil cores were also taken at sampling sites on each field, each sampling day, to determine gravimetric moisture, bulk density and particle size distribution. On 4 of the sampling dates, soil OC was also determined by loss on ignition on the dried soil samples from all fields. Semivariograms were created from the field mean soil OC and field mean surface soil WC sampled at midrow, over all cropland fields and averaged over all sampling dates. The semivariogram models explained a distinct relationship of both soil OC and WC within the soil over a range of 5 km with a Gaussian curve. The variance in soil that soil OC and WC have in common was a similar Gaussian curve in the cross variogram. Following spatial interpolation with Kriging, the spatial maps of soil OC and WC were also very similar with high covariance over the majority of the sampling area. The close correlation between soil OC and WC suggests they are structurally related in the soil. Soil carbon could thus assist in improving downscaling methods for remotely sensed soil WC and act as a surrogate for interpolation of soil WC.

  18. Soil Organic Carbon dynamics in agricultural soils of Veneto Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampa, F. B.; Morari, F. M.; Hiederer, R. H.; Toth, G. T.; Giandon, P. G.; Vinci, I. V.; Montanarella, L. M.; Nocita, M.

    2012-04-01

    One of the eight soil threats expressed in the European Commission's Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection (COM (2006)231 final) it's the decline in Soil Organic Matter (SOM). His preservation is recognized as with the objective to ensure that the soils of Europe remain healthy and capable of supporting human activities and ecosystems. One of the key goals of the strategy is to maintain and improve Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) levels. As climate change is identified as a common element in many of the soil threats, the European Commission (EC) intends to assess the actual contribution of the soil protection to climate change mitigation and the effects of climate change on the possible depletion of SOM. A substantial proportion of European land is occupied by agriculture, and consequently plays a crucial role in maintaining natural resources. Organic carbon preservation and sequestration in the EU's agricultural soils could have some potential to mitigate the effects of climate change, particularly linked to preventing certain land use changes and maintaining SOC stocks. The objective of this study is to assess the SOC dynamics in agricultural soils (cropland and grassland) at regional scale, focusing on changes due to land use. A sub-objective would be the evaluation of the most used land management practices and their effect on SOC content. This assessment aims to determine the geographical distribution of the potential GHG mitigation options, focusing on hot spots in the EU, where mitigation actions would be particularly efficient and is linked with the on-going work in the JRC SOIL Action. The pilot area is Veneto Region. The data available are coming from different sources, timing and involve different variables as: soil texture, climate, soil disturbance, managements and nutrients. The first source of data is the LUCAS project (Land Use/Land Cover Area Frame statistical Survey). Started in 2001, the LUCAS project aims to monitor changes in land cover/use and

  19. Accessibility, searchability, transparency and engagement of soil carbon data: The International Soil Carbon Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden, Jennifer W.; Hugelius, Gustaf; Koven, Charlie; Sulman, Ben; O'Donnell, Jon; He, Yujie

    2016-04-01

    correlated with bulk density and porosity of the rock/sediment matrix. Thus C storage is most stable at depth, yet is susceptible to changes in tillage, rooting depths, and erosion/sedimentation. Fourth, current ESMs likely overestimate the turnover time of soil organic carbon and subsequently overestimate soil carbon sequestration, thus datasets combined with other soil properties will help constrain the ESM predictions. Last, analysis of soil horizon and carbon data showed that soils with a history of tillage had significantly lower carbon concentrations in both near-surface and deep layers, and that the effect persisted even in reforested areas. In addition to the opportunities for empirical science using a large database, the database has great promise for evaluation of biogeochemical and earth system models. The preservation of individual soil core measurements avoids issues with spatial averaging while facilitating evaluation of advanced model processes such as depth distributions of soil carbon, land use impacts, and spatial heterogeneity.

  20. Modelling erosion and its interaction with soil organic carbon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyesiku-Blakemore, Joseph; Verrot, Lucile; Geris, Josie; Zhang, Ganlin; Peng, Xinhua; Hallett, Paul; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Water driven soil erosion removes and relocates a significant quantity of soil organic carbon. In China the quantity of carbon removed from the soil through water erosion has been reported to be 180+/-80 Mt y-1 (Yue et al., 2011). Being able to effectively model the movement of such a large quantity of carbon is important for the assessment of soil quality and carbon storage in the region and further afield. A large selection of erosion models are available and much work has been done on evaluating the performance of these in developed countries (Merritt et al., 2006). Fewer studies have evaluated the application of these models on soils in developing countries. Here we evaluate and compare the performance of two of these models, WEPP (Laflen et al., 1997) and RUSLE (Renard et al., 1991), for simulations of soil erosion and deposition at the slope scale on a Chinese Red Soil under cultivation using measurements taken at the site. We also describe work to dynamically couple the movement of carbon presented in WEPP to a model of soil organic matter and nutrient turnover, ECOSSE (Smith et al., 2010). This aims to improve simulations of both erosion and carbon cycling by using the simulated rates of erosion to alter the distribution of soil carbon, the depth of soil and the clay content across the slopes, changing the simulated rate of carbon turnover. This, in turn, affects the soil carbon available to be eroded in the next timestep, so improving estimates of carbon erosion. We compare the simulations of this coupled modelling approach with those of the unaltered ECOSSE and WEPP models to determine the importance of coupling erosion and turnover models on the simulation of carbon losses at catchment scale.

  1. Limits to soil carbon stability; Deep, ancient soil carbon decomposition stimulated by new labile organic inputs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil carbon (C) pools store about one-third of the total terrestrial organic carbon. Deep soil C pools (below 1 m) are thought to be stable due to their low biodegradability, but little is known about soil microbial processes and carbon dynamics below the soil surface, or how global change might aff...

  2. Ecological value of soil carbon management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management of soil carbon is critical to the climate change debate, as well as to the long-term productivity and ecosystem resilience of the biosphere. Soil organic carbon is a key ecosystem property that indicates inherent productivity of land, controls soil biological functioning and diversity, r...

  3. Evolution of black carbon properties in soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Black carbon deposited in soil from natural or deliberate wildfires and engineered black carbon products (biochar) intentionally added to soil are known to have significant effects on soil biogeochemical processes and in many cases to influence the yield and quality of crops and to enhance the abili...

  4. [Spatial distribution patterns of soil organic carbon under Elacagnus angustifolia--Achnatherum splendens community in an arid area of Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Chi, Ting; Xu, Chi; Liu, Mao-Song; Zhang, Ming-Juan; Yang, Xue-Jiao

    2013-10-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the relationships of soil organic carbon (SOC) content with root biomass and soil moisture content as well as the accumulation mechanisms of SOC under the Elacagnus angustifolia-Achnatherum splenden community in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region of Northwest China. The results showed that the SOC content decreased gradually with increasing soil depth, and changed gently in both horizontal and vertical directions. The correlations of the SOC content and its affecting factors varied with soil depth. In 0-30 cm layer, the SOC content was significantly negatively correlated with soil moisture content; in 60-150 cm layer, the SOC content was significantly positively correlated with soil moisture content and root biomass. Partial regression analysis indicated that the root biomass density in 0-30 cm soil layer contributed significantly to the variance of SOC content. In 60-150 cm layer, the SOC content was mainly affected by root system and soil moisture content; in 30-60 cm layer, no significant correlations were observed between the SOC content and the root biomass and soil moisture content. There was an obvious difference in the accumulation mechanism of SOC in different soil layers and at different locations of E. angustifolia--A. splendens community.

  5. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.; McPherson, B.J.; Sundquist, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  6. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon sequ...

  7. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon (C) input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon ...

  8. Biogeochemistry: The soil carbon erosion paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw

    2017-04-01

    Erosion is typically thought to degrade soil resources. However, the redistribution of soil carbon across the landscape, caused by erosion, can actually lead to a substantial sink for atmospheric CO2.

  9. Underestimation of boreal soil carbon stocks by mathematical soil carbon models linked to soil nutrient status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ťupek, Boris; Ortiz, Carina A.; Hashimoto, Shoji; Stendahl, Johan; Dahlgren, Jonas; Karltun, Erik; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-08-01

    Inaccurate estimate of the largest terrestrial carbon pool, soil organic carbon (SOC) stock, is the major source of uncertainty in simulating feedback of climate warming on ecosystem-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange by process-based ecosystem and soil carbon models. Although the models need to simplify complex environmental processes of soil carbon sequestration, in a large mosaic of environments a missing key driver could lead to a modeling bias in predictions of SOC stock change.We aimed to evaluate SOC stock estimates of process-based models (Yasso07, Q, and CENTURY soil sub-model v4) against a massive Swedish forest soil inventory data set (3230 samples) organized by a recursive partitioning method into distinct soil groups with underlying SOC stock development linked to physicochemical conditions.For two-thirds of measurements all models predicted accurate SOC stock levels regardless of the detail of input data, e.g., whether they ignored or included soil properties. However, in fertile sites with high N deposition, high cation exchange capacity, or moderately increased soil water content, Yasso07 and Q models underestimated SOC stocks. In comparison to Yasso07 and Q, accounting for the site-specific soil characteristics (e. g. clay content and topsoil mineral N) by CENTURY improved SOC stock estimates for sites with high clay content, but not for sites with high N deposition.Our analysis suggested that the soils with poorly predicted SOC stocks, as characterized by the high nutrient status and well-sorted parent material, indeed have had other predominant drivers of SOC stabilization lacking in the models, presumably the mycorrhizal organic uptake and organo-mineral stabilization processes. Our results imply that the role of soil nutrient status as regulator of organic matter mineralization has to be re-evaluated, since correct SOC stocks are decisive for predicting future SOC change and soil CO2 efflux.

  10. Soil carbon stock and soil characteristics at Tasik Chini Forest Reserve, Pahang, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Aqlili Riana, R.; Sahibin A., R.

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to determine soil carbon stock and soil characteristic at Tasik Chini Forest Reserve (TCFR), Pahang. A total of 10 (20 m x 25 m) permanent sampling plot was selected randomly within the area of TCFR. Soil samples were taken from all subplots using dutch auger based on soil depth of 0-20cm, 20-40cm, 40-60cm. Soil parameters determined were size distribution, soil water content, bulk density, organic matter, organic carbon content, pH and electrical conductivity. All parameters were determined following their respective standard methods. Results obtained showed that the soil in TCFR was dominated by clay texture (40%), followed by sandy clay loam (30%), loam (20%). Silty clay, clay loam and sandy loam constitutes about 10% of the soil texture. Range of mean percentage of organic matter and bulk density are from 2.42±0.06% to 11.64±0.39% and 1.01 to 1.04 (gcm-ł), respectively. Soil pH are relatively very acidic and mean of electrical conductivity is low. Soil carbon content ranged from 0.83±0.03 to 1.87±0.41%. All soil parameter showed a decreasing trend with depth except electrical conductivity. ANOVA test of mean percentage of organic matter, soil water content, soil pH and electrical conductivity showed a significant difference between plot (p<0.05). However there are no significant difference of mean bulk density between plots (p>0.05). There are no significant difference in mean percentage of soil water content, organic matter and bulk density between three different depth (p>0.05). There were a significant difference on percentage of soil carbon organic between plots and depth. The mean of soil organic carbon stock in soil to a depth of 60 cm calculated was 35.50 t/ha.

  11. Soil organic carbon across scales.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Sharon M; Angers, Denis A; Holden, Nicholas M; McBratney, Alex B

    2015-10-01

    Mechanistic understanding of scale effects is important for interpreting the processes that control the global carbon cycle. Greater attention should be given to scale in soil organic carbon (SOC) science so that we can devise better policy to protect/enhance existing SOC stocks and ensure sustainable use of soils. Global issues such as climate change require consideration of SOC stock changes at the global and biosphere scale, but human interaction occurs at the landscape scale, with consequences at the pedon, aggregate and particle scales. This review evaluates our understanding of SOC across all these scales in the context of the processes involved in SOC cycling at each scale and with emphasis on stabilizing SOC. Current synergy between science and policy is explored at each scale to determine how well each is represented in the management of SOC. An outline of how SOC might be integrated into a framework of soil security is examined. We conclude that SOC processes at the biosphere to biome scales are not well understood. Instead, SOC has come to be viewed as a large-scale pool subjects to carbon flux. Better understanding exists for SOC processes operating at the scales of the pedon, aggregate and particle. At the landscape scale, the influence of large- and small-scale processes has the greatest interaction and is exposed to the greatest modification through agricultural management. Policy implemented at regional or national scale tends to focus at the landscape scale without due consideration of the larger scale factors controlling SOC or the impacts of policy for SOC at the smaller SOC scales. What is required is a framework that can be integrated across a continuum of scales to optimize SOC management. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Sensitivity of Soil Carbon Stock Estimates in Alaska to Soil Taxonomic Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, N. B.; Maursetter, J.

    2006-12-01

    Soil carbon stock estimates will help calibrate models of soil carbon change, including fluxes of carbon between the land and the atmosphere. Warming in Alaska in the last several decades has been more rapid than global averages, and is leading to a variety of ecological changes. In particular, increased respiration of soil carbon may lead to a positive feedback for climate change by releasing carbon dioxide and methane from the land to the atmosphere. Better estimates of carbon stocks are needed to more accurately model fluxes of greenhouse gases between the land and the atmosphere. New estimates of the stocks of soil organic carbon in Alaska were made by linking spatial and field data developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service. The spatial data are from the State Soil Geographic (STATSGO) database, and the field data are from the Soil Characterization Database, also known as the pedon database. Many more sampled pedons are available now than when the original STATSGO data were compiled. Analysis of the STATSGO data alone, as distributed in 1994, provides a soil carbon stock estimate for Alaska of less than 20 petagrams. The new estimates range from 35 to 50 petagrams of soil organic carbon for Alaska, depending on the choice of methods for linking the spatial and pedon data. The higher estimates are based on linking at more generalized taxonomic levels such as soil order or suborder. The lower estimates are based on linking at more detailed soil taxonomic levels, and are likely more precise for the areas that match, but have larger areas with no match between the pedon and spatial databases. The carbon estimates are summarized by soil taxonomic unit, by regions with similar geomorphic processes, by elevation, and by land cover type.

  13. Prediction of soil organic carbon concentration and soil bulk density of mineral soils for soil organic carbon stock estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putku, Elsa; Astover, Alar; Ritz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Soil monitoring networks provide a powerful base for estimating and predicting nation's soil status in many aspects. The datasets of soil monitoring are often hierarchically structured demanding sophisticated data analyzing methods. The National Soil Monitoring of Estonia was based on a hierarchical data sampling scheme as each of the monitoring site was divided into four transects with 10 sampling points on each transect. We hypothesized that the hierarchical structure in Estonian Soil Monitoring network data requires a multi-level mixed model approach to achieve good prediction accuracy of soil properties. We used this database to predict soil bulk density and soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable land using different statistical methods: median approach, linear regression and mixed model; additionally, random forests for SOC concentration. We compared the prediction results and selected the model with the best prediction accuracy to estimate soil organic carbon stock. The mixed model approach achieved the best prediction accuracy in both soil organic carbon (RMSE 0.22%) and bulk density (RMSE 0.09 g cm-3) prediction. Other considered methods under- or overestimated higher and lower values of soil parameters. Thus, using these predictions we calculated the soil organic carbon stock of mineral arable soils and applied the model to a specific case of Tartu County in Estonia. Average estimated SOC stock of Tartu County is 54.8 t C ha-1 and total topsoil SOC stock 1.8 Tg in humus horizon.

  14. Soil warming, carbon-nitrogen interactions, and forest carbon budgets.

    PubMed

    Melillo, Jerry M; Butler, Sarah; Johnson, Jennifer; Mohan, Jacqueline; Steudler, Paul; Lux, Heidi; Burrows, Elizabeth; Bowles, Francis; Smith, Rose; Scott, Lindsay; Vario, Chelsea; Hill, Troy; Burton, Andrew; Zhou, Yu-Mei; Tang, Jim

    2011-06-07

    Soil warming has the potential to alter both soil and plant processes that affect carbon storage in forest ecosystems. We have quantified these effects in a large, long-term (7-y) soil-warming study in a deciduous forest in New England. Soil warming has resulted in carbon losses from the soil and stimulated carbon gains in the woody tissue of trees. The warming-enhanced decay of soil organic matter also released enough additional inorganic nitrogen into the soil solution to support the observed increases in plant carbon storage. Although soil warming has resulted in a cumulative net loss of carbon from a New England forest relative to a control area over the 7-y study, the annual net losses generally decreased over time as plant carbon storage increased. In the seventh year, warming-induced soil carbon losses were almost totally compensated for by plant carbon gains in response to warming. We attribute the plant gains primarily to warming-induced increases in nitrogen availability. This study underscores the importance of incorporating carbon-nitrogen interactions in atmosphere-ocean-land earth system models to accurately simulate land feedbacks to the climate system.

  15. Soil organic carbon in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, E.; Baldock, J.; Hua, Q.; Wilson, B.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the drivers of SOC dynamics and depth distribution across eastern Australia using laboratory analyses (CN, fractionation, radiocarbon) coupled with modelling and machine learning. At over 1400 sites, surface SOC storage was driven by precipitation, whereas SOC depth distribution (0-30 cm) was influenced by land-use. Based upon these findings, 100 sites were selected for profile analysis (up to 1 m) of SOC and its component fractions - particulate (POC), humus (HOC) and resistant (ROC) organic carbon. Profile SOC content was modelled using an exponential model describing surface SOC content, SOC depth distribution and residual SOC at depth and the drivers of these parameters investigated via machine learning. Corroborating previous findings, surface SOC content was highly influenced by rainfall, whereas SOC depth distribution was influenced by land-use. At depth, site properties were the most important predictors of SOC. Cropped sites had significantly lower SOC content than native and grazed sites at depth, indicating that land-use influences SOC content throughout the profile. The machine learning algorithms identified depth as the key control on the proportion of all three fractions down the profile: POC decreased whereas HOC increased with increasing depth. POC was strongly linked with total SOC but HOC and ROC were driven more by climate and soil physico-chemical properties. Human influences (land-use and management) were not important to the fractions, implying that the controls humans can exert on SOC stability may be limited. A subset of 12 soil profiles was analysed for 14C. Radiocarbon content was affected strongly by land-use, with effects most pronounced at depth. Native systems had the youngest carbon down the profile, cropped systems had the oldest SOC. All fractions reacted to land-use change down the soil profile, indicating a lack of stability when the whole profile is viewed. These results indicate that natural systems act as a

  16. [Effect of Biochar Application on Soil Aggregates Distribution and Moisture Retention in Orchard Soil].

    PubMed

    An, Yan; Ji, Qiang; Zhao, Shi-xiang; Wang, Xu-dong

    2016-01-15

    Applying biochar to soil has been considered to be one of the important practices in improving soil properties and increasing carbon sequestration. In order to investigate the effects of biochar application on soil aggregates distribution and its organic matter content and soil moisture constant in different size aggregates, various particle-size fractions of soil aggregates were obtained with the dry-screening method. The results showed that, compared to the treatment without biochar (CK), the application of biochar reduced the mass content of 5-8 mm and < 0.25 mm soil aggregates at 0-10 cm soil horizon, while increased the content of 1-2 mm and 2-5 mm soil aggregates at this horizon, and the content of 1-2 mm aggregates significantly increased along with the rates of biochar application. The mean diameter of soil aggregates was reduced by biochar application at 0-10 cm soil horizon. However, the effect of biochar application on the mean diameter of soil aggregates at 10-20 cm soil horizon was not significant. Compared to CK, biochar application significantly increased soil organic carbon content in aggregates, especially in 1-2 mm aggregates which was increased by > 70% compared to CK. Both the water holding capacity and soil porosity were significantly increased by biochar application. Furthermore, the neutral biochar was more effective than alkaline biochar in increasing soil moisture.

  17. Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: Implications for soil carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garten, Charles T.; Ashwood, Tom L.

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate (≥53 μm) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 μm). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

  18. Soil and soil organic carbon redistribution on the landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Jerry C.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Venteris, Erik R.; Kaspar, T. C.

    2007-09-01

    Patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) vary widely across the landscape leading to large uncertainties in the SOC budget especially for agricultural landscapes where water, tillage and wind erosion redistributes soil and SOC across the landscape. It is often assumed that soil erosion results in a loss of SOC from the agricultural ecosystem but recent studies indicate that soil erosion and its subsequent redistribution within fields can stimulate carbon sequestration in agricultural ecosystems. This study investigates the relationship between SOC and soil redistribution patterns on agricultural landscapes. Soil redistribution (erosion and deposition) patterns were estimated in three tilled agricultural fields using the fallout 137Cesium technique. 137Cs and SOC concentrations of upland soils are significantly correlated in our study areas. Upland areas (eroding) have significantly less SOC than soils in deposition areas. SOC decreased as gradient slope increases and soils on concave slopes had higher SOC than soils on convex slopes. These data suggest that soil redistribution patterns and topographic patterns may be used to help understand SOC dynamics on the landscape. Different productivity and oxidation rates of SOC of eroded versus deposited soils also contribute to SOC spatial patterns. However, the strong significant relationships between soil redistribution and SOC concentrations in the upland soil suggest that they are moving along similar physical pathways in these systems. Our study also indicates that geomorphic position is important for understanding soil movement and redistribution patterns within a field or watershed. Such information can help develop or implement management systems to increase SOC in agricultural ecosystems.

  19. Spatial variability of total carbon and soil organic carbon in agricultural soils in Baranja region, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogunović, Igor; Trevisani, Sebastiano; Pereira, Paulo; Šeput, Miranda

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is expected to have an important influence on the crop production in agricultural regions. Soil carbon represents an important soil property that contributes to mitigate the negative influence of climate change on intensive cropped areas. Based on 5063 soil samples sampled from soil top layer (0-30 cm) we studied the spatial distribution of total carbon (TC) and soil organic carbon (SOC) content in various soil types (Anthrosols, Cambisols, Chernozems, Fluvisols, Gleysols, Luvisols) in Baranja region, Croatia. TC concentrations ranged from 2.10 to 66.15 mg/kg (with a mean of 16.31 mg/kg). SOC concentrations ranged from 1.86 to 58.00 mg/kg (with a mean of 13.35 mg/kg). TC and SOC showed moderate heterogeneity with coefficient of variation (CV) of 51.3% and 33.8%, respectively. Average concentrations of soil TC vary in function of soil types in the following decreasing order: Anthrosols (20.9 mg/kg) > Gleysols (19.3 mg/kg) > Fluvisols (15.6 mg/kg) > Chernozems (14.2 mg/kg) > Luvisols (12.6 mg/kg) > Cambisols (11.1 mg/kg), while SOC concentrations follow next order: Gleysols (15.4 mg/kg) > Fluvisols (13.2 mg/kg) = Anthrosols (13.2 mg/kg) > Chernozems (12.6 mg/kg) > Luvisols (11.4 mg/kg) > Cambisols (10.5 mg/kg). Performed geostatistical analysis of TC and SOC; both the experimental variograms as well as the interpolated maps reveal quite different spatial patterns of the two studied soil properties. The analysis of the spatial variability and of the spatial patterns of the produced maps show that SOC is likely influenced by antrophic processes. Spatial variability of SOC indicates soil health deterioration on an important significant portion of the studied area; this suggests the need for future adoption of environmentally friendly soil management in the Baranja region. Regional maps of TC and SOC provide quantitative information for regional planning and environmental monitoring and protection purposes.

  20. Soil organic components distribution in a podzol and the possible relations with the biological soil activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Romero, Marta; Papa, Stefania; Verstraeten, Arne; Curcio, Elena; Cools, Nathalie; Lozano-Garcia, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Coppola, Elio

    2016-04-01

    This research reports the preliminary results of a study based on the SOC (Soil Organic Carbon) fractionation in a pine forest soil (Pinus nigra). Hyperskeletic Albic Podzol soil (P113005, World Reference Base, 2014), described by the following sequence O-Ah-E-Bh-Bs-Cg, was investigated at Zoniën, Belgium. Total (TOC) and extractable (TEC) soil contents were determined by Italian official method of soil analysis. Different soil C fractions were also determined: Humic Acid Carbon (HAC) and Fulvic Acid Carbon (FAC). Not Humic Carbon (NHC) and Humin Carbon (Huc) fractions were obtained by difference. Along the mineral soil profile, therefore, were also tested some enzymatic activities, such as cellulase, xylanase, laccase and peroxidase, involved in the degradation of the main organic substance components, and dehydrogenase activity, like soil microbial biomass index. The results shows a differential TEC fractions distribution in the soil profile along three fronts of progress: (i) An E leaching horizon of TEC; Bh horizon (humic) of humic acids preferential accumulation, morphologically and analytically recognizable, in which humic are more insoluble that fulvic acids, and predominate over the latter; (ii) horizon Bs (spodic) in which fulvic acids are more soluble that humic acid, and predominate in their turn. All enzyme activities appear to be highest in the most superficial part of the mineral profile and decrease towards the deeper layers with different patterns. It is known that the enzymes production in a soil profile reflects the organic substrates availability, which in turn influences the density and the composition of the microbial population. The deeper soil horizons contain microbial communities adapted and specialized to their environment and, therefore, different from those present on the surface The results suggest that the fractionation technique of TEC is appropriate to interpret the podsolisation phenomenon that is the preferential distribution of

  1. Comparing global soil models to soil carbon profile databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koven, C. D.; Harden, J. W.; He, Y.; Lawrence, D. M.; Nave, L. E.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Treat, C.; Sulman, B. N.; Kane, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    As global soil models begin to consider the dynamics of carbon below the surface layers, it is crucial to assess the realism of these models. We focus on the vertical profiles of soil C predicted across multiple biomes form the Community Land Model (CLM4.5), using different values for a parameter that controls the rate of decomposition at depth versus at the surface, and compare these to observationally-derived diagnostics derived from the International Soil Carbon Database (ISCN) to assess the realism of model predictions of carbon depthattenuation, and the ability of observations to provide a constraint on rates of decomposition at depth.

  2. [Organic carbon and carbon mineralization characteristics in nature forestry soil].

    PubMed

    Yang, Tian; Dai, Wei; An, Xiao-Juan; Pang, Huan; Zou, Jian-Mei; Zhang, Rui

    2014-03-01

    Through field investigation and indoor analysis, the organic carbon content and organic carbon mineralization characteristics of six kinds of natural forest soil were studied, including the pine forests, evergreen broad-leaved forest, deciduous broad-leaved forest, mixed needle leaf and Korean pine and Chinese pine forest. The results showed that the organic carbon content in the forest soil showed trends of gradual decrease with the increase of soil depth; Double exponential equation fitted well with the organic carbon mineralization process in natural forest soil, accurately reflecting the mineralization reaction characteristics of the natural forest soil. Natural forest soil in each layer had the same mineralization reaction trend, but different intensity. Among them, the reaction intensity in the 0-10 cm soil of the Korean pine forest was the highest, and the intensities of mineralization reaction in its lower layers were also significantly higher than those in the same layers of other natural forest soil; comparison of soil mineralization characteristics of the deciduous broad-leaved forest and coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest found that the differences of litter species had a relatively strong impact on the active organic carbon content in soil, leading to different characteristics of mineralization reaction.

  3. Application of Geant4 simulation for analysis of soil carbon inelastic neutron scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Yakubova, Galina; Kavetskiy, Aleksandr; Prior, Stephen A; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) was applied to determine soil carbon content. Due to non-uniform soil carbon depth distribution, the correlation between INS signals with some soil carbon content parameter is not obvious; however, a proportionality between INS signals and average carbon weight percent in ~10cm layer for any carbon depth profile is demonstrated using Monte-Carlo simulation (Geant4). Comparison of INS and dry combustion measurements confirms this conclusion. Thus, INS measurements give the value of this soil carbon parameter.

  4. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in different size fractions of soil from a coke oven plant and its relationship to organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Li, Helian; Chen, Jiajun; Wu, Wei; Piao, Xuesong

    2010-04-15

    The concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in US EPA priority list were analyzed in the bulk and six particle size fractions of soil samples from a coke oven plant. The relationships of PAHs concentrations with total organic carbon (TOC), black carbon (BC) and other forms of organic carbon (OC) contents have been investigated. Total PAH concentrations ranged from 6.27 to 40.18 mg kg(-1) dry weight. The highest total PAH concentration occurred in the 250-500 microm size fraction. The maximum individual PAH concentration was in the 250-500 microm or 500-2000 microm size fraction. The size fractions of 125-500 microm and <50 microm have higher percentages and contributed 24.62% and 23.33% of the total PAH mass, respectively. The relative abundance of individual PAH compounds and PAH molecular indices present typical characteristic pyrogenic origin. The maximal TOC and BC contents were found in the 125-250 microm size fraction. Strong positive linear relationship between total PAH concentration and TOC or BC has been demonstrated, with a linear regression coefficient value of 0.7277 and 0.9245, respectively. The linear relationship between total PAH concentration versus OC (OC = TOC - BC) is weaker than that versus TOC or BC, with a correlation coefficient of 0.4117. It indicates that partitioned in organic matter, especially in black carbon is the dominant form of PAHs in the soil. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hyperspectral analysis of soil nitrogen, carbon, carbonate, and organic matter using regression trees.

    PubMed

    Gmur, Stephan; Vogt, Daniel; Zabowski, Darlene; Moskal, L Monika

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of soil attributes using hyperspectral sensors has revealed patterns in soil spectra that are known to respond to mineral composition, organic matter, soil moisture and particle size distribution. Soil samples from different soil horizons of replicated soil series from sites located within Washington and Oregon were analyzed with the FieldSpec Spectroradiometer to measure their spectral signatures across the electromagnetic range of 400 to 1,000 nm. Similarity rankings of individual soil samples reveal differences between replicate series as well as samples within the same replicate series. Using classification and regression tree statistical methods, regression trees were fitted to each spectral response using concentrations of nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter as the response variables. Statistics resulting from fitted trees were: nitrogen R(2) 0.91 (p < 0.01) at 403, 470, 687, and 846 nm spectral band widths, carbonate R(2) 0.95 (p < 0.01) at 531 and 898 nm band widths, total carbon R(2) 0.93 (p < 0.01) at 400, 409, 441 and 907 nm band widths, and organic matter R(2) 0.98 (p < 0.01) at 300, 400, 441, 832 and 907 nm band widths. Use of the 400 to 1,000 nm electromagnetic range utilizing regression trees provided a powerful, rapid and inexpensive method for assessing nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter for upper soil horizons in a nondestructive method.

  6. Soil carbon changes for bioenergy crops.

    SciTech Connect

    Andress, D.

    2004-04-22

    Bioenergy crops, which displace fossil fuels when used to produce ethanol, biobased products, and/or electricity, have the potential to further reduce atmospheric carbon levels by building up soil carbon levels, especially when planted on lands where these levels have been reduced by intensive tillage. The purpose of this study is to improve the characterization of the soil carbon (C) sequestration for bioenergy crops (switchgrass, poplars, and willows) in the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model (Wang 1999) by using the latest results reported in the literature and by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Because soil carbon sequestration for bioenergy crops can play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for cellulosic ethanol, it is important to periodically update the estimates of soil carbon sequestration from bioenergy crops as new and better data become available. We used the three-step process described below to conduct our study.

  7. Towards Soil and Sediment Inventories of Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, C. A.

    2008-12-01

    A body of literature on black carbon (BC) concentrations in soils and sediments is rapidly accumulating, but as of yet, there are no global or regional inventories of BC in either reservoir. Soil and sediment BC inventories are badly needed for a range of fields. For example, in oceanography a global sediment BC inventory is crucial in understanding the role of biomass burning in the development of stable marine carbon reservoirs, including dissolved organic carbon and sedimentary organic carbon. Again in the marine environment, BC likely strongly impacts the fate and transport of anthropogenic pollutants: regional inventories of BC in sediments will help develop better environmental remediation strategies. In terrestrial systems well-constrained natural BC soil inventories would help refine ecological, agricultural, and soil biogeochemical studies. BC is highly sorptive of nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorous. The presence of BC in ecosystems almost certainly alters N and P cycling; however, without soil BC inventories, we cannot know where BC has a significant impact. BC's nutrient sorptivity and water-holding capacity make it an important component of agricultural soils, and some researchers have proposed artificially increasing soil BC inventories to improve soil fertility. Natural soil BC concentrations in some regions are quite high, but without a baseline inventory, it is challenging to predict when agricultural amendment will significantly exceed natural conditions. And finally, because BC is one of the most stable fractions of organic carbon in soils, understanding its concentration and regional distribution will help us track the dynamics of soil organic matter response to changing environmental conditions. Developing effective regional and global BC inventories is challenging both because of data sparsity and methodological intercomparison issues. In this presentation I will describe a roadmap to generating these valuable inventories.

  8. [Research methods of carbon sequestration by soil aggregates: a review].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Xia; Liang, Ai-Zhen; Zhang, Xiao-Ping

    2012-07-01

    To increase soil organic carbon content is critical for maintaining soil fertility and agricultural sustainable development and for mitigating increased greenhouse gases and the effects of global climate change. Soil aggregates are the main components of soil, and have significant effects on soil physical and chemical properties. The physical protection of soil organic carbon by soil aggregates is the important mechanism of soil carbon sequestration. This paper reviewed the organic carbon sequestration by soil aggregates, and introduced the classic and current methods in studying the mechanisms of carbon sequestration by soil aggregates. The main problems and further research trends in this study field were also discussed.

  9. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  10. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  11. Changes in Soil Carbon Storage After Cultivation

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mann, L. K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Previously published data from 625 paired soil samples were used to predict carbon in cultivated soil as a function of initial carbon content. A 30-cm sampling depth provided a less variable estimate (r2 = 0.9) of changes in carbon than a 15-cm sampling depth (r2 = 0.6). Regression analyses of changes in carbon storage in relation to years of cultivation confirmed that the greatest rates of change occurred in the first 20 y. An initial carbon effect was present in all analyses: soils very low in carbon tended to gain slight amounts of carbon after cultivation, but soils high in carbon lost at least 20% during cultivation. Carbon losses from most agricultural soils are estimated to average less than 20% of initial values or less than 1.5 kg/m2 within the top 30 cm. These estimates should not be applied to depths greater than 30 cm and would be improved with more bulk density information and equivalent sample volumes.

  12. Effects of composite soil with feldspathic sandstone and sand on soil aggregates and organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Han, J. C.; Zhang, Y.; Lei, G. Y.; Wang, H. Y.; Zhu, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    The case was to study the effects of soils with different proportions of feldspathic sandstone and sand on soil stability and organic carbon at 0-30 cm soil depth with four different ratios(C1, C2, C3 and C4), They were used to prepare the composite soil in Fu Ping, Shaanxi Province of China, then the soil aggregates distribution, WASR, MWD, GMD, D valueand and organic carbon content were measured and analysed.The results showed : the soil stability of C1, C2 and C3 was better than C4, i.e., the composition could improve the soil stability. With the increasing of the planting years, the contents of soil aggregates with the size >0.25 mm and MWD, GMD and SOC increased for each treatment at 0- 30 cm soil depth, which was contrary to D values. WASR of C2 was significantly higher than others (p<0.05) after 3-year planting. The significant logarithmic relationships were found between the D values and the ratios in C1, C2 and C3. Besides C1 and C2 could increase the stability and content of large soil aggregates to improve soil structure; C2 could significantly increase the SOC than others at 0- 30 cm soil depth.

  13. Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in Depositional Landscapes of Bavaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegs, Stefanie; Schwindt, Daniel; Völkel, Jörg; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    Erosion leads to redistribution and accumulation of soil organic matter (SOM) within agricultural landscapes. These fluvic and colluvic deposits are characterized by a highly diverse vertical structure and can contain high amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) over the whole soil profile. Depositional landscapes are therefore not only productive sites for agricultural use but also influence carbon dynamics which is of great interest with regard on the recent climate change debate. The aim of our study is to elucidate the spatial distribution of organic carbon stocks, as well as its depth function and the role of these landscapes as a reservoir for SOM. Therefore we compare two representative depositional landscapes in Bavaria composed of different parent materials (carbonate vs. granitic). We hypothesize that the soils associated with different depositional processes (fluvial vs. colluvial) differ in SOC contents and stocks, also because of different hydromorphic regimes in fluvic versus colluvic soil profiles. Sampling sites are located in the Alpine Foreland (quaternary moraines with carbonatic parent material) and the foothills of the Bavarian Forest (Granite with Loess) with the main soil types Fluvisols, Gleysols and Luvisols. At both sites we sampled twelve soil profiles up to 150 cm depth, six in the floodplain and six along a vertical slope transect. We took undisturbed soil samples from each horizon and analyzed them for bulk density, total Carbon (OC and IC) and total Nitrogen (N) concentrations. This approach allows to calculate total OC contents and OC stocks and to investigate vertical and horizontal distribution of OC stocks. It will also reveal differences in OC stocks due to the location of the soil profile in fluvic or colluvic deposition scenarios.

  14. Soil carbon sequestration estimated with the soil conditioning index

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid and reliable assessments of the potential of different agricultural management systems to sequester soil organic carbon are needed to promote conservation and help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The soil conditioning index (SCI) is a relatively simple model to parameterize and is currentl...

  15. Ectomycorrhizal fungi slow soil carbon cycling.

    PubMed

    Averill, Colin; Hawkes, Christine V

    2016-08-01

    Respiration of soil organic carbon is one of the largest fluxes of CO2 on earth. Understanding the processes that regulate soil respiration is critical for predicting future climate. Recent work has suggested that soil carbon respiration may be reduced by competition for nitrogen between symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi that associate with plant roots and free-living microbial decomposers, which is consistent with increased soil carbon storage in ectomycorrhizal ecosystems globally. However, experimental tests of the mycorrhizal competition hypothesis are lacking. Here we show that ectomycorrhizal roots and hyphae decrease soil carbon respiration rates by up to 67% under field conditions in two separate field exclusion experiments, and this likely occurs via competition for soil nitrogen, an effect larger than 2 °C soil warming. These findings support mycorrhizal competition for nitrogen as an independent driver of soil carbon balance and demonstrate the need to understand microbial community interactions to predict ecosystem feedbacks to global climate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  16. Uncertainty in soil carbon accounting due to unrecognized soil erosion.

    PubMed

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Chappell, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The movement of soil organic carbon (SOC) during erosion and deposition events represents a major perturbation to the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the recognized impact soil redistribution can have on the carbon cycle, few major carbon accounting models currently allow for soil mass flux. Here, we modified a commonly used SOC model to include a soil redistribution term and then applied it to scenarios which explore the implications of unrecognized erosion and deposition for SOC accounting. We show that models that assume a static landscape may be calibrated incorrectly as erosion of SOC is hidden within the decay constants. This implicit inclusion of erosion then limits the predictive capacity of these models when applied to sites with different soil redistribution histories. Decay constants were found to be 15-50% slower when an erosion rate of 15 t soil ha(-1)  yr(-1) was explicitly included in the SOC model calibration. Static models cannot account for SOC change resulting from agricultural management practices focused on reducing erosion rates. Without accounting for soil redistribution, a soil sampling scheme which uses a fixed depth to support model development can create large errors in actual and relative changes in SOC stocks. When modest levels of erosion were ignored, the combined uncertainty in carbon sequestration rates was 0.3-1.0 t CO2  ha(-1)  yr(-1) . This range is similar to expected sequestration rates for many management options aimed at increasing SOC levels. It is evident from these analyses that explicit recognition of soil redistribution is critical to the success of a carbon monitoring or trading scheme which seeks to credit agricultural activities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Distribution and significance of dissolved organic carbon under three land-use systems, NSW, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fancy, Rubeca; Wilson, Brian R.; Daniel, Heiko; Osanai, Yui

    2017-04-01

    Carbon accumulation in surface soils is well documented but very little is known about the mechanisms and processes that result in carbon accumulation and long-term storage in the deeper soil profile. Understanding soil carbon storage and distribution mechanisms is critical to evaluate the sequestration potential of the soils of different land uses. Recent investigations have demonstrated that the movement of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the soil profile could contribute significantly to the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems. However, very little is known regarding the importance of DOC to vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) pool through the soil profile in different land-use systems, management practices and conditions prevalent in Australia. We investigated the quantity and distribution of SOC and DOC through the profile under three different land-use systems in northern NSW, Australia. A series of site clusters containing a representative range of land-uses (cultivated, improved pasture and woodland) were selected across the region. Within each land use, we determined SOC and DOC concentration and quantity down the soil profile to a depth of 0-100 cm using six soil depth increments. Here we discuss the distribution and relative importance of DOC down the soil profile to the storage and distribution of carbon. We compare and contrast the patterns associated with the different land use systems and explore potential mechanisms of carbon cycling in these soils. Near to the soil surface, SOC had larger concentrations in the order woodland>improved pasture>cropping at all sites studied. However, DOC was found in significantly larger concentrations in the woodland soils at all soil depths. The larger DOC:TOC ratio in woodland and improved pasture soils suggests a direct relationship between TOC and DOC but increased DOC:TOC ratio in deeper soil layers suggests an increasing importance of DOC in soil carbon cycling in these deeper soils under

  18. [Dynamics of unprotected soil organic carbon with the restoration process of Pinus massoniana plantation in red soil erosion area].

    PubMed

    Lü, Mao-Kui; Xie, Jin-Sheng; Zhou, Yan-Xiang; Zeng, Hong-Da; Jiang, Jun; Chen, Xi-Xiang; Xu, Chao; Chen, Tan; Fu, Lin-Chi

    2014-01-01

    By the method of spatiotemporal substitution and taking the bare land and secondary forest as the control, we measured light fraction and particulate organic carbon in the topsoil under the Pinus massoniana woodlands of different ages with similar management histories in a red soil erosion area, to determine their dynamics and evaluate the conversion processes from unprotected to protected organic carbon. The results showed that the content and storage of soil organic carbon increased significantly along with ages in the process of vegetation restoration (P < 0.01). The unprotected soil organic carbon content and distribution proportion to the total soil organic carbon increased significantly (P < 0.05) after 7-11 years' restoration but stabilized after 27 and 30 years of restoration. It suggested that soil organic carbon mostly accumulated in the form of unprotected soil organic carbon during the initial restoration period, and reached a stable level after long-term vegetation restoration. Positive correlations were found between restoration years and the rate constant for C transferring from the unprotected to the protected soil pool (k) in 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm soil layers, which demonstrated that the unprotected soil organic carbon gradually transferred to the protected soil organic carbon in the process of vegetation restoration.

  19. Distribution of Soil Organic Matter Pools among Land Uses across a Diversity of Tropical Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, S.; Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2016-12-01

    Our understanding of the response of soil organic matter (SOM) to land-use change in the tropics is strongly biased towards volcanic and highly-weathered soils, despite the diversity of tropical soil environments. SOM plays an important role in many chemical and biological functions of the biosphere, including soil fertility and carbon cycling. In this study, we measured the distribution of SOM pools across a diversity of soil orders under different land cover types, including forests, pastures, croplands, and rangelands to gain a better picture of potential mechanisms influencing soil C cycling in tropical soils. The fractionation, or isolation, of SOM into different pools with different turnover times can reveal insights into C cycling beyond those offered by measurements of bulk C stocks. Sampling sites were selected from across the Caribbean islands of Puerto Rico and St. Croix to provide a comprehensive look at distinct microenvironments and factors influencing SOM. We used a density fractionation approach to separate the particulate organic matter in the free light fraction (FLF), particulate organic matter released after the disruption of soil aggregates, or the occluded light fraction (oLF), and the heavy or dense residual mineral-associated fraction (HF). We report differences in the amount of C and nitrogen associated with different SOM pools as well as C:N ratios, which provide information about organic matter source and stage of decomposition. This study will provide an understanding of how soil organic carbon cycling varies between land uses and soil orders among tropical soils.

  20. Soil Inorganic Carbon Formation: Can Parent Material Overcome Climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanbery, C.; Will, R. M.; Seyfried, M. S.; Benner, S. G.; Flores, A. N.; Guilinger, J.; Lohse, K. A.; Good, A.; Black, C.; Pierce, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Soil carbon is the third largest carbon reservoir and is composed of both organic and inorganic constituents. However, the storage and flux of soil carbon within the global carbon cycle are not fully understood. While organic carbon is often the focus of research, the factors controlling the formation and dissolution of soil inorganic carbon (SIC) are complex. Climate is largely accepted as the primary control on SIC, but the effects of soil parent material are less clear. We hypothesize that effects of parent material are significant and that SIC accumulation will be greater in soils formed from basalts than granites due to the finer textured soils and more abundant calcium and magnesium cations. This research is being conducted in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in southwestern Idaho. The watershed is an ideal location because it has a range of gradients in precipitation (250 mm to 1200 mm), ecology (sagebrush steppe to juniper), and parent materials (a wide array of igneous and sedimentary rock types) over a relatively small area. Approximately 20 soil profiles will be excavated throughout the watershed and will capture the effects of differing precipitation amounts and parent material on soil characteristics. Several samples at each site will be collected for analysis of SIC content and grain size distribution using a pressure calcimeter and hydrometers, respectively. Initial field data suggests that soils formed over basalts have a higher concentration of SIC than those on granitic material. If precipitation is the only control on SIC, we would expect to see comparable amounts in soils formed on both rock types within the same precipitation zone. However, field observations suggest that for all but the driest sites, soils formed over granite had no SIC detected while basalt soils with comparable precipitation had measurable amounts of SIC. Grain size distribution appears to be a large control on SIC as the sandier, granitic soils promote

  1. Fumigant distribution in forest nursery soils

    Treesearch

    Dong Wang; Stephen W. Fraedrich; Jennifer Juzwik; Kurt Spokas; Yi Zhang; William C. Koskinen

    2006-01-01

    Adequate concentration, exposure time and distribution uniformity of activated fumigant gases are prerequisites for successful soil fumigation. Field experiments were conducted to evaluate gas phase distributions of methyl isothiocyanate (MITC) and chloropicrin (CP) in two forest-tree nurseries. Concentrations of MITC and CP in soil air were measured from replicated...

  2. NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, Lucian; Hendrey, G.; Orion, I.; Prior, S.; Rogers, H.; Runion, B.; Torbert, A.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon

  3. [Effects of climate change on forest soil organic carbon storage: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-yu; Zhang, Cheng-yi; Guo, Guang-fen

    2010-07-01

    Forest soil organic carbon is an important component of global carbon cycle, and the changes of its accumulation and decomposition directly affect terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage and global carbon balance. Climate change would affect the photosynthesis of forest vegetation and the decomposition and transformation of forest soil organic carbon, and further, affect the storage and dynamics of organic carbon in forest soils. Temperature, precipitation, atmospheric CO2 concentration, and other climatic factors all have important influences on the forest soil organic carbon storage. Understanding the effects of climate change on this storage is helpful to the scientific management of forest carbon sink, and to the feasible options for climate change mitigation. This paper summarized the research progress about the distribution of organic carbon storage in forest soils, and the effects of elevated temperature, precipitation change, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on this storage, with the further research subjects discussed.

  4. Soil carbon sequestration: Quantifying this ecosystem service

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soils have a crucial role in supplying many goods and services that society depends upon on a daily basis. These include food and fiber production, water cleansing and supply, nutrient cycling, waste isolation and degradation. Soils also provide a significant amount of carbon s...

  5. Soil Carbon: Compositional and Isotopic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Alexander, M. L.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    This is a short chapter to be included in the next edition of the Encyclopedia of Soil Science. The work here describes techniques being developed at PNNL for investigating organic carbon in soils. Techniques discussed include: laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry, laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometry, and nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  6. Building soil carbon content of Texas Vertisols

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soils in central Texas, USA (Udic and Entic Pellusterts) have been degraded by intensive agricultural practices. This was typified by loss of soil organic carbon from about 1880 to 1949 from a concentration of about 6.5 percent in the surface to about 1 percent. Agriculture practices since 1949 are...

  7. Soil carbon sequestration: Quantifying this ecosystem service

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soils have a crucial role in supplying many goods and services that society depends upon on a daily basis. These include food and fiber production, water cleansing and supply, nutrient cycling, waste isolation and degradation. Soils also provide a significant amount of carbon s...

  8. Soil science: Heat-proof carbon compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Cindy

    2008-12-01

    Two-thirds of terrestrial carbon is stored as organic matter in soils, but its response to warming has yet to be resolved. A soil warming experiment in a Canadian forest has revealed that the leaf-derived compound cutin is resistant to decomposition under elevated temperatures.

  9. Influence of urban land development and subsequent soil rehabilitation on soil aggregates, carbon, and hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujuan; Day, Susan D; Wick, Abbey F; McGuire, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    Urban land use change is associated with decreased soil-mediated ecosystem services, including stormwater runoff mitigation and carbon (C) sequestration. To better understand soil structure formation over time and the effects of land use change on surface and subsurface hydrology, we quantified the effects of urban land development and subsequent soil rehabilitation on soil aggregate size distribution and aggregate-associated C and their links to soil hydraulic conductivity. Four treatments [typical practice (A horizon removed, subsoil compacted, A horizon partially replaced), enhanced topsoil (same as typical practice plus tillage), post-development rehabilitated soils (compost incorporation to 60-cm depth in subsoil; A horizon partially replaced plus tillage), and pre-development (undisturbed) soils] were applied to 24 plots in Virginia, USA. All plots were planted with five tree species. After five years, undisturbed surface soils had 26 to 48% higher levels of macroaggregation and 12 to 62% greater macroaggregate-associated C pools than those disturbed by urban land development regardless of whether they were stockpiled and replaced, or tilled. Little difference in aggregate size distribution was observed among treatments in subsurface soils, although rehabilitated soils had the greatest macroaggregate-associated C concentrations and pool sizes. Rehabilitated soils had 48 to 171% greater macroaggregate-associated C pool than the other three treatments. Surface hydraulic conductivity was not affected by soil treatment (ranging from 0.4 to 2.3 cm h(-1)). In deeper regions, post-development rehabilitated soils had about twice the saturated hydraulic conductivity (14.8 and 6.3 cm h(-1) at 10-25 cm and 25-40 cm, respectively) of undisturbed soils and approximately 6-11 times that of soils subjected to typical land development practices. Despite limited effects on soil aggregation, rehabilitation that includes deep compost incorporation and breaking of compacted

  10. Environmental Controls of Soil Organic Carbon in Soils Across Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Paz, Claudia; Phillips, Oliver; Nonato Araujo Filho, Raimundo; Lloyd, Jon

    2015-04-01

    Amazonian forests store and cycle a significant amount of carbon on its soils and vegetation. Yet, Amazonian forests are now subject to strong environmental pressure from both land use and climate change. Some of the more dramatic model projections for the future of the Amazon predict a major change in precipitation followed by savanization of most currently forested areas, resulting in major carbon losses to the atmosphere. However, how soil carbon stocks will respond to climatic and land use changes depend largely on how soil carbon is stabilized. Amazonian soils are highly diverse, being very variable in their weathering levels and chemical and physical properties, and thus it is important to consider how the different soils of the Basin stabilize and store soil organic carbon (SOC). The wide variation in soil weathering levels present in Amazonia, suggests that soil groups with contrasting pedogenetic development should differ in their predominant mechanism of SOC stabilization. In this study we investigated the edaphic, mineralogical and climatic controls of SOC concentration in 147 pristine forest soils across nine different countries in Amazonia, encompassing 14 different WRB soil groups. Soil samples were collected in 1 ha permanent plots used for forest dynamics studies as part of the RAINFOR project. Only 0-30 cm deep averages are reported here. Soil samples were analyzed for carbon and nitrogen and for their chemical (exchangeable bases, phosphorus, pH) and physical properties, (particle size, bulk density) and mineralogy through standard selective dissolution techniques (Fe and Al oxides) and by semi-quantitative X-Ray diffraction. In Addition, selected soils from each soil group had SOC fractionated by physical and chemical techniques. Our results indicate that different stabilization mechanisms are responsible for SOC stabilization in Amazonian soils with contrasting pedogenetic level. Ferralsols and Acrisols were found to have uniform mineralogy

  11. Investigation of soil carbon sequestration processes in a temperate deciduous forest using soil respiration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Claudia; Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Zöphel, Hendrik; Gimper, Sebastian; Dienstbach, Laura; Garcia Quirós, Inmaculada; Cuntz, Matthias; Rebmann, Corinna

    2016-04-01

    Considering the carbon cycles of terrestrial ecosystems, soils represent a major long-term carbon storage pool. However, the storage capacity depends on several impact parameters based on biotic factors (e.g. vegetation activity, microbial activity, nutrient availability, interactions between vegetation and microbial activity) and abiotic driving factors (e.g. soil moisture, soil temperature, soil composition). Especially, increases in vegetation and microbial activity can lead to raised soil carbon release detectable as higher soil respiration rates. Within the frame of the ICOS project, several soil respiration experiments are under consideration at the temperate deciduous forest site "Hohes Holz" (Central Germany). These experiments started in May 2014. Soil respiration data acquisition was carried out using 8 automatic continuous chambers (LI-COR) and 60 different plots for bi-weekly survey chamber measurements in order to clarify the controlling factors for soil CO2 emissions such as litter availability, above- and belowground vegetation, and activation of microbial activity with temperature, soil moisture and root occurrence. Hence, several treatments (trenched, non-trenched, litter supply) were investigated on different plots within the research area. The data analysis of the 20-month observation period reveals preliminary results of the study. Obviously, significant differences between the trenched and the non-trenched plots concerning the CO2 emissions occurred. Increased soil carbon releases are supposed to be associated to the activation of microbial mineralization of soil organic matter by root inputs. Furthermore, depending on the amount of litter supply, different levels of activation were observed. The data of the continuous chamber measurements with a temporal resolution of one hour sampling interval can be used to show the dependence on above described biogeochemical processes due to abiotic controlling factors. Especially, soil moisture as a

  12. Biogeochemistry: Projections of the soil-carbon deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Eric A.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in the amount of carbon stored in soil might be a crucial feedback to climate change. Experimental field studies show that warming-induced soil carbon losses are greatest where carbon stocks are largest. See Letter p.104

  13. Distribution and diversity of archaeal communities in selected Chinese soils.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng; Zhang, Li-Mei; Shen, Ju-Pei; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Di, Hong J; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-04-01

    To understand the distribution and diversity of archaea in Chinese soils, the archaeal communities in a series of topsoils and soil profiles were investigated using quantitative PCR, T-RFLP combining sequencing methods. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers, ranging from 4.96 × 10(6) to 1.30 × 10(8)  copies g(-1) dry soil, were positively correlated with soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen in the topsoils. In the soil profiles, archaeal abundance was positively correlated with soil pH but negatively with depth profile. The relative abundance of archaea in the prokaryotes (sum of bacteria and archaea) ranged from 0.20% to 9.26% and tended to increase along the depth profile. T-RFLP and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the structure of archaeal communities in cinnamon soils, brown soils, and fluvo-aquic soils was similar and dominated by Crenarchaeota group 1.1b and 1.1a. These were different from those in red soils, which were dominated by Crenarchaeota group 1.3 and 1.1c. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the archaeal community was primarily influenced by soil pH.

  14. Soil fauna: key to new carbon models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filser, Juliane; Faber, Jack H.; Tiunov, Alexei V.; Brussaard, Lijbert; Frouz, Jan; De Deyn, Gerlinde; Uvarov, Alexei V.; Berg, Matty P.; Lavelle, Patrick; Loreau, Michel; Wall, Diana H.; Querner, Pascal; Eijsackers, Herman; José Jiménez, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is key to maintaining soil fertility, mitigating climate change, combatting land degradation, and conserving above- and below-ground biodiversity and associated soil processes and ecosystem services. In order to derive management options for maintaining these essential services provided by soils, policy makers depend on robust, predictive models identifying key drivers of SOM dynamics. Existing SOM models and suggested guidelines for future SOM modelling are defined mostly in terms of plant residue quality and input and microbial decomposition, overlooking the significant regulation provided by soil fauna. The fauna controls almost any aspect of organic matter turnover, foremost by regulating the activity and functional composition of soil microorganisms and their physical-chemical connectivity with soil organic matter. We demonstrate a very strong impact of soil animals on carbon turnover, increasing or decreasing it by several dozen percent, sometimes even turning C sinks into C sources or vice versa. This is demonstrated not only for earthworms and other larger invertebrates but also for smaller fauna such as Collembola. We suggest that inclusion of soil animal activities (plant residue consumption and bioturbation altering the formation, depth, hydraulic properties and physical heterogeneity of soils) can fundamentally affect the predictive outcome of SOM models. Understanding direct and indirect impacts of soil fauna on nutrient availability, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and plant growth is key to the understanding of SOM dynamics in the context of global carbon cycling models. We argue that explicit consideration of soil fauna is essential to make realistic modelling predictions on SOM dynamics and to detect expected non-linear responses of SOM dynamics to global change. We present a decision framework, to be further developed through the activities of KEYSOM, a European COST Action, for when mechanistic SOM models

  15. Black Carbon Contribution to Organic Carbon Stocks in Urban Soil.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Potter, Jonathan; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Manning, David A C; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2015-07-21

    Soil holds 75% of the total organic carbon (TOC) stock in terrestrial ecosystems. This comprises ecosystem-derived organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC), a recalcitrant product of the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. Urban topsoils are often enriched in BC from historical emissions of soot and have high TOC concentrations, but the contribution of BC to TOC throughout the urban soil profile, at a regional scale is unknown. We sampled 55 urban soil profiles across the North East of England, a region with a history of coal burning and heavy industry. Through combined elemental and thermogravimetic analyses, we found very large total soil OC stocks (31-65 kg m(-2) to 1 m), exceeding typical values reported for UK woodland soils. BC contributed 28-39% of the TOC stocks, up to 23 kg C m(-2) to 1 m, and was affected by soil texture. The proportional contribution of the BC-rich fraction to TOC increased with soil depth, and was enriched in topsoil under trees when compared to grassland. Our findings establish the importance of urban ecosystems in storing large amounts of OC in soils and that these soils also capture a large proportion of BC particulates emitted within urban areas.

  16. Pressure pumping of carbon dioxide from soil

    Treesearch

    E. S. Takle; J. R. Brandle; R. A. Schmidt; R. Garcia; I. V. Litvina; G. Doyle; X. Zhou; Q. Hou; C. W. Rice; W. J. Massman

    2000-01-01

    Recent interest in atmospheric increases in carbon dioxide have heightened the need for improved accuracy in measurements of fluxes of carbon dioxide from soils. Diffusional movement has long been considered the dominant process by which trace gases move from the subsurface source to the surface, although there has been some indication that atmospheric pressure...

  17. Understanding on Soil Inorganic Carbon Transformation in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guitong; Yang, Lifang; Zhang, Chenglei; Zhang, Hongjie

    2015-04-01

    Soil total carbon balance in long-term fertilization field experiments in North China Plain. Four long-term fertilization experiments (20-30 years) were investigated on SOC in 40 cm, calcium carbonate and active carbonate (AC) in 180 or 100 cm soil profile, δ13C values of SOC and δ13C and δ18O values of carbonate in soil profile, particle distribution of SOC and SIC in main soil layers, and ratios of pedogenic carbonate (PC) in SIC and C3-SOC in SOC. The most important conclusion is that fertilization of more than 20 years can produce detectable impact on pool size, profile distribution, ratio of active component and PC of SIC, which make it clear that SIC pool must be considered in the proper evaluation of the response of soil carbon balance to human activities in arid and semi-arid region. Land use impact on soil total carbon pool in Inner Mongolia. With the data of the second survey of soils in Inner Mongolia and the 58 soil profile data from Wu-lan-cha-bu-meng and Xi-lin-hao-te, combining with the 13C and 18O techniques, SIC density and stock in Inner Mongolia is estimated. The main conclusion is that soils in inner Mongolia have the same level of SOC and SIC, with the density in 100cm pedons of 8.97 kg•m-2 and 8.61 kg•m-2, respectively. Meanwhile, the significantly positive relationship between SOC and SIC in A layer indicates co-sequestration of SOC and SIC exist. Evaluation of the methods for measuring CA enzyme activity in soil. In laboratory, method in literature to measure CA activity in soil sample was repeated, and found it was not valid indeed. The failure could not attribute to the disturbance of common ions like NO3-, SO42-, Ca2+, and Mg2+. The adsorption of CA to soil material was testified as the main reason for that failure. A series of extractants were tested but no one can extract the adsorbed CA and be used in measuring CA activity in soil sample. Carbonate transformation in field with straw returned and biochar added. In 2009, a field

  18. Regional prediction of carbon isotopes in soil carbonates for Asian dust source tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Yaqiang

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles emitted from deserts and semi-arid lands in northern China cause particulate pollution that increases the burden of disease particularly for urban population in East Asia. The stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of carbonates in soils and dust aerosols in northern China were investigated. We found that the δ13C of carbonates in surface soils in northern China showed clearly the negative correlation (R2 = 0.73) with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite-derived NDVI, we predicted the regional distribution of δ13C of soil carbonates in deserts, sandy lands, and steppe areas. The predictions show the mean δ13C of -0.4 ± 0.7‰ in soil carbonates in Taklimakan Desert and Gobi Deserts, and the isotope values decrease to -3.3 ± 1.1‰ in sandy lands. The increase in vegetation coverage depletes 13C in soil carbonates, thus the steppe areas are predicted by the lowest δ13C levels (-8.1 ± 1.7‰). The measurements of atmospheric dust samples at eight sites showed that the Asian dust sources were well assigned by the 13C mapping in surface soils. Predicting 13C in large geographical areas with fine resolution offers a cost-effective tracer to monitor dust emissions from sandy lands and steppe areas which show an increasing role in Asian dust loading driven by climate change and human activities.

  19. Radiocarbon constraints imply reduced carbon uptake by soils during the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yujie; Trumbore, Susan E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Vaughn, Lydia J. S.; Allison, Steven D.; Randerson, James T.

    2016-09-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial carbon reservoir and may influence the sign and magnitude of carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. Many Earth system models (ESMs) estimate a significant soil carbon sink by 2100, yet the underlying carbon dynamics determining this response have not been systematically tested against observations. We used 14C data from 157 globally distributed soil profiles sampled to 1-meter depth to show that ESMs underestimated the mean age of soil carbon by a factor of more than six (430 ± 50 years versus 3100 ± 1800 years). Consequently, ESMs overestimated the carbon sequestration potential of soils by a factor of nearly two (40 ± 27%). These inconsistencies suggest that ESMs must better represent carbon stabilization processes and the turnover time of slow and passive reservoirs when simulating future atmospheric carbon dioxide dynamics.

  20. Extrapolating existing soil organic carbon data to estimate soil organic carbon stocks below 20 cm

    Treesearch

    An-Min Wu; Cinzia Fissore; Charles H. Perry; An-Min Wu; Brent Dalzell; Barry T. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of forest soil organic carbon stocks across the US are currently developed from expert opinion in STATSGO/SSURGO and linked to forest type. The results are reported to the US EPA as the official United States submission to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Beginning in 2015, however, estimates of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks will be based on...

  1. ESTABLISHING A SOIL CARBON BASELINE FOR CARBON ACCOUNTING THE FORESTED SOILS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soils are an important global reservoir of organic carbon (C). It has been estimated that at 1500 Pg world soils hold approximately three times the amount of C held in vegetation and two times that in the atmosphere. Soils provide a relatively stable reservoir for C. With the int...

  2. ESTABLISHING A SOIL CARBON BASELINE FOR CARBON ACCOUNTING THE FORESTED SOILS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soils are an important global reservoir of organic carbon (C). It has been estimated that at 1500 Pg world soils hold approximately three times the amount of C held in vegetation and two times that in the atmosphere. Soils provide a relatively stable reservoir for C. With the int...

  3. Carbon and carbon-14 in lunar soil 14163

    SciTech Connect

    Fireman, E.L.; Stoenner, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon is removed from the surface of lunar soil 14163 size fractions by combustions at 500 and 1000/sup 0/C in an oxygen stream and the carbon contents and the carbon-14 activities are measured. The carbon contents are inversely correlated with grain size. A measured carbon content of 198 ppM for bulk 14163, obtained by combining the size fraction results, is modified to 109 +- 12 ppM by a carbon contamination correction. This value is in accord with a previous determination, 110 ppM, for bulk 14163. The small (< 53 ..mu..) grains of 14163 had more combusted carbon-14 activity, 31.2 +- 2.5 dpm /kg, than the large (> 53 ..mu..) grains, 11.2 +- 2.0 dpm/kg. The combusted carbon and carbon-14 are attributed mainly to solar-wind implantation. Melt extractions of carbon-14 from the combusted soil samples gave essentially identical activities, 21.0 +- 1.5 and 19.2 +- 2.0 dpm/kg for the small and large grains, and are attributed to cosmic-ray spallation-produced carbon-14.

  4. Carbon sequestration potential of coastal wetland soils of Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Romero, Elisabeth; García-Calderón, Norma Eugenia; Ikkonen, Elena; García-Varela, Kl

    2014-05-01

    Tropical coastal wetlands, including rainforests and mangrove ecosystems play an increasingly important ecological and economic role in the tropical coastal area of the State of Veracruz /Mexico. However, soil processes in these environments, especially C-turnover rates are largely unknown until today. Therefore, we investigated CO2 and CH4 emissions together with gains and losses of organic C in the soils of two different coastal ecosystems in the "Natural Protected Area Cienaga del Fuerte (NPACF)" near Tecolutla, in the State of Veracruz. The research areas were an artificially introduced grassland (IG) and a wetland rainforest (WRF). The gas emissions from the soil surfaces were measured by a static chamber array, the soil organic C was analysed in soil profiles distributed in the two areas, humic substances were characterized and C budget was calculated. The soils in both areas acted as carbon sinks, but the soils of the WRF sequestered more C than those of the IG, which showed a higher gas emission rate and produced more dissolved organic carbon. The gas emission measurements during the dry and the rainy seasons allowed for estimating the possible influence of global warming on gas fluxes from the soils of the two different ecological systems, which show in the WRF a quite complex spatial emission pattern during the rainy season in contrast to a more continuous emission pattern in the IG plots

  5. Influence of management history and landscape variables on soil organic carbon and soil redistribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venteris, E.R.; McCarty, G.W.; Ritchie, J.C.; Gish, T.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled studies to investigate the interaction between crop growth, soil properties, hydrology, and management practices are common in agronomy. These sites (much as with real world farmland) often have complex management histories and topographic variability that must be considered. In 1993 an interdisiplinary study was started for a 20-ha site in Beltsville, MD. Soil cores (271) were collected in 1999 in a 30-m grid (with 5-m nesting) and analyzed as part of the site characterization. Soil organic carbon (SOC) and 137Cesium (137Cs) were measured. Analysis of aerial photography from 1992 and of farm management records revealed that part of the site had been maintained as a swine pasture and the other portion as cropped land. Soil properties, particularly soil redistribution and SOC, show large differences in mean values between the two areas. Mass C is 0.8 kg m -2 greater in the pasture area than in the cropped portion. The pasture area is primarily a deposition site, whereas the crop area is dominated by erosion. Management influence is suggested, but topographic variability confounds interpretation. Soil organic carbon is spatially structured, with a regionalized variable of 120 m. 137Cs activity lacks spatial structure, suggesting disturbance of the profile by animal activity and past structures such as swine shelters and roads. Neither SOC nor 137Cs were strongly correlated to terrain parameters, crop yields, or a seasonal soil moisture index predicted from crop yields. SOC and 137Cs were weakly correlated (r2 ???0.2, F-test P-value 0.001), suggesting that soil transport controls, in part, SOC distribution. The study illustrates the importance of past site history when interpreting the landscape distribution of soil properties, especially those strongly influenced by human activity. Confounding variables, complex soil hydrology, and incomplete documentation of land use history make definitive interpretations of the processes behind the spatial distributions

  6. [Effects of land use change on soil active organic carbon in deep soils in Hilly Loess Plateau region of Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Wang, Chao-Hua; Chen, Gai

    2015-02-01

    Response of soil active organic carbon to land-use change has become a hot topic in current soil carbon and nutrient cycling study. Soil active organic carbon distribution characteristics in soil profile under four land-use types were investigated in Ziwuling forest zone of the Hilly Loess Plateau region. The four types of land-use changes included natural woodland converted into artificial woodland, natural woodland converted into cropland, natural shrubland converted into cropland and natural shrubland converted into revegetated grassland. Effects of land-use changes on soil active organic carbon in deep soil layers (60-200 cm) were explored by comparison with the shallow soil layers (0-60 cm). The results showed that: (1) The labile organic carbon ( LOC) and microbial carbon (MBC) content were mainly concentrated in the shallow 0-60 cm soil, which accounted for 49%-66% and 71%-84% of soil active organic carbon in the profile (0-200 cm) under different land-use types. Soil active organic carbon content in shallow soil was significantly varied for the land-use changes types, while no obvious difference was observed in soil active organic carbon in deep soil layer. (2) Land-use changes exerted significant influence on soil active organic carbon, the active organic carbon in shallow soil was more sensitive than that in deep soil. The four types of land-use changes, including natural woodland to planted woodland, natural woodland to cropland, natural shrubland to revegetated grassland and natural shrubland to cropland, LOC in shallow soil was reduced by 10%, 60%, 29%, 40% and LOC in the deep layer was decreased by 9%, 21%, 12%, 1%, respectively. MBC in the shallow soil was reduced by 24% 73%, 23%, 56%, and that in the deep layer was decreased by 25%, 18%, 8% and 11%, respectively. (Land-use changes altered the distribution ratio of active organic carbon in soil profile. The ratio between LOC and SOC in shallow soil increased when natural woodland and shrubland were

  7. Linking soil bacterial biodiversity and soil carbon stability.

    PubMed

    Mau, Rebecca L; Liu, Cindy M; Aziz, Maliha; Schwartz, Egbert; Dijkstra, Paul; Marks, Jane C; Price, Lance B; Keim, Paul; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    Native soil carbon (C) can be lost in response to fresh C inputs, a phenomenon observed for decades yet still not understood. Using dual-stable isotope probing, we show that changes in the diversity and composition of two functional bacterial groups occur with this 'priming' effect. A single-substrate pulse suppressed native soil C loss and reduced bacterial diversity, whereas repeated substrate pulses stimulated native soil C loss and increased diversity. Increased diversity after repeated C amendments contrasts with resource competition theory, and may be explained by increased predation as evidenced by a decrease in bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results suggest that biodiversity and composition of the soil microbial community change in concert with its functioning, with consequences for native soil C stability.

  8. Intercropping enhances soil carbon and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wen-Feng; Hoffland, Ellis; Li, Long; Six, Johan; Sun, Jian-Hao; Bao, Xing-Guo; Zhang, Fu-Suo; Van Der Werf, Wopke

    2015-04-01

    Intercropping, the simultaneous cultivation of multiple crop species in a single field, increases aboveground productivity due to species complementarity. We hypothesized that intercrops may have greater belowground productivity than sole crops, and sequester more soil carbon over time due to greater input of root litter. Here, we demonstrate a divergence in soil organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content over 7 years in a field experiment that compared rotational strip intercrop systems and ordinary crop rotations. Soil organic C content in the top 20 cm was 4% ± 1% greater in intercrops than in sole crops, indicating a difference in C sequestration rate between intercrop and sole crop systems of 184 ± 86 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1). Soil organic N content in the top 20 cm was 11% ± 1% greater in intercrops than in sole crops, indicating a difference in N sequestration rate between intercrop and sole crop systems of 45 ± 10 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Total root biomass in intercrops was on average 23% greater than the average root biomass in sole crops, providing a possible mechanism for the observed divergence in soil C sequestration between sole crop and intercrop systems. A lowering of the soil δ(15) N signature suggested that increased biological N fixation and/or reduced gaseous N losses contributed to the increases in soil N in intercrop rotations with faba bean. Increases in soil N in wheat/maize intercrop pointed to contributions from a broader suite of mechanisms for N retention, e.g., complementary N uptake strategies of the intercropped plant species. Our results indicate that soil C sequestration potential of strip intercropping is similar in magnitude to that of currently recommended management practises to conserve organic matter in soil. Intercropping can contribute to multiple agroecosystem services by increased yield, better soil quality and soil C sequestration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Soil organic carbon accumulation and influencing factors at the saltmarsh of Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Jiang, J.; Xue, L.

    2016-02-01

    Soil organic carbon sequestration in the coastal saltmarsh is considered to be an important part of "blue carbon" because of its high carbon accumulation rate and low greenhouse gas emission. However, the factors influencing the carbon accumulation ability is not yet fully revealed yet due to lack of knowledge about underground biomass and root zone soil processes. Based on the field investigation at the young salt marsh of the East Chongming Headland, Yangtze Estuary, we tried to link the spatial and vertical distribution of soil organic carbon with key influencing factors such as above ground and underground biomass, surface elevation, salinity, and sediment particle size, through ArcGIS Kriging interpolation, SPSS correlation and path analyses. We found that: 1) The spatial distribution of soil organic carbon was relatively high in the northern part and high tidal zone of East Chongming Headland, with soil salinity, biomass and elevation as main influencing factors; 2) The vertical distribution of soil organic carbon was closely related to soil salinity, biomass, and 0-31 μm soil particles; 3) The carbon sequestration rate showed a decrease trend with time of vegetation establishment. To promote carbon sequestration in coastal wetlands for mitigating climate change, protection of "old marsh" and creating "new marsh" are both needed in the future management.

  10. Dynamics of Maize Carbon Contribution to Soil Organic Carbon in Association with Soil Type and Fertility Level

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jiubo; Li, Hui; Li, Shuangyi; An, Tingting; Farmer, John; Fu, Shifeng; Wang, Jingkuan

    2015-01-01

    Soil type and fertility level influence straw carbon dynamics in the agroecosystems. However, there is a limited understanding of the dynamic processes of straw-derived and soil-derived carbon and the influence of the addition of straw carbon on soil-derived organic carbon in different soils associated with different fertility levels. In this study, we applied the in-situ carborundum tube method and 13C-labeled maize straw (with and without maize straw) at two cropland (Phaeozem and Luvisol soils) experimental sites in northeast China to quantify the dynamics of maize-derived and soil-derived carbon in soils associated with high and low fertility, and to examine how the addition of maize carbon influences soil-derived organic carbon and the interactions of soil type and fertility level with maize-derived and soil-derived carbon. We found that, on average, the contributions of maize-derived carbon to total organic carbon in maize-soil systems during the experimental period were differentiated among low fertility Luvisol (from 62.82% to 42.90), high fertility Luvisol (from 53.15% to 30.00%), low fertility Phaeozem (from 58.69% to 36.29%) and high fertility Phaeozem (from 41.06% to 16.60%). Furthermore, the addition of maize carbon significantly decreased the remaining soil-derived organic carbon in low and high fertility Luvisols and low fertility Phaeozem before two months. However, the increasing differences in soil-derived organic carbon between both soils with and without maize straw after two months suggested that maize-derived carbon was incorporated into soil-derived organic carbon, thereby potentially offsetting the loss of soil-derived organic carbon. These results suggested that Phaeozem and high fertility level soils would fix more maize carbon over time and thus were more beneficial for protecting soil-derived organic carbon from maize carbon decomposition. PMID:25774529

  11. Dynamics of maize carbon contribution to soil organic carbon in association with soil type and fertility level.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jiubo; Li, Hui; Li, Shuangyi; An, Tingting; Farmer, John; Fu, Shifeng; Wang, Jingkuan

    2015-01-01

    Soil type and fertility level influence straw carbon dynamics in the agroecosystems. However, there is a limited understanding of the dynamic processes of straw-derived and soil-derived carbon and the influence of the addition of straw carbon on soil-derived organic carbon in different soils associated with different fertility levels. In this study, we applied the in-situ carborundum tube method and 13C-labeled maize straw (with and without maize straw) at two cropland (Phaeozem and Luvisol soils) experimental sites in northeast China to quantify the dynamics of maize-derived and soil-derived carbon in soils associated with high and low fertility, and to examine how the addition of maize carbon influences soil-derived organic carbon and the interactions of soil type and fertility level with maize-derived and soil-derived carbon. We found that, on average, the contributions of maize-derived carbon to total organic carbon in maize-soil systems during the experimental period were differentiated among low fertility Luvisol (from 62.82% to 42.90), high fertility Luvisol (from 53.15% to 30.00%), low fertility Phaeozem (from 58.69% to 36.29%) and high fertility Phaeozem (from 41.06% to 16.60%). Furthermore, the addition of maize carbon significantly decreased the remaining soil-derived organic carbon in low and high fertility Luvisols and low fertility Phaeozem before two months. However, the increasing differences in soil-derived organic carbon between both soils with and without maize straw after two months suggested that maize-derived carbon was incorporated into soil-derived organic carbon, thereby potentially offsetting the loss of soil-derived organic carbon. These results suggested that Phaeozem and high fertility level soils would fix more maize carbon over time and thus were more beneficial for protecting soil-derived organic carbon from maize carbon decomposition.

  12. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Cycle Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, D.; Chaoka, S.; Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Second generation bioenergy crops, such as miscanthus (Miscantus × giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), are regarded as clean energy sources, and are an attractive option to mitigate the human-induced climate change. However, the global climate change and the expansion of perennial grass bioenergy crops have the power to alter the biogeochemical cycles in soil, especially, soil carbon storages, over long time scales. In order to develop a predictive understanding, this study develops a coupled hydrological-soil nutrient model to simulate soil carbon responses under different climate scenarios such as: (i) current weather condition, (ii) decreased precipitation by -15%, and (iii) increased temperature up to +3C for four different crops, namely miscanthus, switchgrass, maize, and natural prairie. We use Precision Agricultural Landscape Modeling System (PALMS), version 5.4.0, to capture biophysical and hydrological components coupled with a multilayer carbon and ¬nitrogen cycle model. We apply the model at daily time scale to the Energy Biosciences Institute study site, located in the University of Illinois Research Farms, in Urbana, Illinois. The atmospheric forcing used to run the model was generated stochastically from parameters obtained using available data recorded in Bondville Ameriflux Site. The model simulations are validated with observations of drainage and nitrate and ammonium concentrations recorded in drain tiles during 2011. The results of this study show (1) total soil carbon storage of miscanthus accumulates most noticeably due to the significant amount of aboveground plant carbon, and a relatively high carbon to nitrogen ratio and lignin content, which reduce the litter decomposition rate. Also, (2) the decreased precipitation contributes to the enhancement of total soil carbon storage and soil nitrogen concentration because of the reduced microbial biomass pool. However, (3) an opposite effect on the cycle is introduced by the increased

  13. Measurable Pools of Soil Carbon for Carbon Cycle Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, M. A.; Wang, G.; Abramoff, R. Z.; Xu, X.; Hartman, M. D.; Feng, W.; Davidson, E.; Finzi, A.; Moorhead, D.; Schimel, J.; O'Brien, S. L.; Thornton, P. E.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon in soils can have long residence times, but the exact mechanisms are not well understood, which complicates defining pools and parameters for carbon cycling models. Physical protection involves the formation of hierarchical aggregates of mineral-associated carbon, microbes, and particulate carbon. Aggregation leads to a complex pore structure, which can alter moisture potentials, gas diffusion rates, ionic strength and composition of soil solutions, and nutrient availability for microbes. Diffusion gradients between pore size classes can also sequester organic materials from microbes and their accompanying enzymes. Mineral protection is considered to involve sorption of dissolved organic compounds onto reactive clays and iron and aluminum oxides, but there is controversy as to whether sorption occurs as a monolayer or in complex architectures, as well as the degree of mineral coverage. Further, pore structure can alter the ionic composition of porewaters, thereby influencing the extent and nature of adsorption and desorption. Only mineral protection is thought to yield the long residence times found in soils, but dynamics of these pools are poorly constrained in models due to an absence of long-term measurements and an accompanying lack of process understanding. This talk will review the evidence for and against these different mechanisms of carbon preservation, with particular attention to definitions of soil pools for modeling and the influence of protection mechanisms on carbon pool residence times.

  14. Ectomycorrhizal fungi increase soil carbon storage: molecular signatures of mycorrhizal competition driving soil C storage at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, C.; Barry, B. K.; Hawkes, C.

    2015-12-01

    Soil carbon storage and decay is regulated by the activity of free-living decomposer microbes, which can be limited by nitrogen availability. Many plants associate with symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi on their roots, which produce nitrogen-degrading enzymes and may be able to compete with free-living decomposers for soil organic nitrogen. By doing so, ectomycorrhizal fungi may able to induce nitrogen limitation and reduce activity of free-living microbial decomposition by mining soil organic nitrogen. The implication is that ectomycorrhizal-dominated systems should have increased soil carbon storage relative to non-ectomycorrhizal systems, which has been confirmed at a global scale. To investigate these effects, we analyzed 364 globally distributed observations of soil fungal communities using 454 sequencing of the ITS region, along with soil C and N concentrations, climate and chemical data. We assigned operational taxonomic units using the QIIME pipeline and UNITE fungal database and assigned fungal reads as ectomycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal based on current taxonomic knowledge. We tested for associations between ectomycorrhizal abundance, climate, and soil carbon and nitrogen. Sites with greater soil carbon had quantitatively more ectomycorrhizal fungi within the soil microbial community based on fungal sequence abundance, after accounting for soil nitrogen availability. This is consistent with our hypothesis that ectomycorrhizal fungi induce nitrogen-limitation of free-living decomposers and thereby increase soil carbon storage. The strength of the mycorrhizal effect increased non-linearly with ectomycorrhizal abundance: the greater the abundance, the greater the effect size. Mean annual temperature, potential evapotranspiration, soil moisture and soil pH were also significant predictors in the final AIC selected model. This analysis suggests that molecular data on soil microbial communities can be used to make quantitative biogeochemical predictions. The

  15. Burrowing herbivores alter soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in a semi-arid ecosystem, Argentina

    Treesearch

    Kenneth L. Clark; Lyn C. Branch; Jose L. Hierro; Diego. Villarreal

    2016-01-01

    Activities of burrowing herbivores, including movement of soil and litter and deposition of waste material, can alter the distribution of labile carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil, affecting spatial patterning of nutrient dynamics in ecosystems where they are abundant. Their role in ecosystem processes in surface soil has been studied extensively, but effects of...

  16. Radiocarbon constraints imply reduced carbon uptake by soils during the 21st century

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Yujie; Trumbore, Susan E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Vaughn, Lydia J.S.; Allison, Steven D.; Randerson, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial carbon reservoir and may influence the sign and magnitude of carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. Many Earth system models (ESMs) estimate a significant soil carbon sink by 2100, yet the underlying carbon dynamics determining this response have not been systematically tested against observations. We used 14C data from 157 globally distributed soil profiles sampled to 1 m depth to show that ESMs underestimated the mean age of soil carbon by more than six-fold (430±50 years vs. 3100±1800 years). Consequently, ESMs overestimated the carbon sequestration potential of soils by nearly two-fold (40±27%). These biases suggest that ESMs must better represent carbon stabilization processes and the turnover time of slow and passive reservoirs when simulating future atmospheric CO2 dynamics.

  17. Pedogenetic processes and carbon budgets in soils of Queretaro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Calderón, Norma Eugenia; Fuentes Romero, Elizabeth; Hernandez Silva, Gilberto

    2014-05-01

    Pedogenetic processes have been investigated in two different physiographic regions of the state of Querétaro in order to assess the carbon budget of soils, looking into the gains and losses of organic and inorganic carbon: In the mountain region of the natural reserve Sierra Gorda (SG) with soils developed on cretaceous argillites and shales under sub-humid temperate to semi-arid conditions, and in the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) with soils developed on acid and intermediate igneous rocks under humid temperate climate in the highlands and semi-arid and subhumid subtropical conditions in the lowlands. The analyses of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil inorganic carbon (SIC) of the SG region, including additional physical, chemical and mineralogical investigations were based on 103 topsoils in an area of 170 km2. The analyses in the TMVB region were based on the profiles of a soil toposequence from high mountainous positions down to the plains of the lowlands. The results show a SOC accumulation from temperate to semi-arid forest environments, based on processes of humification and clay formation including the influence of exchangeable Ca and the quantity and quality of clay minerals. The turnover rates of SOC and SIC depended largely on the rock parent materials, especially the presence of carbonate rocks. Moreover, we found that the SOC content and distribution was clearly depending on land use, decreasing from forests to agricultural land, such as pasture and cropping areas and were lowest under mining sites. The highest SIC pools were found in accumulation horizons of soils under semi-arid conditions. On all investigated sites SOC decreased the mobility of cations and especially that of heavy metals, such as As, Hg, Sb, Pb, and Cd.

  18. Estimating soil organic carbon using aerial imagery and soil surveys

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Widespread implementation of precision agriculture practices requires low-cost, high-quality, georeferenced soil organic carbon (SOC) maps, but currently these maps require expensive sample collection and analysis. Widely available aerial imagery is a low-cost source of georeferenced data. After til...

  19. Urban Tree Effects on Soil Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Jill L.; O'Sullivan, Odhran S.; Inger, Richard; Potter, Jonathan; McHugh, Nicola; Gaston, Kevin J.; Leake, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered. PMID:25003872

  20. Urban tree effects on soil organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Jill L; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Inger, Richard; Potter, Jonathan; McHugh, Nicola; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered.

  1. [Distribution patterns of PAHs in soils from coking plant and the particle-size cut points of soil washing].

    PubMed

    Li, He-Lian; Chen, Jia-Jun; Wu, Wei; Piao, Xue-Song; Jiang, Lin; Shi, Zhen-Tian; Sun, Tian-Wei

    2011-04-01

    Soil particle size distribution and contaminants distribution patterns in different soil size fractions are the basis of soil treatability using soil washing method. Soil particle-size cut points are important parameters of soil washing process. According to ex situ soil washing technology, soil samples were collected in a former coking plant. The soil particle size distribution and the concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in USEPA priority list were analyzed. Tween 80 and Triton X-100 solutions were used to clean the polluted soil with different particle size. Results showed that the total concentrations of 16 PAHs ranged from 6.27 to 40.18 mg/kg dry weight in the six soil size fractions and present a bimodal distribution. The maximum individual PAH concentration mostly occurred in the 250-500 microm size fraction. The lowest individual PAH concentration was in the 50-75 microm size fraction. The removal efficiencies of PAHs in different soil size fractions depended on their initial concentrations and the characteristics of soil. The PAHs removal efficiencies in coarser size fractions were lower than that in the finer size fractions owing to their higher organic carbon content. Based on the removal efficiency of PAHs in each soil size fractions by surfactant solution and the requirements of waste volume reduction, 50 microm was determined as the particle-size cut point. Then, 82.95% volume reduction can be achieved.

  2. Soil-soil solution distribution coefficient of soil organic matter is a key factor for that of radioiodide in surface and subsurface soils.

    PubMed

    Unno, Yusuke; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Takeda, Akira; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the vertical distribution of the soil-soil-solution distribution coefficients (Kd) of (125)I, (137)Cs, and (85)Sr in organic-rich surface soil and organic-poor subsurface soil of a pasture and an urban forest near a spent-nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. Kd of (137)Cs was highly correlated with water-extractable K(+). Kd of (85)Sr was highly correlated with water-extractable Ca(2+) and SOC. Kd of (125)I(-) was low in organic-rich surface soil, high slightly below the surface, and lowest in the deepest soil. This kinked distribution pattern differed from the gradual decrease of the other radionuclides. The thickness of the high-(125)I(-)Kd middle layer (i.e., with high radioiodide retention ability) differed between sites. Kd of (125)I(-) was significantly correlated with Kd of soil organic carbon. Our results also showed that the layer thickness is controlled by the ratio of Kd-OC between surface and subsurface soils. This finding suggests that the addition of SOC might prevent further radioiodide migration down the soil profile. As far as we know, this is the first report to show a strong correlation of a soil characteristic with Kd of (125)I(-). Further study is needed to clarify how radioiodide is retained and migrates in soil.

  3. Nitrogen controls the lability of Alaska Arctic soil carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Li, H.

    2016-12-01

    Warming of Arctic soils is causing a large pool of once frozen carbon to become increasingly susceptible to microbial degradation and therefore additional atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. The microbial degradation of soil carbon is typically studied by measuring carbon dioxide fluxes in laboratory-based incubations or in chambers at the soil surface, with each approach having its limitations. Hypotheses for the factors controlling the fate of soil carbon include temperature and the soil carbon to nitrogen content. However, the amount of soil carbon being used by microbes and what factors are controlling the depth dependent degradation remain unknown. Here we show that the amount of soil carbon being consumed by the microbes is a function of the relative soil nitrogen content rather than soil composition or age. By measuring the radiocarbon content of the soil organic carbon and the lipid membranes of the viable microbial community, we calculated the amount of soil carbon being consumed by the microbes along a transect of active layer soil cores from three tundra and one boreal sites in northern Alaska. We found that while the bulk organic carbon at all sites was progressively older with depth, the age of carbon in the microbes was more variable. Our results indicate that the nitrogen content was a major driver in the microbial usage of soil carbon, and was decoupled from both the soil carbon content and the microbial community composition. The greatest difference in radiocarbon content between soil organic carbon and microbes was observed at the depth of lowest nitrogen content, just below the organic-mineral soil boundary. These results suggest that the depth dependent nitrogen content may regulate the degradation of old, permafrost carbon and therefore potential limit climate feedbacks from Arctic soil degradation.

  4. High Resolution Partitioning of Soil Properties and Soil Organic Carbon Storage in the Lena River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugelius, G.; Siewert, M. B.; Heim, B.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution vertical and spatial information on SOC storage and other key properties of permafrost-affected soils is key for the assessment and modeling of the vulnerability of permafrost carbon. We present findings of soil investigations from the high Arctic Lena river delta. In total 50 soil pedons have been sampled from different geomorphological units (delta terraces) in the delta in late summer 2013. All pedons have been classified according to the U.S. soil taxonomy. We described and sampled 19 Turbels, 27 Orthels and 4 Histels. On average 7.9±2.7 samples have been analyzed from each profile, including samples of the upper permafrost down to one meter depth. Soil horizons are described from open soil pits and their respective thicknesses are calculated from perspective-corrected photographs. Soil samples were analyzed for bulk density, as well as content of water/ice soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (N). The data is aggregated for the different geomorphological units and partitioned at centimeter level. High resolution vertical depth plots of different soil properties, including C%, N%, water and ice content and soil horizon distribution, are generated to demonstrate the information density of the dataset. A high-resolution land cover classification is generated for a subregion of the delta using advanced remote sensing classification methods. The soil pedon data and the land cover classification are combined for thematic upscaling of SOC and N stocks. We identify major geomorphological units of the Lena delta to control SOC storage in the subregion. We can show that SOC storage is highly variable with depth. Strong cryoturbation contributes to much deep SOC storages on the relatively stable first and third delta terraces, while fluvial deposition controls SOC storage in the recent alluvial floodplain. Soils sampled on thermokarst-affected rims of the third terrace show lower SOC storages indicating considerable reworking of the SOC.

  5. Soil Carbon Cycling - More than Changes in Soil Organic Carbon Stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, K.

    2015-12-01

    Discussions about soil carbon (C) sequestration generally focus on changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. Global SOC mass in the top 1 m was estimated at about 1325 Pg C, and at about 3000 Pg C when deeper soil layers were included. However, both inorganically and organically bound carbon forms are found in soil but estimates on global soil inorganic carbon (SIC) mass are even more uncertain than those for SOC. Globally, about 947 Pg SIC may be stored in the top 1 m, and especially in arid and semi-arid regions SIC stocks can be many times great than SOC stocks. Both SIC and SOC stocks are vulnerable to management practices, and stocks may be enhanced, for example, by optimizing net primary production (NPP) by fertilization and irrigation (especially optimizing belowground NPP for enhancing SOC stocks), adding organic matter (including black C for enhancing SOC stocks), and reducing soil disturbance. Thus, studies on soil C stocks, fluxes, and vulnerability must look at both SIC and SOC stocks in soil profiles to address large scale soil C cycling.

  6. Identifying Chemical and Biological Factors Affecting Soil Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrant, D. N.; Naughton, H.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes a majority of the terrestrial carbon stock, but current models of carbon compound cycling lack grounding in biological and chemical mechanisms. We investigated microbial aerobic and anaerobic respiration rates with respect to depth and the distribution of electron acceptors as possible climate-sensitive drivers of SOM cycling. Soil reactors were designed to simulate the sediment column such that oxygenated water flows horizontally over a column of soil. A native soil that was rich in iron oxides was treated with nitrate, sulfate, neither, and a combination of nitrate and sulfate to mimic potential gradients of available electron acceptors observed in natural environments. Assuming a typical high-to-low oxygen gradient along a soil profile, microbial respiration is expected to decrease at greater depths as available electron acceptors become less energetically favorable. High-energy SOM is expected to be increasingly depleted with depth to counteract low-energy available electron acceptors. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations in the reactor effluent were calculated with Henry's Law using the effluent pH and headspace CO2 content. Anaerobic respiration was quantified along the soil profile via incubations and both porewater and solid-state sampling of Mn(II), Fe(II), nitrate, sulfate, and H2S. SOM chemistry was analyzed via carbon near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Initial results exhibit highest DIC concentrations in the nitrate treatment, corresponding to nitrate's high reduction potential. This research can improve existing models of carbon storage under different redox conditions through examination of the biological and chemical factors determining SOM respiration and storage.

  7. Complexity Analysis of Peat Soil Density Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampurno, Joko; Diah Faryuni, Irfana; Dzar Eljabbar Latief, Fourier; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2016-08-01

    The distributions of peat soil density have been identified using fractal analysis method. The study was conducted on 5 peat soil samples taken from a ground field in Pontianak, West Kalimantan, at the coordinates (0 ° 4 '2:27 "S, 109 ° 18' 48.59" E). In this study, we used micro computerized tomography (pCT Scanner) at 9.41 micro meter per pixel resolution under peat soil samples to provide 2-D high-resolution images L1-L5 (200 200 pixels) that were used to detect the distribution of peat soil density. The method for determining the fractal dimension and intercept was the 2-D Fourier analysis method. The method was used to obtain the log log-plot of magnitude with frequency. Fractal dimension was obtained from the straight regression line that interpolated the points in the interval with the largest coefficient determination. Intercept defined by the point of intersection on the -axis. The conclusion was that the distributions of peat soil density showing the fractal behaviour with the heterogeneity of the samples from the highest to the lowest were L5, L1, L4, L3 and L2. Meanwhile, the range of density values of the samples from the highest to the lowest was L3, L2, L4, L5 and L1. The study also concluded that the behaviour of the distribution of peat soil density was a weakly anisotropic.

  8. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-xian; Liang, Xin-qiang; Luo, Qi-xiang; Fan, Fang; Chen, Ying-xu; Li, Zu-zhang; Sun, Huo-xi; Dai, Tian-fang; Wan, Jun-nan; Li, Xiao-jun

    2012-01-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China. The experiment included eight treatments: (1) check, (2) PK, (3) NP, (4) NK, (5) NPK, (6) 7F:3M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N), (7) 5F:5M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N), (8) 3F:7M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N). Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment. The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha. The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check. Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers. The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues. Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization. Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC. PMID:22467369

  9. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-xian; Liang, Xin-qiang; Luo, Qi-xiang; Fan, Fang; Chen, Ying-xu; Li, Zu-zhang; Sun, Huo-xi; Dai, Tian-fang; Wan, Jun-nan; Li, Xiao-jun

    2012-04-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China. The experiment included eight treatments: (1) check, (2) PK, (3) NP, (4) NK, (5) NPK, (6) 7F:3M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N), (7) 5F:5M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N), (8) 3F:7M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N). Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment. The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha. The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check. Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers. The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues. Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization. Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC.

  10. Soil carbon change in reconstructed tallgrass prairies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reconstructing former cropland to tallgrass prairie can increase soil carbon (C) and enhance C sequestration to mitigate increases in atmospheric CO2. This large-scale study was conducted at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (NSNWR) in Jasper County, south-central IA. Tracts of cropped land at NSN...

  11. Carbon Cycling in Wetland Forest Soils

    Treesearch

    Carl C. Trettin; Martin F. Jurgensen

    2003-01-01

    Wetlands comprise a small proportion (i.e., 2 to 3%) of earth's terrestrial surface, yet they contain a significant proportion of the terrestrial carbon (C) pool. Soils comprise the largest terrestrial C pool (ca. 1550 Pg C in upper 100 cm; Eswaran et al., 1993; Batjes, 1996), and wetlands contain the single largest component, with estimates ranging between 18...

  12. Carbon stabilization mechanisms in soils in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Boris; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The volcanic ash soils of the Andes contain very large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) per unit area. Consequently, they constitute significant potential sources or sinks of the greenhouse gas CO2. Climate and/or land use change potentially have a strong effect on these large SOM stocks. To clarify the role of chemical and physical stabilisation mechanisms in volcanic ash soils in the montane tropics, we investigated carbon stocks and stabilization mechanisms in the top- and subsoil along an altitudinal transect in the Ecuadorian Andes. The transect encompassed a sequence of paleosols under forest and grassland (páramo), including a site where vegetation cover changed in the last century. We applied selective extraction techniques, performed X-ray diffraction analyses of the clay fraction and estimated pore size distributions at various depths in the top- and subsoil along the transect. In addition, from several soils the molecular composition of SOM was further characterized with depth in the current soil as well as the entire first and the top of the second paleosol using GC/MS analyses of extractable lipids and Pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses of bulk organic matter. Our results show that organic carbon stocks in the mineral soil under forest a páramo vegetation were roughly twice as large as global averages for volcanic ash soils, regardless of whether the first 30cm, 100cm or 200cm were considered. We found the carbon stabilization mechanisms involved to be: i) direct stabilization of SOM in organo-metallic (Al-OM) complexes; ii) indirect protection of SOM through low soil pH and toxic levels of Al; and iii) physical protection of SOM due to a very high microporosity of the soil (Tonneijck et al., 2010; Jansen et al. 2011). When examining the organic carbon at a molecular level, interestingly we found extensive degradation of lignin in the topsoil while extractable lipids were preferentially preserved in the subsoil (Nierop and Jansen, 2009). Both vegetation

  13. Impact of bioenergy production on carbon storage and soil functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prays, Nadia; Franko, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    An important renewable energy source is methane produced in biogas plants (BGPs) that convert plant material and animal excrements to biogas and a residue (BGR). If the plant material stems from crops produced specifically for that purpose, a BGP have a 'footprint' that is defined by the area of arable land needed for the production of these energy crops and the area for distributing the BGRs. The BGR can be used to fertilize these lands (reducing the need for carbon and nitrogen fertilizers), and the crop land can be managed to serve as a carbon sink, capturing atmospheric CO2. We focus on the ecological impact of different BGPs in Central Germany, with a specific interest in the long-term effect of BGR-fertilization on carbon storage within the footprint of a BGP. We therefore studied nutrient fluxes using the CANDY (CArbon and Nitrogen Dynamics) model, which processes site-specific information on soils, crops, weather, and land management to compute stocks and fluxes of carbon and nitrogen for agricultural fields. We used CANDY to calculated matter fluxes within the footprints of BGPs of different sizes, and studied the effect of the substrate mix for the BGP on the carbon dynamics of the soil. This included the land requirement of the BGR recycling when used as a fertilizer: the footprint of a BGP required for the production of the energy crop generally differs from its footprint required to take up its BGR. We demonstrate how these findings can be used to find optimal cropping choices and land management for sustainable soil use, maintaining soil fertility and other soil functions. Furthermore, site specific potentials and limitations for agricultural biogas production can be identified and applied in land-use planning.

  14. Soil organic carbon sequestration and tillage systems in Mediterranean environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francaviglia, Rosa; Di Bene, Claudia; Marchetti, Alessandro; Farina, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon sequestration is of special interest in Mediterranean areas, where rainfed cropping systems are prevalent, inputs of organic matter to soils are low and mostly rely on crop residues, while losses are high due to climatic and anthropic factors such as intensive and non-conservative farming practices. The adoption of reduced or no tillage systems, characterized by a lower soil disturbance in comparison with conventional tillage, has proved to be positively effective on soil organic carbon (SOC) conservation and other physical and chemical processes, parameters or functions, e.g. erosion, compaction, ion retention and exchange, buffering capacity, water retention and aggregate stability. Moreover, soil biological and biochemical processes are usually improved by the reduction of tillage intensity. The work deals with some results available in the scientific literature, and related to field experiment on arable crops performed in Italy, Greece, Morocco and Spain. Data were organized in a dataset containing the main environmental parameters (altitude, temperature, rainfall), soil tillage system information (conventional, minimum and no-tillage), soil parameters (bulk density, pH, particle size distribution and texture), crop type, rotation, management and length of the experiment in years, initial SOCi and final SOCf stocks. Sampling sites are located between 33° 00' and 43° 32' latitude N, 2-860 m a.s.l., with mean annual temperature and rainfall in the range 10.9-19.6° C and 355-900 mm. SOC data, expressed in t C ha-1, have been evaluated both in terms of Carbon Sequestration Rate, given by [(SOCf-SOCi)/length in years], and as percentage change in comparison with the initial value [(SOCf-SOCi)/SOCi*100]. Data variability due to the different environmental, soil and crop management conditions that influence SOC sequestration and losses will be examined.

  15. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  16. Soil organic carbon pools in the northern circumpolar permafrost region

    Treesearch

    C. Tarnocai; J.G. Canadell; E.A.G. Schuur; P. Kuhry; G. Mazhitova; S. Zimov

    2009-01-01

    The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database was developed to determine carbon pools in soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost region. Here we report a new estimate of the carbon pools in soils of the northern permafrost region, including deeper layers and pools not accounted for in previous analyses.

  17. Combining Soil Databases for Topsoil Organic Carbon Mapping in Europe.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Ece; Yigini, Yusuf; Montanarella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important issue because of playing key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. There are several studies in the literature with the aim of finding the best method to assess and map the distribution of SOC content for Europe. Therefore this study aims searching for another aspect of this issue by looking to the performances of using aggregated soil samples coming from different studies and land-uses. The total number of the soil samples in this study was 23,835 and they're collected from the "Land Use/Cover Area frame Statistical Survey" (LUCAS) Project (samples from agricultural soil), BioSoil Project (samples from forest soil), and "Soil Transformations in European Catchments" (SoilTrEC) Project (samples from local soil data coming from six different critical zone observatories (CZOs) in Europe). Moreover, 15 spatial indicators (slope, aspect, elevation, compound topographic index (CTI), CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, world reference base (WRB) soil classification, geological formations, annual average temperature, min-max temperature, total precipitation and average precipitation (for years 1960-1990 and 2000-2010)) were used as auxiliary variables in this prediction. One of the most popular geostatistical techniques, Regression-Kriging (RK), was applied to build the model and assess the distribution of SOC. This study showed that, even though RK method was appropriate for successful SOC mapping, using combined databases was not helpful to increase the statistical significance of the method results for assessing the SOC distribution. According to our results; SOC variation was mainly affected by elevation, slope, CTI, average temperature, average and total precipitation, texture, WRB and CORINE variables for Europe scale in our model. Moreover, the highest average SOC contents were found in the wetland areas; agricultural

  18. Combining Soil Databases for Topsoil Organic Carbon Mapping in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Ece

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important issue because of playing key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. There are several studies in the literature with the aim of finding the best method to assess and map the distribution of SOC content for Europe. Therefore this study aims searching for another aspect of this issue by looking to the performances of using aggregated soil samples coming from different studies and land-uses. The total number of the soil samples in this study was 23,835 and they’re collected from the “Land Use/Cover Area frame Statistical Survey” (LUCAS) Project (samples from agricultural soil), BioSoil Project (samples from forest soil), and “Soil Transformations in European Catchments” (SoilTrEC) Project (samples from local soil data coming from six different critical zone observatories (CZOs) in Europe). Moreover, 15 spatial indicators (slope, aspect, elevation, compound topographic index (CTI), CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, world reference base (WRB) soil classification, geological formations, annual average temperature, min-max temperature, total precipitation and average precipitation (for years 1960–1990 and 2000–2010)) were used as auxiliary variables in this prediction. One of the most popular geostatistical techniques, Regression-Kriging (RK), was applied to build the model and assess the distribution of SOC. This study showed that, even though RK method was appropriate for successful SOC mapping, using combined databases was not helpful to increase the statistical significance of the method results for assessing the SOC distribution. According to our results; SOC variation was mainly affected by elevation, slope, CTI, average temperature, average and total precipitation, texture, WRB and CORINE variables for Europe scale in our model. Moreover, the highest average SOC contents were found in the wetland areas

  19. Distribution of soil bulk density and organic matter along an elevation gradient in central Oklahoma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The distribution of total soil carbon (TSC) within Oklahoma paddocks may affect sampling requirements to accurately monitor carbon (C) sequestration. This study examined how TSC was distributed in 3-1.6 ha paddocks [under different forms of long-term (1978-2004) management] situated across a common ...

  20. Increasing Soil Calcium Availability Alters Forest Soil Carbon Stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, A.; Goodale, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    Acid deposition in the Northeastern U.S. has been linked to a loss of soil base cations, especially calcium (Ca). While much research has addressed the effects of Ca depletion on soil and stream acidification, few studies have investigated its effects on ecosystem carbon (C) balance. We studied the long-term effects of increased Ca availability on C cycling in a northern hardwood forest in the Adirondack Park, NY. In 1989, calcium carbonate (lime) was added to ~ 100 ha of the Woods Lake Watershed to ameliorate the effects of soil Ca depletion. An additional 100 ha were maintained as controls. We hypothesized that the lime addition would improve forest health and that this improvement would be evident in increased tree biomass, leaf litter, and fine root production. Within the forest floor, we anticipated that the increased pH associated with liming would stimulate microbial activity resulting in increased decomposition and basal soil respiration, and reduced C stocks. Additionally, we hypothesized that increased Ca availability could enhance Ca-OM complexation in the upper mineral soils, leading to increased C stocks in these horizons. Eighteen years after liming, soil pH and exchangeable Ca pools remained elevated in the forest floor and upper mineral soil of the limed plots. Forest floor C stocks were significantly larger in limed plots (68 vs. 31 t C ha-1), and were driven primarily by greater C accumulation in the forest floor Oa horizon. Mineral soil C stocks did not differ between limed and control soils. Liming did not affect tree growth, however a net decline in biomass was observed across the entire watershed. There was a trend for larger fine root and foliar litter inputs in limed plots relative to controls, but the observed forest floor accumulation appears to be driven primarily by a suppression of decomposition. Liming reduced basal soil respiration rates by 17 and 43 % in the Oe and Oa horizons, respectively. This research suggests that Ca may

  1. Green Carbon, Black Carbon, White Carbon: Simultaneous Differentiation Between Soil Organic Matter, Pyrogenic Carbon and Carbonates Using Thermal Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Peltre, C.; Chan, J.; Baumgartl, T.; Erskine, P.; Apesteguía, M.; Virto, I.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of soil carbon stocks and fluxes continues to be an important endeavor in assessments of soil quality, and more broadly in assessments of ecosystem functioning. The quantification of soil carbon in alkaline, carbonate-containing soils, such as those found in Mediterranean areas, is complicated by the need to differentiate between organic carbon (OC) and inorganic carbon (IC), which continues to present methodological challenges. Acidification is frequently used to eliminate carbonates prior to soil OC quantification, but when performed in the liquid phase, can promote the dissolution and loss of a portion of the OC. Acid fumigation (AF) is increasingly preferred for carbonate removal, but its effectiveness is difficult to assess using conventional elemental and isotopic analyses. The two-step approach is time, labor and cost intensive, and generates additional uncertainties from the calculations. Quantification of the actively cycling pool of soil organic C (SOC) in many soils is further complicated by the potential presence of more recalcitrant/stable forms such as pyrogenic or black carbon (BC) derived from incomplete combustion of vegetation, or even geogenic carbon such as coal. The wide spectrum of materials currently considered BC makes its quantification challenging. The chemical method using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) as markers of condensed aromatic structures indicative of pyrogenic C is highly time, labor and cost intensive, and can generate artifacts. Several research groups are now developing method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of these various forms of soil carbon using thermal analysis techniques such as thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis. The objective of this presentation is to provide a general overview and specific examples of the current progress and technical challenges in this evolving methodology.

  2. Soil management and carbon calculation methods influence changes in soil carbon estimation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Throughout the years, many studies have evaluated changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) mass on a fixed-depth (FD) basis without considering changes in soil mass caused by changing in bulk density. In two study sites, we investigated the effect of different management practices on SOC changes calcul...

  3. Global Land Carbon Uptake from Trait Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, E. E.; Datta, A.; Flores-Moreno, H.; Fazayeli, F.; Chen, M.; Wythers, K. R.; Banerjee, A.; Atkin, O. K.; Kattge, J.; Reich, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    Historically, functional diversity in land surface models has been represented through a range of plant functional types (PFTs), each of which has a single value for all of its functional traits. Here we expand the diversity of the land surface by using a distribution of trait values for each PFT. The data for these trait distributions is from a sub-set of the global database of plant traits, TRY, and this analysis uses three leaf traits: mass based nitrogen and phosphorus content and specific leaf area, which influence both photosynthesis and respiration. The data are extrapolated into continuous surfaces through two methodologies. The first, a categorical method, classifies the species observed in TRY into satellite estimates of their plant functional type abundances - analogous to how traits are currently assigned to PFTs in land surface models. Second, a Bayesian spatial method which additionally estimates how the distribution of a trait changes in accord with both climate and soil covariates. These two methods produce distinct patterns of diversity which are incorporated into a land surface model to estimate how the range of trait values affects the global land carbon budget.

  4. Process based modelling of soil organic carbon redistribution on landscape scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Seher, Wiebke; Amorim, Amorim S. S.; Maeso, Daniel L.; Jürgen, Schmidt

    2014-05-01

    grain size distribution (clay, silt and sand) of the transported sediment. A test slope is modeled covering certain land use and soil management scenarios referring to different rainfall events. Results allow first insights on carbon loss and depletion on sediment delivery areas as well as carbon gains and enrichments on deposition areas on landscape scale. Lal, R. (2003). Soil erosion and the global carbon budget. Environment International vol. 29: 437-450.

  5. Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedy, Katrin; Freudenschuss, Alexandra; Zethner, Gehard; Spiegel, Heide; Franko, Uwe; Gründling, Ralf; Xaver Hölzl, Franz; Preinstorfer, Claudia; Haslmayr, Hans Peter; Formayer, Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils. The project funded by the Klima- und Energiefonds, Austrian Climate Research Programme, 4th call Authors: Katrin Sedy, Alexandra Freudenschuss, Gerhard Zethner (Environment Agency Austria), Heide Spiegel (Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety), Uwe Franko, Ralf Gründling (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research) Climate change will affect plant productivity due to weather extremes. However, adverse effects could be diminished and satisfying production levels may be maintained with proper soil conditions. To sustain and optimize the potential of agricultural land for plant productivity it will be necessary to focus on preserving and increasing soil organic carbon (SOC). Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils is strongly influenced by management practice. The present management is affected by management practices that tend to speed up carbon loss. Crop rotation, soil cultivation and the management of crop residues are very important measures to influence carbon dynamics and soil fertility. For the future it will be crucial to focus on practical measures to optimize SOC and to improve soil structure. To predict SOC turnover the existing humus balance model the application of the "Carbon Candy Balance" was verified by results from Austrian long term field experiments and field data of selected farms. Thus the main aim of the project is to generate a carbon balancing tool box that can be applied in different agricultural production regions to assess humus dynamics due to agricultural management practices. The toolbox will allow the selection of specific regional input parameters for calculating the C-balance at field level. However farmers or other interested user can also apply their own field data to receive the result of C-dynamics under certain management practises within the next 100 years. At regional level the impact of predefined changes in agricultural management

  6. The Unified North American Soil Map and Its Implication on the Soil Organic Carbon Stock in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shishi; Wei, Yaxing; Post, Wilfred M; Cook, Robert B; Schaefer, Kevin; Thornton, Michele M

    2013-01-01

    The Unified North American Soil Map (UNASM) was developed to provide more accurate regional soil information for terrestrial biosphere modeling. The UNASM combines information from state-of-the-art U.S. STATSGO2 and Soil Landscape of Canada (SLCs) databases. The area not covered by these datasets is filled with the Harmonized World Soil Database version 1.1 (HWSD1.1). The UNASM contains maximum soil depth derived from the data source as well as seven soil attributes (including sand, silt, and clay content, gravel content, organic carbon content, pH, and bulk density) for the top soil layer (0-30 cm) and the sub soil layer (30-100 cm) respectively, of the spatial resolution of 0.25 degrees in latitude and longitude. There are pronounced differences in the spatial distributions of soil properties and soil organic carbon between UNASM and HWSD, but the UNASM overall provides more detailed and higher-quality information particularly in Alaska and central Canada. To provide more accurate and up-to-date estimate of soil organic carbon stock in North America, we incorporated Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) into the UNASM. The estimate of total soil organic carbon mass in the upper 100 cm soil profile based on the improved UNASM is 347.70 Pg, of which 24.7% is under trees, 14.2% is under shrubs, and 1.3% is under grasses and 3.8% under crops. This UNASM data will provide a resource for use in land surface and terrestrial biogeochemistry modeling both for input of soil characteristics and for benchmarking model output.

  7. The Unified North American Soil Map and its implication on the soil organic carbon stock in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Wei, Y.; Post, W. M.; Cook, R. B.; Schaefer, K.; Thornton, M. M.

    2012-10-01

    The Unified North American Soil Map (UNASM) was developed to provide more accurate regional soil information for terrestrial biosphere modeling. The UNASM combines information from state-of-the-art US STATSGO2 and Soil Landscape of Canada (SLCs) databases. The area not covered by these datasets is filled with the Harmonized World Soil Database version 1.1 (HWSD1.1). The UNASM contains maximum soil depth derived from the data source as well as seven soil attributes (including sand, silt, and clay content, gravel content, organic carbon content, pH, and bulk density) for the top soil layer (0-30 cm) and the sub soil layer (30-100 cm) respectively, of the spatial resolution of 0.25° in latitude and longitude. There are pronounced differences in the spatial distributions of soil properties and soil organic carbon between UNASM and HWSD, but the UNASM overall provides more detailed and higher-quality information particularly in Alaska and Central Canada. To provide more accurate and up-to-date estimate of soil organic carbon stock in North America, we incorporated Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) into the UNASM. The estimate of total soil organic carbon mass in the upper 100 cm soil profile based on the improved UNASM is 347.70 Pg, of which 24.7% is under trees, 14.2% is under shrubs, and 1.3% is under grasses and 3.8% under crops. This UNASM data will provide a resource for use in land surface and terrestrial biogeochemistry modeling both for input of soil characteristics and for benchmarking model output.

  8. Regional Scale Characterization of Soil Carbon Fractions with Pedometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, H.; Grunwald, S.; Myers, D. B.; Harris, W. G.

    2015-12-01

    Regional scale characterization of the spatial distribution of soil carbon (C) fractions can facilitate a better understanding of the lability and recalcitrance of C across diverse land uses, soils, and climatic gradients. While C lability is associated with decomposition and transport processes in soils in, the stable portion of soil C persists in soil for decades to millennia. To better understand storage, flux and processes of soil C from across the soil-landscape continuum, we upscaled different fractions of soil C. Recalcitrant carbon (RC), hydrolysable carbon (HC) and total carbon (TC) were derived from the topsoil (0-20 cm) at 1,014 georeferenced sites in Florida (~150 000 km2). These were identified using a random-stratified sampling design with landuse-soil suborders strata. The Boruta method was employed for identifying all-relevant variables from the available 327 soil-environmental variables in order to develop the most parsimonious model for TC, RC and HC. We compared eight methods: Classification and Regression Tree (CaRT), Bagged Regression Tree (BaRT), Boosted Regression Tree (BoRT), Random Forest (RF), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR), Regression Kriging (RK), and Ordinary Kriging (OK). The accuracy of each method was assessed from 304 randomly chosen samples that were used for validation. Overall, 36, 20 and 25 variables stood out as all-relevant to TC, RC and HC, respectively. We predicted TC with a mean of 4.89 kg m-2 and standard error of 3.71 kg m-2. The prediction performance based on the ratio of prediction error to inter-quartile range in order of accuracy for TC was as follows: RF>BoRT>BaRT>SVM>PLSR>RK>CART>OK; however, BoRT outperformed RF for RC and HC, and the remaining order was identical for RC and HC. The best models, explained 71.6, 73.2, and 32.9 % of the total variation for TC, RC and HC, respectively. No residual spatial autocorrelation was left among the evaluated models. This indicates that

  9. Nexus Thinking on Soil Carbon Dynamics and Soil Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, R.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropocene is driven by global population of 7.5 billion in 2016, increasing annually by 80 million and projected to be 9.7 billion by 2050. The ecological impact (I=PAT, where P is population, A is affluence, and T is technology) of the population is similar to that of a geological force. Thus, humanity's impact is driven by demands for food, water, energy, and services derived from soil. Soil health, its capacity to function as a vital living system, is determined by quantity and quality of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the root zone ( 50cm). Maintenance of SOC at above the threshold level (1.5 to 2.0% by weight in the root zone) is critical to performing numerous ecosystem services for human wellbeing and nature conservancy. These services and functions strongly depend on nexus or inter-connectivity of biological processes within the pedosphere. The nexus is strongly governed by coupled biogeochemical cycling of water (H2O), carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sulfur (S). Further, it is the nexus between pedological and biological processes that renews and purifies water by denaturing and filtering pollutants; circulates C among biotic and abiotic pools in close association with other elements (N, P, S); provides habitat and energy source for soil biota (macro, meso, and micro flora and fauna), facilitates exchanges of gases between soil and the atmosphere and moderates climate, and creates favorable rhizospheric processes that promote plant growth and enhance net primary productivity. Soil health, governed by SOC quality and quantity, determines the provisioning of numerous ecosystem services and the importance of nexus thinking is highlighted by the truism that "health of soil, plants, animals, human and ecosystem is one and indivisible." The sequestration of SOC depends on land use and soil management strategies which create a positive C budget. Thus, input of biomass-C into the soil must exceed the losses by erosion, mineralization and leaching

  10. Decadal soil carbon accumulation across Tibetan permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jinzhi; Chen, Leiyi; Ji, Chengjun; Hugelius, Gustaf; Li, Yingnian; Liu, Li; Qin, Shuqi; Zhang, Beibei; Yang, Guibiao; Li, Fei; Fang, Kai; Chen, Yongliang; Peng, Yunfeng; Zhao, Xia; He, Honglin; Smith, Pete; Fang, Jingyun; Yang, Yuanhe

    2017-06-01

    Permafrost soils store large amounts of carbon. Warming can result in carbon release from thawing permafrost, but it can also lead to enhanced primary production, which can increase soil carbon stocks. The balance of these fluxes determines the nature of the permafrost feedback to warming. Here we assessed decadal changes in soil organic carbon stocks in the active layer--the uppermost 30 cm--of permafrost soils across Tibetan alpine regions, based on repeated soil carbon measurements in the early 2000s and 2010s at the same sites. We observed an overall accumulation of soil organic carbon irrespective of vegetation type, with a mean rate of 28.0 g C m-2 yr-1 across Tibetan permafrost regions. This soil organic carbon accrual occurred only in the subsurface soil, between depths of 10 and 30 cm, mainly induced by an increase of soil organic carbon concentrations. We conclude that the upper active layer of Tibetan alpine permafrost currently represents a substantial regional soil carbon sink in a warming climate, implying that carbon losses of deeper and older permafrost carbon might be offset by increases in upper-active-layer soil organic carbon stocks, which probably results from enhanced vegetation growth.

  11. [Characteristics of soil organic carbon and enzyme activities in soil aggregates under different vegetation zones on the Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Ma, Rui-ping; An, Shao-shan; Zeng, Quan-chao; Li, Ya-yun

    2015-08-01

    In order to explore the distribution characteristics of organic carbon of different forms and the active enzymes in soil aggregates with different particle sizes, soil samples were chosen from forest zone, forest-grass zone and grass zone in the Yanhe watershed of Loess Plateau to study the content of organic carbon, easily oxidized carbon, and humus carbon, and the activities of cellulase, β-D-glucosidase, sucrose, urease and peroxidase, as well as the relations between the soil aggregates carbon and its components with the active soil enzymes were also analyzed. It was showed that the content of organic carbon and its components were in order of forest zone > grass zone > forest-grass zone, and the contents of three forms of organic carbon were the highest in the diameter group of 0.25-2 mm. The content of organic carbon and its components, as well as the activities of soil enzymes were higher in the soil layer of 0-10 cm than those in the 10-20 cm soil layer of different vegetation zones. The activities of cellulase, β-D-glucosidase, sucrose and urease were in order of forest zone > grass zone > forest-grass zone. The peroxidase activity was in order of forest zone > forest-grass zone > grass zone. The activities of various soil enzymes increased with the decreasing soil particle diameter in the three vegetation zones. The activities of cellulose, peroxidase, sucrose and urease had significant positive correlations with the contents of various forms of organic carbon in the soil aggregates.

  12. Soil carbon sequestration and forest management: challenges and opportunities

    Treesearch

    Coeli M. Hoover

    2003-01-01

    The subject of the effects of forest management activities on soil carbon is a difficult one to address, but ongoing discussions of carbon sequestration as an emissions offset and the emergence of carbon-credit-trading systems necessitate that we broaden and deepen our understanding of the response of forest-soil carbon pools to forest management. There have been...

  13. Contribution of soil respiration to the global carbon equation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Shang, Hua

    2016-09-20

    Soil respiration (Rs) is the second largest carbon flux next to GPP between the terrestrial ecosystem (the largest organic carbon pool) and the atmosphere at a global scale. Given their critical role in the global carbon cycle, Rs measurement and modeling issues have been well reviewed in previous studies. In this paper, we briefly review advances in soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition processes and the factors affecting Rs. We examine the spatial and temporal distribution of Rs measurements available in the literature and found that most of the measurements were conducted in North America, Europe, and East Asia, with major gaps in Africa, East Europe, North Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australia, especially in dry ecosystems. We discuss the potential problems of measuring Rs on slope soils and propose using obliquely-cut soil collars to solve the existing problems. We synthesize previous estimates of global Rs flux and find that the estimates ranged from 50 PgC/yr to 98 PgC/yr and the error associated with each estimation was also high (4 PgC/yr to 33.2 PgC/yr). Using a newly integrated database of Rs measurements and the MODIS vegetation map, we estimate that the global annual Rs flux is 94.3 PgC/yr with an estimation error of 17.9 PgC/yr at a 95% confidence level. The uneven distribution of Rs measurements limits our ability to improve the accuracy of estimation. Based on the global estimation of Rs flux, we found that Rs is highly correlated with GPP and NPP at the biome level, highlighting the role of Rs in global carbon budgets.

  14. Deep soil carbon dynamics are driven more by soil type than by climate: a worldwide meta-analysis of radiocarbon profiles.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Jordane A; Hatté, Christine; Balesdent, Jérôme; Parent, Éric

    2015-11-01

    The response of soil carbon dynamics to climate and land-use change will affect both the future climate and the quality of ecosystems. Deep soil carbon (>20 cm) is the primary component of the soil carbon pool, but the dynamics of deep soil carbon remain poorly understood. Therefore, radiocarbon activity (Δ14C), which is a function of the age of carbon, may help to understand the rates of soil carbon biodegradation and stabilization. We analyzed the published 14C contents in 122 profiles of mineral soil that were well distributed in most of the large world biomes, except for the boreal zone. With a multivariate extension of a linear mixed-effects model whose inference was based on the parallel combination of two algorithms, the expectation-maximization (EM) and the Metropolis-Hasting algorithms, we expressed soil Δ14C profiles as a four-parameter function of depth. The four-parameter model produced insightful predictions of soil Δ14C as dependent on depth, soil type, climate, vegetation, land-use and date of sampling (R2=0.68). Further analysis with the model showed that the age of topsoil carbon was primarily affected by climate and cultivation. By contrast, the age of deep soil carbon was affected more by soil taxa than by climate and thus illustrated the strong dependence of soil carbon dynamics on other pedologic traits such as clay content and mineralogy.

  15. [Impact of land-use change on soil carbon storage].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiaoquan; Xu, Deying

    2004-04-01

    Through comparing the concentration and inventory of soil organic carbon (SOC) and its distribution in soil profiles under cropland, rangeland, natural secondary forest (brushwood, natural secondary forest dominated by Querces liaotungensis or Populus davidiana) and larch plantations (13, 18 and 25 years old Larix principisrupprechtil), this paper studied the effect of land use change from natural secondary forest to cropland or rangeland as well as from cropland or rangeland to plantation on SOC storage in the Liupan mountain forest zone. The results showed that the concentration of SOC in 0-110 cm soil layer under cropland and rangeland was 54% and 27% lower than that under natural secondary forest, respectively. The difference of SOC concentration between natural secondary forest and cropland or rangeland was greater in 0-50 cm than in 50-110 cm soil layer, while that between larch plantations and cropland or rangeland was greater in 0-40 cm than in 40-110 cm soil layer. The inventory of SOC in 0-110 cm soil layer under cropland and rangeland was respectively 35% and 14% lower than that under natural secondary forest, while 23% lower under cropland and 4% higher under rangeland than that under larch plantations. The difference of SOC inventory between natural secondary forest and cropland or rangeland was greater in 0-50 cm than in 50-110 cm soil layer, while that between plantations and cropland or rangeland was greater in 0-30 cm than in 30-110 cm soil layer. The decreasing magnitude of SOC storage with soil profile depth under natural secondary forest or larch plantations was greater than that under cropland or rangeland. The above-mentioned facts resulted from the changes of SOC input or output and the distribution of roots in soil. The results indicated that the SOC concentration and inventory would decline (mainly in 0-50 cm soil layer) after converting from natural secondary forest to cropland or rangeland, but increase (mainly in 0-30 cm soil layer

  16. Edaphic controls on soil organic carbon stocks in restored grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Sarah L.; Jastrow, Julie D.; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.; Grimley, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Cultivation of undisturbed soils dramatically depletes organic carbon stocks at shallow depths, releasing a substantial quantity of stored carbon to the atmosphere. Restoration of native ecosystems can help degraded soils rebuild a portion of the depleted soil organic matter. However, the rate and magnitude of soil carbon accrual can be highly variable from site to site. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling soil organic carbon stocks is necessary to improve predictions of soil carbon recovery. We measured soil organic carbon stocks and a suite of edaphic factors in the upper 10 cm of a series of restored tallgrass prairies representing a range of drainage conditions. Our findings suggest that factors related to soil organic matter stabilization mechanisms (texture, polyvalent cations) were key predictors of soil organic carbon, along with variables that influence plant and microbial biomass (available phosphorus, pH) and soil moisture. Exchangeable soil calcium was the strongest single predictor, explaining 74% of the variation in soil organic carbon, followed by clay content,which explained 52% of the variation. Our results demonstrate that the cumulative effects of even relatively small differences in these edaphic properties can have a large impact on soil carbon stocks when integrated over several decades.

  17. Comparison between soil and biomass carbon in adjacent hardwood and red pine forests

    SciTech Connect

    Perala, D.A.; Rollinger, J.L.; Wilson, D.M.

    1995-06-01

    The distribution of carbon in soil and biomass was studied across Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan, USA, in 40 pole-sized red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) plantations paired with adjacent hardwood stands. Pine and hardwood stands shared a common boundary and soil. Hardwood stands were mixed species, naturally regenerated second growth following logging. Carbon in total, standing crop averaged the same in both hardwood and red pine forest types, although the hardwoods averaged 14 years older than red pine. Coarse woody debris, shrubs, and herbs contained little carbon. Only the forest floor carbon pool was significantly different between forest types. Forest floor had a greater mass beneath red pine than hardwoods. There was no difference in total ecosystem carbon between red pine and hardwood stands. Total mineral soil aggregated across the depth profile contained the same total amount of carbon in both pine and hardwood stands; however, the carbon was found in different vertical patterns. Amounts of carbon in the upper levels of soil (0--4 cm) were higher under hardwoods, and amounts were higher under red pine at the 8--16 cm and 16--32 cm soil depths. Where July air temperatures were relatively cool, red pine stored carbon more efficiently both in the forest floor and deep in the soil. Red pine also sequestered more carbon in mineral soil with increasing April--September precipitation.

  18. [Responses of forest soil carbon pool and carbon cycle to the changes of carbon input].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-kui

    2011-04-01

    Litters and plant roots are the main sources of forest soil organic carbon (C). This paper summarized the effects of the changes in C input on the forest soil C pool and C cycle, and analyzed the effects of these changes on the total soil C, microbial biomass C, dissoluble organic C, and soil respiration. Different forests in different regions had inconsistent responses to C input change, and the effects of litter removal or addition and of root exclusion or not differed with tree species and regions. Current researches mainly focused on soil respiration and C pool fractions, and scarce were about the effects of C input change on the changes of soil carbon structure and stability as well as the response mechanisms of soil organisms especially soil fauna, which should be strengthened in the future.

  19. Organic and Inorganic Carbon in Paddy Soil as Evaluated by Mid-Infrared Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Changwen, Du; Jianmin, Zhou; Goyne, Keith W.

    2012-01-01

    Paddy soils are classified as wetlands which play a vital role in climatic change and food production. Soil carbon (C), especially soil organic C (SOC), in paddy soils has been received considerable attention as of recent. However, considerably less attention has been given to soil inorganic carbon (SIC) in paddy soils and the relationship between SOC and SIC at interface between soil and the atmosphere. The objective of this research was to investigate the utility of applying Fourier transform mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) to explore SOC and SIC present near the surface (0–10 µm) of paddy soils. The FTIR-PAS spectra revealed an unique absorption region in the wavenumber range of 1,350–1,500 cm−1 that was dominated by C-O (carbonate) and C-H bending vibrations (organic materials), and these vibrations were used to represented SIC and SOC, respectively. A circular distribution between SIC and SOC on the surface of paddy soils was determined using principal component analysis (PCA), and the distribution showed no significant relationship with the age of paddy soil. However, SIC and SOC were negatively correlated, and higher SIC content was observed near the soil surface. This relationship suggests that SIC in soil surface plays important roles in the soil C dynamics. PMID:22912863

  20. Organic and inorganic carbon in paddy soil as evaluated by mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Changwen, Du; Jianmin, Zhou; Goyne, Keith W

    2012-01-01

    Paddy soils are classified as wetlands which play a vital role in climatic change and food production. Soil carbon (C), especially soil organic C (SOC), in paddy soils has been received considerable attention as of recent. However, considerably less attention has been given to soil inorganic carbon (SIC) in paddy soils and the relationship between SOC and SIC at interface between soil and the atmosphere. The objective of this research was to investigate the utility of applying Fourier transform mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) to explore SOC and SIC present near the surface (0-10 µm) of paddy soils. The FTIR-PAS spectra revealed an unique absorption region in the wavenumber range of 1,350-1,500 cm(-1) that was dominated by C-O (carbonate) and C-H bending vibrations (organic materials), and these vibrations were used to represented SIC and SOC, respectively. A circular distribution between SIC and SOC on the surface of paddy soils was determined using principal component analysis (PCA), and the distribution showed no significant relationship with the age of paddy soil. However, SIC and SOC were negatively correlated, and higher SIC content was observed near the soil surface. This relationship suggests that SIC in soil surface plays important roles in the soil C dynamics.

  1. Mapping soil organic carbon stock in the area of Neamtu Catchment, Northeastern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breaban, Ana-Ioana; Bobric, Elena-Diana; Breaban, Iuliana-Gabriela; Rusu, Eugen

    2017-04-01

    The quantification of soil organic carbon stocks and its spatial extent is directly influenced by the land cover. The aim of the study is to quantify both the spatial distribution of soil organic carbon and stocks under different soil types and land uses in an area of 41.808,04 ha in northeastern part of Romania. It has been studied the evolution of carbon stocks over time, taking into account the change of land use between 1990-2012 under 5 classes: forests, pastures, arable land, orchard and built spaces. Common soils are Cambisols, Fluvisols, Phaezems, and Luvisols, forest being the predominant land use. The most important loss of soil organic carbon occurs as a result of changes in the supply of biomass supplying litter and therefore the process of bioaccumulation. The samples were collected from 100 representative soil profiles and analyzed with Analytik Jena multi N/C 2100 with HT 1300 solid module. Based on the soil organic carbon, C/N ratio and texture the values of those parameters varied from high values in Ao and Bv horizons to lower values in C horizon. In order to model soil organic carbon concentration were used different interpolation techniques (regression and ordinary -kriging, IDW) at different sampling densities for each depth to 100 cm, using a Gaussian approach to estimate the uncertainty. It is noticeable that soil organic carbon had a positive correlation with different types of land uses and a negative correlation with the elevation, being a decreasing trend of the carbon stocks sequestered in biomass, litter and soil. In the upper part of the profiles, the soil organic carbon stock considerably varied for forest land between 6.5-7.23 kg C/sqm) and agricultural land (3.67-4.65 kg C/sqm). The kriging regression evidenced a good variability of the calculated root mean square errors of the predicted soil organic carbon stocks.

  2. Soil Organic Carbon Degradation during Incubation, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Elizabeth Herndon; Ziming Yang; Baohua Gu

    2017-01-05

    This dataset provides information about soil organic carbon decomposition in Barrow soil incubation studies. The soil cores were collected from low-center polygon (Area A) and were incubated in the laboratory at different temperatures for up to 60 days. Transformations of soil organic carbon were characterized by UV and FT-IR, and small organic acids in water-soluble carbons were quantified by ion chromatography during the incubation (Herndon et al., 2015).

  3. Existing Soil Carbon Models Do Not Apply to Forested Wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C C; Song, B; Jurgensen, M F; Li, C

    2001-09-14

    Evaluation of 12 widely used soil carbon models to determine applicability to wetland ecosystems. For any land area that includes wetlands, none of the individual models would produce reasonable simulations based on soil processes. Study presents a wetland soil carbon model framework based on desired attributes, the DNDC model and components of the CENTURY and WMEM models. Proposed synthesis would be appropriate when considering soil carbon dynamics at multiple spatial scales and where the land area considered includes both wetland and upland ecosystems.

  4. An invisible soil acidification: Critical role of soil carbonate and its impact on heavy metal bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Wei; Yang, Zhongfang; Chen, Yang; Shao, Wenjing; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-07-01

    It is well known that carbonates inhibit heavy metals transferring from soil to plants, yet the mechanism is poorly understood. Based on the Yangtze River delta area, we investigated bioaccumulation of Ni and Cd in winter wheat as affected by the presence of carbonates in soil. This study aimed to determine the mechanism through which soil carbonates restrict transport and plant uptake of heavy metals in the wheat cropping system. The results indicate that soil carbonates critically influenced heavy metal transfer from soil to plants and presented a tipping point. Wheat grains harvested from carbonates-depleted (due to severe leaching) soils showed Ni and Cd concentrations 2-3 times higher than those of the wheat grains from carbonates-containing soils. Correspondingly, the incidence of Ni or Cd contamination in the wheat grain samples increased by about three times. With the carbonate concentration >1% in soil, uptake and bioaccumulation of Ni and Cd by winter wheat was independent with the soil pH and carbonate content. The findings suggest that soil carbonates play a critical role in heavy metal transfer from soil to plants, implying that monitoring soil carbonate may be necessary in addition to soil pH for the evaluating soil quality and food safety.

  5. An invisible soil acidification: Critical role of soil carbonate and its impact on heavy metal bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Wei; Yang, Zhongfang; Chen, Yang; Shao, Wenjing; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that carbonates inhibit heavy metals transferring from soil to plants, yet the mechanism is poorly understood. Based on the Yangtze River delta area, we investigated bioaccumulation of Ni and Cd in winter wheat as affected by the presence of carbonates in soil. This study aimed to determine the mechanism through which soil carbonates restrict transport and plant uptake of heavy metals in the wheat cropping system. The results indicate that soil carbonates critically influenced heavy metal transfer from soil to plants and presented a tipping point. Wheat grains harvested from carbonates-depleted (due to severe leaching) soils showed Ni and Cd concentrations 2–3 times higher than those of the wheat grains from carbonates-containing soils. Correspondingly, the incidence of Ni or Cd contamination in the wheat grain samples increased by about three times. With the carbonate concentration >1% in soil, uptake and bioaccumulation of Ni and Cd by winter wheat was independent with the soil pH and carbonate content. The findings suggest that soil carbonates play a critical role in heavy metal transfer from soil to plants, implying that monitoring soil carbonate may be necessary in addition to soil pH for the evaluating soil quality and food safety. PMID:26227091

  6. An invisible soil acidification: Critical role of soil carbonate and its impact on heavy metal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Wei; Yang, Zhongfang; Chen, Yang; Shao, Wenjing; Ji, Junfeng

    2015-07-31

    It is well known that carbonates inhibit heavy metals transferring from soil to plants, yet the mechanism is poorly understood. Based on the Yangtze River delta area, we investigated bioaccumulation of Ni and Cd in winter wheat as affected by the presence of carbonates in soil. This study aimed to determine the mechanism through which soil carbonates restrict transport and plant uptake of heavy metals in the wheat cropping system. The results indicate that soil carbonates critically influenced heavy metal transfer from soil to plants and presented a tipping point. Wheat grains harvested from carbonates-depleted (due to severe leaching) soils showed Ni and Cd concentrations 2-3 times higher than those of the wheat grains from carbonates-containing soils. Correspondingly, the incidence of Ni or Cd contamination in the wheat grain samples increased by about three times. With the carbonate concentration >1% in soil, uptake and bioaccumulation of Ni and Cd by winter wheat was independent with the soil pH and carbonate content. The findings suggest that soil carbonates play a critical role in heavy metal transfer from soil to plants, implying that monitoring soil carbonate may be necessary in addition to soil pH for the evaluating soil quality and food safety.

  7. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  8. Organic carbon transport in Paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer, Tino; Grootes, Pieter M.; Nadeau, Marie-Josée.; Andersen, Nils

    2010-05-01

    Paddy and non-paddy soils from a chronosequence of 50 to 2000 years of agricultural use, developed on former estuarine sediments of the Yangtze River, were sampled near Cixi, Zhejiang Province, China, in the framework of the Research Unit 'Biogeochemistry of paddy soil evolution' of the German Research Foundation (DFG). In addition samples of Yangtze River estuarine sediments were obtained. Results from the 50-year and the 700-year paddy and non-paddy soils reveal increases in both total organic carbon (TOC) and TOC 14C concentration relative to the estuarine sediment. In the non-paddy soil, a 14C gradient with 14C concentrations decreasing with increasing depth is already established after 50 years, while in the paddy soil little 14C increase can be seen below the plough pan. In the 700-year sites, the 14C depth profiles are, however, quite similar. This indicates that paddy rice cultivation quickly leads to a plough pan, which seriously reduces, but not totally prevents, downward transport of organic matter and leads to equilibrium times for TOC and 14C concentrations in paddy soil profiles in the order of centuries.

  9. Soil type modifies response of soil carbon pools to an atmospheric CO2 gradient

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Literature suggests that as atmospheric CO2 rises, soil carbon will cycle more rapidly as plants input greater amounts of labile carbon into the soil. This labile carbon may stimulate the decomposition of more slowly-cycling soil organic matter through microbial priming. We test these hypotheses i...

  10. Gravimetric Determination of Inorganic Carbon in Calcareous Soils Using the Carbonate-Meter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic carbon affects many important physical, chemical and microbiological soil properties. In calcareous soils, the inorganic carbon has to be measured and subtracted from the total carbon to obtain organic carbon. Our objective was to develop a gravimetric technique to quantify inorganic carbon ...

  11. [Quantifying soil autotrophic microbes-assimilated carbon input into soil organic carbon pools following continuous 14C labeling].

    PubMed

    Shi, Ran; Chen, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Jian, Yan; Yuan, Hong-Zhao; Ge, Ti-Da; Sui, Fang-Gong; Tong, Cheng-Li; Wu, Jin-Shui

    2013-07-01

    Soil autotrophic microbe has been found numerous and widespread. However, roles of microbial autotrophic processes and the mechanisms of that in the soil carbon sequestration remain poorly understood. Here, we used soils incubated for 110 days in a closed, continuously labeled 14C-CO2 atmosphere to measure the amount of labeled C incorporated into the microbial biomass. The allocation of 14C-labeled assimilated carbon in variable soil C pools such as dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC) were also examined over the 14C labeling span. The results showed that significant amounts of 14C-SOC were measured in paddy soils, which ranged from 69.06-133.81 mg x kg(-1), accounting for 0.58% to 0.92% of the total soil organic carbon (SOC). The amounts of 14C in the dissolved organic C (14C-DOC) and in the microbial biomass C (14C-MBC) were dependent on the soils, ranged from 2.54 to 8.10 mg x kg(-1), 19.50 to 49.16 mg x kg(-1), respectively. There was a significantly positive linear relationship between concentrations of 14C-SOC and 14C-MBC (R2 = 0.957**, P < 0.01). The 14C-DOC and 14C-MBC as proportions of total DOC, MBC, were 5.65%-24.91% and 4.23%-20.02%, respectively. Moreover, the distribution and transformation of microbes-assimilated-derived C had a greater influence on the dynamics of DOC and MBC than that on the dynamics of SOC. These data provide new insights into the importance of microorganisms in the fixation of atmospheric CO2 and of the potentially significant contributions made by microbial autotrophy to terrestrial C cycling.

  12. Carbon sequestration potential of soils in southeast Germany derived from stable soil organic carbon saturation.

    PubMed

    Wiesmeier, Martin; Hübner, Rico; Spörlein, Peter; Geuß, Uwe; Hangen, Edzard; Reischl, Arthur; Schilling, Bernd; von Lützow, Margit; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2014-02-01

    Sequestration of atmospheric carbon (C) in soils through improved management of forest and agricultural land is considered to have high potential for global CO2 mitigation. However, the potential of soils to sequester soil organic carbon (SOC) in a stable form, which is limited by the stabilization of SOC against microbial mineralization, is largely unknown. In this study, we estimated the C sequestration potential of soils in southeast Germany by calculating the potential SOC saturation of silt and clay particles according to Hassink [Plant and Soil 191 (1997) 77] on the basis of 516 soil profiles. The determination of the current SOC content of silt and clay fractions for major soil units and land uses allowed an estimation of the C saturation deficit corresponding to the long-term C sequestration potential. The results showed that cropland soils have a low level of C saturation of around 50% and could store considerable amounts of additional SOC. A relatively high C sequestration potential was also determined for grassland soils. In contrast, forest soils had a low C sequestration potential as they were almost C saturated. A high proportion of sites with a high degree of apparent oversaturation revealed that in acidic, coarse-textured soils the relation to silt and clay is not suitable to estimate the stable C saturation. A strong correlation of the C saturation deficit with temperature and precipitation allowed a spatial estimation of the C sequestration potential for Bavaria. In total, about 395 Mt CO2 -equivalents could theoretically be stored in A horizons of cultivated soils - four times the annual emission of greenhouse gases in Bavaria. Although achieving the entire estimated C storage capacity is unrealistic, improved management of cultivated land could contribute significantly to CO2 mitigation. Moreover, increasing SOC stocks have additional benefits with respect to enhanced soil fertility and agricultural productivity.

  13. Variations in Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Re-Vegetation of Hilly Slopes with Purple Soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Zou, Dongsheng; Yang, Manyuan; Lin, Zhonggui

    2016-01-01

    Crust restoration is increasingly being done but we lack quantitative information on soil improvements. The study aimed to elucidate the dynamics involving soil microbial biomass carbon and soil dissolved organic carbon in the re-vegetation chronosequences of a hillslope land with purple soil in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil can cause serious disasters with both soil erosion and seasonal drought, and also becomes a typical representative of ecological disaster area in South China. Using the space-for-time method, we selected six typical sampling plots, designated as follows: grassplot community, meadow thicket community, frutex community, frutex and arbor community, arbor community, and top-level vegetation community. These plots were established to analyze the changes in soil microbial biomass carbon, soil microbial quotien, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon, and soil basal respiration in 0-10, 10-20, and 20-40 cm soil layers. The relationships of these parameters with soils physic-chemical properties were also determined. The ecological environment of the 6 plant communities is similar and typical; they denoted six different successive stages of restoration on hillslopes with purple soils in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil microbial biomass carbon and soil basal respiration contents decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with re-vegetation. By contrast, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and re-vegetation. From 0-10 cm soil layer to 20-40 cm soil layer, the dissolved organic carbon content decreased in different re-vegetation stages. In the process of re-vegetation, the dissolved organic carbon content increased in the 0-10 and 10-20 cm soil layers, whereas the dissolved organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase in the 20-40 cm soil layers. Meanwhile, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased with re

  14. Variations in Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Re-Vegetation of Hilly Slopes with Purple Soil

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ning; Zou, Dongsheng; Yang, Manyuan; Lin, Zhonggui

    2016-01-01

    Crust restoration is increasingly being done but we lack quantitative information on soil improvements. The study aimed to elucidate the dynamics involving soil microbial biomass carbon and soil dissolved organic carbon in the re-vegetation chronosequences of a hillslope land with purple soil in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil can cause serious disasters with both soil erosion and seasonal drought, and also becomes a typical representative of ecological disaster area in South China. Using the space-for-time method, we selected six typical sampling plots, designated as follows: grassplot community, meadow thicket community, frutex community, frutex and arbor community, arbor community, and top-level vegetation community. These plots were established to analyze the changes in soil microbial biomass carbon, soil microbial quotien, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon, and soil basal respiration in 0–10, 10–20, and 20–40 cm soil layers. The relationships of these parameters with soils physic-chemical properties were also determined. The ecological environment of the 6 plant communities is similar and typical; they denoted six different successive stages of restoration on hillslopes with purple soils in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil microbial biomass carbon and soil basal respiration contents decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with re-vegetation. By contrast, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and re-vegetation. From 0–10 cm soil layer to 20–40 cm soil layer, the dissolved organic carbon content decreased in different re-vegetation stages. In the process of re-vegetation, the dissolved organic carbon content increased in the 0–10 and 10–20 cm soil layers, whereas the dissolved organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase in the 20–40 cm soil layers. Meanwhile, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased

  15. Role of micro-topographic variability on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in Intensively Managed Landscape.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, D.; Kumar, P.

    2016-12-01

    Micro-topographic variability is one of the major factors that determine the heterogeneity of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks. By exploring the spatial distribution of soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, the optimum management of carbon sequestration and soil fertility can be achieved to promote sustainable agricultural practices. The objective of this study is to examine the interactions between micro-topography and soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Toward this objective, we developed a three-dimensional soil carbon and nitrogen model by considering various transformation, and transport associated with soil moisture, temperature, and microbes. We used published data for the study site at the Allerton Trust Farm site in Monticello, IL, USA. We found that soil organic carbon and nitrogen were significantly higher in the low-lying zones of flow convergence than upslope areas. This was mainly because the higher moisture and lower temperature conditions in the low-lying areas suppressed microbial processes, thus reducing the decomposition rates. Also, lower inorganic nitrogen concentrations in the low-lying areas than upslope areas were identified, which can be explained to a great extent by higher nitrogen leaching in the low-lying areas. Our results highlight that spatial patterns in soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics are largely regulated by micro-topographic variability that drives soil moisture and temperature conditions.

  16. Cost effective tools for soil organic carbon monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Keith; Aynekulu, Ermias

    2013-04-01

    There is increasing demand for data on soil properties at fine spatial resolution to support management and planning decisions. Measurement of soil organic carbon has attracted much interest because (i) soil organic carbon is widely cited as a useful indicator of soil condition and (ii) of the importance of soil carbon in the global carbon cycle and climate mitigation strategies. However in considering soil measurement designs there has been insufficient attention given to careful analysis of the specific decisions that the measurements are meant to support and on what measurements have high information value for decision-making. As a result, much measurement effort may be wasted or focused on the wrong variables. A cost-effective measurement is one that reduces risk in decisions and does not cost more than the societal returns to additional evidence. A key uncertainty in measuring soil carbon as a soil condition indicator is what constitutes a good or bad level of carbon on a given soil. A measure of soil organic carbon concentration may have limited value for informing management decisions without the additional information required to interpret it, and so expending further efforts on improving measurements to increase precision may then have no value to improving the decision. Measuring soil carbon stock changes for carbon trading purposes requires high levels of measurement precision but there is still large uncertainty on whether the costs of measurement exceed the benefits. Since the largest cost component in soil monitoring is often travel to the field and physically sampling soils, it is generally cost-effective to meet multiple objectives by analysing a number of properties on a soil sample. Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy is playing a key role in allowing multiple soil properties to be determined rapidly and at low cost. The method provides estimation of multiple soil properties (e.g. soil carbon, texture and mineralogy) in one measurement

  17. The Unified North American Soil Map and Its Implication on the Soil Organic Carbon Stock in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Liu, S.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Michalak, A. M.; Post, W. M.; Cook, R. B.; Schaefer, K. M.; Thornton, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Unified North American Soil Map (UNASM) was developed by Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) to provide more accurate regional soil information for terrestrial biosphere modeling. The UNASM combines information from state-of-the-art US STATSGO2 and Soil Landscape of Canada (SLCs) databases. The area not covered by these datasets is filled by using the Harmonized World Soil Database version 1.21 (HWSD1.21). The UNASM contains maximum soil depth derived from the data source as well as seven soil attributes (including sand, silt, and clay content, gravel content, organic carbon content, pH, and bulk density) for the topsoil layer (0-30 cm) and the subsoil layer (30-100 cm), respectively, of the spatial resolution of 0.25 degrees in latitude and longitude. There are pronounced differences in the spatial distributions of soil properties and soil organic carbon between UNASM and HWSD, but the UNASM overall provides more detailed and higher-quality information particularly in Alaska and central Canada. To provide more accurate and up-to-date estimate of soil organic carbon stock in North America, we incorporated Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) into the UNASM. The estimate of total soil organic carbon mass in the upper 100 cm soil profile based on the improved UNASM is 365.96 Pg, of which 23.1% is under trees, 14.1% is in shrubland, and 4.6% is in grassland and cropland. This UNASM data has been provided as a resource for use in terrestrial ecosystem modeling of MsTMIP both for input of soil characteristics and for benchmarking model output.

  18. The Unified North American Soil Map and its implication on the soil organic carbon stock in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Wei, Y.; Post, W. M.; Cook, R. B.; Schaefer, K.; Thornton, M. M.

    2013-05-01

    The Unified North American Soil Map (UNASM) was developed to provide more accurate regional soil information for terrestrial biosphere modeling. The UNASM combines information from state-of-the-art US STATSGO2 and Soil Landscape of Canada (SLCs) databases. The area not covered by these datasets is filled by using the Harmonized World Soil Database version 1.21 (HWSD1.21). The UNASM contains maximum soil depth derived from the data source as well as seven soil attributes (including sand, silt, and clay content, gravel content, organic carbon content, pH, and bulk density) for the topsoil layer (0-30 cm) and the subsoil layer (30-100 cm), respectively, of the spatial resolution of 0.25 degrees in latitude and longitude. There are pronounced differences in the spatial distributions of soil properties and soil organic carbon between UNASM and HWSD, but the UNASM overall provides more detailed and higher-quality information particularly in Alaska and central Canada. To provide more accurate and up-to-date estimate of soil organic carbon stock in North America, we incorporated Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) into the UNASM. The estimate of total soil organic carbon mass in the upper 100 cm soil profile based on the improved UNASM is 365.96 Pg, of which 23.1% is under trees, 14.1% is in shrubland, and 4.6% is in grassland and cropland. This UNASM data will provide a resource for use in terrestrial ecosystem modeling both for input of soil characteristics and for benchmarking model output.

  19. How to map soil carbon stocks in highly urbanized regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, V. I.; Stoorvogel, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest carbon stock in terrestrial ecosystems and the capacity for carbon sequestration is a widely accepted soil function. For land-use planning and decision making the regional analysis of SOC stocks and their spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention. Quite a few studies focus on mapping the carbon stocks in natural and agricultural areas using digital soil mapping (DSM) techniques. Although urban areas remain almost neglected. The urban environment provides a number of specific features and processes that influence soil formation and functioning: soil sealing, functional zoning and settlement history. This not only results in a considerable urban SOC (especially in the subsoil), but also results in a unique spatial variability of SOC stocks at short distance. In contrast to the often gradual changes in natural areas, urban soils may exhibit abrupt changes due to the anthropogenic influence. Thus implementation of standard DSM methodology will result in extremely high nuggets and correspondingly low prediction accuracy. Besides, traditional regression kriging, widely-used for the case when legacy data is lacking, is often based on the correlation between SOC and dominating soil forming factors (climate, relief, parent material and vegetation). Although in urban conditions, anthropogenic influence itself turns out to be a predominant soil-forming factor. The spatial heterogeneity of urban soil carbon stocks is further complicated by a specific profile distribution with possible second SOC maximum, referred to cultural layer. Importance of urban SOC as well as specifics of urban environment requires for a specific approach to map urban SOC as part of regional analysis. Moscow region with its variability of bioclimatic conditions and high urbanization level (10 % from the total area) was chosen as an interesting case study. Random soil sampling in different soil zones (4) and land

  20. Improved soil fumigation by Telone C35 using carbonation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J E; Ou, L T; Allen, L H; Vu, J C; Dickson, D W

    2011-01-01

    Soil fumigation to control pests and pathogens is an important part of current agricultural practice. A reduction in fumigant emissions is required to ensure worker safety and environment health. A field trial in Florida was conducted to investigate whether carbonating Telone C35™ ((Z)- and (E)-1,3-dichloropropene with 35 % chloropicrin) would improve the delivery of the fumigant to such an extent that the application rate could be decreased without sacrificing efficacy. All treatments were carried out in three replications in a complete block design. The use of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) to carbonate and pressurize Telone C35 provided quicker and deeper distribution initially compared to application by nitrogen gas (N(2)) pressurization. The deeper distribution of Telone C35 components found with CO(2) application may have lowered the initial concentration of Telone C35, but it did not appreciably alter the disappearance rate of the three chemicals, chloropicrin, (Z)- and (E)-1,3-dichloropropene. The faster vertical distribution within the bedded soil of the Telone C35 by CO(2) did enhance volatilization of the active ingredients into the atmosphere compared to volatilization of similar reduced rate applied by N(2) pressurization. However, the cumulative amount volatilized from the carbonated fumigant beds at 75 % application rate was lower than the cumulative amount emitted by full rate of Telone C35 using N(2). The efficacy of the carbonated Telone C35 at a lower application rate was statistically equivalent to that of non-carbonated fumigant using N(2) pressurized injection at a higher application rate, based on weed enumeration and the root-knot nematode galling index.

  1. Carbon sequestration in two alpine soils on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu-Qiang; Xu, Xing-Liang; Song, Ming-Hua; Zhou, Cai-Ping; Gao, Qiong; Ouyang, Hua

    2009-09-01

    Soil carbon sequestration was estimated in a conifer forest and an alpine meadow on the Tibetan Plateau using a carbon-14 radioactive label provided by thermonuclear weapon tests (known as bomb-(14)C). Soil organic matter was physically separated into light and heavy fractions. The concentration spike of bomb-(14)C occurred at a soil depth of 4 cm in both the forest soil and the alpine meadow soil. Based on the depth of the bomb-(14)C spike, the carbon sequestration rate was determined to be 38.5 g C/m(2) per year for the forest soil and 27.1 g C/m(2) per year for the alpine meadow soil. Considering that more than 60% of soil organic carbon (SOC) is stored in the heavy fraction and the large area of alpine forests and meadows on the Tibetan Plateau, these alpine ecosystems might partially contribute to "the missing carbon sink".

  2. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in a soil profile: Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Brovelli, Alessandro; Barry, D. Andrew

    2010-05-01

    In order to meet demands for crops, pasture and firewood, the rate of land use change from forested to agricultural uses has steadily increased over several decades, resulting in an increased release of nutrients towards groundwater and surface water bodies. In parallel, the degradation of riparian zones has diminished their capacity to provide critical ecosystem functions, such as the ability to control and buffer nutrient cycles. In recent years, however, the key environmental importance of natural, healthy ecosystems has been progressively recognized and restoration of degraded lands towards their former natural state has become an area of active research worldwide. Land use changes and restoration practices are known to affect both soil nutrient dynamics and their transport to neighbouring areas. To this end, in order to interpret field experiments and elucidate the different mechanisms taking place, numerical tools are beneficial. Microbiological transformations of the soil organic matter, including decomposition and nutrient turnover are controlled to a large extent by soil water content, influenced in turn by climatic and environmental conditions such as precipitation and evapotranspiration. The work presented here is part of the Swiss RECORD project (http://www.cces.ethz.ch/projects/nature/Record), a large collaborative research effort undertaken to monitor the changes in ecosystem functioning in riparian areas undergoing restoration. In this context we have developed a numerical model to simulate carbon and nitrogen transport and turnover in a one-dimensional variably saturated soil profile. The model is based on the zero-dimensional mechanistic batch model of Porporato et al. (Adv. Water Res., 26: 45-58, 2003), but extends its capabilities to simulate (i) the transport of the mobile components towards deeper horizons, and (ii) the vertical evolution of the profile and the subsequent distribution of the organic matter. The soil is divided in four

  3. Fresh carbon input differentially impacts soil carbon decomposition across natural and managed systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongkui; Wang, Enli; Smith, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The amount of fresh carbon input into soil is experiencing substantial changes under global change. It is unclear what will be the consequences of such input changes on native soil carbon decomposition across ecosystems. By synthesizing data from 143 experimental comparisons, we show that, on average, fresh carbon input stimulates soil carbon decomposition by 14%. The response was lower in forest soils (1%) compared with soils from other ecosystems (> 24%), and higher following inputs of plant residue-like substrates (31%) compared to root exudate-like substrates (9%). The responses decrease with the baseline soil carbon decomposition rate under no additional carbon input, but increase with the fresh carbon input rate. The rates of these changes vary significantly across ecosystems and with the carbon substrates being added. These findings can be applied to provide robust estimates of soil carbon balance across ecosystems under changing aboveground and belowground inputs as consequence of climate and land management changes.

  4. Molecular DYNAmics of Soil Organic carbon (DYNAMOS *): a project focusing on soils and carbon through data and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatté, C.; Balesdent, J.; Derenne, S.; Derrien, D.; Dignac, M.; Egasse, C.; Ezat, U.; Gauthier, C.; Mendez-Millan, M.; Nguyen Tu, T.; Rumpel, C.; Sicre, M.; Zeller, B.

    2009-12-01

    Here we present the first results of the DynaMOS project whose main issue is the build-up of a new generation of soil carbon model. The modeling will describe together soil organic geochemistry and soil carbon dynamics in a generalized, quantitative representation. The carbon dynamics time scale envisaged here will cover the 1 to 1000 yr range and described molecules will be carbohydrate, peptide, amino acid, lignin, lipids, their products of biodegradation and uncharacterized carbonaceous species of biological origin. Three main characteristics define DYNAMOS model originalities: it will consider organic matter at the molecular scale, integrate back to global scale and account for component vertical movements. In a first step, specific data acquisition will concern the production, fate and age of carbon of individual organic compounds. Dynamic parameters will be acquired by compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of both 13C and 14C, by GC/C/IR-MS and AMS. Sites for data acquisition, model calibration and model validation will be chosen on the base of their isotopic history and environmental constraints: 13C natural labeling (with and without C3/C4 vegetation changes), 13C/15N-labelled litter application in both forest and cropland. They include some long-term experiments owned by the partners themselves plus a worldwide panel of sites. In a second step the depth distribution of organic species, isotopes and ages in soils (1D representation) will be modeled by coupling carbon dynamics and vertical movement. Besides the main objective of providing a robust soil carbon dynamics model, DYNAMOS will assess and model the alteration of the isotopic signature of molecules throughout decay and create a shared database of both already published and new data of compound specific information. Issues of the project will concern different scientific fields: global geochemical cycles by refining the description of the terrestrial carbon cycle and entering the chemical

  5. Molecular DYNAmics of Soil Organic carbon (DYNAMOS ): a project focusing on soils and carbon through data and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez-Millan, Mercedes

    2010-05-01

    Here we present the first results of the DynaMOS project whose main issue is the build-up of a new generation of soil carbon model. The modeling will describe together soil organic geochemistry and soil carbon dynamics in a generalized, quantitative representation. The carbon dynamics time scale envisaged here will cover the 1 to 1000 yr range and describe molecule behaviours (i.e.)carbohydrate, peptide, amino acid, lignin, lipids, their products of biodegradation and uncharacterized carbonaceous species of biological origin. Three main characteristics define DYNAMOS model originalities: it will consider organic matter at the molecular scale, integrate back to global scale and account for component vertical movements. In a first step, specific data acquisition will concern the production, fate and age of carbon of individual organic compounds. Dynamic parameters will be acquired by compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of both 13C and 14C, by GC/C/IR-MS and AMS. Sites for data acquisition, model calibration and model validation will be chosen on the base of their isotopic history and environmental constraints: 13C natural labeling (with and without C3/C4 vegetation changes), 13C/15N-labelled litter application in both forest and cropland. They include some long-term experiments owned by the partners themselves plus a worldwide panel of sites. In a second step the depth distribution of organic species, isotopes and ages in soils (1D representation) will be modeled by coupling carbon dynamics and vertical movement. Besides the main objective of providing a robust soil carbon dynamics model, DYNAMOS will assess and model the alteration of the isotopic signature of molecules throughout decay and create a shared database of both already published and new data of compound specific information. Issues of the project will concern different scientific fields: global geochemical cycles by refining the description of the terrestrial carbon cycle and entering the chemical

  6. Differential priming of soil carbon driven by soil depth and root impacts on carbon availability

    SciTech Connect

    de Graaff, Marie-Anne; Jastrow, Julie D.; Gillette, Shay; Johns, Aislinn; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2013-11-15

    Enhanced root-exudate inputs can stimulate decomposition of soil carbon (C) by priming soil microbial activity, but the mechanisms controlling the magnitude and direction of the priming effect remain poorly understood. With this study we evaluated how differences in soil C availability affect the impact of simulated root exudate inputs on priming. We conducted a 60-day laboratory incubation with soils collected (60 cm depth) from under six switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) cultivars. Differences in specific root length (SRL) among cultivars were expected to result in small differences in soil C inputs and thereby create small differences in the availability of recent labile soil C; whereas soil depth was expected to create large overall differences in soil C availability. Soil cores from under each cultivar (roots removed) were divided into depth increments of 0–10, 20–30, and 40–60 cm and incubated with addition of either: (1) water or (2) 13C-labeled synthetic root exudates (0.7 mg C/g soil). We measured CO2 respiration throughout the experiment. The natural difference in 13C signature between C3 soils and C4 plants was used to quantify cultivar-induced differences in soil C availability. Amendment with 13C-labeled synthetic root-exudate enabled evaluation of SOC priming. Our experiment produced three main results: (1) switchgrass cultivars differentially influenced soil C availability across the soil profile; (2) small differences in soil C availability derived from recent root C inputs did not affect the impact of exudate-C additions on priming; but (3) priming was greater in soils from shallow depths (relatively high total soil C and high ratio of labile-to-stable C) compared to soils from deep depths (relatively low total soil C and low ratio of labile-to-stable C). These findings suggest that the magnitude of the priming effect is affected, in part, by the ratio of root exudate C inputs to total soil C and that the impact of changes in exudate inputs on

  7. Climatic, edaphic, and biotic controls over storage and turnover of carbon in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimel, David S.; Braswell, B. H.; Holland, Elisabeth A.; McKeown, Rebecca; Ojima, D. S.; Painter, Thomas H.; Parton, William J.; Townsend, Alan R.

    1994-09-01

    Soil carbon, a major component of the global carbon inventory, has significant potential for change with changing climate and human land use. We applied the Century ecosystem model to a series of forest and grassland sites distributed globally to examine large-scale controls over soil carbon. Key site-specific parameters influencing soil carbon dynamics are soil texture and foliar lignin content; accordingly, we perturbed these variables at each site to establish a range of carbon concentrations and turnover times. We examined the simulated soil carbon stores, turnover times, and C:N ratios for correlations with patterns of independent variables. Results showed that soil carbon is related linearly to soil texture, increasing as clay content increases, that soil carbon stores and turnover time are related to mean annual temperature by negative exponential functions, and that heterotrophic respiration originates from recent detritus (˜50%), microbial turnover (˜30%), and soil organic matter (˜20%) with modest variations between forest and grassland ecosystems. The effect of changing temperature on soil organic carbon (SOC) estimated by Century is dSOC/dT= 183e-0.034T. Global extrapolation of this relationship leads to an estimated sensitivity of soil C storage to a temperature of -11.1 Pg° C-1, excluding extreme arid and organic soils. In Century, net primary production (NPP) and soil carbon are closely coupled through the N cycle, so that as temperatures increase, accelerated N release first results in fertilization responses, increasing C inputs. The Century-predicted effect of temperature on carbon storage is modified by as much as 100% by the N cycle feedback. Century-estimated soil C sensitivity (-11.1 Pg° C-1) is similar to losses predicted with a simple data-based calculation (-14.1 Pg° C-1). Inclusion of the N cycle is important for even first-order predictions of terrestrial carbon balance. If the NPP-SOC feedback is disrupted by land use or other

  8. Associations between soil carbon and ecological landscape drivers at escalating spatial scales in Florida, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spatial distribution of soil carbon (C) is controlled by ecological landscape processes that evolve over a range of spatial scales. Soil C patterns derive from a number of interacting ecological processes, some of which more dominant than others, depending on the landscape conditions. The spatia...

  9. Exploring the multiplicity of soil-human interactions: organic carbon content, agro-forest landscapes and the Italian local communities.

    PubMed

    Salvati, Luca; Barone, Pier Matteo; Ferrara, Carlotta

    2015-05-01

    Topsoil organic carbon (TOC) and soil organic carbon (SOC) are fundamental in the carbon cycle influencing soil functions and attributes. Many factors have effects on soil carbon content such as climate, parent material, land topography and the human action including agriculture, which sometimes caused a severe loss in soil carbon content. This has resulted in a significant differentiation in TOC or SOC at the continental scale due to the different territorial and socioeconomic conditions. The present study proposes an exploratory data analysis assessing the relationship between the spatial distribution of soil organic carbon and selected socioeconomic attributes at the local scale in Italy with the aim to provide differentiated responses for a more sustainable use of land. A strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis contributed to understand the effectiveness of local communities responses for an adequate comprehension of the role of soil as carbon sink.

  10. Benchmarking the inelastic neutron scattering soil carbon method

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The herein described inelastic neutron scattering (INS) method of measuring soil carbon was based on a new procedure for extracting the net carbon signal (NCS) from the measured gamma spectra and determination of the average carbon weight percent (AvgCw%) in the upper soil layer (~8 cm). The NCS ext...

  11. [Effect of reclaimed water irrigation on soil properties and vertical distribution of heavy metal].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zong-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ping; Jiao, Wen-Tao; Wang, Mei-E

    2012-12-01

    Utilization of reclaimed water is one of the important methods to alleviate water shortage. The effect of reclaimed water irrigation on soil is always a concern. To understand the effect of long time reclaimed water irrigation on soil, typical farmland irrigated with reused water was selected. Soil properties and heavy metal concentration of soil and water samples were analyzed to identify the effect of the irrigation on heavy metal vertical distribution and organic matter content, total carbon, total nitrogen and pH value in soil. The results show that heavy metal contents of irrigation water used in Liangshuihe farmland are 2.5 to 10.5 times higher than that of Beiyechang farmland, and reclaimed water irrigation could cause changes of soil properties that soil organic matter content, total carbon, total nitrogen were increased and pH values were reduced. Based on the field investigation results, the soil nutrient conditions benefit from irrigate reclaimed water, however, the accumulation of heavy metal in soil could raise the risk. As a source of soil heavy metal, reclaimed water irrigation could make differences on the accumulation and mobility of soil heavy metal. Also the distribution and mobility of soil heavy metal are influenced by soil organic matter content and there are more heavy metal were taken up by plants or transferred to the deeper area in Liangshuihe farmland.

  12. Remediation of Contaminated Soils By Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, A.; Zanetti, M. C.; Banchero, M.; Fiore, S.; Manna, L.

    superficial velocity of the supercritical carbon dioxide; therefore, the mass transfer resistance can be reduced increasing such velocity. In this work, higher values of superficial velocity were investigated. The experimental apparatus includes a pump, an extraction vessel, an adjustable restrictor and a trap to collect the extracted substance. Liquid carbon dioxide coming from a cylinder with a dip-tube is cooled by a cryostatic bath and then it is compressed by a pneumatic drive pump (the max- imum available pressure is 69 MPa). Subsequently, the pressurised current flows into 1 a heating coil and then into the extraction vessel, which is contained in a stove; the outlet flow is depressurised in an adjustable restrictor and the extracted substance is collected in a trap by dissolution into a solvent. The extracted naphthalene quantity was obtained by weighting the solvent and measuring the naphthalene concentration with a gas chromatograph. The soil sample is a sandy soil geologically representative of the North of Italy that was sampled and physically and chemically characterized: particle-size distribution analysis, diffractometric analysis, Cation Exchange Capac- ity, Total Organic Carbon, iron content and manganese content in order to evaluate the potential sorption degree. The soil was artificially polluted by means of a naphta- lene and methylene chloride solution. The experimental work consists in a number of naphthalene extractions from the spiked soil, that were carried out at different operat- ing conditions, temperature, pressure and flow rate by means of supercritical carbon dioxide evaluating the corresponding recovery efficiencies. The results obtained were analysed and compared in order to determine which parameters influence the system. [1] G. A. Montero, T.D. Giorgio, and K. B. Schnelle, Jr..Removal of Hazardous ,1994, Contaminants form Soils by Supercritical Fluid Extraction. Innovations in Supercriti- cal Fluids. ACS Symposium Series, 608, 280-197. 2

  13. Atmospheric (210)Pb as a tracer for soil organic carbon transport in a coniferous forest.

    PubMed

    Teramage, Mengistu T; Onda, Yuichi; Wakiyama, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hiroaki; Kanda, Takashi; Tamura, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Core soils and falling litter samples were collected in a Japanese cypress forest (Chamaecyparis obtusa) to determine the litter-fed (210)Pbex and organic carbon transfer from the forest canopy to soil and their subsequent distribution. Of the canopy residing (210)Pbex pool, litterfall annually transports 53% to the forest floor while it adds 117 g m(-2) per year of organic carbon to the forest soil, implying that litterfall dynamics can influence the distribution of (210)Pbex and soil organic carbon (SOC). (210)Pbex and SOC showed identical profile shapes and strong correlation in spatial as well as along the soil depth, indicating that both are affected by a similar process. Given the ubiquitous natural source of (210)Pbex, it is plausible to infer that radiolead can be a possible tracer to study the SOC redistribution at regional and global scales.

  14. Carbon Dynamics in Vegetation and Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumbore, Susan; Chambers, Jeffrey Q.; Camargo, Plinio; Martinelli, Luiz; Santos, Joaquim

    2005-01-01

    The overall goals of CD-08 team in Phase I were to quantify the contributions of different components of the carbon cycle to overall ecosystem carbon balance in Amazonian tropical forests and to undertake process studies at a number of sites along the eastern LBA transect to understand how and why these fluxes vary with site, season, and year. We divided this work into a number of specific tasks: (1) determining the average rate (and variability) of tree growth over the past 3 decades; (2) determining age demographics of tree populations, using radiocarbon to determine tree age; (3) assessing the rate of production and decomposition of dead wood debris; (4) determining turnover rates for organic matter in soils and the mean age of C respired from soil using radiocarbon measurements; and (5) comparing our results with models and constructing models to predict the potential of tropical forests to function as sources or sinks of C. This report summarizes the considerable progress made towards our original goals, which have led to increased understanding of the potential for central Amazon forests to act as sources or sinks of carbon with altered productivity. The overall picture of tropical forest C dynamics emerging from our Phase I studies suggests that the fraction of gross primary production allocated to growth in these forests is only 25-30%, as opposed to the 50% assumed by many ecosystem models. Consequent slow tree growth rates mean greater mean tree age for a given diameter, as reflected in our measurements and models of tree age. Radiocarbon measurements in leaf and root litter suggest that carbon stays in living tree biomass for several years up to a decade before being added to soils, where decomposition is rapid. The time lags predicted from 14C, when coupled with climate variation on similar time scales, can lead to significant interannual variation in net ecosystem C exchange.

  15. Different tree species affect soil respiration spatial distribution in a subtropical forest of southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Yu, Jui-Chu; Wang, Ya-nan; Lai, Yen-Jen

    2014-05-01

    Global forests contain 69% of total carbon stored in forest soil and litter. But the carbon storage ability and release rate of warming gases of forest soil also affect global climate change. Soil carbon cycling processes are paid much attention by ecological scientists and policy makers because of the possibility of carbon being stored in soil via land use management. Soil respiration contributed large part of terrestrial carbon flux, but the relationship of soil respiration and climate change was still obscurity. Most of soil respiration researches focus on template and tropical area, little was known that in subtropical area. Afforestation is one of solutions to mitigate CO2 increase and to sequestrate CO2 in tree and soil. Therefore, the objective of this study is to clarify the relationship of tree species and soil respiration distribution in subtropical broad-leaves plantation in southern Taiwan. The research site located on southern Taiwan was sugarcane farm before 2002. The sugarcane was removed and fourteen broadleaved tree species were planted in 2002-2005. Sixteen plots (250m*250m) were set on 1 km2 area, each plot contained 4 subplots (170m2). The forest biomass (i.e. tree height, DBH) understory biomass, litter, and soil C were measured and analyzed at 2011 to 2012. Soil respiration measurement was sampled in each subplot in each month. The soil belongs to Entisol with over 60% of sandstone. The soil pH is 5.5 with low base cations because of high sand percentage. Soil carbon storage showed significantly negative relationship with soil bulk density (p<0.001) in research site. The differences of distribution of live tree C pool among 16 plots were affected by growth characteristic of tree species. Data showed that the accumulation amount of litterfall was highest in December to February and lowest in June. Different tree species planted in 16 plots, resulting in high spatial variation of litterfall amount. It also affected total amount of litterfall

  16. Quantification of soil organic carbon sequestration potential in cropland: a model approach.

    PubMed

    Qin, ZhangCai; Huang, Yao

    2010-07-01

    Agroecosystems have a critical role in the terrestrial carbon cycling process. Soil organic carbon (SOC) in cropland is of great importance for mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide increases and for global food security. With an understanding of soil carbon saturation, we analyzed the datasets from 95 global long-term agricultural experiments distributed across a vast area spanning wide ranges of temperate, subtropical and tropical climates. We then developed a statistical model for estimating SOC sequestration potential in cropland. The model is driven by air temperature, precipitation, soil clay content and pH, and explains 58% of the variation in the observed soil carbon saturation (n=76). Model validation using independent data observed in China yielded a correlation coefficient R (2) of 0.74 (n=19, P<0.001). Model sensitivity analysis suggested that soils with high clay content and low pH in the cold, humid regions possess a larger carbon sequestration potential than other soils. As a case study, we estimated the SOC sequestration potential by applying the model in Henan Province. Model estimations suggested that carbon (C) density at the saturation state would reach an average of 32 t C ha(-1) in the top 0-20 cm soil depth. Using SOC density in the 1990s as a reference, cropland soils in Henan Province are expected to sequester an additional 100 Tg C in the future.

  17. Microbial carbon recycling: an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-07-01

    The mean residence times (MRT) of different compound classes of soil organic matter (SOM) do not match their inherent recalcitrance to decomposition. One reason for this is the stabilisation within the soil matrix, but recycling, i.e. the reuse of "old" organic material to form new biomass may also play a role as it uncouples the residence times of organic matter from the lifetime of discrete molecules in soil. We analysed soil sugar dynamics in a natural 30 years old labelling experiment after a~wheat-maize vegetation change to determine the extent of recycling and stabilisation in plant and microbial derived sugars: while plant derived sugars are only affected by stabilisation processes, microbial sugars may be subject to both, stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the dynamics of soil sugars, we separated different density fractions (free particulate organic matter (fPOM), light occluded particulate organic matter (≤1.6 g cm-3; oPOM1.6), dense occluded particulate organic matter (≤2 g cm-3; oPOM2) and mineral-associated organic matter (>2 g cm-3; Mineral)) of a~silty loam under long term wheat and maize cultivation. The isotopic signature of sugars was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS), after hydrolysis with 4 M Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). While apparent mean residence times (MRT) of sugars were comparable to total organic carbon in the bulk soil and mineral fraction, the apparent MRT of sugars in the oPOM fractions were considerably lower than those of the total carbon of these fractions. This indicates that oPOM formation was fuelled by microbial activity feeding on new plant input. In the bulk soil, mean residence times of the mainly plant derived xylose (xyl) were significantly lower than those of mainly microbial derived sugars like galactose (gal), rhamnose (rha), fucose (fuc), indicating that recycling of organic matter is an important factor regulating organic matter dynamics

  18. Effect of activated carbon on microbial bioavailability of phenanthrene in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Hunter, W.; Tao, S.; Crowley, D.; Gan, J.

    2009-11-15

    Bioavailability is a governing factor that controls the rate of biological degradation of hydrophobic organic contaminants in soil. Among the solid phases that can adsorb hydrophobic organic contaminants in soil, black carbon (BC) exerts a particularly significant effect on phase distribution. However, knowledge on the effect of BC on the microbial availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil is still limited. In the present study, the effect of a coal-derived activated carbon on the bioavailability of phenanthrene (PHE) during its degradation by Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 was measured in three soils. The freely dissolved concentration of PHE was concurrently determined in soil solutions using disposable polydimethylsiloxane fibers. The results showed that PHE mineralization was significantly inhibited after addition of activated carbon in all test soils. After 216 h, only 5.20, 5.83, and 6.85% of PHE was degraded in the 0.5% BC-amended soils initially containing organic carbon at 0.23, 2.1, and 7.1%, respectively. Significant correlation was found between PHE degradability and freely dissolved concentration, suggesting that BC affected PHE bioavailability by decreasing chemical activity. The effect of activated carbon in the amended soils was attributed to its enhancement of soil surface areas and pore volumes. Results from the present study clearly highlighted the importance of BC for influencing the microbial availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils.

  19. Aggregate formation and soil carbon sequestration by earthworms at the ORNL FACE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-de Leon, Y.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.; Lugo-Perez, J.; Wise, D. H.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Earthworms have an important role in soil carbon sequestration, but their contribution to carbon sequestration in soils exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations has been largely overlooked. Previous studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Free Air CO2 Experiment (ORNL FACE) site showed that the formation of soil aggregates is a key mechanism for soil carbon sequestration. We did a microcosm experiment to quantify earthworm-mediated aggregate formation and compare between two earthworm species with different feeding habits (endogeic vs. epi-edogeic). In addition, we wanted to identify the carbon source (soil, leaf litter or root litter) within aggregates formed by earthworms. We used 13C-depleted soil and 15N-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) leaf and root litter collected from the ORNL FACE site to assess soil aggregate formation of the native, endogeic earthworm Diplocardia sp. and European, epi-endogeic earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. Both earthworm species are present at the ORNL FACE site. We crushed, sieved (< 250 μm) soil and prepared four treatments: (I) soil only; (II) soil and plant material; (III) soil, plant material and Diplocardia sp.; (IV) soil, plant material and L. rubellus. All treatments were at 30% water content and temperature was maintained at 20°C. The incubation period lasted 26 days. We measured aggregate size distribution, total aggregate carbon content and 13C and 15N to elucidate aggregate carbon source. Newly formed soil macroaggregates (> 250 μm) were higher in treatments with earthworms (III and IV) than in treatments without earthworms (I and II) (p = 0.02). Within macroaggregates, most of the carbon was soil-derived. Leaf and root-derived carbon was found in treatment IV only. Our results suggest that earthworms at the ORNL FACE site directly contribute to the formation of soil aggregates, thus contributing to soil carbon sequestration. Carbon source within macroaggregates correspond with earthworm feeding

  20. Determining Total Soil Carbon Storage in the Critical Zone Using Topography and Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, N. R.; Lohse, K. A.; Seyfried, M. S.; Crosby, B. T.; Godsey, S.

    2015-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions comprise over 41% of the terrestrial ecosystems on Earth and are considered to be one of the most susceptible to environmental change. Estimating the amount and distribution of soil carbon in these regions is challenging due to their high degree of spatial heterogeneity. We aim to develop a total soil carbon model using tangential curvature, total mobile regolith depth, and aspect in order to predict the distribution of soil carbon in complex terrain within a semi-arid environment. We excavated 45 randomly selected soil pits down to saprolite in a first order watershed within the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory located in Southwestern Idaho. Total mobile regolith depth was measured vertically and plotted against tangential curvature to produce an inverse linear relationship function, predicting soil depth to an r2 value of 0.86. Soil depths were plotted against total soil carbon for both the north and south-facing aspects. A quadratic polynomial function fit well with r2 values of 0.90 and 0.89, respectively. Across the watershed, total soil carbon on the north-facing aspect was 8.02 x1011 Kg C or ~38% of the total soil carbon, despite comprising only ~33% of the total land area. South-facing aspect totaled 9.87 x1011 Kg C, or ~46% of the total soil carbon. East and west aspects were excluded. If samples were collected to a maximum depth of 1 m, total soil carbon would be underestimated by ~1.6 times the amount that we predict (1.31 x1012 to 2.12 x1012 Kg C, respectively). By sampling down to saprolite, our model has the potential to provide more accurate total carbon pools than other models, which focus only on the upper 1 m of soil. Our findings indicate that a significant amount of carbon is stored deep in critical zone that may be less sensitive to loss and that estimates of soil carbon significantly underestimate total soil carbon stores on complex terrain.

  1. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  2. Effect of management and soil moisture regimes on wetland soils total carbon and nitrogen in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiri, Hellen; Kreye, Christine; Becker, Mathias

    2013-04-01

    Wetland soils play an important role as storage compartments for water, carbon and nutrients. These soils implies various conditions, depending on the water regimes that affect several important microbial and physical-chemical processes which in turn influence the transformation of organic and inorganic components of nitrogen, carbon, soil acidity and other nutrients. Particularly, soil carbon and nitrogen play an important role in determining the productivity of a soil whereas management practices could determine the rate and magnitude of nutrient turnover. A study was carried out in a floodplain wetland planted with rice in North-west Tanzania- East Africa to determine the effects of different management practices and soil water regimes on paddy soil organic carbon and nitrogen. Four management treatments were compared: (i) control (non weeded plots); (ii) weeded plots; (iii) N fertilized plots, and (iv) non-cropped (non weeded plots). Two soil moisture regimes included soil under field capacity (rainfed conditions) and continuous water logging compared side-by-side. Soil were sampled at the start and end of the rice cropping seasons from the two fields differentiated by moisture regimes during the wet season 2012. The soils differed in the total organic carbon and nitrogen between the treatments. Soil management including weeding and fertilization is seen to affect soil carbon and nitrogen regardless of the soil moisture conditions. Particularly, the padddy soils were higher in the total organic carbon under continuous water logged field. These findings are preliminary and a more complete understanding of the relationships between management and soil moisture on the temporal changes of soil properties is required before making informed decisions on future wetland soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Keywords: Management, nitrogen, paddy soil, total carbon, Tanzania,

  3. [Effects of land use type on soil organic carbon storage in aquic brown soil].

    PubMed

    Yu, Wan-Tai; Jiang, Zi-Shao; Li, Xin-Yu; Ding, Huai-Xiang

    2007-12-01

    The profile distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC), its storage, and carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio at the depth of 0-100 cm under different land use types were investigated in this paper. The results showed that the profile distribution of SOC varied significantly with land use type. The SOC contents in each soil layer in forestland, mowing land and wasteland were all higher than that in agricultural land. In all land use types, SOC was significantly correlated with soil total N. Soil C/N ratio generally decreased with depth, which was higher in forestland than in mowing land, wasteland and bare land, and was the lowest in agricultural land. At the depth of 0-100 cm, the annual sequestration of SOC in wasteland was 4.52, 4.25, 4.46 and 3.58 t x hm(-2) more than that in farmland with no fertilization, farmland with recycled manure application, farmland with N, P and K fertilization, and farmland with the application of both recycled manure and N, P and K, respectively, suggesting that wasteland had a great potential in increasing SOC storage.

  4. Quantifying global soil carbon losses in response to warming.

    PubMed

    Crowther, T W; Todd-Brown, K E O; Rowe, C W; Wieder, W R; Carey, J C; Machmuller, M B; Snoek, B L; Fang, S; Zhou, G; Allison, S D; Blair, J M; Bridgham, S D; Burton, A J; Carrillo, Y; Reich, P B; Clark, J S; Classen, A T; Dijkstra, F A; Elberling, B; Emmett, B A; Estiarte, M; Frey, S D; Guo, J; Harte, J; Jiang, L; Johnson, B R; Kröel-Dulay, G; Larsen, K S; Laudon, H; Lavallee, J M; Luo, Y; Lupascu, M; Ma, L N; Marhan, S; Michelsen, A; Mohan, J; Niu, S; Pendall, E; Peñuelas, J; Pfeifer-Meister, L; Poll, C; Reinsch, S; Reynolds, L L; Schmidt, I K; Sistla, S; Sokol, N W; Templer, P H; Treseder, K K; Welker, J M; Bradford, M A

    2016-11-30

    The majority of the Earth's terrestrial carbon is stored in the soil. If anthropogenic warming stimulates the loss of this carbon to the atmosphere, it could drive further planetary warming. Despite evidence that warming enhances carbon fluxes to and from the soil, the net global balance between these responses remains uncertain. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of warming-induced changes in soil carbon stocks by assembling data from 49 field experiments located across North America, Europe and Asia. We find that the effects of warming are contingent on the size of the initial soil carbon stock, with considerable losses occurring in high-latitude areas. By extrapolating this empirical relationship to the global scale, we provide estimates of soil carbon sensitivity to warming that may help to constrain Earth system model projections. Our empirical relationship suggests that global soil carbon stocks in the upper soil horizons will fall by 30 ± 30 petagrams of carbon to 203 ± 161 petagrams of carbon under one degree of warming, depending on the rate at which the effects of warming are realized. Under the conservative assumption that the response of soil carbon to warming occurs within a year, a business-as-usual climate scenario would drive the loss of 55 ± 50 petagrams of carbon from the upper soil horizons by 2050. This value is around 12-17 per cent of the expected anthropogenic emissions over this period. Despite the considerable uncertainty in our estimates, the direction of the global soil carbon response is consistent across all scenarios. This provides strong empirical support for the idea that rising temperatures will stimulate the net loss of soil carbon to the atmosphere, driving a positive land carbon-climate feedback that could accelerate climate change.

  5. Quantifying global soil carbon losses in response to warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, T. W.; Todd-Brown, K. E. O.; Rowe, C. W.; Wieder, W. R.; Carey, J. C.; Machmuller, M. B.; Snoek, B. L.; Fang, S.; Zhou, G.; Allison, S. D.; Blair, J. M.; Bridgham, S. D.; Burton, A. J.; Carrillo, Y.; Reich, P. B.; Clark, J. S.; Classen, A. T.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Elberling, B.; Emmett, B. A.; Estiarte, M.; Frey, S. D.; Guo, J.; Harte, J.; Jiang, L.; Johnson, B. R.; Kröel-Dulay, G.; Larsen, K. S.; Laudon, H.; Lavallee, J. M.; Luo, Y.; Lupascu, M.; Ma, L. N.; Marhan, S.; Michelsen, A.; Mohan, J.; Niu, S.; Pendall, E.; Peñuelas, J.; Pfeifer-Meister, L.; Poll, C.; Reinsch, S.; Reynolds, L. L.; Schmidt, I. K.; Sistla, S.; Sokol, N. W.; Templer, P. H.; Treseder, K. K.; Welker, J. M.; Bradford, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    The majority of the Earth’s terrestrial carbon is stored in the soil. If anthropogenic warming stimulates the loss of this carbon to the atmosphere, it could drive further planetary warming. Despite evidence that warming enhances carbon fluxes to and from the soil, the net global balance between these responses remains uncertain. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of warming-induced changes in soil carbon stocks by assembling data from 49 field experiments located across North America, Europe and Asia. We find that the effects of warming are contingent on the size of the initial soil carbon stock, with considerable losses occurring in high-latitude areas. By extrapolating this empirical relationship to the global scale, we provide estimates of soil carbon sensitivity to warming that may help to constrain Earth system model projections. Our empirical relationship suggests that global soil carbon stocks in the upper soil horizons will fall by 30 ± 30 petagrams of carbon to 203 ± 161 petagrams of carbon under one degree of warming, depending on the rate at which the effects of warming are realized. Under the conservative assumption that the response of soil carbon to warming occurs within a year, a business-as-usual climate scenario would drive the loss of 55 ± 50 petagrams of carbon from the upper soil horizons by 2050. This value is around 12-17 per cent of the expected anthropogenic emissions over this period. Despite the considerable uncertainty in our estimates, the direction of the global soil carbon response is consistent across all scenarios. This provides strong empirical support for the idea that rising temperatures will stimulate the net loss of soil carbon to the atmosphere, driving a positive land carbon-climate feedback that could accelerate climate change.

  6. Plant functional traits and soil carbon sequestration in contrasting biomes.

    PubMed

    De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Bardgett, Richard D

    2008-05-01

    Plant functional traits control a variety of terrestrial ecosystem processes, including soil carbon storage which is a key component of the global carbon cycle. Plant traits regulate net soil carbon storage by controlling carbon assimilation, its transfer and storage in belowground biomass, and its release from soil through respiration, fire and leaching. However, our mechanistic understanding of these processes is incomplete. Here, we present a mechanistic framework, based on the plant traits that drive soil carbon inputs and outputs, for understanding how alteration of vegetation composition will affect soil carbon sequestration under global changes. First, we show direct and indirect plant trait effects on soil carbon input and output through autotrophs and heterotrophs, and through modification of abiotic conditions, which need to be considered to determine the local carbon sequestration potential. Second, we explore how the composition of key plant traits and soil biota related to carbon input, release and storage prevail in different biomes across the globe, and address the biome-specific mechanisms by which plant trait composition may impact on soil carbon sequestration. We propose that a trait-based approach will help to develop strategies to preserve and promote carbon sequestration.

  7. Chemistry of organic carbon in soil with relationship to the global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Post, W.M. III )

    1988-09-01

    Soil organic carbon in active exchange with the atmosphere constitutes approximately two-thirds of the carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. The large size and long residence time of this pool make it an important component of the global carbon cycle. The amount of carbon stored in soils and the rate of exchange of soil carbon with the atmosphere depends on many factors related to the chemistry of soil organic matter. The amount of carbon stored in soil is determined by the balance of two biotic processes associated with productivity of terrestrial vegetation and decomposition of organic matter. Each of these processes have strong physical controls that can be related to the climate variables temperature and precipitation at a regional or global scale. Soil carbon density generally increases with increasing precipitation, and there is an increase in soil carbon with decreasing temperature for any particular level of precipitation. Various ecosystem disturbances alter the balances between production and decomposition and therefore change the amount of carbon in soil. The most severe perturbation is conversion of natural vegetation to cultivation. The amount of soil carbon and nitrogen change resulting from cultivation depends on the initial amounts of each. Average changes in nitrogen are about one half to one forth the corresponding average carbon changes. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen linkages in soil shed some light on soil carbon dynamics after conversion to agriculture. The amount of initial carbon lost is associated with the amount of carbon in excess of C/N ratio of about 12 to 14. Soils with a high C/N ratio lose a larger fraction of the initial carbon then those with low C/N ratios. Soils with high C/N ratios have a larger percentage of organic matter in slowly decomposing forms. Cultivation results in a lowered input of slowly decomposing material which causes a reduction in overall carbon levels.

  8. The International Soil Carbon Network: data synthesis and community development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanston, C.; Nave, L. E.; ISCN Scientific Steering Group

    2013-05-01

    The International Soil Carbon Network (ISCN) is a collaborative effort to improve understanding of carbon dynamics in soils, including the spatial and temporal distribution and vulnerability of carbon forms. Many agencies, institutions, groups and individuals pursue these issues and share similar goals, yet differences in methods, scales of investigation, products and world views within this broader community create a challenging environment for unified scientific progress. The ISCN, which began in the US as the National Soil Carbon Network in 2009, responded to interest within the scientific community and in 2012 initiated collaborations with several international scientific efforts, changing not only its name but also the scope of its activities and the representation in its steering group. The flagship of the Network is a dynamic, geo-referenced database of 41,000 soil profiles, contributed by agency and academic sources, which is available to the community for primary research, synthesis, and validation. The database shares infrastructure with the fluxdata.org domain and features online data browsing, upload/download functionalities, and map-based data access. A robust Fair Use Policy emphasizes giving credit to data contributors, providing metadata in addition to data, and giving contributors control over when their data become visible or public. A variety of past, ongoing and planned contributions to the database derive from focused scientific groups with data synthesis and access needs; the dynamic nature of the database allows addition of new variables and other capacities to meet the unique approaches of specific user groups. As the ISCN expands, we hope to learn about the needs of interested communities and how we might meet those needs. In doing so, we hope to avoid duplicated investment even as we increase the "lifetime" and reach of data and use the database to foster recognition and new collaboration.

  9. Estimating Soil Organic Carbon Stocks and Spatial Patterns with Statistical and GIS-Based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Junjun; Jing, Changwei; Lin, Shengpan; Zhang, Cao; Liu, Qiankun; DeGloria, Stephen D.; Wu, Jiaping

    2014-01-01

    Accurately quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered fundamental to studying soil quality, modeling the global carbon cycle, and assessing global climate change. This study evaluated the uncertainties caused by up-scaling of soil properties from the county scale to the provincial scale and from lower-level classification of Soil Species to Soil Group, using four methods: the mean, median, Soil Profile Statistics (SPS), and pedological professional knowledge based (PKB) methods. For the SPS method, SOC stock is calculated at the county scale by multiplying the mean SOC density value of each soil type in a county by its corresponding area. For the mean or median method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated using provincial arithmetic mean or median. For the PKB method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated at the county scale considering soil parent materials and spatial locations of all soil profiles. A newly constructed 1∶50,000 soil survey geographic database of Zhejiang Province, China, was used for evaluation. Results indicated that with soil classification levels up-scaling from Soil Species to Soil Group, the variation of estimated SOC stocks among different soil classification levels was obviously lower than that among different methods. The difference in the estimated SOC stocks among the four methods was lowest at the Soil Species level. The differences in SOC stocks among the mean, median, and PKB methods for different Soil Groups resulted from the differences in the procedure of aggregating soil profile properties to represent the attributes of one soil type. Compared with the other three estimation methods (i.e., the SPS, mean and median methods), the PKB method holds significant promise for characterizing spatial differences in SOC distribution because spatial locations of all soil profiles are considered during the aggregation procedure. PMID:24840890

  10. Estimating soil organic carbon stocks and spatial patterns with statistical and GIS-based methods.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Junjun; Jing, Changwei; Lin, Shengpan; Zhang, Cao; Liu, Qiankun; DeGloria, Stephen D; Wu, Jiaping

    2014-01-01

    Accurately quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered fundamental to studying soil quality, modeling the global carbon cycle, and assessing global climate change. This study evaluated the uncertainties caused by up-scaling of soil properties from the county scale to the provincial scale and from lower-level classification of Soil Species to Soil Group, using four methods: the mean, median, Soil Profile Statistics (SPS), and pedological professional knowledge based (PKB) methods. For the SPS method, SOC stock is calculated at the county scale by multiplying the mean SOC density value of each soil type in a county by its corresponding area. For the mean or median method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated using provincial arithmetic mean or median. For the PKB method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated at the county scale considering soil parent materials and spatial locations of all soil profiles. A newly constructed 1∶50,000 soil survey geographic database of Zhejiang Province, China, was used for evaluation. Results indicated that with soil classification levels up-scaling from Soil Species to Soil Group, the variation of estimated SOC stocks among different soil classification levels was obviously lower than that among different methods. The difference in the estimated SOC stocks among the four methods was lowest at the Soil Species level. The differences in SOC stocks among the mean, median, and PKB methods for different Soil Groups resulted from the differences in the procedure of aggregating soil profile properties to represent the attributes of one soil type. Compared with the other three estimation methods (i.e., the SPS, mean and median methods), the PKB method holds significant promise for characterizing spatial differences in SOC distribution because spatial locations of all soil profiles are considered during the aggregation procedure.

  11. Effect of soil type on distribution and bioaccessibility of metal contaminants in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi; Bowman, Mark; McLure, Stuart

    2012-11-01

    Shooting ranges from Department of Defence sites around Australia were investigated for extent of metal contamination. Shooting range soils contained concentrations ranging from 399 to 10,403 mg/kg Pb, 6.57 to 252 mg/kg Sb, 28.7 to 1250 mg/kg Cu, 5.63 to 153 mg/kg Zn, 1.35 to 8.8 mg/kg Ni and 3.08 to 15.8 mg/kg As. Metal(loid)s were primarily concentrated in the stop butt and the surface soil (0-10 cm). The distribution of contamination reflected firing activity, soil properties, climate and management practices. Climatic variations among sites in Australia are significant, with a temperate climate in the south and tropical climate with high rainfall in the north. Up to 8% of total Pb resided in soil fines (<0.075 mm), due to the fragmentation of bullets on impact. Distribution and bioaccessibility varied between each site. Acidic Townsville soil had the highest proportion of water extractable Pb at 10%, compared to the alkaline Murray Bridge with only 2% Pb water extractable. Soil properties such as CEC, pH and dissolved organic carbon influence mobility. This is reflected in the subsoil concentrations of Pb in Townsville and Darwin which are up to 30 and 46% of surface concentration in the subsoil respectively. Similarly bioaccessibility is influenced by soil properties and ranges from 46% in Townsville to 70% in Perth. Acidic pH promotes dissolution of secondary minerals and the downward movement of Pb in the profile. The secondary Pb minerals formed as a result of weathering in these soils were cerussite, hydrocerussite, pyromorphite, galena and anglesite. Copper oxide was also reported on fragments from bullet jackets. These results have implications for range management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Climate Warming Can Increase Soil Carbon Fluxes Without Decreasing Soil Carbon Stocks in Boreal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, S. E.; Benner, R. H.; Billings, S. A.; Edwards, K. A.; Philben, M. J.; Zhu, X.; Laganiere, J.

    2016-12-01

    Ecosystem C fluxes respond positively to climate warming, however, the net impact of changing C fluxes on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks over decadal scales remains unclear. Manipulative studies and global-scale observations have informed much of the existing knowledge of SOC responses to climate, providing insights on relatively short (e.g. days to years) and long (centuries to millennia) time scales, respectively. Natural climate gradient studies capture integrated ecosystem responses to climate on decadal time scales. Here we report the soil C reservoirs, fluxes into and out of those reservoirs, and the chemical composition of inputs and soil organic matter pools along a mesic boreal forest climate transect. The sites studied consist of similar forest composition, successional stage, and soil moisture but differ by 5.2°C mean annual temperature. Carbon fluxes through these boreal forest soils were greatest in the lowest latitude regions and indicate that enhanced C inputs can offset soil C losses with warming in these forests. Respiration rates increased by 55% and the flux of dissolved organic carbon from the organic to mineral soil horizons tripled across this climate gradient. The 2-fold increase in litterfall inputs to these soils coincided with a significant increase in the organic horizon C stock with warming, however, no significant difference in the surface mineral soil C stocks was observed. The younger mean age of the mineral soil C ( 70 versus 330 YBP) provided further evidence for the greater turnover of SOC in the warmer climate soils. In spite of these differences in mean radiocarbon age, mineral SOC exhibited chemical characteristics of highly decomposed material across all regions. In contrast with depth trends in soil OM diagenetic indices, diagenetic shifts with latitude were limited to increases in C:N and alkyl to O-alkyl ratios in the overlying organic horizons in the warmer relative to the colder regions. These data indicate that the

  13. Effects of different soil types in natural Mediterranean areas on soil organic carbon (SOC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requejo Silva, Ana; Lozano García, Beatriz; Parras Alcántara, Luis

    2017-04-01

    statement, the main goal of this work consists in establishing the vertical distribution in the profile of SOC and N concentrations and to quantify the SOC and N stocks affected by different soil types in a natural Mediterranean area, under the same land use (agroforestry system) and management (conventional tillage). This will allow to evaluate the soil quality. It was verified that SOC concentrations significantly decreased with depth in the majority of soil profiles for all soil groups under consideration. Leptosols are characterized by the highest concentration of soil organic carbon in the subsurface horizons as opposed to Cambisols which are defined by the lowest SOC concentration in depth. The SOC stock determined in the studied soil groups are 110. Mg. ha-1 for Fluvisols and 78.35 Mg.ha-1 for Regosols that can be caused by soil thickness. According to McLauchlan (2006), it cannot be found a strong relationship between clay content and organic carbon in the soil groups under study. REFERENCES IPPC: Climate Change 2007: the physical science basis, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge/New York, NY, 2007. IUSS Working Group WRB, 2006. World Reference base for soil resources 2006. World Soil Resources Report N° 103. FAO, Rome. Khaledian, Y., Kiani, F., Ebrahimi, S., Brevik, E.C., Aitkenhead-Peterson, J., 2016. Assessment and monitoring of soil degradation during land use change using multivariate analysis. Land Degrad. Dev. Doi: http:// dx.doi.org/10.1002/ldr.2541. Lozano-García, B., Parras-Alcántara, L., Cantudo-Pérez, M., 2016. Land use change effects on stratification and storage of soil carbon and nitrogen: Application to a Mediterranean nature reserve. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, 231, 105-113. McLauchlan, K.K., 2006. Effect of soil texture on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamic after cessation of agriculture. Geoderma 136, 289-299. Parras-Alcántara, L., Martín-Carrillo, M. and Lozano-García, B. Impacts of land use change in soil carbon and nitrogen

  14. Importance of vegetation distribution for future carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlström, A.; Xia, J.; Arneth, A.; Luo, Y.; Smith, B.

    2015-12-01

    Projections of future terrestrial carbon uptake vary greatly between simulations. Net primary production (NPP), wild fires, vegetation dynamics (including biome shifts) and soil decomposition constitute the main processes governing the response of the terrestrial carbon cycle in a changing climate. While primary production and soil respiration are relatively well studied and implemented in all global ecosystem models used to project the future land sink of CO2, vegetation dynamics are less studied and not always represented in global models. Here we used a detailed second generation dynamic global vegetation model with advanced representation of vegetation growth and mortality and the associated turnover and proven skill in predicting vegetation distribution and succession. We apply an emulator that describes the carbon flows and pools exactly as in simulations with the full model. The emulator simulates ecosystem dynamics in response to 13 different climate or Earth system model simulations from the CMIP5 ensemble under RCP8.5 radiative forcing at year 2085. We exchanged carbon cycle processes between these 13 simulations and investigate the changes predicted by the emulator. This method allowed us to partition the entire ensemble carbon uptake uncertainty into individual processes. We found that NPP, vegetation dynamics (including biome shifts, wild fires and mortality) and soil decomposition rates explained 49%, 17% and 33% respectively of uncertainties in modeled global C-uptake. Uncertainty due to vegetation dynamics was further partitioned into stand-clearing disturbances (16%), wild fires (0%), stand dynamics (7%), reproduction (10%) and biome shifts (67%) globally. We conclude that while NPP and soil decomposition rates jointly account for 83% of future climate induced C-uptake uncertainties, vegetation turnover and structure, dominated by shifts in vegetation distribution, represent a significant fraction globally and regionally (tropical forests: 40

  15. How will Shrub Expansion Impact Soil Carbon Sequestration in Arctic Tundra?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, C. I.; Holden, S. R.; He, Y.; Randerson, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest that plant productivity, and especially shrub abundance, is increasing in the Arctic in response to climate change. This greening is substantiated by increases in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, repeat photography and field observations. The implications of a greener Arctic on carbon sequestration by tundra ecosystems remain poorly understood. Here, we explore existing datasets of plant productivity and soil carbon stocks to quantify how greening, and in particular an expansion of woody shrubs, may translate to the sequestration of carbon in arctic soils. As an estimate of carbon storage in arctic tundra soils, we used the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database v2. As estimates of tundra type and productivity, we used the Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation map as well as the MODIS and Landsat Vegetation Continuous Fields, and MODIS GPP/NPP (MOD17) products. Preliminary findings suggest that in graminoid tundra and erect-shrub tundra higher shrub abundance is associated with greater soil carbon stocks. However, this relationship between shrub abundance and soil carbon is not apparent in prostrate-shrub tundra, or when comparing across graminoid tundra, erect-shrub tundra and prostrate-shrub tundra. Uncertainties originate from the extreme spatial (vertical and horizontal) heterogeneity of organic matter distribution in cryoturbated soils, the fact that (some) permafrost carbon stocks, e.g. yedoma, reflect previous rather than current vegetative cover, and small sample sizes, esp. in the High Arctic. Using Vegetation Continuous Fields and MODIS GPP/NPP (MOD17), we develop quantitative trajectories of soil carbon storage as a function of shrub cover and plant productivity in the Arctic (>60°N). We then compare our greening-derived carbon sequestration estimates to projected losses of carbon from thawing permafrost. Our findings will reduce uncertainties in the magnitude and timing of the carbon-climate feedback from the

  16. Multivariate distributions of soil hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wei; Pachepsky, Yakov; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Martinez, Gonzalo; Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    Statistical distributions of soil hydraulic parameters have to be known when synthetic fields of soil hydraulic properties need to be generated in ensemble modeling of soil water dynamics and soil water content data assimilation. Pedotransfer functions that provide statistical distributions of water retention and hydraulic conductivity parameters for textural classes are most often used in the parameter field generation. Presence of strong correlations can substantially influence the parameter generation results. The objective of this work was to review and evaluate available data on correlations between van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model parameters. So far, two different approaches were developed to estimate these correlations. The first approach uses pedotransfer functions to generate VGM parameters for a large number of soil compositions within a textural class, and then computes parameter correlations for each of the textural classes. The second approach computes the VGM parameter correlations directly from parameter values obtained by fitting VGM model to measured water retention and hydraulic conductivity data for soil samples belonging to a textural class. Carsel and Parish (1988) used the Rawls et al. (1982) pedotransfer functions, and Meyer et al. (1997) used the Rosetta pedotransfer algorithms (Schaap, 2002) to develop correlations according to the first approach. We used the UNSODA database (Nemes et al. 2001), the US Southern Plains database (Timlin et al., 1999), and the Belgian database (Vereecken et al., 1989, 1990) to apply the second approach. A substantial number of considerable (>0.7) correlation coefficients were found. Large differences were encountered between parameter correlations obtained with different approaches and different databases for the same textural classes. The first of the two approaches resulted in generally higher values of correlation coefficients between VGM parameters. However, results of the first approach application depend

  17. Total organic carbon in aggregates as a soil recovery indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciene Maltoni, Katia; Rodrigues Cassiolato, Ana Maria; Amorim Faria, Glaucia; Dubbin, William

    2015-04-01

    The soil aggregation promotes physical protection of organic matter, preservation of which is crucial to improve soil structure, fertility and ensure the agro-ecosystems sustainability. The no-tillage cultivation system has been considered as one of the strategies to increase total soil organic carbono (TOC) contents and soil aggregation, both are closely related and influenced by soil management systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of soil aggregates and the total organic carbon inside aggregates, with regard to soil recovery, under 3 different soil management systems, i.e. 10 and 20 years of no-tillage cultivation as compared with soil under natural vegetation (Cerrado). Undisturbed soils (0-5; 5-10; and 10-20 cm depth) were collected from Brazil, Central Region. The soils, Oxisols from Cerrado, were collected from a field under Natural Vegetation-Cerrado (NV), and from fields that were under conventional tillage since 1970s, and 10 and 20 years ago were changed to no-tillage cultivation system (NT-10; NT-20 respectively). The undisturbed samples were sieved (4mm) and the aggregates retained were further fractionated by wet sieving through five sieves (2000, 1000, 500, 250, and 50 μm) with the aggregates distribution expressed as percentage retained by each sieve. The TOC was determined, for each aggregate size, by combustion (Thermo-Finnigan). A predominance of aggregates >2000 μm was observed under NV treatment (92, 91, 82 %), NT-10 (64, 73, 61 %), and NT-20 (71, 79, 63 %) for all three depths (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm). In addition greater quantities of aggregates in sizes 1000, 500, 250 and 50 μm under NT-10 and NT-20 treatments, explain the lower aggregate stability under these treatments compared to the soil under NV. The organic C concentration for NV in aggregates >2000 μm was 24,4; 14,2; 8,7 mg/g for each depth (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm, respectively), higher than in aggregates sized 250-50 μm (7,2; 5,5; 4,4 mg/g) for all depths

  18. Distribution of Cd, Ni, Cr and Pb in sewage sludge amended soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfeliu, Teófilo

    2010-05-01

    Restoration of degraded soils with organic wastes could be a feasible practice to minimise erosion in the Mediterranean area. Today the use of sewage sludge to improve the nutrient contents of a soil is a common practice. Contamination of soils by potentially toxic elements (e.g. Cd, Ni, Cr, Pb) from amendments of sewage sludge is subject to strict controls within the European Community in relation to total permissible metal concentrations, soil properties and intended use. This study is aimed at ascertaining the chemical partitioning of Cd, Ni, Cr and Pb in agricultural soils repeatedly amended with sludge. Five surface soils (0-15 cm) that were polluted as a result of agricultural activities were used in this experiment. The sewage sludge amended soils were selected for diversity of physicochemical properties, especially pH and carbonate content. The soils are classified as non-calcareous and calcareous soils. The distribution of chemical forms of Cd, Ni, Cr and Pb in five sewage sludge amended soils was studied using a sequential extraction procedure that fractionates the metal into soluble-exchangeable, specifically sorbed-carbonate bound, oxidizable, reducible and residual forms. With regard to the mineralogical composition of the soil clay fraction, the mineralogical association found was: illite, kaolinite and chlorite. This paper provides quantitative evidence regarding the form of the association of metals and indirectly of their bioavailability. It can help to explain the process by which metals are eliminated from sewage sludge and also indicate the impact of the use of sludge on agricultural soils, as amendments. Data obtained showed different metal distribution trend among the fractions in sludge-amended soils. Comparison of distribution pattern of metals in sludge-applied soils shows that there is possible redistribution of metals among the different phases. Detailed knowledge of the soil at the application site, especially pH, CEC, buffering capacity

  19. Elevated carbon dioxide does not offset loss of soil carbon from a corn-soybean agroecosystem.

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, K. K.; Jastrow, J. D.; Biosciences Division

    2010-04-01

    The potential for storing additional C in U.S. Corn Belt soils - to offset rising atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] - is large. Long-term cultivation has depleted substantial soil organic matter (SOM) stocks that once existed in the region's native ecosystems. In central Illinois, free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment technology was used to investigate the effects of elevated [CO{sub 2}] on SOM pools in a conservation tilled corn-soybean rotation. After 5 and 6 y of CO{sub 2} enrichment, we investigated the distribution of C and N among soil fractions with varying ability to protect SOM from rapid decomposition. None of the isolated C or N pools, or bulk-soil C or N, was affected by CO{sub 2} treatment. However, the site has lost soil C and N, largely from unprotected pools, regardless of CO{sub 2} treatment since the experiment began. These findings suggest management practices have affected soil C and N stocks and dynamics more than the increased inputs from CO{sub 2}-stimulated photosynthesis. Soil carbon from microaggregate-protected and unprotected fractions decreased in a conservation tilled corn-soybean rotation despite increases in primary production from exposure to atmospheric CO{sub 2} enrichment.

  20. Legacy effects of grassland management on soil carbon to depth.

    PubMed

    Ward, Susan E; Smart, Simon M; Quirk, Helen; Tallowin, Jerry R B; Mortimer, Simon R; Shiel, Robert S; Wilby, Andrew; Bardgett, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    The importance of managing land to optimize carbon sequestration for climate change mitigation is widely recognized, with grasslands being identified as having the potential to sequester additional carbon. However, most soil carbon inventories only consider surface soils, and most large-scale surveys group ecosystems into broad habitats without considering management intensity. Consequently, little is known about the quantity of deep soil carbon and its sensitivity to management. From a nationwide survey of grassland soils to 1 m depth, we show that carbon in grassland soils is vulnerable to management and that these management effects can be detected to considerable depth down the soil profile, albeit at decreasing significance with depth. Carbon concentrations in soil decreased as management intensity increased, but greatest soil carbon stocks (accounting for bulk density differences), were at intermediate levels of management. Our study also highlights the considerable amounts of carbon in subsurface soil below 30 cm, which is missed by standard carbon inventories. We estimate grassland soil carbon in Great Britain to be 2097 Tg C to a depth of 1 m, with ~60% of this carbon being below 30 cm. Total stocks of soil carbon (t ha(-1) ) to 1 m depth were 10.7% greater at intermediate relative to intensive management, which equates to 10.1 t ha(-1) in surface soils (0-30 cm), and 13.7 t ha(-1) in soils from 30 to 100 cm depth. Our findings highlight the existence of substantial carbon stocks at depth in grassland soils that are sensitive to management. This is of high relevance globally, given the extent of land cover and large stocks of carbon held in temperate managed grasslands. Our findings have implications for the future management of grasslands for carbon storage and climate mitigation, and for global carbon models which do not currently account for changes in soil carbon to depth with management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Decadally cycling soil carbon is more sensitive to warming than faster-cycling soil carbon.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junjie; Zhu, Biao; Cheng, Weixin

    2015-12-01

    The response of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools to globally rising surface temperature crucially determines the feedback between climate change and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC which is the main component of total soil carbon stock and the most relevant to global change. We tackled this issue using two decadally (13) C-labeled soils and a much improved measuring system in a long-term incubation experiment. Results indicated that the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC (>23 years in one soil and >55 years in the other soil) was significantly greater than that for faster-cycling SOC (<23 or 55 years) or for the entire SOC stock. Moreover, decadally cycling SOC contributed substantially (35-59%) to the total CO2 loss during the 360-day incubation. Overall, these results indicate that the decomposition of decadally cycling SOC is highly sensitive to temperature change, which will likely make this large SOC stock vulnerable to loss by global warming in the 21st century and beyond.

  2. Fate and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Wastewater Irrigated Calcareous Soils

    PubMed Central

    Stietiya, Mohammed Hashem; Duqqah, Mohammad; Udeigwe, Theophilus; Zubi, Ruba; Ammari, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of heavy metals in Jordanian soils irrigated with treated wastewater threatens agricultural sustainability. This study was carried out to investigate the environmental fate of Zn, Ni, and Cd in calcareous soils irrigated with treated wastewater and to elucidate the impact of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) amendment on metal redistribution among soil fractions. Results showed that sorption capacity for Zarqa River (ZR1) soil was higher than Wadi Dhuleil (WD1) soil for all metals. The order of sorption affinity for WD1 was in the decreasing order of Ni > Zn > Cd, consistent with electrostatic attraction and indication of weak association with soil constituents. Following metal addition, Zn and Ni were distributed among the carbonate and Fe/Mn oxide fractions, while Cd was distributed among the exchangeable and carbonate fractions in both soils. Amending soils with 3% HFO did not increase the concentration of metals associated with the Fe/Mn oxide fraction or impact metal redistribution. The study suggests that carbonates control the mobility and bioavailability of Zn, Ni, and Cd in these calcareous soils, even in presence of a strong adsorbent such as HFO. Thus, it can be inferred that in situ heavy metal remediation of these highly calcareous soils using iron oxide compounds could be ineffective. PMID:24723833

  3. Reduced carbon sequestration potential of biochar in acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yaqi; Zhan, Yu; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-12-01

    Biochar application in soil has been proposed as a promising method for carbon sequestration. While factors affecting its carbon sequestration potential have been widely investigated, the number of studies on the effect of soil pH is limited. To investigate the carbon sequestration potential of biochar across a series of soil pH levels, the total carbon emission, CO2 release from inorganic carbon, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) of six soils with various pH levels were compared after the addition of straw biochar produced at different pyrolysis temperatures. The results show that the acidic soils released more CO2 (1.5-3.5 times higher than the control) after the application of biochar compared with neutral and alkaline soils. The degradation of both native soil organic carbon (SOC) and biochar were accelerated. More inorganic CO2 release in acidic soil contributed to the increased degradation of biochar. Higher proportion of gram-positive bacteria in acidic soil (25%-36%) was responsible for the enhanced biochar degradation and simultaneously co-metabolism of SOC. In addition, lower substrate limitation for bacteria, indicated by higher C-O stretching after the biochar application in the acidic soil, also caused more CO2 release. In addition to the soil pH, other factors such as clay contents and experimental duration also affected the phsico-chemical and biotic processes of SOC dynamics. Gram-negative/gram-positive bacteria ratio was found to be negatively related to priming effects, and suggested to serve as an indicator for priming effect. In general, the carbon sequestration potential of rice-straw biochar in soil reduced along with the decrease of soil pH especially in a short-term. Given wide spread of acidic soils in China, carbon sequestration potential of biochar may be overestimated without taking into account the impact of soil pH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Altered soil microbial community at elevated CO2 leads to loss of soil carbon

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Karen M.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Drake, Bert G.; Megonigal, J. Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Increased carbon storage in ecosystems due to elevated CO2 may help stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations and slow global warming. Many field studies have found that elevated CO2 leads to higher carbon assimilation by plants, and others suggest that this can lead to higher carbon storage in soils, the largest and most stable terrestrial carbon pool. Here we show that 6 years of experimental CO2 doubling reduced soil carbon in a scrub-oak ecosystem despite higher plant growth, offsetting ≈52% of the additional carbon that had accumulated at elevated CO2 in aboveground and coarse root biomass. The decline in soil carbon was driven by changes in soil microbial composition and activity. Soils exposed to elevated CO2 had higher relative abundances of fungi and higher activities of a soil carbon-degrading enzyme, which led to more rapid rates of soil organic matter degradation than soils exposed to ambient CO2. The isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids confirmed that elevated CO2 increased microbial utilization of soil organic matter. These results show how elevated CO2, by altering soil microbial communities, can cause a potential carbon sink to become a carbon source. PMID:17360374

  5. Soil organic matter and land use change: the effect of soil carbon saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, J. W.; Carrington, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    Land management affects soil organic carbon (SOC) storage through the balance between inputs and outputs, the structural and functional complexity of plant and microbial communities, alterations to microbial processes and activity, and changes to edaphic soil conditions. An ultimate determinant on the rate of accumulation and total C storage potential of a soil, however, is its inherent capacity to protect organic matter within the soil matrix, i.e. soil C saturation. As a soil approaches its soil C saturation level, i.e. finite aggregate and mineral protective capacity, limits the C sequestration potential of a soil. For this reason, the preexisting amount and distribution of soil C in protected soil C pools, in addition to the soil's capacity for stabilization, must be considered when predicting effects of land management change on SOC stocks. Evidence points to the amount, type, and location of silt and clay-sized particles, as well as the soil's inherent potential for aggregate formation, as the main controlling factors of soil C saturation. The innate biochemistry of uncomplexed soil organic matter does not appear to affect soil C saturation, nor does it interact with protective mechanisms at high SOC loadings. This confirms that C saturation level cannot be modified though management of C input quality. Land use induced changes to a soil's physical matrix, such as preferential erosion of smaller particles or soil compaction, could, however, have irreversible threshold effects on a soil's potential for organic matter stabilization. Experiments in agricultural and grassland systems have determined saturating responses of soils and functional soil fractions (i.e. chemical-protection by associations with silt and clay, physical-protection by occlusion in aggregates, and a combination of physical and chemical protection in aggregated silt and clay) to equilibrium C inputs, or C input proxies, such as CO2 or total SOC. Estimates of C saturation parameters for

  6. Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Data (1986) (NDP-018)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zinke, P. J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stangenberger, A. G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Post, W. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Emanuel, W. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olson, J. S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Millemann, R. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boden, T. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1986-01-01

    This data base was begun with the collection and analysis of soil samples from California. Additional data came from soil surveys of Italy, Greece, Iran, Thailand, Vietnam, various tropical Amazonian areas, and U.S. forests and from the soil-survey literature. The analyzed samples were collected at uniform soil-depth increments and included bulk-density determinations. The data on each sample are soil profile number; soil profile carbon content; soil profile nitrogen content; sampling site latitude and longitude; site elevation; profile literature reference source; and soil profile codes for Holdridge life zone, Olson ecosystem type, and parent material. These data may be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon and nitrogen pools at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors.

  7. Digital mapping of soil organic carbon contents and stocks in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Hartemink, Alfred E; Minasny, Budiman; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette B; Greve, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard soil depth intervals (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60 and 60-100 cm) using 18 environmental variables as predictors. SOC distribution was influenced by precipitation, land use, soil type, wetland, elevation, wetness index, and multi-resolution index of valley bottom flatness. The highest average SOC content of 20 g kg(-1) was reported for 0-5 cm soil, whereas there was on average 2.2 g SOC kg(-1) at 60-100 cm depth. For SOC and bulk density prediction precision decreased with soil depth, and a standard error of 2.8 g kg(-1) was found at 60-100 cm soil depth. Average SOC stock for 0-30 cm was 72 t ha(-1) and in the top 1 m there was 120 t SOC ha(-1). In total, the soils stored approximately 570 Tg C within the top 1 m. The soils under agriculture had the highest amount of carbon (444 Tg) followed by forest and semi-natural vegetation that contributed 11% of the total SOC stock. More than 60% of the total SOC stock was present in Podzols and Luvisols. Compared to previous estimates, our approach is more reliable as we adopted a robust quantification technique and mapped the spatial distribution of SOC stock and prediction uncertainty. The estimation was validated using common statistical indices and the data and high-resolution maps could be used for future soil carbon assessment and inventories.

  8. Digital Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon Contents and Stocks in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Hartemink, Alfred E.; Minasny, Budiman; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette B.; Greve, Mogens H.

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard soil depth intervals (0−5, 5−15, 15−30, 30−60 and 60−100 cm) using 18 environmental variables as predictors. SOC distribution was influenced by precipitation, land use, soil type, wetland, elevation, wetness index, and multi-resolution index of valley bottom flatness. The highest average SOC content of 20 g kg−1 was reported for 0−5 cm soil, whereas there was on average 2.2 g SOC kg−1 at 60−100 cm depth. For SOC and bulk density prediction precision decreased with soil depth, and a standard error of 2.8 g kg−1 was found at 60−100 cm soil depth. Average SOC stock for 0−30 cm was 72 t ha−1 and in the top 1 m there was 120 t SOC ha−1. In total, the soils stored approximately 570 Tg C within the top 1 m. The soils under agriculture had the highest amount of carbon (444 Tg) followed by forest and semi-natural vegetation that contributed 11% of the total SOC stock. More than 60% of the total SOC stock was present in Podzols and Luvisols. Compared to previous estimates, our approach is more reliable as we adopted a robust quantification technique and mapped the spatial distribution of SOC stock and prediction uncertainty. The estimation was validated using common statistical indices and the data and high-resolution maps could be used for future soil carbon assessment and inventories. PMID:25137066

  9. Soil-profile distribution of organic C and N at the end of 6 years of tillage and grazing management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total soil nitrogen (TSN) are key determinants for evaluating agricultural management practices to address climate change, environmental quality, and soil productivity issues. We determined SOC, TSN, and particulate organic C and N depth distributions and cum...

  10. Modelling carbon in permafrost soils from preindustrial to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinen, T.; Brovkin, V.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon release from thawing permafrost soils constitutes one of the large uncertainties in the carbon cycle under future climate change. Analysing the problem further, this uncertainty results from an uncertainty about the total amount of C that is stored in frozen soils, combined with an uncertainty about the areas where soils might thaw under a particular climate change scenario, as well as an uncertainty about the decomposition product since some of the decomposed C might result the release of CH4 as well as CO2. We use the land surface model JSBACH, part of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model MPI-ESM, to quantify the release of soil carbon from thawing permafrost soils. We have extended the soil carbon model YASSO by introducing carbon storages in frozen soils, with increasing fractions of C being available to decomposition as permafrost thaws. In order to quantify the amount of carbon released as CH4, as opposed to CO2, we have also implemented a TOPMODEL-based wetland scheme, as well as anaerobic C decomposition and methane transport. We initialise the soil C pools for the preindustrial climate state from the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database to insure initial C pool sizes close to measurements. We then determine changes in soil C storage in transient model experiments following historical and future climate changes under RCP 8.5. Based on these experiments, we quantify the greenhouse gas release from permafrost C decomposition, determining both CH4 and CO2 emissions.

  11. Biochar for soil fertility and natural carbon sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Rutherford, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Biochar is charcoal (similar to chars generated by forest fires) that is made for incorporation into soils to increase soil fertility while providing natural carbon sequestration. The incorporation of biochar into soils can preserve and enrich soils and also slow the rate at which climate change is affecting our planet. Studies on biochar, such as those cited by this report, are applicable to both fire science and soil science.

  12. Soil warming, carbon–nitrogen interactions, and forest carbon budgets

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Butler, Sarah; Johnson, Jennifer; Mohan, Jacqueline; Steudler, Paul; Lux, Heidi; Burrows, Elizabeth; Bowles, Francis; Smith, Rose; Scott, Lindsay; Vario, Chelsea; Hill, Troy; Burton, Andrew; Zhou, Yu-Mei; Tang, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Soil warming has the potential to alter both soil and plant processes that affect carbon storage in forest ecosystems. We have quantified these effects in a large, long-term (7-y) soil-warming study in a deciduous forest in New England. Soil warming has resulted in carbon losses from the soil and stimulated carbon gains in the woody tissue of trees. The warming-enhanced decay of soil organic matter also released enough additional inorganic nitrogen into the soil solution to support the observed increases in plant carbon storage. Although soil warming has resulted in a cumulative net loss of carbon from a New England forest relative to a control area over the 7-y study, the annual net losses generally decreased over time as plant carbon storage increased. In the seventh year, warming-induced soil carbon losses were almost totally compensated for by plant carbon gains in response to warming. We attribute the plant gains primarily to warming-induced increases in nitrogen availability. This study underscores the importance of incorporating carbon–nitrogen interactions in atmosphere–ocean–land earth system models to accurately simulate land feedbacks to the climate system. PMID:21606374

  13. Comparison of soil microbial respiration and carbon turnover under perennial and annual biofuel crops in two agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, L. M.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Sanford, G. R.; Jackson, R. D.; Heckman, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Bioenergy crops have the potential to provide a low carbon-intensive alternative to fossil fuels. More than a century of agricultural research has shown that conventional cropping systems can reduce soil organic matter (SOM) reservoirs, which cause long-term soil nutrient loss and C release to the atmosphere. In the face of climate change and other human disruptions to biogeochemical cycles, identifying biofuel crops that can maintain or enhance soil resources is desirable for the sustainable production of bioenergy. The objective of our study was to compare the effects of four biofuel crop treatments on SOM dynamics in two agricultural soils: Mollisols at Arlington Agricultural Research Station in Wisconsin and Alfisols at Kellogg Biological Station in Michigan, USA. We used fresh soils collected in 2013 and archived soils from 2008 to measure the effects of five years of crop management. Using a one-year long laboratory soil incubation coupled with a regression model and radiocarbon measurements, we separated soils into three SOM pools and their corresponding C turnover times. We found that the active pool, or biologically available C, was more sensitive to management and is an earlier indicator of changes to soil C dynamics than bulk soil C measurements. There was no effect of treatment on the active pool size at either site; however, the percent C in the active pool decreased, regardless of crop type, in surface soils with high clay content. At depth, the response of the slow pool differed between annual and perennial cropping systems. The distribution of C among SOM fractions varied between the two soil types, with greater C content associated with the active fraction in the coarser textured-soil and greater C content associated with the slow-cycling fraction in the soils with high clay content. These results suggest that the effects of bioenergy crops on soil resources will vary geographically, with implications for the carbon-cost of biocrop production.

  14. Deep carbon storage potential of buried floodplain soils.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Amanda H; Liles, Garrett C; Viers, Joshua H; Smart, David R

    2017-08-15

    Soils account for the largest terrestrial pool of carbon and have the potential for even greater quantities of carbon sequestration. Typical soil carbon (C) stocks used in global carbon models only account for the upper 1 meter of soil. Previously unaccounted for deep carbon pools (>1 m) were generally considered to provide a negligible input to total C contents and represent less dynamic C pools. Here we assess deep soil C pools associated with an alluvial floodplain ecosystem transitioning from agricultural production to restoration of native vegetation. We analyzed the soil organic carbon (SOC) concentrations of 87 surface soil samples (0-15 cm) and 23 subsurface boreholes (0-3 m). We evaluated the quantitative importance of the burial process in the sequestration of subsurface C and found our subsurface soils (0-3 m) contained considerably more C than typical C stocks of 0-1 m. This deep unaccounted soil C could have considerable implications for global C accounting. We compared differences in surface soil C related to vegetation and land use history and determined that flooding restoration could promote greater C accumulation in surface soils. We conclude deep floodplain soils may store substantial quantities of C and floodplain restoration should promote active C sequestration.

  15. Microbial carbon pump and its significance for carbon sequestration in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chao

    2017-04-01

    Studies of the decomposition, transformation and stabilization of soil organic carbon have dramatically increased in recent years due to growing interest in studying the global carbon cycle as it pertains to climate change. While it is readily accepted that the magnitude of the organic carbon reservoir in soils depends upon microbial involvement because soil carbon dynamics are ultimately the consequence of microbial growth and activity, it remains largely unknown how these microbe-mediated processes lead to soil carbon stabilization. Here, two pathways, ex vivo modification and in vivo turnover, were defined to jointly explain soil carbon dynamics driven by microbial catabolism and/or anabolism. Accordingly, a conceptual framework consisting of the raised concept of the soil "microbial carbon pump" (MCP) was demonstrated to describe how microbes act as an active player in soil carbon storage. The hypothesis is that the long-term microbial assimilation process may facilitate the formation of a set of organic compounds that are stabilized (whether via protection by physical interactions or a reduction in activation energy due to chemical composition), ultimately leading to the sequestration of microbial-derived carbon in soils. The need for increased efforts was proposed to seek to inspire new studies that utilize the soil MCP as a conceptual guideline for improving mechanistic understandings of the contributions of soil carbon dynamics to the responses of the terrestrial carbon cycle under global change.

  16. Soil Carbon Storage in Christmas Tree Farms: Maximizing Ecosystem Management and Sustainability for Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. K.; Shaw, R.; Langley, A.

    2008-12-01

    Management of agroecosystems for the purpose of manipulating soil carbon stocks could be a viable approach for countering rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, while maximizing sustainability of the agroforestry industry. We investigated the carbon storage potential of Christmas tree farms in the southern Appalachian mountains as a potential model for the impacts of land management on soil carbon. We quantified soil carbon stocks across a gradient of cultivation duration and herbicide management. We compared soil carbon in farms to that in adjacent pastures and native forests that represent a control group to account for variability in other soil-forming factors. We partitioned tree farm soil carbon into fractions delineated by stability, an important determinant of long-term sequestration potential. Soil carbon stocks in the intermediate pool are significantly greater in the tree farms under cultivation for longer periods of time than in the younger tree farms. This pool can be quite large, yet has the ability to repond to biological environmental changes on the centennial time scale. Pasture soil carbon was significantly greater than both forest and tree farm soil carbon, which were not different from each other. These data can help inform land management and soil carbon sequestration strategies.

  17. Managing uncertainty in soil carbon feedbacks to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Mark A.; Wieder, William R.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Fierer, Noah; Raymond, Peter A.; Crowther, Thomas W.

    2016-08-01

    Planetary warming may be exacerbated if it accelerates loss of soil carbon to the atmosphere. This carbon-cycle-climate feedback is included in climate projections. Yet, despite ancillary data supporting a positive feedback, there is limited evidence for soil carbon loss under warming. The low confidence engendered in feedback projections is reduced further by the common representation in models of an outdated knowledge of soil carbon turnover. 'Model-knowledge integration' -- representing in models an advanced understanding of soil carbon stabilization -- is the first step to build confidence. This will inform experiments that further increase confidence by resolving competing mechanisms that most influence projected soil-carbon stocks. Improving feedback projections is an imperative for establishing greenhouse gas emission targets that limit climate change.

  18. [Effects of revegetation on organic carbon storage in deep soils in hilly Loess Plateau region of Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Wang, Zheng; Ma, Xin-Xin; Qiu, Yu-Jie

    2012-10-01

    Taking the Robinia pseudoacacia woodlands, Caragana korshinskii shrublands, and abandoned croplands with different years of revegetation in the hilly Loess Plateau region of Northwest China as test objects, this paper studied the profile distribution and accumulation dynamics of organic carbon storage in deep soil (100-400 cm), with those in 0-100 cm soil profile as the control. In 0-100 cm soil profile, the organic carbon storage decreased significantly with the increase of soil depth; while in deep soil, the organic carbon storage had a slight fluctuation. The total organic carbon storage in 100-400 cm soil profile was considerably high, accounting for approximately 60% of that in 0-400 cm soil profile. The organic carbon storage in 80-100 cm soil layer had a significant linear correlation with that in 100-200 and 200-400 cm soil layers, and among the organic carbon storages in the five layers in 0-100 cm soil profile, the organic carbon storage in 80-100 cm soil layer had the strongest correlation with that in 100-400 cm soil profile, being able to be used to estimate the organic carbon storage in deep soil in this region. The organic carbon storage in 0-20 cm soil layer in the three types of revegetation lands was significantly higher than that in slope croplands, but the organic carbon storage in deep soil had no significant difference among the land use types. The organic carbon storage in deep soil increased with the increasing years of revegetation. In R. pseudoacacia woodlands and C. korshinskii shrub lands, the average increasing rate of the organic carbon storage in 100-400 cm soil layer was 0.14 and 0.19 t x hm(-2) x a(-1), respectively, which was comparable to that in the 0-100 cm soil layer in C. korshinskii shrublands. It was suggested that in the estimation of the soil carbon sequestration effect of revegetation in hilly Loess Plateau region, the organic carbon accumulation in deep soil should be taken into consideration. Otherwise, the effect of

  19. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon and Microbial Biomass Carbon in Relation to Water Erosion and Tillage Erosion

    PubMed Central

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the 137Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of 137Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. 137Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the <0.002-mm clay shows that water erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion. PMID:23717530

  20. Dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon in relation to water erosion and tillage erosion.

    PubMed

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the (137)Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of (137)Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. (137)Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the <0.002-mm clay shows that water erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion.

  1. Geographic distribution of Vertisols and Vertic soils in Russia: diversity of soils and landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitrov, Nikolay; Chizhikova, Nataliya; Rogovneva, Ludmila

    2013-04-01

    There is a little information about geographic distribution of Vertisols and Vertic soils in Russia. Large areas of these soils (known in Russia as slitozems) are described in the Northen Caucasus Region (Bistritzkaya, Tyuryukanov, 1971; Khitrov, 2003). Swelling clay alluvial soils with microrelief gilgai were studied within the Volga-Akhtuba floodplain (Kozlovskyi, Kornblum, 1972). These and some other regions with slitozems in Russia are between latitudes 45 N and 48 N. For the north from latitude 48 N these soils have not been noted until 2006. Recently a lot of new areas of Vertisols and Vertic soils were identified in the Central Chernozemic Region of Russia (Khitrov, 2012) and in the Middle and the Lower Volga Region between latitudes 48 N and 54 N on the basis of soil studies along routes and on key plots. The portion of these soils in the soil cover patterns varies from 0,5 to 15-30%. Some areas of Vertisols and/or Vertic soils are up to 40-200 ha and more. With that their portion in the soil cover of the entire landscape is much less than 1%. All the delineated areas of vertic soils are confined to the outcrops of swelling clay sediments of different origins (marine, lacustrine, glacial, colluvial and alluvial materials) and ages (Jurassic, Cretaceous, Paleogene, Neogene, Quaternary). Mineral composition of clay fraction consists of smectites, irregular stratified illite-smectite, chlorite-smectite, hydromicas, chlorite and kaolinite in different proportions. Vertisols and Vertic soils may be found in different landscape positions that provides contrast water regime of soil including alternate periods of intense wetting and drying. The landscape positions are: (1) the step-like interfluvial surfaces and/or different concave slopes with swelling clay outcrops; (2) the deep closed depressions within vast flat watersheds; (3) the bottoms of wide hollows on interfluvial slopes; (4) different geomorphic positions in hydromorphic solonetzic complexes; (5) the

  2. Soil carbon storage estimation in a forested watershed using quantitative soil-landscape modeling

    Treesearch

    James A. Thompson; Randall K. Kolka

    2005-01-01

    Carbon storage in soils is important to forest ecosystems. Moreover, forest soils may serve as important C sinks for ameliorating excess atmospheric CO2. Spatial estimates of soil organic C (SOC) storage have traditionally relied upon soil survey maps and laboratory characterization data. This approach does not account for inherent variability...

  3. Effects of Biochar Amendment on Soil Properties and Soil Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Zhu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Biochar addition to soils potentially affects various soil properties and soil carbon sequestration, and these effects are dependent on biochars derived from different feedstock materials and pyrolysis processes. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of amendment of different biochars on soil physical and biological properties as well as soil carbon sequestration. Biochars were produced with dairy manure and woodchip at temperatures of 300, 500, and 700°C, respectively. Each biochar was mixed at 5% (w/w) with a forest soil and the mixture was incubated for 180 days, during which soil physical and biological properties, and soil respiration rates were measured. Results showed that the biochar addition significantly enhanced the formation of soil macroaggregates at the early incubation time. The biochar application significantly reduced soil bulk density, increased the amount of soil organic matter, and stimulated microbial activity and soil respiration rates at the early incubation stage. Biochar applications improved water retention capacity, with stronger effects by biochars produced at higher pyrolysis temperatures. At the same suction, the soil with woodchip biochars possessed higher water content than with the dairy manure biochars. Biochar addition significantly affected the soil physical and biological properties, which resulted in different soil carbon mineralization rates and the amount of soil carbon storage.

  4. Distribution, efficacy, and off-tarp emissions of carbonated fumigants in low permeability film tarped field

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous research in Florida indicated that carbonated fumigants can distribute more quickly and uniformly through soil which suggests that soil-borne disease control could be improved compared to conventional nitrogen pressurized fumigants. Tarping fields with totally impermeable film (TIF) may fur...

  5. A disconnect between O horizon and mineral soil carbon - Implications for soil C sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T

    2009-01-01

    Changing inputs of carbon to soil is one means of potentially increasing carbon sequestration in soils for the purpose of mitigating projected increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The effect of manipulations of aboveground carbon input on soil carbon storage was tested in a temperate, deciduous forest in east Tennessee, USA. A 4.5-year experiment included exclusion of aboveground litterfall and supplemental litter additions (three times ambient) in an upland and a valley that differed in soil nitrogen availability. The estimated decomposition rate of the carbon stock in the O horizon was greater in the valley than in the upland due to higher litter quality (i.e., lower C/N ratios). Short-term litter exclusion or addition had no effect on carbon stock in the mineral soil, measured to a depth of 30 cm, or the partitioning of carbon in the mineral soil between particulate- and mineral-associated organic matter. A two-compartment model was used to interpret results from the field experiments. Field data and a sensitivity analysis of the model were consistent with little carbon transfer between the O horizon and the mineral soil. Increasing aboveground carbon input does not appear to be an effective means of promoting carbon sequestration in forest soil at the location of the present study because a disconnect exists in carbon dynamics between O horizon and mineral soil. Factors that directly increase inputs to belowground soil carbon, via roots, or reduce decomposition rates of organic matter are more likely to benefit efforts to increase carbon sequestration in forests where carbon dynamics in the O horizon are uncoupled from the mineral soil.

  6. Stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates affected by application of apatite, lime, and charcoal.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongbiao; Ma, Kaiqiang; Fan, Yuchao; Peng, Xinhua; Mao, Jingdong; Zhou, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhongbin; Zhou, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Only a few studies have been reported on the stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates after soil treatments to reduce the availability of heavy metals. In this study, apatite (22.3 t ha(-1)), lime (4.45 t ha(-1)), and charcoal (66.8 t ha(-1)) were applied to a heavy metal-contaminated soil for 4 years. The stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates were investigated by dry and wet sieving. No significant change in the dry mean weight diameter was observed in any treatments. Compared with the control, three-amendment treatments significantly increased the wet mean weight diameter, but only charcoal treatment significantly increased the wet aggregate stability. The soil treatments increased the content of soil organic carbon, and the fraction 0.25-2 mm contained the highest content of soil organic carbon. Amendments' application slightly increased soil total Cu and Cd, but decreased the concentrations of CaCl2 -extractable Cu and Cd except for the fraction <0.053 mm. The fractions >2 and 0.25-2 mm contained the highest concentrations of CaCl2-extractable Cu and Cd, accounted for about 74.5-86.8 % of CaCl2-extractable Cu and Cd in soil. The results indicated that amendments' application increased the wet soil aggregate stability and decreased the available Cu and Cd. The distribution of available heavy metals in wet soil aggregates was not controlled by soil aggregate stability, but possibly by soil organic carbon.

  7. Riparian soil physicochemical properties and correlation with soil organic carbon of an inflowing river of Taihu Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jin; Liu, Jingjing; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Li, Kun; Shen, Mengmeng

    2017-03-01

    Profile method and the classic measurement method were used to analyse the vertical distribution of riparian soil physicochemical properties of an inflowing river (Yincungang River) of Taihu Lake. The results showed that the soil physicochemical properties distribution of the riparian zones with three different vegetation communities were showed a similar regular change tendency with the increase of soil depth. But the maximum of soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were occurred in the riparian zone with Arundo donax community, and the maximum of soil bulk density (BD) and pH value were occurred in the riparian zone with phragmites australis community. Besides, there was significant positive correlation between SOC and TN, TP, BD, while the opposite result was observed for pH.

  8. Molecular investigations into a globally important carbon pool: permafrost-protected carbon in Alaskan soils

    Treesearch

    M.P. Waldrop; K.P. Wickland; R. White; A.A. Berhe; J.W. Harden; V.E. Romanovsky

    2010-01-01

    The fate of carbon (C) contained within permafrost in boreal forest environments is an important consideration for the current and future carbon cycle as soils warm in northern latitudes. Currently, little is known about the microbiology or chemistry of permafrost soils that may affect its decomposition once soils thaw. We tested the hypothesis that low microbial...

  9. [Spatial distribution patterns of soil nutrients and microbes in seasonal wet meadow in Zha-long wetland].

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Ding, Xin-hua; Gu, Wei; Ma, Wei

    2011-07-01

    This paper studied the spatial distribution patterns of soil nutrients and biological characteristics and related major affecting factors in seasonal wet meadow in Zhalong wetland. In the meadow, the soil nutrients, microbial communities, and microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen showed an obvious vertical distribution, but the soil enzyme activities had a complicated spatial distribution due to the effects of multi factors. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed that soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen had significant positive correlations with soil beta-glucosidase, urease, and phosphatase activities (P<0.05), soil organic carbon had significant correlations with soil actinomycetes and soil catalase activity (P<0.05), soil available K, total N, alkali-hydrolyzable N, and C/N ratio were significantly correlated with soil bacteria (P<0.05), actinomycetes (P<0.05), beta-glucosidase activity (P<0.05), and microbial biomass nitrogen (P<0.05) , respectively, whereas soil total P and pH had no significant correlations with soil microbial activity (P>0.05). Two models, one for soil nutrients evaluation and another for soil microbiological prediction, were constructed by principal component analysis.

  10. Estimating and mapping of soil carbon stock using satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, C.; Tamura, E.; Aijima, K.; Niwa, K.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the carbon capture and storage has been attracting attention as a method for the mitigation of the global warming in agricultural sphere. In Japan, since its topography is complicated, precision monitoring and investigation has a limit. So, utilization of the remote sensing is expected as a precise and effective investigation method. Previous research in Japan, Sekiya et al. (2010) estimated the soil carbon stock from soil surface down to 100 cm depth in Hokkaido. However, the estimated values may not reflect current situation, because in this research relatively old soil survey data from the 1960's to the 1970's were used to estimate the soil carbon stock. Under this background, we developed an estimation method using satellite data to evaluate the soil carbon stocks in the agricultural field covering wide area to be used as the fundamental data. Result of our study suggests that there is a significant correlation between the amount of soil carbon and the reflectance value from visible to near-infrared wavelength region. This is the reason that the color of the soil becomes dark and electromagnetic wave absorbency from visible to near-infrared wavelength increases corresponding with increment of the soil carbon content. Especially, a high negative correlation is found between the reflectance value of red wavelength and the soil carbon stock in the SPOT satellite data of 2013.

  11. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  12. [Characteristics of soil organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon in hilly red soil region].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoyon; Huang, Daoyou; Tong, Chengli; Zhang, Wenju; Xiao, Heai; Su, Yirong; Wu, Jinshui

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, 535 soil samples (0 to approximately 20 cm) were taken from the woodland, orchard, upland, and paddy field in the hilly red soil region of south China, and the quantitative characteristics of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil microbial biomass carbon (SMB-C) were studied. The results showed that SOC content was the highest (16.0 g x kg(-1)) in paddy field and the lowest (8.4 g x kg(-1)) in woodland, while SMB-C content was the highest in paddy field (830 mg x kg(-1)) and the lowest in orchard (200 mg x kg(-1)). There was a highly significant positive correlation (P < 0.01) between the contents of SOC and SMB-C in the four land-use types. It was suggested that the changes of SMB-C content could sensitively indicate the dynamics of SOC. The transition from woodland to orchard or cultivated land in hilly red soil region would not decrease the SOC content.

  13. Accelerated soil carbon turnover under tree plantations limits soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangshui; Yang, Yusheng; Yang, Zhijie; Xie, Jinsheng; Guo, Jianfen; Gao, Ren; Yin, Yunfeng; Robinson, David

    2016-01-25

    The replacement of native forests by tree plantations is increasingly common globally, especially in tropical and subtropical areas. Improving our understanding of the long-term effects of this replacement on soil organic carbon (SOC) remains paramount for effectively managing ecosystems to mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions. Meta-analyses imply that native forest replacement usually reduces SOC stocks and may switch the forest from a net sink to a net source of atmospheric carbon. Using a long-term chronosequence during which areas of subtropical native forest were replaced by Chinese fir, we show by direct measurement that plantations have significantly accelerated SOC turnover compared with native forest, an effect that has persisted for almost a century. The immediate stimulation of SOC decomposition was caused by warmer soil before the closure of the plantation's canopy. Long-term reductions in SOC mean residence times were coupled to litter inputs. Faster SOC decomposition was associated with lower soil microbial carbon use efficiency, which was due to smaller litter inputs and reduced nutrient availabilities. Our results indicate a previously unelucidated control on long-term SOC dynamics in native forests and demonstrate a potential constraint on climate mitigation when such forests are replaced by plantations.

  14. Accelerated soil carbon turnover under tree plantations limits soil carbon storage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangshui; Yang, Yusheng; Yang, Zhijie; Xie, Jinsheng; Guo, Jianfen; Gao, Ren; Yin, Yunfeng; Robinson, David

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of native forests by tree plantations is increasingly common globally, especially in tropical and subtropical areas. Improving our understanding of the long-term effects of this replacement on soil organic carbon (SOC) remains paramount for effectively managing ecosystems to mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions. Meta-analyses imply that native forest replacement usually reduces SOC stocks and may switch the forest from a net sink to a net source of atmospheric carbon. Using a long-term chronosequence during which areas of subtropical native forest were replaced by Chinese fir, we show by direct measurement that plantations have significantly accelerated SOC turnover compared with native forest, an effect that has persisted for almost a century. The immediate stimulation of SOC decomposition was caused by warmer soil before the closure of the plantation’s canopy. Long-term reductions in SOC mean residence times were coupled to litter inputs. Faster SOC decomposition was associated with lower soil microbial carbon use efficiency, which was due to smaller litter inputs and reduced nutrient availabilities. Our results indicate a previously unelucidated control on long-term SOC dynamics in native forests and demonstrate a potential constraint on climate mitigation when such forests are replaced by plantations. PMID:26805949

  15. Accelerated soil carbon turnover under tree plantations limits soil carbon storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangshui; Yang, Yusheng; Yang, Zhijie; Xie, Jinsheng; Guo, Jianfen; Gao, Ren; Yin, Yunfeng; Robinson, David

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of native forests by tree plantations is increasingly common globally, especially in tropical and subtropical areas. Improving our understanding of the long-term effects of this replacement on soil organic carbon (SOC) remains paramount for effectively managing ecosystems to mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions. Meta-analyses imply that native forest replacement usually reduces SOC stocks and may switch the forest from a net sink to a net source of atmospheric carbon. Using a long-term chronosequence during which areas of subtropical native forest were replaced by Chinese fir, we show by direct measurement that plantations have significantly accelerated SOC turnover compared with native forest, an effect that has persisted for almost a century. The immediate stimulation of SOC decomposition was caused by warmer soil before the closure of the plantation’s canopy. Long-term reductions in SOC mean residence times were coupled to litter inputs. Faster SOC decomposition was associated with lower soil microbial carbon use efficiency, which was due to smaller litter inputs and reduced nutrient availabilities. Our results indicate a previously unelucidated control on long-term SOC dynamics in native forests and demonstrate a potential constraint on climate mitigation when such forests are replaced by plantations.

  16. The uncertainty of modeled soil carbon stock change for Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtonen, Aleksi; Heikkinen, Juha

    2013-04-01

    Countries should report soil carbon stock changes of forests for Kyoto Protocol. Under Kyoto Protocol one can omit reporting of a carbon pool by verifying that the pool is not a source of carbon, which is especially tempting for the soil pool. However, verifying that soils of a nation are not a source of carbon in given year seems to be nearly impossible. The Yasso07 model was parametrized against various decomposition data using MCMC method. Soil carbon change in Finland between 1972 and 2011 were simulated with Yasso07 model using litter input data derived from the National Forest Inventory (NFI) and fellings time series. The uncertainties of biomass models, litter turnoverrates, NFI sampling and Yasso07 model were propagated with Monte Carlo simulations. Due to biomass estimation methods, uncertainties of various litter input sources (e.g. living trees, natural mortality and fellings) correlate strongly between each other. We show how original covariance matrices can be analytically combined and the amount of simulated components reduce greatly. While doing simulations we found that proper handling correlations may be even more essential than accurate estimates of standard errors. As a preliminary results, from the analysis we found that both Southern- and Northern Finland were soil carbon sinks, coefficient of variations (CV) varying 10%-25% when model was driven with long term constant weather data. When we applied annual weather data, soils were both sinks and sources of carbon and CVs varied from 10%-90%. This implies that the success of soil carbon sink verification depends on the weather data applied with models. Due to this fact IPCC should provide clear guidance for the weather data applied with soil carbon models and also for soil carbon sink verification. In the UNFCCC reporting carbon sinks of forest biomass have been typically averaged for five years - similar period for soil model weather data would be logical.

  17. Long-term sensitivity of soil carbon turnover to warming.

    PubMed

    Knorr, W; Prentice, I C; House, J I; Holland, E A

    2005-01-20

    The sensitivity of soil carbon to warming is a major uncertainty in projections of carbon dioxide concentration and climate. Experimental studies overwhelmingly indicate increased soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition at higher temperatures, resulting in increased carbon dioxide emissions from soils. However, recent findings have been cited as evidence against increased soil carbon emissions in a warmer world. In soil warming experiments, the initially increased carbon dioxide efflux returns to pre-warming rates within one to three years, and apparent carbon pool turnover times are insensitive to temperature. It has already been suggested that the apparent lack of temperature dependence could be an artefact due to neglecting the extreme heterogeneity of soil carbon, but no explicit model has yet been presented that can reconcile all the above findings. Here we present a simple three-pool model that partitions SOC into components with different intrinsic turnover rates. Using this model, we show that the results of all the soil-warming experiments are compatible with long-term temperature sensitivity of SOC turnover: they can be explained by rapid depletion of labile SOC combined with the negligible response of non-labile SOC on experimental timescales. Furthermore, we present evidence that non-labile SOC is more sensitive to temperature than labile SOC, implying that the long-term positive feedback of soil decomposition in a warming world may be even stronger than predicted by global models.

  18. Infrared sensors to map soil carbon in agricultural ecosystems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid methods of measuring soil carbon such as near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy have gained interest but problems of accurate and precise measurement still persist resulting from the high spatial variability of soil carbon within agricultural landscapes. T...

  19. Topographic Controls on the Thickness of Mobile Regolith and Total Soil Organic Carbon in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, N. R.; Lohse, K. A.; Seyfried, M. S.; Crosby, B. T.; Godsey, S.; Parsons, S.

    2016-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions comprise over 40% of the terrestrial ecosystems on Earth and are considered to be one of the most susceptible to environmental change. Estimating the amount and distribution of soil carbon in these regions is challenging due to their high degree of spatial heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to develop a total soil carbon model using curvature, thickness of mobile regolith (TMR), and aspect in order to predict the distribution of soil carbon across complex terrain within a semi-arid environment. We excavated 45 randomly selected soil pits vertically down to saprolite to acquire TMR, in a first order watershed within the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory located in Southwestern Idaho. TMR varied as an inverse linear function of curvature (r2 value = 0.89) and was shown to be predicable across lithology and ecosystems. Soil thicknesses were plotted against total soil carbon for both the north and south-facing aspects. A quadratic polynomial function fit well with r2 values of 0.89 and 0.90, respectively. Across the watershed, total soil carbon on the north-facing aspect was 7,172 Mg C or 54% of the total soil carbon, despite comprising only 37% of the total land area. South-facing aspect totaled 6,115 Mg C, or 46% of the total soil carbon. If samples were collected to a maximum thickness of 1 m or 0.3 m and extrapolated using kriging techniques (which is typical of other inventories and models) total soil carbon has the potential to under- and overestimate carbon as much as 50% to 133% and 26% to 1167% with aspect and microtopography, respectively. By requiring sampling down to saprolite, our model has the potential to provide more accurate total carbon pools than other models. Our findings indicate that a significant amount of carbon is stored deep in a part of the critical zone that may be less sensitive to loss but leads to an underestimation of total soil carbon stores on complex terrain.

  20. Soil Organic Carbon Pools and Stocks in Permafrost-Affected Soils on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Dörfer, Corina; Kühn, Peter; Baumann, Frank; He, Jin-Sheng; Scholten, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau reacts particularly sensitively to possible effects of climate change. Approximately two thirds of the total area is affected by permafrost. To get a better understanding of the role of permafrost on soil organic carbon pools and stocks, investigations were carried out including both discontinuous (site Huashixia, HUA) and continuous permafrost (site Wudaoliang, WUD). Three organic carbon fractions were isolated using density separation combined with ultrasonic dispersion: the light fractions (<1.6 g cm−3) of free particulate organic matter (FPOM) and occluded particulate organic matter (OPOM), plus a heavy fraction (>1.6 g cm−3) of mineral associated organic matter (MOM). The fractions were analyzed for C, N, and their portion of organic C. FPOM contained an average SOC content of 252 g kg−1. Higher SOC contents (320 g kg−1) were found in OPOM while MOM had the lowest SOC contents (29 g kg−1). Due to their lower density the easily decomposable fractions FPOM and OPOM contribute 27% (HUA) and 22% (WUD) to the total SOC stocks. In HUA mean SOC stocks (0–30 cm depth) account for 10.4 kg m−2, compared to 3.4 kg m−2 in WUD. 53% of the SOC is stored in the upper 10 cm in WUD, in HUA only 39%. Highest POM values of 36% occurred in profiles with high soil moisture content. SOC stocks, soil moisture and active layer thickness correlated strongly in discontinuous permafrost while no correlation between SOC stocks and active layer thickness and only a weak relation between soil moisture and SOC stocks could be found in continuous permafrost. Consequently, permafrost-affected soils in discontinuous permafrost environments are susceptible to soil moisture changes due to alterations in quantity and seasonal distribution of precipitation, increasing temperature and therefore evaporation. PMID:23468904

  1. Soil organic carbon pools and stocks in permafrost-affected soils on the tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Dörfer, Corina; Kühn, Peter; Baumann, Frank; He, Jin-Sheng; Scholten, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau reacts particularly sensitively to possible effects of climate change. Approximately two thirds of the total area is affected by permafrost. To get a better understanding of the role of permafrost on soil organic carbon pools and stocks, investigations were carried out including both discontinuous (site Huashixia, HUA) and continuous permafrost (site Wudaoliang, WUD). Three organic carbon fractions were isolated using density separation combined with ultrasonic dispersion: the light fractions (<1.6 g cm(-3)) of free particulate organic matter (FPOM) and occluded particulate organic matter (OPOM), plus a heavy fraction (>1.6 g cm(-3)) of mineral associated organic matter (MOM). The fractions were analyzed for C, N, and their portion of organic C. FPOM contained an average SOC content of 252 g kg(-1). Higher SOC contents (320 g kg(-1)) were found in OPOM while MOM had the lowest SOC contents (29 g kg(-1)). Due to their lower density the easily decomposable fractions FPOM and OPOM contribute 27% (HUA) and 22% (WUD) to the total SOC stocks. In HUA mean SOC stocks (0-30 cm depth) account for 10.4 kg m(-2), compared to 3.4 kg m(-2) in WUD. 53% of the SOC is stored in the upper 10 cm in WUD, in HUA only 39%. Highest POM values of 36% occurred in profiles with high soil moisture content. SOC stocks, soil moisture and active layer thickness correlated strongly in discontinuous permafrost while no correlation between SOC stocks and active layer thickness and only a weak relation between soil moisture and SOC stocks could be found in continuous permafrost. Consequently, permafrost-affected soils in discontinuous permafrost environments are susceptible to soil moisture changes due to alterations in quantity and seasonal distribution of precipitation, increasing temperature and therefore evaporation.

  2. Soil carbon isotopic composition and soil carbon content in an agroecosystem during six years of Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE).

    PubMed

    Giesemann, Anette; Weigel, Hans-Joachim

    2008-12-01

    The Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment conducted at the Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL) in Braunschweig in an arable crop rotation (total duration six years) allowed us to trace carbon (C) input in the soil C pool, as the CO(2), used in the experiment to increase the atmospheric CO(2) concentration, was depleted in (13)C. Accurate assessment of the C input by means of stable C isotope analysis requires detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of both the C isotopic composition and the C content in the soil C. Assumed changes in these parameters were examined. CO(2) enrichment treatment over a six year period resulted in a clear trend towards an increase of soil C content in the uppermost 10 cm of soil. About 4.9% of the soil C present under ambient air conditions, and 10.7% present under elevated CO(2) conditions were determined as new input. However, the results are not statistically significant yet.

  3. Ecosystem carbon budgeting and soil carbon sequestration in reclaimed mine soil.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Raj K; Lal, Rattan

    2006-08-01

    Global warming risks from emissions of green house gases (GHGs) by anthropogenic activities, and possible mitigation strategies of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration have increased the need for the identification of ecosystems with high C sink capacity. Depleted soil organic C (SOC) pools of reclaimed mine soil (RMS) ecosystems can be restored through conversion to an appropriate land use and adoption of recommended management practices (RMPs). The objectives of this paper are to (1) synthesize available information on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from coal mining and combustion activities, (2) understand mechanisms of SOC sequestration and its protection, (3) identify factors affecting C sequestration potential in RMSs, (4) review available methods for the estimation of ecosystem C budget (ECB), and (5) identify knowledge gaps to enhance C sink capacity of RMS ecosystems and prioritize research issues. The drastic perturbations of soil by mining activities can accentuate CO2 emission through mineralization, erosion, leaching, changes in soil moisture and temperature regimes, and reduction in biomass returned to the soil. The reclamation of drastically disturbed soils leads to improvement in soil quality and development of soil pedogenic processes accruing the benefit of SOC sequestration and additional income from trading SOC credits. The SOC sequestration potential in RMS depends on amount of biomass production and return to soil, and mechanisms of C protection. The rate of SOC sequestration ranges from 0.1 to 3.1 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1) and 0.7 to 4 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1) in grass and forest RMS ecosystem, respectively. Proper land restoration alone could off-set 16 Tg CO2 in the U.S. annually. However, the factors affecting C sequestration and protection in RMS leading to increase in microbial activity, nutrient availability, soil aggregation, C build up, and soil profile development must be better understood in order to formulate guidelines for development of an

  4. Large uncertainty in permafrost carbon stocks due to hillslope soil deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelef, Eitan; Rowland, Joel C.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Hilley, G. E.; Mishra, Umakant; Altmann, Garrett L.; Ping, Chien-Lu

    2017-06-01

    Northern circumpolar permafrost soils contain more than a third of the global soil organic carbon pool (SOC). The sensitivity of this carbon pool to a changing climate is a primary source of uncertainty in simulation-based climate projections. These projections, however, do not account for the accumulation of soil deposits at the base of hillslopes (hill toes) and the influence of this accumulation on the distribution, sequestration, and decomposition of SOC in landscapes affected by permafrost. Here we combine topographic models with soil profile data and topographic analysis to evaluate the quantity and uncertainty of SOC mass stored in perennially frozen hill toe soil deposits. We show that in Alaska this SOC mass introduces an uncertainty that is >200% the state-wide estimates of SOC stocks (77 Pg C) and that a similarly large uncertainty may also pertain at a circumpolar scale. Soil sampling and geophysical imaging efforts that target hill toe deposits can help constrain this large uncertainty.

  5. Forest soil carbon is threatened by intensive biomass harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achat, David L.; Fortin, Mathieu; Landmann, Guy; Ringeval, Bruno; Augusto, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Forests play a key role in the carbon cycle as they store huge quantities of organic carbon, most of which is stored in soils, with a smaller part being held in vegetation. While the carbon storage capacity of forests is influenced by forestry, the long-term impacts of forest managers’ decisions on soil organic carbon (SOC) remain unclear. Using a meta-analysis approach, we showed that conventional biomass harvests preserved the SOC of forests, unlike intensive harvests where logging residues were harvested to produce fuelwood. Conventional harvests caused a decrease in carbon storage in the forest floor, but when the whole soil profile was taken into account, we found that this loss in the forest floor was compensated by an accumulation of SOC in deeper soil layers. Conversely, we found that intensive harvests led to SOC losses in all layers of forest soils. We assessed the potential impact of intensive harvests on the carbon budget, focusing on managed European forests. Estimated carbon losses from forest soils suggested that intensive biomass harvests could constitute an important source of carbon transfer from forests to the atmosphere (142-497 Tg-C), partly neutralizing the role of a carbon sink played by forest soils.

  6. Forest soil carbon is threatened by intensive biomass harvesting.

    PubMed

    Achat, David L; Fortin, Mathieu; Landmann, Guy; Ringeval, Bruno; Augusto, Laurent

    2015-11-04

    Forests play a key role in the carbon cycle as they store huge quantities of organic carbon, most of which is stored in soils, with a smaller part being held in vegetation. While the carbon storage capacity of forests is influenced by forestry, the long-term impacts of forest managers' decisions on soil organic carbon (SOC) remain unclear. Using a meta-analysis approach, we showed that conventional biomass harvests preserved the SOC of forests, unlike intensive harvests where logging residues were harvested to produce fuelwood. Conventional harvests caused a decrease in carbon storage in the forest floor, but when the whole soil profile was taken into account, we found that this loss in the forest floor was compensated by an accumulation of SOC in deeper soil layers. Conversely, we found that intensive harvests led to SOC losses in all layers of forest soils. We assessed the potential impact of intensive harvests on the carbon budget, focusing on managed European forests. Estimated carbon losses from forest soils suggested that intensive biomass harvests could constitute an important source of carbon transfer from forests to the atmosphere (142-497 Tg-C), partly neutralizing the role of a carbon sink played by forest soils.

  7. Forest soil carbon is threatened by intensive biomass harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Achat, David L.; Fortin, Mathieu; Landmann, Guy; Ringeval, Bruno; Augusto, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Forests play a key role in the carbon cycle as they store huge quantities of organic carbon, most of which is stored in soils, with a smaller part being held in vegetation. While the carbon storage capacity of forests is influenced by forestry, the long-term impacts of forest managers’ decisions on soil organic carbon (SOC) remain unclear. Using a meta-analysis approach, we showed that conventional biomass harvests preserved the SOC of forests, unlike intensive harvests where logging residues were harvested to produce fuelwood. Conventional harvests caused a decrease in carbon storage in the forest floor, but when the whole soil profile was taken into account, we found that this loss in the forest floor was compensated by an accumulation of SOC in deeper soil layers. Conversely, we found that intensive harvests led to SOC losses in all layers of forest soils. We assessed the potential impact of intensive harvests on the carbon budget, focusing on managed European forests. Estimated carbon losses from forest soils suggested that intensive biomass harvests could constitute an important source of carbon transfer from forests to the atmosphere (142–497 Tg-C), partly neutralizing the role of a carbon sink played by forest soils. PMID:26530409

  8. Mycorrhizal mediation of soil organic carbon decomposition under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Significant effort in global change research has recently been directed towards assessing the potential of soil as a carbon sink under future atmospheric carbon dioxide scenarios. Attention has focused on the impact of elevated carbon dioxide on plant interactions with mycorrhizae, a symbiotic soil...

  9. Soil organic carbon enrichment of dust emissions: Magnitude, mechanisms and its implications for the carbon cycle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil erosion is an important component of the global carbon cycle. However, little attention has been given to the role of aeolian processes in influencing soil organic carbon (SOC) flux and the release of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon-dioxide (CO2), to the atmosphere. Understanding the magnitu...

  10. Distribution and possible immobilization of lead in a forest soil (Luvisol) profile.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Péter; Németh, Tibor; Mohai, Ilona

    2005-02-01

    Geochemical analyses using a sequential extraction method and lead adsorption studies were carried out in order to characterize the distribution and adsorption of lead on each genetic horizon of a Luvisol profile developed on a pelagic clayey aleurolite. Clay illuviation is the most important pedogenic process in the profile studied. Its clay mineralogy is characterized by chlorite/vermiculite species with increasing chlorite component downward. The amount of carbonate minerals strongly increases in the lower part of the profile resulting in an abrupt rise in soil pH within a small distance. The Pb content of the soil profile exceeds the natural geochemical background only in the Ao horizon, and its amount decreases with depth in the profile without correcting for differences in bulk density, suggesting the binding of Pb to soil organic matter. According to the sequential extraction analysis the organic matter and carbonate content of the soil have the most significant effect on lead distribution. This effect varies in the different soil horizons. Lead adsorption experiments were carried out on whole soil samples, soil clay fractions, as well as on their carbonate and organic matter free variant. The different soil horizons adsorb lead to different extents depending on their organic matter, clay mineral and carbonate content; and the mineralogical features of soil clays significantly affect their lead adsorption capacity. The clay fraction adsorbs 25% more lead than the whole soil, while in the calcareous subsoil a significant proportion of lead is precipitated due to the alkaline conditions. 10 and 5% of adsorbed Pb can be leached with distilled water in the organic matter and clay mineral dominated soil horizons, respectively. These results suggest that soil organic matter plays a decisive role in the adsorption of Pb, but the fixation by clay minerals is stronger.

  11. Conservation agricultural management to sequester soil organic carbon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Storing carbon (C) in soil as organic matter is not only a viable strategy to sequester CO2 from the atmosphere, but is vital for improving the quality, fertility, and functioning of soil. This presentation describes relevant management approaches to avoid land degradation and foster soil organic C ...

  12. Does North Appalachian Agriculture Contribute to Soil Carbon Sequestration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agricultural systems are important for world ecosystems. They can be managed to moderate CO2 emissions. World soils can be both a sink and source of atmospheric CO2, but it is a slow process. Data from long-term soil management exp