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Sample records for carbon transverse relaxation

  1. Transverse Spin Relaxation in Liquid X

    SciTech Connect

    Romalis, M. V.; Ledbetter, M. P.

    2001-08-06

    Using spin-echo NMR techniques we study the transverse spin relaxation of hyperpolarized liquid X{sup 129}e in a spherical cell. We observe an instability of the transverse magnetization due to dipolar fields produced by liquid X{sup 129}e , and find that imperfections in the {pi} pulses of the spin-echo sequence suppress this instability. A simple perturbative model of this effect is in good agreement with the data. We obtain a transverse spin relaxation time of 1300sec in liquid X{sup 129}e , and discuss applications of hyperpolarized liquid X{sup 129}e as a sensitive magnetic gradiometer and for a permanent electric dipole moment search.

  2. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  3. Correlation of transverse relaxation time with structure of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Gregory B.; Meerovich, Victor M.; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L.

    2016-09-01

    Transverse spin-spin relaxation of liquids entrapped in nanocavities with different orientational order is theoretically investigated. Based on the bivariate normal distribution of nanocavities directions, we have calculated the anisotropy of the transverse relaxation time for biological systems, such as collagenous tissues, articular cartilage, and tendon. In the framework of the considered model, the dipole-dipole interaction is determined by a single coupling constant. The calculation results for the transverse relaxation time explain the angular dependence observed in MRI experiments with biological objects. The good agreement with the experimental data is obtained by adjustment of only one parameter which characterizes the disorder in fiber orientations. The relaxation time is correlated with the degree of ordering in biological tissues. Thus, microstructure of the tissues can be revealed from the measurement of relaxation time anisotropy. The clinical significance of the correlation, especially in the detection of damage must be evaluated in a large prospective clinical trials.

  4. Correlation of transverse relaxation time with structure of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Furman, Gregory B; Meerovich, Victor M; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L

    2016-09-01

    Transverse spin-spin relaxation of liquids entrapped in nanocavities with different orientational order is theoretically investigated. Based on the bivariate normal distribution of nanocavities directions, we have calculated the anisotropy of the transverse relaxation time for biological systems, such as collagenous tissues, articular cartilage, and tendon. In the framework of the considered model, the dipole-dipole interaction is determined by a single coupling constant. The calculation results for the transverse relaxation time explain the angular dependence observed in MRI experiments with biological objects. The good agreement with the experimental data is obtained by adjustment of only one parameter which characterizes the disorder in fiber orientations. The relaxation time is correlated with the degree of ordering in biological tissues. Thus, microstructure of the tissues can be revealed from the measurement of relaxation time anisotropy. The clinical significance of the correlation, especially in the detection of damage must be evaluated in a large prospective clinical trials.

  5. Transverse quasilinear relaxation in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    1998-08-01

    Transverse quasilinear relaxation of the cyclotron Cherenkov instability of an ultrarelativistic beam propagating along a strong, inhomogeneous magnetic field in a pair plasma is considered. We find a quasilinear state in which the kinetic-type instability is saturated by the force arising in the inhomogeneous field due to the conservation of the adiabatic invariant. The resulting wave intensities generally have a non-power-law frequency dependence, but in a broad frequency range can be well approximated by a power law with a spectral index -2. The emergent spectra and fluxes are consistent with the one observed from radio pulsars.

  6. A fast determination method for transverse relaxation of spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jixi Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-04-15

    We propose a fast and accurate determination method for transverse relaxation of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. This method is based on the measurement of magnetic resonance linewidth via a chirped magnetic field excitation and the amplitude spectrum analysis. Compared with the frequency sweeping via separate sinusoidal excitation, our method can realize linewidth determination within only few seconds and meanwhile obtain good frequency resolution. Therefore, it can avoid the drift error in long term measurement and improve the accuracy of the determination. As the magnetic resonance frequency of the SERF magnetometer is very low, we include the effect of the negative resonance frequency caused by the chirp and achieve the coefficient of determination of the fitting results better than 0.998 with 95% confidence bounds to the theoretical equation. The experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis.

  7. A fast determination method for transverse relaxation of spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixi; Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-04-01

    We propose a fast and accurate determination method for transverse relaxation of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. This method is based on the measurement of magnetic resonance linewidth via a chirped magnetic field excitation and the amplitude spectrum analysis. Compared with the frequency sweeping via separate sinusoidal excitation, our method can realize linewidth determination within only few seconds and meanwhile obtain good frequency resolution. Therefore, it can avoid the drift error in long term measurement and improve the accuracy of the determination. As the magnetic resonance frequency of the SERF magnetometer is very low, we include the effect of the negative resonance frequency caused by the chirp and achieve the coefficient of determination of the fitting results better than 0.998 with 95% confidence bounds to the theoretical equation. The experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation in muscle water.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M; Puon, P S

    1981-01-01

    The origin of the nonexponentiality of proton spin echoes of skeletal muscle has been carefully examined. It is shown that the slowly decaying part of the proton spin echoes is not due to extracellular water. First, for muscle from mice with in vivo deuteration, the deuteron spin echoes were also nonexponential, but the slowly decaying part had a larger weighing factor. Second, for glycerinated muscle in which cell membranes were disrupted, the proton spin echoes were similar to those in intact muscle. Third, the nonexponentiality of the proton spin echoes in intact muscle increased when postmortem rigor set in. Finally, when the lifetimes of extracellular water and intracellular water were taken into account in the exchange, it was found that the two types of water would not give two resolvable exponentials with the observed decay constants. It is suggested that the unusually short T2's and the nonexponential character of the spin echoes of proton and deuteron in muscle water are mainly due to hydrogen exchange between water and functional groups in the protein filaments. These groups have large dipolar or quadrupolar splittings, and undergo hydrogen exchange with water at intermediate rates. The exchange processes and their effects on the spin echoes are pH-dependent. The dependence of transverse relaxation of pH was observed in glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers. PMID:7272437

  9. Transverse relaxation in the rotating frame induced by chemical exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaeli, Shalom; Sorce, Dennis J.; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Ugurbil, Kamil; Garwood, Michael

    2004-08-01

    In the presence of radiofrequency irradiation, relaxation of magnetization aligned with the effective magnetic field is characterized by the time constant T1 ρ. On the other hand, the time constant T2 ρ characterizes the relaxation of magnetization that is perpendicular to the effective field. Here, it is shown that T2 ρ can be measured directly with Carr-Purcell sequences composed of a train of adiabatic full-passage (AFP) pulses. During adiabatic rotation, T2 ρ characterizes the relaxation of the magnetization, which under adiabatic conditions remains approximately perpendicular to the time-dependent effective field. Theory is derived to describe the influence of chemical exchange on T2 ρ relaxation in the fast-exchange regime, with time constant defined as T2 ρ,ex . The derived theory predicts the rate constant R 2ρ, ex (=1/T 2ρ, ex) to be dependent on the choice of amplitude- and frequency-modulation functions used in the AFP pulses. Measurements of R2 ρ,ex of the water/ethanol exchanging system confirm the predicted dependence on modulation functions. The described theoretical framework and adiabatic methods represent new tools to probe exchanging systems.

  10. Low-Dimensional Nanoparticle Clustering in Polymer Micelles and Their Transverse Relaxivity Rates

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Robert J.; Meng, Xin; Zhang, Peijun; Park, So-Jung

    2015-01-01

    One- or two-dimensional arrays of iron oxide nanoparticles were formed in colloidal assemblies of amphiphilic polymers. Electron tomography imaging revealed that nanoparticles are arranged into one-dimensional strings in magneto-micelles or two-dimensional sheets in magneto-core/shell assemblies. The distinct directional assembly behavior was attributed to the interparticle interaction relative to the nanoparticle–polymer interaction, which was modulated by varying the cosolvent used for the solution phase self-assembly. Magneto-core/shell assemblies with varying structural parameters were formed with a range of different sized as-synthesized nanoparticles. The transverse magnetic relaxivity rates (r2) of a series of different assemblies were determined to examine the effect of nanoparticle arrangement on the magnetic relaxivity for their potential applications in MRI. The results indicated that the assembly structure of nanoparticles in polymer micelles significantly affects the r2 of surrounding water, providing a way to control magnetic relaxivity. PMID:23731021

  11. An approximate analytical expression for the nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation rate of half-integer spins in liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation process of half-integer spins in liquid samples is known to exhibit multi-exponential behaviors. Within the framework of Redfield's relaxation theory, exact analytical expressions for describing such a process exist only for spin-3/2 nuclei. As a result, analyses of nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with spin >3/2 must rely on numerical diagonalization of the Redfield relaxation matrix over the entire motional range. In this work we propose an approximate analytical expression that can be used to analyze nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data of any half-integer spin in liquids over the entire motional range. The proposed equation yields results that are in excellent agreement with the exact numerical calculations.

  12. Experimental validation of a T2 ρ transverse relaxation model using LASER and CPMG acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, Simona; Bowen, Chris V.; Bartha, Robert

    2006-07-01

    The transverse relaxation rate (R2 = 1/T2) of many biological tissues are altered by endogenous magnetized particles (i.e., ferritin, deoxyhemoglobin), and may be sensitive to the pathological progression of neurodegenerative disorders associated with altered brain-iron stores. R2 measurements using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) acquisitions are sensitive to the refocusing pulse interval (2τcp), and have been modeled as a chemical exchange (CE) process, while R2 measurements using a localization by adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) sequence have an additional relaxation rate contribution that has been modeled as a R2ρ process. However, no direct comparison of the R2 measured using these two sequences has been described for a controlled phantom model of magnetized particles. The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to compare the accuracy of R2 relaxation rate predictions from the CE model with experimental data acquired using a conventional CPMG sequence, (2) to compare R2 estimates obtained using LASER and CPMG acquisitions, and (3) to determine whether the CE model, modified to account for R2ρ relaxation, adequately describes the R2 measured by LASER for a full range of τcp values. In all cases, our analysis was confined to spherical magnetic particles that satisfied the weak field regime. Three phantoms were produced that contained spherical magnetic particles (10 μm diameter polyamide powders) suspended in Gd-DTPA (1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mmol/L) doped gel. Mono-exponential R2 measurements were made at 4 T as a function of refocusing pulse interval. CPMG measurements of R2 agreed with CE model predictions while significant differences in R2 estimates were observed between LASER and CPMG measurements for short τcp acquisitions. The discrepancy between R2 estimates is shown to be attributable to contrast enhancement in LASER due to T2ρ relaxation.

  13. A theoretical and numerical consideration of the longitudinal and transverse relaxations in the rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kenya

    2013-11-01

    We previously derived a simple equation for solving time-dependent Bloch equations by a matrix operation. The purpose of this study was to present a theoretical and numerical consideration of the longitudinal (R1ρ=1/T1ρ) and transverse relaxation rates in the rotating frame (R2ρ=1/T2ρ), based on this method. First, we derived an equation describing the time evolution of the magnetization vector (M(t)) by expanding the matrix exponential into the eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors using diagonalization. Second, we obtained the longitudinal magnetization vector in the rotating frame (M1ρ(t)) by taking the inner product of M(t) and the eigenvector with the smallest eigenvalue in modulus, and then we obtained the transverse magnetization vector in the rotating frame (M2ρ(t)) by subtracting M1ρ(t) from M(t). For comparison, we also computed the spin-locked magnetization vector. We derived the exact solutions for R1ρ and R2ρ from the eigenvalues, and compared them with those obtained numerically from M1ρ(t) and M2ρ(t), respectively. There was excellent agreement between them. From the exact solutions for R1ρ and R2ρ, R2ρ was found to be given by R2ρ=(2R2+R1)/2-R1ρ/2, where R1 and R2 denote the conventional longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates, respectively. We also derived M1ρ(t) and M2ρ(t) for bulk water protons, in which the effect of chemical exchange was taken into account using a 2-pool chemical exchange model, and we compared the R1ρ and R2ρ values obtained from the eigenvalues and those obtained numerically from M1ρ(t) and M2ρ(t). There was also excellent agreement between them. In conclusion, this study will be useful for better understanding of the longitudinal and transverse relaxations in the rotating frame and for analyzing the contrast mechanisms in T1ρ- and T2ρ-weighted MRI.

  14. Detection of intermolecular homonuclear dipolar coupling in organic rich shale by transverse relaxation exchange.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Kathryn E; Cheng, Yuesheng

    2017-03-04

    The mechanism behind surface relaxivity within organic porosity in shales has been an unanswered question. Here, we present results that confirm the existence of intermolecular homonuclear dipolar coupling between solid and liquid phases in sedimentary organic matter. Transverse magnetization exchange measurements were performed on an organic-rich shale saturated with liquid hydrocarbon. Liquid and solid constituents were identified through both sample resaturation and through their T1/T2 ratios. Extensive cross peaks are observed in the T2-T2 exchange spectra between the solid and liquid constituents, indicating an exchange of magnetization between the two phases. This result cannot arise from physical molecular diffusion, and the dissolution energies are too high for chemical exchange, such that the magnetization exchange must arise from intermolecular homonuclear dipolar coupling. These results both confirm a possible source of surface relaxivity in organic matter and emphasize caution in the use of standard porous media interpretations of relaxation results in shales because of coupling between different magnetization environments.

  15. Measurement of longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation rates using the ground-state Hanle effect

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, N.; Weis, A.

    2011-11-15

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the resonant circularly-polarized-light-induced Hanle effect in the ground state of Cs vapor atoms in a paraffin-coated cell. The effect manifests itself as a narrow resonance (centered at B=0) in the dependence of the optical transmission coefficient of the vapor on the magnitude of an external magnetic field B(vector sign). We develop a theoretical model that yields an algebraic expression for the shape of these resonances for arbitrary field orientations and arbitrary angular momenta of the states coupled by the exciting light, provided that the light power is kept sufficiently small. An experimental procedure for assessing the range of validity of the model is given. Experiments were carried out on the laser-driven Cs D{sub 1} transition both in longitudinal and transverse field geometries, and the observed line shapes of the corresponding bright and dark resonances give an excellent confirmation of the model predictions. The method is applied for determining the intrinsic longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of the vector magnetization in the vapor and their dependence on light power.

  16. Electromechanical behavior of carbon nanotube fibers under transverse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Lu, Weibang; Sockalingam, Subramani; Gu, Bohong; Sun, Baozhong; Gillespie, John W.; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2017-03-01

    Although in most cases carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers experience axial stretch or compression, they can also be subjected to transverse compression, for example, under impact loading. In this paper, the electromechanical properties of both aerogel-spun and dry-spun CNT fibers under quasi-static transverse compressive loading are investigated for the first time. Transverse compression shows a nonlinear and inelastic behavior. The compressive modulus/strength of the aerogel-spun and dry-spun CNT fibers are about 0.21 GPa/0.796 GPa and 1.73 GPa/1.036 GPa, respectively. The electrical resistance goes through three stages during transverse compressive loading/unloading: initially it decreases, then it increases during the loading, and finally it decreases upon unloading. This study extends our knowledge of the overall properties of CNT fibers, and will be helpful in promoting their engineering applications.

  17. Dysprosium-bearing red cells as potential transverse relaxation agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K M; Tao, J Z; Kennan, R P; Gore, J C

    2001-05-01

    The cytosol of intact human red blood cells was loaded with 28.1 +/- 3.4 mM of dysprosium DTPA-BMA using a hypoosmotic technique. When loaded cells were diluted with saline and control cells to give an average dysprosium concentration of 3.3 +/- 0.5 mM, the transverse relaxation rate constants R(*)(2) and R(2) increased. R(*)(2) increased from 7.5 +/- 0.9 sec(-1) to 356 +/- 50 sec(-1), and R(2) increased from 7.4 +/- 0.7 sec(-1) to 148 +/- 40 sec(-1). After lysing, R(*)(2) was 6.0 +/- 0.6 sec(-1) in the control and 13.4 +/- 1.5 sec(-1) in the mixture; R(2) was 6.4 +/- 1.1 sec(-1) and 9.8 +/- 2.4 sec(-1), respectively. Thus, the relaxivity effects were enhanced by sequestration of the dysprosium within intact red cells, and this effect was lost after lysis. At a circulating whole-blood concentration of 0.81 +/- 0.15 mM in rats, the liver signal intensity dropped 29.9% +/- 3.7% and kidney signal intensity dropped 19.4% +/- 8.7%. Dysprosium-loaded cells might be useful in the study of perfusion and tissue blood volume.

  18. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Muncaci, S.; Ardelean, I.; Boboia, S.

    2013-11-13

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  19. Transverse Relaxation and Magnetization Transfer in Skeletal Muscle: Effect of pH

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Elizabeth A.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Does, Mark D.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise increases the intracellular T2 (T2,i) of contracting muscles. The mechanism(s) for the T2,i increase have not been fully described, and may include increased intracellular free water and acidification. These changes may alter chemical exchange processes between intracellular free water and proteins. In this study, the hypotheses were tested that 1) pH changes T2,i by affecting the rate of magnetization transfer (MT) between free intracellular water and intracellular proteins and 2) the magnitude of the T2,i effect depends on acquisition mode (localized or non-localized) and echo spacing. Frog gastrocnemius muscles were excised and their intracellular pH was either kept at physiological pH (7.0) or modified to model exercising muscle (pH 6.5). The intracellular transverse relaxation rate (R2,i =1/T2,i) always decreased in the acidic muscles, but the changes were greater when measured using more rapid refocusing rates. The MT rate from the macromolecular proton pool to the free water proton pool, its reverse rate, and the spin-lattice relaxation rate of water decreased in acidic muscles. It is concluded that intracellular acidification alters the R2,i of muscle water in a refocusing rate-dependent manner and that the R2,i changes are correlated with changes in the MT rate between macromolecules and free intracellular water. PMID:19097244

  20. Effect of the cross-relaxation rate on the transverse radiation dynamics of a wide-aperture laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zaikin, A P; Molevich, N E

    2004-08-31

    The effect of a finite polarisation relaxation time on the transverse structure of the optical field of a wide-aperture laser is considered. The conditions are found for the emergence of periodic autowaves for positive and negative frequency detuning. These conditions are shown to depend strongly on the cross-relaxation rate. It is established that the dynamics of finite-aperture lasers at high cross-relaxation rates is satisfactorily described by simplified models in which the polarisation is adiabatically eliminated. (lasers)

  1. An in vivo study of the orientation-dependent and independent components of transverse relaxation rates in white matter.

    PubMed

    Gil, Rita; Khabipova, Diana; Zwiers, Marcel; Hilbert, Tom; Kober, Tobias; Marques, José P

    2016-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides information that allows the estimation of white-matter (WM) fibre orientation and distribution, but it does not provide information about myelin density, fibre concentration or fibre size within each voxel. On the other hand, quantitative relaxation contrasts (like the apparent transverse relaxation, R2∗) offer iron and myelin-related contrast, but their dependence on the orientation of microstructure with respect to the applied magnetic field, B0 , is often neglected. The aim of this work was to combine the fibre orientation information retrieved from the DWI acquisition and the sensitivity to microstructural information from quantitative relaxation parameters. The in vivo measured quantitative transverse relaxation maps (R2 and R2∗) were decomposed into their orientation-dependent and independent components, using the DWI fibre orientation information as prior knowledge. The analysis focused on major WM fibre bundles such as the forceps major (FMj), forceps minor (FMn), cingulum (CG) and corticospinal tracts (CST). The orientation-dependent R2 parameters, despite their small size (0-1.5 Hz), showed higher variability across different fibre populations, while those derived from R2∗, although larger (3.1-4.5 Hz), were mostly bundle-independent. With this article, we have, for the first time, attempted the in vivo characterization of the orientation-(in)dependent components of the transverse relaxation rates and demonstrated that the orientation of WM fibres influences both R2 and R2∗ contrasts.

  2. The effect of magnetically induced linear aggregates on proton transverse relaxation rates of aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Woodward, Robert C; House, Michael J; Tokarev, Alexander; Hammers, Jacob; Qi, Bin; Shaw, Jeremy; Saunders, Martin; Varsani, Rahi R; St Pierre, Tim G; Mefford, O Thompson

    2013-03-07

    It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R(2), is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. It is widely known that chain formation occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. In this work we examine the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles. A series of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying stabilizing ligand brush lengths were synthesized. These systems were characterized with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dark-field optical microscopy, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements. The dark field optical microscopy and R(2) measurements were made in similar magnetic fields over the same time scale so as to correlate the reduction of the transverse relaxivity with the formation of linear aggregates. Our results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal arrangement of the system in a magnetic field, producing differences in the rate and size of chain formation, and hence systematic changes in transverse relaxation rates over time. With increasing ligand brush length, attractive inter-particle interactions are reduced, which results in slower aggregate formation and shorter linear aggregate length. These results have implications for the stabilization, characterization and potentially the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticle systems used in biomedical applications.

  3. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ant_e^k (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  4. Bone marrow segmentation based on a combined consideration of transverse relaxation processes and Dixon oscillations.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Mukund; Jarrett, Delma Y; Mulkern, Robert V

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that gradient-echo sampling of single spin echoes can be used to isolate the signal from trabecular bone marrow, with high-quality segmentation and surface reconstructions resulting from the application of simple post-processing strategies. Theoretical expressions of the time-domain single-spin-echo signal were used to simulate signals from bone marrow, non-bone fatty deposits and muscle. These simulations were compared with and used to interpret signals obtained by the application of the gradient-echo sampling of a spin-echo sequence to image the knee and surrounding tissues at 1.5 T. Trabecular bone marrow has a much higher reversible transverse relaxation rate than surrounding non-bone fatty deposits and other musculoskeletal tissues. This observation, combined with a choice of gradient-echo spacing that accentuates Dixon-type oscillations from chemical-shift interference effects, enabled the isolation of bone marrow signal from surrounding tissues through the use of simple image subtraction and thresholding. Three-dimensional renderings of the marrow surface were then readily generated with this approach - renderings that may prove useful for bone morphology assessment, e.g. for the measurement of femoral anteversion. In conclusion, understanding the behavior of signals from bone marrow and surrounding tissue as a function of time through a spin echo facilitates the segmentation and reconstruction of bone marrow surfaces using straightforward post-processing strategies that are typically available on modern radiology workstations.

  5. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grampp, S.; Majumdar, S.; Jergas, M.; Lang, P.; Gies, A.; Genant, H. K.

    1995-01-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2* is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2* in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2* measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 degrees. An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2* and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm2) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2* and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2* times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm2 (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis.

  6. Mechanical Impedance of the Non-loaded Lower Leg with Relaxed Muscles in the Transverse Plane

    PubMed Central

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols and results of the experiments for the estimation of the mechanical impedance of the humans’ lower leg in the External–Internal direction in the transverse plane under non-load bearing condition and with relaxed muscles. The objectives of the estimation of the lower leg’s mechanical impedance are to facilitate the design of passive and active prostheses with mechanical characteristics similar to the humans’ lower leg, and to define a reference that can be compared to the values from the patients suffering from spasticity. The experiments were performed with 10 unimpaired male subjects using a lower extremity rehabilitation robot (Anklebot, Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc.) capable of applying torque perturbations to the foot. The subjects were in a seated position, and the Anklebot recorded the applied torques and the resulting angular movement of the lower leg. In this configuration, the recorded dynamics are due mainly to the rotations of the ankle’s talocrural and the subtalar joints, and any contribution of the tibiofibular joints and knee joint. The dynamic mechanical impedance of the lower leg was estimated in the frequency domain with an average coherence of 0.92 within the frequency range of 0–30 Hz, showing a linear correlation between the displacement and the torques within this frequency range under the conditions of the experiment. The mean magnitude of the stiffness of the lower leg (the impedance magnitude averaged in the range of 0–1 Hz) was determined as 4.9 ± 0.74 Nm/rad. The direct estimation of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg results in the mean value of 5.8 ± 0.81 Nm/rad. An analysis of variance shows that the estimated values for the stiffness from the two experiments are not statistically different. PMID:26697424

  7. NMR permeability estimators in 'chalk' carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Guedes Domingues, Ana Beatriz; Bagueira de Vasconcellos Azeredo, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cut-off. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cut-offs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  8. Determination of transverse relaxation rates in systems with scalar-coupled spins: The role of antiphase coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Takuya F.; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-12-01

    Homogeneous line-widths that arise from transverse relaxation tend to be masked by B0 field inhomogeneity and by multiplets due to homonuclear J-couplings. Besides well-known spin-locking sequences that lead to signals that decay with a rate R1ρ without any modulations, alternative experiments allow one to determine the transverse relaxation rates R2 in systems with scalar-coupled spins. We evaluate three recent strategies by experiment and simulation: (i) moderate-amplitude SITCOM-CPMG sequences (Dittmer and Bodenhausen, 2006 [2]), (ii) multiple-quantum filtered (MQF) sequences (Barrère et al., 2011 [4]) and (iii) PROJECT sequences (Aguilar et al., 2012 [5]). Experiments where the J-evolution is suppressed by spin-locking measure the pure relaxation rate R2(Ix) of an in-phase component. Experiments based on J-refocusing yield a mixture of in-phase rates R2(Ix) and antiphase rates R2(2IySz), where the latter are usually faster than the former. Moderate-amplitude SITCOM-CPMG and PROJECT methods can be applied to systems with many coupled spins, but applications of MQF sequences are limited to two-spin systems since modulations in larger systems can only partly be suppressed.

  9. The Effect of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneity on the Transverse Relaxation of Quadrupolar Nuclei Measured by Multiple Quantum Filtered NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, U.; Kushnir, T.; Knubovets, T.; Itzchak, Y.; Navon, G.

    1997-09-01

    The effects of magnetic fieldsB0andB1inhomogeneities on techniques which are commonly used for the measurements of triple-quantum-filtered (TQF) NMR spectroscopy of23Na in biological tissues are analyzed. The results of measurements by pulse sequences with and without refocusing ofB0inhomogeneities are compared. It is shown that without refocusing the errors in the measurement of the transverse relaxation times by TQF NMR spectroscopy may be as large as 100%, and thus, refocusing of magnetic field inhomogeneity is mandatory. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that without refocusingB0inhomogeneities the spectral width and phase depend on the interpulse time intervals, thus, leading to errors in the measured relaxation times. It is shown that pulse sequences that were used for the refocusing of the magnetic field (B0) inhomogeneity also reduce the sensitivity of the experimental results to radiofrequency (B1) magnetic field inhomogeneity.

  10. Assessing tumor cytoarchitecture using multi-echo DSC-MRI derived measures of the Transverse Relaxivity at Tracer Equilibrium (TRATE)

    PubMed Central

    Semmineh, Natenael B; Xu, Junzhong; Skinner, Jack T; Xie, Jingping; Li, Hua; Ayers, Gregory; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain tumor dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI studies, multi-echo acquisition methods are used to quantify the dynamic changes in T1 and T2* that occur when contrast agent (CA) extravasates. Such methods also enable the estimation of the effective tissue CA transverse relaxivity. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the Transverse Relaxivity at Tracer Equilibrium (TRATE) to tumor cytoarchitecture. Theory and Methods Computational and in vitro studies were used to evaluate the biophysical basis of TRATE. In 9L, C6 and human brain tumors, TRATE, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), the CA transfer constant (Ktrans), the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve) and histological data were compared. Results Simulations and in vitro results indicate that TRATE is highly sensitive to variations in cellular properties such as cell size and density. The histologic cell density and TRATE values were significantly higher in 9L tumors as compared to C6 tumors. In animal and human tumors, a voxel-wise comparison of TRATE with ADC, ve, and Ktrans maps showed low spatial correlation. Conclusion The assessment of TRATE is clinically feasible and its sensitivity to tissue cytoarchitectural features not present in other imaging methods indicate that it could potentially serve as a unique structural signature or “trait” of cancer. PMID:25227668

  11. Preparation of Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles and their silica-coated clusters: Magnetic properties and transverse relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaman, Ondřej; Kuličková, Jarmila; Herynek, Vít; Koktan, Jakub; Maryško, Miroslav; Dědourková, Tereza; Knížek, Karel; Jirák, Zdeněk

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal synthesis of Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 nanoparticles followed by direct encapsulation of the as-grown material into silica is demonstrated as a fast and facile method for preparation of efficient negative contrast agents based on clusters of ferrite crystallites. At first, the hydrothermal procedure is optimized to achieve strictly single-phase magnetic nanoparticles of Mn-Zn ferrites in the compositional range of x≈0.2-0.6 and with the mean size of crystallites ≈10 nm. The products are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and SQUID magnetometry, and the composition close to x=0.4 is selected for the preparation of silica-coated clusters with the mean diameter of magnetic cores ≈25 nm. Their composite structure is studied by means of transmission electron microscopy combined with detailed image analysis and magnetic measurements in DC fields. The relaxometric studies, performed in the magnetic field of B0=0.5 T, reveal high transverse relaxivity (r2(20 °C)=450 s-1 mmol(Me3O4)-1 L) with a pronounced temperature dependence, which correlates with the observed temperature dependence of magnetization and is ascribed to a mechanism of transverse relaxation similar to the motional averaging regime.

  12. The effect of polymer coatings on proton transverse relaxivities of aqueous suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Matthew R J; Huffstetler, Phillip P; Miles, William C; Goff, Jonathon D; Davis, Richey M; Riffle, Judy S; House, Michael J; Woodward, Robert C; St Pierre, Timothy G

    2011-08-12

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their high magnetic susceptibilities. Here we investigate 19 polyether-coated magnetite nanoparticle systems comprising three series. All systems were synthesized from the same batch of magnetite nanoparticles. A different polyether was used for each series. Each series comprised systems with systematically varied polyether loadings per particle. A highly significant (p < 0.0001) linear correlation (r = 0.956) was found between the proton relaxivity and the intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering in the 19 particle systems studied. The intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering is sensitive to small number fractions of larger particles/aggregates. We conclude that the primary effect leading to differences in proton relaxivity between systems arises from the small degree of aggregation within the samples, which appears to be determined by the nature of the polymer and, for one system, the degree of polymer loading of the particles. For the polyether coatings used in this study, any changes in relaxivity from differences in water exclusion or diffusion rates caused by the polymer are minor in comparison with the changes in relaxivity resulting from variations in the degree of aggregation.

  13. Ultrafast direct modulation of transverse-mode coupled-cavity VCSELs far beyond the relaxation oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    A novel approach for bandwidth augmentation for direct modulation of VCSELs using transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is raised, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. The base structure is similar to that of 3QW VCSELs with 980 nm wavelength operation. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs was limited by 9-10 GHz, the 3-dB bandwidth of TCC VCSEL with aperture diameters of 8.5×8.5μm2 and 3×3μm2 are increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. Our current bandwidth achievement on the larger aperture size is 29 GHz which is limited by the used photo-detector. To the best of our knowledge this is the fastest 980 nm VCSEL.

  14. NOTE: Detection limits for ferrimagnetic particle concentrations using magnetic resonance imaging based proton transverse relaxation rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, H.; Chua-anusorn, W.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Dobson, J.

    2003-03-01

    A clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was used to measure proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) in agar gels with varying concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in a field strength of 1.5 T. The nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation of ferric and ferrous ions in the presence of either dextran or polyvinyl alcohol. The method of preparation resulted in loosely packed clusters (dextran) or branched chains (polyvinyl alcohol) of particles containing of the order of 600 and 400 particles, respectively. For both methods of particle preparation, concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron in agar gel less than 0.01 mg ml-1 had no measurable effect on the value of R2 for the gel. The results indicate that MRI-based R2 measurements using 1.5 T clinical scanners are not quite sensitive enough to detect the very low concentrations of nanoparticulate biogenic magnetite reported in human brain tissue.

  15. SU-E-I-64: Transverse Relaxation Time in Methylene Protons of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance compared to other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point — resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated considering repetition time (TR) as 6000 msec and echo time (TE) as 40 — 550 msec. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H — MRS), eight male Sprague — Dawley rats were given free access to a normal - chow (NC) and eight other male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high — fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T{sub 2} measurements in the rats’ livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000 msec and TE of 40 – 220 msec. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: A chemical analysis of phantom and liver was not performed but a T{sub 2} decay curve was acquired. The T{sub 2} relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.07 ± 4.32 msec; HF rats, 31.43 ± 1.81 msec (p < 0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p < 0.005). Conclusion: This study of {sup 1}H-MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal — to — noise ratio differences to characterize all observable resonances for yielding T{sub 2} relaxation times of methylene resonance. {sup 1}H — MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease. This study was supported by grant (2012-007883 and 2014R1A2A1A10050270) from the Mid-career Researcher Program through the NRF funded by Ministry of Science. In addition, this study was supported by the Industrial R&D of MOTIE/KEIT (10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI-guided tumor tracking)

  16. Dielectric relaxation of ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate from molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; You, Xinli; Pratt, Lawrence R.; ...

    2015-11-24

    Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are widely used solvents in lithium (Li)-ion batteries and supercapacitors. Ion dissolution and diffusion in those media are correlated with solvent dielectric responses. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the pure solvents to calculate dielectric constants and relaxation times, and molecular mobilities. The computed results are compared with limited available experiments to assist more exhaustive studies of these important characteristics. As a result, the observed agreement is encouraging and provides guidance for further validation of force-field simulation models for EC and PC solvents.

  17. Effects of Mesoporous Silica Coating and Post-Synthetic Treatment on the Transverse Relaxivity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Katie R.; Lin, Yu-Shen; Zhang, Jinjin; Egger, Sam M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles have the capacity to load and deliver therapeutic cargo and incorporate imaging modalities, making them prominent candidates for theranostic devices. One of the most widespread imaging agents utilized in this and other theranostic platforms is nanoscale superparamagnetic iron oxide. Although several core-shell magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles presented in the literature have provided high T2 contrast in vitro and in vivo, there is ambiguity surrounding which parameters lead to enhanced contrast. Additionally, there is a need to understand the behavior of these imaging agents over time in biologically relevant environments. Herein, we present a systematic analysis of how the transverse relaxivity (r2) of magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles is influenced by nanoparticle diameter, iron oxide nanoparticle core synthesis, and the use of a hydrothermal treatment. This work demonstrates that samples which did not undergo a hydrothermal treatment experienced a drop in r2 (75% of original r2 within 8 days of water storage), while samples with hydrothermal treatment maintained roughly the same r2 for over 30 days in water. Our results suggest that iron oxide oxidation is the cause of the r2 loss, and this oxidation can be prevented both during synthesis and storage by the use of deoxygenated conditions during nanoparticle synthesis. The hydrothermal treatment also provides colloidal stability, even in acidic and highly salted solutions, and a resistance against acid degradation of the iron oxide nanoparticle core. The results of this study show the promise of multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles but will also likely inspire further investigation into multiples types of theranostic devices, taking into consideration their behavior over time and in relevant biological environments. PMID:23814377

  18. Effects of in-pulse transverse relaxation in 3D ultrashort echo time sequences: analytical derivation, comparison to numerical simulation and experimental application at 3T.

    PubMed

    Springer, Fabian; Steidle, Günter; Martirosian, Petros; Claussen, Claus D; Schick, Fritz

    2010-09-01

    The introduction of ultrashort-echo-time-(UTE)-sequences to clinical whole-body MR scanners has opened up the field of MR characterization of materials or tissues with extremely fast signal decay. If the transverse relaxation time is in the range of the RF-pulse duration, approximation of the RF-pulse by an instantaneous rotation applied at the middle of the RF-pulse and immediately followed by free relaxation will lead to a distinctly underestimated echo signal. Thus, the regular Ernst equation is not adequate to correctly describe steady state signal under those conditions. The paper presents an analytically derived modified Ernst equation, which correctly describes in-pulse relaxation of transverse magnetization under typical conditions: The equation is valid for rectangular excitation pulses, usually applied in 3D UTE sequences. Longitudinal relaxation time of the specimen must be clearly longer than RF-pulse duration, which is fulfilled for tendons and bony structures as well as many solid materials. Under these conditions, the proposed modified Ernst equation enables adequate and relatively simple calculation of the magnetization of materials or tissues. Analytically derived data are compared to numerical results obtained by using an established Runge-Kutta-algorithm based on the Bloch equations. Validity of the new approach was also tested by systematical measurements of a solid polymeric material on a 3T whole-body MR scanner. Thus, the presented modified Ernst equation provides a suitable basis for T1 measurements, even in tissues with T2 values as short as the RF-pulse duration: independent of RF-pulse duration, the 'variable flip angle method' led to consistent results of longitudinal relaxation time T1, if the T2 relaxation time of the material of interest is known as well.

  19. THE EXCRETION OF CARBON DIOXIDE BY RELAXED AND CONTRACTED SEA ANEMONES

    PubMed Central

    Parker, G. H.

    1922-01-01

    1. The metabolism of the sea anemone Metridium marginatum Edw. was measured in four states, relaxed, relaxing, contracted, and contracting, by means of an Osterhout respiratory apparatus. The basis of measurement was the number of hundred-thousandths of a milligram of carbon dioxide excreted per second by a gram of living sea anemone. 2. In the relaxed state this varied from 6.1 to 4.4+ and averaged 5.43–. 3. In a comparison of the relaxed and contracted states the amount of carbon dioxide excreted was found to beabout the same; in one instance in relaxation 4.2 and in contraction 4.1+; in another in relaxation 7.8+ and 7.9– and in contraction 8.1–. 4. In a comparison of the three states relaxed, relaxing, and contracting, the first two were found to average about the same, 4.8+ and 4.6– respectively and the last proved to be appreciably higher 7.1–. 5. It is, therefore, concluded that the process of relaxing and the states of relaxation and of contraction are accompanied by no unusual metabolism, but that in the operation of contracting the metabolism becomes about half again as intense as that characteristic of the other states. 6. The maintenance of the contracted state in Metridium for days at a time without an increase of metabolism indicates that its musculature is of the type known as tonus muscle. 7. In tonus muscle, contraction is accomplished by an active shortening of the myofibrils, extension by a passive drawing out of these fibrils through the distension of the adjacent cavities, etc., and the continued maintenance of any particular state of shortening by some form of catch mechanism in the muscle, such, possibly, as the gelation of its sarcoplasm. PMID:19871978

  20. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of the vibrational relaxation of photolyzed carbon monoxide in a hemoprotein.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Alexander; Falvo, Cyril; Meier, Christoph

    2016-08-07

    We present mixed quantum-classical simulations on relaxation and dephasing of vibrationally excited carbon monoxide within a protein environment. The methodology is based on a vibrational surface hopping approach treating the vibrational states of CO quantum mechanically, while all remaining degrees of freedom are described by means of classical molecular dynamics. The CO vibrational states form the "surfaces" for the classical trajectories of protein and solvent atoms. In return, environmentally induced non-adiabatic couplings between these states cause transitions describing the vibrational relaxation from first principles. The molecular dynamics simulation yields a detailed atomistic picture of the energy relaxation pathways, taking the molecular structure and dynamics of the protein and its solvent fully into account. Using the ultrafast photolysis of CO in the hemoprotein FixL as an example, we study the relaxation of vibrationally excited CO and evaluate the role of each of the FixL residues forming the heme pocket.

  1. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of the vibrational relaxation of photolyzed carbon monoxide in a hemoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Alexander; Falvo, Cyril; Meier, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    We present mixed quantum-classical simulations on relaxation and dephasing of vibrationally excited carbon monoxide within a protein environment. The methodology is based on a vibrational surface hopping approach treating the vibrational states of CO quantum mechanically, while all remaining degrees of freedom are described by means of classical molecular dynamics. The CO vibrational states form the "surfaces" for the classical trajectories of protein and solvent atoms. In return, environmentally induced non-adiabatic couplings between these states cause transitions describing the vibrational relaxation from first principles. The molecular dynamics simulation yields a detailed atomistic picture of the energy relaxation pathways, taking the molecular structure and dynamics of the protein and its solvent fully into account. Using the ultrafast photolysis of CO in the hemoprotein FixL as an example, we study the relaxation of vibrationally excited CO and evaluate the role of each of the FixL residues forming the heme pocket.

  2. Assessment of chemical exchange in tryptophan-albumin solution through (19)F multicomponent transverse relaxation dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping-Chang

    2015-06-01

    A number of NMR methods possess the capability of probing chemical exchange dynamics in solution. However, certain drawbacks limit the applications of these NMR approaches, particularly, to a complex system. Here, we propose a procedure that integrates the regularized nonnegative least squares (NNLS) analysis of multiexponential T2 relaxation into Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments to probe chemical exchange in a multicompartmental system. The proposed procedure was validated through analysis of (19)F T2 relaxation data of 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan in a two-compartment solution with and without bovine serum albumin. Given the regularized NNLS analysis of a T2 relaxation curve acquired, for example, at the CPMG frequency υ CPMG  = 125, the nature of two distinct peaks in the associated T2 distribution spectrum indicated 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan either retaining the free state, with geometric mean */multiplicative standard deviation (MSD) = 1851.2 ms */1.51, or undergoing free/albumin-bound interconversion, with geometric mean */MSD = 236.8 ms */1.54, in the two-compartment system. Quantities of the individual tryptophan species were accurately reflected by the associated T2 peak areas, with an interconversion state-to-free state ratio of 0.45 ± 0.11. Furthermore, the CPMG relaxation dispersion analysis estimated the exchange rate between the free and albumin-bound states in this fluorinated tryptophan analog and the corresponding dissociation constant of the fluorinated tryptophan-albumin complex in the chemical-exchanging, two-compartment system.

  3. Graphene oxide-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle composite with high transverse proton relaxivity value for magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesha, N.; Srivastava, Chandan; Poojar, Pavan; Geethanath, Sairam; Qurishi, Yasrib

    2015-04-21

    The potential of graphene oxide–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle (GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite as an image contrast enhancing material in magnetic resonance imaging has been investigated. Proton relaxivity values were obtained in three different homogeneous dispersions of GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites synthesized by precipitating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in three different reaction mixtures containing 0.01 g, 0.1 g, and 0.2 g of graphene oxide. A noticeable difference in proton relaxivity values was observed between the three cases. A comprehensive structural and magnetic characterization revealed discrete differences in the extent of reduction of the graphene oxide and spacing between the graphene oxide sheets in the three composites. The GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite framework that contained graphene oxide with least extent of reduction of the carboxyl groups and largest spacing between the graphene oxide sheets provided the optimum structure for yielding a very high transverse proton relaxivity value. It was found that the GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites possessed good biocompatibility with normal cell lines, whereas they exhibited considerable toxicity towards breast cancer cells.

  4. NMR T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF{sub 4} and propylene carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P. M. Voice, A. M. Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-07

    Longitudinal relaxation (T{sub 1}) measurements of {sup 19}F, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 1}H in propylene carbonate/LiBF{sub 4} liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T{sub 1} values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T{sub 1} minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T{sub 1} from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  5. Effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes based on Timoshenko laminated beam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    Based on Timoshenko laminated beam models, this paper investigates the influence of initial stress on the vibration and transverse wave propagation in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under ultrahigh frequency (above 1 THz), in which the initial stress in the MWNTs can occur due to thermal or lattice mismatch between different materials. Considering van der Waals force interaction between two adjacent tubes and effects of rotary inertia and shear deformation, results show that the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes not only affects the number of transverse wave speeds and the magnitude of transverse wave speeds, but also terahertz critical frequencies at which the number of wave speeds changes. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the compressive stress, transverse wave speeds decrease and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes increases. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the tensile stress, transverse wave speeds increase and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes decreases. The investigation of the effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes may be used as a useful reference for the application and the design of nanoelectronic and nanodrive devices, nano-oscillators, and nanosensors, in which carbon nanotubes act as basic elements.

  6. Transverse Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Measurements of Carbon Fibers Using ESEM at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, O.; Jiang, J.; Putnam, D.; Lo, Z.; Ellis, A.; Effinger, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The transverse coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of single IM7, T1000, and P55 carbon fibers are measured at elevated temperatures. The specimens are prepared by press-fitting fiber tows into 0.7mm-diameter cavity in a graphite disk of 5mm in diameter and 3mm high. The specimens are placed on a crucible in an ESEM, and images of the fiber cross section are taken as the fibers are heated up to 800 C. Holding time, heating and cool down cycles are also introduced. The geometrical changes are measured using a graphics tablet. The change in area/perimeter is calculated to determine the strain and transverse CTE for each fiber. In a complimentary computational effort, displacements and stresses are calculated with finite element models.

  7. Scaling Effects in Carbon/Epoxy Laminates Under Transverse Quasi-Static Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Douglas, Michael J.; Estes, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Scaling effects were considered for 8, 16, 32, and 64 ply IM-7/8551-7 carbon/epoxy composites plates transversely loaded to the first significant load drop by means of both a quasi-static and an equivalent impact force. The resulting damage was examined by x-ray and photomicroscopy analysis. Load-deflection curves were generated for the quasi-static tests and the resulting indentation depth was measured. Results showed that the load-deflection data scaled well for most of the various thicknesses of plates. However, damage did not scale as well. No correlation could be found between dent depth and any of the other parameters measured in this study. The impact test results showed that significantly less damage was formed compared to the quasi- static results for a given maximum transverse load. The criticality of ply-level scaling (grouping plies) was also examined.

  8. Second harmonic generation in carbon nanotubes induced by transversal electrostatic field.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Mads Lund; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2013-08-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of armchair and zigzag type contain an inversion centre, and are thus intrinsically unable to generate dipole even-order nonlinearities, such as second harmonic generation (SHG). Breaking the inversion symmetry by application of an external voltage transversal to the CNT axis will, however, induce a second harmonic response. Similarly, additional non-vanishing second harmonic tensor elements will be induced in chiral tubes already displaying an intrinsic response. Many geometries realizing such a setup can be envisaged, e.g., an experimental gate setup or deposition of CNTs on, or integration in, strongly polarized host media, perhaps facilitating a tunable second harmonic response. In this work, we calculate the SHG signal from CNTs under transversally applied electric fields based on a tight-binding model.

  9. High performance current and spin diode of atomic carbon chain between transversely symmetric ribbon electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yao-Jun; Wang, Xue-Feng; Yang, Shuo-Wang; Wu, Xue-Mei

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that giant current and high spin rectification ratios can be achieved in atomic carbon chain devices connected between two symmetric ferromagnetic zigzag-graphene-nanoribbon electrodes. The spin dependent transport simulation is carried out by density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It is found that the transverse symmetries of the electronic wave functions in the nanoribbons and the carbon chain are critical to the spin transport modes. In the parallel magnetization configuration of two electrodes, pure spin current is observed in both linear and nonlinear regions. However, in the antiparallel configuration, the spin-up (down) current is prohibited under the positive (negative) voltage bias, which results in a spin rectification ratio of order 104. When edge carbon atoms are substituted with boron atoms to suppress the edge magnetization in one of the electrodes, we obtain a diode with current rectification ratio over 106. PMID:25142376

  10. Effect of low concentrations of carbon nanotubes on electric dipole relaxation in a polyurethane elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabenok, E. V.; Novikov, G. F.; Estrin, Ya. I.; Badamshina, E. R.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of small (up to 0.018 wt %) additions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the complex electric modulus M*= M' - jM″ and the spectrum of the relaxation times G(τ) of a cross-linked polyurethane elastomer containing ˜10 vol % of polyamide-6 dispersed in the polyurethane matrix and incompatible with it was studied. The measurements were conducted in the range of electric field frequencies 10-3-105 Hz at temperatures from 133 to 413 K. Based on the shape analysis of the M″( M') diagrams, the contributions of electric conductivity and dielectric relaxation to complex dielectric permittivity ɛ* = ɛ' - jɛ″ were separated and the effect of additions on α and β relaxation for both polyurethane and polyamide phases was analyzed in accordance with the peculiarities of phase-separated systems. The introduction of SWNTs in the composite affected the dielectric properties of the material; the maximum effect was observed at concentrations of 0.002-0.008 wt %; at higher SWNT concentrations, the scatter of data increased and did not allow us to evaluate the effect. The effect of SWNTs on G(τ) in the main phase was opposite to that in the polyamide phase. In the temperature range of α relaxation of the polyurethane phase, the relaxation times increased after the introduction of SWNTs evidently because of the decrease in the free volume that determines the α relaxation times of polyurethane. In contrast, for the polyamide phase in the range of α relaxation, the relaxation times decreased after the introduction of SWNTs. The results agree with the literature data on the effect of ultrasmall SWNT concentrations on the physicomechanical characteristics of the polyurethane elastomer and its electric conductivity.

  11. Transverse spin relaxation and magnetic correlation in Pr1-xCaxMnO3: Influence of particle size variation and chemical doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Vinay Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Soumik

    2017-03-01

    The short ranged magnetic correlations and dynamics of hole doped Pr1-xCaxMnO3 (0.33 < x < 0.5) of different crystallite sizes have been investigated using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The major contribution to the temperature dependence of paramagnetic line-width is attributed to the spin-lattice relaxation dominated by thermally activated hopping of small polarons with the typical activation energy of 20-50 meV. Irrespective of the crystallite size and dopant concentration, the transverse spin relaxation time (t2) follows a universal scaling behaviour of the type t 2 ˜ ( T / T 0 ) n in the paramagnetic regime, where T0 and n are the scaling parameters. Using the temperature dependence of t2, we construct a phase diagram which shows that near half-doping, the magnetic correlations associated with charge ordering not only survives even down to the crystallite size of 22 nm but is also actually enhanced. We conclude that the eventual suppression of charge ordering with reduction in the particle size is possibly more to do with the greater influence of chemical disorder than any intrinsic effect.

  12. Conductivity analysis of epoxy/carbon nanotubes composites by dipole relaxation and hopping models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Airton; Pezzin, Sergio H.; Farias, Heric Denis; Becker, Daniela; Bello, Roger H.; Coelho, Luiz A. F.

    2016-10-01

    In this study it was used a numerical technique of successive approximations to estimate parameters of a conductivity model that includes the hopping process and the dipole relaxation for the purpose of describing the behavior of the conductivity measured on nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes in epoxy resin in the range of frequency of 100 Hz to 40 MHz. Two relaxation bands were detected, one with a response below 10 kHz and one above 10 MHz. For the first band, it was observed that the nanocomposites become more conductive, and its conductivity less temperature dependent, as the nanotube content increases. The second band is characterized by a large spread in relaxation time. The results show that the percolation threshold is below 0.15 vol% and that 'ac' hopping is the main transport process above 100 kHz, becoming dominant with respect to percolation at higher temperatures (>340 K).

  13. Electrical transport in transverse direction through silicon carbon alloy multilayers containing regular size silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Aparajita; Kole, Arindam; Dasgupta, Arup; Chaudhuri, Partha

    2016-11-01

    Electrical transport in the transverse direction has been studied through a series of hydrogenated silicon carbon alloy multilayers (SiC-MLs) deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. Each SiC-ML consists of 30 cycles of the alternating layers of a nearly amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) and a microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) that contains high density of silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs). A detailed investigation by cross sectional TEM reveals preferential growth of densely packed Si-QDs of regular sizes ∼4.8 nm in diameter in a vertically aligned columnar structure within the SiC-ML. More than six orders of magnitude increase in transverse current through the SiC-ML structure were observed for decrease in the a-SiC:H layer thickness from 13 nm to 2 nm. The electrical transport mechanism was established to be a combination of grain boundary or band tail hopping and Frenkel-Poole (F-P) type conduction depending on the temperature and externally applied voltage ranges. Evaluation of trap concentration within the multilayer structures from the fitted room temperature current voltage characteristics by F-P function shows reduction up-to two orders of magnitude indicating an improvement in the short range order in the a-SiC:H matrix for decrease in the thickness of a-SiC:H layer.

  14. Investigating the Relationship between Transverse Relaxation Rate (R2) and Interecho Time in MagA-Expressing, Iron-Labeled Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey Y; Thompson, R Terry; Prato, Frank S; Goldhawk, Donna E; Gelman, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Reporter gene-based labeling of cells with iron is an emerging method of providing magnetic resonance imaging contrast for long-term cell tracking and monitoring cellular activities. This report investigates 9.4 T nuclear magnetic resonance properties of mammalian cells overexpressing MagA, a putative iron transport protein from magnetotactic bacteria. MagA-expressing MDA-MB-435 cells were cultured in the presence and absence of iron supplementation and compared to the untransfected control. The relationship between the transverse relaxation rate (R2) and interecho time was investigated using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This relationship was analyzed using a model based on water diffusion in weak magnetic field inhomogeneities (Jensen-Chandra model) as well as a fast-exchange model (Luz-Meiboom model). Increases in R2 with increasing interecho time were larger in the iron-supplemented, MagA-expressing cells compared to other cells. The dependence of R2 on interecho time in these iron-supplemented, MagA-expressing cells was better represented by the Jensen-Chandra model compared to the Luz-Meiboom model, whereas the Luz-Meiboom model performed better for the remaining cell types. Our findings provide an estimate of the distance scale of microscopic magnetic field variations in MagA-expressing cells, which is thought to be related to the size of iron-containing vesicles.

  15. Carbon-13 chemical shift anisotropy in DNA bases from field dependence of solution NMR relaxation rates.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jinfa; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2006-03-01

    Knowledge of (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) in nucleotide bases is important for the interpretation of solution-state NMR relaxation data in terms of local dynamic properties of DNA and RNA. Accurate knowledge of the CSA becomes particularly important at high magnetic fields, prerequisite for adequate spectral resolution in larger oligonucleotides. Measurement of (13)C relaxation rates of protonated carbons in the bases of the so-called Dickerson dodecamer, d(CGCGAATTCGCG)(2), at 500 and 800 MHz (1)H frequency, together with the previously characterized structure and diffusion tensor yields CSA values for C5 in C, C6 in C and T, C8 in A and G, and C2 in A that are closest to values previously reported on the basis of solid-state FIREMAT NMR measurements, and mostly larger than values obtained by in vacuo DFT calculations. Owing to the noncollinearity of dipolar and CSA interactions, interpretation of the NMR relaxation rates is particularly sensitive to anisotropy of rotational diffusion, and use of isotropic diffusion models can result in considerable errors.

  16. Stress Relaxation Behavior of Unidirectional Carbon/Epoxy Composites at Elevated Temperature and Analysis Using Viscoplasticity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masamichi; Kazama, Takeshi; Masuko, Yoichi; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Jun; Kemmochi, Kiyoshi

    Off-axis stress relaxation behavior of unidirectional T800H/3631 carbon/epoxy composite exposed to high temperature is examined at relatively high tensile strain levels, and a phenomenological viscoplasticity model is tested on the capability to describe the time-dependent response observed. First, stress relaxation tests are performed at 100°C on plain coupon specimens with different fiber orientations, θ=0, 10, 30, 45, and 90°. For each of the fiber orientations, in principle, stress relaxation tests are carried out at three different strain levels. The relaxation of axial stress in the unidirectional composite is clearly observed, regardless of the fiber orientation. Just after the total strain hold, the axial stress quickly relaxes with time in a short period. The stress relaxation rate of the composite tends to become zero, irrespective of the fiber orientation. The associated relaxation modulus depends on the level of strain. The entire process of the prior instantaneous tensile response and the subsequent off-axis stress relaxation behavior is simulated using a macromechanical viscoplasticity model based on an overstress concept. It is demonstrated that the model succeeds in adequately reproducing the off-axis stress relaxation behavior of the unidirectional composite laminate.

  17. My starting point: the discovery of an NMR method for measuring blood oxygenation using the transverse relaxation time of blood water.

    PubMed

    Thulborn, Keith R

    2012-08-15

    This invited personal story, covering the period from 1979 to 2010, describes the discovery of the dependence of the transverse relaxation time of water in blood on the oxygenation state of hemoglobin in the erythrocytes. The underlying mechanism of the compartmentation of the different magnetic susceptibilities of hemoglobin in its different oxygenation states also explains the mechanism that underlies blood oxygenation level dependent contrast used in fMRI. The story begins with the initial observation of line broadening during ischemia in small rodents detected by in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy at high field. This spectroscopic line broadening or T2* relaxation effect was demonstrated to be related to the oxygenation state of blood. The effect was quantified more accurately using T2 values measured by the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill method. The effect was dependent on the integrity of the erythrocytes to compartmentalize the different magnetic susceptibilities produced by the changing spin state of the ferrous iron of hemoglobin in its different oxygenation states between the erythrocytes and the suspending solution. The hematocrit and magnetic field dependence, the requirement for erythrocyte integrity and lack of T1 dependence confirmed that the magnetic susceptibility effect explained the oxygenation state dependence of T2* and T2. This T2/T2* effect was combined with T1 based measurements of blood flow to measure oxygen consumption in animals. This blood oxygenation assay and its underlying magnetic susceptibility gradient mechanism was published in the biochemistry literature in 1982 and largely forgotten. The observation was revived to explain evolving imaging features of cerebral hematoma as MR imaging of humans increased in field strength to 1.5 T by the mid 1980s. Although the imaging version of this assay was used to measure a global metabolic rate of cerebral oxygen consumption in humans at 1.5-T by 1991, the global measurement had little clinical value

  18. Reduced white matter MRI transverse relaxation rate in cognitively normal H63D-HFE human carriers and H67D-HFE mice.

    PubMed

    Meadowcroft, Mark D; Wang, Jianli; Purnell, Carson J; Peters, Douglas G; Eslinger, Paul J; Neely, Elizabeth B; Gill, David J; Vasavada, Megha; Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Yang, Qing X; Connor, James R

    2016-12-01

    Mutations within the HFE protein gene sequence have been associated with increased risk of developing a number of neurodegenerative disorders. To this effect, an animal model has been created which incorporates the mouse homologue to the human H63D-HFE mutation: the H67D-HFE knock-in mouse. These mice exhibit alterations in iron management proteins, have increased neuronal oxidative stress, and a disruption in cholesterol regulation. However, it remains undetermined how these differences translate to human H63D carriers in regards to white matter (WM) integrity. To this endeavor, MRI transverse relaxation rate (R2) parametrics were employed to test the hypothesis that WM alterations are present in H63D human carriers and are recapitulated in the H67D mice. H63D carriers exhibit widespread reductions in brain R2 compared to non-carriers within white matter association fibers in the brain. Similar R2 decreases within white matter tracts were observed in the H67D mouse brain. Additionally, an exacerbation of age-related R2 decrease is found in the H67D animal model in white matter regions of interest. The decrease in R2 within white matter tracts of both species is speculated to be multifaceted. The R2 changes are hypothesized to be due to alterations in axonal biochemical tissue composition. The R2 changes observed in both the human-H63D and mouse-H67D data suggest that modified white matter myelination is occurring in subjects with HFE mutations, potentially increasing vulnerability to neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Lung Parenchymal Signal Intensity in MRI: A Technical Review with Educational Aspirations Regarding Reversible Versus Irreversible Transverse Relaxation Effects in Common Pulse Sequences

    PubMed Central

    MULKERN, ROBERT; HAKER, STEVEN; MAMATA, HATSUHO; LEE, EDWARD; MITSOURAS, DIMITRIOS; OSHIO, KOICHI; BALASUBRAMANIAN, MUKUND; HATABU, HIROTO

    2014-01-01

    Lung parenchyma is challenging to image with proton MRI. The large air space results in ~l/5th as many signal-generating protons compared to other organs. Air/tissue magnetic susceptibility differences lead to strong magnetic field gradients throughout the lungs and to broad frequency distributions, much broader than within other organs. Such distributions have been the subject of experimental and theoretical analyses which may reveal aspects of lung microarchitecture useful for diagnosis. Their most immediate relevance to current imaging practice is to cause rapid signal decays, commonly discussed in terms of short T2* values of 1 ms or lower at typical imaging field strengths. Herein we provide a brief review of previous studies describing and interpreting proton lung spectra. We then link these broad frequency distributions to rapid signal decays, though not necessarily the exponential decays generally used to define T2* values. We examine how these decays influence observed signal intensities and spatial mapping features associated with the most prominent torso imaging sequences, including spoiled gradient and spin echo sequences. Effects of imperfect refocusing pulses on the multiple echo signal decays in single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequences and effects of broad frequency distributions on balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) sequence signal intensities are also provided. The theoretical analyses are based on the concept of explicitly separating the effects of reversible and irreversible transverse relaxation processes, thus providing a somewhat novel and more general framework from which to estimate lung signal intensity behavior in modern imaging practice. PMID:25228852

  20. Transversal thermal transport in single-walled carbon nanotube bundles: influence of axial stretching and intertube bonding.

    PubMed

    Gharib-Zahedi, Mohammad Reza; Tafazzoli, Mohsen; Böhm, Michael C; Alaghemandi, Mohammad

    2013-11-14

    Using reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations the influence of intermolecular bridges on the thermal conductivity (λ) in carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles has been investigated. The chosen cross linkers (CH2, O, CO) strengthen the transversal energy transport relative to the one in CNT bundles without bridges. The results showed that λ does not increase linearly with the linker density. The efficiency of the heat transport is determined by the number of linkers in the direction of the heat flux, the type of the linker, and their spatial ordering. The influence of a forced axial stress on the transversal λ has been also studied. The observed λ reduction with increasing axial stretching in a neat CNT bundle can be (over)compensated by cross linkers. The present computational data emphasize the contribution of phonons to the transversal heat transport in CNT bundles with intertube bonds.

  1. Relaxation NMR as a tool to study the dispersion and formulation behavior of nanostructured carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, David; Cosgrove, Terence; Prescott, Stuart W

    2016-06-01

    Solvent relaxation NMR has been used to estimate the surface areas and wettability of various types of nanostructured carbon materials in a range of solvents including water, ethanol, and tetrahydrofuran. We illustrate the application of the technique through several short case studies using samples including nanocarbon blacks, graphene oxide, nanographites, and porous graphenes. The technique is shown to give a good measure of surface area, correlating well with conventional surface area estimates obtained by nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, or light scattering for the non-porous samples. NMR relaxation has advantages in terms of speed of analysis and being able to use concentrated, wet, and opaque samples. For samples that are porous, two distinct surface areas can be estimated assuming the two environments ('inner' and 'outer') have the same surface chemistry, and that there is a slow exchange of solvent molecules between them. Furthermore, we show that differences in wettability and dispersability between samples dispersed in water, ethanol, and cyclopentanone can be observed, along with changes to the surface chemistry of the interface. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Magnetic Field Strength Dependence of Transverse Relaxation and Signal-to-Noise Ratio for Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 and Helium-3 Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-Viqueira, William

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases (HNG), 3He or 129Xe, has become a promising approach for studying lung anatomy and function. Unlike conventional MR imaging, the magnetization in HNG MR is independent of the magnetic field strength. This means that no improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is expected with increasing clinical field strength above ˜0.25T. Furthermore, it has been predicted that the SNR may decline at clinical field strength due to decreases in the apparent transverse relaxation time (T2*), caused by the increased magnetic susceptibility induced field gradients at the air-tissue interface. In this thesis the magnetic field strength dependence of T2* and SNR in HNG MR is investigated experimentally in rodent and human lungs. For rodent imaging, a novel broad-band (0.1-100MHz) variable field strength MR imaging system for rodents was built. This system permitted imaging of 129Xe, 3He and 1H at low magnetic field strengths (3-73.5mT) to experimentally investigate the field dependence of HNG imaging SNR in rodent lungs. In vivo 129Xe and 3He signals were acquired at 73.5mT and T 2* was estimated to be approximately 180+/-8 ms, in good agreement with previously reported values. At 73.5mT, image noise is dominated by losses originated from the radiofrequency (RF) coils. To address this issue, RF coils were built using different types of copper wire and compared in phantoms and in vivo in rat lungs using hyperpolarized 3He and 129Xe gas. An SNR improvement of up to 200% was obtained with Litz wire compared to conventional copper wire. This improvement demonstrated the feasibility of HNG lung imaging in rodents at 73.5mT with SNR comparable to that obtained at clinical field strengths. To verify the SNR field dependence in humans, hyperpolarized 3He lung imaging at two commonly used clinical field strengths (1.5T and 3T) was performed in the same volunteers and compared. No significant differences in SNR were obtained

  3. Microwave permittivity and dielectric relaxation of a high surface area activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, J. E.; Wheeler, R. R., Jr.

    Carbonaceous materials are amenable to microwave heating to varying degrees. The primary indicator of susceptibility is the complex permittivity (ɛ*), of which, the real component correlates with polarization, and the imaginary term represents dielectric loss. For a given material, the complex permittivity is dependent upon both frequency and temperature. Here we report the complex permittivity of a high surface area coconut shell activated carbon which is commonly used in analytical chemistry and a wide variety of industrial separations. Associated polarization-relaxation phenomena are also characterized. Broadband measurements were made using a high temperature compatible open-ended coaxial dielectric probe at frequencies between 0.2 and 26 GHz, and across the temperature region between 24 °C and 191 °C.

  4. Intra- and inter-tube exciton relaxation dynamics in high purity semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Saito, Shingo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Ando, Hiroaki

    2013-02-01

    We have measured the exciton and carrier dynamics in the high purity semiconducting (S-) and metallic (M-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the isolated and aggregated (bundled) forms. The exciton relaxation decay times are measured by using the pump-probe spectroscopy. For bundled samples, the relaxation time becomes shorter than that for isolated SWNTs sample, because of the existence of inter-tube relaxation. We estimate the relaxation rates from S-SWNT to S-SWNT and S-SWNT to M-SWNT using the decay times for isolated SWNTs, high purity S-SWNTs bundle, and doped S-SWNTs in high purity M-SWNTs bundle. For S-SWNTs, inter-tube relaxation plays an important role in the relaxation dynamics. However, for M-SWNTs, the inter-tube relaxation is not so important, and the transition energy and intensity of exciton in M-SWNTs is strongly affected by the photoexcited carriers which plays like as photo doping.

  5. Relaxivity enhancement of aquated Tris(β-diketonate)gadolinium(III) chelates by confinement within ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Law, Justin J; Guven, Adem; Wilson, Lon J

    2014-01-01

    Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes loaded with gadolinium ions (gadonanotubes) have been previously shown to exhibit extremely high T1 -weighted relaxivities (>100 mm(-1) s(-1) ). To further examine the effect of nanoconfinement on the relaxivity of gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, a series of ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotube (US-tube) materials internally loaded with gadolinium chelates have been prepared and studied. US-tubes were loaded with Gd(acac)3  · 2H2 O, Gd(hfac)3  · 2H2 O, and Gd(thd)3 (acac = acetylacetone, hfac = hexafluoroacetylacetone, thd = tetramethylheptanedione). The longitudinal relaxivities of the prepared materials determined at 25°C in a 1.5 T field were 103 mm(-1) s(-1) for Gd(acac)3  · 2H2 O@US-tubes, 105 mm(-1) s(-1) for Gd(hfac)3  · 2H2 O@US-tubes and 26 mm(-1) s(-1) for Gd(thd)3 @US-tubes. Compared with the relaxivities obtained for the unloaded chelates (<10 mm(-1) s(-1) ) as well as accounting for the T1 reduction observed for the empty US-tubes, the boost in relaxivity for chelate-loaded US-tubes is attributed to confinement within the nanotube and depends on the number of coordinated water molecules.

  6. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  7. Transverse flowmetry of carbon particles based on photoacoustic Doppler standard deviation using an auto-correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Sun, Li-jun

    2015-05-01

    In order to measure the flow velocity of carbon particle suspension perpendicular to the receiving axis of ultrasound transducer, the standard deviation of photoacoustic Doppler frequency spectrum is used to estimate the bandwidth broadening, and the spectrum standard deviation is calculated by an auto-correlation method. A 532 nm pulsed laser with the repetition rate of 20 Hz is used as a pumping source to generate photoacoustic signal. The photoacoustic signals are detected using a focused PZT ultrasound transducer with the central frequency of 10 MHz. The suspension of carbon particles is driven by a syringe pump. The complex photoacoustic signal is calculated by Hilbert transformation from time domain signal before auto-correlation. The standard deviation of the Doppler bandwidth broadening is calculated by averaging the auto-correlation results of several individual A scans. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by measuring the spectrum standard deviation of the transversal carbon particle flow from 5.0 mm/s to 8.4 mm/s. The experimental results show that the auto-correlation result is approximately linearly distributed within the measuring range.

  8. Variational principles for transversely vibrating multiwalled carbon nanotubes based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model.

    PubMed

    Adali, Sarp

    2009-05-01

    Variational principles are derived for multiwalled carbon nanotubes undergoing vibrations. Derivations are based on the continuum modeling with the Euler-Bernoulli beam representing the nanotubes and small scale effects taken into account via the nonlocal elastic theory. Hamilton's principle for multiwalled nanotubes is given and Rayleigh's quotient for the frequencies is derived for nanotubes undergoing free vibrations. Natural and geometric boundary conditions are derived which lead to a set of coupled boundary conditions due to nonlocal effects.

  9. Spectrochemical analysis of powdered biological samples using transversely excited atmospheric carbon dioxide laser plasma excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivkovic, Sanja; Momcilovic, Milos; Staicu, Angela; Mutic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan; Savovic, Jelena

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) method for quantitative elemental analysis of powdered biological materials based on laboratory prepared calibration samples. The analysis was done using ungated single pulse LIBS in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. Transversely-Excited Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser was used as an energy source for plasma generation on samples. The material used for the analysis was a blue-green alga Spirulina, widely used in food and pharmaceutical industries and also in a few biotechnological applications. To demonstrate the analytical potential of this particular LIBS system the obtained spectra were compared to the spectra obtained using a commercial LIBS system based on pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A single sample of known concentration was used to estimate detection limits for Ba, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Si and Sr and compare detection power of these two LIBS systems. TEA CO2 laser based LIBS was also applied for quantitative analysis of the elements in powder Spirulina samples. Analytical curves for Ba, Fe, Mg, Mn and Sr were constructed using laboratory produced matrix-matched calibration samples. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used as the reference technique for elemental quantification, and reasonably well agreement between ICP and LIBS data was obtained. Results confirm that, in respect to its sensitivity and precision, TEA CO2 laser based LIBS can be successfully applied for quantitative analysis of macro and micro-elements in algal samples. The fact that nearly all classes of materials can be prepared as powders implies that the proposed method could be easily extended to a quantitative analysis of different kinds of materials, organic, biological or inorganic.

  10. Dynamics and relaxation of charge carriers in poly(methylmethacrylate)-lithium salt based polymer electrolytes plasticized with ethylene carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, P.; Ghosh, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we have studied the dynamics and relaxation of charge carriers in poly(methylmethacrylate)-lithium salt based polymer electrolytes plasticized with ethylene carbonate. Structural and thermal properties have been examined using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. We have analyzed the complex conductivity spectra by using power law model coupled with the contribution of electrode polarization at low frequencies and high temperatures. The temperature dependence of the ionic conductivity and crossover frequency exhibits Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher type behavior indicating a strong coupling between the ionic and the polymer chain segmental motions. The scaling of the ac conductivity indicates that relaxation dynamics of charge carriers follows a common mechanism for all temperatures and ethylene carbonate concentrations. The analysis of the ac conductivity also shows the existence of a nearly constant loss in these polymer electrolytes at low temperatures and high frequencies. The fraction of free anions and ion pairs in polymer electrolyte have been obtained from the analysis of Fourier transform infrared spectra. It is observed that these quantities influence the behavior of the composition dependence of the ionic conductivity.

  11. Investigation of ligand binding and protein dynamics in Bacillus subtilis chorismate mutase by transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Kienhöfer, Alexander; Hilvert, Donald; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2005-05-10

    The structural and dynamical consequences of ligand binding to a monofunctional chorismate mutase from Bacillus subtilis have been investigated by solution NMR spectroscopy. TROSY methods were employed to assign 98% of the backbone (1)H(N), (1)H(alpha), (15)N, (13)C', and (13)C(alpha) resonances as well as 86% of the side chain (13)C resonances of the 44 kDa trimeric enzyme at 20 degrees C. This information was used to map chemical shift perturbations and changes in intramolecular mobility caused by binding of prephenate or a transition state analogue to the X-ray structure. Model-free interpretation of backbone dynamics for the free enzyme and its complexes based on (15)N relaxation data measured at 600 and 900 MHz showed significant structural consolidation of the protein in the presence of a bound ligand. In agreement with earlier structural and biochemical studies, substantial ordering of 10 otherwise highly flexible residues at the C-terminus is particularly notable. The observed changes suggest direct contact between this protein segment and the bound ligand, providing support for the proposal that the C-terminus can serve as a lid for the active site, limiting diffusion into and out of the pocket and possibly imposing conformational control over substrate once bound. Other regions of the protein that experience substantial ligand-induced changes also border the active site or lie along the subunit interfaces, indicating that the enzyme adapts dynamically to ligands by a sort of induced fit mechanism. It is believed that the mutase-catalyzed chorismate-to-prephenate rearrangement is partially encounter controlled, and backbone motions on the millisecond time scale, as seen here, may contribute to the reaction barrier.

  12. Carbon segregation as a strain relaxation mechanism in thin germanium-carbon layers deposited directly on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, D. I.; José-Yacamán, M.; Lu, Shifeng; Kelly, D. Q.; Banerjee, S. K.

    2006-08-01

    We report experimental evidence for the segregation and preferential localization of C atoms at the surface and substrate interfaces in thin Ge1-xCx films deposited directly on Si (100). The results are interpreted in the context of C segregation providing a mechanism for strain relaxation. Four different experimental techniques, including energy-dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry, support our claims. The EELS analyses showed that the C bonding near the Ge1-xCx/Si substrate interface presented a higher sp3 character than in the central region or at the surface. Two interpretations are given for this observation; one is that structural relaxation occurs when C atoms occupy substitutional sites in the Ge crystal closer to the Ge1-xCx/Si substrate interface; the other is that the higher sp3 character of the C atoms might be an indication that C-containing tetrahedral interstitial complexes form at the interface (chemical relaxation).

  13. NMR relaxation of neritic carbonates: An integrated petrophysical and petrographical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Benoit; Fleury, Marc; Santerre, Yannick; Brigaud, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    A set of carbonate outcrop samples, covering a wide range of the sedimentary textures and depositional environments existing on carbonate systems, was studied through an integrated petrographical and petrophysical approach. With the aim of improving the understanding of the NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signal of carbonates, this work is: 1) providing an atlas for various carbonate reservoir rock-types, 2) providing a workflow for integrating geological and petrophysical data and, 3) documenting common shortfalls in NMR/MICP analyses in carbonates. The petrographical investigation includes thin section and SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) observations, whereas petrophysical investigation includes porosity (Φ), permeability (K), NMR, MICP (Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure), and specific surface area (BET) measurements. On the basis of NMR and MICP data, 4 groups of samples were identified: (1) microporous samples, (2) micro-mesoporous samples, (3) wide multimodal samples, and (4) atypical samples. The microporous samples allow us to define a maximum NMR threshold for microporosity at a T 2 of 200 ms. NMR and MICP response of the investigated carbonates are often comparable in terms of modal distribution (microporous, micro-mesoporous and wide multimodal samples). In particular, micritization, a well known but underestimated early diagenetic process, tends to homogenize the NMR signal of primarily different sedimentary facies. A grainstone with heavily micritized grains can display well sorted unimodal NMR and MICP signatures very similar, even identical, to a mudstone-wackestone. Their signatures are comparable to that of a simple sphere packing model. On the contrary, several samples (labeled atypical samples) show a discrepancy between NMR and MICP response. This discrepancy is explained by the fact that MICP can be affected by the physical connectivity of the pore network, in case of disseminated and isolated molds in a micrite matrix for instance

  14. Relaxation in quantum glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona Torres, Carlos E.

    The Ising model in transverse field provides the simplest description of a quantum glass. I study two systems that are realizations of the Ising model in transverse field, LiHoxY1-- xF4 and Rb1-- x(NH4)xH2PO 4. In the spin glass LiHoxY1-- xF4, applying a magnetic field Ht transverse to the Ising direction introduces tunneling between the bare Ising eigenstates. In addition, the coupling between the transverse dipolar interaction and the transverse field introduces entanglement or tunable random fields depending on the concentration. By comparing the classical and quantum transitions in LiHo0.198Y0.802F4 and LiHo 0.167Y0.833F4, I characterize the crossover from random field dominated behavior in the 19.8% sample to entanglement dominated behavior in the 16.7% sample. The quantum transition in the 19.8% sample is dominated by the limit on its correlation length caused by the random fields, while the dominant effect in the 16.7% sample is the enhanced tunneling rate introduced by entanglement. The proton glass Rb1--x(NH 4)xH2PO4 relaxes through tunneling of protons in the hydrogen bonds of the crystal, yielding an effective Ising model in transverse field. Since this field cannot be tuned directly, I combine bulk dielectric susceptibility measurements with neutron Compton scattering measurements of the local tunneling potential in two different concentrations, x = 35% and 72%. I find that tunneling drives the fastest relaxation processes at temperatures as high as 20 K and explicitly calculate the tunneling rate from the tunneling potential of the hydrogen bond. Moreover, the structural mechanism for the glassy relaxation allows a real-space picture of the relaxation dynamics to be correlated to the free energy description of aging. I find that the glassy relaxation is driven by the sequential diffusion of defects called Takagi configurations with a classical to quantum crossover in the relaxation at 3 K. I relate the relaxation rate to the quantum action of tunneling

  15. Vibrational population relaxation of carbon monoxide in the heme pocket of photolyzed carbonmonoxy myoglobin: Comparison of time-resolved mid-IR absorbance experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sagnella, Diane E.; Straub, John E.; Jackson, Timothy A.; Lim, Manho; Anfinrud, Philip A.

    1999-01-01

    The vibrational energy relaxation of carbon monoxide in the heme pocket of sperm whale myoglobin was studied by using molecular dynamics simulation and normal mode analysis methods. Molecular dynamics trajectories of solvated myoglobin were run at 300 K for both the δ- and ɛ-tautomers of the distal His-64. Vibrational population relaxation times of 335 ± 115 ps for the δ-tautomer and 640 ± 185 ps for the ɛ-tautomer were estimated by using the Landau–Teller model. Normal mode analysis was used to identify those protein residues that act as the primary “doorway” modes in the vibrational relaxation of the oscillator. Although the CO relaxation rates in both the ɛ- and δ-tautomers are similar in magnitude, the simulations predict that the vibrational relaxation of the CO is faster in the δ-tautomer with the distal His playing an important role in the energy relaxation mechanism. Time-resolved mid-IR absorbance measurements were performed on photolyzed carbonmonoxy hemoglobin (Hb13CO). From these measurements, a T1 time of 600 ± 150 ps was determined. The simulation and experimental estimates are compared and discussed. PMID:10588704

  16. Enhanced NMR Relaxation of Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquids and the Magnitude of the Carbon Hyperfine Coupling in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, A.; Pályi, A.; Ihara, Y.; Wzietek, P.; Simon, P.; Alloul, H.; Zólyomi, V.; Koltai, J.; Kürti, J.; Dóra, B.; Simon, F.

    2011-10-01

    Recent transport measurements [Churchill et al. Nature Phys.NPAHAX1745-2473 5, 321 (2009)10.1038/nphys1247] found a surprisingly large, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than usual C13 hyperfine coupling (HFC) in C13 enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes. We formulate the theory of the nuclear relaxation time in the framework of the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory to enable the determination of the HFC from recent data by Ihara et al. [Europhys. Lett. 90, 17 004 (2010)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/90/17004]. Though we find that 1/T1 is orders of magnitude enhanced with respect to a Fermi-liquid behavior, the HFC has its usual, small value. Then, we reexamine the theoretical description used to extract the HFC from transport experiments and show that similar features could be obtained with HFC-independent system parameters.

  17. Mechanisms of Gadographene-Mediated Proton Spin Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Andy H.; Duch, Matthew C.; Parigi, Giacomo; Rotz, Matthew W.; Manus, Lisa M.; Mastarone, Daniel J.; Dam, Kevin T.; Gits, Colton C.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Luchinat, Claudio; Hersam, Mark C.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Gd(III) associated with carbon nanomaterials relaxes water proton spins at an effectiveness that approaches or exceeds the theoretical limit for a single bound water molecule. These Gd(III)-labeled materials represent a potential breakthrough in sensitivity for Gd(III)-based contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their mechanism of action remains unclear. A gadographene library encompassing GdCl3, two different Gd(III)-complexes, graphene oxide (GO), and graphene suspended by two different surfactants and subjected to varying degrees of sonication was prepared and characterized for their relaxometric properties. Gadographene was found to perform comparably to other Gd(III)-carbon nanomaterials; its longitudinal (r1) and transverse (r2) relaxivity is modulated between 12–85 mM−1s−1 and 24–115 mM−1s−1, respectively, depending on the Gd(III)-carbon backbone combination. The unusually large relaxivity and its variance can be understood under the modified Florence model incorporating the Lipari-Szabo approach. Changes in hydration number (q), water residence time (τM), molecular tumbling rate (τR), and local motion (τfast) sufficiently explain most of the measured relaxivities. Furthermore, results implicated the coupling between graphene and Gd(III) as a minor contributor to proton spin relaxation. PMID:24298299

  18. Direct imaging of the structure, relaxation, and sterically constrained motion of encapsulated tungsten polyoxometalate lindqvist ions within carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Jeremy; Matthewman, Gemma; Dyer-Smith, Clare; Sung, A-Young; Liu, Zheng; Suenaga, Kazu; Kirkland, Angus I; Flahaut, Emmanuel

    2008-05-01

    The imaging properties and observation of the sterically regulated translational motion of discrete tungsten polyoxometalate Linqvist ions (i.e., [W(6)O(19)](2-)) within carbon nanotubes of specific internal diameter are reported. The translational motion of the nonspheroidal anion within the nanotube capillary is found to be impeded by its near-perfect accommodation to the internal van der Waals surface of the nanotube wall. Rotational motion of the anion about one remaining degree of freedom permits translational motion of the anion along the nanotube followed by locking in at sterically favorable positions in a mechanism similar to a molecular ratchet. This steric locking permits the successful direct imaging of the constituent octahedral cation template of individual [W(6)O(19)](2-) anions by high resolution transmission electron microscopy thereby permitting meterological measurements to be performed directly on the anion. Direct imaging of pairs of equatorial W(2) atoms within the anion reveal steric relaxation of the anion contained within the nanotube capillary relative to the bulk anion structure.

  19. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of the molecular conformation of the nootropic drug 2-oxopyrrolidin-1-ylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Grassi, A.; Guidoni, L.; Nicolini, M.; Pappalardo, G. C.; Viti, V.

    The spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) of carbon-13 resonances of the drug 2-oxopyrrolidin- 1-ylacetamide ( 2OPYAC) were determined in CDCl 3 + DMSO and H 2O solutions to investigate the internal conformational flexibility. The measured T1s for the hydrogen-bearing carbon atoms of the 2-pyrrolidone ring fragment were diagnostic of a rigid conformation with respect to the acetamide linked moiety. The model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body was used to analyse the measured relaxation data in terms of a single conformation. Owing to the small number of T1 data available the fitting procedure for each of the possible conformations failed. The structure corresponding to the rigid conformation was therefore considered to be the one that is strongly stabilized by internal hydrogen bonding as predicted on the basis of theoretical MO ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

  20. Transversity 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuseppe, Ciullo; Paolo, Lenisa; Marco, Contalbrigo; Delia, Hasch

    2009-04-01

    Purpose and status of the Italian transversity project / F. Bradamante -- Transversity asymmetries / D. Boer -- The transverse angular momentum sum rule / E. Leader -- Measurement of Collins and Sivers asymmetries at HERMES / L. L. Pappalardo (for the HERMES collaboration) -- Review of SSA results on deuteron at COMPASS / A. Richter (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Single spin asymmetries on a transversely polarized proton target at COMPASS / S. Levorato (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- New preliminary results on the transversity distribution and the Collins fragmentation functions / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Sivers effect in SIDIS pion and kaon production / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Spin-orbit correlations / M. Burkardt -- Correlation functions in hard and (semi)-inclusive processes / M. Schlegel, S. Mei[symbol]ner and A. Metz -- Transversity via exclusive [pie symbol]-electroproduction / G. R. Goldstein, S. Liuti and S. Ahmad -- Estimate of the Sivers asymmetry at intermediate energies with rescattering extracted from exclusive processes / A. Bianconi -- Exclusively produced p[symbol] asymmetries on the deuteron and future GPD measurements at COMPASS / C. Schill (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Transversity and transverse-momentum-dependent distribution measurements from PHENIX and BRAHMS / C. Aidala (for the PHENIX and BRAHMS collaborations) -- Sivers and Collins effects in polarized pp scattering processes / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Sivers function in constituent quark models / S. Scopetta ... [et al.] -- Sivers, Boer-Mulders and transversity in Drell-Yan processes / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- TMDs and Drell-Yan experiments at Fermilab and J-PARC / J.-C. Peng -- Double polarisation observables at PAX / M. Nekipelov (for the PAX collaboration) -- Future Drell-Yan measurement @ COMPASS / M. Colantoni (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Measurements of unpolarized azimuthal asymmetries at COMPASS / W. Käfer (for the COMPASS collaboration

  1. Unexpectedly broad photoelectron spectrum as a signature of ultrafast electronic relaxation of Rydberg states of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Sato, Motoki; Suzuki, Toshinori; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of CO2 excited into Rydberg states lying 0.2 eV below the ionization threshold is studied by means of time resolved photoelectron imaging. Over 3 eV broad photoelectron spectra are measured for all pump-probe delay times. Quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that the spectral broadening is due to ultrafast electronic relaxation of Rydberg states and identify the likely relaxation pathways. Experiment and theory bracket the relaxation time between 15 and 65 fs. A weak time independent ionization signal is attributed to CO2 trapped in near-threshold triplet states.

  2. Relaxed heaps

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, J.R. ); Gabow, H.N.; Shrairman, R. ); Tarjan, R.E. )

    1988-11-01

    The relaxed heap is a priority queue data structure that achieves the same amortized time bounds as the Fibonacci heap - a sequence of m decrease key and n delete min operations takes time O(m + n log n). A variant of relaxed heaps achieves similar bounds in the worst case - O(1) time for decrease key and O(log n) for delete min. Relaxed heaps give a processor-efficient parallel implementation of Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, and hence other algorithms in network optimization. A relaxed heap is a type of binomial queue that allows heap order to be violated.

  3. Optical Emission Studies of Copper Plasma Induced Using Infrared Transversely Excited Atmospheric (IR TEA) Carbon Dioxide Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milos; Kuzmanovic, Miroslav; Rankovic, Dragan; Ciganovic, Jovan; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Savovic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan

    2015-04-01

    Spatially resolved, time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy was applied for investigation of copper plasma produced by a nanosecond infrared (IR) transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm. The effect of surrounding air pressure, in the pressure range 0.1 to 1013 mbar, on plasma formation and its characteristics was investigated. A linear dependence of intensity threshold for plasma formation on logarithm of air pressure was found. Lowering of the air pressure reduces the extent of gas breakdown, enabling better laser-target coupling and thus increases ablation. Optimum air pressure for target plasma formation was 0.1 mbar. Under that pressure, the induced plasma consisted of two clearly distinguished and spatially separated regions. The maximum intensity of emission, with sharp and well-resolved spectral lines and negligibly low background emission, was obtained from a plasma zone 8 mm from the target surface. The estimated excitation temperature in this zone was around 7000 K. The favorable signal to background ratio obtained in this plasma region indicates possible analytical application of TEA CO2 laser produced copper plasma. Detection limits of trace elements present in the Cu sample were on the order of 10 ppm (parts per million). Time-resolved measurements of spatially selected plasma zones were used to find a correlation between the observed spatial position and time delay.

  4. The influence of external transverse magnetic field in propagation of electrostatic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdikian, Alireza

    2016-10-01

    Propagation of an electrostatic oscillation by using the linearized quantum hydrodynamic model in conjunction with Maxwell's equations was studied. The dispersion relation of a system of electron plasma in single-walled carbon nanotubes in the presence of an external magnetic field B 0 by considering the exchange-correlation effects in 2D cylindrical geometry is derived here. The uniform static magnetic field is assumed to be normal to the cylindrical surface (Voigt configuration). Distribution of the electrons and ions are considered uniformly over the cylindrical surface of a nanotube. It is found that the external magnetic field has significant impact on the wave in the longer wavelength. The influence of variation in azimuthal index and radius of the nanotube on dispersion relation is also discussed. It is tried to plot some schemes and analyze numerically in different limits of cylindrical and planar geometries. The results can be important in the study of collective phenomena in nanostructures.

  5. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure and increases frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Akash; Meshram, Megha; Gopan, Amrit; Ganjewar, Vaibhav; Kumar, Praveen; Bhatia, Shobna J

    2012-06-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (tLESR) and decreased basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure are postulated mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). There is conflicting evidence on the effect of carbonated drinks on lower esophageal sphincter function. This study was conducted to assess the effect of a carbonated beverage on tLESR and LES pressure. High resolution manometry tracings (16 channel water-perfused, Trace 1.2, Hebbard, Australia) were obtained in 18 healthy volunteers (6 men) for 30 min each at baseline, and after 200 mL of chilled potable water and 200 mL of chilled carbonated cola drink (Pepsi [Pepsico India Ltd]). The sequence of administration of the drinks was determined by random number method generated by a computer. The analysis of tracings was done using TRACE 1.2 software by a physician who was unaware of the sequence of administration of fluids. The mean (SD) age of the participant was 37.3 (12.9) years. The median (range) frequency of tLESr was higher after the carbonated beverage (10.5 [0-26]) as compared to baseline (0 [0-3], p = 0.005) as well as after water (1 [0-14], p = 0.010). The LES pressure decreased after ingestion of the carbonated beverage (18.5 [11-37] mmHg) compared to baseline (40.5 [25-66] mmHg, p = 0.0001) and after water (34 [15-67] mmHg, p = 0.003). Gastric pressure was not different in the three groups. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage increases tLESr and lowers LES pressure in healthy subjects.

  6. Role of carbon monoxide in electrically induced non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic relaxations in the guinea-pig isolated whole trachea

    PubMed Central

    Dellabianca, A; Sacchi, M; Anselmi, L; De Amici, E; Cervio, E; Agazzi, A; Tonini, S; Sternini, C; Tonini, M; Candura, S M

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Nitric oxide (NO) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) are considered transmitters of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxations in guinea-pig trachea, whereas the role of carbon monoxide (CO) is unknown. This study was designed to assess the participation of CO, and to investigate the localization of haem oxygenase-2 (HO-2), the CO-producing enzyme, in tracheal neurons. Experimental approach: NANC responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) at 3 and 10 Hz were evaluated in epithelium-free whole tracheal segments as intraluminal pressure changes. Drugs used were: L-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μ M) to inhibit NO synthase (NOS), α-chymotrypsin (2 U ml−1) to inactivate VIP, zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP-IX, 10 μM) to inhibit HO-2, and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 μM), a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. For immunohistochemistry, tissues were exposed to antibodies to PGP 9.5, a general neuronal marker, HO-2 and NOS, and processed with an indirect immunofluorescence method. Key results: α-Chymotrypsin did not affect NANC relaxations. ODQ inhibited NANC responses by about 60%, a value similar to that obtained by combining L-NAME and ZnPP-IX. The combination of ODQ, L-NAME and ZnPP-IX reduced the responses by 90%. Subpopulations of HO-2 positive neurons containing NOS were detected in tracheal sections. Conclusions and Implications: In the guinea-pig trachea, NANC inhibitory responses at 3 and 10 Hz use NO and CO as main transmitters. Their participation is revealed following inhibition of NOS, HO-2 and soluble guanylyl cyclase. The involvement of CO as a relaxing transmitter paves the way for novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of airway obstruction. PMID:17179955

  7. Dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behavior of carboxyl functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/poly (vinyl alcohol) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrin, Sayed; Deshpande, V. D.

    2017-03-01

    We study the dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behavior of MWCNT-COOH/Polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposite films in the temperature (T) range 303-423 K and in the frequency (f) range 0.1 Hz-1 MHz. The dielectric constant increases with an increase in temperature and also with an increase in MWCNT-COOH loading into the polymer matrix, as a result of interfacial polarization. The permittivity data were found to fit well with the modified Cole-Cole equation. Temperature dependent values of the relaxation times, free charge carrier conductivity and space charge carrier conductivity were extracted from the equation. An observed increment in the ac conductivity for the nanocomposites was analysed by a Jonscher power law which suggests that the correlated barrier hopping is the dominant charge transport mechanism for the nanocomposite films. The electric modulus study revealed deviations from ideal Debye-type behavior which are explained by considering a generalized susceptibility function. XRD and DSC results show an increase in the degree of crystallinity.

  8. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  9. Natural relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  10. Transverse vibration of nematic elastomer Timoshenko beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dong; Liu, Ying; Liu, Chuang

    2017-01-01

    Being a rubber-like liquid crystalline elastomer, a nematic elastomer (NE) is anisotropic viscoelastic, and displays dynamic soft elasticity. In this paper, the transverse vibration of a NE Timoshenko beam is studied based on the linear viscoelasticity theory of nematic elastomers. The governing equation of motion for the transverse vibration of a NE Timoshenko beam is derived. A complex modal analysis method is used to obtain the natural frequencies and decrement coefficients of NE beams. The influences of the nematic director rotation, the rubber relaxation time, and the director rotation time on the vibration characteristic of NE Timoshenko beams are discussed in detail. The sensitivity of the dynamic performance of NE beams to director initial angle and relaxation times provides a possibility of intelligent controlling of their dynamic performance.

  11. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... level is often dependent on his or her breathing pattern. Therefore, people with chronic lung conditions may ...

  12. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  13. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  14. Transverse gravity versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J.J. E-mail: anton.fernandez@uam.es

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂{sub μ}ξ{sup μ} = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  15. Transverse instability of dunes.

    PubMed

    Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-10-28

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation.

  16. Relaxation magnétique nucléaire du carbone-13 et dynamique des molécules de chlorpromazine associées en solution aqueuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, S.; Thévand, A.

    1998-02-01

    13C relaxation times and heteronuclear NOE enhancements have been measured for chlorpromazine hydrochloride salt in chloroform and water. The dipolar contribution to 13C ^1H spin systems relaxation rates were extracted and allowed us to characterize the molecular reorientation in the two solvents. The correlation times are on either side of “T1 minimum". The values agree with the size of the molecule and show an association by stacking of 11 monomeric entities. Les temps de relaxation des 13C et les accroissements par effet Overhauser 1Hto13C ont été mesurés parallèlement sur la molécule de chlorhydrate de chlorpromazine non associée dans le chloroforme et auto-associée dans l'eau. L'extraction de la contribution dipolaire aux constantes de vitesse de relaxation des systèmes 13C 1H de la molécule a permis de caractériser la réorientation de la molécule dans les deux cas. Les temps de corrélation obtenus qui se situent de part et d'autre du “T1 minimum" sont en accord avec la taille de la molécule isolée et montrent que l'agrégat est formé par empilement de 11 molécules.

  17. Molecular motions of [Beta]-carotene and a carotenoporphyrin dyad in solution. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation time study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Swindle, S.L.; Smith, S.K.; Nieman, R.A.; Moore, A.L.; Moore, T.A.; Gust, D. )

    1995-03-09

    Analysis of [sup 13]C NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T[sub 1]) yields information concerning both overall tumbling of molecules in solution and internal rotations about single bonds. Relaxation time and nuclear Overhauser effect data have been obtained for [Beta]-carotene and two related molecules, squalane and squalene, for zinc meso-tetraphenylporphyrin, and for a dyad consisting of a porphyrin covalently linked to a carotenoid polyene through a trimethylene bridge. Squalane and squalene, which lack conjugated double bonds, behave essentially as limp string, with internal rotations at least as rapid as overall isotropic tumbling motions. In contrast, [Beta]-carotene reorients as a rigid rod, with internal motions which are too slow to affect relaxation times. Modeling it as an anisotropic rotor yields a rotational diffusion coefficient for motion about the major axis which is 14 times larger than that for rotation about axes perpendicular to that axis. The porphyrin reorients more nearly isotropically and features internal librational motions about the single bonds to the phenyl groups. The relaxation time data for the carotenoporphyrin are consistent with internal motions similar to those of a medieval military flail. 31 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  19. Molecular factors that determine Curie spin relaxation in dysprosium complexes.

    PubMed

    Caravan, P; Greenfield, M T; Bulte, J W

    2001-11-01

    Dysprosium complexes can serve as transverse relaxation (T(2)) agents for water protons through chemical exchange and the Curie spin relaxation mechanism. Using a pair of matched dysprosium(III) complexes, Dy-L1 (contains one inner-sphere water) and Dy-L2 (no inner-sphere water), it is shown that the transverse relaxation of bulk water is predominantly an inner-sphere effect. The kinetics of water exchange at Dy-L1 were determined by (17)O NMR. Proton transverse relaxation by Dy-L1 at high fields is governed primarily through a large chemical shift difference between free and bound water. Dy-L1 forms a noncovalent adduct with human serum albumin which dramatically lengthens the rotational correlation time, tau(R), causing the dipole-dipole component of the Curie spin mechanism to become significant and transverse relaxivity to increase by 3-8 times that of the unbound chelate. These findings aid in the design of new molecular species as efficient r(2) agents.

  20. Charge relaxation resistance at atomic scale: An ab initio calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Jian

    2008-06-01

    We report an investigation of ac quantum transport properties of a nanocapacitor from first principles. At low frequencies, the nanocapacitor is characterized by a static electrochemical capacitance Cμ and the charge relaxation resistance Rq . We carry out a first principle calculation within the nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism. In particular, we investigate charge relaxation resistance of a single carbon atom as well as two carbon atoms in a nanocapacitor made of a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) and an alkane chain connected to a bulk Si. The nature of charge relaxation resistance is predicted for this nanocapacitor. Specifically, we find that the charge relaxation resistance shows resonant behavior and it becomes sharper as the distance between plates of nanocapacitor increases. If there is only one transmission channel dominating the charge transport through the nanocapacitor, the charge relaxation resistance Rq is half of resistance quantum h/2e2 . This result shows that the theory of charge relaxation resistance applies at atomic scale.

  1. Transverse spin and transverse momentum in scattering of plane waves.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudipta; Singh, Ankit K; Ray, Subir K; Banerjee, Ayan; Gupta, Subhasish Dutta; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2016-10-01

    We study the near field to the far field evolution of spin angular momentum (SAM) density and the Poynting vector of the scattered waves from spherical scatterers. The results show that at the near field, the SAM density and the Poynting vector are dominated by their transverse components. While the former (transverse SAM) is independent of the helicity of the incident circular polarization state, the latter (transverse Poynting vector) depends upon the polarization state. It is further demonstrated that the interference of the transverse electric and transverse magnetic scattering modes enhances both the magnitudes and the spatial extent of the transverse SAM and the transverse momentum components.

  2. Characterization of spin relaxation anisotropy in Co using spin pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Cao, Wei; Bailey, W. E.

    2016-11-01

    Ferromagnets are believed to exhibit strongly anisotropic spin relaxation, with relaxation lengths for spin longitudinal to the magnetization significantly longer than those for spin transverse to the magnetization. Here, we characterize the anisotropy of spin relaxation in Co using the spin pumping contribution to Gilbert damping in noncollinearly magnetized Py1 -xCux /Cu/Co trilayer structures. The static magnetization angle between Py1 -xCux and Co, adjusted under field bias perpendicular to film planes, controls the projections of longitudinal and transverse spin current pumped from Py1 -xCux into Co. We find nearly isotropic absorption of pure spin current in Co using this technique; fits to a diffusive transport model yield the longitudinal spin relaxation length <2 nm in Co. The longitudinal spin relaxation lengths found are an order of magnitude smaller than those determined by current-perpendicular-to-planes giant magnetoresistance measurements, but comparable with transverse spin relaxation lengths in Co determined by spin pumping.

  3. Relaxation-relaxation exchange experiments in porous media with portable Halbach-Magnets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, A.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2009-04-01

    Mobile NMR became a powerful tool following the development of portable NMR sensors for well logging. By now there are numerous applications of mobile NMR in materials analysis and chemical engineering where, for example, unique information about the structure, morphology and dynamics of polymers is obtained, and new opportunities are provided for geo-physical investigations [1]. In particular, dynamic information can be retrieved by two-dimensional Laplace exchange NMR, where the initial NMR relaxation environment is correlated with the final relaxation environment of molecules migrating from one environment to the other within a so-called NMR mixing time tm [2]. Relaxation-relaxation exchange experiments of water in inorganic porous media were performed at low and moderately inhomogeneous magnetic field with a simple, portable Halbach-Magnet. By conducting NMR transverse relaxation exchange experiments for several mixing times and converting the results to 2D T2 distributions (joint probability densities of transverse relaxation times T2) with the help of the inverse 2D Laplace Transformation (ILT), we obtained characteristic exchange times for different pore sizes. The results of first experiments on soil samples are reported, which reveal information about the complex pore structure of soil and the moisture content. References: 1. B. Blümich, J. Mauler, A. Haber, J. Perlo, E. Danieli, F. Casanova, Mobile NMR for Geo-Physical Analysis and Material Testing, Petroleum Science, xx (2009) xxx - xxx. 2. K. E. Washburn, P.T. Callaghan, Tracking pore to pore exchange using relaxation exchange spectroscopy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 175502.

  4. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Mohamed Ali, Elouer; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome. PMID:23785565

  5. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus.

    PubMed

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Ali, Elouer Mohamed; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome.

  6. Digital transversal filter architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A fast and efficient architecture is described for the realization of a pipelined, fully parallel digital transversal filter in VLSI. The order of summation is changed such that no explicit multiplication is seen, gated accumulators are used, and the coefficients are circulated. Estimates for the number of transistors needed for a CMOS implementation are given.

  7. PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION IN CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTALS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME , CRYSTAL DEFECTS, QUARTZ, GLASS, STRAIN(MECHANICS), TEMPERATURE, NUCLEAR SPINS, HYDROGEN, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, COLOR CENTERS, PHONONS, OXYGEN.

  8. Clarification of the measurement of surface spin relaxation via conduction electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigler, D. M.; Schultz, S.

    1982-12-01

    We clarify the parameterization of the probability of transverse conduction electron spin relaxation. ɛ, at the surface of a metal. Using Walker's boundary condition on the transverse spin magnetization, we have calculated the ɛ and thickness dependence of the spin resonance linewidth. The results are discussed in simple physical terms. The recent work of Allam and Vigouroux is shown to contain errors.

  9. Modified Statistical Dynamical Diffraction Theory: A Novel Metrological Analysis Method for Partially Relaxed and Defective Carbon-doped Silicon and Silicon Germanium Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreeman, Paul K.

    The statistical dynamical diffraction theory, which has been initially developed by late Kato remained in obscurity for many years due to intense and difficult mathematical treatment that proved to be quite challenging to implement and apply. With assistance of many authors in past (including Bushuev, Pavlov, Pungeov, and among the others), it became possible to implement this unique x-ray diffraction theory that combines the kinematical (ideally imperfect) and dynamical (the characteristically perfect diffraction) into a single system of equations controlled by two factors determined by long range order and correlation function within the structure. The first stage is completed by the publication (Shreeman and Matyi, J. Appl. Cryst., 43, 550 (2010)) demonstrating the functionality of this theory with new modifications hence called modified statistical dynamical diffraction theory (mSDDT). The foundation of the theory is also incorporated into this dissertation, and the next stage of testing the model against several ion-implanted SiGe materials has been published: (Shreeman and Matyi, physica status solidi (a)208(11), 2533-2538, 2011). The dissertation with all the previous results summarized, dives into comprehensive analysis of HRXRD analyses complete with several different types of reflections (symmetrical, asymmetrical and skewed geometry). The dynamical results (with almost no defects) are compared with well-known commercial software. The defective materials, to which commercially available modeling software falls short, is then characterized and discussed in depth. The results will exemplify the power of the novel approach in the modified statistical dynamical diffraction theory: Ability to detect and measure defective structures qualitatively and quantitatively. The analysis will be compared alongside with TEM data analysis for verification and confirmation. The application of this theory will accelerate the ability to quickly characterize the relaxed

  10. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  11. Relaxation of magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.

    1987-01-01

    A quasi-thermodynamic model is presented for the relaxation of magnetotail plasmas during substorms, followed by quiet times. It is proposed that the plasma relaxes to a state of low-potential energy subject to a small number of global constraints. The constraints are exactly preserved by all ideal motions and, approximately, by a wide class of motions of the plasma undergoing magnetic reconnection. A variational principle which minimizes the free energy predicts the relaxed state. Exact, two-dimensional solutions of the relaxed state are obtained. A universal feature of the exact solutions is a chain of magnetic islands along the tail axis. Sufficient conditions for the stability of relaxed states are obtained from the second variation of the free-energy functional.

  12. Tunable Microwave Transversal Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER AFOSR-TR. 84-0977 S4. TI TLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYP ?FE&T&PEO OEE U!NABLE MICROWAVE TRANSVERSAL FILTERS...this goal through magnetostatic waves MSW propagating at microwave frequency in magnetically biased, liquid phase epitaxial films of yttrium iron...garnet (YIG) grown on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG). This technology has a number of advantages; low loss (greater than 30db/usec at xband), tunable by

  13. Transverse Spin Physics: Recent Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-12-10

    Transverse-spin physics has been very active and rapidly developing in the last few years. In this talk, I will briefly summarize recent theoretical developments, focusing on the associated QCD dynamics in transverse spin physics.

  14. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  15. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  16. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  17. [Transverse ectopic testis].

    PubMed

    Jouini, Riadh; Lefi, Mounir; Sami, Chelly; Manef, Gesmi; Mohsen, Belguith; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2002-09-01

    Transverse ectopic testis (TET) is a rare form of ectopic testis. The authors report the case of a 2-month-old infant presenting with right inguinoscrotal hernia and ectopic left testis with an impalpable testis. Opening of the hernia sac revealed two testes with two distally fused vasa deferentes. The contralateral testis was easily descended by translocation through the other inguinal canal. A favourable result was obtained with two testes situated in a normal position. In the light of this case, the authors emphasize the clinical and therapeutic features of this anomaly.

  18. Transverse axis fluid turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, B.

    1983-11-15

    A fluid turbine, the rotation axis of which is transverse to the direction of fluid flow, has at least two blade assemblies mounted for rotation about the rotation axis. Each blade assembly includes a streamlined elongated blade having a span parallel to the rotation axis. Each blade is pivotable about a pivot axis parallel to and spaced from the rotation axis. The pivot axis is located circumferentially ahead of the blade center of pressure with respect to the direction of turbine rotation. Each blade assembly is so constructed that its center of mass is located either at its pivot axis or circumferentially at its pivot axis and radially outboard of its pivot axis.

  19. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  20. Relaxation techniques for stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease ...

  1. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  2. The influence of nanofiller alignment on transverse percolation and conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tallman, T N; Wang, K W

    2015-01-16

    Nanocomposites have unprecedented potential for conductivity-based damage identification when used as matrices in structural composites. Recent research has investigated nanofiller alignment in structural composites, but because damage identification often requires in-plane measurements, percolation and conductivity transverse to the alignment direction become crucial considerations. We herein contribute indispensable guidance to the development of nanocomposites with aligned nanofiller networks and insights into percolation trends transverse to the alignment direction by studying the influence of alignment on transverse critical volume fraction, conductivity, and rate of transition from non-percolating to percolating in three-dimensional carbon nanotube composite systems.

  3. Dynamic postures of the transverse metacarpal arch during typing.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nancy A; Xiu, Kaihua; Moehling, Krissy; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the transverse metacarpal arch (TMA) during a dynamic typing task. Static/relaxed and dynamic typing TMA were collected from 36 right-handed females with musculoskeletal discomfort using a motion capture system. While the angle of right TMA static/relaxed posture (10.1° ± 5.5°) was significantly larger than the left (8.5° ± 5.6°) (P < .05), the right dynamic posture (10.6° ± 4.3°) was not significantly different from the left (10.3° ± 5.5°) (P = .66). Within both these mean scores, there was considerable individual variation, with some subjects demonstrating very flat TMA, and some very curved. The results indicate that TMA angular postures both for static/relaxed and dynamic typing are highly variable both between individuals and between individual hands.

  4. Panic attacks during relaxation and relaxation-induced anxiety: a hyperventilation interpretation.

    PubMed

    Ley, R

    1988-12-01

    This paper explains how a hyperventilation theory of panic disorder accounts for panic attacks during relaxation and relaxation-induced anxiety. The explanation is based on the observation that chronic hyperventilators maintain a steady state of low pCO2 (arterial carbon dioxide tension) and are, therefore, sensitive to relatively small increases in ventilation when metabolism is low and to relatively sudden reductions in metabolism when ventilation is relatively constant. Thus, if minute volume of air breathed remains constant while the metabolic production of CO2 decreases, as in the case of one who sits down or lies down to relax, respiratory hypocapnea may increase in intensity until it produces the familiar sensations which mark the panic attack. Data from relevant studies of panic attacks during relaxation support the hyperventilation interpretation.

  5. Molecular determinants for drug-receptor interactions. 8. Anisotropic and internal motions in morphine, nalorphine, oxymorphone, naloxone and naltrexone in aqueous solution by carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.

    1989-02-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) were measured for morphine, oxymorphone, nalorphine, naloxone and naltrexone as hydrochloride salts in 2H 2O solution. The data refer to the molecules in the N-equatorial configuration. The experimental T1 values were interpreted using a model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body with superimposed internal motions of the flexible N-methyl, N-methyl-allyl and N-methyl-cyclopropyl fragments. The calculated internal motional rates were found to markedly decrease on passing from agonists to mixed (nalorphine) and pure (naloxone, naltrexone) antagonists. For these latter the observed trend of the internal flexibility about NC and CC bonds of the N-substituents is discussed in terms of a correlation with their relative antagonistic potencies. In fact, such an evidence of decreasing internal conformational dynamics in the order nalorphine, naloxone, naltrexone, appeared interestingly in line with the "two-state" model of opiate receptor operation mode proposed by Snyder.

  6. General formulation of transverse hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Florkowski, Wojciech

    2008-06-15

    General formulation of hydrodynamics describing transversally thermalized matter created at the early stages of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Similarities and differences with the standard three-dimensionally thermalized relativistic hydrodynamics are discussed. The role of the conservation laws as well as the thermodynamic consistency of two-dimensional thermodynamic variables characterizing transversally thermalized matter is emphasized.

  7. NMR relaxation rate studies of molecular motions in NaSn, the Laves-phase metal hydride C15-ZrCr(2)H(x) and carbon/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Ronald Dean

    Here I present studies of molecular motions in three very different systems: NaSn, which exhibits motion characteristic of both a superionic conductor and a rotor crystal; C15-ZrCrsb2Hsbx (x < 0.5), a metal hydride which exhibits unusual characteristics in its hydrogen motion; and, finally a study of the relationship between Tsb2 and the degree of cure of carbon/epoxy materials. NaSn is characterized by Nasp+ ions and stable (Snsb4)sp{4-} tetrahedra. At high temperatures NaSn displays a disordered solid phase (alpha-NaSn). The presence of Nasp+ ions suggests that alpha-NaSn may be a superionic conductor (translationally disordered) and the presence of stable Snsb4 tetrahedra suggests it may be a rotor crystal (organizationally disordered). The purpose of this study is to gain better understanding of the motions in alpha-NaSn by monitoring Na and Sn motion using sp{23}Na and sp{119}Sn NMR, respectively. C15-ZrCrsb2Hsbx (x < 0.5) is a Laves phase metal hydride which displays extremely rapid hydrogen motion and a Tsb1 peak which cannot be explained by a model employing a single correlation time for the motion. A model employing a Gaussian distribution of correlation times has been used to successfully fit Tsb1, but the origin of this distribution in a crystalline solid solution is not known. The purpose of this study is to better understand the low temperature hydrogen motions occurring in C15-ZrCrsb2Hsbx by extending the previous NMR measurements using Tsb1p and Tsb1D, experiments which effectively push the relaxation peak to lower temperatures. New techniques for manufacturing carbon/epoxy components are under development which require partial curing of the material. At present, no method for monitoring partial curing exists. Tsb2 is a promising monitor of degree of cure because of its sensitivity to changes rates of molecular motions. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the sensitivity of Tsb2 to changes in molecular motion due to curing, and to find a

  8. Design of self-refocused pulses under short relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Issa, Bashar

    2009-06-01

    The effect of using self-refocused RF pulses of comparable duration to relaxation times is studied in detail using numerical simulation. Transverse magnetization decay caused by short T2 and longitudinal component distortion due to short T1 are consistent with other studies. In order to design new pulses to combat short T1 and T2 the relaxation terms are directly inserted into the Bloch equations. These equations are inverted by searching the RF solution space using simulated annealing global optimization technique. A new T2-decay efficient excitation pulse is created (SDETR: single delayed excursion T2 resistive) which is also energy efficient. Inversion pulses which improve the inverted magnetization profile and achieve better suppression of the remaining transverse magnetization are also created even when both T1 and T2 are short. This is achieved, however, on the expense of a more complex B1 shape of larger energy content.

  9. The origin of biexponential T2 relaxation in muscle water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, W. C.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    Two theories have been proposed to explain the multiexponential transverse relaxation of muscle water protons: "anatomical" and "chemical" compartmentation. In an attempt to obtain evidence to support one or the other of these two theories, interstitial and intracellular macromolecular preparations were studied and compared with rat muscle tissue by proton NMR transverse relaxation (T2) measurements. All macromolecule preparations displayed monoexponential T2 decay. Membrane alteration with DMSO/glycerin did not eliminate the biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue. Maceration converted biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue to single exponential decay. It is concluded that the observed two component exponential T2 decay of muscle represents anatomical compartmentation of tissue water, probably intracellular versus extracellular.

  10. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  11. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  12. Spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation in phosphorene: Intrinsic versus extrinsic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2016-10-01

    First-principles calculations of the essential spin-orbit and spin relaxation properties of phosphorene are performed. Intrinsic spin-orbit coupling induces spin mixing with the probability of b2≈10-4 , exhibiting a large anisotropy, following the anisotropic crystalline structure of phosphorene. For realistic values of the momentum relaxation times, the intrinsic (Elliott-Yafet) spin relaxation times are hundreds of picoseconds to nanoseconds. Applying a transverse electric field (simulating gating and substrates) generates extrinsic C2 v symmetric spin-orbit fields in phosphorene, which activate the D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism for spin relaxation. It is shown that this extrinsic spin relaxation also has a strong anisotropy and can dominate over the Elliott-Yafet one for strong enough electric fields. Phosphorene on substrates can thus exhibit an interesting interplay of both spin-relaxation mechanisms, whose individual roles could be deciphered using our results.

  13. T2 relaxation time abnormalities in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ongür, Dost; Prescot, Andrew P; Jensen, J Eric; Rouse, Elizabeth D; Cohen, Bruce M; Renshaw, Perry F; Olson, David P

    2010-01-01

    There are substantial abnormalities in the number, density, and size of cortical neurons and glial cells in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Because molecule-microenvironment interactions modulate metabolite signals characteristics, these cellular abnormalities may impact transverse (T2) relaxation times. We measured T2 relaxation times for three intracellular metabolites (N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartylglutamate, creatine+phosphocreatine, and choline-containing compounds) in the anterior cingulate cortex and parieto-occipital cortex from 20 healthy subjects, 15 patients with bipolar disorder, and 15 patients with schizophrenia at 4 T. Spectra used in T2 quantification were collected from 8-cc voxels with varying echo times (30 to 500 ms, in 10-ms steps). Both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia groups had numerically shorter T2 relaxation times than the healthy subjects group in both regions; these differences reached statistical significance for creatine+phosphocreatine and choline-containing compounds in bipolar disorder and for choline-containing compounds in schizophrenia. Metabolite T2 relaxation time shortening is consistent with reduced cell volumes and altered macromolecule structures, and with prolonged water T2 relaxation times reported in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. These findings suggest that metabolite concentrations reported in magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of psychiatric conditions may be confounded by T2 relaxation and highlight the importance of measuring and correcting for this variable.

  14. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  15. Relaxation from particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a "Relaxion" solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  16. Combined Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Transverse Relaxometry in Early-Onset Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonenc, Atilla; Frazier, Jean A.; Crowley, David J.; Moore, Constance M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Transverse relaxation time (T2) imaging provides the opportunity to examine membrane fluidity, which can affect a number of cellular functions. The objective of the present work was to examine T2 abnormalities in children with unmodified DSM-IV-TR bipolar disorder (BD) in bilateral cingulate-paracingulate (CPC) white matter. Method: A…

  17. Transverse Mode Dynamics and Ultrafast Modulation of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We show that multiple transverse mode dynamics of VCSELs (Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers) can be utilized to generate ultrafast intensity modulation at a frequency over 100 GHz, much higher than the relaxation oscillation frequency. Such multimode beating can be greatly enhanced by taking laser output from part of the output facet.

  18. Transverse correlations in multiphoton entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih Yanhua

    2007-10-15

    We have analyzed the transverse correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case.

  19. Interatomic relaxation effects in double core ionization of chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V.; Tashiro, Motomichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2012-10-01

    Core vacancies created on opposite sides of a molecule operate against each other in polarizing the environment between them. Consequently, the relaxation energy associated with the simultaneous creation of these two core holes turns out to be smaller than the sum of the relaxation energies associated with each individual single core vacancy created independently. The corresponding residual, termed interatomic relaxation energy, is sensitive to the environment. In the present paper we explore how the interatomic relaxation energy depends on the length and type of carbon chains bridging two core ionized nitrile groups (-C≡N). We have uncovered several trends and discuss them with the help of simple electrostatic and quantum mechanical models. Namely, the absolute value of the interatomic relaxation energy depends strongly on the orbital hybridization in carbons being noticeably larger in conjugated chains (sp and sp2 hybridizations) possessing highly mobile electrons in delocalized π-type orbitals than in saturated chains (sp3 hybridization) where only σ bonds are available. The interatomic relaxation energy decreases monotonically with increasing chain length. The corresponding descent is determined by the energetics of the molecular bridge, in particular, by the HOMO-LUMO gap. The smallest HOMO-LUMO gap is found in molecules with the sp2-hybridized backbone. Here, the interatomic relaxation energy decreases slowest with the chain length.

  20. Determining the relaxivity values of protein cage-templated nanoparticles using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sana, Barindra; Lim, Sierin

    2015-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often limited by low magnetic relaxivity of currently used contrast agents. This problem can be addressed by developing more sensitive contrast agents by synthesizing new types of metal complex or metallic nanoparticles. Protein cage has been used as a template in biological synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticle-protein cage composites have been reported to have high magnetic relaxivity, which implies their potential application as an MRI contrast agent. The magnetic relaxivity is determined by measuring longitudinal and transverse magnetic relaxivities of the potential agent. The commonly performed techniques are field-cycling NMR relaxometry (also known as variable field relaxometry or nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiling) and in vitro or in vivo MRI relaxometry. Here, we describe techniques for the synthesis of nanoparticle-protein cage composite and determination of their magnetic relaxivities by in vitro MR image acquisition and data processing. In this method, longitudinal and transverse relaxivities are calculated by measuring relaxation rates of water hydrogen nuclei at different nanoparticle-protein cage composite concentrations.

  1. Evaluation of sandstone surface relaxivity using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Sandor, Magdalena; Cheng, Yuesheng

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a common technique used to assess the pore size of fluid-filled porous materials in a wide variety of fields. However, the NMR signal itself only provides a relative distribution of pore size. To calculate an absolute pore size distribution from the NMR data, the material's surface relaxivity needs to be known. Here, a method is presented using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to evaluate surface relaxivity in sandstones. NMR transverse and longitudinal relaxation was measured on a set of sandstone samples and the surface relaxivity was calculated from the pore size distribution determined with MICP measurements. Using multivariate analysis, it was determined that the LIBS data can predict with good accuracy the longitudinal (R2 ∼ 0.84) and transverse (R2 ∼ 0.79) surface relaxivity. Analysis of the regression coefficients shows significant influence from several elements. Some of these are elements previously established to have an effect on surface relaxivity, such as iron and manganese, while others are not commonly associated with surface relaxivity, such as cobalt and titanium. Furthermore, LIBS provides advantages compared to current methods to calibrate surface relaxivity in terms of speed, portability, and sample size requirements. While this paper focuses on geological samples, the method could potentially be expanded to other types of porous materials.

  2. Evaluation of sandstone surface relaxivity using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Kathryn E; Sandor, Magdalena; Cheng, Yuesheng

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a common technique used to assess the pore size of fluid-filled porous materials in a wide variety of fields. However, the NMR signal itself only provides a relative distribution of pore size. To calculate an absolute pore size distribution from the NMR data, the material's surface relaxivity needs to be known. Here, a method is presented using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to evaluate surface relaxivity in sandstones. NMR transverse and longitudinal relaxation was measured on a set of sandstone samples and the surface relaxivity was calculated from the pore size distribution determined with MICP measurements. Using multivariate analysis, it was determined that the LIBS data can predict with good accuracy the longitudinal (R(2)∼0.84) and transverse (R(2)∼0.79) surface relaxivity. Analysis of the regression coefficients shows significant influence from several elements. Some of these are elements previously established to have an effect on surface relaxivity, such as iron and manganese, while others are not commonly associated with surface relaxivity, such as cobalt and titanium. Furthermore, LIBS provides advantages compared to current methods to calibrate surface relaxivity in terms of speed, portability, and sample size requirements. While this paper focuses on geological samples, the method could potentially be expanded to other types of porous materials.

  3. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN CHROMOSPHERIC MOTTLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P.; Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R.; Dorrian, G. D.

    2012-05-01

    A number of recent investigations have revealed that transverse waves are ubiquitous in the solar chromosphere. The vast majority of these have been reported in limb spicules and active region fibrils. We investigate long-lived, quiet-Sun, on-disk features such as chromospheric mottles (jet-like features located at the boundaries of supergranular cells) and their transverse motions. The observations were obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope. The data set is comprised of simultaneous imaging in the H{alpha} core, Ca II K, and G band of an on-disk quiet-Sun region. Time-distance techniques are used to study the characteristics of the transverse oscillations. We detect over 40 transverse oscillations in both bright and dark mottles, with periods ranging from 70 to 280 s, with the most frequent occurrence at {approx}165 s. The velocity amplitudes and transverse displacements exhibit characteristics similar to limb spicules. Neighboring mottles oscillating in-phase are also observed. The transverse oscillations of individual mottles are interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Their estimated periods and damping times are consistent with phase mixing and resonant mode conversion.

  4. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  5. Transverse deformations of extreme horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Carmen; Lucietti, James

    2016-04-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining all extreme black hole solutions to the Einstein equations with a prescribed near-horizon geometry. We investigate this problem by considering infinitesimal deformations of the near-horizon geometry along transverse null geodesics. We show that, up to a gauge transformation, the linearised Einstein equations reduce to an elliptic PDE for the extrinsic curvature of a cross-section of the horizon. We deduce that for a given near-horizon geometry there exists a finite dimensional moduli space of infinitesimal transverse deformations. We then establish a uniqueness theorem for transverse deformations of the extreme Kerr horizon. In particular, we prove that the only smooth axisymmetric transverse deformation of the near-horizon geometry of extreme Kerr, such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped surfaces, corresponds to that of the extreme Kerr black hole. Furthermore, we determine all smooth and biaxisymmetric transverse deformations of the near-horizon geometry of the five-dimensional extreme Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. We find a three parameter family of solutions such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped, which is more general than the known black hole solutions. We discuss the possibility that they correspond to new five-dimensional vacuum black holes.

  6. An evaluation of the contributions of diffusion and exchange in relaxation enhancement by MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossuin, Yves; Roch, Alain; Muller, Robert N.; Gillis, Pierre

    2002-09-01

    Magnetic compounds are known to enhance water proton relaxation, either by diffusion or by proton exchange. An experimental procedure to distinguish both mechanisms is proposed and validated by relaxation measurements made in water-methanol solutions of Dy 3+, Ni 2+, Gd 3+, Tempo, and AMI-25. The test discriminates according to the character of the transverse relaxation in water-methanol solutions: a mono-exponential decay corresponds to diffusion, while a bi-exponential decay indicates the contribution of a proton exchange. The study of ferritin and akaganeite particle solutions confirms the occurrence of a proton exchange between protons belonging to hydroxyl groups of the particle surface and free water protons.

  7. Flutter analysis using transversality theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afolabi, D.

    1993-01-01

    A new method of calculating flutter boundaries of undamped aeronautical structures is presented. The method is an application of the weak transversality theorem used in catastrophe theory. In the first instance, the flutter problem is cast in matrix form using a frequency domain method, leading to an eigenvalue matrix. The characteristic polynomial resulting from this matrix usually has a smooth dependence on the system's parameters. As these parameters change with operating conditions, certain critical values are reached at which flutter sets in. Our approach is to use the transversality theorem in locating such flutter boundaries using this criterion: at a flutter boundary, the characteristic polynomial does not intersect the axis of the abscissa transversally. Formulas for computing the flutter boundaries and flutter frequencies of structures with two degrees of freedom are presented, and extension to multi-degree of freedom systems is indicated. The formulas have obvious applications in, for instance, problems of panel flutter at supersonic Mach numbers.

  8. Transverse discrete breathers in unstrained graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barani, Elham; Lobzenko, Ivan P.; Korznikova, Elena A.; Soboleva, Elvira G.; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Zhou, Kun; Marjaneh, Aliakbar Moradi

    2017-02-01

    Discrete breathers (DB) are spatially localized vibrational modes of large amplitude in defect-free nonlinear lattices. The search for DBs in graphene is of high importance, taking into account that this one atom thick layer of carbon is promising for a number of applications. There exist several reports on successful excitation of DBs in graphene, based on molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations. In a recent work by Hizhnyakov with co-authors the possibility to excite a DB with atoms oscillating normal to the graphene sheet has been reported. In the present study we use a systematic approach for finding initial conditions to excite transverse DBs in graphene. The approach is based on the analysis of the frequency-amplitude dependence for a delocalized, short-wavelength vibrational mode. This mode is a symmetry-dictated exact solution to the dynamic equations of the atomic motion, regardless the mode amplitude and regardless the type of interatomic potentials used in the simulations. It is demonstrated that if the AIREBO potential is used, the mode frequency increases with the amplitude bifurcating from the upper edge of the phonon spectrum for out-of-plane phonons. Then a bell-shaped function is superimposed on this delocalized mode to obtain a spatially localized vibrational mode, i.e., a DB. Placing the center of the bell-shaped function at different positions with respect to the lattice sites, three different DBs are found. Typically, the degree of spatial localization of DBs increases with the DB amplitude, but the transverse DBs in graphene reported here demonstrate the opposite trend. The results are compared to those obtained with the use of the Savin interatomic potential and no transverse DBs are found in this case. The results of this study contribute to a better understanding of the nonlinear dynamics of graphene and they call for the ab initio simulations to verify which of the two potentials used in this study is more precise.

  9. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  10. Ultrafast Relaxation in Conjugated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * EXPERIMENTAL * Samples * Femtosecond experimental apparatus * RESULTS AND DISCUSSION * Poly(phenylacetylenes) * Blue-phase PDA-3BCMU * Red-phase PDA-4BCMU * Blue-phase PDA-DFMP * P3MT * P3DT * PTV * RELAXATION MECHANISMS * Review of the previous works * Symmetry of the lower electronic excited states * Primary relaxation processes * Theoretical studies of nonlinear excitations * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a weakly nondegenerate ground state (poly(phenylacetylene)s) * Dual peak component with power-law decay * Single-peak component with an exponential decay * Hot self-trapped exciton * Transition to the electron-hole threshold * Transition to a biexciton state * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a strongly or moderately nondegenerate ground state * Classifications of polymers * Femtosecond relaxation * Picosecond relaxation * CONCLUSION * Acknowledgments * REFERENCES

  11. Relaxing music for anxiety control.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dave; Polman, Remco; McGregor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of relaxing music for anxiety control. Undergraduate students (N=84) were instructed to imagine themselves in an anxiety producing situation while listening to a selection of 30 music compositions. For each composition, level of relaxation, the factors that either enhanced or detracted from its relaxing potential and the emotional labels attached were assessed. Participants were also asked to state which music components (e.g., tempo, melody) were most conducive to relaxation. Additional information was obtained through the use of a focus group of 6 undergraduate music students. This paper presents details on the characteristics of relaxing-music for anxiety control and emotional labels attached to the relaxing compositions. Furthermore, an importance value has been attached to each of the music components under scrutiny, thus providing an indication of which music components should receive greatest attention when selecting music for anxiety control.

  12. ABC relaxation theory and the factor structure of relaxation states, recalled relaxation activities, dispositions, and motivations.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Wedell, A B; Kolotylo, C J; Lewis, J E; Byers, K Y; Segin, C M

    2000-06-01

    ABC Relaxation Theory proposes 15 psychological relaxation-related states (R-States): Sleepiness, Disengagement, Physical Relaxation, Mental Quiet, Rested/Refreshed, At Ease/At Peace, Energized, Aware, Joy, Thankfulness and Love, Prayerfulness, Childlike Innocence, Awe and Wonder, Mystery, and Timeless/Boundless/Infinite. The present study summarizes the results of 13 separate factor analyses of immediate relaxation-related states, states associated with recalled relaxation activities, relaxation dispositions, and relaxation motivations on a combined sample of 1,904 individuals (group average ages ranged from 28-40 yr.). Four exploratory factor analyses of Smith Relaxation Inventories yielded 15 items that most consistently and exclusively load (generally at least .70) on six replicated factors. These items included happy, joyful, energized, rested, at peace, warm, limp, silent, quiet, dozing, drowsy, prayerful, mystery, distant, and indifferent. Subsequent factor analyses restricted to these items and specifying six factors were performed on 13 different data sets. Each yielded the same six-factor solution: Factor 1: Centered Positive Affect, Factor 2: Sleepiness, Factor 3: Disengagement, Factor 4: Physical Relaxation, Factor 5: Mental Quiet, and Factor 6: Spiritual. Implications for ABC Relaxation Theory are discussed.

  13. Cosmology in Weyl transverse gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-11-01

    We study the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology in the Weyl-transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general spacetime dimension. The WTDiff gravity is invariant under both the local Weyl (conformal) transformation and the volume preserving diffeormorphisms (transverse diffeomorphisms) and is believed to be equivalent to general relativity at least at the classical level (perhaps, even in the quantum regime). It is explicitly shown by solving the equations of motion that the FLRW metric is a classical solution in the WTDiff gravity only when the spatial metric is flat, that is, the Euclidean space, and the lapse function is a nontrivial function of the scale factor.

  14. Probabilities of transversions and transitions.

    PubMed

    Vol'kenshtein, M V

    1976-01-01

    The values of the mean relative probabilities of transversions and transitions have been refined on the basis of the data collected by Jukes and found to be equal to 0.34 and 0.66, respectively. Evolutionary factors increase the probability of transversions to 0.44. The relative probabilities of individual substitutions have been determined, and a detailed classification of the nonsense mutations has been given. Such mutations are especially probable in the UGG (Trp) codon. The highest probability of AG, GA transitions correlates with the lowest mean change in the hydrophobic nature of the amino acids coded.

  15. Indentation of Transversely Isotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Talapady Srivatsa

    Instrumented indentation, as a tool for characterization of mechanical properties, has well been established in the past decades. Studies have been conducted to understand the behavior of isotropic materials under indentation and techniques to accurately predict isotropic material properties have also been reported. Further, within the isotropic regime, work has been done to predict the indentation hardness without having to investigate the area of contact during indentation. Studies have also reported the prospect of utilizing indentation to predict the fatigue behavior of isotropic materials. This dissertation is made with the intent of extending the use of indentation, as a characterization tool, to the anisotropic regime. The effect of transverse isotropy on the indentation response of materials is systematically studied here. Extensive computational analysis is performed to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanics of indentation of transversely isotropic materials. Owing to the anisotropy, indentation may be performed parallel or perpendicular to the plane of isotropy of the specimen. It is observed that the indentation response varies significantly for each of these cases. The two cases are treated as unique and an identical systematic analysis is carried for both. The indentation orientations shall henceforth be referred to as transverse and longitudinal indentation for indentation parallel and perpendicular to the plane of isotropy respectively. A technique is developed capable of extracting the elastic-plastic properties of transversely isotropic materials from interpretation of indentation response in either direction. The technique is rigorously tested for its robustness, accuracy and uniqueness of results. A sensitivity analysis is performed to determine how sensitive the technique is to errors in experimental results. Rigorous studies are performed to understand the variation in pile-up or sink-in during indentation with varying anisotropy in the

  16. Measuring the relaxation time of the xenon atoms and the rubidium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Li, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Qi-Yuan; Luo, Hui

    2016-11-01

    In a nuclear-magnetic-resonance gyroscope (NMRG), the polarization of nuclear spins and the detection of motional information are usually achieved by utilizing the atomic spins of alkali atoms. The parameters of the atomic spins are mainly evaluated by the relaxation time. Relaxation time is very important and can influence signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, start time, and other gyroscope parameters. Therefore, its accurate measurement is critical in the study of NMRG performance. In this study, we evaluate a variety of methods to measure the transverse and longitudinal relaxation times. First we examine the free-induction-decay method, which is the industry standard for measuring spin relaxation time. Second we investigate the improved free-induction-decay, fitting-ratio, and magnetic-resonance-broadening- fitting methods for measuring the transverse relaxation time, and the flipped polarization method for measuring the longitudinal relaxation time. By changing the experimental conditions, we obtain the longitudinal relaxation time using the flipped polarization method under a variety of conditions. Finally, by comparing these measurement methods, we propose the best measurement methods under different conditions.

  17. New approach for understanding experimental NMR relaxivity properties of magnetic nanoparticles: focus on cobalt ferrite.

    PubMed

    Rollet, Anne-Laure; Neveu, Sophie; Porion, Patrice; Dupuis, Vincent; Cherrak, Nadine; Levitz, Pierre

    2016-12-07

    Relaxivities r1 and r2 of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated in the aim of improving the models of NMR relaxation induced by magnetic nanoparticles. On one hand a large set of relaxivity data has been collected for cobalt ferrite MNP dispersions. On the other hand the relaxivity has been calculated for dispersions of cobalt ferrite MNPs with size ranging from 5 to 13 nm, without using any fitting procedure. The model is based on the magnetic dipolar interaction between the magnetic moments of the MNPs and the (1)H nuclei. It takes into account both the longitudinal and transversal contributions of the magnetic moments of MNPs leading to three contributions in the relaxation equations. The comparison of the experimental and theoretical data shows a good agreement of the NMR profiles as well as the temperature dependence.

  18. Hemorrhagic Longitudinally Extensive Transverse Myelitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chris Y; Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Nakamoto, Beau K

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) may be associated with viral triggers, including both infections and vaccinations. We present a case of a healthy immunocompetent 33-year-old woman who developed a hemorrhagic LETM 2 weeks after seasonal influenza vaccination. Hemorrhagic LETM has not to our knowledge been reported after influenza vaccination. It may represent a forme fruste variant of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.

  19. Transverse effects in UV FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Small, D.W.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    In an ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL), the electron beam size can be approximately the same as the optical mode size. The performance of a UV FEL is studied including the effect of emittance, betatron focusing, and external focusing of the electron beam on the transverse optical mode. The results are applied to the Industrial Laser Consortium`s UV FEL.

  20. Transverse force on transversely polarized quarks in longitudinally polarized nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Manal; Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the semiclassical interpretation of the x3 and x4 moments of twist-3 parton distribution functions (PDFs). While no semiclassical interpretation for the higher moments of gT(x ) and e (x ) was found, the x3 moment of the chirally odd spin-dependent twist-3 PDF hL3(x ) can be related to the longitudinal gradient of the transverse force on transversely polarized quarks in longitudinally polarized nucleons in a deep-inelastic scattering experiment. We discuss how this result relates to the torque acting on a quark in the same experiment. This has further implications for comparisons between the Jaffe-Manohar and the Ji decompositions of the nucleon spin.

  1. Development of relaxation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    Relaxation turbulence models have been intensively studied. The complete time dependent mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations have been solved for flow into a two dimensional compression corner. A new numerical scheme has been incorporated into the developed computed code with an attendant order of magnitude reduction in computation time. Computed solutions are compared with experimental measurements of Law for supersonic flow. Details of the relaxation process have been studied; several different relaxation models, including different relaxation processes and varying relaxation length, are tested and compared. Then a parametric study has been conducted in which both Reynolds number and wedge angle are varied. To assess effects of Reynolds number and wedge angle, the parametric study includes the comparison of computed separation location and upstream extent of pressure rise; numerical results are also compared with the measurements of surface pressure, skin friction and mean velocity field.

  2. Transverse shape of the electron

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, Paul; Kurki, Samu

    2010-01-01

    We study the charge density, form factors and spin distributions of the electron induced by its |e{gamma}> light-front Fock state in impact parameter space. Only transversally compact Fock states contribute to the leading behavior of the Dirac and Pauli form factors as the momentum transfer tends to infinity. Power suppressed contributions are not compact, and distributions weighted by the transverse size have endpoint contributions. The Fock state conserves the spin of the parent electron locally, but the separate contributions of the electron, photon, and orbital angular momentum depend on longitudinal momentum and impact parameter. The sign of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron may be understood intuitively from the density distribution, addressing a challenge by Feynman.

  3. Nonequilibrium quantum relaxation across a localization-delocalization transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roósz, Gergő; Divakaran, Uma; Rieger, Heiko; Iglói, Ferenc

    2014-11-01

    We consider the one-dimensional X X model in a quasiperiodic transverse field described by the Harper potential, which is equivalent to a tight-binding model of spinless fermions with a quasiperiodic chemical potential. For weak transverse field (chemical potential), h hc . We study the nonequilibrium relaxation of the system by applying two protocols: a sudden change of h (quench dynamics) and a slow change of h in time (adiabatic dynamics). For a quench into the delocalized (localized) phase, the entanglement entropy grows linearly (saturates) and the order parameter decreases exponentially (has a finite limiting value). For a critical quench the entropy increases algebraically with time, whereas the order parameter decreases with a stretched exponential. The density of defects after an adiabatic field change through the critical point is shown to scale with a power of the rate of field change and a scaling relation for the exponent is derived.

  4. Hemorrhagic Longitudinally Extensive Transverse Myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chris Y.; Riangwiwat, Tanawan

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) may be associated with viral triggers, including both infections and vaccinations. We present a case of a healthy immunocompetent 33-year-old woman who developed a hemorrhagic LETM 2 weeks after seasonal influenza vaccination. Hemorrhagic LETM has not to our knowledge been reported after influenza vaccination. It may represent a forme fruste variant of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis. PMID:27847660

  5. Liquid-state paramagnetic relaxation from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantaharju, Jyrki; Vaara, Juha

    2016-10-01

    We simulate nuclear and electron spin relaxation rates in a paramagnetic system from first principles. Sampling a molecular dynamics trajectory with quantum-chemical calculations produces a time series of the instantaneous parameters of the relevant spin Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonians are, in turn, used to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by studying the aqueous solution of the Ni2 + ion. Taking advantage of Kubo's theory, the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation rates are extracted from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available experimental data is obtained by the method.

  6. Transverse spin effects at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaro, G.

    2009-03-23

    The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has a broad physics program focused on the nucleon spin structure and on hadron spectroscopy, using both muon and hadron beams. One of the main objectives for the spin program with the muon beam is the measurement of transverse spin effects in semi inclusive deep inelastic scattering. A longitudinally polarized 160 GeV/c muon beam is impinging on a transversely polarized target: from 2002 to 2004 a {sup 6}LiD(deuteron) target has been used, while during 2007 data taking a NH{sub 3}(proton) target was put in place. All measured transverse asymmetries on deuteron have been found to be small, and compatible with zero, within the few percent statistical errors. These results, which are currently used as input for global fits, can be interpreted as cancellation between u and d quark contribution in the deuteron. The first results for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for charged hadrons from the 2007 proton COMPASS data are also presented and discussed.

  7. Suppression of sodium nuclear magnetic resonance double-quantum coherence by chemical shift and relaxation reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Robert B.; Huntley, James J. A.; Jin, Haoran; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    1992-12-01

    An investigation into the signal suppression behavior of the paramagnetic shift and relaxation reagents, Dy(P3O10)27- and Gd(P3O10)27-, with regard to their use in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of sodium has been performed. Measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time constants of sodium in normal saline, Krebs-Henseleit buffer, and human blood serum, as a function of concentration of these reagents showed that, although closely coupled in the saline and K-H buffer environments, in plasma T1 and T2 become decoupled, transverse relaxation dominating in comparison to longitudinal relaxation. Linewidth measurements further suggest that relaxation in the plasma milieu is controlled primarily by inherent T2 relaxation, rather than by field inhomogeneity or diffusion effects. Quantitative single-quantum (1Q) and double-quantum (2Q) intensity measurements, biexponential T2 relaxation measurements, and parametric studies of the preparation time of the 2Q pulse sequence, were obtained in suspensions of bovine serum albumin and human erythrocytes. The observed suppression of sodium 2Q coherence by paramagnetic shift and relaxation reagents was found to exhibit a complex behavior in albumin solutions, involving the biexponential T2 decay to be expected during the preparation time of the 2Q filter pulse sequence, as well as the optimum preparation time for production of the double-quantum coherence itself. The controlling factor for both of these effects is the biexponential amplitude function in the expression for the transverse magnetization observed following application of the 2Q pulse sequence. This in turn is determined entirely by the values for the slow and fast components of biexponential relaxation in sodium, which themselves depend upon the concentration of the macromolecular binding sites for quadrupolar interaction. A similar behavior has been observed in suspensions of human erythrocytes.

  8. Progressive muscle relaxation, breathing exercises, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Smith, J C

    2001-12-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) and breathing exercises. Forty-two students were divided randomly into two groups and taught PMR or breathing exercises. Both groups practiced for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, PMR practitioners displayed greater increments in relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement, while breathing practitioners displayed higher levels of R-State Strength and Awareness. Slight differences emerged at Weeks 1 and 2; major differences emerged at Weeks 4 and 5. A delayed and potentially reinforcing aftereffect emerged for PMR only after five weeks of training--increased levels of Mental Quiet and Joy. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  9. Stress relaxation in heterogeneous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.

    1992-05-01

    When heterogeneous polymers such as diblock copolymers form a microdomain phase, an imposed strain gives rise to stress from two sources, and several mechanisms of stress relaxation. The release of stress by disentanglement is strongly influenced by the effective confinement of the junction points to the domain boundaries and by the stretching of the chains. Using accepted notions of entangled chain kinetics, it is argued that the relaxation time for sliding stress is exponential in the chainlength to the 7/9 power. A method for calculating the frequency-dependent dynamic modulus is sketched. Despite the slow relaxation implied by these mechanisms, it appears possible to create domains of high energy.

  10. Stress Relaxation of Interim Restoratives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-18

    unmodified zinc oxide- eugenol cement were more favorable than those of IRM and Cavit. The plastic behavior of gutta-percha temporary stopping precluded assessment of its relaxation at temperatures in excess of 22P C. (Author)

  11. Relaxation labeling using modular operators

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.S.; Frei, W.

    1983-01-01

    Probabilistic relaxation labeling has been shown to be useful in image processing, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. The approaches taken to date have been encumbered with computationally extensive summations which generally prevent real-time operation and/or easy hardware implementation. The authors present a new and unique approach to the relaxation labeling problem using modular, VLSI-oriented hierarchical complex operators. One of the fundamental concepts of this work is the representation of the probability distribution of the possible labels for a given object (pixel) as an ellipse, which may be summed with neighboring object's distribution ellipses, resulting in a new, relaxed label space. The mathematical development of the elliptical approach will be presented and compared to more classical approaches, and a hardware block diagram that shows the implementation of the relaxation scheme using vlsi chips will be presented. Finally, results will be shown which illustrate applications of the modular scheme, iteratively, to both edges and lines. 13 references.

  12. From Strong to Fragile Glass Formers: Secondary Relaxation in Polyalcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döß, A.; Paluch, M.; Sillescu, H.; Hinze, G.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied details of the molecular origin of slow secondary relaxation near Tg in a series of neat polyalcohols by means of dielectric spectroscopy and 2H NMR. From glycerol to threitol, xylitol, and sorbitol the appearance of the secondary relaxation changes gradually from a wing-type scenario to a pronounced β peak. It is found that in sorbitol the dynamics of the whole molecule contributes equally to the β process, while in glycerol the hydrogen bond forming OH groups remain rather rigid compared to the hydrogens bonded to the carbon skeleton.

  13. Phenomenological extraction of Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2011-10-24

    We discuss phenomenological extraction of Transverse Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) from experimental data. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. TMDs reveal three-dimensional distribution of partons inside polarised nucleon. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised experiments using Spin Asymmetries in particular Single Spin Asymmetries (SSAs). We discuss transversity that measures distribution of transversely polarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon and Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon.

  14. Electron Ion Collider transverse spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2011-07-01

    Electron Ion Collider is a future high energy facility for studies of the structure of the nucleon. Three-dimensional parton structure is one of the main goals of EIC. In momentum space Transverse Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) are the key ingredients to map such a structure. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised SIDIS experiments. We discuss Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon and transversity that measures distribution of transversely polarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon

  15. Electron Ion Collider transverse spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2011-07-15

    Electron Ion Collider is a future high energy facility for studies of the structure of the nucleon. Three-dimensional parton structure is one of the main goals of EIC. In momentum space Transverse Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) are the key ingredients to map such a structure. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised SIDIS experiments. We discuss Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon and transversity that measures distribution of transversely polarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon.

  16. Vacancy Relaxation in Cubic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girifalco, L. A.; Weizer, V. G.

    1960-01-01

    The configuration of the atoms surrounding a vacancy in four face-centered cubic and three body-centered cubic metals has been computed, using a pairwise, central-force model in which the energy of interaction between two atoms was taken to have the form of a Morse function. Only radial relaxations were considered. The first and second nearest-neighbor relaxations for the face-centered systems were found to be: Pb (1.42,-0.43), Ni (2.14,-0.39), Cu(2.24,-0.40) and Ca (2.73,-0.41, expressed in percentages of normal distances. For the body-centered systems the relaxations out to the fourth nearest neighbors to the vacancy were: Fe (6.07,-2.12, -0.25, -), Ba (7.85, -2.70, 0.70, -0.33) and Na (10.80, -3.14, 3.43, -0.20). The positive signs indicate relaxation toward the vacancy and the negative signs indicate relaxation away from the vacancy. The energies of relaxation (eV) are: Pb (0.162), Ni (0.626), Cu (0.560), Ca (0.400), Fe (1.410), Ba (0.950) and Na (0.172).

  17. Investigation of transverse oscillation method.

    PubMed

    Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-05-01

    Conventional ultrasound scanners can display only the axial component of the blood velocity vector, which is a significant limitation when vessels nearly parallel to the skin surface are scanned. The transverse oscillation (TO) method overcomes this limitation by introducing a TO and an axial oscillation in the pulse echo field. The theory behind the creation of the double oscillation pulse echo field is explained as well as the theory behind the estimation of the vector velocity. A parameter study of the method is performed, using the ultrasound simulation program Field II. A virtual linear-array transducer with center frequency 7 MHz and 128 active elements is created, and a virtual blood vessel of radius 6.4 mm is simulated. The performance of the TO method is found around an initial point in the parameter space. The parameters varied are: flow angle, transmit focus depth, receive apodization, pulse length, transverse wave length, number of emissions, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and type of echo-canceling filter used. Using an experimental scanner, the performance of the TO method is evaluated. An experimental flowrig is used to create laminar parabolic flow in a blood mimicking fluid, and the fluid is scanned under different flow-to-beam angles. The relative standard deviation on the transverse velocity estimate is found to be less than 10% for all angles between 50 degrees and 90 degrees. Furthermore, the TO method is evaluated in the flowrig using pulsatile flow, which resembles the flow in the femoral artery. The estimated volume flow as a function of time is compared to the volume flow derived from a conventional axial method at a flow-to-beam angle of 60 degrees. It is found that the method is highly sensitive to the angle between the flow and the beam direction. Also, the choice of echo canceling filter affects the performance significantly.

  18. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

  19. Optical Isolators With Transverse Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Yuan X.; Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    New design for isolator includes zigzag, forward-and-backward-pass beam path and use of transverse rather than longitudinal magnetic field. Design choices produce isolator with as large an aperture as desired using low-Verdet-constant glass rather than more expensive crystals. Uses commercially available permanent magnets in Faraday rotator. More compact and less expensive. Designed to transmit rectangular beam. Square cross section of beam extended to rectangular shape by increasing one dimension of glass without having to increase magnetic field. Potentially useful in laser systems involving slab lasers and amplifiers. Has applications to study of very-high-power lasers for fusion research.

  20. A Transversely Isotropic Thermoelastic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    A continuum theory is presented for representing the thermoelastic behavior of composites that can be idealized as transversely isotropic. This theory is consistent with anisotropic viscoplastic theories being developed presently at NASA Lewis Research Center. A multiaxial statement of the theory is presented, as well as plane stress and plane strain reductions. Experimental determination of the required material parameters and their theoretical constraints are discussed. Simple homogeneously stressed elements are examined to illustrate the effect of fiber orientation on the resulting strain distribution. Finally, the multiaxial stress-strain relations are expressed in matrix form to simplify and accelerate implementation of the theory into structural analysis codes.

  1. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  2. Dynamics of the transverse Ising model with next-nearest-neighbor interactions.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, P R C; Plascak, J A; de Alcantara Bonfim, O F; Florencio, J

    2015-10-01

    We study the effects of next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) interactions on the dynamics of the one-dimensional spin-1/2 transverse Ising model in the high-temperature limit. We use exact diagonalization to obtain the time-dependent transverse correlation function and the corresponding spectral density for a tagged spin. Our results for chains of 13 spins with periodic boundary conditions produce results which are valid in the infinite-size limit. In general we find that the NNN coupling produces slower dynamics accompanied by an enhancement of the central mode behavior. Even in the case of a strong transverse field, if the NNN coupling is sufficiently large, then there is a crossover from collective mode to central mode behavior. We also obtain several recurrants for the continued fraction representation of the relaxation function.

  3. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  4. Transverse Domain Wall Profile for Spin Logic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Goolaup, S.; Ramu, M.; Murapaka, C.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    Domain wall (DW) based logic and memory devices require precise control and manipulation of DW in nanowire conduits. The topological defects of Transverse DWs (TDW) are of paramount importance as regards to the deterministic pinning and movement of DW within complex networks of conduits. In-situ control of the DW topological defects in nanowire conduits may pave the way for novel DW logic applications. In this work, we present a geometrical modulation along a nanowire conduit, which allows for the topological rectification/inversion of TDW in nanowires. This is achieved by exploiting the controlled relaxation of the TDW within an angled rectangle. Direct evidence of the logical operation is obtained via magnetic force microscopy measurement. PMID:25900455

  5. A three-dimensional constitutive model for the stress relaxation of articular ligaments.

    PubMed

    Davis, Frances M; De Vita, Raffaella

    2014-06-01

    A new nonlinear constitutive model for the three-dimensional stress relaxation of articular ligaments is proposed. The model accounts for finite strains, anisotropy, and strain-dependent stress relaxation behavior exhibited by these ligaments. The model parameters are identified using published uniaxial stress-stretch and stress relaxation data on human medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) subjected to tensile tests in the fiber and transverse to the fiber directions (Quapp and Weiss in J Biomech Eng Trans ASME 120:757-763, 1998; Bonifasi-Lista et al. in J Orthop Res 23(1):67-76, 2005). The constitutive equation is then used to predict the nonlinear elastic and stress relaxation response of ligaments subjected to shear deformations in the fiber direction and transverse to the fiber direction, and an equibiaxial extension. A direct comparison with stress relaxation data collected by subjecting human MCLs to shear deformation in the fiber direction is presented in order to demonstrate the predictive capabilities of the model.

  6. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  7. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented.

  8. Transitions, transversions, and the molecular evolutionary clock.

    PubMed

    Jukes, T H

    1987-01-01

    Nucleotide substitutions in the form of transitions (purine-purine or pyrimidine-pyrimidine interchanges) and transversions (purine-pyrimidine interchanges) occur during evolution and may be compiled by aligning the sequences of homologous genes. Referring to the genetic code tables, silent transitions take place in third positions of codons in family boxes and two-codon sets. Silent transversions in third positions occur only in family boxes, except for A = C transversions between AGR and CGR arginine codons (R = A or G). Comparisons of several protein genes have been made, and various subclasses of transitional and transversional nucleotide substitutions have been compiled. Considerable variations occur among the relative proportions of transitions and transversions. Such variations could possibly be caused by mutator genes, favoring either transitions or, conversely, transversions, during DNA replication. At earlier stages of evolutionary divergence, transitions are usually more frequent, but there are exceptions. No indication was found that transversions usually originate from multiple substitutions in transitions.

  9. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  10. Transversal magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, J.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore theoretically the magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals in transversal magnetic fields within two alternative models of disorder: (i) short-range impurities and (ii) charged (Coulomb) impurities. Impurity scattering is treated using the self-consistent Born approximation. We find that an unusual broadening of Landau levels leads to a variety of regimes of the resistivity scaling in the temperature-magnetic field plane. In particular, the magnetoresistance is nonmonotonous for the white-noise disorder model. For H →0 the magnetoresistance for short-range impurities vanishes in a nonanalytic way as H1 /3. In the limits of strongest magnetic fields H , the magnetoresistivity vanishes as 1 /H for pointlike impurities, while it is linear and positive in the model with Coulomb impurities.

  11. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  12. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  13. Transverse patterning and human amnesia.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Timothy C; Verfaellie, Mieke; Grafman, Jordan

    2006-10-01

    The transverse patterning (TP) task (A+ B-, B+ C-, C+ A-) has played a central role in testing the hypothesis that medial-temporal (and, in particular, hippocampal) brain damage selectively impairs learning on at least some classes of configural (i.e., nonlinear) learning tasks. Results in the animal and human literature generally support that hypothesis. Reed and Squire [Impaired transverse patterning in human amnesia is a special case of impaired memory for two-choice discrimination tasks. Behavioral Neuroscience, 113, 3-9, 1999], however, advanced an alternative account in which impaired TP performance in amnesia reflects a generic scaling artifact arising from the greater difficulty of the TP task compared to the elemental (i.e., linear) control task that is typically used. We begin with a critique of Reed and Squire, countering their conceptual arguments and showing that their results, when analyzed appropriately, support the configural deficit hypothesis. We then report results from eight new amnesic patients and controls on an improved version of the TP task. Despite substantial practice, accuracy of patients with bilateral hippocampal damage due to anoxia reached and maintained an asymptote of only 54% correct, well below the maximum accuracy obtainable (67%) in the absence of configural learning. A patient with selective bilateral damage to the anterior thalamic nuclei exhibited a TP accuracy asymptote that was near 67%, a pattern of two out of three correct consecutive trials, and a pattern of nearly always answering correctly for two of the three TP item pairs. These results are consistent with a set of unique and parameter-free predictions of the configural deficit hypothesis.

  14. Ultraviolet and visible Brillouin scattering study of viscous relaxation in 3-methylpentane down to the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassi, P.; Nardone, M.; Giugni, A.

    2012-09-01

    Brillouin light scattering spectra from transverse and longitudinal acoustic waves in liquid and supercooled 3-methylpentane have been collected from room temperature down to 80 K, just above the glass transition. Spectra at different wave vectors have been obtained using 532 nm and 266 nm excitation. We found evidence of a shear relaxation with a characteristic time of 100 s at the glass transition which only partly accounts for the relaxation observed in the propagation and attenuation of the longitudinal modes. The inclusion of a relaxing bulk viscosity contribution with a relaxation time of the order of 102 ns at the glass transition is found to adequately reproduce the experimental data including transient grating data at a much lower frequency. A consistent picture of relaxed shear and bulk moduli as a function of temperature is derived. These two quantities are found to be related by a linear relation suggesting that a Cauchy-like relation holds also above the glass transition.

  15. Analog circuits for relaxation networks.

    PubMed

    Card, H

    1993-12-01

    Selected examples are presented of recent advances, primarily from the U.S. and Canada, in analog circuits for relaxation networks. Relaxation networks having feedback connections exhibit potentially greater computational power per neuron than feedforward networks. They are also more poorly understood especially with respect to learning algorithms. Examples are described of analog circuits for (i) supervised learning in deterministic Boltzmann machines, (ii) unsupervised competitive learning and feature maps and (iii) networks with resistive grids for vision and audition tasks. We also discuss recent progress on in-circuit learning and synaptic weight storage mechanisms.

  16. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and C-13 enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution H-1 and C-13 liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 angstrom. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time greater than 10(exp -8) s(exp -1). The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring (N-14)-(H-1) J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T(sub 1) and T(sub 2) experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in C-13 enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  17. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sachleben, Joseph Robert

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and 13C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution 1H and 13C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 Å. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10-8 s-1. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring 14N-1H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T1 and T2 experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in 13C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  18. CPMG relaxation rate dispersion in dipole fields around capillaries.

    PubMed

    Kurz, F T; Kampf, T; Buschle, L R; Heiland, S; Schlemmer, H-P; Bendszus, M; Ziener, C H

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rates for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences increase with inter-echo time in presence of microscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities due to nuclear spin diffusion. For a weak field approximation that includes diffusion effects, the CPMG relaxation rate shift for proton diffusion around capillaries in muscle tissue can be expressed in terms of a frequency correlation function and the inter-echo time. The present work provides an analytical expression for the local relaxation rate shift that is dependent on local blood volume fraction, diffusion coefficient, capillary radius, susceptibility difference and inter-echo time. Asymptotic regions of the model are in agreement with previous modeling results of Brooks et al., Luz et al. and Ziener et al. In comparison with simulation data, the model shows an equal or better accuracy than established approximations. Also, model behavior coincides with experimental data for rat heart and skeletal muscle. The present work provides analytical tools to extract sub-voxel information about uniform capillary networks that can be used to study capillary organization or micro-circulatory remodeling.

  19. Nuclear Spin Relaxation and Molecular Interactions of a Novel Triazolium-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Jesse J; Schneider, Yanika; Kail, Brian W; Luebke, David R; Nulwala, Hunaid; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-04-11

    Nuclear spin relaxation, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques are used to determine supramolecular arrangement of 3-methyl-1-octyl-4-phenyl-1H-triazol-1,2,3-ium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [OMPhTz][Tf{sub 2}N], an example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid. The results obtained showed first-order thermodynamic dependence for nuclear spin relaxation of the anion. First-order relaxation dependence is interpreted as through-bond dipolar relaxation. Greater than first-order dependence was found in the aliphatic protons, aromatic carbons (including nearest neighbors), and carbons at the end of the aliphatic tail. Greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of spin relaxation rates is interpreted as relaxation resulting from at least one mechanism additional to through-bond dipolar relaxation. In rigid portions of the cation, an additional spin relaxation mechanism is attributed to anisotropic effects, while greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of the octyl side chain’s spin relaxation rates is attributed to cation–cation interactions. Little interaction between the anion and the cation was observed by spin relaxation studies or by ESI-MS. No extended supramolecular structure was observed in this study, which was further supported by MS and SAXS. nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) factors are used in conjunction with spin–lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) measurements to calculate rotational correlation times for C–H bonds (the time it takes for the vector represented by the bond between the two atoms to rotate by one radian). The rotational correlation times are used to represent segmental reorientation dynamics of the cation. A combination of techniques is used to determine the segmental interactions and dynamics of this example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid.

  20. "Stressing" Relaxation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager-Decker, Iris

    A rationale is offered for incorporating relaxation training in elementary school classroom activities. Cited are research studies which focus on the reaction of children to stressful life changes and resulting behavioral and physical disorders. A list is given of significant life events which may be factors in causing diseases or misbehavior in…

  1. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  2. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  3. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  4. Angular momentum relaxation in atom-diatom dilute gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Glenn T.

    1987-04-01

    The angular momentum relaxation cross sections for a diatomic molecule in a dilute atomic gas are estimated subject to the assumption that the intermolecular torque is dominated by the hard, impulsive contribution (evaluated using Boltzmann kinetic theory for nonspherical molecules). For carbon monoxide in a variety of gases, the kinetic theory derived contribution to the angular momentum cross section is in qualitative agreement with the experimental results of Jameson, Jameson, and Buchi.

  5. Relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turik, A. V.; Bogatin, A. S.; Andreev, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    The specific features of the relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics have been investigated. The nature of the difference between the relaxation frequencies of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss (conductivity) has been explained. It has been shown that the average relaxation frequency of the conductivity is considerably (in some cases, by several orders of magnitude) higher than the relaxation frequency of the dielectric constant owing to an increase in the conductivity spectra of the statistical weight of the relaxation processes with short relaxation times.

  6. Laparoscopic correction of right transverse colostomy prolapse.

    PubMed

    Gundogdu, Gokhan; Topuz, Ufuk; Umutoglu, Tarik

    2013-08-01

    Colostomy prolapse is a frequently seen complication of transverse colostomy. In one child with recurrent stoma prolapse, we performed a loop-to-loop fixation and peritoneal tethering laparoscopically. No prolapse had recurred at follow-up. Laparoscopic repair of transverse colostomy prolapse seems to be a less invasive method than other techniques.

  7. Transverse instability at the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    Sporadic transverse instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in transverse emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities are computed. Remaining problems are discussed.

  8. Acute transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Bucknall, R C

    1989-01-01

    A sixteen year old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus developed acute transverse myelopathy. She was treated with high dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange and regained partial neurological function. Previous descriptions of transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus are reviewed, with particular reference to the efficacy of high dose steroid treatment. PMID:2662918

  9. Transverse impedance localization using intensity dependent optics

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Arduini, G.; Metral, E.; Papotti, G.; Quatraro, D.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Tomas, R.

    2009-05-04

    Measurements of transverse impedance in the SPS to track the evolution over the last few years show discrepancies compared to the analytical estimates of the major contributors. Recent measurements to localize the major sources of the transverse impedance using intensity dependent optics are presented. Some simulations using HEADTAIL to understand the limitations of the reconstruction and related numerical aspects are also discussed.

  10. Cladding For Transversely-Pumped Laser Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee

    1989-01-01

    Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of transversely-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older transverse-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.

  11. Transverse Mercator Projection Via Elliptic Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Improved method of construction of U.S. Army's universal transverse Mercator grid system based on Gauss-Kruger transverse Mercator projection and on use of elliptic integrals of second kind. Method can be used to map entire northern or southern hemisphere with respect to single principal meridian.

  12. Electrodeposited, Transverse Nanowire Electroluminescent Junctions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaopeng; Xu, Qiang; Dutta, Rajen K; Le Thai, Mya; Li, Xiaowei; Penner, Reginald M

    2016-09-27

    The preparation by electrodeposition of transverse nanowire electroluminescent junctions (tn-ELJs) is described, and the electroluminescence (EL) properties of these devices are characterized. The lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition process is first used to prepare long (millimeters), linear, nanocrystalline CdSe nanowires on glass. The thickness of these nanowires along the emission axis is 60 nm, and the width, wCdSe, along the electrical axis is adjustable from 100 to 450 nm. Ten pairs of nickel-gold electrical contacts are then positioned along the axis of this nanowire using lithographically directed electrodeposition. The resulting linear array of nickel-CdSe-gold junctions produces EL with an external quantum efficiency, EQE, and threshold voltage, Vth, that depend sensitively on wCdSe. EQE increases with increasing electric field and also with increasing wCdSe, and Vth also increases with wCdSe and, therefore, the electrical resistance of the tn-ELJs. Vth down to 1.8(±0.2) V (for wCdSe ≈ 100 nm) and EQE of 5.5(±0.5) × 10(-5) (for wCdSe ≈ 450 nm) are obtained. tn-ELJs produce a broad EL emission envelope, spanning the wavelength range from 600 to 960 nm.

  13. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  14. Transversity from two pion interference fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    She Jun; Huang Yang; Barone, Vincenzo; Ma Boqiang

    2008-01-01

    We present calculation on the azimuthal spin asymmetries for pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) process at both HERMES and COMPASS kinematics, with transversely polarized proton, deuteron, and neutron targets. We calculate the asymmetry by adopting a set of parametrization of the interference fragmentation functions and two different models for the transversity. We find that the result for the proton target is insensitive to the approaches of the transversity but more helpful to understand the interference fragmentation functions. However, for the neutron target, which can be obtained through using deuteron and {sup 3}He targets, we find different predictions for different approaches to the transversity. Thus probing the two pion interference fragmentation from the neutron can provide us more interesting information on the transversity.

  15. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  16. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  17. Models of violently relaxed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Tremaine, Scott; Johnstone, Doug

    1989-02-01

    The properties of spherical self-gravitating models derived from two distribution functions that incorporate, in a crude way, the physics of violent relaxation are investigated. The first distribution function is identical to the one discussed by Stiavelli and Bertin (1985) except for a change in the sign of the 'temperature', i.e., e exp(-aE) to e exp(+aE). It is shown that these 'negative temperature' models provide a much better description of the end-state of violent relaxation than 'positive temperature' models. The second distribution function is similar to the first except for a different dependence on angular momentum. Both distribution functions yield single-parameter families of models with surface density profiles very similar to the R exp 1/4 law. Furthermore, the central concentration of models in both families increases monotonically with the velocity anisotropy, as expected in systems that formed through cold collapse.

  18. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  19. Resonant relaxation in electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    We compute the leading, chiral charge-changing relaxation term in the quantum transport equations that govern electroweak baryogenesis using the closed time path formulation of nonequilibrium quantum field theory. We show that the relaxation transport coefficients may be resonantly enhanced under appropriate conditions on electroweak model parameters and that such enhancements can mitigate the impact of similar enhancements in the CP-violating source terms. We also develop a power counting in the time and energy scales entering electroweak baryogenesis and include effects through second order in ratios ɛ of the small and large scales. We illustrate the implications of the resonantly enhanced O(ɛ2) terms using the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, focusing on the interplay between the requirements of baryogenesis and constraints obtained from collider studies, precision electroweak data, and electric dipole moment searches.

  20. Capturing fast relaxing spins with SWIFT adiabatic rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation (T1ρ) mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Nissi, M J; Idiyatullin, D; Michaeli, S; Garwood, M; Ellermann, J

    2016-04-01

    Rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, with the characteristic time constant T1ρ, provides a means to access motion-restricted (slow) spin dynamics in MRI. As a result of their restricted motion, these spins are sometimes characterized by a short transverse relaxation time constant T2 and thus can be difficult to detect directly with conventional image acquisition techniques. Here, we introduce an approach for three-dimensional adiabatic T1ρ mapping based on a magnetization-prepared sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (MP-SWIFT) sequence, which captures signal from almost all water spin populations, including the extremely fast relaxing pool. A semi-analytical procedure for T1ρ mapping is described. Experiments on phantoms and musculoskeletal tissue specimens (tendon, articular and epiphyseal cartilages) were performed at 9.4 T for both the MP-SWIFT and fast spin echo (FSE) read outs. In the phantom with liquids having fast molecular tumbling and a single-valued T1ρ time constant, the measured T1ρ values obtained with MP-SWIFT and FSE were similar. Conversely, in normal musculoskeletal tissues, T1ρ values measured with MP-SWIFT were much shorter than the values obtained with FSE. Studies of biological tissue specimens demonstrated that T1ρ-weighted SWIFT provides higher contrast between normal and diseased tissues relative to conventional acquisitions. Adiabatic T1ρ mapping with SWIFT readout captures contributions from the otherwise undetected fast relaxing spins, allowing more informative T1ρ measurements of normal and diseased states.

  1. Relaxation: A Fourth "R" for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, A. B.

    Relaxation training helps the individual handle tension through concentrating upon efficient use of muscles. A program of progressive relaxation can be easily incorporated into elementary and secondary schools. Objectives of such a program include the following: (a) to learn to relax technically for purposes of complete rest (deep muscle…

  2. A nonlinear constitutive model for stress relaxation in ligaments and tendons.

    PubMed

    Davis, Frances M; De Vita, Raffaella

    2012-12-01

    A novel constitutive model that describes stress relaxation in transversely isotropic soft collagenous tissues such as ligaments and tendons is presented. The model is formulated within the nonlinear integral representation framework proposed by Pipkin and Rogers (J. Mech. Phys. Solids. 16:59-72, 1968). It represents a departure from existing models in biomechanics since it describes not only the strain dependent stress relaxation behavior of collagenous tissues but also their finite strains and transverse isotropy. Axial stress-stretch data and stress relaxation data at different axial stretches are collected on rat tail tendon fascicles in order to compute the model parameters. Toward this end, the rat tail tendon fascicles are assumed to be incompressible and undergo an isochoric axisymmetric deformation. A comparison with the experimental data proves that, unlike the quasi-linear viscoelastic model (Fung, Biomechanics: Mechanics of Living Tissues. Springer, New York, 1993) the constitutive law can capture the observed nonlinearities in the stress relaxation response of rat tail tendon fascicles.

  3. The Effects of Dissolved Oxygen upon Amide Proton Relaxation and Chemical Shift in a Perdeuterated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Tobias S.; Campbell, Iain D.; Boyd, Jonathan

    2002-08-01

    The effects of dissolved molecular oxygen upon amide proton ( 1H N) longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and chemical shifts were studied for a small protein domain, the second type 2 module of fibronectin ( 2F2)—isotopically enriched to 99% 2H, 98% 15N. Longitudinal relaxation rate enhancements, R O 2( 1H N), of individual backbone 1H N nuclei varied up to 14 fold between a degassed and oxygenated (1 bar) solution, indicating that the oxygen distribution within the protein is inhomogeneous. On average, smaller relaxation rate enhancements were observed for 1H N nuclei associated with the core of the protein compared to 1H N nuclei closer to the surface, suggesting restricted oxygen accessibility to some regions. In agreement with an O 2- 1H N hyperfine interaction in the extreme narrowing limit, the 1H N transverse relaxation rates showed no significant change, up to an oxygen pressure of 9.5 bar (the maximum pressure used in this study). For most 1H N resonances, small Δδ O 2( 1H N) hyperfine chemical shifts could be detected between oxygen pressures of 1 bar and 9.5 bar.

  4. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  5. Effects of Various Forms of Relaxation Training on Physiological and Self-Report Measures of Relaxation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Richard H.; Kohl, Marilyn L.

    1975-01-01

    Examines relative effectiveness of four types of relaxation training including Jacobson-Wolpe and electromyograph (EMG) feedback. Dependent measures are EMG recordings and self-report measures of relaxation. All groups reported increased relaxation, but EMG groups were superior in EMG measures of speed of learning and depth of relaxation.…

  6. Relation between Direct Observation of Relaxation and Self-Reported Mindfulness and Relaxation States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Lacey S.; Lundervold, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-four individuals, 18-47 (MN 21.8, SD 5.63) years of age, took part in a study examining the magnitude and direction of the relationship between self-report and direct observation measures of relaxation and mindfulness. The Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS), a valid direct observation measure of relaxation, was used to assess relaxed behavior…

  7. Effects of Progressive Relaxation versus Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation with College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, John D.; Czerlinsky, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Examined use of biofeedback, relaxation training, or both in a college relaxation class with an enrollment of 33 students. Results indicated students receiving relaxation training plus biofeedback improved significantly more on psychological variables than did students receiving only relaxation training. (Author/ABL)

  8. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  9. TRANSVERSE SPIN AT PHENIX AND FUTURE PLANS.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.

    2005-01-28

    The PHENIX experiment took data with transversely polarized proton beams in 2001-2002 and measured the transverse single spin asymmetries in inclusive neutral pion and non-identified charge hadrons at midrapidity and {radical} s = 200 GeV. The data near X{sub F} {approx} 0 cover a transverse momentum range from 0.5 to 5.0 GeV/c. The observed asymmetries are consistent with zero with good statistical accuracy. This paper presents the current work in light of earlier measurements at lower energies in this kinematic region and the future plans of the PHENIX detector.

  10. Transverse single bunch instability study on BEPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Sun, Y. P.

    2007-04-01

    In recent years, a lot of experiments were done on ESRF and ELETTRA to study the single bunch transverse instability. To prevent such instabilities on BEPCII in the future, experiments were made on the single bunch transverse instability threshold current versus the chromaticity on BEPC. By analyzing the experimental data based on the theory developed in [J. Gao, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 416 (1998) 186 (see also PAC97, Vancouver, Canada, 1997, p. 1605).], the transverse loss factor of BEPC and the corresponding scaling law are obtained.

  11. Transverse Colon Diverticulitis with Calcified Fecalith

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Solak, Ilhami; Genç, Berhan; Sahin, Neslin; Yalaz, Seyhan

    2013-01-01

    Left colonic diverticula are common in Western populations, whereas right colonic diverticulosis primarily occurs in Oriental populations. Diverticulitis of the transverse colon is very rare, with very few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of transverse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone in a 69-year-old female. This was a solitary diverticulum. The signs and symptoms of the disease are similar to acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings of a patient with trans-verse colon diverticulitis caused by a calcified stone. PMID:25610254

  12. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  13. Impact of electron-impurity scattering on the spin relaxation time in graphene: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Dmitry V; Gradhand, Martin; Ostanin, Sergey; Maznichenko, Igor V; Ernst, Arthur; Fabian, Jaroslav; Mertig, Ingrid

    2013-04-12

    The effect of electron-impurity scattering on momentum and spin relaxation times in graphene is studied by means of relativistic ab initio calculations. Assuming carbon and silicon adatoms as natural impurities in graphene, we are able to simulate fast spin relaxation observed experimentally. We investigate the dependence of the relaxation times on the impurity position and demonstrate that C or Si adatoms act as real-space spin hot spots inducing spin-flip rates about 5 orders of magnitude larger than those of in-plane impurities. This fact confirms the hypothesis that the adatom-induced spin-orbit coupling leads to fast spin relaxation in graphene.

  14. Novel itinerant transverse spin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, John Delaney

    In 1956, Lev Davidovich Landau put forth his theory on systems of interacting fermions, or fermi liquids. A year later, Viktor Pavlovich Silin described spin waves that such a system of fermions would support. The treatment of the contribution of the molecular field to the spin wave dispersion was a novel aspect of these spin waves. Silin predicted that there would exist a hierarchy of spin waves in a fermi liquid, one for each component of the spherical harmonic expansion of the fermi surface. In 1968, Anthony J. Leggett and Michael J. Rice derived from fermi liquid theory how the behavior of the spin diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid could be directly experimentally observable via the spin echo effect [24]. Their prediction, that the diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid would not decay exponentially with temperature, but rather would have a maximum at some non-zero temperature, was a direct consequence of the fermi liquid molecular field and spin wave phenomena, and this was corroborated by experiment in 1971 by Corruccini, et al. [13]. A parallel advancement in the theory of fermi liquid spin waves came with the extension of the theory to describe weak ferromagnetic metals. In 1959, Alexei Abrikosov and I. E. Dzyaloshiski put forth a theoretical description of a ferromagnetic fermi liquid [1]. In 2001, Kevin Bedell and Krastan Blagoev showed that a non-trivial contribution to the dispersion of the ferromagnetic current spin wave arises from the necessary consideration of higher harmonic moments in the distortion of the fermi surface from its ground state [8]. In the chapters to follow, the author presents new results for transverse spin waves in a fermi liquid, which arise from a novel ground state of a fermi liquid-one in which an l = 1 harmonic distortion exists in the ground state polarization. It is shown that such an instability can lead to spin waves with dispersions that are characterized by a linear dependence on the wave number at long

  15. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  16. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  17. Generalized dynamic scaling for quantum critical relaxation in imaginary time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyi; Yin, Shuai; Zhong, Fan

    2014-10-01

    We study the imaginary-time relaxation critical dynamics of a quantum system with a vanishing initial correlation length and an arbitrary initial order parameter M0. We find that in quantum critical dynamics, the behavior of M0 under scale transformations deviates from a simple power law, which was proposed for very small M0 previously. A universal characteristic function is then suggested to describe the rescaled initial magnetization, similar to classical critical dynamics. This characteristic function is shown to be able to describe the quantum critical dynamics in both short- and long-time stages of the evolution. The one-dimensional transverse-field Ising model is employed to numerically determine the specific form of the characteristic function. We demonstrate that it is applicable as long as the system is in the vicinity of the quantum critical point. The universality of the characteristic function is confirmed by numerical simulations of models belonging to the same universality class.

  18. Pressure-induced emergence of unusually high-frequency transverse excitations in a liquid alkali metal: Evidence of two types of collective excitations contributing to the transverse dynamics at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bryk, Taras; Ruocco, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2015-09-14

    Unlike phonons in crystals, the collective excitations in liquids cannot be treated as propagation of harmonic displacements of atoms around stable local energy minima. The viscoelasticity of liquids, reflected in transition from the adiabatic to elastic high-frequency speed of sound and in absence of the long-wavelength transverse excitations, results in dispersions of longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) collective excitations essentially different from the typical phonon ones. Practically, nothing is known about the effect of high pressure on the dispersion of collective excitations in liquids, which causes strong changes in liquid structure. Here dispersions of L and T collective excitations in liquid Li in the range of pressures up to 186 GPa were studied by ab initio simulations. Two methodologies for dispersion calculations were used: direct estimation from the peak positions of the L/T current spectral functions and simulation-based calculations of wavenumber-dependent collective eigenmodes. It is found that at ambient pressure, the longitudinal and transverse dynamics are well separated, while at high pressures, the transverse current spectral functions, density of vibrational states, and dispersions of collective excitations yield evidence of two types of propagating modes that contribute strongly to transverse dynamics. Emergence of the unusually high-frequency transverse modes gives evidence of the breakdown of a regular viscoelastic theory of transverse dynamics, which is based on coupling of a single transverse propagating mode with shear relaxation. The explanation of the observed high-frequency shift above the viscoelastic value is given by the presence of another branch of collective excitations. With the pressure increasing, coupling between the two types of collective excitations is rationalized within a proposed extended viscoelastic model of transverse dynamics.

  19. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). In the subproject A2 of the TR32 we aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere's law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT

  20. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Klitzsch, N.; Clauser, C.

    2009-12-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). We aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere’s law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT). In this respect substantial

  1. Transverse impedances of cavities and collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.A.; Bane, K.L.F.; Bizek, H.

    1987-03-01

    Field matching has been used to compute the transverse impedance of simple, cylindrically symmetric, perfectly conducting structures, the subregions of which are separated by radial cuts. The method is briefly described, and some early results are presented. (LEW)

  2. Transversally periodic solitary gravity–capillary waves

    PubMed Central

    Milewski, Paul A.; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity–capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity–capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  3. Transverse optical forces for manipulating nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Alexander A.; Zharov, Alexander A.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Zharova, Nina A.

    2016-12-01

    We study optical forces acting on a subwavelength particle with anisotropic polarizability and discover an optomechanical effect that resembles the Hall effect for electrons. While in the classical Hall effect the transverse Lorentz force and the transverse voltage appear due to the static magnetic field which induces the nondiagonal components of the electric conductivity tensor; in our case the imaginary parts of the nondiagonal elements of the polarizability tensor are responsible for the transverse scattering force. We calculate this force for the examples of the ellipsoidal plasmonic nanoparticles and the spherical particle with gyromagnetic properties, and show that the transverse force depends on the physical origin of the anisotropy of the polarizability, and on the electromagnetic wave structure around the particle. Moreover, this force primarily occurs in the inhomogeneous field only.

  4. Development of Transverse Modes Damped DLA Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.

    2009-01-22

    As the dimensions of accelerating structures become smaller and beam intensities higher, the transverse wakefields driven by the beam become quite large with even a slight misalignment of the beam from the geometric axis. These deflection modes can cause inter-bunch beam breakup and intra-bunch head-tail instabilities along the beam path, and thus BBU control becomes a critical issue. All new metal based accelerating structures, like the accelerating structures developed at SLAC or power extractors at CLIC, have designs in which the transverse modes are heavily damped. Similarly, minimizing the transverse wakefield modes (here the HEMmn hybrid modes in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures) is also very critical for developing dielectric based high energy accelerators. In this paper, we present the design of a 7.8 GHz transverse mode damped DLA structure currently under construction, along with plans for the experimental program.

  5. Exploring the transverse spin structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alesio, Umberto

    2008-10-13

    We discuss our present understanding of the transverse spin structure of the nucleon and of related properties originating from parton transverse motion. Starting from the transversity distribution and the ways to access it, we then address the role played by spin and transverse momentum dependent (TMD) distributions in azimuthal and transverse single spin asymmetries. The latest extractions of the Sivers, Collins and transversity functions are also presented.

  6. Schwarzschild solution from Weyl transverse gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    We study classical solutions in the Weyl-transverse (WTDiff) gravity. The WTDiff gravity is invariant under both the local Weyl (conformal) transformation and the volume preserving diffeomorphisms (Diff) (transverse diffeomorphisms (TDiff)) and is known to be equivalent to general relativity at least at the classical level. In particular, we find that in a general spacetime dimension, the Schwarzschild metric is a classical solution in the WTDiff gravity when it is expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system.

  7. Transverse flat plate heat pipe experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a Shuttle-launched flight experiment to evaluate the performance of a transverse flat plate heat pipe that serves as an integral temperature control/mounting panel for electronic equipment. A transverse heat pipe is a gas-controlled variable conductance heat pipe that can handle relatively large thermal loads. An experiment designed to flight test the concept over a 6-9 month period is self-sufficient with respect to electrical power, timing sequences, and data storage.

  8. Acute transverse myelitis complicating breakthrough varicella infection.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Asli; Kurugol, Zafer; Gokben, Sarenur

    2014-11-01

    We report a 10-year-old girl who presented with acute transverse myelitis after breakthrough varicella infection. The diagnosis was based on the development of motor weakness, paraparesis and bladder dysfunction, spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings and detection of anti-varicella zoster virus IgG antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid. This case report highlights that breakthrough varicella can result in serious complications such as acute transverse myelitis.

  9. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In the partonic (or light-front) description of relativistic systems the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent charge and magnetization densities in transverse space. This formulation allows one to identify the chiral components of nucleon structure as the peripheral densities at transverse distances b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and compute them in a parametrically controlled manner. A dispersion relation connects the large-distance behavior of the transverse charge and magnetization densities to the spectral functions of the Dirac and Pauli form factors near the two--pion threshold at timelike t = 4 M{ sub {pi}}{sup 2}, which can be computed in relativistic chiral effective field theory. Using the leading-order approximation we (a) derive the asymptotic behavior (Yukawa tail) of the isovector transverse densities in the "chiral" region b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and the "molecular" region b = O(M{sub N}{sup 2}/M{sub {pi}}{sup 3}); (b) perform the heavy-baryon expansion of the transverse densities; (c) explain the relative magnitude of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities in a simple mechanical picture; (d) include Delta isobar intermediate states and study the peripheral transverse densities in the large-N{ sub c} limit of QCD; (e) quantify the region of transverse distances where the chiral components of the densities are numerically dominant; (f) calculate the chiral divergences of the b{sup 2}-weighted moments of the isovector transverse densities (charge and anomalous magnetic radii) in the limit M{sub {pi}} -> 0 and determine their spatial support. Our approach provides a concise formulation of the spatial structure of the nucleon's chiral component and offers new insights into basic properties of the chiral expansion. It relates the information extracted from low-t elastic form factors to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  10. Transverse structure of the QCD string

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Harvey B.

    2010-11-15

    The characterization of the transverse structure of the QCD string is discussed. We formulate a conjecture as to how the stress-energy tensor of the underlying gauge theory couples to the string degrees of freedom. A consequence of the conjecture is that the energy density and the longitudinal-stress operators measure the distribution of the transverse position of the string, to leading order in the string fluctuations, whereas the transverse-stress operator does not. We interpret recent numerical measurements of the transverse size of the confining string and show that the difference of the energy and longitudinal-stress operators is a particularly natural probe at next-to-leading order. Second, we derive the constraints imposed by open-closed string duality on the transverse structure of the string. We show that a total of three independent ''gravitational'' form factors characterize the transverse profile of the closed string, and obtain the interpretation of recent effective string theory calculations: the square radius of a closed string of length {beta} defined from the slope of its gravitational form factor, is given by (d-1/2{pi}{sigma})log({beta}/4r{sub 0}) in d space dimensions. This is to be compared with the well-known result that the width of the open string at midpoint grows as (d-1/2{pi}{sigma})log(r/r{sub 0}). We also obtain predictions for transition form factors among closed-string states.

  11. Effective rotational correlation times of proteins from NMR relaxation interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghan; Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effective rotational correlation times, τc, for the modulation of anisotropic spin-spin interactions in macromolecules subject to Brownian motion in solution is of key interest for the practice of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. The value of τc enables an estimate of the NMR spin relaxation rates, and indicates possible aggregation of the macromolecular species. This paper reports a novel NMR pulse scheme, [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT, which is based on transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy and permits to determine τc for 15N- 1H bonds without interference from dipole-dipole coupling of the amide proton with remote protons. [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT is highly efficient since only a series of one-dimensional NMR spectra need to be recorded. Its use is suggested for a quick estimate of the rotational correlation time, to monitor sample quality and to determine optimal parameters for complex multidimensional NMR experiments. Practical applications are illustrated with the 110 kDa 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase from Staphylococcus aureus, the uniformly 15N-labeled Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) in 60 kDa mixed OmpX/DHPC micelles with approximately 90 molecules of unlabeled 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), and the 16 kDa pheromone-binding protein from Bombyx mori, which cover a wide range of correlation times.

  12. End-tidal PCO2 as an index of psychophysiological activity during VDT data-entry work and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Schleifer, L M; Ley, R

    1994-02-01

    The present study was designed to assess the utility of end-tidal PCO2 (peak concentration of carbon dioxide in a single breath of exhaled air) as an index of psychophysiological activity during performance of a computer-based task and during relaxation. Eleven data-entry operators were monitored continuously for three consecutive, 6 hour work days under the following conditions: (a) during a self-relaxation baseline period; (b) during an abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation period; and (c) during a period of computer-based data-entry work. End-tidal PCO2, respiration frequency, and cardiac inter-beat interval (a measure of heart rate and its variability) were monitored continuously during the three conditions of the study. Self-ratings of relaxation and tension were also monitored at periodic intervals. Consistent with a decrease in psychophysiological arousal, end-tidal PCO2 and self-ratings of relaxation were significantly higher during progressive muscle relaxation than during baseline relaxation. Consistent with an increase in psychophysiological arousal, end-tidal PCO2, cardiac inter-beat interval, and relaxation ratings during data-entry work were significantly lower than during either baseline relaxation or progressive muscle relaxation, while respiration frequency and tension ratings were higher. The findings indicate that end-tidal PCO2 discriminates among different psychophysiological states, and that end-tidal PCO2 may be useful in indexing the stress-health effects of human-computer interactions.

  13. Analysis of reliable sub-ns spin-torque switching under transverse bias magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aquino, M.; Perna, S.; Serpico, C.; Bertotti, G.; Mayergoyz, I. D.

    2015-05-07

    The switching process of a magnetic spin-valve nanosystem subject to spin-polarized current pulses is considered. The dependence of the switching probability on the current pulse duration is investigated. The further application of a transverse field along the intermediate anisotropy axis of the particle is used to control the quasi-random relaxation of magnetization to the reversed magnetization state. The critical current amplitudes to realize the switching are determined by studying the phase portrait of the Landau-Lifshtz-Slonczewski dynamics. Macrospin numerical simulations are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction and demonstrate reliable switching even for very short (below 100 ps) current pulses.

  14. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  15. Engineered magnetic hybrid nanoparticles with enhanced relaxivity for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Santosh; Key, Jaehong; Stigliano, Cinzia; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Zhong, Meng; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Clinically used contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suffer by the lack of specificity; short circulation time; and insufficient relaxivity. Here, a one-step combinatorial approach is described for the synthesis of magnetic lipid-polymer (hybrid) nanoparticles (MHNPs) encapsulating 5 nm ultra-small super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIOs) and decorated with Gd(3+) ions. The MHNPs comprise a hydrophobic poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core, containing up to ~5% USPIOs (w/w), stabilized by lipid and polyethylene glycol (PEG). Gd(3+) ions are directly chelated to the external lipid monolayer. Three different nanoparticle configurations are presented including Gd(3+) chelates only (Gd-MHNPs); USPIOs only (Fe-MHNPs); and the combination thereof (MHNPs). All three MHNPs exhibit a hydrodynamic diameter of about 150 nm. The Gd-MHNPs present a longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 12.95 ± 0.53 (mM s)(-1)) about four times larger than conventional Gd-based contrast agents (r1 = 3.4 (mM s)(-1)); MHNPs have a transversal relaxivity of r2 = 164.07 ± 7.0 (mM s)(-1), which is three to four times larger than most conventional systems (r2 ~ 50 (mM s)(-1)). In melanoma bearing mice, elemental analysis for Gd shows about 3% of the injected MHNPs accumulating in the tumor and 2% still circulating in the blood, at 24 h post-injection. In a clinical 3T MRI scanner, MHNPs provide significant contrast confirming the observed tumor deposition. This approach can also accommodate the co-loading of hydrophobic therapeutic compounds in the MHNP core, paving the way for theranostic systems.

  16. Crimp morphology in relaxed and stretched rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Fini, Milena; Quaranta, Marilisa; De Pasquale, Viviana; Raspanti, Mario; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Ottani, Vittoria; Ruggeri, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Fibrous extracellular matrix of tendon is considered to be an inextensible anatomical structure consisting of type I collagen fibrils arranged in parallel bundles. Under polarized light microscopy the collagen fibre bundles appear crimped with alternating dark and light transverse bands. This study describes the ultrastructure of the collagen fibrils in crimps of both relaxed and in vivo stretched rat Achilles tendon. Under polarized light microscopy crimps of relaxed Achilles tendons appear as isosceles or scalene triangles of different size. Tendon crimps observed via SEM and TEM show the single collagen fibrils that suddenly change their direction containing knots. The fibrils appear partially squeezed in the knots, bent on the same plane like bayonets, or twisted and bent. Moreover some of them lose their D-period, revealing their microfibrillar component. These particular aspects of collagen fibrils inside each tendon crimp have been termed 'fibrillar crimps' and may fulfil the same functional role. When tendon is physiologically stretched in vivo the tendon crimps decrease in number (46.7%) (P<0.01) and appear more flattened with an increase in the crimp top angle (165 degrees in stretched tendons vs. 148 degrees in relaxed tendons, P<0.005). Under SEM and TEM, the 'fibrillar crimps' are still present, never losing their structural identity in straightened collagen fibril bundles of stretched tendons even where tendon crimps are not detectable. These data suggest that the 'fibrillar crimp' may be the true structural component of the tendon crimp acting as a shock absorber during physiological stretching of Achilles tendon.

  17. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI -dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We , are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We , the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI -dependent.

  18. Relaxation of liquid bridge after droplets coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiangen; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Guo; Huang, Yingzhou; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the relaxation of liquid bridge after the coalescence of two sessile droplets resting on an organic glass substrate both experimentally and theoretically. The liquid bridge is found to relax to its equilibrium shape via two distinct approaches: damped oscillation relaxation and underdamped relaxation. When the viscosity is low, damped oscillation shows up, in this approach, the liquid bridge undergoes a damped oscillation process until it reaches its stable shape. However, if the viscous effects become significant, underdamped relaxation occurs. In this case, the liquid bridge relaxes to its equilibrium state in a non-periodic decay mode. In depth analysis indicates that the damping rate and oscillation period of damped oscillation are related to an inertial-capillary time scale τc. These experimental results are also testified by our numerical simulations with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  19. Search for supersymmetry in events with opposite-sign dileptons and missing transverse energy using an artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a search for supersymmetry (SUSY) is presented in events with two opposite-sign isolated leptons in the final state, accompanied by hadronic jets and missing transverse energy. An artificial neural network is employed to discriminate possible SUSY signals from a standard model background. The analysis uses a data sample collected with the CMS detector during the 2011 LHC run, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.98fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Compared to other CMS analyses, this one uses relaxed criteria on missing transverse energy (E̸T>40GeV) and total hadronic transverse energy (HT>120GeV), thus probing different regions of parameter space. Agreement is found between standard model expectation and observations, yielding limits in the context of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model and on a set of simplified models.

  20. Conservation of magnetic helicity during plasma relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    Decay of the total magnetic helicity during the sawtooth relaxation in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch is much larger than the MHD prediction. However, the helicity decay (3--4%) is smaller than the magnetic energy decay (7--9%), modestly supportive of the helicity conservation hypothesis in Taylor`s relaxation theory. Enhanced fluctuation-induced helicity transport during the relaxation is observed.

  1. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: General theory with applications to two-spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-02-01

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. We have embarked on a systematic program to develop, from the stochastic Liouville equation, a general and rigorous theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole coupling strengths, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we present a general theoretical framework applicable to spin systems of arbitrary size with symmetric or asymmetric exchange. So far, the dipolar EMOR theory is only available for a two-spin system with symmetric exchange. Asymmetric exchange, when the spin system is fragmented by the exchange, introduces new and unexpected phenomena. Notably, the anisotropic dipole couplings of non-exchanging spins break the axial symmetry in spin Liouville space, thereby opening up new relaxation channels in the locally anisotropic sites, including longitudinal-transverse cross relaxation. Such cross-mode relaxation operates only at low fields; at higher fields it becomes nonsecular, leading to an unusual inverted relaxation dispersion that splits the extreme-narrowing regime into two sub-regimes. The general dipolar EMOR theory is illustrated here by a detailed analysis of the asymmetric two-spin case, for which we present relaxation dispersion profiles over a wide range of conditions as well as analytical results for integral relaxation rates and time-dependent spin modes in the zero-field and motional-narrowing regimes. The general theoretical framework presented here will enable a quantitative analysis of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation in model systems with immobilized macromolecules and, ultimately, will provide a rigorous link between relaxation-based magnetic resonance image contrast and molecular parameters.

  3. Nucleon Spin Structure: Longitudinal and Transverse

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-02-01

    Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments have provided us with the most extensive information on the unpolarized and longitudinal polarized parton (quark and gluon) distributions in the nucleon. It has becoming clear that transverse spin and transverse momentum dependent distributions (TMDs) study are crucial for a more complete understanding of the nucleon structure and the dynamics of the strong interaction. The transverse spin structure and the TMDs are the subject of increasingly intense theoretical and experimental study recently. With a high luminosity electron beam facility, JLab has played a major role in the worldwide effort to study both the longitudinal and transverse spin structure. Highlights of recent results will be presented. With 12-GeV energy upgrade, JLab will provide the most precise measurements in the valence quark region to close a chapter in longitudinal spin study. JLab will also perform a multi-dimensional mapping of the transverse spin structure and TMDs in the valence quark region through Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments, providing a 3-d partonic picture of the nucleon in momentum space and extracting the u and d quark tensor charges of the nucleon. The precision mapping of TMDs will also allow a detailed study of the quark orbital motion and its dynamics.

  4. Paley-Wiener criterion for relaxation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Rajagopal, A. K.; Rendell, R. W.; Teitler, S.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown how the Paley-Wiener theorem in Fourier-transform theory can provide the bound for physically acceptable relaxation functions for long times. In principle the linear exponential decay function, and hence also a superposition of linear exponential decay functions, does not provide an acceptable description of relaxation phenomenon although the Paley-Wiener bound can be made to approach arbitrarily close to linear exponential. A class of relaxation functions proposed recently obeys the Paley-Wiener bound. The general necessity for time-dependent relaxation rates is emphasized and discussed.

  5. Transverse Bursts in Inclined Layer Convection: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Wiener, Richard; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2002-03-01

    We report experimental results on inclined layer convection in a fluid of Prandtl number σ ≈ 1. A codimension-two point divides regions of buoyancy-driven convection (longitudinal rolls) at lower angles from shear-driven convection (transverse rolls) at higher angles (Daniels et al. PRL 84: 5320, 2000). In the region of buoyancy-driven convection, near the codimension-two point, we observe longitudinal rolls with intermittent, localized, subharmonic transverse bursts. The patterns are spatiotemporally chaotic. With increasing temperature difference the bursts increase in duration and number. We examine the details of the bursting process (e.g. the energy of longitudinal, transverse, and mixed modes) and compare our results to bursting processes in other systems. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant DMR-0072077 and the IGERT program in nonlinear systems, grant DGE-9870631.

  6. Efficient modeling in transversely isotropic inhomogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhalifah, T.

    1993-11-01

    An efficient modeling technique for transversely isotropic, inhomogeneous media, is developed using a mix of analytical equations and numerical calculations. The analytic equation for the raypath in a factorized transversely isotropic (FTI) media with linear velocity variation, derived by Shearer and Chapman, is used to trace between two points. In addition, I derive an analytical equation for geometrical spreading in FTI media that aids in preserving program efficiency; however, the traveltime is calculated numerically. I then generalize the method to treat general transversely isotropic (TI) media that are not factorized anisotropic inhomogeneous by perturbing the FTI traveltimes, following the perturbation ideas of Cerveny and Filho. A Kirchhoff-summation-based program relying on Trorey`s (1970) diffraction method is used to generate synthetic seismograms for such a medium. For the type of velocity models treated, the program is much more efficient than finite-difference and general ray-trace modeling techniques.

  7. Myocardial contraction-relaxation coupling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Henry Pickering Bowditch in the late 1800s to early 1900s, cardiac muscle contraction has remained an intensely studied topic for several reasons. The heart is located centrally in our body, and its pumping motion demands the attention of the observer. The contraction of the heart encompasses a complex interplay of mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties, and its function can thus be studied from any of these viewpoints. In addition, diseases of the heart are currently killing more people in the Westernized world than any other disease. When combined with the increasing emphasis of research to be clinically relevant, this contributes to the heart remaining a topic of continued basic and clinical investigation. Yet, there are significant aspects of cardiac muscle contraction that are still not well understood. A big complication of the study of cardiac muscle contraction is that there exists no equilibrium among many of the important governing parameters, which include pre- and afterload, intracellular ion concentrations, membrane potential, and velocity and direction of movement. Thus the classic approach of perturbing an equilibrium or a steady state to learn about the role of the perturbing factor in the system cannot be unambiguously interpreted, since each of the parameters that govern contraction are constantly changing, as well as constantly changing their interaction with each other. In this review, presented as the 54th Bowditch Lecture at Experimental Biology meeting in Anaheim in April 2010, I will revisit several governing factors of cardiac muscle relaxation by applying newly developed tools and protocols to isolated cardiac muscle tissue in which the dynamic interactions between the governing factors of contraction and relaxation can be studied. PMID:20852049

  8. Simulations of a Detonation Wave in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Lord; Karagozian, Ann; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2010-11-01

    Numerical simulations of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) effects on detonation wave structures are performed, with applications to flow control and MHD power extraction in Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE) and their design variations. In contrast to prior studies of MHD interactions in PDEs,ootnotetextCambier, et al., AIAA-2008-4688 the effects of the finite relaxation length scale for ionization on the stability of the detonation wave are examined. Depending on the coupling parameters, the magnetic field can quench the detonation and effectively act as a barrier to its propagation. Conversely, an applied transient magnetic field can exert a force on a pre-ionized gas and accelerate it. The dynamics are subject to non-linear effects; a propagating transverse magnetic field will initially exert a small force if the gas has a low conductivity and the magnetic Reynolds number (Rem) is low. Nevertheless, the gas accelerated by the "piston" action of the field can pre-heat the ambient gas and increase its conductivity. As the wave progresses, Rem increases and the magnetic field becomes increasingly effective. The dynamics of this process are examined in detail with a high-order shock-capturing method and full kinetics of combustion and ionization. The complex chemical kinetics calculations are ported onto a GPU using the CUDA language, and computational performance is compared with standard CPU-based computations.

  9. Encapsulated gadolinium and dysprosium ions within ultra-short carbon nanotubes for MR microscopy at 11.75 and 21.1 T.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jens T; Cisneros, Brandon T; Matson, Michael; Sokoll, Michelle; Sachi-Kocher, Afi; Bejarano, Fabian Calixto; Wilson, Lon J; Grant, Samuel C

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have gained interest for their biocompatibility and multifunctional properties. Ultra-short SWNTs (US-tubes) have demonstrated high proton relaxivity when encapsulating gadolinium ions (Gd(3+)) at clinical field strengths. At higher field strengths, however, Gd(3+) ions demonstrate decreased proton relaxation properties while chemically similar dysprosium ions (Dy(3+)) improve relaxation properties. This report investigates the first use of Gd(3+) and Dy(3+) ions within US-tubes (GNTs and DNTs, respectively) at ultra-high magnetic field (21.1 T). Both agents are compared in solution and as an intracellular contrast agent labeling a murine microglia cell line (Bv2) immobilized in a tissue-mimicking agarose phantom using two high magnetic fields: 21.1 and 11.75 T. In solution at 21.1 T, results show excellent transverse relaxation; DNTs outperformed GNTs as a T(2) agent with measured r(2)/r(1) ratios of 247 and 47, respectively. Additionally, intracellular DNTs were shown to be a better T(2) agent than GNTs with higher contrast percentages and contrast-to-noise ratios. As such, this study demonstrates the potential of DNTs at high magnetic fields for cellular labeling and future in vivo, MRI-based cell tracking.

  10. The logarithmic relaxation process and the critical temperature of liquids in nano-confined states

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changjiu; Wong, Kaikin; Mole, Richard A.; Yu, Dehong; Chathoth, Suresh M.

    2016-01-01

    The logarithmic relaxation process is the slowest of all relaxation processes and is exhibited by only a few molecular liquids and proteins. Bulk salol, which is a glass-forming liquid, is known to exhibit logarithmic decay of intermediate scattering function for the β-relaxation process. In this article, we report the influence of nanoscale confinements on the logarithmic relaxation process and changes in the microscopic glass-transition temperature of salol in the carbon and silica nanopores. The generalized vibrational density-of-states of the confined salol indicates that the interaction of salol with ordered nanoporous carbon is hydrophilic in nature whereas the interaction with silica surfaces is more hydrophobic. The mode-coupling theory critical temperature derived from the QENS data shows that the dynamic transition occurs at much lower temperature in the carbon pores than in silica pores. The results of this study indicate that, under nano-confinements, liquids that display logarithmic β-relaxation phenomenon undergo a unique glass transition process. PMID:27671486

  11. The logarithmic relaxation process and the critical temperature of liquids in nano-confined states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changjiu; Wong, Kaikin; Mole, Richard A.; Yu, Dehong; Chathoth, Suresh M.

    2016-09-01

    The logarithmic relaxation process is the slowest of all relaxation processes and is exhibited by only a few molecular liquids and proteins. Bulk salol, which is a glass-forming liquid, is known to exhibit logarithmic decay of intermediate scattering function for the β-relaxation process. In this article, we report the influence of nanoscale confinements on the logarithmic relaxation process and changes in the microscopic glass-transition temperature of salol in the carbon and silica nanopores. The generalized vibrational density-of-states of the confined salol indicates that the interaction of salol with ordered nanoporous carbon is hydrophilic in nature whereas the interaction with silica surfaces is more hydrophobic. The mode-coupling theory critical temperature derived from the QENS data shows that the dynamic transition occurs at much lower temperature in the carbon pores than in silica pores. The results of this study indicate that, under nano-confinements, liquids that display logarithmic β-relaxation phenomenon undergo a unique glass transition process.

  12. Dynamic transverse shear modulus for a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.; Duan, Yunda

    2016-09-01

    An exact analytical solution is presented for the effective dynamic transverse shear modulus in a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions. The complex and frequency-dependent properties of the dynamic shear modulus are caused by the physical mechanism of mesoscopic-scale wave-induced fluid flow whose scale is smaller than wavelength but larger than the size of pores. Our model consists of three phases: a long cylindrical inclusion, a cylindrical shell of poroelastic matrix material with different mechanical and/or hydraulic properties than the inclusion and an outer region of effective homogeneous medium of laterally infinite extent. The behavior of both the inclusion and the matrix is described by Biot's consolidation equations, whereas the surrounding effective medium which is used to describe the effective transverse shear properties of the inner poroelastic composite is assumed to be a viscoelastic solid whose complex transverse shear modulus needs to be determined. The determined effective transverse shear modulus is used to quantify the S-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in heterogeneous fluid-filled poroelastic rocks. The calculation shows the relaxation frequency and relative position of various fluid saturation dispersion curves predicted by this study exhibit very good agreement with those of a previous 2-D finite-element simulation. For the double-porosity model (inclusions having a different solid frame than the matrix but the same pore fluid as the matrix) the effective shear modulus also exhibits a size-dependent characteristic that the relaxation frequency moves to lower frequencies by two orders of magnitude if the radius of the cylindrical poroelastic composite increases by one order of magnitude. For the patchy-saturation model (inclusions having the same solid frame as the matrix but with a different pore fluid from the matrix), the heterogeneity in pore fluid cannot cause any attenuation in the

  13. Evolution of transverse modes in FELIX macropulses

    SciTech Connect

    Weits, H.H.; Lin, L.; Werkhoven, G.H.C. van

    1995-12-31

    We present ringdown measurements of both the intracavity beam, using a low reflection beamsplitter, as well as the hole-outcoupled beam of FELIX, the intracavity measurements being taken at various sets of transverse coordinates. Recent measurements show a significant difference in the decay of the signals at different radial positions, suggesting the presence of higher order transverse modes. The formation of transverse modes depends on the properties of the cold cavity and its losses (i.e. resonator parameters, diffraction and outcoupling at the hole, absorption and edge losses on the mirrors, waveguide clipping), as well as on the gain mechanism. Both simulations with the axisymmetric ELIXER code and previous hole-outcoupled measurements indicated a substantial energy content of the 2nd or 4th Gauss-Laguerre (GL) mode for the 20-30 {mu}m regime of FELIX. Moreover, as FELIX has a phase degenerate cavity, the fundamental and higher order transverse modes can interplay to create a reduced outcoupling efficiency at the hole. For example, in contrast to the decay rate of 13% per roundtrip that we would expect for a pure gaussian beam when we include a loss of 6% for the reflection at the intracavity beamsplitter, recent simulations indicate a decay rate as high as 23% of the hole-outcoupled signal. In this case the 2nd order GL mode contains 30% of the total intracavity power. The effect of transverse modes on subpulses in the limit cycle regime is an interesting aspect. As soon as a subpulse is losing contact with the electrons, its transverse pattern will exhibit an on-axis hole after a few roundtrips, according to the simulations. This process could mean that the subpulses are less pronounced in the hole-outcoupled signal of FELIX 1.

  14. Metabasin transitions are Johari-Goldstein relaxation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicerone, Marcus T.; Tyagi, Madhusudan

    2017-02-01

    We show that by representing quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from propylene carbonate (PC) with an explicitly heterogeneous model, we recover signatures of two distinct localized modes in addition to diffusive motion. The intermediate scattering function provides access to the time-dependence of these two localized dynamic processes, and they appear to correspond to transitions between inherent states and between metabasins on a potential energy landscape. By fitting the full q-dependence of inelastic scattering, we confirm that the Johari-Goldstein (βJ G) relaxation in PC is indistinguishable from metabasin transitions.

  15. Metabasin transitions are Johari-Goldstein relaxation events.

    PubMed

    Cicerone, Marcus T; Tyagi, Madhusudan

    2017-02-07

    We show that by representing quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from propylene carbonate (PC) with an explicitly heterogeneous model, we recover signatures of two distinct localized modes in addition to diffusive motion. The intermediate scattering function provides access to the time-dependence of these two localized dynamic processes, and they appear to correspond to transitions between inherent states and between metabasins on a potential energy landscape. By fitting the full q-dependence of inelastic scattering, we confirm that the Johari-Goldstein (βJG) relaxation in PC is indistinguishable from metabasin transitions.

  16. Stress relaxation behavior of tessellated cartilage from the jaws of blue sharks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Dean, Mason N; Youssefpour, Hamed; Summers, Adam P; Earthman, James C

    2014-01-01

    Much of the skeleton of sharks, skate and rays (Elasmobranchii) is characterized by a tessellated structure, composed of a shell of small, mineralized plates (tesserae) joined by intertesseral ligaments overlaying a soft cartilage core. Although tessellated cartilage is a defining feature of this group of fishes, the significance of this skeletal tissue type - particularly from a mechanical perspective - is unknown. The aim of the present work was to perform stress relaxation experiments with tessellated cartilage samples from the jaws of blue sharks to better understand the time dependent behavior of this skeletal type. In order to facilitate this aim, the resulting relaxation behavior for different loading directions were simulated using the transversely isotropic biphasic model and this model combined with generalized Maxwell elements to represent the tessellated layer. Analysis of the ability of the models to simulate the observed experimental behavior indicates that the transversely isotropic biphasic model can provide good predictions of the relaxation behavior of the hyaline cartilage. However, the incorporation of Maxwell elements into this model can achieve a more accurate simulation of the dynamic behavior of calcified cartilage when the loading is parallel to the tessellated layer. Correlation of experimental data with present combined composite models showed that the equilibrium modulus of the tessellated layer for this loading direction is about 45 times greater than that for uncalcified cartilage. Moreover, tessellation has relatively little effect on the viscoelasticity of shark cartilage under loading that is normal to the tessellated layer.

  17. Chatter in a transverse grinding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yao; Xu, Jian; Wiercigroch, Marian

    2014-02-01

    In transverse grinding, the wheel moves along the workpiece, which induces unique grinding dynamics. To understand these dynamic phenomena, specifically the grinding chatter, a new dynamical model of the process is proposed, in which the wheel position is assumed to be quasi-static since the transverse wheel velocity is small. From the stability and bifurcation analyses of the chatter vibration, it appears that the dynamics of the process is governed by the quasi-static interactions. Moreover, the obtained results also show that the wheel and workpiece chatters are quite different, having continuous and intermittent characters respectively.

  18. Fractional variational calculus and the transversality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, O. P.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the Euler-Lagrange equations and the transversality conditions for fractional variational problems. The fractional derivatives are defined in the sense of Riemann-Liouville and Caputo. The connection between the transversality conditions and the natural boundary conditions necessary to solve a fractional differential equation is examined. It is demonstrated that fractional boundary conditions may be necessary even when the problem is defined in terms of the Caputo derivative. Furthermore, both fractional derivatives (the Riemann-Liouville and the Caputo) arise in the formulations, even when the fractional variational problem is defined in terms of one fractional derivative only. Examples are presented to demonstrate the applications of the formulations.

  19. [The transversality and health promotion schools].

    PubMed

    Gavidia Catalán, V

    2001-01-01

    The following article shows the evolution of the schools contribution to the Health Education of children and young people. Moving on from the traditional concept of health, today, Health Education has a general and global meaning, which encompasses all of the physical, psychological and social aspects of health. These aspects define the characteristics of the "Healthy School". The need to broach the "transversal subject" offers schools the possibility of developing "transversality" in the Health Education. Finally, the concept of promoting health defines, together with the other subjects, that which we understand by "the heath promotion schools", which attempts to progress the full integration of schools in the society in which they are located.

  20. Transverse dimension and long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Vanarsdall, R L

    1999-09-01

    This article emphasizes the critical importance of the skeletal differential between the width of the maxilla and the width of the mandible. Undiagnosed transverse discrepancy leads to adverse periodontal response, unstable dental camouflage, and less than optimal dentofacial esthetics. Hundreds of adult retreatment patients corrected for significant maxillary transverse deficiency using surgically assisted maxillary expansion (similar to osseous distraction) has produced excellent stability. Eliciting tooth movement for children (orthopedics, lip bumper, Cetlin plate) in all three planes of space by muscles, eruption, and growth, develops the broader arch form (without the mechanical forces of fixed or removable appliances) and has also demonstrated impressive long term stability.

  1. Transverse dune trailing ridges and vegetation succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; ‘Marisa' Martinez, M. L.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the evolution of, and vegetation succession on, a previously undescribed landform: transverse dune trailing ridges at El Farallón transgressive dunefield in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Three-dimensional clinometer/compass and tape topographic surveys were conducted in conjunction with 1 m 2 contiguous percent cover and presence/absence vegetation survey transects at eight locations across two adjacent trailing ridges. At the study site, and elsewhere, the transverse dune trailing ridges are formed by vegetation colonization of the lateral margins of active transverse, barchanoidal transverse, and aklé or network dunes. For simplicity, all trailing ridges formed from these dune types are referred to as transverse dune trailing ridges. Because there are several transverse dunes in the dunefield, multiple trailing ridges can be formed at one time. Two adjacent trailing ridges were examined. The shortest length ridge was 70 m long, and evolving from a 2.5 m-high transverse dune, while the longer ridge was 140 m long, and evolving from an 8 m-high dune. Trailing ridge length is a proxy measure of ridge age, since the longer the ridge, the greater the length of time since initial formation. With increasing age or distance upwind, species diversity increased, as well as species horizontal extent and percent cover. In turn, the degree of bare sand decreased. Overall, the data indicate a successional trend in the vegetation presence and cover with increasing age upwind. Those species most tolerant to burial ( Croton and Palafoxia) begin the process of trailing ridge formation. Ipomoea and Canavalia are less tolerant to burial and also are typically the next colonizing species. Trachypogon does not tolerate sand burial or deposition very well and only appears after significant stabilization has taken place. The ridges display a moderately defined successional sequence in plant colonization and percentage cover with time (and upwind distance). They are

  2. Program Computes Universal Transverse Mercator Projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, David E.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program produces Gauss-Kruger (constant meridional scale) transverse Mercator projection, used to construct U.S. Army's universal transverse Mercator (UTM) grid system. Capable of mapping entire Northern Hemisphere of Earth (and, by symmetry of projection, entire Earth) accurately with respect to single principal meridian. Mathematically insensitive to proximity to pole or equator and insensitive to departure of meridian from central meridian. Useful to any mapmaking agency. FORTRAN 77 program developed on IBM PC-series computer equipped with Intel Math Coprocessor.

  3. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in MAS solid-state NMR provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanoseconds-to-milliseconds (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear (13C, 15N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radio-frequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins has been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely (i) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR), and (ii) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e. proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable, and that this cross-correlated relaxation rate constant depends on ns-ms motions, and can thus itself provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin-diffusion attenuates this cross-correlated relaxation, due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and the present manuscript reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  4. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Perturbative calculations of quantum spin tunneling in effective spin systems with a transversal magnetic field and transversal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizanac, M.; Vedmedenko, E. Y.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2017-01-01

    We present a perturbative approach for the resonant tunnel splittings of an arbitrary effective single spin system. The Hamiltonian of such a system contains a uniaxial anisotropy, a transversal magnetic field and a second-order transversal anisotropy. Further, we investigate the influence of the transversal magnetic field on the energy splittings for higher integer quantum spins and we introduce an exact formula, which defines values of the transversal magnetic field, the transversal anisotropy and the uniaxial anisotropy where the contribution of the transversal magnetic field to the energy splitting is at least equal to the contribution of the transversal anisotropy.

  6. Mechanical spectroscopy of Snoek type relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, S. A.; Golovin, I. S.

    2012-09-01

    A review is presented for work in the area of elasticity for metals and alloys with a body-centered cubic lattice caused by diffusion under stress of interstitial atoms, i.e., Snoek relaxation in metals and Snoek type relaxation in alloys. Practical possibilities in analyzing materials of this class by mechanical spectroscopy are demonstrated.

  7. Analysis of sawtooth relaxation oscillations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, K.; McGuire, K.; Okabayashi, M.

    1982-07-01

    Sawtooth relaxation oscillations are analyzed using the Kadomtsev's disruption model and a thermal relaxation model. The sawtooth period is found to be very sensitive to the thermal conduction loss. Qualitative agreement between these calculations and the sawtooth period observed in several tokamaks is demonstrated.

  8. Dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, John le G.

    1987-12-01

    Two dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate are attributed to reorientations of mixed-isotope ammonium ions. Loss peaks were observed between 20 and 40 K and obey the Arrhenius law with activation energy 1.5 kcal/mol for the stronger relaxation. The dipole moment is of the order of 0.015 D.

  9. On relaxations and aging of various glasses

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Ariel; Oreg, Yuval; Imry, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Slow relaxation occurs in many physical and biological systems. “Creep” is an example from everyday life. When stretching a rubber band, for example, the recovery to its equilibrium length is not, as one might think, exponential: The relaxation is slow, in many cases logarithmic, and can still be observed after many hours. The form of the relaxation also depends on the duration of the stretching, the “waiting time.” This ubiquitous phenomenon is called aging, and is abundant both in natural and technological applications. Here, we suggest a general mechanism for slow relaxations and aging, which predicts logarithmic relaxations, and a particular aging dependence on the waiting time. We demonstrate the generality of the approach by comparing our predictions to experimental data on a diverse range of physical phenomena, from conductance in granular metals to disordered insulators and dirty semiconductors, to the low temperature dielectric properties of glasses. PMID:22315418

  10. Enthalpy relaxation and annealing effect in polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Sakatsuji, Waki; Konishi, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-07-01

    The effects of thermal history on the enthalpy relaxation in polystyrene are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature dependence of the specific heat in the liquid and the glassy states, that of relaxation time, and the exponent of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function are determined by measurements of the thermal response against sinusoidal temperature variation. A phenomenological model equation previously proposed to interpret the memory effect in the frozen state is applied to the enthalpy relaxation and the evolution of entropy under a given thermal history is calculated. The annealing below the glass transition temperature produces two effects on enthalpy relaxation: the decay of excess entropy with annealing time in the early stage of annealing and the increase in relaxation time due to physical aging in the later stage. The crossover of these effects is reflected in the variation of temperature of the maximum specific heat observed in the heating process after annealing and cooling.

  11. Sex Education as a Transversal Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabelo, Amanda Oliveira; Pereira, Graziela Raupp; Reis, Maria Amélia; Ferreira, António G.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, sex education is in many countries a transversal subject, in which the school becomes a privileged place for the implementation of policies that aim at promoting "public health." Its design as a cross-cutting subject envisages fostering the dissemination of these subjects in all pedagogical and curricular fields; however, we…

  12. The Effects of Transverse Stress on Magnetization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    move to oppose the field in tension (90-). The contributions of these two types of walls are reversed with the aplication of co.npression((90-) walls...stress and field, whereas this research investigates transverse stress and field. An examination of the thermodynamics involved in the two cases quickly

  13. Measuring transverse shape with virtual photons

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, Paul; Kurki, Samu

    2011-06-01

    A two-dimensional Fourier transform of hadron form factors allows to determine their charge density in transverse space. We show that this method can be applied to any virtual photon induced transition, such as {gamma}{sup *}(q)+N{yields}{pi}N. Only Fock states that are common to the initial and final states contribute to the amplitudes, which are determined by the overlap of the corresponding light-front wave functions. Their transverse extent may be studied as a function of the final state configuration, allowing qualitatively new insight into strong interaction dynamics. Fourier transforming the cross section (rather than the amplitude) gives the distribution of the transverse distance between the virtual photon interaction vertices in the scattering amplitude and its complex conjugate. While the measurement of parton distributions in longitudinal momentum depends on the leading twist approximation (-q{sup 2}{yields}{infinity} limit), all q{sup 2}<0 values contribute to the Fourier transform, with the transverse resolution increasing with the available range in q{sup 2}. We illustrate the method using QED amplitudes.

  14. Transverse stability in a Stark decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-02-15

    The concept of phase stability in a Stark decelerator ensures that polar molecules can be accelerated, guided, or decelerated without loss; molecules within a certain position and velocity interval are kept together throughout the deceleration process. In this paper the influence of the transverse motion on phase stability in a Stark decelerator is investigated. For typical deceleration experiments--i.e., for high values of the phase angle {phi}{sub 0}--the transverse motion considerably enhances the region in phase space for which phase stable deceleration occurs. For low values of {phi}{sub 0}, however, the transverse motion reduces the acceptance of a Stark decelerator and unstable regions in phase space appear. These effects are quantitatively explained in terms of a coupling between the longitudinal and transverse motion. The predicted longitudinal acceptance of a Stark decelerator is verified by measurements on a beam of OH (X {sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2},J=3/2) radicals passing through a Stark decelerator.

  15. Bending of Beams Subjected to Transverse Impacts,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    and rotary inertia effects have been considered by Karunes and Onat [6] Symonds [7] and Jones and Gomes de Oliveira (8]. The main aspects of the...Phys. Sol., Vol. 2, 1954, pp. 92-102. 6. Karunes , B. and Onat, E.T., "On the Effect of Shear on Plastic Deformation of Beams Under Transverse Impact

  16. Barium granuloma of the transverse colon.

    PubMed Central

    McKee, P. H.; Cameron, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    A case of barium sulphate granuloma of the transverse colon following gunshot wounds to the abdomen has been described. Scanning electron microscopy with electron probe microanalysis was used to confirm the presence of barium sulphate and the absence of lead or other elements related to the gunshot wounds. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:740599

  17. Variation of transverse momentum in hadronic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Amand, J.; Uritam, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed parameterization of the transverse momentum in hadronic collisions on multiplicity and on beam momentum. Hadronic collisions are considered at energies below the ultra-high energy domain, on the basis of an uncertainty relation and a naive eikonal model with an impact-parameter-dependent multiplicity.

  18. Formulas for Precise Transverse Mercator Projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse mercator projection, surface of Earth or other spheroid is mapped onto cylinder tangent at meridian of longitude. New method performs mapping by means of mathematical series in which higher order terms correct for deviation from exact sphericity. New method yields precise geodetic maps.

  19. [Desmin content and transversal stiffness of the left ventricle mouse cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibers after a 30-day space flight on board "BION-M1" biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V; Maximova, M V; Larina, I M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton and the cytoskeletal protein desmin content in the left ventricle cardiomyocytes, fibers of the mouse soleus and tibialis anterior muscle after a 30-day space flight on board the "BION-M1" biosatellite (Russia, 2013). The dissection was made after 13-16.5 h after landing. The transversal stiffness was measured in relaxed and calcium activated state by, atomic force microscopy. The desmin content was estimated by western blotting, and the expression level of desmin-coding gene was detected using real-time PCR. The results indicate that, the transversal stiffness of the left ventricle cardiomyocytes and fibers of the soleus muscle in relaxed and activated states did not differ from the control. The transversal stiffness of the tibialis muscle fibers in relaxed and activated state was increased in the mice group after space flight. At the same time, in all types of studied tissues the desmin content and the expression level of desmin-coding gene did not differ from the control level.

  20. Stabilization of electrical sensing properties of carbon fiber sensors using pre-tensioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saifeldeen, M. A.; Fouad, N.; Huang, H.; Wu, Z. S.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to fabrication defects in carbon fiber (CF) tows, the unevenness of fiber roves, such as local bends, misalignments, and skewness, results in irregular distribution of the electrical resistance in the transverse direction along the gauge length of a sensor, which affects its performance. In this study, a pre-tension approach was developed according to the creep mechanism of composites to straighten the CFs. In addition, the resin relaxation was controlled by tensioning the fibers during and after hardening of the epoxy resin using a double-tension method to enhance the electrical sensing properties of long gauge carbon fiber line (CFL) strain sensors. Different levels of sustained tensile stresses were studied to obtain the optimal tensile stress level both during and after hardening to be applied in the double-tension method. The results of static and dynamic tests showed that the double-tension technique could significantly straighten the fibers, and stabilize the transverse connections of CFL sensors in the case of tensioning the fibers during and after hardening under a sustained stress of 60% of the ultimate tensile stress of the CFs. The proposed double-tension method was utilized to improve the response of the CFL sensors with short gauge lengths.

  1. Postseismic relaxation and transient creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Yu, S.-B.

    2005-01-01

    Postseismic deformation has been observed in the epicentral area following the 1992 Landers (M = 7.3), 1999 Chi-Chi (M = 7.6), 1999 Hector Mine (M = 7.1), 2002 Denali (M = 7.9), 2003 San Simeon (M = 6.5), and 2004 Parkfield (M = 6.0) earthquakes. The observations consist of repeated GPS measurements of the position of one monument relative to another (separation ???100 km). The early observations (t < 0.1 year) are well fit by the function a' + c'log(t), where t is the time after the earthquake and a' and c' are constants chosen to fit the data. Because a log(t) time dependence is characteristic of transient (primary) creep, the early postseismic response may be governed by transient creep as Benioff proposed in 1951. That inference is provisional as the stress conditions prevailing in postseismic relaxation are not identical to the constant stress condition in creep experiments. The observed logarithmic time dependence includes no characteristic time that might aid in identifying the micromechanical cause.

  2. Supervised Discrete Hashing With Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jie; Liu, Tongliang; Sun, Zhenan; Tao, Dacheng; Tan, Tieniu

    2016-12-29

    Data-dependent hashing has recently attracted attention due to being able to support efficient retrieval and storage of high-dimensional data, such as documents, images, and videos. In this paper, we propose a novel learning-based hashing method called ''supervised discrete hashing with relaxation'' (SDHR) based on ''supervised discrete hashing'' (SDH). SDH uses ordinary least squares regression and traditional zero-one matrix encoding of class label information as the regression target (code words), thus fixing the regression target. In SDHR, the regression target is instead optimized. The optimized regression target matrix satisfies a large margin constraint for correct classification of each example. Compared with SDH, which uses the traditional zero-one matrix, SDHR utilizes the learned regression target matrix and, therefore, more accurately measures the classification error of the regression model and is more flexible. As expected, SDHR generally outperforms SDH. Experimental results on two large-scale image data sets (CIFAR-10 and MNIST) and a large-scale and challenging face data set (FRGC) demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of SDHR.

  3. Nonlinear electrochemical relaxation around conductors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kevin T; Bazant, Martin Z

    2006-07-01

    We analyze the simplest problem of electrochemical relaxation in more than one dimension-the response of an uncharged, ideally polarizable metallic sphere (or cylinder) in a symmetric, binary electrolyte to a uniform electric field. In order to go beyond the circuit approximation for thin double layers, our analysis is based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations of dilute solution theory. Unlike most previous studies, however, we focus on the nonlinear regime, where the applied voltage across the conductor is larger than the thermal voltage. In such strong electric fields, the classical model predicts that the double layer adsorbs enough ions to produce bulk concentration gradients and surface conduction. Our analysis begins with a general derivation of surface conservation laws in the thin double-layer limit, which provide effective boundary conditions on the quasineutral bulk. We solve the resulting nonlinear partial differential equations numerically for strong fields and also perform a time-dependent asymptotic analysis for weaker fields, where bulk diffusion and surface conduction arise as first-order corrections. We also derive various dimensionless parameters comparing surface to bulk transport processes, which generalize the Bikerman-Dukhin number. Our results have basic relevance for double-layer charging dynamics and nonlinear electrokinetics in the ubiquitous PNP approximation.

  4. An NCN-pincer ligand dysprosium single-ion magnet showing magnetic relaxation via the second excited state

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Nan; Ungur, Liviu; Granroth, Garrett E.; Powell, Annie K.; Wu, Chunji; Nagler, Stephen E.; Tang, Jinkui; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Cui, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets are compounds that exhibit magnetic bistability purely of molecular origin. The control of anisotropy and suppression of quantum tunneling to obtain a comprehensive picture of the relaxation pathway manifold, is of utmost importance with the ultimate goal of slowing the relaxation dynamics within single-molecule magnets to facilitate their potential applications. Combined ab initio calculations and detailed magnetization dynamics studies reveal the unprecedented relaxation mediated via the second excited state within a new DyNCN system comprising a valence-localized carbon coordinated to a single dysprosium(III) ion. The essentially C2v symmetry of the DyIII ion results in a new relaxation mechanism, hitherto unknown for mononuclear DyIII complexes, opening new perspectives for means of enhancing the anisotropy contribution to the spin-relaxation barrier. PMID:24969218

  5. The generalized Phillips-Twomey method for NMR relaxation time inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Xiao, Lizhi; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Qingming

    2016-10-01

    The inversion of NMR relaxation time involves the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Due to its ill-posedness, numerical solutions to this type of equations are often found much less accurate and bear little resemblance to the true solution. There has been a strong interest in finding a well-posed method for this ill-posed problem since 1950s. In this paper, we prove the existence, the uniqueness, the stability and the convergence of the generalized Phillips-Twomey regularization method for solving this type of equations. Numerical simulations and core analyses arising from NMR transverse relaxation time inversion are conducted to show the effectiveness of the generalized Phillips-Twomey method. Both the simulation results and the core analyses agree well with the model and the realities.

  6. Nuclear Spin Relaxation in Glass States of 3He-A in Stretched Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, V. V.; Krasnikhin, D. A.; Mulders, N.; Senin, A. A.; Yudin, A. N.

    2011-02-01

    We present results of pulse NMR investigations of superfluid A-like phase of 3He in stretched aerogel. In this case we have anisotropic orbital glass (OG) with two possible types of ordering in spin space—ordered spin nematic (OG-SN) or disordered spin glass (OG-SG) states. It was found that longitudinal relaxation of magnetization is non-exponential in both states and depends on temperature and on inhomogeneity of external steady magnetic field. At the same conditions the relaxation in OG-SG state is more rapid than in OG-SN state. For transverse orientation of the magnetic field relative to anisotropy axis the duration of free induction decay signal was longer than in normal phase. It may be explained by formation of coherently precessing spin state.

  7. Muon spin relaxation in the heavy fermion system UPt sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, G.M.; Le, L.P.; Sternlieb, B.J.; Wu, W.D.; Uemura, Y.J. ); Dalichaouch, Y.; Lee, B.W.; Maple, M.B.; Seaman, C.L. . Dept. of Physics Institute for Pure and Applied Physical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California ); Armstrong, P.E.; Ellis, R.W.; Fisk, Z. )

    1991-11-15

    We report muon spin rotation/relaxation ({mu}SR) measurements of the heavy fermion superconductor UPt{sub 3} in external fields {ital H}{sub ext}{parallel}{ital {cflx c}}. We find that the muon Knight shift is unchanged in the superconducting state, consistent with odd-parity pairing (such as {ital p} wave). The transverse field relaxation is observed to be strongly field dependent, decreasing with increasing field. Below {ital T}{sub {ital c}} the increase is barely detectable in an applied field of 4 kG{parallel}{ital {cflx c}}. On the basis of the high field measurements, we estimate the low temperature penetration depth to be {lambda}({ital T}{r arrow}0){ge} (R18)11 000 A.

  8. The generalized Phillips-Twomey method for NMR relaxation time inversion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Xiao, Lizhi; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Qingming

    2016-10-01

    The inversion of NMR relaxation time involves the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Due to its ill-posedness, numerical solutions to this type of equations are often found much less accurate and bear little resemblance to the true solution. There has been a strong interest in finding a well-posed method for this ill-posed problem since 1950s. In this paper, we prove the existence, the uniqueness, the stability and the convergence of the generalized Phillips-Twomey regularization method for solving this type of equations. Numerical simulations and core analyses arising from NMR transverse relaxation time inversion are conducted to show the effectiveness of the generalized Phillips-Twomey method. Both the simulation results and the core analyses agree well with the model and the realities.

  9. Plasma Relaxation Dynamics Moderated by Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Robert; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2014-10-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor-relaxed equilibrium model all these constraints are relaxed save for global magnetic flux and helicity. A Lagrangian is presented that leads to a new variational formulation of magnetized fluid dynamics, relaxed MHD (RxMHD), all static solutions of which are Taylor equilibrium states. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-relaxed MHD (MRxMHD), is developed. These concepts are illustrated using a simple two-region slab model similar to that proposed by Hahm and Kulsrud--the formation of an initial shielding current sheet after perturbation by boundary rippling is calculated using MRxMHD and the final island state, after the current sheet has relaxed through a reconnection sequence, is calculated using RxMHD. Australian Research Council Grant DP110102881.

  10. Relaxation processes in disaccharide sugar glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yoon-Hwae; Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Seo, Jeong-Ah; Shin, Dong-Myeong; Ha, Ji-Hye; Kim, Hyung-Kook

    2013-02-01

    We represented relaxation processes of disaccharide sugars (anhydrous trehalose and maltose) in supercooled and glassy states by using several spectroscopy techniques which include a broadband dielectric loss spectroscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (Retvield analysis) methods which are powerful tools to measure the dynamics in glass forming materials. In a dielectric loss spectroscopy study, we found that anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses have an extra relaxation process besides α-, JG β- and γ-relaxations which could be related to a unique property of glycoside bond in disaccharides. In photon correlation spectroscopy study, we found an interesting compressed exponential relaxation at temperatures above 140°C. The q-1 dependence of its relaxation time corresponds to an ultraslow ballistic motion due to the local structure rearrangements. In the same temperature range, we found the glycosidic bond structure changes in trehalose molecule from the Raman and the Retvield X-ray diffraction measurements indicating that the observed compressed exponential relaxation in supercooled liquid trehalose could be resulted in the glycosidic bond structure change. Therefore, the overall results from this study might support the fact that the superior bioprotection ability of disaccharide sugar glasses might originate from this unique relaxation process of glycosidic bond.

  11. Relaxation of impact basins on icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of relaxation of very large impact craters on icy satellites is addressed and the extent to which such studies can help place constraints on the nature of such satellite interiors is investigated. Very general calculations aimed at understanding the nature of relaxation of large impact structures, including the directions, relaxation velocities, and stress levels, are presented. The dependence of relaxation on such factors as silicate core size and viscosity gradients in the ice is examined. The general results are used to address whether comparing the current morphology of impact basins to estimates of their original shape will yield an understanding of the thermal and mechanical structure of the interiors of the icy satellites. It is found that the relaxation rates derived from models of satellite interiors can provide constraints on viscous layer thicknesses. High thermal gradients can permit substantial relaxation even in thin viscous layers. Finally, the constraints on the internal structure of Tethys arising from the extremely relaxed state of the Odysseus basin and the existence of Ithaca Chasma are discussed.

  12. Repetitive operation of switchless transverse flow transversely excited atmosphere CO2 lasers.

    PubMed

    Patil, Gautam C; Nilaya, J Padma; Biswas, D J

    2011-09-01

    The enhanced preionisation efficiency of a mutually coupled parallel spark preioniser has been exploited to achieve switchless operation of a transversely excited atmosphere (TEA) CO(2) laser in the conventional transverse gas flow configuration. This made the laser more compatible to repetitive operation and the satisfactory performance of a switchless TEA CO(2) laser of ~8 cc active volume is reported here up to a maximum repetition rate of 100 Hz at a gas replenishment factor of ~2.

  13. Mineralogical controls on NMR rock surface relaxivity: A case study of the Fontainebleau Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livo, Kurt

    Pore size distribution is derived from nuclear magnetic resonance, but is scaled by surface relaxivity. While nuclear magnetic resonance studies generally focus on the difficulty of determining pore size distribution in unconventional shale reservoirs, there is a lack of discussion concerning pure quartz sandstones. Long surface relaxivity causes complications analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance data for pore size distribution determination. Currently, I am unaware of research that addresses the complicated pore size distribution determination in long relaxing, pure sandstone formations, which is essential to accurate downhole petrophysical modeling. The Fontainebleau sandstone is well known for its homogenous mineralogical makeup and wide range of porosity and permeability. The Hibernia sandstone exhibits a similar mineralogy and is characterized by a similar and porosity-permeability range to the Fontainebleau sandstones, but with a significantly higher portion of clay minerals (1-6%). I present systematic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution from nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation times, permeability, and volumetric magnetic susceptibility to aide in characterization of the Fontainebleau sandstone. Analysis of collected nuclear magnetic resonance data is then compared to other petrophysical studies from literature such as helium porosity and permeability, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. I find that the lack of impurities on the grain surfaces of pure quartz samples imparts a lower surface relaxivity as compared to clay containing sandstones and makes nuclear magnetic resonance analysis more complex. Thus, inverted nuclear magnetic resonance data from cleaner outcrop samples incorrectly models pore size distribution without accounting for wider surface relaxivity variation and is improperly used when characterizing the Fontainebleau sandstone. This is further supported by evidence from less

  14. 3D Electron Spin Relaxation Control by Electric Field in Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie, Xavier

    2012-02-01

    We have measured the electron spin relaxation time in (111)-oriented GaAs quantum wells by time-resolved photoluminescence. By embedding the QWs in a PIN or NIP structure we demonstrate the tuning of the conduction band spin splitting and hence the spin relaxation time with an applied external electric field applied along the growth z direction . The application of an external electric field of 50 kV/cm yields a two-order of magnitude increase of the spin relaxation time which can reach values larger than 30 ns; this is a consequence of the electric field tuning of the spin-orbit conduction band splitting which can almost vanish when the Rashba term compensates exactly the Dresselhaus one [1]. The spin quantum beats measurements under transverse magnetic field prove that the D'Yakonov-Perel (DP) spin relaxation time is not only increased for the Sz electron spin component but also for both Sx and Sy. These results contrast drastically with the (001) and (110) quantum wells.The role of the cubic Dresselhaus terms on the spin relaxation anisotropy will finally be discussed. The tuning or suppression of the DP electron spin relaxation demonstrated here for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells grown on (111) substrates is also possible in many other III-V and II-VI zinc-blende nanostructures since the principle relies only on symmetry considerations. [4pt] [1] A. Balocchi, Q. H. Duong, P. Renucci, B. L. Liu, C. Fontaine, T. Amand, D. Lagarde, and X. Marie, Phys. Rev. Lett 107, 136604(2011)

  15. Heteronuclear Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion (HARD) for quantitative analysis of conformational dynamics in proteins.

    PubMed

    Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Chao, Fa-An; Masterson, Larry R; Mangia, Silvia; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Seelig, Burckhard; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2012-06-01

    NMR relaxation methods probe biomolecular motions over a wide range of timescales. In particular, the rotating frame spin-lock R(1ρ) and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) R(2) experiments are commonly used to characterize μs to ms dynamics, which play a critical role in enzyme folding and catalysis. In an effort to complement these approaches, we introduced the Heteronuclear Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion (HARD) method, where dispersion in rotating frame relaxation rate constants (longitudinal R(1ρ) and transverse R(2ρ)) is created by modulating the shape and duration of adiabatic full passage (AFP) pulses. Previously, we showed the ability of the HARD method to detect chemical exchange dynamics in the fast exchange regime (k(ex)∼10(4)-10(5) s(-1)). In this article, we show the sensitivity of the HARD method to slower exchange processes by measuring R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) relaxation rates for two soluble proteins (ubiquitin and 10C RNA ligase). One advantage of the HARD method is its nominal dependence on the applied radio frequency field, which can be leveraged to modulate the dispersion in the relaxation rate constants. In addition, we also include product operator simulations to define the dynamic range of adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) that is valid under all exchange regimes. We conclude from both experimental observations and simulations that this method is complementary to CPMG-based and rotating frame spin-lock R(1ρ) experiments to probe conformational exchange dynamics for biomolecules. Finally, this approach is germane to several NMR-active nuclei, where relaxation rates are frequency-offset independent.

  16. The Stern-Gerlach experiment and the effects of spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wennerström, Håkan; Westlund, Per-Olof

    2012-02-07

    The classical Stern-Gerlach experiment is analyzed with an emphasis on the spin dynamics. The central question asked is whether there occurs a relaxation of the spin angular momentum during the time the particle passes through the Stern-Gerlach magnet. We examine in particular the transverse relaxation, involving angular momentum exchange between the spin of the particles and the spins of the magnet. A method is presented describing relaxation effects at an individual particle level. This leads to a stochastic equation of motion for the spins. This is coupled to a classical equation of motion for the particle translation. The experimental situation is then modeled through simulations of individual trajectories using two sets of parameter choices and three different sets of initial conditions. The two main conclusions are: (A) if the coupling between the magnet and the spin is solely described by the Zeeman interaction with the average magnetic field the simulations show a clear disagreement with the experimental observation of Stern and Gerlach. (B) If one, on the other hand, also allows for a T(2) relaxation time shorter than the passage time one can obtain a practically quantitative agreement with the experimental observations. These conclusions are at variance with the standard textbook explanation of the Stern-Gerlach experiment.

  17. Spin dynamics simulation of electron spin relaxation in Ni{sup 2+}(aq)

    SciTech Connect

    Rantaharju, Jyrki Mareš, Jiří Vaara, Juha

    2014-07-07

    The ability to quantitatively predict and analyze the rate of electron spin relaxation of open-shell systems is important for electron paramagnetic resonance and paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. We present a combined molecular dynamics (MD), quantum chemistry (QC), and spin dynamics simulation method for calculating such spin relaxation rates. The method is based on the sampling of a MD trajectory by QC calculations, to produce instantaneous parameters of the spin Hamiltonian used, in turn, to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by simulating the relaxation of electron spin in an aqueous solution of Ni{sup 2+} ion. The spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxation rates are extracted directly from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available, indirectly obtained experimental data is obtained by our method.

  18. Low-field one-dimensional and direction-dependent relaxation imaging of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Mollova, Ayret; Stapf, Siegfried

    2011-12-01

    The structure of articular cartilage is separated into three layers of differently oriented collagen fibers, which is accompanied by a gradient of increasing glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and decreasing water concentration from the top layer towards the bone interface. The combined effect of these structural variations results in a change of the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times as a function of the distance from the cartilage surface. In this paper, this dependence is investigated at a magnetic field strength of 0.27 T with a one-dimensional depth resolution of 50 μm on bovine hip and stifle joint articular cartilage. By employing this method, advantage is taken of the increasing contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate found at lower magnetic field strengths. Furthermore, evidence for an orientational dependence of relaxation times with respect to an axis normal to the surface plane is given, an observation that has recently been reported using high-field MRI and that was explained by preferential orientations of collagen bundles in each of the three cartilage zones. In order to quantify the extent of a further contrast mechanism and to estimate spatially dependent glycosaminoglycan concentrations, the data are supplemented by proton relaxation times that were acquired in bovine articular cartilage that was soaked in a 0.8 mM aqueous Gd ++ solution.

  19. [A study on Korean concepts of relaxation].

    PubMed

    Park, J S

    1992-01-01

    Relaxation technique is an independent nursing intervention used in various stressful situations. The concept of relaxation must be explored for the meaning given by the people in their traditional thought and philosophy. Korean relaxation technique, wanting to become culturally acceptable and effective, is learning to recognize and develop Korean concepts, experiences, and musics of relaxation. This study was aimed at discovering Korean concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation and contributing the development of the relaxation technique for Korean people. The subjects were 59 nursing students, 39 hospitalized patients, 61 housewives, 21 rural residents and 16 researchers. Data were collected from September 4th to October 24th, 1991 by interviews or questionnaires. The data analysis was done by qualitative research method, and validity assured by conformation of the concept and category by 2 nursing scientists who had written a Master's thesis on the relaxation technique. The results of the study were summarized as follows; 1. The meaning of the relaxation concept; From 298 statements, 107 concepts were extracted and then 5 categories "Physical domain", "Psychological domain", "Complex domain", "Situation", and "environment" were organized. 'Don't have discomforts, 'don't have muscle tension', 'don't have energy (him in Korean)', 'don't have activities' subcategories were included in "Physical domain". 'Don't have anxiety', 'feel good', 'emotional stability', 'don't have wordly thoughts', 'feel one's brain muddled', 'loss of desire' subcategories were included in "physical domain" 'Comfort body and mind', 'don't have tension of body and mind', 'be sagged' 'liveliness of thoughts' subcategories were included in "Complex domain". 'Rest', 'sleep', 'others' subcategories were included in "Situation domain". And 'quite environment' & 'comfortable environment' subcategories were included in "Environmental domain". 2. The experiences of the relaxation; From 151

  20. Le Chatelier's principle with multiple relaxation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, R.; Levine, R. D.

    1986-05-01

    Le Chatelier's principle is discussed within the constrained variational approach to thermodynamics. The formulation is general enough to encompass systems not in thermal (or chemical) equilibrium. Particular attention is given to systems with multiple constraints which can be relaxed. The moderation of the initial perturbation increases as additional constraints are removed. This result is studied in particular when the (coupled) relaxation channels have widely different time scales. A series of inequalities is derived which describes the successive moderation as each successive relaxation channel opens up. These inequalities are interpreted within the metric-geometry representation of thermodynamics.

  1. Relaxation time in disordered molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Rodrigo P.; Freire, José A.

    2015-05-28

    Relaxation time is the typical time it takes for a closed physical system to attain thermal equilibrium. The equilibrium is brought about by the action of a thermal reservoir inducing changes in the system micro-states. The relaxation time is intuitively expected to increase with system disorder. We derive a simple analytical expression for this dependence in the context of electronic equilibration in an amorphous molecular system model. We find that the disorder dramatically enhances the relaxation time but does not affect its independence of the nature of the initial state.

  2. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    Smooth muscle relaxation in vertebrates is regulated by a variety of neuronal signalling molecules, including neuropeptides and nitric oxide (NO). The physiology of muscle relaxation in echinoderms is of particular interest because these animals are evolutionarily more closely related to the vertebrates than to the majority of invertebrate phyla. However, whilst in vertebrates there is a clear structural and functional distinction between visceral smooth muscle and skeletal striated muscle, this does not apply to echinoderms, in which the majority of muscles, whether associated with the body wall skeleton and its appendages or with visceral organs, are made up of non-striated fibres. The mechanisms by which the nervous system controls muscle relaxation in echinoderms were, until recently, unknown. Using the cardiac stomach of the starfish Asterias rubens as a model, it has been established that the NO-cGMP signalling pathway mediates relaxation. NO also causes relaxation of sea urchin tube feet, and NO may therefore function as a 'universal' muscle relaxant in echinoderms. The first neuropeptides to be identified in echinoderms were two related peptides isolated from Asterias rubens known as SALMFamide-1 (S1) and SALMFamide-2 (S2). Both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of the starfish cardiac stomach, but with S2 being approximately ten times more potent than S1. SALMFamide neuropeptides have also been isolated from sea cucumbers, in which they cause relaxation of both gut and body wall muscle. Therefore, like NO, SALMFamides may also function as 'universal' muscle relaxants in echinoderms. The mechanisms by which SALMFamides cause relaxation of echinoderm muscle are not known, but several candidate signal transduction pathways are discussed here. The SALMFamides do not, however, appear to act by promoting release of NO, and muscle relaxation in echinoderms is therefore probably regulated by at least two neuronal signalling systems acting in parallel. Recently, other

  3. Effect of EC & LiCF3SO3 on conductivity and relaxation in PVA-PEO blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joge, Prajakta; Kanchan, D. K.; Sharma, Poonam; Gondaliya, Nirali

    2013-02-01

    PVA-PEO-EC-LiCF3SO3 blend system has been prepared using solution cast technique wherein, plasticizer (Ethylene Carbonate (EC)) and salt (Lithium Trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiCF3SO3)) concentrations are varied. The conductivity studies are carried out using impedance spectroscopic analysis. The relaxation time is obtained using frequency dependent (Z"/Z"max) plot. A comparative study between conductivity (σ) and conductivity relaxation time (τ) has been carried out.

  4. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: influence of electron spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Kowalewski, J; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-03-28

    The work presents a theory of nuclear ((1)H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of (15)N and (14)N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)]. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The (1)H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the (1)H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against (1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(14)N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both (14)N and (15)N systems and explains the features of (1)H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  5. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: Influence of electron spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-03-01

    The work presents a theory of nuclear (1H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of 15N and 14N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The 1H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the 1H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-14N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both 14N and 15N systems and explains the features of 1H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  6. Retardation of the orientation relaxation of azo-dye doped amorphous polymers upon photoinduced isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S. W.; Quatela, A.; Casalboni, M.; Nunzi, J.-M.

    2006-08-01

    The orientation relaxation upon photo-induced isomerization of azo-dyes was studied. All-optical poling (AOP) and photo-induced birefringence, which are based on the mechanism of angular selective photo-isomerization, were employed to manipulate the angular distribution of azo-dyes (Disperse-red 1) doped in three different amorphous polymers: (poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, poly(carbonate) PC and poly(sulfone) PSU), with different glass transition temperature (T g). In the case of AOP, quasi-permanent macroscopic second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ (2) was inscribed in the dye-doped centro-symmetric polymer systems, while in the case of photo-induced birefringence, quasi-permanent birefringence Δn was inscribed in the dye-doped isotropic polymer systems. Relaxation of χ (2) and Δn were monitored upon different duration of AOP and photo-induced birefringence preparation. Experimental results show that azo-dye orientation relaxation follows the duration of the photo-nduced isomerization process: the longer the photo-induced isomerization process, the slower the relaxation of the inscribed χ (2) and Δn. In addition, retardation of the orientation relaxation does not follow a simple relation with hardness (T g) of the polymer host. Causes of the orientation relaxation retardation are discussed.

  7. Direct simulation Monte Carlo modeling of relaxation processes in polyatomic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, M. Nizenkov, P. Mirza, A. Fasoulas, S.

    2016-02-15

    Relaxation processes of polyatomic molecules are modeled and implemented in an in-house Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code in order to enable the simulation of atmospheric entry maneuvers at Mars and Saturn’s Titan. The description of rotational and vibrational relaxation processes is derived from basic quantum-mechanics using a rigid rotator and a simple harmonic oscillator, respectively. Strategies regarding the vibrational relaxation process are investigated, where good agreement for the relaxation time according to the Landau-Teller expression is found for both methods, the established prohibiting double relaxation method and the new proposed multi-mode relaxation. Differences and applications areas of these two methods are discussed. Consequently, two numerical methods used for sampling of energy values from multi-dimensional distribution functions are compared. The proposed random-walk Metropolis algorithm enables the efficient treatment of multiple vibrational modes within a time step with reasonable computational effort. The implemented model is verified and validated by means of simple reservoir simulations and the comparison to experimental measurements of a hypersonic, carbon-dioxide flow around a flat-faced cylinder.

  8. Study into the correlation of dominant pore throat size and SIP relaxation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, Sabine; Prinz, Carsten; Zimathies, Annett

    2016-12-01

    There is currently a debate within the SIP community about the characteristic textural length scale controlling relaxation time of consolidated porous media. One idea is that the relaxation time is dominated by the pore throat size distribution or more specifically the modal pore throat size as determined in mercury intrusion capillary pressure tests. Recently new studies on inverting pore size distributions from SIP data were published implying that the relaxation mechanisms and controlling length scale are well understood. In contrast new analytical model studies based on the Marshall-Madden membrane polarization theory suggested that two relaxation processes might compete: the one along the short narrow pore (the throat) with one across the wider pore in case the narrow pores become relatively long. This paper presents a first systematically focused study into the relationship of pore throat sizes and SIP relaxation times. The generality of predicted trends is investigated across a wide range of materials differing considerably in chemical composition, specific surface and pore space characteristics. Three different groups of relaxation behaviors can be clearly distinguished. The different behaviors are related to clay content and type, carbonate content, size of the grains and the wide pores in the samples.

  9. Direct simulation Monte Carlo modeling of relaxation processes in polyatomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Nizenkov, P.; Mirza, A.; Fasoulas, S.

    2016-02-01

    Relaxation processes of polyatomic molecules are modeled and implemented in an in-house Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code in order to enable the simulation of atmospheric entry maneuvers at Mars and Saturn's Titan. The description of rotational and vibrational relaxation processes is derived from basic quantum-mechanics using a rigid rotator and a simple harmonic oscillator, respectively. Strategies regarding the vibrational relaxation process are investigated, where good agreement for the relaxation time according to the Landau-Teller expression is found for both methods, the established prohibiting double relaxation method and the new proposed multi-mode relaxation. Differences and applications areas of these two methods are discussed. Consequently, two numerical methods used for sampling of energy values from multi-dimensional distribution functions are compared. The proposed random-walk Metropolis algorithm enables the efficient treatment of multiple vibrational modes within a time step with reasonable computational effort. The implemented model is verified and validated by means of simple reservoir simulations and the comparison to experimental measurements of a hypersonic, carbon-dioxide flow around a flat-faced cylinder.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of NMR relaxation and diffusion of bulk hydrocarbons and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Philip M.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Chapman, Walter G.; Hirasaki, George J.

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and diffusion of bulk n-C5H12 to n-C17H36 hydrocarbons and bulk water. The MD simulations of the 1H NMR relaxation times T1,2 in the fast motion regime where T1 =T2 agree with measured (de-oxygenated) T2 data at ambient conditions, without any adjustable parameters in the interpretation of the simulation data. Likewise, the translational diffusion DT coefficients calculated using simulation configurations agree with measured diffusion data at ambient conditions. The agreement between the predicted and experimentally measured NMR relaxation times and diffusion coefficient also validate the forcefields used in the simulation. The molecular simulations naturally separate intramolecular from intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions helping bring new insight into the two NMR relaxation mechanisms as a function of molecular chain-length (i.e. carbon number). Comparison of the MD simulation results of the two relaxation mechanisms with traditional hard-sphere models used in interpreting NMR data reveals important limitations in the latter. With increasing chain length, there is substantial deviation in the molecular size inferred on the basis of the radius of gyration from simulation and the fitted hard-sphere radii required to rationalize the relaxation times. This deviation is characteristic of the local nature of the NMR measurement, one that is well-captured by molecular simulations.

  11. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-12

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surface codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. Lastly, the specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.

  12. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    DOE PAGES

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-12

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surfacemore » codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. Lastly, the specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.« less

  13. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing. PMID:28106036

  14. Optimization of energy extraction in transverse galloping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorribes-Palmer, F.; Sanz-Andres, A.

    2013-11-01

    A numerical method to analyse the stability of transverse galloping based on experimental measurements, as an alternative method to polynomial fitting of the transverse force coefficient Cz, is proposed in this paper. The Glauert-Den Hartog criterion is used to determine the region of angles of attack (pitch angles) prone to present galloping. An analytic solution (based on a polynomial curve of Cz) is used to validate the method and to evaluate the discretization errors. Several bodies (of biconvex, D-shape and rhomboidal cross sections) have been tested in a wind tunnel and the stability of the galloping region has been analysed with the new method. An algorithm to determine the pitch angle of the body that allows the maximum value of the kinetic energy of the flow to be extracted is presented.

  15. Transverse Instabilities in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Burov, A.; Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.M.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Transverse instabilities of the antiproton beam have been observed in the Recycler ring soon after its commissioning. After installation of transverse dampers, the threshold for the instability limit increased significantly but the instability is still found to limit the brightness of the antiprotons extracted from the Recycler for Tevatron shots. In this paper, we describe observations of the instabilities during the extraction process as well as during dedicated studies. The measured instability threshold phase density agrees with the prediction of the rigid beam model within a factor of 2. Also, we conclude that the instability threshold can be significantly lowered for a bunch contained in a narrow and shallow potential well due to effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping.

  16. Transverse mode imaging of guided matter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dall, R. G.; Hodgman, S. S.; Johnsson, M. T.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2010-01-15

    Ultracold atoms whose de Broglie wavelength is of the same order as an extended confining potential can experience waveguiding along the potential. When the transverse kinetic energy of the atoms is sufficiently low, they can be guided in the lowest order mode of the confining potential by analogy with light guided by a single mode optical fiber. We have obtained the first images of the transverse mode structure of guided matter waves in a confining potential with up to 65% of atoms in the lowest order mode. The coherence of the guided atomic de Broglie waves is demonstrated by the diffraction pattern produced when incident upon a two dimensional periodic structure. Such coherent waveguides will be important atom optic components in devices with applications such as atom holography and atom interferometry.

  17. Transverse tectonic boundaries near Kodiak Island, Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Bruns, T.R.; Von Huene, R.

    1981-01-01

    Transverse tectonic boundaries exist at the NE and SW ends of the Kodiak islands, so that the Aleutian arc-trench system is longitudinally segmented in this area. Evidence for the transverse boundaries includes alignments of such geologic features as offset volcanic lineations, terminations of structural trends, and boundaries of discrete zones of earthquake aftershock sequences. The boundaries appear to be broad zones of disruption that began to form during the late Miocene or Pliocene. Although oceanic fracture zones and seamount chains intersect the continental margin near the boundaries, subduction of these features probably did not cause the tectonic boundaries. The fracture zones and seamount chains have swept northeastward along the margin, at least since the late Pliocene, because of the direction of convergence of the Pacific and N American plates. -Authors

  18. Transverse mis-alignments in a driver

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.; Hahn, K.

    1988-06-01

    The transverse errors of the beam lines are usually corrected by an appropriate feed back to bring the beam back on axis. In an induction linac, however, the head and tail of the bunch differ substantially in momentum at a given lens location. As a result, the correction has to be time dependent. Such a correction becomes increasingly difficult as the beam energy increases and the time duration of the bunch decreases. As a step towards an understanding of the problem, we have analyzed the extreme case of applying no correction. Since the lattice configuration changes and the transverse oscillations are damped as the ions are accelerated, the rms amplitude does not increase simply as the square root of the number of periods, as one would expect for constant velocity in a uniform channel. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  19. MEASUREMENT OF TRANSVERSE ECHOES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.; SATOGATA, T.; TOMAS. R.

    2005-05-16

    Beam echoes are a very sensitive method to measure diffusion, and longitudinal echo measurements were performed in a number of machines. In RHIC, for the first time, a transverse beam echo was observed after applying a dipole kick followed by a quadrupole .kick. After application of the dipole kick, the dipole moment decohered completely due to lattice nonlinearities. When a quadrupole kick is applied at time {tau} after the dipole kick, the beam re-cohered at time 2{tau} thus showing an echo response. We describe the experimental setup and measurement results. In the measurements the dipole and quadrupole kick amplitudes, amplitude dependent tune shift, and the time between dipole and quadrupole kick were varied. In addition, measurements were taken with gold bunches of different intensities. These should exhibit different transverse diffusion rates due to intra-beam scattering.

  20. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing.

  1. Transverse acousto-electric effect in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipavský, P.; Koláček, J.; Lin, P.-J.

    2016-06-01

    We formulate a theory based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) theory and Newtonian vortex dynamics to study the transverse acousto-electric response of a type-II superconductor with Abrikosov vortex lattice. When exposed to a transverse acoustic wave, Cooper pairs emerge from the moving atomic lattice and moving electrons. As in the Tolman-Stewart effect in a normal metal, an electromagnetic field is radiated from the superconductor. We adapt the equilibrium-based TDGL theory to this non-equilibrium system by using a floating condensation kernel. Due to the interaction between normal and superconducting components, the radiated electric field as a function of magnetic field attains a maximum value occurring below the upper critical magnetic field. This local increase in electric field has weak temperature dependence and is suppressed by the presence of impurities in the superconductor.

  2. Characteristics of transverse waves in chromospheric mottles

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P.; Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R.; Morton, R. J.; Christian, D. J.

    2013-12-10

    Using data obtained by the high temporal and spatial resolution Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope, we investigate at an unprecedented level of detail transverse oscillations in chromospheric fine structures near the solar disk center. The oscillations are interpreted in terms of propagating and standing magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Wave characteristics including the maximum transverse velocity amplitude and the phase speed are measured as a function of distance along the structure's length. Solar magnetoseismology is applied to these measured parameters to obtain diagnostic information on key plasma parameters (e.g., magnetic field, density, temperature, flow speed) of these localized waveguides. The magnetic field strength of the mottle along the ∼2 Mm length is found to decrease by a factor of 12, while the local plasma density scale height is ∼280 ± 80 km.

  3. Damped transverse oscillations of interacting coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto; Luna, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Damped transverse oscillations of magnetic loops are routinely observed in the solar corona. This phenomenon is interpreted as standing kink magnetohydrodynamic waves, which are damped by resonant absorption owing to plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field. The periods and damping times of these oscillations can be used to probe the physical conditions of the coronal medium. Some observations suggest that interaction between neighboring oscillating loops in an active region may be important and can modify the properties of the oscillations. Here we theoretically investigate resonantly damped transverse oscillations of interacting nonuniform coronal loops. We provide a semi-analytic method, based on the T-matrix theory of scattering, to compute the frequencies and damping rates of collective oscillations of an arbitrary configuration of parallel cylindrical loops. The effect of resonant damping is included in the T-matrix scheme in the thin boundary approximation. Analytic and numerical results in the specific case of two interacting loops are given as an application.

  4. Transversal Clifford gates on folded surface codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan E.

    2016-10-01

    Surface and color codes are two forms of topological quantum error correction in two spatial dimensions with complementary properties. Surface codes have lower-depth error detection circuits and well-developed decoders to interpret and correct errors, while color codes have transversal Clifford gates and better code efficiency in the number of physical qubits needed to achieve a given code distance. A formal equivalence exists between color codes and folded surface codes, but it does not guarantee the transferability of any of these favorable properties. However, the equivalence does imply the existence of constant-depth circuit implementations of logical Clifford gates on folded surface codes. We achieve and improve this result by constructing two families of folded surface codes with transversal Clifford gates. This construction is presented generally for qudits of any dimension. The specific application of these codes to universal quantum computation based on qubit fusion is also discussed.

  5. Ferrimagnetic behaviors in a transverse Ising nanoisland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyoshi, T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the phase diagrams and magnetizations of a magnetic nanoisland described by the transverse Ising model (TIM) are investigated by the use of the effective-field theory (EFT) with correlations. A lot of characteristic behaviors observed in standard ferrimagnetic materials as well as novel phenomena have been obtained, although the system consists of two finite spin-1/2 layers coupled antiferromagnetically with a negative interlayer coupling.

  6. TRANSVERSE MODE ELECTRO-OPTIC MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    electro - optic modulators presently used are crystals such as KDP which exhibit a longitudinal electro - optic effect. It has been demonstrated that a more efficient modulator can be produced when a crystal having a transverse electro - optic effect is employed. Generally these crystals are produced either from the melt or from fluxes. Since melt grown crystals must be cooled through several hundred degrees and often must undergo phase transitions, these crystals are generally highly strained. Flux grown crystals are also

  7. Computed Tomography of Transverse Phase Space

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, A.; Johnstone, C.; Johnstone, J.

    2016-09-19

    Two computed tomography techniques are explored to reconstruct beam transverse phase space using both simulated beam and multi-wire profile data in the Fermilab Muon Test Area ("MTA") beamline. Both Filtered Back-Projection ("FBP") and Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique ("SART") algorithms [2] are considered and compared. Errors and artifacts are compared as a function of each algorithm’s free parameters, and it is shown through simulation and MTA beamline profiles that SART is advantageous for reconstructions with limited profile data.

  8. Complementary methods of transverse emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, James; Hu, Martin; Jansson, Andreas; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yan, Ming-Jen; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    Several complementary transverse emittance monitors have been developed and used at the Fermilab accelerator complex. These include Ionization profile Monitors (IPM), Flying Wires, Schottky detectors and a Synchrotron Light Monitor (Synchlite). Mechanical scrapers have also been used for calibration purposes. This paper describes the various measurement devices by examining their basic features, calibration requirements, systematic uncertainties, and applications to collider operation. A comparison of results from different kinds of measurements is also presented.

  9. Strong transverse fields in delta-spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold; Wang, Haimin

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of the strength and direction of transverse magnetic fields in six delta-spots are presented. The field direction is determined by the relative strength of the pi- and sigma-components at different polarizer orientations, and is, with one exception, parallel to the neutral line and as strong as the umbral field. Field strengths determined by line splitting are as high as 3980 G.

  10. Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2011-10-24

    Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) provide three-dimensional images of the partonic structure of the nucleon in momentum space. We made impressive progress in understanding TMDs, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. This brief overview on TMDs is divided in two parts: in the first, an essential list of achievements is presented. In the second, a selection of open questions is discussed.

  11. Electron in a transverse harmonic cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Honkanen, H.; Maris, P.; Vary, J.P.; Brodsky, S.J.; /SLAC

    2010-10-27

    We employ Hamiltonian light-front quantum field theory in a basis function approach to solve the non-perturbative problem of an electron in a strong scalar transverse confining potential. We evaluate both the invariant mass spectra and the anomalous magnetic moment of the lowest state for this two-scale system. The weak external field limit of the anomalous magnetic moment agrees with the result of QED perturbation theory within the anticipated accuracy.

  12. Transverse Mixing in a Natural River Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swick, W. A.; Macmahan, J. H.; Reniers, A. J.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.

    2010-12-01

    Transverse mixing in a river channel is investigated using field observations and a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic model, Delft3D. Six fluorescent Rhodamine dye releases were conducted in a 30 m wide, 500 m long, and 2 m deep relatively straight reach in the Kootenai River, ID on 12-16 August 2010. The study reach contained a number of natural channel features, such as a pool-riffle sequence and bank irregularities, which influence transverse mixing. The dye was released at a constant rate for one hour from a kayak fixed in the center of the channel. River discharge was steady and all releases were conducted in the morning hours to avoid diurnal wind effects. Vertical dye concentrations and velocity profiles were measured near the source and four downstream locations: 25m, 100m, 300m and 500m. In addition to the stationary observations, two different roving dye sampling schemes were performed to increase the spatial dye concentration resolution. The first sampling scheme consisted of 5 evenly-spaced dye sensors being slowly moved upstream. The second scheme consisted of 3 dye sensors moved transversely across the channel at various streamwise channel locations. These observations provide the horizontal and vertical extent of the dye plume and the spatial and temporal variability of the dye concentration. Local flow structures, produced by the separation of flow over riffles and bank irregularities, strongly control the observed local concentration distributions. Qualitative calculations highlight the influence of channel irregularities on the rate of transverse mixing and quantitative inferences shed light on the dominant mixing processes operating within different parts of the channel. 1D analytical and 3D numerical model are used to assess the relative importance of turbulent diffusion and local flow structure on predicted spatial dye concentrations.

  13. Theoretical Overview on Recent Developments in Transverse Spin Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2009-01-14

    Transverse-spin physics has been very active and rapidly developing in the last few years. In this talk, I will briefly summarize recent theoretical developments, focusing on the associated QCD dynamics in transverse spin physics.

  14. Vibrational energy relaxation in liquid oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, K. F.; Egorov, S. A.; Skinner, J. L.

    1998-09-01

    We consider theoretically the relaxation from the first excited vibrational state to the ground state of oxygen molecules in neat liquid oxygen. The relaxation rate constant is related in the usual way to the Fourier transform of a certain quantum mechanical force-force time-correlation function. A result from Egelstaff allows one instead to relate the rate constant (approximately) to the Fourier transform of a classical force-force time-correlation function. This Fourier transform is then evaluated approximately by calculating three equilibrium averages from a classical molecular dynamics simulation. Our results for the relaxation times (at two different temperatures) are within a factor of 5 of the experimental relaxation times, which are in the ms range.

  15. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  16. Relaxation dynamics of a multihierarchical polymer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurjiu, Aurel; Biter, Teodor Lucian; Turcu, Flaviu

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study the relaxation dynamics of a multihierarchical polymer network built by replicating the Vicsek fractal in dendrimer shape. The relaxation dynamics is investigated in the framework of the generalized Gaussian structure model by employing both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse-type approach, we show the iterative procedure whereby the whole eigenvalue spectrum of the connectivity matrix of the multihierarchical structure can be obtained. Remarkably, the general picture that emerges from both approaches, even though we have a mixed growth algorithm, is that the obtained multihierarchical structure preserves the individual relaxation behaviors of its components. The theoretical findings with respect to the splitting of the intermediate domain of the relaxation quantities are well supported by experimental results.

  17. The Irreversible Thermodynamics of Chemical Relaxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schelly, Z. A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the thermodynamics of relaxation methods, considering (1) mode of perturbation of chemical equilibria, (2) enforced change of the concentrations, and (3) chemical contributions to equations of state. (CS)

  18. Slow spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendac, Martin; Sedlakova, Lucia; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Vrabel, Peter; Feher, Alexander; Pajerowski, Daniel M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Meisel, Mark W.; Shirai, Masae; Bramwell, Steven T.

    2009-03-01

    Spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7 was investigated using the magnetocaloric effect and susceptibility. The magnetocaloric behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 at temperatures where the orientation of spins is governed by ``ice rules`` (T < Tice) revealed thermally activated relaxation; however, the resulting temperature dependence of the relaxation time is more complicated than anticipated by a mere extrapolation of the corresponding high temperature data [1]. A susceptibility study of Ho2Ti2O7 was performed at T > Tice and in high magnetic fields, and the results suggest a slow relaxation of spins analogous to the behavior reported in a highly polarized cooperative paramagnet [2]. [1] J. Snyder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 107201. [2] B. G. Ueland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 027216.

  19. Cephalad-caudad versus transverse blunt expansion of the low transverse uterine incision during cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Xodo, Serena; Saccone, Gabriele; Cromi, Antonella; Ozcan, Pinar; Spagnolo, Emanuela; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative to have evidence-based guidelines for cesarean delivery. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of a cephalad-caudad compared to transverse blunt expansion of the uterine incision to reduce blood loss in women who underwent low-segment transverse cesarean delivery. We therefore performed a systematic search in electronic databases from their inception until March 2016. We included all randomized trials comparing cephalad-caudad versus transverse (control group) blunt expansion of the uterine incision in women who underwent a low transverse cesarean delivery. The primary outcome was postpartum blood loss, defined as the mean amount of blood loss (mL). Two trials (921 women) were analyzed. After the transverse uterine incision in the lower uterine segment with the scalpel, the uterine incision was then bluntly expanded by the designated method. Blunt expansion of the primary incision was derived by placing the index fingers of the operating surgeon into the incision and pulling the fingers apart laterally (transverse group) or cephalad (cephalad-caudad group). Women who were randomized in the cephalad-caudad group had lower: mean of postpartum blood loss, hemoglobin drop and hematocrit drop 24h after cesarean, unintended extension, uterine vessels injury, blood loss >1500mL and need for additional stitches. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of blood loss >1000mL, in the operating time and in post-operative pain. In conclusion, expansion of the uterine incision with fingers in a cephalad-caudad direction is associated with better maternal outcomes and, therefore, should be preferred to transverse expansion during a cesarean delivery.

  20. Transversity and Drell-Yan K-Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, P. G.

    2005-08-01

    The Drell-Yan K-factors for transversely polarised hadrons are examined. Since transverse spin is peculiar in having no DIS reference point, the effects of higher-order corrections on DY asymmetries are examined via a DIS definition for transversity devised using a hypothetical scalar vertex. The results suggest that some care may be required when interpreting experimentally extracted partonic transversity, particularly when comparing with model calculations or predictions..

  1. Cladding for transverse-pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L. (Inventor); Fan, Tso Y. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a transverse pumped, solid state laser, a nonabsorptive cladding surrounds a gain medium. A single tranverse mode, namely the Transverse Electromagnetic (TEM) sub 00 mode, is provided. The TEM sub 00 model has a cross sectional diameter greater than a transverse dimension of the gain medium but less than a transverse dimension of the cladding. The required size of the gain medium is minimized while a threshold for laser output is lowered.

  2. Control of dipolar relaxation in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquiou, B.; Bismut, G.; Beaufils, Q.; Crubellier, A.; Maréchal, E.; Pedri, P.; Vernac, L.; Gorceix, O.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2010-04-01

    We study dipolar relaxation in both ultracold thermal and Bose-condensed Cr atom gases. We show three different ways to control dipolar relaxation, making use of either a static magnetic field, an oscillatory magnetic field, or an optical lattice to reduce the dimensionality of the gas from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D). Although dipolar relaxation generally increases as a function of a static magnetic-field intensity, we find a range of nonzero magnetic-field intensities where dipolar relaxation is strongly reduced. We use this resonant reduction to accurately determine the S=6 scattering length of Cr atoms: a6=103±4a0. We compare this new measurement to another new determination of a6, which we perform by analyzing the precise spectroscopy of a Feshbach resonance in d-wave collisions, yielding a6=102.5±0.4a0. These two measurements provide, by far, the most precise determination of a6 to date. We then show that, although dipolar interactions are long-range interactions, dipolar relaxation only involves the incoming partial wave l=0 for large enough magnetic-field intensities, which has interesting consequences on the stability of dipolar Fermi gases. We then study ultracold Cr gases in a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice resulting in a collection of independent 2D gases. We show that dipolar relaxation is modified when the atoms collide in reduced dimensionality at low magnetic-field intensities, and that the corresponding dipolar relaxation rate parameter is reduced by a factor up to 7 compared to the 3D case. Finally, we study dipolar relaxation in the presence of rf oscillating magnetic fields, and we show that both the output channel energy and the transition amplitude can be controlled by means of the rf frequency and Rabi frequency.

  3. Physical modeling of transverse drainage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, J. C.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    Streams that incise across bedrock highlands such as anticlines, upwarps, cuestas, or horsts are termed transverse drainages. Their relevance today involves such diverse matters as highway and dam construction decisions, location of wildlife corridors, better-informed sediment budgets, and detailed studies into developmental histories of late Cenozoic landscapes. The transient conditions responsible for transverse drainage incision have been extensively studied on a case-by-case basis, and the dominate mechanisms proposed include: antecedence, superimposition, overflow, and piracy. Modeling efforts have been limited to antecedence, and such the specific erosional conditions required for transverse drainage incision, with respect to the individual mechanisms, remains poorly understood. In this study, fifteen experiments attempted to simulate the four mechanisms and constructed on a 9.15 m long, 2.1 m wide, and 0.45 m deep stream table. Experiments lasted between 50 and 220 minutes. The stream table was filled with seven tons of sediment consisting of a silt and clay (30%) and a fine to coarse sand (70%) mixture. The physical models highlighted the importance of downstream aggradation with regard to antecedent incision versus possible defeat and diversion. The overflow experiments indicate that retreating knickpoints across a basin outlet produce a high probability of downstream flooding when associated with a deep lake. Misters used in a couple of experiments illustrate a potential complication with regard to headward erosion driven piracy. Relatively level asymmetrically sloped ridges allow for the drainage divide across the ridge to retreat from headward erosion, but hindered when the ridge's apex undulates or when symmetrically sloped. Although these physical models cannot strictly simulate natural transverse drainages, the observed processes, their development over time, and resultant landforms roughly emulate their natural counterparts. Proposed originally from

  4. Electron-ion relaxation in a dense plasma. [supernovae core physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littleton, J. E.; Buchler, J.-R.

    1974-01-01

    The microscopic physics of the thermonuclear runaway in highly degenerate carbon-oxygen cores is investigated to determine if and how a detonation wave is generated. An expression for the electron-ion relaxation time is derived under the assumption of large degeneracy and extreme relativity of the electrons in a two-temperature plasma. Since the nuclear burning time proves to be several orders of magnitude shorter than the relaxation time, it is concluded that in studying the structure of the detonation wave the electrons and ions must be treated as separate fluids.

  5. On convex relaxation of graph isomorphism

    PubMed Central

    Aflalo, Yonathan; Bronstein, Alexander; Kimmel, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of exact and inexact matching of weighted undirected graphs, in which a bijective correspondence is sought to minimize a quadratic weight disagreement. This computationally challenging problem is often relaxed as a convex quadratic program, in which the space of permutations is replaced by the space of doubly stochastic matrices. However, the applicability of such a relaxation is poorly understood. We define a broad class of friendly graphs characterized by an easily verifiable spectral property. We prove that for friendly graphs, the convex relaxation is guaranteed to find the exact isomorphism or certify its inexistence. This result is further extended to approximately isomorphic graphs, for which we develop an explicit bound on the amount of weight disagreement under which the relaxation is guaranteed to find the globally optimal approximate isomorphism. We also show that in many cases, the graph matching problem can be further harmlessly relaxed to a convex quadratic program with only n separable linear equality constraints, which is substantially more efficient than the standard relaxation involving 2n equality and n2 inequality constraints. Finally, we show that our results are still valid for unfriendly graphs if additional information in the form of seeds or attributes is allowed, with the latter satisfying an easy to verify spectral characteristic. PMID:25713342

  6. Ultrasonic relaxations in lanthanide phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, G.; D'angelo, G.; Federico, M.; Tripodo, G.; Saunders, G. A.; Senin, H. B.

    1994-08-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range of 10 to 90 MHz have been measured in La2O3-P2O5 and Sm2O3-P2O5 glasses with high lanthanide concentrations as a function of temperature between 1.5 and 400 K. Two distinct features characterize the attenuation behavior: (i) a plateau at temperatures below 15 K and (ii) a broad high-temperature peak. The former feature is interpreted in terms of the phonon-assisted relaxation of two-level systems and the latter by assuming the existence of a distribution of thermally activated relaxing centers. For both these mechanisms the product of the deformation potential squared and the density of relaxing particles decreases with increasing lanthanide-ion concentration. This result, taken together with previous observations of the properties of oxide glasses, provides physical insight into the microscopic origin of the relaxation effects and suggests that the source of the low- and high-temperature attenuation mechanisms is the same. At temperatures below 100 K, the sound velocity, after the subtraction of the relaxation and anharmonic contributions, follows a linear law as predicted by the soft-potential model for the relaxation of soft harmonic oscillators. An encouraging agreement is obtained between the parameters regulating this mechanism and those determined from the acoustic attenuation plateau.

  7. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of phlogopite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Mohan; Singh, Anupinder; Awasthi, A. M.; Singh, Lakhwant

    2012-11-01

    An in-depth investigation of the dielectric characteristics of annealed phlogopite mica has been conducted in the frequency range 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and over the temperature range 653-873 K through the framework of dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. These formalisms show qualitative similarities in relaxation processes. The frequency dependence of the M″ and dc conductivity is found to obey an Arrhenius law and the activation energy of the phlogopite mica calculated both from dc conductivity and the modulus spectrum is similar, indicating that same type of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation phenomena. The electric modulus and conductivity data have been fitted with the Havriliak-Negami function. Scaling of M‧, M″, ac conductivity has also been performed in order to obtain insight into the relaxation mechanisms. The scaling behaviour indicates that the relaxation describes the same mechanism at different temperatures. The relaxation mechanism was also examined using the Cole-Cole approach. The study elaborates that the investigation regarding the temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric relaxation in the phlogopite mica will be helpful for various cutting edge applications of this material in electrical engineering.

  8. Longitudinal and transverse mode evolution in free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Giannessi, L.; Georgii, R.

    1995-12-31

    We use the method of Padg approximants and Fourier transform techniques to treat analytically the problem of transverse and longitudinal mode evolution in FELs. We obtain simple relations providing a transparent understanding of the dynamic of pulse propagation effects and of transverse mode guiding. We discuss the interplay with inhomogeneous broadening effects and derive gain formulae including longitudinal and transverse mode couplings.

  9. 46 CFR 154.174 - Transverse contiguous hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transverse contiguous hull structure. 154.174 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.174 Transverse contiguous hull structure. (a) The transverse contiguous hull structure of a vessel having cargo containment systems without secondary barriers must meet the standards...

  10. Temperature and concentration-dependent relaxation of ferrofluids characterized with a high-Tc SQUID-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Chang; Liu, Chieh-Wen; Liao, S. H.; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Chen, M. J.; Chen, K. L.; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, S. Y.; Wang, L. M.

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the relaxation of protons in magnetic fluids using a high-Tc SQUID magnetometer. It was found that the longitudinal relaxation rate, 1/T1, is slower than the transverse relaxation rate, 1/T2, for ferrofluids in the same field. This is due to the fact that the 1/T1 process involves returning the magnetization to the z-direction, which automatically involves the loss of magnetization in the x-y plane governed by the 1/T2 process. Additionally, 1/T1 and 1/T2 at high temperatures are slower than the corresponding relaxation rates at low temperatures, which is due to the enhanced Brownian motion of nanoparticles at high temperatures.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Magnetohydrodynamics of Plasma Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    This monograph on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation in plasmas by Ortolani and Schnack occupies a fascinating niche in the plasma physics literature. It is rare in the complex and often technically sophisticated subject of plasma physics to be able to isolate a topic and deal with it comprehensively in a mere 180 pages. Furthermore, it brings a refreshingly original and personal approach to the treatment of plasma relaxation, synthesizing the experiences of the two authors to produce a very readable account of phenomena appearing in such diverse situations as laboratory reversed field pinches (RFPs) and the solar corona. Its novelty lies in that, while it does acknowledge the seminal Taylor theory of relaxation as a general guide, it emphasizes the role of large scale numerical MHD simulations in developing a picture for the relaxation phenomena observed in experiment and nature. Nevertheless, the volume has some minor shortcomings: a tendency to repetitiveness and some omissions that prevent it being entirely self-contained. The monograph is divided into nine chapters, with the first a readable, `chatty', introduction to the physics and phenomena of relaxation discussed in the later chapters. Chapter 2 develops the tools for describing relaxation processes, namely the resistive MHD model, leading to a discussion of resistive instabilities and the stability properties of RFPs. This chapter demonstrates the authors' confessed desire to avoid mathematical detail with a rather simplified discussion of Δ' and magnetic islands; it also sets the stage for their own belief, or thesis, that numerical simulation of the non-linear consequences of the MHD model is the best approach to explaining the physics of relaxation. Nevertheless, in Chapter 3 they provide a reasonably good account and critique of one analytic approach that is available, and which is the commonly accepted picture for relaxation in pinches - the Taylor relaxation theory based on the conservation of

  12. Phenomenological Extraction of Transverse-Momentum-Dependent Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alexei Prokudin

    2011-10-01

    We discuss phenomenological extraction of Transverse Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) from experimental data. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. TMDs reveal three-dimensional distribution of partons inside polarised nucleon. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised experiments using Spin Asymmetries in particular Single Spin Asymmetries (SSAs). We discuss transversity that measures distribution of transversely polarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon and Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon.

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of Three Relaxation Training Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Jeffrey E.

    Comparison was made between the effectiveness of three relaxation training procedures: (1) Behavioral Relaxation Training, which consisted of training in relaxing specific parts of the body and controlling breathing; (2) Meditation (based on Benson's procedure for eliciting the relaxation response); and (3) Seashore Sounds "Attention Focusing,"…

  14. Electrical Relaxation in Rare Earth Doped Cubic Lead Fluoride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    PAGE (W v,. Data Fleted ) READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFRE CMPETINGFORSORE OMPLETIN FO M 1. REPORT NUMBER j2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3...For the smallest rare earths, however, at least nine .* relaxations are found. The concentration studies indicate multiple relaxations for certain...relaxations are found. The concentration studies indicate multiple relaxations for certain sites. Both simple sites and clusters are observed for

  15. Fractal geometry impact on nuclear relaxation in irregular pores.

    PubMed

    Sapoval, B; Russ, S; Petit, D; Korb, J P

    1996-01-01

    We apply a fractal description of pore surface irregularity to study the nuclear relaxation of a confined liquid. From the introduction of a length characteristic of diffusive and surface relaxing properties we describe three different relaxation regimes. These regimes show that the nuclear relaxation can be drastically modified by pore surface irregularity.

  16. Transverse seismic analysis of buried pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Mavridis, G.A.; Pitilakis, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to develop an analytical procedure for calculating upper bounds for stresses and strains for the case of the transverse seismic shaking of continuous buried pipelines taking into account the soil-pipeline interaction effects. A sensibility analysis of some critical parameters is performed. The influence of various parameters such as the apparent propagation velocity, the frequency content of the seismic ground excitation, the dynamic soil properties, the pipe`s material and size, on the ratio of the pipe to ground displacements amplitudes and consequently to the induced pipe strains, are studied parametrically.

  17. Transversely isotropic elasticity imaging of cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Shore, Spencer W; Barbone, Paul E; Oberai, Assad A; Morgan, Elise F

    2011-06-01

    To measure spatial variations in mechanical properties of biological materials, prior studies have typically performed mechanical tests on excised specimens of tissue. Less invasive measurements, however, are preferable in many applications, such as patient-specific modeling, disease diagnosis, and tracking of age- or damage-related degradation of mechanical properties. Elasticity imaging (elastography) is a nondestructive imaging method in which the distribution of elastic properties throughout a specimen can be reconstructed from measured strain or displacement fields. To date, most work in elasticity imaging has concerned incompressible, isotropic materials. This study presents an extension of elasticity imaging to three-dimensional, compressible, transversely isotropic materials. The formulation and solution of an inverse problem for an anisotropic tissue subjected to a combination of quasi-static loads is described, and an optimization and regularization strategy that indirectly obtains the solution to the inverse problem is presented. Several applications of transversely isotropic elasticity imaging to cancellous bone from the human vertebra are then considered. The feasibility of using isotropic elasticity imaging to obtain meaningful reconstructions of the distribution of material properties for vertebral cancellous bone from experiment is established. However, using simulation, it is shown that an isotropic reconstruction is not appropriate for anisotropic materials. It is further shown that the transversely isotropic method identifies a solution that predicts the measured displacements, reveals regions of low stiffness, and recovers all five elastic parameters with approximately 10% error. The recovery of a given elastic parameter is found to require the presence of its corresponding strain (e.g., a deformation that generates ɛ₁₂ is necessary to reconstruct C₁₂₁₂), and the application of regularization is shown to improve accuracy. Finally

  18. Ferrimagnetism in a transverse Ising antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyoshi, T.

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagrams and temperature dependences of total magnetization mT in a transverse Ising antiferromagnet consisting of alternating two (A and B) layers are studied by the uses of the effective-field theory with correlations and the mean-field-theory. A lot of characteristic phenomena, namely ferrimagnetic behaviors, have been found in the mT, when the crystallographically equivalent conditions between the A and B layers are broken. The appearance of a compensation point has been found below its transition temperature.

  19. Tornados and Transverse Oscillations during Prominence Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Dipankar; Chandrashekhar, K.; Morton, Richard; Pant, Vaibhav; Datta, Ajanta

    2016-07-01

    We report and analyse different phases of a prominence eruption. The winding-unwinding of two footpoints and a tornado like swirling motion is studied. The prominence eruption is observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This prominence eruption is associated with a CME at a central principal angle of 340 degree, according to the SOHO/LASCO CME catalogue. We can observe the prominence threads and the time distance maps reveal that the loop threads are entangled. We also study the transverse oscillations in the threads. Swirling motions after the eruptions are also quantified and its possible link with the CME kinematics is also studied

  20. TRANSVERSE OPTICS IMPROVEMENTS FOR RHIC RUN 4.

    SciTech Connect

    VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2004-07-05

    The magnetic settings in RHIC are driven by an on-line model, and the quality of the resulting lattice functions depend on the correctness of the settings, and knowledge of the magnet transfer-functions. Here we first present the different inputs into the model, including dipole sextupole components, used to set tunes and chromaticities along the ramp. Based on an analysis of measured tunes along the FY03 polarized proton ramp, we present predictions for quadrupole transfer-function changes which have been implemented for the FY04 Au ramp. We show the improved model agreement for tunes along the ramp, and measured transverse phase-advance at store.

  1. Transversely Isotropic Elasticity Imaging of Cancellous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Spencer W.; Barbone, Paul E.; Oberai, Assad A.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2012-01-01

    To measure spatial variations in mechanical properties of biological materials, prior studies have typically performed mechanical tests on excised specimens of tissue. Less invasive measurements, however, are preferable in many applications, such as patient-specific modeling, disease diagnosis, and tracking of age- or damage-related degradation of mechanical properties. Elasticity imaging (elastography) is a nondestructive imaging method in which the distribution of elastic properties throughout a specimen can be reconstructed from measured strain or displacement fields. To date, most work in elasticity imaging has concerned incompressible, isotropic materials. This study presents an extension of elasticity imaging to three-dimensional, compressible, transversely isotropic materials. The formulation and solution of an inverse problem for an anisotropic tissue subjected to a combination of quasi-static loads is described, and an optimization and regularization strategy that indirectly obtains the solution to the inverse problem is presented. Several applications of transversely isotropic elasticity imaging to cancellous bone from the human vertebra are then considered. The feasibility of using isotropic elasticity imaging to obtain meaningful reconstructions of the distribution of material properties for vertebral cancellous bone from experiment is established. However, using simulation, it is shown that an isotropic reconstruction is not appropriate for anisotropic materials. It is further shown that the transversely isotropic method identifies a solution that predicts the measured displacements, reveals regions of low stiffness, and recovers all five elastic parameters with approximately 10% error. The recovery of a given elastic parameter is found to require the presence of its corresponding strain (e.g., a deformation that generates ε12 is necessary to reconstruct C1212), and the application of regularization is shown to improve accuracy. Finally, the effects

  2. Interacting dark sector with transversal interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chimento, Luis P.; Richarte, Martín G.

    2015-03-26

    We investigate the interacting dark sector composed of dark matter, dark energy, and dark radiation for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background by introducing a three-dimensional internal space spanned by the interaction vector Q and solve the source equation for a linear transversal interaction. Then, we explore a realistic model with dark matter coupled to a scalar field plus a decoupled radiation term, analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era and find that our model is consistent with the recent measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropy coming from Planck along with the future constraints achievable by CMBPol experiment.

  3. Summary report on transverse emittance preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Vos, L.

    1997-12-01

    During the past years, significant progress has been made in understanding the beam transverse emittance blow-up and its preservation. However, one often finds him-/herself ignorant when he/she tries to explain what was observed in an existing machine or to predict what will happen in a machine under design. There are a number of such examples given in this report. Some of them are even fundamental. These are the challenges. But they are also the directions leading to new achievements. The workshop gladly acknowledged them and promised to work on them.

  4. Zero-field spin relaxation of the positive muon in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Clawson, C.W.

    1982-07-01

    The spin relaxation of the ..mu../sup +/ in high purity single crystal and polycrystalline copper has been measured at temperatures between 0.5/sup 0/K and 5.2/sup 0/K by the zero-field ..mu../sup +/SR technique. In both types of sample the experiments show a temperature independent dipolar width ..delta../sub z/ = 0.389 +- 0.003 ..mu..s/sup -1/ and a hopping rate decreasing from approx. 0.5 ..mu..s/sup -1/ at 0.5/sup 0/K to approx. 0.05 ..mu..s/sup -1/ above 5/sup 0/K. This is the first direct proof of a dynamic effect in the low temperature ..mu../sup +/ spin relaxation in copper. The relationship between the zero-field and transverse-field dipolar widths is discussed, and the measured zero-field width is found to be approx. 10% larger than expected based on the known transverse-field widths. A new ..mu../sup +/SR spectrometer has been constructed and used in this work. The spectrometer and the associated beam lines and data acquisition facilities are discussed.

  5. A Static Picture of the Relaxation and Intersystem Crossing Mechanisms of Photoexcited 2-Thiouracil

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurate excited-state quantum chemical calculations on 2-thiouracil, employing large active spaces and up to quadruple-ζ quality basis sets in multistate complete active space perturbation theory calculations, are reported. The results suggest that the main relaxation path for 2-thiouracil after photoexcitation should be S2 → S1 → T2 → T1, and that this relaxation occurs on a subpicosecond time scale. There are two deactivation pathways from the initially excited bright S2 state to S1, one of which is nearly barrierless and should promote ultrafast internal conversion. After relaxation to the S1 minimum, small singlet–triplet energy gaps and spin–orbit couplings of about 130 cm–1 are expected to facilitate intersystem crossing to T2, from where very fast internal conversion to T1 occurs. An important finding is that 2-thiouracil shows strong pyramidalization at the carbon atom of the thiocarbonyl group in several excited states. PMID:26284285

  6. Biocompatible nanotemplate-engineered nanoparticles containing gadolinium: stability and relaxivity of a potential MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua; White, R D; Hardy, Peter A; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida; Sutthanut, Khaetthareeya; Jay, Michael

    2006-04-01

    In this article, we use a nanotemplate engineering approach to prepare biodegradable nanoparticles composed of FDA-approved materials and possessing accessible gadolinium (Gd) atoms and demonstrate their potential as a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Nanoparticles containing dimyristoyl phosphoethanolamine diethylene triamine penta acetate (PE-DTPA) were prepared using 3.5 mg of Brij 78, 2.0 mg of emulsifying wax and 0.5 mg of PE-DTPA/ml from a microemulsion precursor. After the addition of GdCl3, the presence of Gd on the surface of nanoparticles was characterized using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). The in vitro relaxivities of the PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles in different media were assessed at different field strengths. The conditional stability constant of Gd binding to the nanoparticles was determined using competitive spectrophotometric titration. Transmetallation kinetics of the gadolinium ion from PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles with zinc as the competing ionic was measured using the relaxivity evolution method. Nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 130 nm possessing surface chelating functions were made from GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) materials. STEM demonstrated the uniform distribution of Gd3+ on the surface of the nanoparticles. The thermodynamic binding constant for Gd3+ to the nanoparticles was approximately 10(18) M(-1) and transmetallation studies with Zn2+ yielded kinetic constants K1 and K(-1) of 0.033 and 0.022 1/h, respectively, with an equilibrium constant of 1.5. A payload of approximately 10(5) Gd/nanoparticle was achieved; enhanced relaxivities were observed, including a pH dependence of the transverse relaxivity (r2). Nanoparticles composed of materials that have been demonstrated to be hemocompatible and enzymatically metabolized and possessing accessible Gd ions on their surface induce relaxivities in the bulk water signal that make them

  7. 29 GHz directly modulated 980 nm vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers with bow-tie shape transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    A concept for the bandwidth enhancement of directly modulated vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) using a transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is proposed, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. A bow-tie shaped oxide aperture forms the transverse-coupled cavity resulting in optical feedback to boost the modulation speed. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs is 9-10 GHz, the 3 dB-bandwidth of the TCC VCSEL is increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. The maximum bandwidth is currently limited by the photo-detector used in the experiment. Clear 36 Gbps eye opening was attained with an extinction ratio of 4 dB.

  8. Transverse dynamics of water across the melting point: A parallel neutron and x-ray inelastic scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo A.; Kodituwakku C.; Bencivenga, F.; Frontzek, M.; Leu, b.M.; Said, A.H.

    2012-05-29

    Joint inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering measurements have been performed on heavy water across the melting point. The spectra bear clear evidence of low- and high-frequency inelastic shoulders related to transverse and longitudinal modes, respectively. Upon increasing the momentum transfer, the spectral shape evolves from a viscoelastic regime, where the low-frequency mode is clearly over-damped, toward an elastic one where its propagation becomes instead allowed. The crossover between the two regimes occurs whenever both the characteristic frequency and the linewidth of the low-frequency mode match the inverse of the structural relaxation time. Furthermore, we observe that the frequency of the transverse mode undergoes a discontinuity across the melting, whose extent reduces upon increasing the exchanged momentum.

  9. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutions to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution

  10. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  11. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-21

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  12. Hot Electron Energy Relaxation in Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chia-Hung

    We present experimental results on hot electron relaxation in doped bulk GaAs and quantum wells. Using steady state photoluminescence we measured the electron -LO phonon scattering time for thermalized hot electrons in quantum wells. The results are in good agreement with our theoretical calculation of electron-LO phonon interaction in two dimensional systems. Within random phase approximation, the emitted LO phonons may couple to two dimensional plasmons. Both the screening and phonon reabsorption properties can be drastically changed as a function of electron density, temperature and phonon lifetime. Theoretical energy relaxation rates, including dynamical screening and phonon reabsorption effects, will be presented. For hot electrons with energies well above the LO phonon energy, we developed a two-beam, lock-in technique to measure the energy-resolved cooling rate. In the case of quantum wells, hot electrons relax at a constant rate. For heavily doped bulk GaAs, the relaxation rate is inversely proportional to electron kinetic energy. The new method demonstrates itself as a valuable way to study the fast initial relaxation which would otherwise need femtosecond pulse laser techniques.

  13. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  14. Anomalous Enthalpy Relaxation in Vitreous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-08-01

    It is a challenge to calorimetrically determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of vitreous silica. Here we demonstrate that this challenge mainly arises from the extreme sensitivity of the Tg to the hydroxyl content in vitreous silica, but also from the irreversibility of its glass transition when repeating the calorimetric scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas the fragile ones do in a structurally independent fashion. We discuss the origin of the anomalous enthalpy relaxation in the HQ vitreous silica.

  15. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    DOE PAGES

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutionsmore » to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution« less

  16. Scaling Laws at the Nano Size: The Effect of Particle Size and Shape on the Magnetism and Relaxivity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Smolensky, Eric D.; Park, Hee-Yun E.; Zhou, Yue; Rolla, Gabriele A.; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Botta, Mauro; Pierre, Valérie C.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles govern their relaxivities and efficacy as contrast agents for MRI. These properties are in turn determined by their composition, size and morphology. Herein we present a systematic study of the effect of particle size and shape of magnetite nanocrystals synthesized by thermal decompositions of iron salts on both their magnetism and their longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r1 and r2, respectively. Faceted nanoparticles demonstrate superior magnetism and relaxivities than spherical nanoparticles of similar size. For faceted nanoparticles, but not for spherical ones, r1 and r2 further increase with increasing particle size up to a size of 18 nm. This observation is in accordance with increasing saturation magnetization for nanoparticles increasing in size up to 12 nm, above which a plateau is observed. The NMRD (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Dispersion) profiles of MIONs (Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles) display an increase in longitudinal relaxivity with decreasing magnetic field strength with a plateau below 1 MHz. The transverse relaxivity shows no dependence on the magnetic field strength between 20 MHz and 500 MHz. These observations translate to phantom MR images: in T1-weighted SWIFT (SWeep imaging with Fourier Transform) images MIONs have a positive contrast with little dependence on particle size, whereas in T2-weighted gradient-echo images MIONs create a negative contrast which increases in magnitude with increasing particle size. Altogether, these results will enable the development of particulate MRI contrast agents with enhanced efficacy for biomedical and clinical applications. PMID:23819021

  17. Temperature-Dependent Oxygen Effect on NMR D-[Formula: see text] Relaxation-Diffusion Correlation of n-Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Shikhov, Igor; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion-relaxation correlation experiments (D-[Formula: see text]) are widely used for the petrophysical characterisation of rocks saturated with petroleum fluids both in situ and for laboratory analyses. The encoding for both diffusion and relaxation offers increased fluid typing contrast by discriminating fluids based on their self-diffusion coefficients, while relaxation times provide information about the interaction of solid and fluid phases and associated confinement geometry (if NMR responses of pure fluids at particular temperature and pressure are known). Petrophysical interpretation of D-[Formula: see text] correlation maps is typically assisted by the "standard alkane line"-a relaxation-diffusion correlation valid for pure normal alkanes and their mixtures in the absence of restrictions to diffusing molecules and effects of internal gradients. This correlation assumes fluids are free from paramagnetic impurities. In situations where fluid samples cannot be maintained at air-free state the diffusion-relaxation response of fluids shift towards shorter relaxation times due to oxygen paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. Interpretation of such a response using the "standard alkane line" would be erroneous and is further complicated by the temperature-dependence of oxygen solubility for each component of the alkane mixture. We propose a diffusion-relaxation correlation suitable for interpretation of low-field NMR D-[Formula: see text] responses of normal alkanes and their mixtures saturating rocks over a broad temperature range, in equilibrium with atmospheric air. We review and where necessary revise existing viscosity-relaxation correlations. Findings are applied to diffusion-relaxation dependencies taking into account the temperature dependence of oxygen solubility and solvent vapour pressure. The effect is demonstrated on a partially saturated carbonate rock.

  18. Transversal mixing in the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainchtein, Dmitri; Orthey, Perry; Parkman, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We discuss results of numerical simulations and analytical modeling of transversal intraluminal mixing in the GI tract produced by segmentation and peristaltic contractions. Particles that start in different parts of the small intestine are traced over several contractions and mixing is described using the particles' probability distribution function. We show that there is optimal set of parameters of contractions, such as the depth and frequency, that produces the most efficient mixing. We show that contractions create well-defined advection patterns in transversal direction. The research is inspired by several applications. First, there is the study of bacteria populating the walls of the intestine, which rely on fluid mixing for nutrients. Second, there are gastrointestinal diseases, such as Crohn's disease, which can be treated effectively using a drug delivery capsule through GI tract, for which it is needed to know how long it takes for a released drug to reach the intestinal wall. And finally, certain neurological and muscular deceases change the parameters of contractions, thus reducing the efficiency of mixing. Understanding an admissible range of the parameters (when mixing is still sufficient for biological purposes) may indicate when the medical action is required.

  19. QCD Corrections in Transversely Polarized Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelsang,W.

    2008-10-06

    We discuss two recent calculations of higher-order QeD corrections to scattering of transversely polarized hadrons. A basic concept underlying much of the theoretical description of high-energy hadronic scattering is the factorization theorem, which states that large momentum-transfer reactions may be factorized into long-distance pieces that contain information on the structure of the nucleon in terms of its parton densities, and parts that are short-distance and describe the hard interactions of the partons. Two crucial points are that on the one hand the long-distance contributions are universal, i.e., they are the same in any inelastic reaction under consideration, and that on the other hand the short-distance pieces depend only on the large scales related to the large momentum transfer in the overall reaction and, therefore, may be evaluated using QCD perturbation theory. The lowest order for the latter can generally only serve to give a rough description of the reaction under study. It merely captures the main features, but does not usually provide a quantitative understanding. The first-order ('next-to-leading order' (NLO)) corrections are generally indispensable in order to arrive at a firmer theoretical prediction for hadronic cross sections, and in some cases even an all-order resummation of large perturbative corrections is needed. In the present paper we win discuss two calculations [1, 2] of higher-order QeD corrections to transversely polarized scattering.

  20. Transverse-pumped Cs vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, B. V.; Shaffer, M. K.; Sell, J.; Knize, R. J.

    2009-02-01

    Scaling of alkali lasers to higher powers requires combining beams of multiple diode laser pump sources. For longitudinal pumping this can be very complicated if more than four beams are to be combined. In this paper we report a first demonstration of a transversely pumped Cs laser with fifteen laser diode arrays. The LDA pump beams were individually collimated with a beam size of about 1 x 4 cm as measured at a 1 m distance from the diodes. All these beams were incident on a cylindrical lens to be focused and coupled through the side slit of a hollow, cylindrical diffuse reflector which contained the Cs vapor cell. We measured the output power and efficiency of the Cs laser for pump powers up to 200 W at different cell temperatures. Although the values of output power and slope efficiency obtained for this laser system were less than those for a longitudinally pumped alkali laser, these recent results can be significantly improved by using a more optimal laser cavity design. The demonstrated operation of Cs laser with transverse pumping opens new possibilities in power scaling of alkali lasers.

  1. Transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischebeck, Rasmus; Prat, Eduard; Thominet, Vincent; Ozkan Loch, Cigdem

    2015-08-01

    A transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams is presented, which overcomes resolution issues in present designs by observing the Scheimpflug imaging condition as well as the Snell-Descartes law of refraction in the scintillating crystal. Coherent optical transition radiation emitted by highly compressed electron bunches on the surface of the crystal is directed away from the camera, allowing to use the monitor for profile measurements of electron bunches suitable for X-ray free electron lasers. The optical design has been verified by ray tracing simulations, and the angular dependency of the resolution has been verified experimentally. An instrument according to the presented design principles has been used in the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility, and different scintillator materials have been tested. Measurements in conjunction with a transverse deflecting radiofrequency structure and an array of quadrupole magnets demonstrate a normalized slice emittance of 25 nm in the core of a 30 fC electron beam at a pulse length of 10 ps and a particle energy of 230 MeV.

  2. Transversely accelerated ions in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retterer, John M.; Chang, Tom; Jasperse, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Data from the rocket campaigns Mechanism in the Auroral Region for Ion Energization (MARIE) and TOpside Probe of the Auroral Zone (TOPAZ) III, within regions of low-altitude transversely accelerated ions, are interpreted to explain the acceleration of the ions. Using the Monte Carlo kinetic technique to evaluate the ion heating produced by the simultaneously observed lower hybrid waves, we find that their observed electric field amplitudes are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies in the MARIE event. Much of the uncertainty in evaluating the efficiency of a plasma wave induced particle heating process which is dependent on a velocity resonance comes from the lack of information on the phase velocities of the waves. In the case of the MARIE observations, our modeling efforts show that features in the ion velocity distribution are consistent with the wave phase velocities inferred from interferometer measurements of wavelengths. The lower hybrid waves with which low-altitude transversely accelerated ions are associated are frequently observed to be concentrated in small-scale wave packets called 'spikelets'. We demonstrate through the scaling of the size of these wave packets that they are consistent with the theory of lower hybrid collapse. Using the Monte Carlo technique, we find that if the lower hybrid field energy is concentrated in these wave packets, it is still adequate to accelerate the ionospheric ions to the observed energies.

  3. Size-Dependent MRI Relaxivity and Dual Imaging with Eu0.2Gd0.8PO4·H2O Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Three different sizes of Eu0.2Gd0.8PO4·H2O nanoparticles have been prepared to investigate the particle size influence on water proton relaxivity. Longitudinal relaxivity (r1) values increase for smaller particles, reaching as high as r1 = 6.13 mM–1 s–1 for a sample of 40 ± 4 nm particles, which, with a ratio of transverse/longitudinal relaxivity, r2/r1 = 1.27, are shown to be effective positive contrast agents. The correlation between relaxivity and the surface-to-volume ratio implies that access to surface Gd3+ sites is the principal factor affecting relaxivity. On the other hand, although ionic molar relaxivity decreases for larger particles, the relaxivity per particle can be significantly greater. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles doped with fluorescent lanthanide elements have attracted attention for their dual-imaging abilities, combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging agents. In both in vitro experiments with HeLa cells and in vivo experiments with C. elegans, strong red fluorescence is observed from Eu0.2Gd0.8PO4·H2O with high resolution, demonstrating the parallel use of the particles as fluorescence imaging agents. PMID:24825171

  4. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  5. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  6. Swelling and Stress Relaxation in Portland Brownstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, I.; Scherer, G.

    2003-04-01

    Portland Brownstone (PB) is an arkose sandstone extensively used in the northeast-ern USA during the nineteenth century. This reddish-brown stone contains a fraction of swelling clays that are thought to contribute to its degradation upon cycles of wet-ting and drying. During drying events, contraction of the drying surface leads to stresses approaching the tensile strength of the stone. However, we have found that the magnitude of these stresses is limited by the ability of the stone to undergo stress relaxation. In this paper we describe novel methods to determine the magnitude of the stresses and the rate at which they develop and relax. We also discuss the influ-ence of surfactants on the magnitude of swelling and the rate of the stress relaxation of PB. The implications of our findings for the understanding of damage due to swelling of clays are discussed.

  7. A general relaxation theory of simple liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merilo, M.; Morgan, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    A relatively simple relaxation theory to account for the behavior of liquids under dynamic conditions was proposed. The general dynamical equations are similar in form to the phenomenological relaxation equations used in theories of viscoelasticity, however, they differ in that all the coefficients of the present equations are expressed in terms of thermodynamic and molecular quantities. The theory is based on the concept that flow in a liquid distorts both the radial and the velocity distribution functions, and that relaxation equations describing the return of these functions to their isotropic distributions, characterizing a stationary liquid, can be written. The theory was applied to the problems of steady and oscillatory shear flows and to the propagation of longitudinal waves. In all cases classical results are predicted for strain rates, and an expression for the viscosity of a liquid, simular to the Macedo-Litovitz equation, is obtained.

  8. Dielectric relaxation of high-k oxides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Frequency dispersion of high-k dielectrics was observed and classified into two parts: extrinsic cause and intrinsic cause. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant (dielectric relaxation), that is the intrinsic frequency dispersion, could not be characterized before considering the effects of extrinsic frequency dispersion. Several mathematical models were discussed to describe the dielectric relaxation of high-k dielectrics. For the physical mechanism, dielectric relaxation was found to be related to the degree of polarization, which depended on the structure of the high-k material. It was attributed to the enhancement of the correlations among polar nanodomain. The effect of grain size for the high-k materials' structure mainly originated from higher surface stress in smaller grain due to its higher concentration of grain boundary. PMID:24180696

  9. Dielectric relaxation in AC powder electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Su, Haibin; Tan, Chuan Seng; Wong, Terence Kin Shun; Teo, Ronnie Jin Wah

    2017-01-01

    The dielectric properties of AC powder electroluminescent devices were measured and analyzed using complex impedance spectroscopy to determine the relaxation processes occurring within the devices. The relaxation processes identified were ascribed to the electrode polarization caused by ion accumulation at the electrode/resin interfaces, the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars effects at the (ZnS or BaTiO3) particle/resin interfaces, and the dipolar reorientation of polymer chains in the resin matrix. Each relaxation process was represented by its corresponding equivalent circuit component. Space charge polarization at the electrodes were represented by a Warburg element, a resistor, and a constant phase element. The resin matrix, ZnS/resin and BaTiO3/resin interfaces could each be modeled by a resistor and a capacitor in parallel. The simulated equivalent circuits for three different printed structures showed good fitting with their experimental impedance results.

  10. Stratospheric Relaxation in IMPACT's Radiation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Edis, T; Grant, K; Cameron-Smith, P

    2006-11-13

    While Impact incorporates diagnostic radiation routines from our work in previous years, it has not previously included the stratospheric relaxation required for forcing calculations. We have now implemented the necessary changes for stratospheric relaxation, tested its stability, and compared the results with stratosphere temperatures obtained from CAM3 met data. The relaxation results in stable temperature profiles in the stratosphere, which is encouraging for use in forcing calculations. It does, however, produce a cooling bias when compared to CAM3, which appears to be due to differences in radiation calculations rather than the interactive treatment of ozone. The cause of this bias is unclear as yet, but seems to be systematic and hence cancels out when differences are taken relative to a control simulation.

  11. Vibrational relaxation of chloroiodomethane in cold argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amber; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2013-10-01

    Electronically exciting the C-I stretch in the molecule chloroiodomethane CH2ClI embedded in a matrix of argon at 12 K can lead to an isomer, iso-chloroiodomethane CH2Cl-I, that features a chlorine iodine bond. By temporally probing the isomer at two different frequencies of 435 nm and 485 nm, multiple timescales for isomerization and vibrational energy relaxation were inferred [T. J. Preston, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 114503 (2011)]. This relaxation is studied theoretically using molecular dynamics by considering 2 and 3 dimensional models. Multiple decay rate constants of the same order of magnitude as the experiment are observed. These decay rate constants are interpreted within the context of the Landau-Teller theory. Sensitivity of the decay rate constants on the bath and system parameters shed more light into the mechanism of vibrational energy relaxation.

  12. Proton relaxation times in cancer diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Subramanian, S.; Chandrakumar, N.; Rajalakshmi, K.R.; Sukumaran, S.S.

    1988-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation parameters (T1, T2) were measured for over 100 malignant and normal tissue samples of various organs of the human body. The purpose of this study was to estimate the reliability of the NMR technique in discriminating normal from malignant tissues. Breast and cervix samples were analyzed by using the malignancy index concept and we were able to distinguish malignant and normal tissue in 17 out of 18 breast samples and 5 out of 7 cervix samples. Since the relaxation data of a normal control population of the other organs were not available, the data for these are reported without any further analysis. The distinction between carcinomas and sarcomas was also made by using the estimated relaxation parameters. Malignancy indices of breast tissue samples for linear least-squares and nonlinear two-parameter and three-parameter least-squares procedures were calculated and used to evaluate the relative efficiencies in discriminating malignant from normal tissues.

  13. Multi-scales nuclear spin relaxation of liquids in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korb, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(ω) is a rich source of dynamical information for characterizing the molecular dynamics of liquids in confined environments. Varying the magnetic field changes the Larmor frequency ω, and thus the fluctuations to which the nuclear spin relaxation is sensitive. Moreover, this method permits a more complete characterization of the dynamics than the usual measurements as a function of temperature at fixed magnetic field strength, because many common solvent liquids have phase transitions that may alter significantly the character of the dynamics over the temperature range usually studied. Further, the magnetic field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T(ω), provides a good test of the theories that relate the measurement to the microdynamical behavior of the liquid. This is especially true in spatially confined systems where the effects of reduced dimensionality may force more frequent reencounters of the studied proton spin-bearing molecules with paramagnetic impurities at the pore surfaces that may alter the correlation functions that enter the relaxation equations in a fundamental way. We show by low field NMR relaxation that changing the amount of surface paramagnetic impurities leads to striking different pore-size dependences of the relaxation times T and T of liquids in pores. Here, we focus mainly on high surface area porous materials including calibrated porous silica glasses, granular packings, heterogeneous catalytic materials, cement-based materials and natural porous materials such as clay minerals and rocks. Recent highlights NMR relaxation works are reviewed for these porous materials, like continuous characterization of the evolving microstructure of various cementitious materials and measurement of wettability in reservoir carbonate rocks. Although, the recent applications of 2-dimensional T-T and T-z-store-T correlation experiments for characterization of

  14. Extracting temperature and transverse flow by fitting transverse mass spectra and HBT radii together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ronghua; Qian, Jing; Chen, Jianyi; Wu, Qingxin; Huo, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Single particle transverse mass spectra and HBT radii of identical pion and identical kaon are analyzed with a blast-wave parametrization under the assumptions of local thermal equilibrium and transverse expansion. Under the assumptions, temperature parameter T and transverse expansion rapidity ρ are sensitive to the shapes of transverse mass mT spectrum and HBT radius Rs(KT). Negative and positive correlations between T and ρ are observed by fitting mT spectrum and HBT radius Rs(KT), respectively. For a Monte Carlo simulation using the blast-wave function, T and ρ are extracted by fitting mT spectra and HBT radii together utilizing a combined optimization function χ2. With this method, T and ρ of the Monte Carlo sources can be extracted. Using this method for A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy, the differences of T and ρ between pion and kaon are observed obviously, and the tendencies of T and ρ versus collision energy sNN are similar with the results extracted directly from the AMPT model.

  15. Potential infrared relaxation channels calculated for CO2 clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhlifi, Azzedine; Dahoo, Pierre Richard; Chassefière, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The infrared bar-spectrum of a single carbon dioxide molecule encapsulated in nano-cage clathrate hydrate is determined using the LD (Lakhlifi-Dahoo) extended site inclusion model successfully applied to analyze the spectra of CO2 isotopologues isolated in rare gas matrices. Trapping is energetically more favorable in clathrate structure of type sI than sII. CO2 exhibits hindered orientational motions (librational motions) around its equilibrium configurations in the small and large nano-cages. The orientation transitions are weak, and the spectra are purely vibrational. In the static field inside the cage, the doubly degenerate bending mode ν2 is blue shifted and split. From the scheme of the calculated energy levels for the different degrees of freedom, which is comparable to that of CO2 in rare gas matrices, it is conjectured that infrared excited CO2 will rather relax radiatively. Non-radiative channels can be analyzed by binary collision model.

  16. Transverse Tension Fatigue Life Characterization Through Flexure Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The transverse tension fatigue life of S2/8552 glass-epoxy and IM7/8552 carbon-epoxy was characterized using flexure tests of 90-degree laminates loaded in 3-point and 4-point bending. The influence of specimen polishing and specimen configuration on transverse tension fatigue life was examined using the glass-epoxy laminates. Results showed that 90-degree bend specimens with polished machined edges and polished tension-side surfaces, where bending failures where observed, had lower fatigue lives than unpolished specimens when cyclically loaded at equal stress levels. The influence of specimen thickness and the utility of a Weibull scaling law was examined using the carbon-epoxy laminates. The influence of test frequency on fatigue results was also documented for the 4-point bending configuration. A Weibull scaling law was used to predict the 4-point bending fatigue lives from the 3-point bending curve fit and vice-versa. Scaling was performed based on maximum cyclic stress level as well as fatigue life. The scaling laws based on stress level shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the desired direction, however, the magnitude of the shift was not adequate to accurately predict the fatigue lives. Furthermore, the scaling law based on fatigue life shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the opposite direction from measured values. Therefore, these scaling laws were not adequate for obtaining accurate predictions of the transverse tension fatigue lives.

  17. Relaxation Phenomena in Optically Pumped Mercury Isotopes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-15

    AD-AIFIG 332 SINGER CO LITTLE FALLS NJ KEARFOTT DIV F /G 20/10 RELAXATION PHENOMENA IN OPTICALLY PUMPED MERCURY ISOTOPES.(U) AUG 80 P A HEIMANN, J H...2. GVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 7 MOSRqr 80 - 7 44 1 j D,&s~ *> T4iTLE (and SubtUte; S. TYPE O F REPOR ൏ APER_2-VA Relaxation...Phenomena in Optically Interim SAticJepait./ Pupd__uyIooe. 1 Jul R79- Jun. l90 ’ 9 PEFORMNG OGANZA I ’AU!ANO C RSSEI. PORAM EMNd󈧰 T. NOJ ECT RS 7

  18. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  19. A Bayesian method for analysing relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, L.; Pellizza, L. J.; Matteo, C. L.; Sorichetti, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of electrical and mechanical properties of material, relies on a precise analysis of the relaxation spectra. We explore the ability of a Bayesian method to achieve an accurate estimation of spectral parameters. We implemented a parallel-tempering Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm and used it to fit simulated and measured spectra. An exhaustive testing of the code shows that it presents an extremely good performance, accurately fitting complex spectra under strong noise and overlapping components. We conclude that this technique is quite suitable for relaxation spectra analysis, complementing classical methods.

  20. Fast temperature relaxation model in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    We present a fast model to calculate the temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasmas. The electron-ion interaction-potential is calculated by combining a Yukawa approach and a finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model. We include the internal energy as well as the excess energy of ions using the QEOS model. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on an average-atom model are presented. This approach allows the study of the temperature relaxation in a two-temperature electron-ion system in warm and hot dense matter.

  1. Soft Sphere Suspensions: Flow and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workamp, Marcel; Dijksman, Joshua A.

    We experimentally study the role of particle elasticity on the rheology of soft sphere suspensions. Experiments consist of custom designed particles with tuneable stiffness. These particles allow us to probe the role of elastic timescales, relaxation and anisotropy in a custom 3D printed shear cell. We find robust rheological features, such as a flow instability, that are not well captured by existing models for suspension flows. In addition, we find relaxation effects after shear even in the absence of shear or thermal fluctuations. We aim to integrate these findings in the emerging unified framework for structured fluids.

  2. The efficacy of relaxation training with children.

    PubMed

    Richter, N C

    1984-06-01

    This paper reviews studies that have examined the efficacy of relaxation training techniques in the treatment of childhood disorders. Methodological problems encountered in doing research in this area resemble those found in working with an adult population: imprecise definitions of subject populations and use of a variety of dependent variables from one study to another. Findings suggest that relaxation training is at least as effective as other treatment approaches for a variety of learning, behavioral, and physiological disorders when it is continued over an extended period of time and is augmented by other supportive measures. Needs for future research include better follow-up studies and further investigations with a behaviorally disruptive population.

  3. Magnetic Relaxation Detector for Microbead Labels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Paul Peng; Skucha, Karl; Duan, Yida; Megens, Mischa; Kim, Jungkyu; Izyumin, Igor I.; Gambini, Simone; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS. Detection relies on the magnetic relaxation signature of a microbead label for improved tolerance to environmental variations and relaxed dynamic range requirement, eliminating the need for baseline calibration and reference sensors. The device includes embedded electromagnets to eliminate external magnets and reduce power dissipation. Correlated double sampling combined with offset servo loops and magnetic field modulation, suppresses the detector offset to sub-μT. Single 4.5-μm magnetic beads are detected in 16 ms with a probability of error <0.1%. PMID:25308988

  4. Vibrational relaxation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Miner, Gilda A.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical formulations of vibrational relaxation are derived from first principles for application to fluid dynamic computations of hypersonic flow fields. Relaxation within and immediately behind shock waves is shown to be substantially faster than that described in current numerical codes. The result should be a significant reduction in nonequilibrium radiation overshoot in shock layers and in radiative heating of hypersonic vehicles; these results are precisely the trends needed to bring theoretical predictions more in line with flight data. Errors in existing formulations are identified and qualitative comparisons are made.

  5. Dielectric relaxation characteristics of muscovite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Lakhwant; Singh, Mohan; Awasthi, A. M.; Kumar, Jitender

    2014-04-01

    In the present work, the dielectric relaxation phenomenon in muscovite mica has been studied over the frequency range 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and in the temperature range of 653-853K, using the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The values of the activation energy obtained from electric modulus and conductivity data are found to be nearly similar, suggesting that same types of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation mechanism. This type of study will explore the potential of this material for various applications in electrical engineering.

  6. Nonlocal and collective relaxation in stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1993-01-01

    The modal response of stellar systems to fluctuations at large scales is presently investigated by means of analytic theory and n-body simulation; the stochastic excitation of these modes is shown to increase the relaxation rate even for a system which is moderately far from instability. The n-body simulations, when designed to suppress relaxation at small scales, clearly show the effects of large-scale fluctuations. It is predicted that large-scale fluctuations will be largest for such marginally bound systems as forming star clusters and associations.

  7. Temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient of thin films and aging effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossel, C.; Sousa, M.; Abel, S.; Caimi, D.; Suhm, A.; Abergel, J.; Le Rhun, G.; Defay, E.

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique to measure the temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient e31,f of thin films of lead zirconate titanate (PZT), aluminum nitride, and BaTiO3 deposited on Si wafers. It is based on the collection of electric charges induced by the deflection of a Si cantilever coated with the piezoelectric film. The aim of this work is to assess the role of temperature in the decay of the remnant polarization of these materials, in particular, in optimized gradient-free PZT with composition PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3. It is found that in contrast to theoretical predictions, e31,f decreases with temperature because of the dominance of relaxation effects. The observation of steps in the logarithmic aging decay law is reminiscent of memory effects seen in frustrated spin glasses.

  8. Temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient of thin films and aging effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rossel, C. Sousa, M.; Abel, S.; Caimi, D.; Suhm, A.; Abergel, J.; Le Rhun, G.; Defay, E.

    2014-01-21

    We present a technique to measure the temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient e{sub 31,f} of thin films of lead zirconate titanate (PZT), aluminum nitride, and BaTiO{sub 3} deposited on Si wafers. It is based on the collection of electric charges induced by the deflection of a Si cantilever coated with the piezoelectric film. The aim of this work is to assess the role of temperature in the decay of the remnant polarization of these materials, in particular, in optimized gradient-free PZT with composition PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3}. It is found that in contrast to theoretical predictions, e{sub 31,f} decreases with temperature because of the dominance of relaxation effects. The observation of steps in the logarithmic aging decay law is reminiscent of memory effects seen in frustrated spin glasses.

  9. Protein corona affects the relaxivity and MRI contrast efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Houshang; Bordonali, Lorenzo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Wan, Sha; Monopoli, Marco P; Lynch, Iseult; Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2013-09-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly being considered for use in biomedical applications such as biosensors, imaging contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. In a biological fluid, proteins associate in a preferential manner with NPs. The small sizes and high curvature angles of NPs influence the types and amounts of proteins present on their surfaces. This differential display of proteins bound to the surface of NPs can influence the tissue distribution, cellular uptake and biological effects of NPs. To date, the effects of adsorption of a protein corona (PC) on the magnetic properties of NPs have not been considered, despite the fact that some of their potential applications require their use in human blood. Here, to investigate the effects of a PC (using fetal bovine serum) on the MRI contrast efficiency of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs), we have synthesized two series of SPIONs with variation in the thickness and functional groups (i.e. surface charges) of the dextran surface coating. We have observed that different physico-chemical characteristics of the dextran coatings on the SPIONs lead to the formation of PCs of different compositions. (1)H relaxometry was used to obtain the longitudinal, r1, and transverse, r2, relaxivities of the SPIONs without and with a PC, as a function of the Larmor frequency. The transverse relaxivity, which determines the efficiency of negative contrast agents (CAs), is very much dependent on the functional group and the surface charge of the SPIONs' coating. The presence of the PC did not alter the relaxivity of plain SPIONs, while it slightly increased the relaxivity of the negatively charged SPIONs and dramatically decreased the relaxivity of the positively charged ones, which was coupled with particle agglomeration in the presence of the proteins. To confirm the effect of the PC on the MRI contrast efficiency, in vitro MRI experiments at ν = 8.5 MHz were performed using a low-field MRI scanner. The MRI

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements.

  11. Missing transverse energy performance of the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-09-01

    During 2010 the LHC delivered pp collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In this paper, the results of comprehensive studies of missing transverse energy as measured by the CMS detector are presented. The results cover the measurements of the scale and resolution for missing transverse energy, and the effects of multiple pp interactions within the same bunch crossings on the scale and resolution. Anomalous measurements of missing transverse energy are studied, and algorithms for their identification are described. The performances of several reconstruction algorithms for calculating missing transverse energy are compared. An algorithm, called missing-transverse-energy significance, which estimates the compatibility of the reconstructed missing transverse energy with zero, is described, and its performance is demonstrated.

  12. Surface impedance of transversely moving microwave ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical study was made of the surface impedance Z for an electromagnetic transverse magnetic wave from free space on a magnetized ferrite surface moving normal to the plane of incidence. It was found convenient to decompose the surface impedance into two transfer impedances, Z1 and Z2, which relate the hybrid reflected amplitudes to the amplitude of the incident wave. The surface impedance does not vary much with respect to the angle of incidence, so only the case of normal incidence (θi = 0°) was evaluated. Resonant poles at ƒc, [ƒc(ƒc + ƒm)]1/2, and ƒc + ƒm dominate the frequency characteristics of Z1 and Z2. The frequencies ƒc andƒm are the precessional frequency and magnetization frequency, respectively.

  13. The interaction of transverse domain walls.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Benjamin

    2012-01-18

    The interaction between transverse domain walls is calculated analytically using a multipole expansion up to third order. Starting from an analytical expression for the magnetization in the wall, the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole moments are derived and their impact on the interaction is investigated using the surface and volume charges. The surface charges are important for the dipole moment while the volume charges constitute the monopole and quadrupole moments. For domain walls that are situated in different wires it is found that there is a strong deviation from the interaction of two monopoles. This deviation is caused by the interaction of the monopole of the wall in the first wire with the dipole of the wall in the second wire and vice versa. The dipole-dipole and the quadrupole-monopole interactions are found to be also of considerable size and non-negligible. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations shows a good agreement.

  14. Transverse (Harris) lines in Irish archaeological remains.

    PubMed

    Hughes, C; Heylings, D J; Power, C

    1996-09-01

    Transverse lines were examined in 633 long bones from 73 individuals exhumed from two burial sites in the Republic of Ireland: Waterford City and Tintern Abbey. The burials cover four distinct periods between the 11th and 17th centuries. Lines were most numerous in the tibia, especially in the distal segment, and were not seen in the humerus nor the proximal part of the femur. The number of lines varied between the proximal and distal segments of each long bone, and though apparently equal in number across the midline, there were significant differences in the incidence of lines between corresponding pairs of bones. Thus, it is unwise to rely on the results of a single bone or one type of long bone alone either to indicate the health status of an individual, or as the basis for assessing the health status of a small population. Such results should be used only in association with other indicators.

  15. Radiation emitted by transverse-gradient undulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Axel; Braun, Nils; Rodríguez, Verónica Afonso; Peiffer, Peter; Rossmanith, Robert; Widmann, Christina; Scheer, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Conventional undulators are used in synchrotron light sources to produce radiation with a narrow relative spectral width as compared to bending magnets or wigglers. The spectral width of the radiation produced by conventional undulators is determined by the number of undulator periods and by the energy spread and emittance of the electron beam. In more compact electron sources like for instance laser plasma accelerators the energy spread becomes the dominating factor. Due to this effect these electron sources cannot in general be used for high-gain free electron lasers (FELs). In order to overcome this limitation, modified undulator schemes, so-called transverse gradient undulators (TGUs), were proposed and a first superconducting TGU was built at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany. In this paper simulations of the expected synchrotron radiation spectral distribution are presented. An experimental test with that device is under preparation at the laser wakefield accelerator at the JETI laser at the University of Jena, Germany.

  16. Transverse Mode Coupling Instability with Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2016-03-11

    Transverse mode coupling instability of a bunch with space charge and wake field is considered in frameworks of the boxcar model. Eigenfunctions of the bunch without wake are used as the basis for solution of the equations with the wake field included. Dispersion equation for the bunch eigentunes is obtained in the form of an infinite continued fraction. It is shown that influence of space charge on the instability essentially depends on the wake sign. In particular, threshold of the negative wake increases in absolute value until the space charge tune shift is rather small, and goes to zero at higher space charge. The explanation of this behavior is developed by analysis of the bunch spectrum. A comparison of the results with published articles is represented.

  17. Electrodes for transversely excited gas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, R.E

    1989-05-23

    An electrode for a transverse gas flow laser is described comprising: an elongated member having a substantially flat top surface and a substantially flat bottom surface, the top and the bottom surfaces being disposed substantially parallel one to another, the member further having opposing ends of substantially semicircular shape. The member further has a substantially vertical side wall extending perpendicularly upwards from the bottom surface and surrounding the member, the side wall and the top surface being joined by a convex transition region having a given, substantially constant radius of curvature, the substantially constant radius of curvature enabling the electrode to be used use over a range of at least approximately 5,000 volts of discharge potential.

  18. Formability Studies on Transverse Tailor Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, V. Vijay; Narasimhan, K.

    2005-08-01

    Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) technology is one of the several approaches that have been used to reduce the weight of the automobile body. TWBs are made up of two or more blanks having different/same properties (geometry, material etc.) prior to forming. The formability of these blanks depends on material and geometric parameters like strength ratio and thickness ratio. The study of these blanks can be classified on the basis of the weld orientation chosen viz. transverse weld or longitudinal weld with respect to the major straining direction. This paper studies the formability issues related to transverse TWB by FE simulation. The formability is assessed by analyzing tensile and Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests. The weld region is assumed to be a line in all the simulations. While modeling the tensile test, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation are monitored, and in LDH testing, pole height and maximum load (in near plane strain condition) are monitored. LDH testing shows that as thickness ratio increases, the load bearing capacity and the pole height decreases. There is a contribution from both the thicker and the thinner blank to the overall deforming volume. Failure location analysis shows that there is an abrupt change in the location of the failure from punch nose region to weld line region as the thickness ratio reaches a critical magnitude (1.08). The study of material properties shows that as the yield strength ratio (S ratio) and strain hardening exponent ratio (N ratio) between the blanks increases, the maximum load which the blank can sustain without failure (UTS) increases. This becomes constant and comparable to that of single sheet at higher N and S ratios.

  19. Viscous propulsion in active transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupples, G.; Dyson, R. J.; Smith, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    Taylor's swimming sheet is a classical model of microscale propulsion and pumping. Many biological fluids and substances are fibrous, having a preferred direction in their microstructure; for example cervical mucus is formed of polymer molecules which create an oriented fibrous network. Moreover, suspensions of elongated motile cells produce a form of active oriented matter. To understand how these effects modify viscous propulsion, we extend Taylor's classical model of small-amplitude zero-Reynolds-number propulsion of a 'swimming sheet' via the transversely-isotropic fluid model of Ericksen, which is linear in strain rate and possesses a distinguished direction. The energetic costs of swimming are significantly altered by all rheological parameters and the initial fibre angle. Propulsion in a passive transversely-isotropic fluid produces an enhanced mean rate of working, independent of the initial fibre orientation, with an approximately linear dependence of energetic cost on the extensional and shear enhancements to the viscosity caused by fibres. In this regime the mean swimming velocity is unchanged from the Newtonian case. The effect of the constant term in Ericksen's model for the stress, which can be identified as a fibre tension or alternatively a stresslet characterising an active fluid, is also considered. This stress introduces an angular dependence and dramatically changes the streamlines and flow field; fibres aligned with the swimming direction increase the energetic demands of the sheet. The constant fibre stress may result in a reversal of the mean swimming velocity and a negative mean rate of working if sufficiently large relative to the other rheological parameters.

  20. Transversity from First Principles in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2012-02-16

    Transversity observables, such as the T-odd Sivers single-spin asymmetry measured in deep inelastic lepton scattering on polarized protons and the distributions which are measured in deeply virtual Compton scattering, provide important constraints on the fundamental quark and gluon structure of the proton. In this talk I discuss the challenge of computing these observables from first principles; i.e.; quantum chromodynamics, itself. A key step is the determination of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions (LFWFs) of hadrons - the QCD eigensolutions which are analogs of the Schroedinger wavefunctions of atomic physics. The lensing effects of initial-state and final-state interactions, acting on LFWFs with different orbital angular momentum, lead to T-odd transversity observables such as the Sivers, Collins, and Boer-Mulders distributions. The lensing effect also leads to leading-twist phenomena which break leading-twist factorization such as the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions. A similar rescattering mechanism also leads to diffractive deep inelastic scattering, as well as nuclear shadowing and non-universal antishadowing. It is thus important to distinguish 'static' structure functions, the probability distributions computed the target hadron's light-front wavefunctions, versus 'dynamical' structure functions which include the effects of initial- and final-state rescattering. I also discuss related effects such as the J = 0 fixed pole contribution which appears in the real part of the virtual Compton amplitude. AdS/QCD, together with 'Light-Front Holography', provides a simple Lorentz-invariant color-confining approximation to QCD which is successful in accounting for light-quark meson and baryon spectroscopy as well as hadronic LFWFs.

  1. PKU-RBRC Workshop on Transverse Spin

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian,H.; Bunce, G.; Yuan, F.

    2008-06-30

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is a fundamental question in subatomic physics, and it has been under intensive investigation for the last several years. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin structure of the nucleon. Experimental and theoretical investigations worldwide over the last few decades have established that, contrary to nave quark model expectations, quarks carry only about 30% of the totd spin of the proton. The origin of the remaining spin is the key question in current hadronic physics and also the major driving forces for the current and future experiments, such as RHIC and CEBAF in US, JPARC in Japan, COMPASS at CERN in Europe, FAIR at GSI in Germany. Among these studies, the transverse-spin physics develops actively and rapidly in the last few years. Recent studies reveal that transverse-spin physics is closely related to many fundamental properties of the QCD dynamics such as the factorization, the non-trivial universality of the parton distribution and fragmentation functions. It was very timely to bring together the theorists and experimentalists in this field at this workshop to review and discuss the latest developments and future perspective in hadronic spin physics. This workshop was very success iu many aspects. First of all, it attracted almost every expert working in this field. We had more than eighty participants in total, among them 27 came from the US institutes, 13 from Europe, 3 from Korea, and 2 from Japan. The rest participants came from local institutes in China. Second, we arranged plenty physics presentations, and the program covers all recent progresses made in the last few years. In total, we had 47 physics presentations, and two round table discussions. The discussion sessions were especially very useful and very much appreciated by all participants. In addition, we also scheduled plenty time for discussion in each presentation, and the living discussions impressed and benefited all participants.

  2. High relaxivity MRI contrast agents part 2: Optimization of inner- and second-sphere relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Vincent; Dumas, Stephane; Sun, Wei-Chuan; Troughton, Jeffrey S.; Greenfield, Matthew T.; Caravan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and objectives The observed relaxivity of gadolinium based contrast agents has contributions from the water molecule(s) that bind directly to the gadolinium ion (inner-sphere water), long lived water molecules and exchangeable protons that make up the second-sphere of coordination, and water molecules that diffuse near the contrast agent (outer-sphere). Inner- and second-sphere relaxivity can both be increased by optimization of the lifetimes of the water molecules and protons in these coordination spheres, the rotational motion of the complex, and the electronic relaxation of the gadolinium ion. We sought to identify new high relaxivity contrast agents by systematically varying the donor atoms that bind directly to gadolinium to increase inner-sphere relaxivity and concurrently including substituents that influence the second-sphere relaxivity. Methods Twenty GdDOTA derivatives were prepared and their relaxivity determined in presence and absence of human serum albumin as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Data was analyzed to extract the underlying molecular parameters influencing relaxivity. Each compound had a common albumin-binding group and an inner-sphere donor set comprising the 4 tertiary amine N atoms from cyclen, an α-substituted acetate oxygen atom, two amide oxygen atoms, an inner-sphere water oxygen atom, and a variable donor group. Each amide nitrogen was substituted with different groups to promote hydrogen bonding with second-sphere water molecules. Results Relaxivites at 0.47T and 1.4T, 37 °C, in serum albumin ranged from 16.0 to 58.1 mM−1s−1 and from 12.3 to 34.8 mM−1s−1 respectively. The reduction of inner-sphere water exchange typical of amide donor groups could be offset by incorporating a phosphonate or phenolate oxygen atom donor in the first coordination sphere resulting in higher relaxivity. Amide nitrogen substitution with pendant phosphonate or carboxylate groups increased relaxivity by as much as 88

  3. Relaxation/Covert Rehearsal for Problematic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fling, Sheila; McKenzie, Patricia

    A study was conducted to determine whether group relaxation training combined with guided fantasy as a method of covert cognitive rehearsal would be more effective than story-listening or no special treatment in enabling "problematic" children to decrease muscle tension, activity level, and behavior problems and to increase academic performance…

  4. Relaxation dynamics of multilayer triangular Husimi cacti.

    PubMed

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Jurjiu, Aurel

    2016-09-14

    We focus on the relaxation dynamics of multilayer polymer structures having, as underlying topology, the Husimi cactus. The relaxation dynamics of the multilayer structures is investigated in the framework of generalized Gaussian structures model using both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse type-approach, we determine analytically the complete eigenvalues spectrum and based on it we calculate the mechanical relaxation moduli (storage and loss modulus) and the average monomer displacement. First, we monitor these physical quantities for structures with a fixed generation number and we increase the number of layers, such that the linear topology will smoothly come into play. Second, we keep constant the size of the structures, varying simultaneously two parameters: the generation number of the main layer, G, and the number of layers, c. This fact allows us to study in detail the crossover from a pure Husimi cactus behavior to a predominately linear chain behavior. The most interesting situation is found when the two limiting topologies cancel each other. For this case, we encounter in the intermediate frequency/time domain regions of constant slope for different values of the parameter set (G, c) and we show that the number of layers follows an exponential-law of G. In the Zimm-type approach, which includes the hydrodynamic interactions, the quantities that describe the mechanical relaxation dynamics do not show scaling behavior as in the Rouse model, except the limiting case, namely, a very high number of layers and low generation number.

  5. Relaxation processes of densified silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Antoine; Martinez, Valérie; de Ligny, Dominique; Champagnon, Bernard; Martinet, Christine

    2017-03-01

    Densified SiO2 glasses, obtained from different pressure and temperature routes, have been annealed over a wide range of temperatures far below the glass transition temperature (500 °C-900 °C). Hot and cold compressions were useful to separate the effects of pressure and the compression temperature. In situ micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to follow the structural evolution during the thermal relaxation. A similar glass structure between the non-densified silica and the recovered densified silica after the temperature annealing demonstrates a perfect recovery of the non-densified silica glass structure. While the density decreases monotonically, the structural relaxation takes place through a more complex mechanism, which shows that density is not a sufficient parameter to fully characterize the structure of densified silica glass. The relaxation takes place through a transitory state, consisting in an increase of the network inhomogeneity, shown by an increase in the intensity of the D2 band which is associated with 3 membered rings. The activation energy of these processes is 255 ± 45 kJ/mol for the hot compressed samples. The kinetic is overall faster for the cold compressed samples. In that last case, the relaxation is partially activated by internal stresses release.

  6. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  7. Collection Development: Relaxation & Meditation, September 1, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lettus, Dodi

    2010-01-01

    One of the first books to document the relationship between stress and physical and emotional health was "The Relaxation Response" by Herbert Benson, M.D., with Miriam Z. Klipper. Originally published in 1975, the book grew out of Benson's observations as a cardiologist and his research as a fellow at Harvard Medical School. Benson's study of…

  8. An Introduction to Relaxed Hand Anthropometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Anthropometric data comparing the length of the relaxed hand with the flat, straightened hand are presented. The correlation coefficient between the hand length in the two positions is not high. A forthcoming comprehensive research program on the anthropometry of the hand is revealed.

  9. Relaxation for Children. (Revised and Expanded Edition.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Jenny

    Intended as a guide to reduce negative stress in children, this book suggests relaxation and meditation techniques to help children cope with stressful events. Part 1 provides an introduction to the format of the book. Part 2 contains summaries of the 10 sessions that make up the program. Each session has six sequential stages in which students…

  10. Charge Relaxation Dynamics of an Electrolytic Nanocapacitor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ion relaxation dynamics in overlapping electric double layers (EDLs) is critical for the development of efficient nanotechnology-based electrochemical energy storage, electrochemomechanical energy conversion, and bioelectrochemical sensing devices as well as the controlled synthesis of nanostructured materials. Here, a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is employed to simulate an electrolytic nanocapacitor subjected to a step potential at t = 0 for various degrees of EDL overlap, solvent viscosities, ratios of cation-to-anion diffusivity, and electrode separations. The use of a novel continuously varying and Galilean-invariant molecular-speed-dependent relaxation time (MSDRT) with the LB equation recovers a correct microscopic description of the molecular-collision phenomena and enhances the stability of the LB algorithm. Results for large EDL overlaps indicated oscillatory behavior for the ionic current density, in contrast to monotonic relaxation to equilibrium for low EDL overlaps. Further, at low solvent viscosities and large EDL overlaps, anomalous plasmalike spatial oscillations of the electric field were observed that appeared to be purely an effect of nanoscale confinement. Employing MSDRT in our simulations enabled modeling of the fundamental physics of the transient charge relaxation dynamics in electrochemical systems operating away from equilibrium wherein Nernst–Einstein relation is known to be violated. PMID:25678941

  11. Relaxation dynamics of multilayer triangular Husimi cacti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Jurjiu, Aurel

    2016-09-01

    We focus on the relaxation dynamics of multilayer polymer structures having, as underlying topology, the Husimi cactus. The relaxation dynamics of the multilayer structures is investigated in the framework of generalized Gaussian structures model using both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse type-approach, we determine analytically the complete eigenvalues spectrum and based on it we calculate the mechanical relaxation moduli (storage and loss modulus) and the average monomer displacement. First, we monitor these physical quantities for structures with a fixed generation number and we increase the number of layers, such that the linear topology will smoothly come into play. Second, we keep constant the size of the structures, varying simultaneously two parameters: the generation number of the main layer, G, and the number of layers, c. This fact allows us to study in detail the crossover from a pure Husimi cactus behavior to a predominately linear chain behavior. The most interesting situation is found when the two limiting topologies cancel each other. For this case, we encounter in the intermediate frequency/time domain regions of constant slope for different values of the parameter set (G, c) and we show that the number of layers follows an exponential-law of G. In the Zimm-type approach, which includes the hydrodynamic interactions, the quantities that describe the mechanical relaxation dynamics do not show scaling behavior as in the Rouse model, except the limiting case, namely, a very high number of layers and low generation number.

  12. BRIEF REPORT: The colour relaxation equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaofei, Zhang; Jiarong, Li

    1996-03-01

    Colour diffusion in quark - gluon plasma (QGP) is investigated from the transport equations of QGP. The pure non-Abelian collision term describing the colour diffusion in QGP is obtained, the expression for colour relaxation time is derived and the physical picture of the colour diffusion in QGP is shown.

  13. Relaxation in bolted thermoplastic composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Walter J.; Schmitt, Ron R.

    1993-04-01

    The long term effects of the relaxation of fastener clamp-up force on the strength of mechanically fastened joints were investigated through a test program of single-shear joints. Static tests of two graphite/thermoplastic composite materials, IM6/KIII and IM8/APC (HTA), established joint bearing strength as a function of clamp-up force for both protruding head and countersunk fasteners. Test results indicated that joint bearing strength of both materials increased by as much as twenty-eight percent over the range of clamp-up force. Short-term fastener clamp-up force relaxation was monitored with special bolt force sensor washers. The results of these tests indicated that the fastener clamp-up force decreased an average of six percent from the initial value during the short-term room temperature tests and was projected to be as high as sixteen percent after 100,000 hours of service. The relaxation rate at the elevated temperature of 250F was projected to be as high as thirty-seven percent for HTA and sixty percent for KIII after 100,000 hours of service. It was concluded that the short-term relaxation of the clamp-up force did not significantly lower the bearing strength of either material, but an extended exposure to 250F could affect the bearing strength.

  14. Relaxation Treatment for Insomnia: A Component Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolfolk, Robert L.; McNulty, Terrence F.

    1983-01-01

    Compared four relaxation treatments for sleep onset insomnia with a waiting-list control. Treatments varied in presence or absence of muscular tension-release instructions and in foci of attention. Results showed all treatment conditions reduced latency of sleep onset and fatigue; visual focusing best reduced the number of nocturnal awakenings.…

  15. Towards a Calm Baby and Relaxed Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaper, Karen Kennedy

    1982-01-01

    Reviews research findings concerning benefits of particular forms of infant stimulation. Suggests stimulation has a soothing effect on infants. Proposes that, because many parents react with anxiety to infant stress, the use of these stimulation techniques may not only soothe the infant, but also relax the parents. (Author/RC)

  16. Electron Spin Relaxation in Irradiated Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    the development and use of ELDOR techniques to study the spectral diffusion in irradiated L-alanine and other irradiated organic solids. Pulsed STELDOR...and pulsed two-frequency ELDOR methods were developed and the details of the implementation is reported. The assignment of relaxation times that gave

  17. Dielectric relaxation of CdSe nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sayantani; Dutta, Alo; Ghosh, Binita; Banerjee, Sourish; Sinha, T. P.

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles of cadmium selenide (CdSe) have been synthesized by soft chemical route using mercaptoethanol as a capping agent. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope measurements show that the prepared sample belongs to sphalerite structure with the average particle size of 25 nm. The band gap of the material is found to be 2.1 eV. The photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of the sample are measured at various excitation wavelengths. The PL spectra appear in the visible region, and the emission feature depends on the wavelength of the excitation. Impedance spectroscopy is applied to investigate the dielectric relaxation of the sample in a temperature range from 323 to 473 K and in a frequency range from 42 Hz to 1.1 MHz. The complex impedance plane plot has been analyzed by an equivalent circuit consisting of two serially connected R-CPE units, each containing a resistance (R) and a constant phase element (CPE). The dielectric relaxation of the sample is investigated in the electric modulus formalism. The temperature dependent relaxation times obey the Arrhenius law. The Havriliak-Negami model is used to investigate the dielectric relaxation mechanism in the sample. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra are found to obey the power law.

  18. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  19. Stretched Exponential relaxation in pure Se glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Boolchand, P.

    A universal feature of glasses is the stretched exponential relaxation, f (t) = exp[ - t / τ ] β . The model of diffusion of excitations to randomly distributed traps in a glass by Phillips1 yields the stretched exponent β = d[d +2] where d, the effective dimensionality. We have measured the enthalpy of relaxation ΔHnr (tw) at Tg of Se glass in modulated DSC experiments as glasses age at 300K and find β = 0.43(2) for tw in the 0 relaxation is a narrowing of the glass transition width from 7.1°C to 1.4°C, and the ΔHnr term increasing from 0.21 cal/gm to 0.92 cal/gm. In bulk GexSe100-x glasses as x increases to 20%, the length of the polymeric Sen chains between the Ge-crosslinks decreases to n = 2. and the striking relaxation effects nearly vanish. J.C. Phillips, Rep.Prog.Phys. 59 , 1133 (1996). Supported by NSF Grant DMR 08-53957.

  20. Controlling spin relaxation with a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienfait, Audrey; Pla, Jarryd; Kubo, Yuimaru; Zhou, Xin; Stern, Michael; Lo, Cheuk; Weis, Christopher; Schenkel, Thomas; Vion, Denis; Esteve, Daniel; Morton, John; Bertet, Patrice

    Spontaneous emission of radiation is one of the fundamental relaxation mechanisms for a quantum system. For spins, however, it is negligible compared to non-radiative relaxation processes due to their weak coupling to the electromagnetic field. In 1946, Purcell realized that spontaneous emission is strongly enhanced when the quantum system is placed in a resonant cavity - an effect now used to control the lifetime of systems with an electrical dipole. Here, by coupling donor spins in silicon to a high quality factor superconducting microwave cavity of small mode volume, we reach the regime where spontaneous emission constitutes the dominant spin relaxation channel. The relaxation rate is increased by three orders of magnitude when the spins are tuned to the cavity resonance, showing it can be engineered and controlled on-demand. Our results provide a novel way to initialize any spin into its ground state, with applications in magnetic resonance and quantum information processing. They also show for the first time an alteration of spin dynamics by quantum fluctuations, a step towards the coherent magnetic coupling of a spin to microwave photons.

  1. Transverse Microcracking in Celion 6000/PMR-15 Graphite-Polyimide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    strength of a ply is exceeded by the ply’s transverse stress.) The stress- and 83 Table 4. Predicted Transverse Residual Curing Stresses for [0/90]s Gr...strongly influences TVM density. 4. Laminate analysis using stress- and temperature-dependent material properties predicts that the residual curing stresses...Temperature and Curvature of a [03/903Js Lam’ na te 70 3 Material Property Polynomials for Celion 6000/PMR- 15 80 4 Predicted Transverse Residual

  2. Transverse conformal Killing forms on Kähler foliations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seoung Dal

    2015-04-01

    On a closed, connected Riemannian manifold with a Kähler foliation of codimension q = 2 m, any transverse Killing r(≥ 2) -form is parallel (Jung and Jung, 2012). In this paper, we study transverse conformal Killing forms on Kähler foliations. In fact, if the foliation is minimal, then for any transverse conformal Killing r-form ϕ(2 ≤ r ≤ q - 2), Jϕ is parallel. Here J is defined in Section 4.

  3. Collisionless relaxation in beam-plasma systems

    SciTech Connect

    Backhaus, Ekaterina Yu.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis reports the results from the theoretical investigations, both numerical and analytical, of collisionless relaxation phenomena in beam-plasma systems. Many results of this work can also be applied to other lossless systems of plasma physics, beam physics and astrophysics. Different aspects of the physics of collisionless relaxation and its modeling are addressed. A new theoretical framework, named Coupled Moment Equations (CME), is derived and used in numerical and analytical studies of the relaxation of second order moments such as beam size and emittance oscillations. This technique extends the well-known envelope equation formalism, and it can be applied to general systems with nonlinear forces. It is based on a systematic moment expansion of the Vlasov equation. In contrast to the envelope equation, which is derived assuming constant rms beam emittance, the CME model allows the emittance to vary through coupling to higher order moments. The CME model is implemented in slab geometry in the absence of return currents. The CME simulation yields rms beam sizes, velocity spreads and emittances that are in good agreement with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for a wide range of system parameters. The mechanism of relaxation is also considered within the framework of the CME system. It is discovered that the rapid relaxation or beam size oscillations can be attributed to a resonant coupling between different modes of the system. A simple analytical estimate of the relaxation time is developed. The final state of the system reached after the relaxation is complete is investigated. New and accurate analytical results for the second order moments in the phase-mixed state are obtained. Unlike previous results, these connect the final values of the second order moments with the initial beam mismatch. These analytical estimates are in good agreement with the CME model and PIC simulations. Predictions for the final density and temperature are developed that show

  4. Cooling power of transverse thermoelectrics for cryogenic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yang; Ma, Ming; Grayson, M.

    2016-05-01

    Transverse Peltier coolers have been experimentally and theoretically studied since 1960s due to their capability of achieving cooling in a single-leg geometry. Recently proposed pxn-type transverse thermoelectrics reveal the possibility of intrinsic or undoped transverse coolers that can, in principle, function at cryogenic temperatures, which has drawn more attention to the performance of such transverse coolers. However, unlike longitudinal thermoelectrics, the equations for transverse thermoelectrics cannot be solved analytically. In this study, we therefore calculate the thermoelectric transport in transverse coolers numerically, and introduce a normalized notation, which reduces the independent parameters in the governing equations to a normalized electric field E* and a hot-side transverse figure of merit zTh, only. A numerical study of the maximum cooling temperature difference and cooling power reveals the superior performance of transverse thermoelectric coolers compared to longitudinal coolers with the same figure of merit, providing another motivation in the search for new transverse thermoelectric materials with large figure of merit.

  5. Prominent β-relaxations in yttrium based metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Z. G.; Li, Y. Z.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-01-19

    Most metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit weak slow β-relaxation. We report the prominent β-relaxation in YNiAl metallic glass with a wide composition range. Compared with other MGs, the MGs show a pronounced β-relaxation peak and high β-relaxation peak temperature, and the β-relaxation behavior varies significantly with the changes of the constituent elements, which is attributed to the fluctuations of chemical interactions between the components. We demonstrate the correlation between the β-relaxation and the activation of flow units for mechanical behaviors of the MG and show that the MG is model system for studying some controversial issues in glasses.

  6. Study of dielectric relaxations of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Seo, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the frequency dependent dielectric relaxation behaviors of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses in the temperature range which covers a supercooled and glassy states. In addition to the α-, Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-, and γ-relaxations in a typical glass forming system, we observed an extra relaxation process between JG β- and γ-relaxations in the dielectric loss spectra. We found that the unknown extra relaxation is a unique property of disaccharide which might originate from the intramolecular motion of flexible glycosidic bond. We also found that the temperature dependence of the JG β-relaxation time changes at 0.95Tg and it might be universal.

  7. A transverse shift correlation algorithm for use in a Gigahertz Transverse Electromagnetic (GTEM) cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Michael Todd

    Gigahertz Transverse Electromagnetic (GTEM) cells are commonly used to determine radiated emissions from electrically small objects. A correlation algorithm is used to relate the measurements taken in a GTEM cell with measurements that would be seen at an Open Air Test Site (OATS). The correlation algorithm can be broken into two portions. The first portion relates voltage measurements made in a GTEM to the terms of a multipole expansion approximating the radiated emissions of the test object. The second portion determines the equivalent radiated emissions at an OATS due to the terms of the multipole expansion. To date, these correlation algorithms assume that the Equipment Under Test (EUT) is placed at the transverse center of the GTEM cell. In this work a new correlation algorithm is introduced. Instead of assuming that the EUT is located at the transverse center of the cell, this algorithm makes use of different transverse positions in the cell to determine the multipole moments. The method requires a total of six measurements and requires that both the magnitude and phase of the emissions from the EUT are available. The method is numerically robust and can easily be extended to compute higher-order multipole moments. To date, phase measurements in a GTEM cell have only been demonstrated in a rudimentary fashion. This work also introduces the concept of the virtual port as a means of measuring the magnitude and phase of the emissions from an EUT within a GTEM cell. Utilizing a fiber-optic link, it is possible to create a second, virtual port within the GTEM cell.

  8. Tunable pulsed carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megie, G. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    Transverse electrically-excited-atmosphere (TEA) laser is continuously tunable over several hundred megahertz about centers of spectral lines of carbon dioxide. It is operated in single longitudinal mode (SLM) by injection of beam from continuous-wave, tunable-waveguide carbon dioxide laser, which serves as master frequency-control oscillator. Device measures absorption line of ozone; with adjustments, it is applicable to monitoring of atmospheric trace species.

  9. High relaxivity Gd(III)-DNA gold nanostars: investigation of shape effects on proton relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rotz, Matthew W; Culver, Kayla S B; Parigi, Giacomo; MacRenaris, Keith W; Luchinat, Claudio; Odom, Teri W; Meade, Thomas J

    2015-03-24

    Gadolinium(III) nanoconjugate contrast agents (CAs) have distinct advantages over their small-molecule counterparts in magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to increased Gd(III) payload, a significant improvement in proton relaxation efficiency, or relaxivity (r1), is often observed. In this work, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a nanoconjugate CA created by covalent attachment of Gd(III) to thiolated DNA (Gd(III)-DNA), followed by surface conjugation onto gold nanostars (DNA-Gd@stars). These conjugates exhibit remarkable r1 with values up to 98 mM(-1) s(-1). Additionally, DNA-Gd@stars show efficient Gd(III) delivery and biocompatibility in vitro and generate significant contrast enhancement when imaged at 7 T. Using nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion analysis, we attribute the high performance of the DNA-Gd@stars to an increased contribution of second-sphere relaxivity compared to that of spherical CA equivalents (DNA-Gd@spheres). Importantly, the surface of the gold nanostar contains Gd(III)-DNA in regions of positive, negative, and neutral curvature. We hypothesize that the proton relaxation enhancement observed results from the presence of a unique hydrophilic environment produced by Gd(III)-DNA in these regions, which allows second-sphere water molecules to remain adjacent to Gd(III) ions for up to 10 times longer than diffusion. These results establish that particle shape and second-sphere relaxivity are important considerations in the design of Gd(III) nanoconjugate CAs.

  10. Communicating with Transverse Modes of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenburg, Brandon

    Shannon's theory of communication created a set of tools for studying complex systems in an abstract and powerful way, providing the core foundations for the field of information theory. This thesis uses these ideas to provide a framework for studying the transverse degree of freedom of an optical field, appropriate for both classical and quantum states of light. This degree of freedom is in principle an unbounded space, providing a complex resource for encoding a large amount of information. This work focuses on studying the physical limits to the information of this space, both in terms of fundamental theoretical limitations as well as practical limitations due to experimental implementation and error. This thesis will pay particular interest to the design and implementation of a quantum key distribution system encoded using a particular set of transverse modes for encoding known as orbital angular momentum states, which represent normal modes of a typical free-space optical system. This specific technological implementation provides a motivation that acts to unify many of the themes in this work including quantum state preparation, state detection or discrimination, and state evolution or propagation. Additionally, such a setup gives a specific physical meaning to the abstract tools we will be utilizing as the information that we will be quantifying can be thought of as a measure of the possible complexity or information content of a single photon. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to information theory and the basic concepts and tools that are used throughout this work, as well as a basic introduction to quantum key distribution. Chapter 2 theoretically explores the fundamental limits of the information capacity of a channel due to diffraction, as well as computes the communication modes of a channel using a normal mode approach to propagation. Chapter 3 concerns the experimental implementation of a free-space quantum key distribution system including

  11. Muscle Relaxation Therapy in Hyperkinesis: Is It Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatara, Vinod; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The literature on two forms of muscle relaxation training (electro-myographic (EMG) biofeedback and progressive muscle relaxation) with learning disabled and hyperkinetic children is reviewed and the authors' own study is discussed. (Author/PHR)

  12. Giant magneto-impedance and its relaxation in Co{endash}Fe{endash}Si{endash}B amorphous ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sartorelli, M.L.; Knobel, M.; Schoenmaker, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Barandiaran, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    Systematic measurements of giant magneto-impedance (GMI) and its relaxation (magneto-impedance aftereffect) have been carried out in a series of Co-rich amorphous ribbons ranging in magnetostriction values from {minus}3.5 to +3.5thinspppm. The value of GMI is a maximum for the alloy with the lowest value of magnetostriction, corresponding to a maximum of the transverse permeability. The impedance relaxation between two fixed times depends on the magnetostriction constant ({lambda}{sub s}) of the samples, and the observed trend is consistent with the theories which predict a direct relationship of the conventional permeability aftereffect (MAE) with the square of {lambda}{sub s}. Furthermore, the variation of the impedance aftereffect with the driving current resembles the behavior of MAE, and a connection between both effects can be established. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Bootstrapping Rapidity Anomalous Dimensions for Transverse-Momentum Resummation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ye; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2017-01-01

    Soft function relevant for transverse-momentum resummation for Drell-Yan or Higgs production at hadron colliders are computed through to three loops in the expansion of strong coupling, with the help of bootstrap technique and supersymmetric decomposition. The corresponding rapidity anomalous dimension is extracted. An intriguing relation between anomalous dimensions for transverse-momentum resummation and threshold resummation is found.

  14. 17. Interior detail, pilaster on transverse wall at the northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Interior detail, pilaster on transverse wall at the northeast end of the Machine Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to northeast (90mm lens). Note the offset top of the pilaster, a feature common to all interior transverse wall pilasters. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  15. On the Thermal Model of Transverse Flow of Unidirectional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Hsiang

    2002-01-01

    The thermal model for transverse heat flow of having single filament in a unit cell is extended. In this model, we proposed that two circular filaments in a unit cell of square packing array and obtained the transverse thermal conductivity of an unidirectional material.

  16. Acute transverse myelitis: an unusual complication of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Kirtisudha; Kaur, Sharandeep; Basu, Srikanta; Gulati, Praveen; Parakh, Ankit

    2012-08-01

    Typhoid fever is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological complications. Acute transverse myelitis is a rare complication with only a few reports in adults and none in children. A 15-year-old boy with typhoid fever is reported who developed acute transverse myelitis in the 3rd week of illness. He was treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids and made a complete recovery.

  17. Bootstrapping Rapidity Anomalous Dimensions for Transverse-Momentum Resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2017-01-01

    A soft function relevant for transverse-momentum resummation for Drell-Yan or Higgs production at hadron colliders is computed through to three loops in the expansion of strong coupling, with the help of the bootstrap technique and supersymmetric decomposition. The corresponding rapidity anomalous dimension is extracted. An intriguing relation between anomalous dimensions for transverse-momentum resummation and threshold resummation is found.

  18. Transverse wake field simulations for the ILC acceleration structure

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Details of wake potential simulation in the acceleration structure of ILC, including the RF cavities and input/HOM couplers are presented. Transverse wake potential dependence is described versus the bunch length. Beam emittance dilution caused by main and HOM couplers is estimated, followed by a discussion of possible structural modifications allowing a reduction of transverse wake potential.

  19. Computational and Experimental Investigation of Transverse Combustion Instabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    5113. 4. Pomeroy, B., Lamont, W., Anderson, W., “Subscale Tool for Determining Transverse Combustion Response,” 45th JPC , AIAA 2009-5490. 5. Li, D...Combustor”, 46th JPC , AIAA 2010-7146. 10. Ducruix, S., Rey, C., Candel, S., “A Method for the transverse modulation of reactive flows with application

  20. Characteristics of the secondary relaxation process in soft colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Debasish; Joshi, Yogesh M.; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2015-11-01

    A universal secondary relaxation process, known as the Johari-Goldstein (J-G) β-relaxation process, appears in glass formers. It involves all parts of the molecule and is particularly important in glassy systems because of its very close relationship with the α-relaxation process. However, the absence of a J-G β-relaxation mode in colloidal glasses raises questions regarding its universality. In the present work, we study the microscopic relaxation processes in Laponite suspensions, a model soft glassy material, by dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments. α- and β-relaxation timescales are estimated from the autocorrelation functions obtained by DLS measurements for Laponite suspensions with different concentrations, salt concentrations and temperatures. Our experimental results suggest that the β-relaxation process in Laponite suspensions involves all parts of the constituent Laponite particle. The ergodicity breaking time is also seen to be correlated with the characteristic time of the β-relaxation process for all Laponite concentrations, salt concentrations and temperatures. The width of the primary relaxation process is observed to be correlated with the secondary relaxation time. The secondary relaxation time is also very sensitive to the concentration of Laponite. We measure primitive relaxation timescales from the α-relaxation time and the stretching exponent (β) by applying the coupling model for highly correlated systems. The order of magnitude of the primitive relaxation time is very close to the secondary relaxation time. These observations indicate the presence of a J-G β-relaxation mode for soft colloidal suspensions of Laponite.

  1. Relaxed structural property of Al nano-cluster: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwan, Bhoopendra Dhar; Khaskalam, Amit

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we have studied the thermodynamic property of metallic Aluminium (Al) nano-clusters with relaxed structure by model approach. The relaxed cohesive energy is higher than that of the un-relaxed one due to relaxation process decreasing the total energy. It is found that cohesive energy of nano-clauster depends on the size of the clusters and increase with increasing the cluster size.

  2. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  3. Modeling Transverse Chemotaxis in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. L.; Valdés-Parada, F. J.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    The movement of microorganisms toward a chemical attractant (chemotaxis) has been shown to aid in subsurface contaminant degradation and enhanced oil recovery. However, chemotaxis is inherently a pore scale process that must be upscaled to arrive at continuum scale models for field applications. In this work, the method of volume averaging is used to upscale the microscale chemotactic microbial transport equations in order to obtain the corresponding macroscale models for the mass balance of bacteria and the chemical attractant to which they respond. As a first approach, cellular growth/death and consumption of the attractant by chemical reaction are assumed to be negligible with respect to convective and diffusive transport mechanisms. Two effective medium coefficients are introduced in the model, namely a total motility tensor and a total velocity vector. Under certain conditions, it is shown that the coefficients can differ considerably from the values corresponding to non-chemotactic transport. The model is validated by comparing the predicted transverse motility coefficients and concentration profiles to those measured within an engineered porous medium. For the concentration profiles, we introduced a lag that accounts for the difference between the arrival time of the microorganisms and the their chemotactic response to the attractant.

  4. Optical Transversal Processor For Notch Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugt, A. V.

    1984-06-01

    A frequency domain implementation of an optical transversal processor has been described previously. Since this system uses Bragg cells both as the delay line and as the accumulators that provide the tap weights, a key question concerns the effect the finite integration times have on the perfor-mance of the system. Computer programs were written to simulate an adaptive notch filtering application; the measure of performance is the correlation coefficient for the residual signal and the desired received signal. The correlation coefficient was increased significantly by tapering the accumulators so that the readaptation phenomena caused by large values leaving the accumulator are minimized. Several examples of the performance are given as a function of the number of taps, the length and degree of taper of the accumulator, the feedback gain, and the number of iterations. The results show that a finite accumulator is not a serious drawback, particularly for those applications in which the system must operate in a rapidly changing environment. The performance of the system then approaches that of one having an infinite accumulator with the gain adjusted to give equivalent tracking performance.

  5. Transverse Bursts in Inclined Layer Convection: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Brink, Jeandrew; Pesch, Werner

    2002-03-01

    We report theoretical and computational results on thermally driven inclined layer convection. For small Prandtl number fluids, experiments have reported bursting phenomena at both small angles, strong driving and high angles, weak driving (Daniels et al. PRL 84: 5320, 2000). Theoretically, the small angle, strong driving case was described by Clever and Busse (Physics of Fluids 12: 2137, 2000) and was connected to a subharmonic instability. At large angles, close to the codimension-two point, intermittent, localized, transverse subharmonic bursts occur at weak driving. Qualitatively, the bursts draw energy from the roll modes, exhaust them while growing, and die out when they are unable to find a new attractor. We investigate a connection between the small- and large-angle bursts. Using Galerkin methods and direct simulations of the underlying Boussinesq equations, we examine the extent to which they are related to a linear instability of the roll pattern. We address a possible connection to the shear flow turbulent bursts observed in Taylor-Couette flow. In addition, we present a theoretical analysis of the small Prandtl number case, for which the codimension-two point moves to zero angle. This work is supported by a Cornell Graduate Student Fellowship and by the National Science Foundation under grant DMR-0072077.

  6. Protein corona affects the relaxivity and MRI contrast efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Houshang; Bordonali, Lorenzo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Wan, Sha; Monopoli, Marco P.; Lynch, Iseult; Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly being considered for use in biomedical applications such as biosensors, imaging contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. In a biological fluid, proteins associate in a preferential manner with NPs. The small sizes and high curvature angles of NPs influence the types and amounts of proteins present on their surfaces. This differential display of proteins bound to the surface of NPs can influence the tissue distribution, cellular uptake and biological effects of NPs. To date, the effects of adsorption of a protein corona (PC) on the magnetic properties of NPs have not been considered, despite the fact that some of their potential applications require their use in human blood. Here, to investigate the effects of a PC (using fetal bovine serum) on the MRI contrast efficiency of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs), we have synthesized two series of SPIONs with variation in the thickness and functional groups (i.e. surface charges) of the dextran surface coating. We have observed that different physico-chemical characteristics of the dextran coatings on the SPIONs lead to the formation of PCs of different compositions. 1H relaxometry was used to obtain the longitudinal, r1, and transverse, r2, relaxivities of the SPIONs without and with a PC, as a function of the Larmor frequency. The transverse relaxivity, which determines the efficiency of negative contrast agents (CAs), is very much dependent on the functional group and the surface charge of the SPIONs' coating. The presence of the PC did not alter the relaxivity of plain SPIONs, while it slightly increased the relaxivity of the negatively charged SPIONs and dramatically decreased the relaxivity of the positively charged ones, which was coupled with particle agglomeration in the presence of the proteins. To confirm the effect of the PC on the MRI contrast efficiency, in vitro MRI experiments at ν = 8.5 MHz were performed using a low-field MRI scanner. The MRI

  7. Long-pulse generation with a stable-relaxation-oscillation Nd:YLF laser. [yttrium-lithium-fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harisson, J.; Rines, G. A.; Moulton, P. F.

    1988-01-01

    A simple technique for long-pulse (0.2-2 microsec) generation with neodymium lasers has been demonstrated. Under the proper conditions, a normal-mode oscillator, operated in a single transverse mode, produces well-defined relaxation oscillations from which a single subpulse can be isolated for amplification. The characteristic subpulse temporal profile is ideal for saturated amplification without pulse shortening. Data are presented for a Nd:YLF system consisting of an oscillator followed by a 64-nm-long amplifier. Pulse energies in excess of 100 mJ were achieved with a small-signal gain of 630.

  8. Electromagnetic energy transport in RFP magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, K. J.; Thuecks, D. J.; Stone, D. R.; Anderson, J. K.; den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Ko, J.; Kumar, S.; Parke, E.; Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2014-10-01

    In an RFP driven by steady toroidal induction, tearing modes responsible for magnetic relaxation redistribute electromagnetic energy throughout the plasma, generating the net EMF that regulates the equilibrium profile. In MST experiments, insertable edge probes measure local fluctuations in electric and magnetic fields, from which flux-surface-average Poynting flux is derived. This outwardly directed flux is maximum during discrete ``sawtooth'' magnetic relaxation events and is a significant fraction (a few 10s of percent) of the total input inductive power when averaged over time. Spatially, the flux is maximum at the reversal surface and decreases outside, indicating that transported energy is deposited at the plasma edge. These results are similar to expectations from a simple model of an incompressible fluid plasma with a resistive boundary and consistent with estimates of global power balance from time-resolved equilibrium reconstructions. This work was supported by the US DOE and NSF.

  9. Braided magnetic fields: equilibria, relaxation and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontin, D. I.; Candelaresi, S.; Russell, A. J. B.; Hornig, G.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the dynamics of magnetic flux tubes containing non-trivial field line braiding (or linkage), using mathematical and computational modelling, in the context of testable predictions for the laboratory and their significance for solar coronal heating. We investigate the existence of braided force-free equilibria, and demonstrate that for a field anchored at perfectly-conducting plates, these equilibria exist and contain current sheets whose thickness scales inversely with the braid complexity—as measured for example by the topological entropy. By contrast, for a periodic domain braided exact equilibria typically do not exist, while approximate equilibria contain thin current sheets. In the presence of resistivity, reconnection is triggered at the current sheets and a turbulent relaxation ensues. We finish by discussing the properties of the turbulent relaxation and the existence of constraints that may mean that the final state is not the linear force-free field predicted by Taylor’s hypothesis.

  10. NMR relaxation dispersion of vulcanized natural rubber.

    PubMed

    Kariyo, Sobiroh; Stapf, Siegfried

    2004-01-01

    The dependence of the 1H spin-lattice relaxation time on the magnetic field strength has been determined for linear and cross-linked polyisoprene for Larmor frequencies between 5 kHz and 20 MHz. Universal power-law relations are found for all temperatures and cross-link densities under investigation and are compared to published results of rotating-frame experiments on similar natural rubber samples. The shape of the individual dispersion functions can be superposed into a master curve using appropriate shift factors. While addition of filler particles even at large weight fractions has only a minor effect on the relaxation times, uniaxial deformation and swelling are demonstrated to alter the molecular dynamics significantly.

  11. Relaxation matching algorithm for moving photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Liu, Ke; Miao, Yinxiao; Zhu, Jigui

    2015-02-01

    Moving photogrammetry is an application of close range photogrammetry in industrial measurement to realize threedimensional coordinate measurement within large-scale volume. This paper describes an approach of relaxation matching algorithm applicable to moving photogrammetry according to the characteristics of accurate matching result of different measuring images. This method uses neighborhood matching support to improve the matching rate after coarse matching based on epipolar geometry constraint and precise matching using three images. It reflects the overall matching effect of all points, that means when a point is matched correctly, the matching results of those points round it must be correct. So for one point considered, the matching results of points round it are calculated to judge whether its result is correct. Analysis indicates that relaxation matching can eliminate the mismatching effectively and acquire 100% rate of correct matching. It will play a very important role in moving photogrammetry to ensure the following implement of ray bundle adjustment.

  12. New limits of secondary β-relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Satya N.; Rams-Baron, Marzena; Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik-Kowalczuk, Justyna; Paluch, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Glass is an ultraviscous liquid that ceases to flow on a laboratory timescale but continues to relax on a geological timescale. Quintessentially, it has become hopeless for humans to explore the equilibrium behavior of glass, although the technology of glass making witness a remarkable advance. In this work, we propose a novel thermodynamic path to prepare a high density amorphous state of matter (carvedilol dihydrogen phosphate) using high pressure. In addition, we provide the impeccable experimental evidence of heterogeneous nature of secondary β-relaxation and probe its properties to understand the various aspects of pressure densified glass, such as dynamics, packing and disorder. These features are expected to provide new horizons to glass preparation and functional response to pharmaceutical applications. PMID:28225060

  13. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    DOEpatents

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  14. Tuning energy relaxation along quantum Hall channels.

    PubMed

    Altimiras, C; le Sueur, H; Gennser, U; Cavanna, A; Mailly, D; Pierre, F

    2010-11-26

    The chiral edge channels in the quantum Hall regime are considered ideal ballistic quantum channels, and have quantum information processing potentialities. Here, we demonstrate experimentally, at a filling factor of ν(L)=2, the efficient tuning of the energy relaxation that limits quantum coherence and permits the return toward equilibrium. Energy relaxation along an edge channel is controllably enhanced by increasing its transmission toward a floating Ohmic contact, in quantitative agreement with predictions. Moreover, by forming a closed inner edge channel loop, we freeze energy exchanges in the outer channel. This result also elucidates the inelastic mechanisms at work at ν(L)=2, informing us, in particular, that those within the outer edge channel are negligible.

  15. Dislocation Glasses: Aging during Relaxation and Coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Bako, B.; Groma, I.; Gyoergyi, G.; Zimanyi, G. T.

    2007-02-16

    The dynamics of dislocations is reported to exhibit a range of glassy properties. We study numerically various versions of 2D edge dislocation systems, in the absence of externally applied stress. Two types of glassy behavior are identified (i) dislocations gliding along randomly placed, but fixed, axes exhibit relaxation to their spatially disordered stable state; (ii) if both climb and annihilation are allowed, irregular cellular structures can form on a growing length scale before all dislocations annihilate. In all cases both the correlation function and the diffusion coefficient are found to exhibit aging. Relaxation in case (i) is a slow power law, furthermore, in the transient process (ii) the dynamical exponent z{approx_equal}6, i.e., the cellular structure coarsens relatively slowly.

  16. Energy relaxation of a dissipative quantum oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Pollak, Eli

    2014-12-21

    The dissipative harmonic oscillator is studied as a model for vibrational relaxation in a liquid environment. Continuum limit expressions are derived for the time-dependent average energy, average width of the population, and the vibrational population itself. The effect of the magnitude of the solute-solvent interaction, expressed in terms of a friction coefficient, solvent temperature, and initial energy of the oscillator on the relaxation has been studied. These results shed light on the recent femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering probe of the 1570 cm{sup −1} −C=C− stretching mode of trans-Stilbene in the first (S{sub 1}) excited electronic state. When the oscillator is initially cold with respect to the bath temperature, its average energy and width increase in time. When it is initially hot, the average energy and width decrease with time in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  17. Electron-vibration relaxation in oxygen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Heritier, K. L.; Panesi, M.

    2016-06-01

    An ideal chemical reactor model is used to study the vibrational relaxation of oxygen molecules in their ground electronic state, X3Σg-, in presence of free electrons. The model accounts for vibrational non-equilibrium between the translational energy mode of the gas and the vibrational energy mode of individual molecules. The vibrational levels of the molecules are treated as separate species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their population. The electron and vibrational temperatures are varied in the range [0-20,000] K. Numerical results show a fast energy transfer between oxygen molecules and free electron, which causes strong deviation of the vibrational distribution function from Boltzmann distribution, both in heating and cooling conditions. Comparison with Landau-Teller model is considered showing a good agreement for electron temperature range [2000-12,000] K. Finally analytical fit of the vibrational relaxation time is given.

  18. Computational and statistical tradeoffs via convex relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Venkat; Jordan, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Modern massive datasets create a fundamental problem at the intersection of the computational and statistical sciences: how to provide guarantees on the quality of statistical inference given bounds on computational resources, such as time or space. Our approach to this problem is to define a notion of “algorithmic weakening,” in which a hierarchy of algorithms is ordered by both computational efficiency and statistical efficiency, allowing the growing strength of the data at scale to be traded off against the need for sophisticated processing. We illustrate this approach in the setting of denoising problems, using convex relaxation as the core inferential tool. Hierarchies of convex relaxations have been widely used in theoretical computer science to yield tractable approximation algorithms to many computationally intractable tasks. In the current paper, we show how to endow such hierarchies with a statistical characterization and thereby obtain concrete tradeoffs relating algorithmic runtime to amount of data. PMID:23479655

  19. Multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, G. R. Dewar, R. L.; Hole, M. J.; Hudson, S. R.

    2014-04-15

    We present an extension of the multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) equilibrium model that includes plasma flow. This new model is a generalization of Woltjer's model of relaxed magnetohydrodynamics equilibria with flow. We prove that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite, our extension of MRxMHD reduces to ideal MHD with flow. We also prove that some solutions to MRxMHD with flow are not time-independent in the laboratory frame, and instead have 3D structure which rotates in the toroidal direction with fixed angular velocity. This capability gives MRxMHD potential application to describing rotating 3D MHD structures such as 'snakes' and long-lived modes.

  20. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.