Sample records for carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic cfrp

  1. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  2. [Fusion implants of carbon fiber reinforced plastic].

    PubMed

    Früh, H J; Liebetrau, A; Bertagnoli, R

    2002-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are used in the medical field when high mechanical strength, innovative design, and radiolucency (see spinal fusion implants) are needed. During the manufacturing process of the material CFRP carbon fibers are embedded into a resin matrix. This resin material could be thermoset (e.g., epoxy resin EPN/DDS) or thermoplastic (e.g., PEAK). CFRP is biocompatible, radiolucent, and has higher mechanical capabilities compared to other implant materials. This publication demonstrates the manufacturing process of fusion implants made of a thermoset matrix system using a fiber winding process. The material has been used clinically since 1994 for fusion implants of the cervical and lumbar spine. The results of the fusion systems CORNERSTONE-SR C (cervical) and UNION (lumbar) showed no implant-related complications. New implant systems made of this CFRP material are under investigation and are presented.

  3. Analytical, Numerical and Experimental Examination of Reinforced Composites Beams Covered with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimzade, A. A.; Tuhta, S.

    2012-03-01

    In the article, analytical, numerical (Finite Element Method) and experimental investigation results of beam that was strengthened with fiber reinforced plastic-FRP composite has been given as comparative, the effect of FRP wrapping number to the maximum load and moment capacity has been evaluated depending on this results. Carbon FRP qualitative dependences have been occurred between wrapping number and beam load and moment capacity for repair-strengthen the reinforced concrete beams with carbon fiber. Shown possibilities of application traditional known analysis programs, for the analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) strengthened structures.

  4. A New Generation of Sub Mm Telescopes, Made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezger, P.; Baars, J. W. M.; Ulich, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) appears to be the material most suited for the construction of submillimeter telescopes (SMT) not only for ground-based use but also for space applications. The accuracy of the CFRP reflectors needs to be improved beyond value of the 17 micron rms envisaged for the 10 m SMT.

  5. [Tribological properties of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic. Experimental and clinical results].

    PubMed

    Früh, H J; Ascherl, R; Hipp, E

    1997-02-01

    Wear of the articulating components (especially PE-UHMW) of total hip endoprostheses is the most important technical factor limiting the functional lifetime. To minimize wear debris, ceramic heads, according to ISO 6474 (Al2O3), have been used, from 1969 paired with Al2O3 and since 1975 paired with PE-UHMW. Al2O3 balls articulating with cups made from CFRP have been in clinical use since 1988. Laboratory experiments and in-vivo testing showed minimized wear debris and mild biological response to wear products using CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) instead of PE-UHMW as the cup material. The articulating surfaces of retrieved ceramic heads (Al2O3-Biolox) and cementless CFRP cups (carbon fiber reinforced plastic, Caproman) were compared using sphericity measurement techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and roughness measurements (including advanced roughness parameters Rvk or Rpk according to ISO 4287). Altogether, the first results of the clinical study showed that the combination Al2O3-ball/CFRP-cup came up to the expected lower wear rates compared with the conventional combinations. The wear rates are comparable with the combination Al2O3/Al2O3 without the material-related problems of ceramic components in all ceramic combinations.

  6. Laser-Based Surface Modification of Microstructure for Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenfeng; Sun, Ting; Cao, Yu; Li, Shaolong; Liu, Chang; Tang, Qingru

    2018-05-01

    Bonding repair is a powerful feature of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP). Based on the theory of interface bonding, the interface adhesion strength and reliability of the CFRP structure will be directly affected by the microscopic features of the CFRP surface, including the microstructure, physical, and chemical characteristics. In this paper, laser-based surface modification was compared to Peel-ply, grinding, and polishing to comparatively evaluate the surface microstructure of CFRP. The surface microstructure, morphology, fiber damage, height and space parameters were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser confocal microscopy (LCM). Relative to the conventional grinding process, laser modification of the CFRP surface can result in more uniform resin removal and better processing control and repeatability. This decreases the adverse impact of surface fiber fractures and secondary damage. The surface properties were significantly optimized, which has been reflected such things as the obvious improvement of surface roughness, microstructure uniformity, and actual area. The improved surface microstructure based on laser modification is more conducive to interface bonding of CFRP structure repair. This can enhance the interfacial adhesion strength and reliability of repair.

  7. Flexural strength using Steel Plate, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) on reinforced concrete beam in building technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarigan, Johannes; Patra, Fadel Muhammad; Sitorus, Torang

    2018-03-01

    Reinforced concrete structures are very commonly used in buildings because they are cheaper than the steel structures. But in reality, many concrete structures are damaged, so there are several ways to overcome this problem, by providing reinforcement with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) and reinforcement with steel plates. Each type of reinforcements has its advantages and disadvantages. In this study, researchers discuss the comparison between flexural strength of reinforced concrete beam using steel plates and Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP). In this case, the researchers use Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) as external reinforcements. The dimension of the beams is 15 x 25 cm with the length of 320 cm. Based on the analytical results, the strength of the beam with CFRP is 1.991 times its initial, GFRP is 1.877 times while with the steel plate is 1.646 times. Based on test results, the strength of the beam with CFRP is 1.444 times its initial, GFRP is 1.333 times while the steel plate is 1.167 times. Based on these test results, the authors conclude that beam with CFRP is the best choice for external reinforcement in building technology than the others.

  8. Characterization of electrical conductivity of carbon fiber reinforced plastic using surface potential distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikunaga, Kazuya; Terasaki, Nao

    2018-04-01

    A new method of evaluating electrical conductivity in a structural material such as carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) using surface potential is proposed. After the CFRP was charged by corona discharge, the surface potential distribution was measured by scanning a vibrating linear array sensor along the object surface with a high spatial resolution over a short duration. A correlation between the weave pattern of the CFRP and the surface potential distribution was observed. This result indicates that it is possible to evaluate the electrical conductivity of a material comprising conducting and insulating regions.

  9. Polarization dependence of laser interaction with carbon fibers and CFRP.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christian; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2014-01-27

    A key factor for laser materials processing is the absorptivity of the material at the laser wavelength, which determines the fraction of the laser energy that is coupled into the material. Based on the Fresnel equations, a theoretical model is used to determine the absorptivity for carbon fiber fabrics and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). The surface of each carbon fiber is considered as multiple layers of concentric cylinders of graphite. With this the optical properties of carbon fibers and their composites can be estimated from the well-known optical properties of graphite.

  10. [Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics as implant materials].

    PubMed

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Siebels, W; Mittelmeier, W; Gradinger, R

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics have been used clinically as an implant material for different applications for over 20 years.A review of technical basics of the composite materials (carbon fibers and matrix systems), fields of application,advantages (e.g., postoperative visualization without distortion in computed and magnetic resonance tomography), and disadvantages with use as an implant material is given. The question of the biocompatibility of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics is discussed on the basis of experimental and clinical studies. Selected implant systems made of carbon composite materials for treatments in orthopedic surgery such as joint replacement, tumor surgery, and spinal operations are presented and assessed. Present applications for carbon fiber reinforced plastics are seen in the field of spinal surgery, both as cages for interbody fusion and vertebral body replacement.

  11. [Osseontegration of trial implants of carbon fiber reinforced plastics].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, U; Schwarz, M; Scheller, G; Schroeder-Boersch, H; Jani, L

    2000-01-01

    To what extent are carbon fibre-reinforced plastics (CFRP) suitable as an osseous integration surface for implants? CFRP test implants having a plexus-structured, rhombus-structured, and plexus-structured, hydroxyapatite surface were implanted in the femura of mini-plgs. Exposure time lasted 12 weeks. The implants were subjected to a macroradiological, a histological-histomorphometrical, and a fluorescence-microscopical evaluation. One half of the uncoated, plexus-structured implants were not osteointegrated, the other half displayed an osteointegration rate of 11.8% in the spongy area and 29.8% in the cortex layer. The HA-coated test implants showed an osteointegration of 29.5% in the spongiosa and 56.8% in the cortex layer. The rhombus-structured test implants had an osteointegration of 29.2% (spongiosa) and 46.2% (cortex layer). Compared to the osteointegration of metallic, especially titanium surfaces the CFRP surfaces tested by us fared worse, especially the uncoated, plexus-structured surfaces. For this reason we view very critically the use of carbon-fibre reinforced plastics together with the surfaces tested by us as osteointegrating surfaces.

  12. Characterization and Effects of Fiber Pull-Outs in Hole Quality of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Composite.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh Ashrafi, Sina; Miller, Peter W; Wandro, Kevin M; Kim, Dave

    2016-10-13

    Hole quality plays a crucial role in the production of close-tolerance holes utilized in aircraft assembly. Through drilling experiments of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic composites (CFRP), this study investigates the impact of varying drilling feed and speed conditions on fiber pull-out geometries and resulting hole quality parameters. For this study, hole quality parameters include hole size variance, hole roundness, and surface roughness. Fiber pull-out geometries are quantified by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the mechanically-sectioned CFRP-machined holes, to measure pull-out length and depth. Fiber pull-out geometries and the hole quality parameter results are dependent on the drilling feed and spindle speed condition, which determines the forces and undeformed chip thickness during the process. Fiber pull-out geometries influence surface roughness parameters from a surface profilometer, while their effect on other hole quality parameters obtained from a coordinate measuring machine is minimal.

  13. Characterization and Effects of Fiber Pull-Outs in Hole Quality of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Composite

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Ashrafi, Sina; Miller, Peter W.; Wandro, Kevin M.; Kim, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Hole quality plays a crucial role in the production of close-tolerance holes utilized in aircraft assembly. Through drilling experiments of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic composites (CFRP), this study investigates the impact of varying drilling feed and speed conditions on fiber pull-out geometries and resulting hole quality parameters. For this study, hole quality parameters include hole size variance, hole roundness, and surface roughness. Fiber pull-out geometries are quantified by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the mechanically-sectioned CFRP-machined holes, to measure pull-out length and depth. Fiber pull-out geometries and the hole quality parameter results are dependent on the drilling feed and spindle speed condition, which determines the forces and undeformed chip thickness during the process. Fiber pull-out geometries influence surface roughness parameters from a surface profilometer, while their effect on other hole quality parameters obtained from a coordinate measuring machine is minimal. PMID:28773950

  14. Numerical modelling in friction lap joining of aluminium alloy and carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A.; Bang, H. S.; Bang, H. S.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-material combinations of aluminium alloy and carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastics (CFRP) have gained attention in automotive and aerospace industries to enhance fuel efficiency and strength-to-weight ratio of components. Various limitations of laser beam welding, adhesive bonding and mechanical fasteners make these processes inefficient to join metal and CFRP sheets. Friction lap joining is an alternative choice for the same. Comprehensive studies in friction lap joining of aluminium to CFRP sheets are essential and scare in the literature. The present work reports a combined theoretical and experimental study in joining of AA5052 and CFRP sheets using friction lap joining process. A three-dimensional finite element based heat transfer model is developed to compute the temperature fields and thermal cycles. The computed results are validated extensively with the corresponding experimentally measured results.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Andrew C. Y.; Goh, Henry K. H.; Lin, Karen K.; Liew, W. H.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are increasingly used in aerospace applications due to its superior mechanical properties and reduced weight. Adhesive bonding is commonly used to join the composite parts since it is capable of joining incompatible or dissimilar components. However, insufficient adhesive or contamination in the adhesive bonds might occur and pose as threats to the integrity of the plane during service. It is thus important to look for suitable nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques to detect and characterize the sub-surface defects within the CFRP composites. Some of the common NDT techniques include ultrasonic techniques and thermography. In this work, we report the use of the abovementioned techniques for improved interpretation of the results.

  16. Studies on carbon FRP (CFRP) prestressed concrete bridge columns and piles in marine environment.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using concrete piles pretensioned with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) tendons. The study reviews the available literature on mechanical properties of CFRP reinforcement, ...

  17. [Experimental study on carbon fiber reinforced plastic plate--analysis of stabilizing force required for plate].

    PubMed

    Iizuka, H

    1990-11-01

    Plates currently in use for the management of bone fracture made of metal present with various problems. We manufactured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) plates from Pyrofil T/530 puriplegs overlaid at cross angles of +/- 10 degrees, +/- 20 degrees, and +/- 30 degrees for trial and carried out an experimental study on rabbit tibiofibular bones using 316L stainless steel plates of comparable shape and size as controls. The results indicate the influence of CFRP plate upon cortical bone was milder than that of stainless steel plate, with an adequate stabilizing force for the repair of fractured rabbit tibiofibular bones. CFRP has the advantages over metals of being virtually free from corrosion and fatigue, reasonably radiolucent and able to meet a wide range of mechanical requirements. This would make CFRP plate quite promising as a new devices of treating fracture of bones.

  18. The usage of carbon fiber reinforcement polymer and glass fiber reinforcement polymer for retrofit technology building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarigan, Johannes; Meka, Randi; Nursyamsi

    2018-03-01

    Fiber Reinforcement Polymer has been used as a material technology since the 1970s in Europe. Fiber Reinforcement Polymer can reinforce the structure externally, and used in many types of buildings like beams, columns, and slabs. It has high tensile strength. Fiber Reinforcement Polymer also has high rigidity and strength. The profile of Fiber Reinforcement Polymer is thin and light, installation is simple to conduct. One of Fiber Reinforcement Polymer material is Carbon Fiber Reinforcement Polymer and Glass Fiber Reinforcement Polymer. These materials is tested when it is installed on concrete cylinders, to obtain the comparison of compressive strength CFRP and GFRP. The dimension of concrete is diameter of 15 cm and height of 30 cm. It is amounted to 15 and divided into three groups. The test is performed until it collapsed to obtain maximum load. The results of research using CFRP and GFRP have shown the significant enhancement in compressive strength. CFRP can increase the compressive strength of 26.89%, and GFRP of 14.89%. For the comparison of two materials, CFRP is more strengthening than GFRP regarding increasing compressive strength. The usage of CFRP and GFRP can increase the loading capacity.

  19. Investigation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Machining Using 355 nm Picosecond Pulsed Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Zhu, Dezhi

    2018-06-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been widely used in the aircraft industry and automobile industry owing to its superior properties. In this paper, a Nd:YVO4 picosecond pulsed system emitting at 355 nm has been used for CFRP machining experiments to determine optimum milling conditions. Milling parameters including laser power, milling speed and hatch distance were optimized by using box-behnken design of response surface methodology (RSM). Material removal rate was influenced by laser beam overlap ratio which affects mechanical denudation. The results in heat affected zones (HAZ) and milling quality were discussed through the machined surface observed with scanning electron microscope. A re-focusing technique based on the experiment with different focal planes was proposed and milling mechanism was also analyzed in details.

  20. Tensile Properties of Unsaturated Polyester and Epoxy Resin Reinforced with Recycled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Yuta

    2018-06-01

    To better understand the mechanical properties of recycled carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (rCFRP), CFRP crushed into small pieces was mixed randomly in different proportions (0-30 wt%) with two different resins: unsaturated polyester and epoxy resin. Two different sizes of crushed CFRP were used: 0.1 mm × 0.007 mm (milled CFRP) and 30 mm × 2 mm (chopped CFRP). The tensile strength of rCFRP was found to depend on both the proportion and the size of the CFRP pieces. It increased with increasing proportion of chopped CFRP, but decreased with increasing proportion of milled CFRP. There was no clear dependence of the tensile strength on the resin that was used. A low fracture strain was found for rCFRP samples made with chopped CFRP, in contrast to those made with milled CFRP. The fracture strain was found to increase with increasing content of milled CFRP up to 20 wt%, at which point, coalescence of existing microvoids occurred. However, there was a reduction in fracture strain for rCFRP with 30 wt% of milled CFRP, owing to the formation of defects (blow holes). Overall, the fracture strain was higher for rCFRPs based on epoxy resin than for those based on unsaturated polyester with the same CFRP content, because of the high ductility of the epoxy resin. The different tensile properties reflected different failure characteristics, with the use of chopped CFRP leading to a complicated rough fracture surface and with milled CFRP causing ductile failure through the presence of tiny dimple-like fractures. However, for a high content of milled CFRP (30 wt%), large blow holes were observed, leading to low ductility.

  1. Tensile Properties of Unsaturated Polyester and Epoxy Resin Reinforced with Recycled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Yuta

    2017-08-01

    To better understand the mechanical properties of recycled carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (rCFRP), CFRP crushed into small pieces was mixed randomly in different proportions (0-30 wt%) with two different resins: unsaturated polyester and epoxy resin. Two different sizes of crushed CFRP were used: 0.1 mm × 0.007 mm (milled CFRP) and 30 mm × 2 mm (chopped CFRP). The tensile strength of rCFRP was found to depend on both the proportion and the size of the CFRP pieces. It increased with increasing proportion of chopped CFRP, but decreased with increasing proportion of milled CFRP. There was no clear dependence of the tensile strength on the resin that was used. A low fracture strain was found for rCFRP samples made with chopped CFRP, in contrast to those made with milled CFRP. The fracture strain was found to increase with increasing content of milled CFRP up to 20 wt%, at which point, coalescence of existing microvoids occurred. However, there was a reduction in fracture strain for rCFRP with 30 wt% of milled CFRP, owing to the formation of defects (blow holes). Overall, the fracture strain was higher for rCFRPs based on epoxy resin than for those based on unsaturated polyester with the same CFRP content, because of the high ductility of the epoxy resin. The different tensile properties reflected different failure characteristics, with the use of chopped CFRP leading to a complicated rough fracture surface and with milled CFRP causing ductile failure through the presence of tiny dimple-like fractures. However, for a high content of milled CFRP (30 wt%), large blow holes were observed, leading to low ductility.

  2. Laser absorption of carbon fiber reinforced polymer with randomly distributed carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Xu, Hebing; Li, Chao

    2018-03-01

    Laser processing of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is a non-traditional machining method which has many prospective applications. The laser absorption characteristics of CFRP are analyzed in this paper. A ray tracing model describing the interaction of the laser spot with CFRP is established. The material model contains randomly distributed carbon fibers which are generated using an improved carbon fiber placement method. It was found that CFRP has good laser absorption due to multiple reflections of the light rays in the material’s microstructure. The randomly distributed carbon fibers make the absorptivity of the light rays change randomly in the laser spot. Meanwhile, the average absorptivity fluctuation is obvious during movement of the laser. The experimental measurements agree well with the values predicted by the ray tracing model.

  3. Friction stir lap joining of automotive aluminium alloy and carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, H. S.; Das, A.; Lee, S.; Bang, H. S.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-material combination such as aluminium alloys and carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are increasingly used in the aircraft and automobile industries to enhance strength-to-weight ratio of the respective parts and components. Various processes such as adhesive bonding, mechanical fasteners and laser beam joining were employed to join metal alloy and CFRP sheets. However, long processing time of adhesive bonding, extra weight induced by mechanical fasteners and high operating cost of the laser is major limitations of these processes. Therefore, friction stir welding is an alternative choice to overcome those limitations in joining of CFRP and aluminium alloys. In the present work, an attempt is undertaken to join AA5052 alloy and polyamide 66 CFRP sheets by friction stir lap joining technique using pinned and pin-less tools. The joint qualities are investigated extensively at different joining conditions using two different types of tools and surface ground aluminium sheets. The results show that pin-less tool and surface ground aluminium alloy can provide the suitable joint with maximum joint strength around 8 MPa.

  4. Reinforcement of timber beams with carbon fibers reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gugutsidze, G.; Draškovič, F.

    2010-06-01

    Wood is a polymeric material with many valuable features and which also lacks some negative features. In order to keep up with high construction rates and the minimization of negative effects, wood has become one of the most valuable materials in modern engineering. But the use of timber material economically is also an actual problem in order to protect the environment and improve natural surroundings. A panel of scientists is interested in solving these problems and in creating rational structures, where timber can be used efficiently. These constructions are as follows: glue-laminated (gluelam), composed and reinforced wooden constructions. Composed and reinforced wooden constructions are examined less, but according to researches already carried out, it is clear that significant work can be accomplished in creating rational, highly effective and economic timber constructions. The paper deals with research on the formation of composed fiber-reinforced beams (CFRP) made of timber and provide evidence of their effectiveness. The aim of the paper is to investigate cross-bending of CFRP-reinforced gluelaminated timber beams. According to the results we were able to determine the additional effectiveness of reinforcement with CFRP (which depends on the CFRP material's quality, quantity and module of elasticity) on the mechanical features of timber and a whole beam.

  5. All-round joining method with carbon fiber reinforced interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Noriyoshi; Tanaka, Kazunori; Kamiya, Yoshiko; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2008-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) has been recently applied to not only wing, but also fan blades of turbo fan engines. To prevent impact force, leading edge of titanium was often mounted on the CFRP fan blades with adhesive force. In order to enhance the joining strength, a joining method with carbon fiber reinforced interface has been developed. By using nickel-coated carbon fibers, a joining sample with carbon fiber-reinforced interface between CFRP and CFRM has been successfully developed. The joining sample with nickel-coated carbon fiber interface exhibits the high tensile strength, which was about 10 times higher than that with conventional adhesion. On the other hand, Al-welding methods to steel, Cu and Ti with carbon fiber reinforced interface have been successfully developed to lighten the parts of machines of racing car and airplane. Carbon fibers in felt are covered with metals to protect the interfacial reaction. The first step of the welding method is that the Al coated felt is contacted and wrapped with molten aluminum solidified under gravity pressure, whereas the second step is that the felt with double layer of Ni and Al is contacted and wrapped with molten steel (Cu or Ti) solidified under gravity pressure. Tensile strength of Al-Fe (Cu or Ti) welded sample with carbon fiber reinforced interface is higher than those of Al-Fe (Cu or Ti) welded sample.

  6. Thermal effect of laser ablation on the surface of carbon fiber reinforced plastic during laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Sato, Yuji; Matsunaga, Ei-ichi; Tsukamoto, Masahiro

    2018-02-01

    Although laser processing is widely used for many applications, the cutting quality of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) decreases around the heat-affected zone (HAZ) during laser processing. Carbon fibers are exposed around the HAZ, and tensile strength decreases with increasing length of the HAZ. Some theoretical studies of thermal conductions that do not consider fluid dynamics have been performed; however, theoretical considerations that include the dynamics of laser ablation are scarce. Using removed mass and depth observed from experiments, the dynamics of laser ablation of CFRP with high-temperature and high-pressure of compressive gas is simulated herein. In this calculation, the mushroom-like shape of laser ablation is qualitatively simulated compared with experiments using a high-speed camera. Considering the removal temperature of the resin and the temperature distribution at each point on the surface, the simulation results suggest that a wide area of the resin is removed when the processing depth is shallow, and a rounded kerf is generated as the processing depth increases.

  7. Oxygen-assisted multipass cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics with ultra-short laser pulses

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Komlenok, M. S.; Konov, V. I.

    Deep multipass cutting of bidirectional and unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with picosecond laser pulses was investigated in different static atmospheres as well as with the assistance of an oxygen or nitrogen gas flow. The ablation rate was determined as a function of the kerf depth and the resulting heat affected zone was measured. An assisting oxygen gas flow is found to significantly increase the cutting productivity, but only in deep kerfs where the diminished evaporative ablation due to the reduced laser fluence reaching the bottom of the kerf does not dominate the contribution of reactive etching anymore. Oxygen-supportedmore » cutting was shown to also solve the problem that occurs when cutting the CFRP parallel to the fiber orientation where a strong deformation and widening of the kerf, which temporarily slows down the process speed, is revealed to be typical for processing in standard air atmospheres.« less

  8. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Grids for Shear and End Zone Reinforcement in Bridge Beams

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel reduces life spans of bridges throughout the United States; therefore, using non-corroding carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) reinforcement is seen as a way to increase service life. The use of CFRP as the flexural ...

  9. Mid-infrared pulsed laser ultrasonic testing for carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Masahiro; Hatano, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto; Takekawa, Shunji; Yamawaki, Hisashi; Oguchi, Kanae; Enoki, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Laser ultrasonic testing (LUT) can realize contactless and instantaneous non-destructive testing, but its signal-to-noise ratio must be improved in order to measure carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs). We have developed a mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser source optimal for generating ultrasonic waves in CFRPs by using a wavelength conversion device based on an optical parametric oscillator. This paper reports a comparison of the ultrasonic generation behavior between the mid-IR laser and the Nd:YAG laser. The mid-IR laser generated a significantly larger ultrasonic amplitude in CFRP laminates than a conventional Nd:YAG laser. In addition, our study revealed that the surface epoxy matrix of CFRPs plays an important role in laser ultrasonic generation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. On the role of CFRP reinforcement for wood beams stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianasi, A. C.

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, carbon fiber composites have been increasingly used in different ways in reinforcing structural elements. Specifically, the use of composite materials as a reinforcement for wood beams under bending loads requires paying attention to several aspects of the problem such as the number of the composite layers applied on the wood beams. Study consolidation of composites revealed that they are made by bonding fibrous material impregnated with resin on the surface of various elements, to restore or increase the load carrying capacity (bending, cutting, compression or torque) without significant damage of their rigidity. Fibers used in building applications can be fiberglass, aramid or carbon. Items that can be strengthened are concrete, brick, wood, steel and stone, and in terms of structural beams, walls, columns and floors. This paper describes an experimental study which was designed to evaluate the effect of composite material on the stiffness of the wood beams. It proposes a summary of the fundamental principles of analysis of composite materials and the design and use. The type of reinforcement used on the beams is the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheet and plates and also an epoxy resin for bonding all the elements. Structural epoxy resins remain the primary choice of adhesive to form the bond to fiber-reinforced plastics and are the generally accepted adhesives in bonded CFRP-wood connections. The advantages of using epoxy resin in comparison to common wood-laminating adhesives are their gap-filling qualities and the low clamping pressures that are required to form the bond between carbon fiber plates or sheets and the wood beams. Mechanical tests performed on the reinforced wood beams showed that CFRP materials may produce flexural displacement and lifting increases of the beams. Observations of the experimental load-displacement relationships showed that bending strength increased for wood beams reinforced with CFRP composite plates

  11. Polarization Induced Deterioration of Reinforced Concrete with CFRP Anode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Sun, Hongfang; Tang, Luping; Xing, Feng

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates the deterioration of reinforced concrete with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) anode after polarization. The steel in the concrete was first subjected to accelerated corrosion to various extents. Then, a polarization test was performed with the external attached CFRP as the anode and the steel reinforcement as the cathode. Carbon fiber reinforced mortar and conductive carbon paste as contact materials were used to adhere the CFRP anode to the concrete. Two current densities of 1244 and 2488 mA/m², corresponding to the steel reinforcements were applied for 25 days. Electrochemical parameters were monitored during the test period. The deterioration mechanism that occurred at the CFRP/contact material interface was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The increase of feeding voltage and the failure of bonding was observed during polarization process, which might have resulted from the deterioration of the interface between the contact material and CFRP. The formation and accumulation of NaCl crystals at the contact material/CFRP interface were inferred to be the main causes of the failure at the interface.

  12. Heat accumulation between scans during multi-pass cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Freitag, C.; Komlenok, M. S.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.; Konov, V. I.

    2018-02-01

    Matrix evaporation caused by heat accumulation between scans (HAS) was studied in the case of multi-pass scanning of a laser beam over the surface of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). The experiments were performed in two regimes, namely, in the process of CFRP cutting and in the regime of low-fluence irradiation avoiding ablation of carbon fibers. The feature of the ablation-free regime is that all absorbed energy remains in the material as heat, while in the cutting regime the fraction of residual heat is unknown. An analytical model based on two-dimensional (2D) heat flow was applied to predict the critical number of scans, after which the HAS effect causes a distinct growth of the matrix evaporation zone (MEZ). According to the model, the critical number of scans decreases exponentially with increasing laser power, while no dependence on the feed rate is expected. It was found that the model fits well to the experimental data obtained in the ablation-free regime where the heat input is well defined and known. In the cutting regime the measured significant reduction of the critical number of scans observed in deep grooves may be attributed to transformation of the heat flow geometry and to an expected increase of the residual heat fraction.

  13. Laser Processing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics - Release of Carbon Fiber Segments During Short-pulsed Laser Processing of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Juergen; Brodesser, Alexander; Hustedt, Michael; Bluemel, Sven; Jaeschke, Peter; Kaierle, Stefan

    Cutting and ablation using short-pulsed laser radiation are promising technologies to produce or repair CFRP components with outstanding mechanical properties e.g. for automotive and aircraft industry. Using sophisticated laser processing strategies and avoiding excessive heating of the workpiece, a high processing quality can be achieved. However, the interaction of laser radiation and composite material causes a notable release of hazardous substances from the process zone, amongst others carbon fiber segments or fibrous particles. In this work, amounts and geometries of the released fiber segments are analyzed and discussed in terms of their hazardous potential. Moreover, it is investigated to what extent gaseous organic process emissions are adsorbed at the fiber segments, similar to an adsorption of volatile organic compounds at activated carbon, which is typically used as filter material.

  14. Ultrasonic inspection of carbon fiber reinforced plastic by means of sample-recognition methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilgram, R.

    1985-01-01

    In the case of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), it has not yet been possible to detect nonlocal defects and material degradation related to aging with the aid of nondestructive inspection method. An approach for overcoming difficulties regarding such an inspection involves an extension of the ultrasonic inspection procedure on the basis of a use of signal processing and sample recognition methods. The basic concept involved in this approach is related to the realization that the ultrasonic signal contains information regarding the medium which is not utilized in conventional ultrasonic inspection. However, the analytical study of the phyiscal processes involved is very complex. For this reason, an empirical approach is employed to make use of the information which has not been utilized before. This approach uses reference signals which can be obtained with material specimens of different quality. The implementation of these concepts for the supersonic inspection of CFRP laminates is discussed.

  15. Ultrasonic bulk wave measurements on composite using fiber from recycled CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, David; Ijomah, Winifred L.; Windmill, James F. C.; Kao, Chih-Chuan; Smillie, Grant

    2018-04-01

    This study investigates the velocity profile for both a virgin carbon fiber reinforced plastic (v-CFRP) and a reused fiber CFRP (rf-CFRP) which exhibit quasi-isotropy; all samples have 3 iterations of symmetry type [0, -45, +45, 90]s. An isotropic virgin CFRP (v-CFRP), produced by using a hand layup process, is presented along with a pyrolysis recycling process (at 600°C) designed to extract the carbon fibers. A virgin carbon fiber mat with a similar architecture was also thermally conditioned under the same pyrolysis conditions. Both resultant carbon fiber mats were used to produce the rf-CFRPs. Ultrasonic wave velocities at different angles of incidence for both v-CFRP and rf-CFRP were recorded. In the case of v-CFRP, two samples were studied, and it was recorded that the velocity for both a longitudinal wave and transverse wave remained relatively constant up until these waves completely attenuated at observed angles, indicating what would be expected from an isotropic sample. A close relationship in terms of waves speed was also recorded for the two v-CFRP samples. In the case of rf-CFRP, the longitudinal wave velocities were generally less closely related when compared to the v-CFRP, with a maximum of approximately 32% difference being recorded. The transverse wave velocity was also found to decrease incident angle indicating sample anisotropy. The authors suggest that the more severe decreasing velocity with increasing incident angle, when compared to v-CFRP, may be caused by resin impregnation issues and not by changes that occur during the recycling process. Therefore, a hypothesis that both the rf-CFRP and the V-CFRP will return a similar wave profile given an identical resin fiber content is put forward.

  16. Machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminates using candle stick drill and multi-facet drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng-Dong; Qiu, Kun-Xian; Chen, Ming; Cai, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composite laminates are widely used in aerospace and aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. However, they are regarded as difficult-to-cut materials because of bad surface quality and low productivity. Drilling is the most common hole making process for CFRP composite laminates and drilling induced delamination damage usually occurs severely at the exit side of drilling holes, which strongly deteriorate holes quality. In this work, the candle stick drill and multi-facet drill are employed to evaluate the machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A CFRP composite laminates in terms of thrust force, delamination, holes diameter and holes surface roughness. S/N ratio is used to characterize the thrust force while an ellipse-shaped delamination model is established to quantitatively analyze the delamination. The best combination of drilling parameters are determined by full consideration of S/N ratios of thrust force and the delamination. The results indicate that candle stick drill will induce the unexpected ellipse-shaped delamination even at its best drilling parameters of spindle speed of 10,000 rpm and feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth. However, the multi-facet drill cutting at the relative lower feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth and lower spindle speed of 6000 rpm can effectively prevent the delamination. Comprehensively, holes quality obtained by multi-facet drill is much more superior to those obtained by candle stick drill.

  17. Standard Operating Procedure - Manufacture of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic Waveguides and Slotted Waveguide Antennas, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    aerospace grade carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) prepreg . RELEASE LIMITATION Approved for public release UNCLASSIFIED Report...arrays manufactured from aerospace grade carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) prepreg . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...CFRP) prepreg tape and fabric. This report details Version 1.0 of a Standard Operating Procedure for this manufacture. UNCLASSIFIED

  18. Fatigue Damage Evaluation of Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Based on Phase Information of Thermoelastic Temperature Change.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Daiki; Sakagami, Takahide; Nakamura, Yu; Nonaka, Shinichi; Hamada, Kenichi

    2017-12-06

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) is widely used for structural members of transportation vehicles such as automobile, aircraft, or spacecraft, utilizing its excellent specific strength and specific rigidity in contrast with the metal. Short carbon fiber composite materials are receiving a lot of attentions because of their excellent moldability and productivity, however they show complicated behaviors in fatigue fracture due to the random fibers orientation. In this study, thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) using an infrared thermography was applied to evaluate fatigue damage in short carbon fiber composites. The distribution of the thermoelastic temperature change was measured during the fatigue test, as well as the phase difference between the thermoelastic temperature change and applied loading signal. Evolution of fatigue damage was detected from the distribution of thermoelastic temperature change according to the thermoelastic damage analysis (TDA) procedure. It was also found that fatigue damage evolution was more clearly detected than before by the newly developed thermoelastic phase damage analysis (TPDA) in which damaged area was emphasized in the differential phase delay images utilizing the property that carbon fiber shows opposite phase thermoelastic temperature change.

  19. Scanning tone burst eddy-current thermography (S-TBET) for NDT of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) components

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Libin, M. N.; Maxfield, B. W.; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2014-02-18

    Tone Burst Eddy Current technique uses eddy current to apply transient heating inside a component and uses a conventional IR camera for visualization of the response to the transient heating. This technique has been earliest demonstrated for metallic components made of AL, Steel, Stainless Steel, etc., and for detection of cracks, corrosion and adhesive dis-bonds. Although, not nearly as conducting as metals, the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) material absorbs measurable electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range above 10 kHz. When the surface temperature is observed on the surface that is being heated (defined as the surface just beneath andmore » slightly to one side of the heating coil), the surface temperature increases with increasing frequency because the internal heating increases with frequency. A 2-D anisotropic transient Eddy current heating and thermal conduction model has been developed that provides a reasonable description of the processes described above. The inherent anisotropy of CFRP laminates is included in this model by calculating the heating due to three superimposed, tightly coupled isotropic layers having a specified ply-layup. The experimental apparatus consists of an induction heating coil and an IR camera with low NETD and high frame rates. The coil is moved over the sample using a stepper motor controlled manipulator. The IR data recording is synchronized with the motion control to provide a movie of the surface temperature over time. Several components were evaluated for detection of impact damage, location of stiffeners, etc. on CFRP components.« less

  20. Modeling of Dynamic Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Composite under X-ray Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Tang, Wenhui; Fu, Kunkun

    2018-01-16

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have been increasingly used in spacecraft applications. Spacecraft may encounter highenergy-density X-ray radiation in outer space that can cause severe damage. To protect spacecraft from such unexpected damage, it is essential to predict the dynamic behavior of CFRP composites under X-ray radiation. In this study, we developed an in-house three-dimensional explicit finite element (FEM) code to investigate the dynamic responses of CFRP composite under X-ray radiation for the first time, by incorporating a modified PUFF equation-of-state. First, the blow-off impulse (BOI) momentum of an aluminum panel was predicted by our FEM code and compared with an existing radiation experiment. Then, the FEM code was utilized to determine the dynamic behavior of a CFRP composite under various radiation conditions. It was found that the numerical result was comparable with the experimental one. Furthermore, the CFRP composite was more effective than the aluminum panel in reducing radiation-induced pressure and BOI momentum. The numerical results also revealed that a 1 keV X-ray led to vaporization of surface materials and a high-magnitude compressive stress wave, whereas a low-magnitude stress wave was generated with no surface vaporization when a 3 keV X-ray was applied.

  1. Modeling of Dynamic Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Composite under X-ray Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Tang, Wenhui; Fu, Kunkun

    2018-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have been increasingly used in spacecraft applications. Spacecraft may encounter highenergy-density X-ray radiation in outer space that can cause severe damage. To protect spacecraft from such unexpected damage, it is essential to predict the dynamic behavior of CFRP composites under X-ray radiation. In this study, we developed an in-house three-dimensional explicit finite element (FEM) code to investigate the dynamic responses of CFRP composite under X-ray radiation for the first time, by incorporating a modified PUFF equation-of-state. First, the blow-off impulse (BOI) momentum of an aluminum panel was predicted by our FEM code and compared with an existing radiation experiment. Then, the FEM code was utilized to determine the dynamic behavior of a CFRP composite under various radiation conditions. It was found that the numerical result was comparable with the experimental one. Furthermore, the CFRP composite was more effective than the aluminum panel in reducing radiation-induced pressure and BOI momentum. The numerical results also revealed that a 1 keV X-ray led to vaporization of surface materials and a high-magnitude compressive stress wave, whereas a low-magnitude stress wave was generated with no surface vaporization when a 3 keV X-ray was applied. PMID:29337891

  2. Defect Detection on Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics (cfrp) with Laser Generated Lamb Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focke, O.; Huke, P.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2011-06-01

    Standard ultrasound methods using a phased-array or a single transducer are commonly used for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) during manufacturing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) parts and certificated testing schemes were developed for individual parts and geometries. However, most testing methods need direct contact, matching gels and remain therefore time consuming. Laser-Ultrasonics is advantageous due to the contactless measurement technology and high accessibility even on complex parts. Despite the non-destructive testing with body waves, we show that the NDE can be expanded using two-dimensional surface (Lamb) waves for detection of delaminations close to the surface or small deteriorations caused by e.g. impacts. Lamb waves have been excited with a single transducer and with a short-pulse Laser with additionally producing A0-and S0-Lamb waves. The waves were detected with a shearography setup that allows for measuring two-dimensionally the displacement of a surface. Short integration times of the camera were realized using a pulsed ruby laser for illumination. As a consequence to the anisotropy the propagation in different directions exhibits individual characteristics like amplitude, damping and velocity. This has motivated to build up models for the propagation of Lamb waves and to compare them with experimental results.

  3. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K.; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets. PMID:28773024

  4. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets.

    PubMed

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-06-17

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets.

  5. Modification of carbon fabrics by radio-frequency capacitive discharge at low pressure to regulate mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics based on it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garifullin, A. R.; Krasina, I. V.; Skidchenko, E. A.; Shaekhov, M. F.; Tikhonova, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    To increase the values of mechanical properties of carbon fiber (CF) composite materials used in sports equipment production the method of radio-frequency capacitive (RFC) low-pressure plasma treatment in air was proposed. Previously it was found that this type of modification allows to effectively regulate the surface properties of fibers of different nature. This treatment method differs from the traditional ones by efficiency and environmental friendliness as it does not require the use of aggressive, environmentally hazardous chemicals. In this paper it was established that RFC low-pressure air plasma treatment of carbon fabrics enhances the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). As a result of experimental studies of CF by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy method it was proved that after radio-frequency capacitive plasma treatment at low pressure in air the oxygen-containing functional groups is grafted on the surface. These groups improve adhesion at the interface “matrix-fiber”.

  6. Fracture detection in concrete by glass fiber cloth reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Soon-Gi; Lee, Sung-Riong

    2006-04-01

    Two types of carbon (carbon fiber and carbon powder) and a glass cloth were used as conductive phases and a reinforcing fiber, respectively, in polymer rods. The carbon powder was used for fabricating electrically conductive carbon powder-glass fiber reinforced plastic (CP-GFRP) rods. The carbon fiber tows and the CP-GFRP rods were adhered to mortar specimens using epoxy resin and glass fiber cloth. On bending, the electrical resistance of the carbon fiber tow attached to the mortar specimen increased greatly after crack generation, and that of the CP-GFRP rod increased after the early stages of deflection in the mortar. Therefore, the CP-GFRP rod is superior to the carbon fiber tow in detecting fractures. Also, by reinforcing with a glass fiber cloth reinforced plastic, the strength of the mortar specimens became more than twice as strong as that of the unreinforced mortar.

  7. Feasibility study of ultrasonic elliptical vibration-assisted reaming of carbon fiber reinforced plastics/titanium alloy stacks.

    PubMed

    Geng, Daxi; Zhang, Deyuan; Li, Zhe; Liu, Dapeng

    2017-03-01

    The production of high quality bolt holes, especially on the carbon fiber reinforced plastics/titanium alloy (CFRP/Ti) stacks, is essential to the manufacturing process in order to facilitate part assembly and improve the component mechanical integrity in aerospace industry. Reaming is widely used as a mandatory operation for bolt holes to meet the strict industry requirements. In this paper, the ultrasonic elliptical vibration-assisted reaming (UEVR) which is considered as a new method for finish machining of CFRP/Ti stacked holes is studied. The paper outlines an analysis of tool performance and hole quality in UEVR compared with that in conventional reaming (CR). Experimental results show that the quality of holes was significantly improved in UEVR. This is substantiated by monitoring cutting force, hole geometric precision and surface finish. The average thrust forces and torque in UEVR were decreased over 30% and 60% respectively. It is found that, during first 45 holes, better diameter tolerance (IT7 vs. IT8), smaller diameter difference of CFRP and Ti holes (around 3μm vs. 12μm), better geometrical errors were achieved in UEVR as compared to CR. As for surface finish, both of the average roughness and hole surface topography in UEVR were obviously improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Moment redistribution in continuous reinforced concrete beams strengthened with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, M. A.; Valente, L.; Rizzo, A.

    2007-09-01

    The results of tests on continuous steel-fiber-reinforced concrete (RC) beams, with and without an external strengthening, are presented. The internal flexural steel reinforcement was designed so that to allow steel yielding before the collapse of the beams. To prevent the shear failure, steel stirrups were used. The tests also included two nonstrengthened control beams; the other specimens were strengthened with different configurations of externally bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates. In order to prevent the premature failure from delamination of the CFRP strengthening, a wrapping was also applied. The experimental results obtained show that it is possible to achieve a sufficient degree of moment redistribution if the strengthening configuration is chosen properly, confirming the results provided by two simple numerical models.

  9. Environmental Durability of Reinforced Concrete Deck Girders Strengthened for Shear with Surface-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-05-01

    "This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort...

  10. Edge Delamination and Residual Properties of Drilled Carbon Fiber Composites with and without Short-Aramid-Fiber Interleaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi; Hu, Xiaozhi; Shi, Shanshan; Guo, Xu; Zhang, Yupeng; Chen, Haoran

    2016-10-01

    Edge delamination is frequently observed in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates after machining, due to the low fracture toughness of the resin interfaces between carbon fiber plies. In this study, the effects of incorporating tough aramid fibers into the brittle CFRP system are quantified by measuring the residual properties of bolted CFRP. By adding short-aramid-fiber interleaves in CFRP laminates, the residual tensile strength have been substantially increased by 14 % for twill-weave laminates and 45 % for unidirectional laminates respectively. Moreover, tensile failure was observed as the major mode of toughened laminates, in contrast to shear failure of plain laminates. The qualitative FEM results agreed well with the experimental results that edge delamination would cause relatively higher shear stress and therefore alter the failure mode from tensile failure to shear failure.

  11. Electrical and Mechanical Performance of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Used as the Impressed Current Anode Material.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Zhu, Miaochang; Han, Ningxu; Liu, Wei; Xing, Feng

    2014-07-24

    An investigation was performed by using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) as the anode material in the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system of steel reinforced concrete structures. The service life and performance of CFRP were investigated in simulated ICCP systems with various configurations. Constant current densities were maintained during the tests. No significant degradation in electrical and mechanical properties was found for CFRP subjected to anodic polarization with the selected applied current densities. The service life of the CFRP-based ICCP system was discussed based on the practical reinforced concrete structure layout.

  12. Environmental durability of reinforced concrete deck girders strengthened for shear with surface-bonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-05-01

    This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort ...

  13. Environmental durability of reinforced concrete deck girders strengthened for shear with surface bonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-05-01

    This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced : concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effor...

  14. Smart CFRP systems for the controlled retrofitting of reinforced concrete members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, M.-B.; Käseberg, S.; Kuhne, M.

    2010-09-01

    During the last ten years an increasing amount of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) applications to rehabilitate damaged concrete elements was observed. Thereby some important disadvantages of the brittle materials must be considered, for example the low ductility of the bond between CFRP and concrete and brittle failure of FRP. With embedded sensor systems it is possible to measure crack propagation and strains. In this paper a sensor based CFRP system will be presented, that can be used for strengthening and measuring. The used optical fibers with Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) have a large number of advantages in opposite to electrical measuring methods. Examples are small dimensions, low weight as well as high static and dynamic resolution of measured values. The main problem during the investigations was the fixing of the glass fiber and the small FBG at the designated position. In this paper the possibility of setting the glass fiber with embroidery at the reinforcing fiber material will be presented. On the basis of four point bending tests on beams (dimensions of 700 x 150 x 150 mm) and tests on wrapped columns the potential of the Smart CFRP system is introduced.

  15. Fracture mechanics in fiber reinforced composite materials, taking as examples B/A1 and CRFP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. W. M.

    1982-01-01

    The validity of linear elastic fracture mechanics and other fracture criteria was investigated with laminates of boron fiber reinforced aluminum (R/A1) and of carbon fiber reinforced epoxide (CFRP). Cracks are assessed by fracture strength Kc or Kmax (critical or maximum value of the stress intensity factor). The Whitney and Nuismer point stress criterion and average stress criterion often show that Kmax of fiber composite materials increases with increasing crack length; however, for R/A1 and CFRP the curve showing fracture strength as a function of crack length is only applicable in a small domain. For R/A1, the reason is clearly the extension of the plastic zone (or the damage zone n the case of CFRP) which cannot be described with a stress intensity factor.

  16. Feasibility on fiber orientation detection on unidirectional CFRP composite laminates using nondestructive evaluation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, In-Young; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Cha, Cheon-Seok; Lee, Kil-Sung; Hsu, David K.; Im, Kwang-Hee

    2007-07-01

    In particular, CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastics) composite materials have found wide applicability because of their inherent design flexibility and improved material properties. CFRP composites were manufactured from uni-direction prepreg sheet in this paper. It is important to assess fiber orientation, material properties and part defect in order to ensure product quality and structural integrity of CFRP because strength and stiffness of composites depend on fiber orientation. It is desirable to perform nondestructive evaluation which is very beneficial. An new method for nondestructively determining the fiber orientation in a composite laminate is presented. A one-sided pitch-catch setup was used in the detection and evaluation of flaws and material anomalies in the unidirectional CFRP composite laminates. Two Rayleigh wave transducers were joined head-to-head and used in the pitch-catch mode on the surface of the composites. The pitch-catch signal was found to be more sensitive than normal incidence backwall echo of longitudinal wave to subtle flaw conditions in the composite. Especially, ultrasonic waves were extensively characterized in the CFRP composite laminates both normal to fiber and along to fiber with using a one-sided direction of Rayleigh wave transducers. Also, one-sided ultrasonic measurement was made with using a Rayleigh wave transducers and a conventional scanner was used in an immersion tank for extracting fiber orientation information from the ultrasonic reflection in the unidirectional laminate. Therefore, it is thought that the proposed method is useful to evaluate integrity of CFRP laminates.

  17. Influence of Layup and Curing on the Surface Accuracy in the Manufacturing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Composite Space Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jianbao; Xie, Yongjie; Zhang, Boming; Sun, Baogang; Guo, Hongjun

    2017-12-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer, CFRP, composite materials have been used to fabricate space mirror. Usually the composite space mirror can completely replicate the high-precision surface of mould by replication process, but the actual surface accuracy of replicated space mirror is always reduced, still needed further study. We emphatically studied the error caused by layup and curing on the surface accuracy of space mirror through comparative experiments and analyses, the layup and curing influence factors include curing temperature, cooling rate of curing, method of prepreg lay-up, and area weight of fiber. Focusing on the four factors, we analyzed the error influence rule and put forward corresponding control measures to improve the surface figure of space mirror. For comparative analysis, six CFRP composite mirrors were fabricated and surface profile of mirrors were measured. Four guiding control measures were described here. Curing process of composite space mirror is our next focus.

  18. Structural response of near surface mounted CFRP strengthened reinforced concrete bridge deck overhang.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-11-01

    This report presents the results from an experimental investigation which explores the change in structural response due to the addition of near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) reinforcement for increasing the capacity of...

  19. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Guo, Guanping; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Chen, Xianchuan

    2016-02-06

    The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  20. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Guo, Guanping; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Chen, Xianchuan

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities. PMID:28787900

  1. Recognizing defects in carbon-fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuetze, R.; Hillger, W.

    1982-01-01

    The damage tolerance of structures made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic is tested under various loads. Test laminate (73/1/1, 24/9/1, 1465 A) specimens of thickness 1.5-3.2 mm with various defects were subjected to static and dynamic loads. Special attention was given to delamination, and ultrasonic C-scans were made on the specimens. It was shown that cracks from even small defects are detected with great accuracy. The same probes were also X rayed; defects that could not be detected under ordinary X rays were bored and studied under vacuum by a contrast technique. The nondestructive ultrasonic and X ray tests were controlled by partially destructive tests, and good agreement was observed.

  2. Study on properties of CFRP fabricated by VA-RTM process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Hwang, Ye Jin; Lee, Hyun Wook; Son, Soon Keun; Kim, Hyung Sik; Ha, Jin Uk

    2016-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have a lot of attention from industry and academia due to its excellent mechanical property. It has been used for aircraft, automotive and so on, since it can replace metallic materials and reduce total weight with increased physical properties. However, the manufacturing process and the material cost are still challenging to be commercialized in the automotive market. Therefore, many researchers are trying to minimize materials and process cost for broadening their applications. In this study, thermoset epoxy resins were used for binder of CFRP. Epoxy resins were investigated in order to figure out optimized curing speed under vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) processing condition. Mechanical properties of CFRP with different carbon fiber orientation and woven carbon fiber were compared to mathematically simulated results. In order to develop the application of automobile component, reliability tests of CFRP were carried out. Tensile strength of CFRP is increased when the orientation angle between fiber and axis of load was decreased (90°→ 0°). It is considered that epoxy and carbon fiber absorbed the tensile energy because the orientation of fiber and the load bearing are matched with axis direction. In addition, the CFRP automobile engine hood was fabricated by VARTM process. Drop weight impact tests (20kg & 100kg weight) were carried out in order to simulate crash performance of CFRP engine hoods.

  3. Impact damage monitoring in CFRP using fiber Bragg grating ultrasound sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Hiroshi; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Eguchi, Shunji

    2006-03-01

    Impact damage in CFRP was monitored by ultrasonic inspection method using small-diameter fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The FBG ultrasound detection system consisted of broadband light source, FBG sensor and tunable optical filter. Broadband light was launched into the FBG sensor. Light reflected from the FBG sensor was transmitted through the tunable optical filter whose transmissive wavelength range is comparable to the reflected wavelength range of the FBG sensor. The operating wavelength of tunable filter was set to optimize the sensitivity of ultrasound detection. Ultrasound vibration was converted into change in intensity of light transmitted through the filter. A cross-ply carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) plate was used as a test specimen for impact damage monitoring. A 6.3 X 9mm2 impact damage was introduced by ball dropping. Both FBG ultrasound sensor and piezoelectric ultrasound transmitter were attached on the CFRP surface. The change in responses to ultrasound excited by either spike signal or toneburst signal before and after impact damage was investigated. In response to ultrasound excited by spike signal, the response after impact damage showed a scattered behavior where the period of response signal got longer. In response to ultrasound excited by toneburst signal, damage signal features scattered and distorted waveform. Experimental results proved that the FBG inspection system could monitor a 6.3 X 9mm2 impact damage in CFRP.

  4. FEM investigation of concrete silos damaged and reinforced externally with CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermiche, Sihem; Boussaid, Ouzine; Redjel, Bachir; Amirat, Abdelaziz

    2018-03-01

    The present work investigates the reinforcement of concrete wheat-grain silos under initial damage. The reinforcement is achieved by mounting bands of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) on the external walls of the silo. 4 modes of reinforcement are adapted according to the width of the band, the gap between two bands, the height of reinforcement and the number of layers achieved through banding. Analytical analyses were conducted using the Reimbert method and the Eurocode 1 Part 4 method, as well as numerically through the finite element software Abaqus. Results show that the normal pressure reaches a peak value when approaching the silo hopper. Initial damage in a concrete silo was first determined using a 3D geometrical model, while the damage analyses were conducted to optimize the CFRP reinforcement by mounting 2 CFRP bands close together above and below the cylinder-hopper joint. Increasing the number of banding layers could produce better performance as the damage was slightly decreased from 0.161 to 0.152 for 1 and 4 layers respectively.

  5. Simulator trials to determine the wear of the combination aluminium oxide ceramic-carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) used as an insert in a hip socket.

    PubMed

    Scheller, G; Schwarz, M; Früh, H J; Jani, L

    1999-01-01

    Hip simulator trials were conducted to determine the initial wear between alumina femoral heads and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP, CAPROMAN) insert in a titanium socket. A force of 2500 N and a frequency of 0.857 H were applied. Using surface and sphericity measurement techniques, the amount of wear was determined. After 500,000 cycles, the centre of the head had moved by 10 microm into the insert, and the average radius increased by 2 microm. After 1 million cycles, the additional changes were less than 1 microm. Based on an examination of retrieved implants (wear rate: 6.1 microm/year) and based on the simulator results, the combination alumina-CFRP inserts could be approved for total hip replacement.

  6. A carbon fiber reinforced polymer cage for vertebral body replacement: technical note.

    PubMed

    Ciappetta, P; Boriani, S; Fava, G P

    1997-11-01

    We analyzed the surgical technique used for the replacement of damaged vertebral bodies of the thoracolumbar spine and the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages that are used to replace the pathological vertebral bodies. We also evaluated the biomechanical properties of carbon composite materials used in spinal surgery. The surgical technique of CFRP implants may be divided into two distinct steps, i.e., assembling the components that will replace the pathological vertebral bodies and connecting the cage to an osteosynthetic system to immobilize the cage. The CFRP cages, made of Ultrapek polymer and AS-4 pyrolytic carbon fiber (AcroMed, Rotterdam, The Netherlands), are of different sizes and may be placed one on top of the other and fixed together with a titanium rod. These components are hollow to allow fragments of bone to be pressed manually into them and present threaded holes at 15, 30, and 90 degrees on the external surface, permitting the insertion of screws to connect the cage to an anterior or posterior osteosynthetic system. To date, we have used CFRP cages in 13 patients undergoing corporectomies and 10 patients undergoing spondylectomies. None of our patients have reported complications. CFRP implants offer several advantages compared with titanium or surgical grade stainless steel implants, demonstrating high versatility and outstanding biological and mechanical properties. Furthermore, CFRP implants are radiolucent and do not hinder radiographic evaluation of bone fusion, allowing for better follow-up studies.

  7. Environmental Aspects of Use of Recycled Carbon Fiber Composites in Automotive Applications.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanran; McKechnie, Jon; Turner, Thomas; Wong, Kok H; Pickering, Stephen J

    2017-11-07

    The high cost and energy intensity of virgin carbon fiber manufacture provides an opportunity to recover substantial value from carbon fiber reinforced plastic wastes. In this study, we assess the life cycle environmental implications of recovering carbon fiber and producing composite materials as substitutes for conventional and proposed lightweight materials in automotive applications (e.g., steel, aluminum, virgin carbon fiber). Key parameters for the recycled carbon fiber materials, including fiber volume fraction and fiber alignment, are investigated to identify beneficial uses of recycled carbon fiber in the automotive sector. Recycled carbon fiber components can achieve the lowest life cycle environmental impacts of all materials considered, although the actual impact is highly dependent on the design criteria (λ value) of the specific component. Low production impacts associated with recycled carbon fiber components are observed relative to lightweight competitor materials (e.g., aluminum, virgin carbon fiber reinforced plastic). In addition, recycled carbon fiber components have low in-use energy use due to mass reductions and associated reduction in mass-induced fuel consumption. The results demonstrate environmental feasibility of the CFRP recycling materials, supporting the emerging commercialization of CF recycling technologies and identifying significant potential market opportunities in the automotive sector.

  8. Damping properties of fiber reinforced composite suitable for stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhi; Sun, Baochen; Du, Yanliang

    2011-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) cables were initially most investigated to replace steel cables. To further explore the advantages of FRP cables, the potential ability of vibration control is studied in this paper emphasizing the designable characteristic of hybrid FRP cables. Fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites and fiber reinforced epoxy composites were prepared by the pultrusion method. Due to the extensive application of fiber reinforced composites, the temperature spectrum and frequency spectrum of loss factor for the composite were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) equipment. The damping properties and damping mechanism of the composite were investigated and discussed at different temperatures and frequencies. The result indicates that the loss factor of the composites is increasing with the increase of the frequency from 0.1Hz to 2 Hz and decreasing with the decrease of the temperature from -20°C to 60°C. The loss factor of the carbon fiber composite is higher than that of the glass fiber for the same matrix. The loss factor of the vinyl ester composite is higher than that of the epoxy composite for the same fiber.

  9. Damping properties of fiber reinforced composite suitable for stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhi; Sun, Baochen; Du, Yanliang

    2012-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) cables were initially most investigated to replace steel cables. To further explore the advantages of FRP cables, the potential ability of vibration control is studied in this paper emphasizing the designable characteristic of hybrid FRP cables. Fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites and fiber reinforced epoxy composites were prepared by the pultrusion method. Due to the extensive application of fiber reinforced composites, the temperature spectrum and frequency spectrum of loss factor for the composite were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) equipment. The damping properties and damping mechanism of the composite were investigated and discussed at different temperatures and frequencies. The result indicates that the loss factor of the composites is increasing with the increase of the frequency from 0.1Hz to 2 Hz and decreasing with the decrease of the temperature from -20°C to 60°C. The loss factor of the carbon fiber composite is higher than that of the glass fiber for the same matrix. The loss factor of the vinyl ester composite is higher than that of the epoxy composite for the same fiber.

  10. Three-dimensional numerical simulation during laser processing of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Sato, Yuji; Matsunaga, Ei-ichi; Tsukamoto, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    We performed three-dimensional numerical simulation about laser processing of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) using OpenFOAM as libraries of finite volume method (FVM). Although a little theoretical or numerical studies about heat affected zone (HAZ) formation were performed, there is no research discussing how HAZ is generated considering time development about removal of each material. It is important to understand difference of removal speed of carbon fiber and resin in order to improve quality of cut surface of CFRP. We demonstrated how the carbon fiber and resin are removed by heat of ablation plume by our simulation. We found that carbon fiber is removed faster than resin at first stage because of the difference of thermal conductivity, and after that, the resin is removed faster because of its low combustion temperature. This result suggests the existence of optimal contacting time of the laser ablation and kerf of the target.

  11. Use of fiber reinforced polymer composite cable for post-tensioning application.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of this research project was to assess the feasibility of the use of innovative carbon fiber reinforced : polymer (CFRP) tendons and to develop guidelines for CFRP in post-tensioned bridge applications, including segmental : bri...

  12. Fiber-reinforced plastic composites. Possibilities and limitations of applications as machine-construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ophey, Lothar

    1988-01-01

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite structural materials in engineering applications is discussed in a survey of currently available technology and future prospects. The ongoing rapid growth in the use of these materials is described, and the criteria to be applied in selecting base materials, lamination schemes, fasteners, and processing methods are examined in detail and illustrated with graphs, diagrams, flow charts, and drawings. A description of a sample application (comparing the properties of steel, CFRP, SiC-reinforced Al, CFRP/steel, and CFRP/Al automobile piston rods) is included.

  13. Corrosion of steel members strengthenened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumadian, Ibrahim

    Due to many years of service at several cases of exposure at various environments there are many of steel bridges which are in need of rehabilitation. The infrastructure needs upgrading, repair or maintenance, and also strengthening, but by using an alternative as retrofits methods. The alternative retrofit method, which used fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials which their strength materials comes largely from the fiber such as carbon, glass, and aramid fiber. Of the most important materials used in the rehabilitation of infrastructure is a composite material newly developed in bonded externally carbon fiber and polymer (CFRP) sheets, which has achieved remarkable success in the rehabilitation and upgrading of structural members. This technique has many disadvantages one of them is galvanic corrosion. This study presents the effect of galvanic corrosion on the interfacial strength between carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and a steel substrate. A total of 35 double-lap joint specimens and 19 beams specimens are prepared and exposed to an aggressive service environment in conjunction with an electrical potential method accelerating corrosion damage. Six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including five specimens per category for double-lap joint specimens. And six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including three specimens per category for Beam section specimens. In addition one beam section specimen is control. The degree of corrosion is measured. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been used to monitor and confirm the proposed corrosion mechanisms on the surface of CFRP. In this study we are using FTIR-spectroscopic measurement systems in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength region (4000 - 400) cm-1 to monitor characteristic spectral features. Upon completion of corrosion processes, all specimens are monotonically loaded until failure

  14. Design and development of solid carbide step drill K34 for machining of CFRP and GFRP composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangaswamy, T.; Nagaraja, R.

    2018-04-01

    The Study focused on design and development of solid carbide step drill K34 to drill holes on composite materials such as Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP). The step drill K34 replaces step wise drilling of diameter 6.5mm and 9 mm holes that reduces the setup time, cutting speed, feed rate cost, delamination and increase the production rate. Several researchers have analyzed the effect of drilling process on various fiber reinforced plastic composites by carrying out using conventional tools and machinery. However, this process operation can lead to different kind of damages such as delamination, fiber pullout, and local cracks. To avoid the problems encountered at the time of drilling, suitable tool material and geometry is essential. This paper deals with the design and development of K34 Carbide step drill used to drill holes on CFRP and GFRP laminates. An Experimental study carried out to investigate the tool geometry, feed rate and cutting speed that avoids delamination and fiber breakage.

  15. Coded excitation for infrared non-destructive testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

    PubMed

    Mulaveesala, Ravibabu; Venkata Ghali, Subbarao

    2011-05-01

    This paper proposes a Barker coded excitation for defect detection using infrared non-destructive testing. Capability of the proposed excitation scheme is highlighted with recently introduced correlation based post processing approach and compared with the existing phase based analysis by taking the signal to noise ratio into consideration. Applicability of the proposed scheme has been experimentally validated on a carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimen containing flat bottom holes located at different depths.

  16. Fatigue damage evaluation of short fiber CFRP based on phase information of thermoelastic temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Shiozawa, Daiki; Nakamura, Yu; Nonaka, Shinichi; Hamada, Kenichi

    2017-05-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) is widely used for structural members of transportation vehicles such as automobile, aircraft or spacecraft, utilizing its excellent specific strength and specific rigidity in contrast with the metal. Short carbon fiber composite materials are receiving a lot of attentions because of their excellent moldability and productivity, however they show complicated behaviors in fatigue fracture due to the random fibers orientation. In this study, thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) using an infrared thermography was applied to the evaluation of fatigue damage in short carbon fiber composites. The distributions of the thermoelastic temperature change was measured during the fatigue test, as well as the phase difference between the thermoelastic temperature change and applied loading signal. Evolution of fatigue damages was detected from distributions of thermoelastic temperature change according to the thermoelastic damage analysis (TDA) procedure. It was also found that fatigue damage evolution was clearly detected than ever by the newly developed thermoelastic phase damage analysis (TPDA) in which damaged area was emphasized in the differential phase delay images utilizing the nature that carbon fiber show opposite phase thermoelastic temperature change.

  17. Development of Rapid Pipe Moulding Process for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics by Direct Resistance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuto; Harada, Ryuki; Uemura, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutao; Kuwahara, Hideyuki

    To deal with environmental issues, the gasoline mileage of passenger cars can be improved by reduction of the car weight. The use of car components made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) is increasing because of its superior mechanical properties and relatively low density. Many vehicle structural parts are pipe-shaped, such as suspension arms, torsion beams, door guard bars and impact beams. A reduction of the car weight is expected by using CFRP for these parts. Especially, when considering the recyclability and ease of production, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics are a prime candidate. On the other hand, the moulding process of CFRTP pipes for mass production has not been well established yet. For this pipe moulding process an induction heating method has been investigated already, however, this method requires a complicated coil system. To reduce the production cost, another system without such complicated equipment is to be developed. In this study, the pipe moulding process of CFRTP using direct resistance heating was developed. This heating method heats up the mould by Joule heating using skin effect of high-frequency current. The direct resistance heating method is desirable from a cost perspective, because this method can heat the mould directly without using any coils. Formerly developed Non-woven Stitched Multi-axial Cloth (NSMC) was used as semi-product material. NSMC is very suitable for the lamination process due to the fact that non-crimp stitched carbon fiber of [0°/+45°/90°/-45°] and polyamide 6 non-woven fabric are stitched to one sheet, resulting in a short production cycle time. The use of the pipe moulding process with the direct resistance heating method in combination with the NSMC, has resulted in the successful moulding of a CFRTP pipe of 300 mm in length, 40 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness.

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations. PMID:27314352

  19. The stress-strain relationships in wood and fiber-reinforced plastic laminae of reinforced glued-laminated wood beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, Daniel Arthur

    The reinforcement of wood and wood composite structural products to improve their mechanical properties has been in practice for many years. Recently, the use of high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) as a reinforcement in such applications has been commercialized. The reinforcement is manufactured using a standard pultrusion process or alternatively a sheet-forming process commonly referred to as "pulforming". The high-modulus fibers are predominately unidirectional, although off-axis fibers are often used to enhance off-axis properties. The fibers used are either of a single type or multiple types, which are called "hybrids". Unidirectional, single, and hybrid fiber FRP physical properties and characteristics were compared to wood. Full-scale reinforced glulams were tested. Aramid-reinforced plastics (ARP) used as tensile reinforcements were found to be superior in strength applications to other types of FRP made with fiber, such as carbon and fiberglass. Carbon/aramid-reinforced plastic (CARP) was shown to be superior in both modulus and strength design situations. Fiberglass was shown to be suitable only in hybrid situations with another fiber such as aramid or carbon and only in limited use situations where modulus was a design criteria. The testing and analysis showed that the global response of reinforced glulam beams is controlled by localized strength variations in the wood such as slope of grain, knots, finger joints, etc. in the tensile zone. The elemental tensile strains in the extreme wood tensile laminae, due to global applied loads, were found to be well below the strain at failure in clear wood samples recovered from the failure area. Two areas affecting the relationship between the wood and the FRP were investigated: compatibility of the wood and FRP materials and interface characteristics between the wood and FRP. The optimum strain value at yield point for an FRP was assessed to be slightly higher than the clear wood value in tension for a

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) for Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Process

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gao, Jiaying; Liang, Biao; Zhang, Weizhao

    In this work, a multiscale modeling framework for CFRP is introduced to study hierarchical structure of CFRP. Four distinct scales are defined: nanoscale, microscale, mesoscale, and macroscale. Information at lower scales can be passed to higher scale, which is beneficial for studying effect of constituents on macroscale part’s mechanical property. This bottom-up modeling approach enables better understanding of CFRP from finest details. Current study focuses on microscale and mesoscale. Representative volume element is used at microscale and mesoscale to model material’s properties. At microscale, unidirection CFRP (UD) RVE is used to study properties of UD. The UD RVE can bemore » modeled with different volumetric fraction to encounter non-uniform fiber distribution in CFRP part. Such consideration is important in modeling uncertainties at microscale level. Currently, we identified volumetric fraction as the only uncertainty parameters in UD RVE. To measure effective material properties of UD RVE, periodic boundary conditions (PBC) are applied to UD RVE to ensure convergence of obtained properties. Properties of UD is directly used at mesoscale woven RVE modeling, where each yarn is assumed to have same properties as UD. Within woven RVE, there can be many potential uncertainties parameters to consider for a physical modeling of CFRP. Currently, we will consider fiber misalignment within yarn and angle between wrap and weft yarns. PBC is applied to woven RVE to calculate its effective material properties. The effect of uncertainties are investigated quantitatively by Gaussian process. Preliminary results of UD and Woven study are analyzed for efficacy of the RVE modeling. This work is considered as the foundation for future multiscale modeling framework development for ICME project.« less

  1. Evaluation of thermal expansion coefficient of carbon fiber reinforced composites using electronic speckle interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chengzhi; Li, Kai; Jiang, Yuxi; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2018-01-08

    An optical system for measuring the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of materials has been developed based on electronic speckle interferometry. In this system, the temperature can be varied from -60°C to 180°C with a Peltier device. A specific specimen geometry and an optical arrangement based on the Michelson interferometer are proposed to measure the deformation along two orthogonal axes due to temperature changes. The advantages of the system include its high sensitivity and stability over the whole range of measurement. The experimental setup and approach for estimating the CTE was validated using an Aluminum alloy. Following this validation, the system was applied for characterizing the CTE of carbon fiber reinforced composite (CFRP) laminates. For the unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, the CTE varied with fiber orientation and exhibits anisotropic behavior. By stacking the plies with specific angles and order, the CTE of a specific CFRP was constrained to a low level with minimum variation temperature. The optical system developed in this study can be applied to CTE measurement for engineering and natural materials with high accuracy.

  2. A Smart Eddy Current Sensor Dedicated to the Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers.

    PubMed

    Naidjate, Mohammed; Helifa, Bachir; Feliachi, Mouloud; Lefkaier, Iben-Khaldoun; Heuer, Henning; Schulze, Martin

    2017-08-31

    This paper propose a new concept of an eddy current (EC) multi-element sensor for the characterization of carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) to evaluate the orientations of plies in CFRP and the order of their stacking. The main advantage of the new sensors is the flexible parametrization by electronical switching that reduces the effort for mechanical manipulation. The sensor response was calculated and proved by 3D finite element (FE) modeling. This sensor is dedicated to nondestructive testing (NDT) and can be an alternative for conventional mechanical rotating and rectangular sensors.

  3. Low Velocity Impact Behavior of Basalt Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishevan, Farzin Azimpour; Akbulut, Hamid; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    In this research, we studied low velocity impact response of homogenous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) composites and then compared the impact key parameters with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) homogenous composites. BFRPs and CFRPs were fabricated by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) method. Fabricated composites included 60% fiber and 40% epoxy matrix. Basalt and carbon fibers used as reinforcement materials were weaved in 2/2 twill textile tip in the structures of BFRP and CFRP composites. We also utilized the energy profile method to determine penetration and perforation threshold energies. The low velocity impact tests were carried out in 30, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 160 J energy magnitudes, and impact response of BFRPs was investigated by related force-deflection, force-time, deflection-time and absorbed energy-time graphics. The related impact key parameters such as maximum contact force, absorbed energy, deflection and duration time were compared with CFRPs for various impact energy levels. As a result, due to the higher toughness of basalt fibers, a better low velocity impact performance of BFRP than that of CFRP was observed. The effects of fabrication parameters, such as curing process, were studied on the low velocity impact behavior of BFRP. The results of tested new fabricated materials show that the change of fabrication process and curing conditions improves the impact behavior of BFRPs up to 13%.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Delamination in Drilling of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenliang; Chen, Yan; Yang, Haojun; Wang, Hua; Yao, Qiwei

    2018-03-01

    Drilling of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is a challenging task in modern manufacturing sector and machining induced delamination is one of the major problems affecting assembly precision. In this work, a new three-dimensional (3D) finite element model is developed to study the chip formation and entrance delamination in drilling of CFRP composites on the microscopic level. Fiber phase, matrix phase and equivalent homogeneous phase in the multi-phase model have different constitutive behaviors, respectively. A comparative drilling test, in which the cement carbide drill and unidirectional CFRP laminate are employed, is conducted to validate the proposedmodel in terms of the delamination and the similar changing trend is obtained. Microscopic mechanism of entrance delamination together with the chip formation process at four special fiber cutting angles (0°, 45°, 90° and 135°) is investigated. Moreover, the peeling force is also predicted. The results show that the delamination occurrence and the chip formation are both strongly dependent on the fiber cutting angle. The length of entrance delamination rises with increasing fiber cutting angles. Negligible delamination at 0° is attributed to the compression by the minor flank face. For 45° and 90°, the delamination resulted from the mode III fracture. At 135°, serious delamination which is driven by the mode I and III fractures is more inclined to occur and the peeling force reaches its maximum. Such numerical models can help understand the mechanism of hole entrance delamination further and provide guidance for the damage-free drilling of CFRP.

  5. Non-contact inline monitoring of thermoplastic CFRP tape quality using air-coupled ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essig, W.; Fey, P.; Meiler, S.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2017-02-01

    Beginning with the aerospace industry, fiber reinforced plastics have spread towards many applications such as automotive, civil engineering as well as sports and leisure articles. Their superior strength and stiffness to mass ratio made them the number one material for achieving high performance. Especially continuous fiber reinforced plastics allow for the construction of structures which are custom tailored to their mechanical loads by adjusting the paths of the fibers to the loading direction. The two main constituents of CFRP are carbon fibers and matrix. Two possibilities for matrix material exist: thermosetting and thermoplastic matrix. While thermosetting matrix may yield better properties with respect to thermal loads, thermoplasticity opens a wide range of applications due to weldability, shapeability, and compatibility to e.g. injection molded thermoplastic materials. Thin (0.1 mm) thermoplastic continuous fiber CFRP tapes with a width of 100 mm were examined using air-coupled ultrasound. Transducers were arranged in reflection as well as transmission setup. By slanted incidence of the ultrasound on the tape surface, guided waves were excited in the material in fiber direction and perpendicular to the fiber direction. Artificial defects - fiber cuts, matrix cuts, circular holes, low velocity impacts from tool drop, and sharp bends - were produced. Experiments on a stationary tape showed good detectability of all artificial defects by guided waves. Also the effects of variation in material properties, fiber volume content and fiber matrix adhesion being the most relevant, on guided wave propagation were examined, to allow for quality assessment. Guided wave measurements were supported by destructive analysis. Also an apparatus containing one endless loop of CFRP tape was constructed and built to simulate inline testing of CFRP tapes, as it would be employed in a CFRP tape production environment or at a CFRP tape processing facility. The influences of tape

  6. Drilling of CFRP and GFRP composite laminates using one shot solid carbide step drill K44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, R.; Rangaswamy, T.

    2018-04-01

    Drilling is a very common machining operation to install fasteners for assembly of laminates Drilling of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) composite laminate materials are different from that of convention materials that causes excessive tool wear and edge delamination. This paper reports on the tool geometry, cutting speed and feed rate. In this work two composite materials CFRP-G926 and Glass-7781 composite materials of varying thickness are drilled to investigate the effect of feed rate, and cutting speed. The study mainly focused on drilling laminates specimen of varying thickness 9 mm, 9.6 mm and 12 mm by using a single shot solid carbide step drill K44. The drilling is performed from lower to higher feed rate and cutting speed to investigate the hole quality, bottom top edge delamination, fiber breakages and local cracks. The work performed shows that a proper combination of tool geometry, cutting speed and feed rate can help to reduce the occurrence of delamination.

  7. Prospective study on cranioplasty with individual carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) implants produced by means of stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Gabriele; Tomancok, Berndt; Holl, Kurt; Trenkler, Johannes

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) cranial implants produced by means of 3-dimensional (3D) stereolithography (SL) and template modeling for reconstructions of complex or extensive cranial defects. A series of 41 cranioplasties with individual CFRP implants was performed in 37 patients between April 1996 and November 2002. Only patients with complex and/or large cranial defects were included, most of them having extended scarring or dural calcification and poor quality of the overlying soft-tissue cover after infection or multiple preceding operations. Involvement of frontal sinus, a known risk factor for complications after cranioplasty, was the case in 21 patients (51.2%). A computer-based 3D model of the skull with the bony defect was generated by means of stereolithography after acquisition, evaluation and transfer of the patient's helical computed tomography (CT) data. A wax template of the defect that was used to design the individual prosthesis-shape was invested in dental stone. Then, the cranial implant was fabricated out of CFRP by loosen mold. Reconstruction of defects measuring up to 17 x 9 cm was performed. The intra-operative fit of the implants was excellent in 36 (87.8%), good in 1 (2.4%), and fair in 4 (9.8%) of the cases. Problems of implant fit occurred because of extended scarring and poor quality of soft-tissue cover. Adverse reactions were observed in 5 patients (1 subdural, 1 subcutaneous hematoma, 2 infections, 1 allergic reaction). Excellent contours and a solid stable reconstruction have been maintained in 30 out of 35 remaining plates (mean follow-up 3.6 years). No adverse effects concerning postoperative imaging, the accuracy of electroencephalograms and radiation therapy have been observed. The authors believe that this relatively new technique represents an advance in the management of complex and large cranial defects, but seems less suitable for simple defects because of cost

  8. Finite element analysis of drilling in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite (CFRP) laminates are attractive for many applications in the aerospace industry especially as aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. Usually drilling is an important final machining process for components made of composite laminates. In drilling of CFRP, it is an imperative task to determine the maximum critical thrust forces that trigger inter-laminar and intra-laminar damage modes owing to highly anisotropic fibrous media; and negotiate integrity of composite structures. In this paper, a 3D finite element (FE) model of drilling in CFRP composite laminate is developed, which accurately takes into account the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. A user defined material model is developed to account for accurate though thickness response of composite laminates. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for a set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results from literature.

  9. Finite element analysis of CFRP reinforced silo structure design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Long; Xu, Xinsheng

    2017-11-01

    Because of poor construction, there is a serious problem of concrete quality in the silo project, which seriously affects the safe use of the structure. Concrete quality problems are mainly seen in three aspects: concrete strength cannot meet the design requirements, concrete cracking phenomenon is serious, and the unreasonable concrete vibration leads to a lot of honeycombs and surface voids. Silos are usually reinforced by carbon fiber cloth in order to ensure the safe use of silos. By the example of an alumina silo in a fly ash plant in Binzhou, Shandong Province, the alumina silo project was tested and examined on site. According to filed test results, the actual concrete strength was determined, and the damage causes of the silo was analysed. Then, a finite element analysis model of this silo was established, the CFRP cloth reinforcement method was adopted to strengthen the silo, and other technology like additional reinforcement, rebar planting, carbon fiber bonding technology was also expounded. The research of this paper is of great significance to the design and construction of silo structure.

  10. Detection of Fiber Layer-Up Lamination Order of CFRP Composite Using Thermal-Wave Radar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Junyan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, thermal-wave radar imaging (TWRI) is used as a nondestructive inspection method to evaluate carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP) composite. An inverse methodology that combines TWRI with numerical optimization technique is proposed to determine the fiber layer-up lamination sequences of anisotropic CFRP composite. A 7-layer CFRP laminate [0°/45°/90°/0°]_{{s}} is heated by a chirp-modulated Gaussian laser beam, and then finite element method (FEM) is employed to calculate the temperature field of CFRP laminates. The phase based on lock-in correlation between reference chirp signal and the thermal-wave signal is performed to obtain the phase image of TWRI, and the least square method is applied to reconstruct the cost function that minimizes the square of the difference between the phase of TWRI inspection and numerical calculation. A hybrid algorithm that combines the simulation annealing with Nelder-Mead simplex research method is employed to solve the reconstructed cost function and find the global optimal solution of the layer-up sequences of CFRP composite. The result shows the feasibility of estimating the fiber layer-up lamination sequences of CFRP composite with optimal discrete and constraint conditions.

  11. Assessment of historical masonry pillars reinforced by CFRP strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Roberto; Rosati, Giampaolo; Biolzi, Luigi; Cattaneo, Sara

    2014-10-01

    In this methodological study, the ultimate response of masonry pillars strengthened by externally bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) was investigated. Historical bricks were derived from a XVII century rural building, whilst a high strength mortar was utilized for the joints. The conventional experimental information, concerning the overall reaction force and relative displacements provided by "point" sensors (LVDTs and clip gauge), were herein enriched with no-contact, full-field kinematic measurements provided by 2D Digital Image Correlation (2D DIC). Experimental information were critically compared with prediction provided by an advanced three-dimensional models, based on nonlinear finite elements under the simplifying assumption of perfect adhesion between the reinforcement and the support.

  12. Experimental investigations of timber beams strengthened by CFRP and Rebars under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nianqiang, Zhou; Weixing, Shi

    2017-04-01

    Wooden structure houses deteriorate over time due to environmental aging, fatigue, and other reasons. In order to solve this problem, composite timber beams strengthened by extra steel bars (rebar) and carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) are studied experimentally in this paper. Specimens with various strenghting, ie., rebars only, CFRP only, and a combination of the two, were considered under four-point flexural tests. Failure, displacement and strain response and ductility capacity were evaluated for the present tested models. Dramatic enhancement of the capacity in addition to improved deflection and ductility were gained for the strengthened beams relative to the plain specimens, indicating the effectiveness of the reinforcement on the flexural strength of such composite beams.

  13. Properties of fiber reinforced plastics about static and dynamic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Vladimir V.; Korneeva, Natalia V.

    2016-05-01

    A method for investigation of impact toughness of anisotropic polymer composite materials (reinforced plastics) with the help of CM model sample in the configuration of microplastic (micro plastic) and impact pendulum-type testing machine under static and dynamic loadings has been developed. The method is called "Break by Impact" (Impact Break IB). The estimation of impact resistance CFRP by this method showed that an increase in loading velocity ~104 times the largest changes occurs in impact toughness and deformation ability of a material.

  14. Time Domain Reflectometry for Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-18

    Final Report PROJECT ID: AOARD-10-4112 Title: Time Domain Reflectometry for damage detection of laminated CFRP plate Researcher: Professor Akira...From July/2010 To July/2011 Abstract Recently, high toughness Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) laminates are used to primary structures. The...large laminated CFRP structures. In the previous study, Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) method is adopted for the detection of the fiber breakages of

  15. Study on reinforced concrete beams strengthened using shape memory alloy wires in combination with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Zhi-qiang; Ou, Jin-ping

    2007-12-01

    It has been proven that carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets or plates are capable of improving the strength of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. However, residual deformation of RC structures in service reduces the effect of CFRP strengthening. SMA can be applied to potentially decrease residual deformation and even close concrete cracks because of its recovery forces imposed on the concrete when heated. Therefore, a method of a RC structure strengthened by CFRP plates in combination with SMA wires is proposed in this paper. The strengthening effect of this method is investigated through experiments and numerical study based on the nonlinear finite element software ABAQUS in simple RC beams. Parametric analysis and assessment of damage by defining a damage index are carried out. The results indicate that recovery forces of SMA wires can decrease deflections and even close cracks in the concrete. The recovery rate of deflection of the beam increases with increasing the ratio of SMA wires. The specimen strengthened with CFRP plates has a relatively large stiffness and smaller damage index value when the residual deformation of the beam is first reduced by activation of the SMA wires. The effectiveness of this strengthening method for RC beams is verified by experimental and numerical results.

  16. The optimization study on the tool wear of carbide cutting tool during milling Carbon Fibre Reinforced (CFRP) using Response Surface Methodology (RSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor Khairusshima, M. K.; Hafiz Zakwan, B. Muhammad; Suhaily, M.; Sharifah, I. S. S.; Shaffiar, N. M.; Rashid, M. A. N.

    2018-01-01

    Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composite has become one of famous materials in industry, such as automotive, aeronautics, aerospace and aircraft. CFRP is attractive due to its properties, which promising better strength and high specification of mechanical properties other than its high resistance to corrosion. Other than being abrasive material due to the carbon nature, CFRP is an anisotropic material, which the knowledge of machining metal and steel cannot be applied during machining CFRP. The improper technique and parameters used to machine CFRP may result in high tool wear. This paper is to study the tool wear of 8 mm diameter carbide cutting tool during milling CFRP. To predict the suitable cutting parameters within range of 3500-6220 (rev/min), 200-245 (mm/min), and 0.4-1.8 (mm) for cutting speed, speed, feed rate and depth of cut respectively, which produce optimized result (less tool wear), Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used. Based on the developed mathematical model, feed rate was identified as the primary significant item that influenced tool wear. The optimized cutting parameters are cutting speed, feed and depth of cut of 3500 rev/min, 200 mm/min and 0.5 mm, respectively, with tool wear of 0.0267 mm. It is also can be observed that as the cutting speed and feed rate increased the tool wear is increasing.

  17. Capabilities of diagonally-cracked girders repaired with CFRP.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-06-01

    The technique of using carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) for strengthening conventionally reinforced concrete : (CRC) girders in flexure is well understood, but strengthening girders for shear is a newer application and less data are available. ...

  18. Rotary ultrasonic machining of CFRP: A comparison with grinding.

    PubMed

    Ning, F D; Cong, W L; Pei, Z J; Treadwell, C

    2016-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites have been intensively used in various industries due to their superior properties. In aircraft and aerospace industry, a large number of holes are required to be drilled into CFRP components at final stage for aircraft assembling. There are two major types of methods for hole making of CFRP composites in industry, twist drilling and its derived multi-points machining methods, and grinding and its related methods. The first type of methods are commonly used in hole making of CFRP composites. However, in recent years, rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM), a hybrid machining process combining ultrasonic machining and grinding, has also been successfully used in drilling of CFRP composites. It has been shown that RUM is superior to twist drilling in many aspects. However, there are no reported investigations on comparisons between RUM and grinding in drilling of CFRP. In this paper, these two drilling methods are compared in five aspects, including cutting force, torque, surface roughness, hole diameter, and material removal rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Capacity of Steel Fibers to Ensure the Structural Integrity of Reinforced Concrete Specimens Coated with CFRP Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribniak, V.; Arnautov, A. K.; Norkus, A.; Tamulenas, V.; Gudonis, E.; Sokolov, A.

    2016-07-01

    The capacity of steel fibers to ensure the structural integrity of reinforced concrete specimens coated with CFRP sheets was investigated. Test data for four ties and eight beams reinforced with steel or glass-FRP bars are presented. Experiments showed that the fibers significantly increased the cracking resistance and altered the failure character from the splitting of concrete to the debonding of the external sheets, which noticeably increased the load-carrying capacity of the strengthened specimens.

  20. Research on FBG-Based CFRP Structural Damage Identification Using BP Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiangyi; Lu, Shizeng; Jiang, Mingshun; Sui, Qingmei; Lv, Shanshan; Xiao, Hang; Jia, Yuxi; Jia, Lei

    2018-06-01

    A damage identification system of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) structures is investigated using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and back propagation (BP) neural network. FBG sensors are applied to construct the sensing network to detect the structural dynamic response signals generated by active actuation. The damage identification model is built based on the BP neural network. The dynamic signal characteristics extracted by the Fourier transform are the inputs, and the damage states are the outputs of the model. Besides, damages are simulated by placing lumped masses with different weights instead of inducing real damages, which is confirmed to be feasible by finite element analysis (FEA). At last, the damage identification system is verified on a CFRP plate with 300 mm × 300 mm experimental area, with the accurate identification of varied damage states. The system provides a practical way for CFRP structural damage identification.

  1. Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe to a stainless steel flange

    DOEpatents

    Allais, Arnaud [D-30625 Hannover, DE; Hoffmann, Ernst [D-30855 Langenhagen, DE

    2008-02-05

    Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) to a stainless steel flange (12, 16), in which the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) is accommodated in a ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) in the flange (12, 16), the groove conforming to the dimensions of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18), where the gap remaining between the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) and the ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) is filled with a sealant (19).

  2. Surface treatment of CFRP composites using femtosecond laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V.; Sharma, S. P.; de Moura, M. F. S. F.; Moreira, R. D. F.; Vilar, R.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we investigate the surface treatment of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites by laser ablation with femtosecond laser radiation. For this purpose, unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy matrix composites were treated with femtosecond laser pulses of 1024 nm wavelength and 550 fs duration. Laser tracks were inscribed on the material surface using pulse energies and scanning speeds in the range 0.1-0.5 mJ and 0.1-5 mm/s, respectively. The morphology of the laser treated surfaces was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. We show that, by using the appropriate processing parameters, a selective removal of the epoxy resin can be achieved, leaving the carbon fibers exposed. In addition, sub-micron laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are created on the carbon fibers surface, which may be potentially beneficial for the improvement of the fiber to matrix adhesion in adhesive bonds between CFRP parts.

  3. Analysis of hazardous substances released during CFRP laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hustedt, Michael; Walter, Juergen; Bluemel, Sven; Jaeschke, Peter; Kaierle, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Due to their outstanding mechanical properties, in particular their high specific strength parallel to the carbon fibers, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have a high potential regarding resource-efficient lightweight construction. Consequently, these composite materials are increasingly finding application in important industrial branches such as aircraft, automotive and wind energy industry. However, the processing of these materials is highly demanding. On the one hand, mechanical processing methods such as milling or drilling are sometimes rather slow, and they are connected with notable tool wear. On the other hand, thermal processing methods are critical as the two components matrix and reinforcement have widely differing thermophysical properties, possibly leading to damages of the composite structure in terms of pores or delamination. An emerging innovative method for processing of CFRP materials is the laser technology. As principally thermal method, laser processing is connected with the release of potentially hazardous, gaseous and particulate substances. Detailed knowledge of these process emissions is the basis to ensure the protection of man and the environment, according to the existing legal regulations. This knowledge will help to realize adequate protective measures and thus strengthen the development of CFRP laser processing. In this work, selected measurement methods and results of the analysis of the exhaust air and the air at the workplace during different laser processes with CFRP materials are presented. The investigations have been performed in the course of different cooperative projects, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in the course of the funding initiative "Photonic Processes and Tools for Resource-Efficient Lightweight Structures".

  4. Strengthening steel bridge girders using CFRP.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-06-01

    While traditional retrofitting methods for steel bridge girders could be time consuming and uneconomical, an alternative repair method is suggested using Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) laminate strips, providing engineers with a competitive ...

  5. Current Distribution Characteristics of CFRP Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) is widely used in the structures of aircrafts, automobiles, wing turbines, and rockets because of its qualities of high mechanical strength, low weight, fatigue resistance, and dimensional stability. However, these structures are often at risk of being struck by lightning. When lightning strikes such structures and lightning current flows through the CFRP, it may be structurally damaged because of the impact of the lightning strike or ignitions between layers. If there are electronic systems near the CFRP, they may break down or malfunction because of the resulting electromagnetic disturbance. In fact, the generation mechanisms of these breakdowns and malfunctions depend on the current distribution in the CFRP. Hence, it is critical to clarify the current distribution in various kinds of CFRPs. In this study, two kinds of CFRP panels—one composed of quasi-isotropic lamination layers and the other composed of 0°/90° lamination layers of unidirectional CFRP prepregs—are used to investigate the dependence of current distribution on the nature of the lamination layers. The current distribution measurements and simulations for CFRP panels are compared with those for a same-sized aluminum plate. The knowledge of these current distribution characteristics would be very useful for designing the CFRP structures of aircrafts, automobiles, wing turbines, rockets, etc. in the future.

  6. Mechanical analysis of CFRP-steel hybrid composites considering the interfacial adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jinhyeok; Sung, Minchang; Han, Sungjin; Shim, Wonbo; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2017-10-01

    Recently, hybrid composites of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) and steel have attracted great attention from automotive engineers due to their high potential for lightweight and multi-materials structures. Interestingly, such hybrid composites have demonstrated increased breaking strain, i.e., the breaking strain of CFRP in the hybrid was larger than that of single CFRP. As such the mechanical properties of hybrid composites could not be calculated using the rule of mixture. In addition, such increase is strongly dependent on the adhesion between CFRP and steel. In this study, a numerical analysis model was built to investigate the mechanism behind increased breaking strain of CFRP in the hybrid structure. Using cohesive zone model, the adhesion between CFRP and steel was effectively considered. The numerical results showed that the simulated mechanical behavior of the hybrid composites did not change as much as observed in experimental as the interfacial adhesion varied. We will investigate this discrepancy in detail and will report new analysis method suitable for CFRP and steel hybrid composites.

  7. High-speed imaging on static tensile test for unidirectional CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, Hideaki; Aoki, Yuichiro; Hirano, Yoshiyasu; Kondo, Yasushi; Nagao, Yosuke

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) under static tensile loading. The advantages of CFRP are higher specific stiffness and strength than the metal material. The use of CFRP is increasing in not only the aerospace and rapid transit railway industries but also the sports, leisure and automotive industries. The tensile fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP has not been experimentally made clear because the fracture speed of unidirectional CFRP is quite high. We selected the intermediate modulus and high strength unidirectional CFRP laminate which is a typical material used in the aerospace field. The fracture process under static tensile loading was captured by a conventional high-speed camera and a new type High-Speed Video Camera HPV-1. It was found that the duration of fracture is 200 microseconds or less, then images taken by a conventional camera doesn't have enough temporal-resolution. On the other hand, results obtained by HPV-1 have higher quality where the fracture process can be clearly observed.

  8. Assembly of Space CFRP Structures with Racing Sailing Boats Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Jose; Yuste, Laura; Pipo, Alvaro; Santarsiero, Pablo; Bureo, Rafael

    2014-06-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) is commonly used in space applications to get structures with good mechanical performances and a reduced mass. Most of larger parts of spatial structures are already made of CFRP but the achieved weight saving may be jeopardized by the use of metallic brackets as joining elements. This paper describes the work carried out to study and evaluate ways of reducing weight and costs of the joints between structural elements commonly used in space applications.The main objective of this project is to adapt design solutions coming from the racing sailing boats technology to space applications: the use of out-of autoclave (OoA) cured CFRP joints. In addition to that other CFRP solution common in space business, 3D- RTM Bracket, has been evaluated.This development studies the manufacturing and assembly feasibility making use of these CFRP technologies.This study also compares traditional metallic solutions with innovative CFRP ones in terms of mechanical performances at elementary level. Weight and cost of presented solutions are also compared.

  9. Study of tapping process of carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites/AA7075 stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, Alessio; Mehtedi, Mohamad El; Forcellese, Archimede; Nardinocchi, Alessia; Simoncini, Michela

    2018-05-01

    The present investigation aims at studying the tapping process of a three-layer stack constituted by two CFRP layers and a core plate in AA7075 aluminum alloy. The CFRP laminates were obtained by a pre-impregnated woven sample made up of T700 carbon fibers and a thermoset epoxy matrix. Tapping experiments were performed on a 5-axis machining center instrumented with a dynamometer to measure thrust force generated during process. A high-speed steel tool, coated with nanocomposite TiAlN, was used. According to the tool manufacturer recommendations, rotational speed and feed rate were 800 rpm and 1000 mm/min, respectively. Similar thrust force time history responses were obtained by tapping different holes, even though the vertical force increases with number of threaded holes. Furthermore, a quantitative evaluation of delamination at the periphery of entry holes was carried out. The delamination at the entry hole strongly increases with number of threaded holes.

  10. Durability Characteristics Analysis of Plastic Worm Wheel with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Won; Seo, Tae-Il

    2013-05-10

    Plastic worm wheel is widely used in the vehicle manufacturing field because it is favorable for weight lightening, vibration and noise reduction, as well as corrosion resistance. However, it is very difficult for general plastics to secure the mechanical properties that are required for vehicle gears. If the plastic resin is reinforced by glass fiber in the fabrication process of plastic worm wheel, it is possible to achieve the mechanical properties of metallic material levels. In this study, the mechanical characteristic analysis of the glass-reinforced plastic worm wheel, according to the contents of glass fiber, is performed by analytic and experimental methods. In the case of the glass fiber-reinforced resin, the orientation and contents of glass fibers can influence the mechanical properties. For the characteristic prediction of plastic worm wheel, computer-aided engineering (CAE) analysis processes such as structural and injection molding analysis were executed with the polyamide resin reinforcement glass fiber (25 wt %, 50 wt %). The injection mold for fabricating the prototype plastic worm wheel was designed and made to reflect the CAE analysis results. Finally, the durability of prototype plastic worm wheel fabricated by the injection molding process was evaluated by the experimental method and the characteristics according to the glass fiber contents.

  11. Durability Characteristics Analysis of Plastic Worm Wheel with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyamide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Won; Seo, Tae-Il

    2013-01-01

    Plastic worm wheel is widely used in the vehicle manufacturing field because it is favorable for weight lightening, vibration and noise reduction, as well as corrosion resistance. However, it is very difficult for general plastics to secure the mechanical properties that are required for vehicle gears. If the plastic resin is reinforced by glass fiber in the fabrication process of plastic worm wheel, it is possible to achieve the mechanical properties of metallic material levels. In this study, the mechanical characteristic analysis of the glass-reinforced plastic worm wheel, according to the contents of glass fiber, is performed by analytic and experimental methods. In the case of the glass fiber-reinforced resin, the orientation and contents of glass fibers can influence the mechanical properties. For the characteristic prediction of plastic worm wheel, computer-aided engineering (CAE) analysis processes such as structural and injection molding analysis were executed with the polyamide resin reinforcement glass fiber (25 wt %, 50 wt %). The injection mold for fabricating the prototype plastic worm wheel was designed and made to reflect the CAE analysis results. Finally, the durability of prototype plastic worm wheel fabricated by the injection molding process was evaluated by the experimental method and the characteristics according to the glass fiber contents. PMID:28809248

  12. Manufacturing and shear response characterization of carbon nanofiber modified CFRP using the out-of-autoclave-vacuum-bag-only cure process.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Erin E; Wallace, Landon F; Hickman, Gregory J S; Hsiao, Kuang-Ting

    2014-01-01

    The interlaminar shear response is studied for carbon nanofiber (CNF) modified out-of-autoclave-vacuum-bag-only (OOA-VBO) carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). Commercial OOA-VBO prepregs were coated with a CNF modified epoxy solution and a control epoxy solution without CNF to make CNF modified samples and control samples, respectively. Tensile testing was used to study the in-plane shear performance of [± 45°]4s composite laminates. Significant difference in failure modes between the control and CNF modified CFRPs was identified. The control samples experienced half-plane interlaminar delamination, whereas the CNF modified samples experienced a localized failure in the intralaminar region. Digital image correlation (DIC) surface strain results of the control sample showed no further surface strain increase along the delaminated section when the sample was further elongated prior to sample failure. On the other hand, the DIC results of the CNF modified sample showed that the surface strain increased relatively and uniformly across the CFRP as the sample was further elongated until sample failure. The failure mode evidence along with microscope pictures indicated that the CNF modification acted as a beneficial reinforcement inhibiting interlaminar delamination.

  13. Manufacturing and Shear Response Characterization of Carbon Nanofiber Modified CFRP Using the Out-of-Autoclave-Vacuum-Bag-Only Cure Process

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Erin E.; Wallace, Landon F.; Hickman, Gregory J. S.; Hsiao, Kuang-Ting

    2014-01-01

    The interlaminar shear response is studied for carbon nanofiber (CNF) modified out-of-autoclave-vacuum-bag-only (OOA-VBO) carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). Commercial OOA-VBO prepregs were coated with a CNF modified epoxy solution and a control epoxy solution without CNF to make CNF modified samples and control samples, respectively. Tensile testingwas used to study the in-plane shear performance of [±45°]4s composite laminates. Significant difference in failure modes between the control and CNF modified CFRPs was identified. The control samples experienced half-plane interlaminar delamination, whereas the CNF modified samples experienced a localized failure in the intralaminar region. Digital image correlation (DIC) surface strain results of the control sample showed no further surface strain increase along the delaminated section when the sample was further elongated prior to sample failure. On the other hand, the DIC results of the CNF modified sample showed that the surface strain increased relatively and uniformly across the CFRP as the sample was further elongated until sample failure. The failure mode evidence along with microscope pictures indicated that the CNF modification acted as a beneficial reinforcement inhibiting interlaminar delamination. PMID:24688435

  14. Effects of Carbon Nanomaterial Reinforcement on Composite Joints Under Cyclic and Impact Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    prepreg . 2 Figure 1. Composite decks on DDG1000. (From [3]) Figure 2. USV built from nanotube-reinforced carbon fiber composites. (From [2...been proven that the infusion of CNTs enhances the strength and fracture toughness of CFRP laminates under static loading (mode I and mode II...Kostopoulos et al. [5] investigated the influence of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the impact and after-impact behavior of CFRP laminates

  15. A micro-scale cutting model for UD CFRP composites with thermo-mechanical coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Hui; Gao, Jiaying; Kafka, Orion Landauer; ...

    2017-09-23

    Cutting a unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (UD CFRP) structure is the basic unit for CFRP machining, which is a complex thermal-mechanically coupled process. To reveal the deformation mechanism and predict cutting force in UD CFRP micro cutting, a micro-scale fracture model for UD CFRP cutting with thermal-mechanical coupling is demonstrated in this paper, which captures the failure modes for fibers, matrix and the interface based on a micro-level RVE using a relatively simple damage based fracture method. The thermal-mechanical coupling model at the micro scale is developed on the basis of the plastic energy dissipation and frictional heating during cutting.more » Failure models for the fiber, matrix and interface region are applied depending on the material properties of each of these three phases. Numerical simulations based on the above model with different fiber orientations were performed to predict the deformation and forces of different components in UD CFRP. Cutting experiments with the same fiber orientations as considered in the simulations were carried out to validate the force and deformation results. The predicted force and deformation patterns match well with evidence from our experiments. In general, the cutting force is larger than the thrust force regardless of fiber orientation. The cutting force reaches a maximum as the fiber orientation approaches 90 , but thrust forces do not vary substantially across cases. When the fiber orientation is acute, the deformation of fibers is much smaller than when the cutting angle is obtuse. Surface roughness follows the same trend with cutting angle as fiber deformation.« less

  16. A micro-scale cutting model for UD CFRP composites with thermo-mechanical coupling

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Cheng, Hui; Gao, Jiaying; Kafka, Orion Landauer

    Cutting a unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (UD CFRP) structure is the basic unit for CFRP machining, which is a complex thermal-mechanically coupled process. To reveal the deformation mechanism and predict cutting force in UD CFRP micro cutting, a micro-scale fracture model for UD CFRP cutting with thermal-mechanical coupling is demonstrated in this paper, which captures the failure modes for fibers, matrix and the interface based on a micro-level RVE using a relatively simple damage based fracture method. The thermal-mechanical coupling model at the micro scale is developed on the basis of the plastic energy dissipation and frictional heating during cutting.more » Failure models for the fiber, matrix and interface region are applied depending on the material properties of each of these three phases. Numerical simulations based on the above model with different fiber orientations were performed to predict the deformation and forces of different components in UD CFRP. Cutting experiments with the same fiber orientations as considered in the simulations were carried out to validate the force and deformation results. The predicted force and deformation patterns match well with evidence from our experiments. In general, the cutting force is larger than the thrust force regardless of fiber orientation. The cutting force reaches a maximum as the fiber orientation approaches 90 , but thrust forces do not vary substantially across cases. When the fiber orientation is acute, the deformation of fibers is much smaller than when the cutting angle is obtuse. Surface roughness follows the same trend with cutting angle as fiber deformation.« less

  17. Investigation of CFRP in aerospace field and improvement of the molding accuracy by using autoclave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisawa, Takunori

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) has come to be used in a wide range of industries such as sporting goods, fishing tackle and cars because it has a large number of advantages. In this situation, even the passenger aircraft industry also pays attention to the material. CFRP is an ideal material for airplanes because it has a lot of advantages such as light weight and strong, chemical resistance and corrosion resistance. Generally, autoclave is used for molding CFRP in the field of aerospace engineering. Autoclave is a machine that can mold a product by heating and pressurizing material in an evacuated bag. What is examined in this paper is an observation on handmade CFRP by a polarizing microscope. In addition, mechanical characteristics were investigated. Furthermore, an improvement of accuracy in CFRP molding using an autoclave is suggested from viewpoint of thermodynamics.

  18. Characterization of terahertz waves on foreign materials of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Sun-Kyu; Chiou, Chien-Ping; Jung, Jong-An

    2018-04-01

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are widely utilized due to their comparatively high performance in engineering structures. It is well understood that a nondestructive technique would be very beneficial. A new terahertz radiation has been recognized for its importance in technological applications. Recently, T-ray (terahertz ray) advances in technology and instrumentation have provided a probing field on the electromagnetic spectrum. In carbon composites, the penetration characterization of T-ray waves was fundamentally investigated in order to measure the painting thickness. Also, another study dealt with THz scan images of honeycomb sandwich composite panels using a refractive index (n), an absorption coefficient (α), the electrical conductivity of glass fiber embedded epoxy matrix composites, and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) skin. For experiments, a method of detecting FRP composites with impact damage is presented, which utilizes aluminum wires intertwined with woven carbon fibers as they are inserted into the surface of the CFRP honeycomb sandwich panels. Intensive characterization of T-ray for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of carbon composite reinforced plastics (CFRP) composites is discussed in relation to the E-field influence with CFRP composite laminates.

  19. CFRP composite mirrors for space telescopes and their micro-dimensional stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Shin; Kamiya, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Ryuzo

    2010-07-01

    Ultra-lightweight and high-accuracy CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastics) mirrors for space telescopes were fabricated to demonstrate their feasibility for light wavelength applications. The CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) of the all- CFRP sandwich panels was tailored to be smaller than 1×10-7/K. The surface accuracy of mirrors of 150 mm in diameter was 1.8 um RMS as fabricated and the surface smoothness was improved to 20 nm RMS by using a replica technique. Moisture expansion was considered the largest in un-predictable surface preciseness errors. The moisture expansion affected not only homologous shape change but also out-of-plane distortion especially in unsymmetrical compositions. Dimensional stability due to the moisture expansion was compared with a structural mathematical model.

  20. Monitoring of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Old Timber Beams via Strain and Multiresonant Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Rescalvo, Francisco J.; Valverde-Palacios, Ignacio; Gallego, Antolino

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes the monitoring of old timber beams with natural defects (knots, grain deviations, fissures and wanes), reinforced using carbon composite materials (CFRP). Reinforcement consisted of the combination of a CFRP laminate strip and a carbon fabric discontinuously wrapping the timber element. Monitoring considered the use and comparison of two types of sensors: strain gauges and multi-resonant acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Results demonstrate that: (1) the mechanical behavior of the beams can be considerably improved by means of the use of CFRP (160% in bending load capacity and 90% in stiffness); (2) Acoustic emission sensors provide comparable information to strain gauges. This fact points to the great potential of AE techniques for in-service damage assessment in real wood structures. PMID:29673155

  1. Monitoring of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Old Timber Beams via Strain and Multiresonant Acoustic Emission Sensors.

    PubMed

    Rescalvo, Francisco J; Valverde-Palacios, Ignacio; Suarez, Elisabet; Roldán, Andrés; Gallego, Antolino

    2018-04-17

    This paper proposes the monitoring of old timber beams with natural defects (knots, grain deviations, fissures and wanes), reinforced using carbon composite materials (CFRP). Reinforcement consisted of the combination of a CFRP laminate strip and a carbon fabric discontinuously wrapping the timber element. Monitoring considered the use and comparison of two types of sensors: strain gauges and multi-resonant acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Results demonstrate that: (1) the mechanical behavior of the beams can be considerably improved by means of the use of CFRP (160% in bending load capacity and 90% in stiffness); (2) Acoustic emission sensors provide comparable information to strain gauges. This fact points to the great potential of AE techniques for in-service damage assessment in real wood structures.

  2. A fractal image analysis methodology for heat damage inspection in carbon fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridas, Aswin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Prabhathan, P.; Chan, Kelvin; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials in the aerospace industry have far improved the load carrying properties and the design flexibility of aircraft structures. A high strength to weight ratio, low thermal conductivity, and a low thermal expansion coefficient gives it an edge for applications demanding stringent loading conditions. Specifically, this paper focuses on the behavior of CFRP composites under stringent thermal loads. The properties of composites are largely affected by external thermal loads, especially when the loads are beyond the glass temperature, Tg, of the composite. Beyond this, the composites are subject to prominent changes in mechanical and thermal properties which may further lead to material decomposition. Furthermore, thermal damage formation being chaotic, a strict dimension cannot be associated with the formed damage. In this context, this paper focuses on comparing multiple speckle image analysis algorithms to effectively characterize the formed thermal damages on the CFRP specimen. This would provide us with a fast method for quantifying the extent of heat damage in carbon composites, thus reducing the required time for inspection. The image analysis methods used for the comparison include fractal dimensional analysis of the formed speckle pattern and analysis of number and size of various connecting elements in the binary image.

  3. Method of making carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian (Inventor); Benander, Robert (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of making a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composite wherein the result is a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement is embedded within a ceramic matrix. The ceramic matrix does not penetrate into the carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement to any significant degree. The carbide matrix is a formed in situ solid carbide of at least one metal having a melting point above about 1850 degrees centigrade. At least when the composite is intended to operate between approximately 1500 and 2000 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time the solid carbide with the embedded reinforcement is formed first by reaction infiltration. Molten silicon is then diffused into the carbide. The molten silicon diffuses preferentially into the carbide matrix but not to any significant degree into the carbon-carbon reinforcement. Where the composite is intended to operate between approximately 2000 and 2700 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time such diffusion of molten silicon into the carbide is optional and generally preferred, but not essential.

  4. Measurement of Three-Dimensional Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities for Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastics Using Lock-In Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Takuya; Nagano, Hosei

    2015-11-01

    A new measurement technique to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity, the distribution of in-plane anisotropy, and the out-of-plane thermal diffusivity has been developed to evaluate the thermal conductivity of anisotropic materials such as carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs). The measurements were conducted by using a laser-spot-periodic-heating method. The temperature of the sample is detected by using lock-in thermography. Thermography can analyze the phase difference between the periodic heat input and the temperature response of the sample. Two kinds of samples, unidirectional (UD) and cross-ply (CP) pitch-based CFRPs, were fabricated and tested in an atmospheric condition. All carbon fibers of the UD sample run in one direction [90°]. The carbon fibers of the CP sample run in two directions [0°/90°]. It is found that, by using lock-in thermography, it is able to visualize the thermal anisotropy and calculate the angular dependence of the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the CFRPs. The out-of-plane thermal diffusivity of CFRPs was also measured by analyzing the frequency dependence of the phase difference.

  5. Surface characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymers by picosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma, Rodolfo; Palmieri, Frank; Connell, John; Yost, William; Fitz-Gerald, James

    2018-02-01

    Adhesive bonding of composite materials requires reliable monitoring and detection of surface contaminants as part of a vigorous quality control process to assure robust and durable bonded structures. Surface treatment and effective monitoring prior to bonding are essential in order to obtain a surface which is free from contaminants that may lead to inferior bond quality. In this study, the focus is to advance the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique by using pulse energies below 100 μJ (μLIBS) for the detection of low levels of silicone contaminants in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Various CFRP surface conditions were investigated by LIBS using ∼10 ps, 355 nm laser pulses with pulse energies below 30 μJ. Time-resolved analysis was conducted to optimize the gate delay and gate width for the detection of the C I emission line at 247.9 nm to monitor the epoxy resin matrix of CFRP composites and the Si I emission line at 288.2 nm for detection of silicone contaminants in CFRP. To study the surface sensitivity to silicone contamination, CFRP surfaces were coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the active ingredient in many mold release agents. The presence of PDMS was studied by inspecting the Si I emission lines at 251.6 nm and 288.2 nm. The measured PDMS areal densities ranged from 0.15 to 2 μg/cm2. LIBS measurements were performed before and after laser surface ablation. The results demonstrate the successful detection of PDMS thin layers on CFRP using picosecond μLIBS.

  6. Method for detecting damage in carbon-fibre reinforced plastic-steel structures based on eddy current pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Liu, Zhiping; Jiang, Xiaoli; Lodewijks, Gabrol

    2018-01-01

    Eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT) is well established for non-destructive testing of electrical conductive materials, featuring the advantages of contactless, intuitive detecting and efficient heating. The concept of divergence characterization of the damage rate of carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP)-steel structures can be extended to ECPT thermal pattern characterization. It was found in this study that the use of ECPT technology on CFRP-steel structures generated a sizeable amount of valuable information for comprehensive material diagnostics. The relationship between divergence and transient thermal patterns can be identified and analysed by deploying mathematical models to analyse the information about fibre texture-like orientations, gaps and undulations in these multi-layered materials. The developed algorithm enabled the removal of information about fibre texture and the extraction of damage features. The model of the CFRP-glue-steel structures with damage was established using COMSOL Multiphysics® software, and quantitative non-destructive damage evaluation from the ECPT image areas was derived. The results of this proposed method illustrate that damaged areas are highly affected by available information about fibre texture. This proposed work can be applied for detection of impact induced damage and quantitative evaluation of CFRP structures.

  7. Strengthening of defected beam-column joints using CFRP.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamed H; Afefy, Hamdy M; Kassem, Nesreen M; Fawzy, Tarek M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study for the structural performance of reinforced concrete (RC) exterior beam-column joints rehabilitated using carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP). The present experimental program consists of testing 10 half-scale specimens divided into three groups covering three possible defects in addition to an adequately detailed control specimen. The considered defects include the absence of the transverse reinforcement within the joint core, insufficient bond length for the beam main reinforcement and inadequate spliced implanted column on the joint. Three different strengthening schemes were used to rehabilitate the defected beam-column joints including externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets in addition to near surface mounted (NSM) CFRP strips. The failure criteria including ultimate capacity, mode of failure, initial stiffness, ductility and the developed ultimate strain in the reinforcing steel and CFRP were considered and compared for each group for the control and the CFRP-strengthened specimens. The test results showed that the proposed CFRP strengthening configurations represented the best choice for strengthening the first two defects from the viewpoint of the studied failure criteria. On the other hand, the results of the third group showed that strengthening the joint using NSM strip technique enabled the specimen to outperform the structural performance of the control specimen while strengthening the joints using externally bonded CFRP strips and sheets failed to restore the strengthened joints capacity.

  8. Use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) with CFRP anchors for shear-strengthening and design recommendations/quality control procedures for CFRP anchors.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using bi-directional layouts of CFRP for shear : strengthening of bridge girders. In a previous project (0-6306), it was demonstrated that uni-directional CFRP : strips and CFRP anchors...

  9. Rotary ultrasonic machining of CFRP: a mechanistic predictive model for cutting force.

    PubMed

    Cong, W L; Pei, Z J; Sun, X; Zhang, C L

    2014-02-01

    Cutting force is one of the most important output variables in rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM) of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites. Many experimental investigations on cutting force in RUM of CFRP have been reported. However, in the literature, there are no cutting force models for RUM of CFRP. This paper develops a mechanistic predictive model for cutting force in RUM of CFRP. The material removal mechanism of CFRP in RUM has been analyzed first. The model is based on the assumption that brittle fracture is the dominant mode of material removal. CFRP micromechanical analysis has been conducted to represent CFRP as an equivalent homogeneous material to obtain the mechanical properties of CFRP from its components. Based on this model, relationships between input variables (including ultrasonic vibration amplitude, tool rotation speed, feedrate, abrasive size, and abrasive concentration) and cutting force can be predicted. The relationships between input variables and important intermediate variables (indentation depth, effective contact time, and maximum impact force of single abrasive grain) have been investigated to explain predicted trends of cutting force. Experiments are conducted to verify the model, and experimental results agree well with predicted trends from this model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  11. Analysis of acoustic emission cumulative signal strength of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Hakeem, Z.; Noorsuhada, M. N.; Azmi, I.; Noor Syafeekha, M. S.; Soffian Noor, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated using acoustic emission (AE) technique. Three beams with dimension of 150 mm width, 200 mm depth and 1500 mm length were fabricated. The results generated from AE parameters were analysed as well as signal strength and cumulative signal strength. Three relationships were produced namely load versus deflection, signal strength versus time and cumulative signal strength with respect to time. Each relationship indicates significant physical behaviour as the crack propagated in the beams. It is found that an addition of steel fibre in the concrete mix and strengthening of CFRP increase the ultimate load of the beam and the activity of signal strength. Moreover, the highest signal strength generated can be identified. From the study, the occurrence of crack in the beam can be predicted using AE signal strength.

  12. Experimental Study of the Mode I Interlaminar Fracture Toughness Improvement on Stitched CFRP Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahori, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Yoichi; Ito, Akira

    Experimental investigations have been made on the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness (GIC) of stitched CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) laminates. The GIC of stitched CFRP laminates fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) and stitching with five kinds of stitch thread thicknesses, 400d (denier), 600d, 800d, 1000d, and 1200d were experimentally obtained by double cantilever beam (DCB) tests. Interlaminar tension tests for stitched CFRP laminates for a specimen containing only one stitch thread were also carried out. The consumption energy of the single stitched CFRP laminates (Wt) and stitch threads broken modes were obtained by such interlaminar tension tests. DCB test results show that the GIC of stitched CFRP laminates of several stitch thread thicknesses are governed by stitch density (SD). It is found that the relationship between ΔGIC/ΔSD and Wt are linear function. In other words, the GIC of Kevlar® stitched CFRP laminates is not only governed by SD but also Wt obtained from the interlaminar tension tests. It is also suggested that the interlaminar tension test results exhibit the potential for GIC estimation on the Kevlar® stitched CFRP laminates instead of conducting the DCB tests.

  13. Study of a reinforced concrete beam strengthened using a combination of SMA wire and CFRP plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-qiang; Li, Hui

    2006-03-01

    Traditional methods used for strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, such as bonding of steel plates, suffer from inherent disadvantages. In recent years, strengthening of RC structures using carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) plates has attracted considerable attentions around the world. Most existing research on CFRP plate bonding for flexural strengthening of RC beams has been carried out for the strength enhancement. However, little research is focused on effect of residual deformations on the strengthening. The residual deformations have an important effect on the strengthening by CFRP plates. There exists a very significant challenge how the residual deformations are reduced. Shape memory alloy (SMA) has showed outstanding functional properties as an actuator. It is a possibility that SMA can be used to reduce the residual deformation and make cracks of concrete close by imposing the recovery forces on the concrete in the tensile zone. It is only an emergency damage repair since the SMA wires need to be heated continuously. So, an innovative method of a RC beam strengthened by CFRP plates in combination with SMA wires was first investigated experimentally in this paper. In addition, the nonlinear finite element software of ABAQUS was employed to further simulate the behavior of RC beams strengthened through the new strengthening method. It can be found that this is an excellent and effective strengthening method.

  14. Light-weight sandwich panel honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber composite skin for electric vehicle application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyono, Sukmaji Indro; Widodo, Angit; Anwar, Miftahul; Diharjo, Kuncoro; Triyono, Teguh; Hapid, A.; Kaleg, S.

    2016-03-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite is relative high cost material in current manufacturing process of electric vehicle body structure. Sandwich panels consisting polypropylene (PP) honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber composite skin were investigated. The aim of present paper was evaluate the flexural properties and bending rigidity of various volume fraction carbon-glass fiber composite skins with the honeycomb core. The flexural properties and cost of panels were compared to the reported values of solid hybrid Carbon/Glass FRP used for the frame body structure of electric vehicle. The finite element model of represented sandwich panel was established to characterize the flexural properties of material using homogenization technique. Finally, simplified model was employed to crashworthiness analysis for engine hood of the body electric vehicle structure. The good cost-electiveness of honeycomb core with hybrid carbon-glass fiber skin has the potential to be used as a light-weight alternative material in body electric vehicle fabricated.

  15. Proposed Methodology for Design of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Spike Anchors into Reinforced Concrete

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    MacFarlane, Eric Robert

    The included methodology, calculations, and drawings support design of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) spike anchors for securing U-wrap CFRP onto reinforced concrete Tbeams. This content pertains to an installation in one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s facilities. The anchors are part of a seismic rehabilitation to the subject facility. The information contained here is for information purposes only. The reader is encouraged to verify all equations, details, and methodology prior to usage in future projects. However, development of the content contained here complied with Los Alamos National Laboratory’s NQA-1 quality assurance program for nuclear structures. Furthermore, the formulations andmore » details came from the referenced published literature. This literature represents the current state of the art for FRP anchor design. Construction personnel tested the subject anchor design to the required demand level demonstrated in the calculation. The testing demonstrated the ability of the anchors noted to carry loads in excess of 15 kips in direct tension. The anchors were not tested to failure in part because of the hazards associated with testing large-capacity tensile systems to failure. The calculation, methodology, and drawing originator was Eric MacFarlane of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL) Office of Seismic Hazards and Risk Mitigation (OSHRM). The checker for all components was Mike Salmon of the LANL OSHRM. The independent reviewers of all components were Insung Kim and Loring Wyllie of Degenkolb Engineers. Note that Insung Kim contributed to the initial formulations in the calculations that pertained directly to his Doctoral research.« less

  16. Calibrated heat flow model for the determination of different heat-affected zones in single-pass laser-cut CFRP using a cw CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, P.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Speker, N.; Sommer, B.; Graf, T.

    2015-03-01

    Laser machining has great potential for automated manufacturing of parts made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) due to the nearly force and tool-wear free processing. The high vaporization temperatures and the large heat conductivity of the carbon fibers, however, lead to unintentional heat conduction into the material causing damage in zones close to the process. In this paper, the matrix damage zone (MDZ) is subdivided into a matrix sublimation zone (MSZ) where the matrix material was sublimated and a zone where the temperature temporarily exceeded a value causing structural damage in the matrix. In order to investigate the extent of these zones, a one-dimensional heat flow model was applied, which was calibrated by cutting experiments using temperature sensors embedded in the CFRP samples. The investigations showed that the extents of the MSZ and MDZ are dominated by a total interaction time, which includes the passage of the laser beam and the continued interaction of the cloud of hot ablation products with the carbon fibers at the kerf wall and that from a practical point of view, the experimentally determined effective heat conductivity is suitable for simple estimations of the heat-affected zones in CFRP.

  17. Shear transfer in concrete reinforced with carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mokadem, Khaled Mounir

    2001-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The research started with preliminary tests and studies on the behavior and effect of carbon fibers in different water solutions and mortar/concrete mixes. The research work investigated the use of CF in the production of concrete pipes and prestressed concrete double-tee sections. The research then focused on studying the effect of using carbon fibers on the direct shear transfer of sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens. Findings and conclusions. In general, adding carbon fibers to concrete improved its tensile characteristics but decreased its compressive strength. The decrease in compressive strength was due to the decrease in concrete density as fibers act as three-dimensional mesh that entrapped air. The decrease in compressive strength was also due to the increase in the total surface area of non-cementitious material in the concrete. Sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens with carbon fibers had lower shear carrying capacity than those without carbon fibers for the same cement content in the concrete. Current building codes and specifications estimate the shear strength of concrete as a ratio of the compressive strength. If applying the same principals then the ratio of shear strength to compressive strength for concrete reinforced with carbon fibers is higher than that for concrete without carbon fibers.

  18. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Marco; Righetti, Luca; Borri, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The use of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP) bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar’s pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm. PMID:28793423

  19. Hybrid Effect Evaluation of Steel Fiber and Carbon Fiber on the Performance of the Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weimin; Yin, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is an important method to enhance the performance of concrete. In this study, the compressive test and impact test were conducted, and then the hybrid effect between steel fiber (SF) and carbon fiber (CF) was evaluated by employing the hybrid effect index. Compressive toughness and impact toughness of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) and hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC) were explored at steel fiber volume fraction 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and carbon fiber 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%. Results showed that the addition of steel fiber and carbon fiber can increase the compressive strength. SF, CF and the hybridization between them could increase the compressive toughness significantly. The impact test results showed that as the volume of fiber increased, the impact number of the first visible crack and the ultimate failure also increased. The improvement of toughness mainly lay in improving the crack resistance after the first crack. Based on the test results, the positive hybrid effect of steel fiber and carbon fiber existed in hybrid fiber reinforced concrete. The relationship between the compressive toughness and impact toughness was also explored. PMID:28773824

  20. Hybrid Effect Evaluation of Steel Fiber and Carbon Fiber on the Performance of the Fiber Reinforced Concrete.

    PubMed

    Song, Weimin; Yin, Jian

    2016-08-18

    Fiber reinforcement is an important method to enhance the performance of concrete. In this study, the compressive test and impact test were conducted, and then the hybrid effect between steel fiber (SF) and carbon fiber (CF) was evaluated by employing the hybrid effect index. Compressive toughness and impact toughness of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) and hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC) were explored at steel fiber volume fraction 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and carbon fiber 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%. Results showed that the addition of steel fiber and carbon fiber can increase the compressive strength. SF, CF and the hybridization between them could increase the compressive toughness significantly. The impact test results showed that as the volume of fiber increased, the impact number of the first visible crack and the ultimate failure also increased. The improvement of toughness mainly lay in improving the crack resistance after the first crack. Based on the test results, the positive hybrid effect of steel fiber and carbon fiber existed in hybrid fiber reinforced concrete. The relationship between the compressive toughness and impact toughness was also explored.

  1. Thermal Properties of Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Luong, Hoa; Ratcliffe, James G.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages for aircraft structures over conventional aluminum alloys: light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low thermal and electrical conductivities of CFRP composites are deficient in providing structural safety under certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. One possible solution to these issues is to interleave carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers. However, the thermal and electrical properties of the orthotropic hybrid CNT/CF composites have not been fully understood. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel (Registered Trademark) IM7/8852 prepreg. The CNT sheets were infused with a 5% solution of a compatible epoxy resin prior to composite fabrication. Orthotropic thermal and electrical conductivities of the hybrid polymer composites were evaluated. The interleaved CNT sheets improved the in-plane thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by about 400% and the electrical conductivity by about 3 orders of magnitude.

  2. Effects of specialized drill bits on hole defects of CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Xu, Jinyang; Chen, Ming

    2018-05-01

    Drilling is a conventional machining process widely applied to carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) for the riveting and fastening purposes in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, the machining mechanism of CFRP composites differ significantly from that of homogeneous metal alloys owing to their prominent anisotropy and heterogeneity. Serious hole defects such as fiber pullout, matrix debonding and delamination are generally produced during the hole-making process, resulting in the poor machined surface quality, low fatigue durability or even the part rejections. In order to minimize the defects especially the delamination damage in composites drilling, specialized drill bits are often a primary choice being widely adopted in a real production. This paper aims to study the effects of two drills differing in geometrical characteristics during the drilling of CFRP laminates. A number of drilling experiments were carried out with the aim to evaluate the drilling performance of different drill bits. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the drilled surfaces to study the surface roughness. A high frequency scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) was applied to characterize the drilled hole morphologies with a particular focus on the delamination damage occurring in the CFRP laminates. The obtained results indicate that the fiber orientation relative to the cutting direction is a key factor affecting hole morphology and hole wall defects can be reduced by utilizing specialized drill geometries. Moreover, the dagger drill was confirmed outperforming the brad spur drill from the aspect of reducing drilling-induced delamination.

  3. Shear strength of R/C beams wrapped with CFRP fabric

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-08-01

    The emergence of high strength epoxies has enhanced the feasibility of increasing the shear strength of concrete beams by wrapping with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) fabric. The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the increase in ...

  4. Fiber reinforced engineering plastics

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Rodney E. Jacobson; Karl D. Sears; John H. Underwood

    2001-01-01

    Although natural fiber reinforced commodity thermoplastics have a wide range of nonstructural applications in the automotive and decking industries, there have been few reports of cellulosic fiber-reinforced engineering thermoplastics. The commonly held belief has been that the only thermoplastics amenable to natural-fibre reinforcement are limited to low-melting (...

  5. Ablation behaviors of carbon reinforced polymer composites by laser of different operation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen-Wu; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2015-10-01

    Laser ablation mechanism of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composite is of critical meaning for the laser machining process. The ablation behaviors are investigated on the CFRP laminates subject to continuous wave, long duration pulsed wave and short duration pulsed wave lasers. Distinctive ablation phenomena have been observed and the effects of laser operation modes are discussed. The typical temperature patterns resulted from laser irradiation are computed by finite element analysis and thereby the different ablation mechanisms are interpreted.

  6. Fabrication of TiNi/CFRP smart composite using cold drawn TiNi wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ya; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Jang, Byung-Koog; Nagai, Hideki; Oishi, Ryutaro; Kishi, Teruo

    2002-07-01

    In recent years, pre-strained TiNi shape memory alloys (SMA) have been used for fabricating smart structure with carbon fibers reinforced plastics (CFRP) in order to suppress microscopic mechanical damages. However, since the cure temperature of CFRP is higher than the reverse transformation temperatures of TiNi SMA, special fixture jigs have to be used for keeping the pre-strain during fabrication, which restricted its practical application. In order to overcome this difficulty, we developed a new method to fabricate SMA/CFRP smart composites without using special fixture jigs by controlling the transformation temperatures of SMA during fabrication. This method consists of using heavily cold-worked wires to increase the reverse transformation temperatures, and of using flash electrical heating of the wires after fabrication in order to decrease the reverse transformation temperatures to a lower temperature range again without damaging the epoxy resin around SMA wires. By choosing proper cold-working rate and composition of TiNi alloys, the reverse transformation temperatures were well controlled, and the TiNi/CFRP hybrid smart composite was fabricated without using special fixture jigs. The damage suppressing effect of cold drawn wires embedded in CFRP was confirmed.

  7. Selected Bibliography on Fiber-Reinforced Cement and Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    A listing of 660 references with author index is given for fiber reinforced cement and gypsum matrices, mortars, and concretes. Fiber types include steel, glass, plastic, asbestos, organic, carbon, and others. (Author)

  8. Development of CFRP mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Shin; Kamiya, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Ryuzo

    2013-09-01

    CFRP (Caron fiber reinforced plastics) have superior properties of high specific elasticity and low thermal expansion for satellite telescope structures. However, difficulties to achieve required surface accuracy and to ensure stability in orbit have discouraged CFRP application as main mirrors. We have developed ultra-light weight and high precision CFRP mirrors of sandwich structures composed of CFRP skins and CFRP cores using a replica technique. Shape accuracy of the demonstrated mirrors of 150 mm in diameter was 0.8 μm RMS (Root Mean Square) and surface roughness was 5 nm RMS as fabricated. Further optimization of fabrication process conditions to improve surface accuracy was studied using flat sandwich panels. Then surface accuracy of the flat CFRP sandwich panels of 150 mm square was improved to flatness of 0.2 μm RMS with surface roughness of 6 nm RMS. The surface accuracy vs. size of trial models indicated high possibility of fabrication of over 1m size mirrors with surface accuracy of 1μm. Feasibility of CFRP mirrors for low temperature applications was examined for JASMINE project as an example. Stability of surface accuracy of CFRP mirrors against temperature and moisture was discussed.

  9. CFRP mirror technology for cryogenic space interferometry: review and progress to date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Martyn L.; Walker, David; Naylor, David A.; Veenendaal, Ian T.; Gom, Brad G.

    2016-07-01

    The FP7 project, FISICA (Far Infrared Space Interferometer Critical Assessment), called for the investigation into the suitability of Carbon fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) for a 2m primary mirror. In this paper, we focus on the major challenge for application, the development of a mirror design that would maintain its form at cryogenic temperatures. In order to limit self-emission the primary is to be cooled to 4K whilst not exceeding a form error of 275nm PV. We then describe the development of an FEA model that utilizes test data obtained from a cryogenic test undertaken at the University of Lethbridge on CFRP samples. To conclude, suggestions are made in order to advance this technology to be suitable for such an application in order to exploit the low density and superior specific properties of polymeric composites.

  10. Flexural behavior of R/C beams strengthened with CFRP sheets or fabric

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-08-01

    The resistance to electro-chemical corrosion, high-strength to weight ratio, larger creep strain, fatigue resistance, nonmagnetic and non-metallic properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites offer a viable alternative to bonding o...

  11. Cranioplasty with individual carbon fibre reinforced polymere (CFRP) medical grade implants based on CAD/CAM technique.

    PubMed

    Saringer, W; Nöbauer-Huhmann, I; Knosp, E

    2002-11-01

    The authors present a new method for the reconstruction of large or complex-formed cranial bone defects using prefabricated, computer-generated, individual CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced plastics) medical grade implants. CFRP is a composite material containing carbon fibres embedded in an epoxy resin matrix. It is radiolucent, heat-resistant, extremely strong and light (its weight is 20% that of steel), has a modulus of elasticity close to that of bone, and an established biocompatibility. The utilisation of a CAD/CAM (computer aided design/computer aided manufacture) technique based on digitised computed tomography (CT) data, with stereolithographic modelling as intermediate step, enabled the production of individual, prefabricated CFRP medical grade implants with an arithmetical maximum aberration in extension of less than +/-0.25 mm. Between 1995 and February 2002, 29 patients (15 men and 14 women; mean age, 39.9 years; range, 16 to 67 years) underwent cranioplasty with CFRP medical grade implants at the neurosurgical department of the University of Vienna. Twenty-four patients were repaired secondarily (delayed cranioplasty) while 5 were repaired immediately following craniectomy (single stage cranioplasty). All cases were assessed for the accuracy of the intra-operative fit of the implant, restoration of the natural skull contour and aesthetics and adverse symptoms. The intra-operative fit was excellent in 93.1% and good in 6.9% of the implants. In two cases minor adjustments of the bony margin of the defect were required. The operating time for insertion ranged from 16 to 38 minutes, median 21 minutes. Postoperatively, 86.2% of the patients graded the restoration of their natural skull shape and symmetry as excellent while 13.8% termed it good. In one patient a non-space occupying subdural hygroma was found at the follow-up, but required no intervention. Two patients experienced atrophy of the frontal portion of the temporal muscle while one patient had a

  12. GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Fibrous glass fillers Binders used in the glass plastic industry Method of manufacturing glass plastics and glass plastic articles Properties of fiberglass Primary areas for use of glass fibre reinforced plastics

  13. Design and optimization of the CFRP mirror components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Gong, Xiaoxue

    2017-09-01

    As carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) material has been developed and demonstrated as an effective material in lightweight telescope reflector manufacturing recently, the authors of this article have extended to apply this material on the lightweight space camera mirror design and fabrication. By CFRP composite laminate design and optimization using finite element method (FEM) analysis, a spherical mirror with φ316 mm diameter whose core cell reinforcement is an isogrid configuration is fabricated. Compared with traditional ways of applying ultra-low-expansion glass (ULE) on the CFRP mirror surface, the method of nickel electroplating on the surface effectively reduces the processing cost and difficulty of the CFRP mirror. Through the FEM analysis, the first order resonance frequency of the CFRP mirror components reaches up to 652.3 Hz. Under gravity affection coupling with +5°C temperature rising, the mirror surface shape root-mean-square values (RMS) at the optical axis horizontal state is 5.74 nm, which meets mechanical and optical requirements of the mirror components on space camera.

  14. Damage sensing and mechanical characteristics of CFRP strengthened steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieda, Genki; Nakano, Daiki; Fuji, Yuya; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro; Matsui, Takahiro; Ochi, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Yukihiro

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, a large number of structures that were built during the period of high economic growth in Japan is beginning to show signs of aging. For example, the structural performance of steel structures has degraded due to corrosion. One measure that has been proposed and studied to address this issue is the adhesive bonding method, which can be used to repair and reinforce these structures. However, this method produces brittle fracture in the adhesive layer and is difficult to maintain after bonding. To solve the problem faced by this method, a clarification of the mechanical properties inside the adhesive is necessary. Then this background, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor has been used in this study. This sensor can be embedded within the building material that needs repairing and reinforcing because an FBG sensor is extremely small. Eventually based on this, a three-point bending test of a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) strengthened steel plate that was embedded with an FBG sensor was conducted. This paper demonstrates that an FBG sensor is effectively applicable for sensing when damage occurs.

  15. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  16. Temperature-compensated strain measurement using fiber Bragg grating sensors embedded in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Nobuhira; Okabe, Yoji; Takeda, Nobuo

    2003-12-01

    For accurate strain measurement by fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, it is necessary to compensate the influence of temperature change. In this study two devices using FBG sensors have been developed for temperature-compensated strain measurement. They are named 'hybrid sensor' and 'laminate sensor', respectively. The former consists of two different materials connected in series: carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and glass fiber reinforced plastic. Each material contains an FBG sensor with a different Bragg wavelength, and both ends of the device are glued to a structure. Using the difference of their Young's moduli and coefficients of thermal expansion, both strain and temperature can be measured. The latter sensor is a laminate of two 90° plies of CFRP and an epoxy plate, and an FBG sensor is embedded in the epoxy plate. When the temperature changes, the cross section of the optical fiber is deformed by the thermal residual stress. The deformation of the fiber causes the birefringence and widens the reflection spectrum. Since the temperature can be calculated from the spectrum width, which changes in proportion to the temperature, the accuracy of the strain measurement is improved. The usefulness of these sensors was experimentally confirmed.

  17. Lightning Damage of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Laminates with Interlayers Modified by Nickel-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qi; Wan, Guoshun; Xu, Yongzheng; Guo, Yunli; Du, Tianxiang; Yi, Xiaosu; Jia, Yuxi

    2017-12-01

    The numerical model of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with electrically modified interlayers subjected to lightning strike is constructed through finite element simulation, in which both intra-laminar and inter-laminar lightning damages are considered by means of coupled electrical-thermal-pyrolytic analysis method. Then the lightning damage extents including the damage volume and maximum damage depth are investigated. The results reveal that the simulated lightning damages could be qualitatively compared to the experimental counterparts of CFRP laminates with interlayers modified by nickel-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWCNTs). With higher electrical conductivity of modified interlayer and more amount of modified interlayers, both damage volume and maximum damage depth are reduced. This work provides an effective guidance to the anti-lightning optimization of CFRP laminates.

  18. Properties of Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Kang, Jin Ho; Grimsley, Brian W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) offer the potential to enhance the multi-functionality of composites with improved thermal and electrical conductivity. In this study, hybrid CNT/carbon fiber (CF) polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing. Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated.

  19. Global Carbon Fiber Composites. Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Das, Sujit; Warren, Joshua A.; West, Devin

    The objective of this study is to identify key opportunities in the carbon fiber (CF) supply chain where resources and investments can help advance the clean energy economy. The report focuses on four application areas—wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels—that top the list of industries using CF and carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) and are particularly relevant to the mission of U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE). For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fibermore » and components.« less

  20. Detecting barely visible impact damages of honeycomb and laminate CFRP using digital shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, Mikhail; Lyubutin, Pavel; Byakov, Anton; Panin, Sergey

    2017-12-01

    The paper deals with testing of the developed shearographic device and signal processing software applied for nondestructive testing/evaluation (NDT/E) of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP). There were 4 types of test specimens: laminate CFRP, honeycomb CFRP, laminate CFRP with the channel stiffener, and laminate CFRP bolted with the aluminum plate. All the specimens were subjected to impact loading using the drop weight technique according to the ASTM D7136 standard in order to produce barely visible impact damages (BVID). The obtained shearograms easily reveal BVIDs as nonuniformities in strain fields. The results are analyzed and discussed in view of the sensitivity of shearography to delamination and debonding.

  1. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  2. Detection of Matrix Crack Density of CFRP using an Electrical Potential Change Method with Multiple Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoroki, Akira; Omagari, Kazuomi

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminates are adopted for fuel tank structures of next generation space rockets or automobiles. Matrix cracks may cause fuel leak or trigger fatigue damage. A monitoring system of the matrix crack density is required. The authors have developed an electrical resistance change method for the monitoring of delamination cracks in CFRP laminates. Reinforcement fibers are used as a self-sensing system. In the present study, the electric potential method is adopted for matrix crack density monitoring. Finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to investigate the possibility of monitoring matrix crack density using multiple electrodes mounted on a single surface of a specimen. The FEA reveals the matrix crack density increases electrical resistance for a target segment between electrodes. Experimental confirmation was also performed using cross-ply laminates. Eight electrodes were mounted on a single surface of a specimen using silver paste after polishing of the specimen surface with sandpaper. The two outermost electrodes applied electrical current, and the inner electrodes measured electric voltage changes. The slope of electrical resistance during reloading is revealed to be an appropriate index for the detection of matrix crack density.

  3. Evaluation of a bridge deck with CFRP prestressed panels under fatigue load cycles

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-09-01

    This report summarizes a study conducted under an IBRC (Innovative Bridge Research and Construction) project sponsored by the FHWA. In this project, a bridge deck with CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced polymeric) prestressed panels and cast-in-place topp...

  4. Development of a CFRP Engine Thrust Frame for the Next Generation Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Javad; van der Bas, Finn; Cruijssen, Henk

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the activities related to the development of technologies for a composite Engine Thrust Frame (ETF) for the next generation launchers. In particular, the design and analyses of a full Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) engine thrust frame are presented in more detail. The ETF concept is composed of three main parts, i.e. an aluminium top-ring which connects the ETF to the upper-stage tank, a CFRP cone, and a CFRP cone-cap which connects the Vinci engine to the ETF. The main challenging requirements for development of a CFRP ETF are recalled. The ETF concept and its mechanical performances are assessed.

  5. A study examining the effects of water-miscible cutting fluids for end milling process of carbon fiber reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan, Ruito; Matsuoka, Hironori; Ono, Hajime; Ryu, Takahiro; Nakae, Takashi; Shuto, Schuichi; Watanabe, Suguru; Sato, Yuta

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the improvements to the tool life and finished surface roughness by using water-miscible cutting fluids in carbon fiber reinforced plastics end milling. In cutting tests, it was found that the use of emulsion type, soluble type, and solution type cutting fluids improved tool life compared with the case of dry cutting. Specifically, significant differences in tool life were observed at a high cutting speed of 171 m/min. In addition, the finished surface exhibited a low level of roughness when the solution type cutting fluid was used, regardless of the cutting speed.

  6. The meter-class carbon fiber reinforced polymer mirror and segmented mirror telescope at the Naval Postgraduate School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher; Fernandez, Bautista; Bagnasco, John; Martinez, Ty; Romeo, Robert; Agrawal, Brij

    2015-03-01

    The Adaptive Optics Center of Excellence for National Security at the Naval Postgraduate School has implemented a technology testing platform and array of facilities for next-generation space-based telescopes and imaging system development. The Segmented Mirror Telescope is a 3-meter, 6 segment telescope with actuators on its mirrors for system optical correction. Currently, investigation is being conducted in the use of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced polymer structures for large monolithic optics. Advantages of this material include lower manufacturing costs, very low weight, and high durability and survivability compared to its glass counterparts. Design and testing has begun on a 1-meter, optical quality CFRP parabolic mirror for the purpose of injecting collimated laser light through the SMT primary and secondary mirrors as well as the following aft optics that include wavefront sensors and deformable mirrors. This paper will present the design, testing, and usage of this CFRP parabolic mirror and the current path moving forward with this ever-evolving technology.

  7. Predicting fatigue service life extension of RC bridges with externally bonded CFRP repairs : [project brief].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-12-01

    Externally bonded carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites (CFRPs) are increasingly used to : repair concrete bridges. CFRP design techniques are a proven approach for enhancing the strength : of existing structures. This project investigated the d...

  8. Thermal-Mechanical Response of Cracked Satin Weave CFRP Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.; Takeda, T.

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines the thermal-mechanical response of satin weave carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with internal and/or edge cracks subjected to uniaxial tension load at cryogenic temperatures. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. Two-dimentional generalized plane strain finite element models are developed to study the effects of residual thermal stresses and cracks on the mechanical behavior of CFRP woven laminates. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  9. Detection of delamination defects in CFRP materials using ultrasonic signal processing.

    PubMed

    Benammar, Abdessalem; Drai, Redouane; Guessoum, Abderrezak

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, signal processing techniques are tested for their ability to resolve echoes associated with delaminations in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer multi-layered composite materials (CFRP) detected by ultrasonic methods. These methods include split spectrum processing (SSP) and the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. A simulation study on defect detection was performed, and results were validated experimentally on CFRP with and without delamination defects taken from aircraft. Comparison of the methods for their ability to resolve echoes are made.

  10. Co-Curing of CFRP-Steel Hybrid Joints Using the Vacuum Assisted Resin Infusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streitferdt, Alexander; Rudolph, Natalie; Taha, Iman

    2017-10-01

    This study focuses on the one-step co-curing process of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) joined with a steel plate to form a hybrid structure. In this process CFRP laminate and bond to the metal are realized simultaneously by resin infusion, such that the same resin serves for both infusion and adhesion. For comparison, the commonly applied two-step process of adhesive bonding is studied. In this case, the CFRP laminate is fabricated in a first stage through resin infusion of Non Crimp Fabric (NCF) and joined to the steel plate in a further step through adhesive bonding. For this purpose, the commercially available epoxy-based Betamate 1620 is applied. CFRP laminates were fabricated using two different resin systems, namely the epoxy (EP)-based RTM6 and a newly developed fast curing polyurethane (PU) resin. Results show comparable mechanical performance of the PU and EP based CFRP laminates. The strength of the bond of the co-cured samples was in the same order as the samples adhesively bonded with the PU resin and the structural adhesive. The assembly adhesive with higher ductility showed a weaker performance compared to the other tests. It could be shown that the surface roughness had the highest impact on the joint performance under the investigated conditions.

  11. Strut deformation in CFRP-strengthened reinforced concrete deep beams.

    PubMed

    Panjehpour, Mohammad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Voo, Yen Lei

    2014-01-01

    Strut-and-tie model (STM) method evolved as one of the most useful designs for shear critical structures and discontinuity regions (D-regions). It provides widespread applications in the design of deep beams as recommended by many codes. The estimation of bottle-shaped strut dimensions, as a main constituent of STM, is essential in design calculations. The application of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) as lightweight material with high tensile strength for strengthening D-regions is currently on the increase. However, the CFRP-strengthening of deep beam complicates the dimensions estimation of bottle-shaped strut. Therefore, this research aimed to investigate the effect of CFRP-strengthening on the deformation of RC strut in the design of deep beams. Two groups of specimens comprising six unstrengthened and six CFRP-strengthened RC deep beams with the shear span to the effective depth ratios (a/d) of 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 1.75, and 2.00 were constructed in this research. These beams were tested under four-point bending configuration. The deformation of struts was experimentally evaluated using the values of strain along and perpendicular to the strut centreline. The evaluation was made by the comparisons between unstrengthened and CFRP-strengthened struts regarding the widening and shortening. The key variables were a/d ratio and applied load level.

  12. Dielectric strength of irradiated fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, Karl; Weber, Harald W.; Hastik, Ronald; Hauser, Hans; Gerstenberg, Heiko

    2001-05-01

    The insulation system for the toroidal field model coil of international thermonuclear experimental reactor is a fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) laminate, which consists of a combined Kapton/R-glass-fiber reinforcement tape, vacuum-impregnated with an epoxy DGEBA system. Pure disk-shaped laminates, disk-shaped FRP/stainless-steel sandwiches, and conductor insulation prototypes were irradiated at 5 K in a fission reactor up to a fast neutron fluence of 10 22 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) to investigate the radiation induced degradation of the dielectric strength of the insulation system. After warm-up to room temperature, swelling, weight loss, and the breakdown strength were measured at 77 K. The sandwich swells by 4% at a fluence of 5×10 21 m -2 and by 9% at 1×10 22 m -2. The weight loss of the FRP is 2% at 1×10 22 m -2. The dielectric strength remained unchanged over the whole dose range.

  13. Strength Analysis of Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic during Buckling,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An algorithm is developed for calculating and analyzing the stress tensor by the experimental function of deflections during the buckling of glass ... fiber -reinforced plastic shells loaded with a hydrostatic load. Malmeyster’s theory of strength is used to qualitatively establish the possible points of shell failure. (Author-PL)

  14. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chase C.

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are composite materials that consist of carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix, a combination that yields materials with properties exceeding the individual properties of each component. CFRP have several advantages over metals: they offer superior strength to weight ratios and superior resistance to corrosion and chemical attack. These advantages, along with continuing improvement in manufacturing processes, have resulted in rapid growth in the number of CFRP products and applications especially in the aerospace/aviation, wind energy, automotive, and sporting goods industries. Due to theses well-documented benefits and advancements in manufacturing capabilities, CFRP will continue to replace traditional materials of construction throughout several industries. However, some of the same properties that make CFRP outstanding materials also pose a major problem once these materials reach the end of service life. They become difficult to recycle. With composite consumption in North America growing by almost 5 times the rate of the US GDP in 2012, this lack of recyclability is a growing concern. As consumption increases, more waste will inevitably be generated. Current composite recycling technologies include mechanical recycling, thermal processing, and chemical processing. The major challenge of CFRP recycling is the ability to recover materials of high-value and preserve their properties. To this end, the most suitable technology is chemical processing, where the polymer matrix can be broken down and removed from the fiber, with limited damage to the fibers. This can be achieved using high concentration acids, but such a process is undesirable due to the toxicity of such materials. A viable alternative to acid is water in the sub-critical and supercritical region. Under these conditions, the behavior of this abundant and most environmentally friendly solvent resembles that of an organic compound, facilitating the breakdown

  15. Static Design and Finite Element Analysis of Innovative CFRP Transverse Leaf Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carello, M.; Airale, A. G.; Ferraris, A.; Messana, A.; Sisca, L.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the design and the numerical modelization of a novel transverse Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) leaf-spring prototype for a multilink suspension. The most significant innovation is in the functional integration where the leaf spring has been designed to work as spring, anti-roll bar, lower and longitudinal arms at the same time. In particular, the adopted work flow maintains a very close correlation between virtual simulations and experimental tests. Firstly, several tests have been conducted on the CFRP specimen to characterize the material property. Secondly, a virtual card fitting has been carried out in order to set up the leaf-spring Finite Element (FE) model using CRASURV formulation as material law and RADIOSS as solver. Finally, extensive tests have been done on the manufactured component for validation. The results obtained show a good agreement between virtual simulation and experimental tests. Moreover, this solution enabled the suspension to reduce about 75% of the total mass without losing performance.

  16. One-Sided Measurement Approach on Ultrasonic Beam Path Analysis in CFRP Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, K. H.; Hsu, D. K.; Kim, H. J.; Song, S. J.; Dayal, V.; Barnard, D.; Park, J. W.; Lee, K. S.; Yang, Y. J.; Yang, I. Y.

    2008-02-01

    Composite materials are attractive for a wide range of applications because of high performance engineering structures. In particular, the importance of carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been generally recognized in both space and civil aircraft industries; so, CFRP composite laminates are widely used. It is very important to detect defects in composite laminates because they cause the mechanical properties (stiffness, strength) of the laminate to be reduced. As well known for ultrasonic technique for evaluating the defect of CFRP composite laminates, a pitch-catch technique was found to be more practical than normal incidence backwall echo of longitudinal wave to arbitrary flaws in the composite, including fiber orientation, low level porosity, ply waviness, and cracks. The measurement depth using Rayleigh probes can be increased by increasing the separation distance of the transmitting and receiving probes. Also, with the aid of the automatic scanner, the one-sided pitch-catch probe was used to produce C-scan images for mapping out the images with beam profiles. Especially pitch-catch beam path was nondestructively characterized for the specimens when measuring a peak-to-peak amplitude and time-of-flight in order to build the beam profile modeling in the unidirectional CFRP composite laminates. Also, the pitch-catch simulation was performed to predict the beam profile trend of wave propagation in the unidirectional CF/Epoxy composite laminates. Therefore, it is found that the experimentally Rayleigh wave variation of pitch-catch ultrasonic signal was consistent with simulated results and one-side ultrasonic measurement might be very useful to detect the defects in CFRP composites.

  17. A comprehensive study of woven carbon fiber-reinforced nylon 6 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, Selvum

    Liquid molding of thermoset composites has become very popular in all industry sectors, including aerospace, automotive, mass transit, and sporting goods, but the cost of materials and processing has limited the use to high-end applications. Thermoplastic composites are relatively cheap; however, the use has been limited to components with short fiber reinforcing. The high melt viscosity and short processing window precludes their use in the liquid molding of large structures and applications with continuous fiber reinforcement. The current research addresses the processing parameters, methodology, and limitations of vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) of carbon fabric-reinforced, thermoplastic polyamide 6 (PA6). The material used is casting grade PA6. The process developed for using VARTM to produce carbon fabric-reinforced PA6 composites is explained in detail. The effects of infusion temperature and flow distance on the fiber weight fraction and crystallinity of the PA6 resin are presented. The degree of conversion from monomer to polymer was determined. Microscopic studies to show the wet-out of the fibers at the filament level are also presented. Tensile, flexural, short beam shear strength (SBSS), and low-velocity impact test results are presented and compared to a equivalent thermoset matrix composite. The rubber toughened epoxy system (SC-15) was chosen for the comparative study because the system has been especially developed to overcome the brittle nature of epoxy composites. The environmental effects of moisture and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the carbon/nylon 6 composite were investigated. The samples were immersed in boiling water for 100 hr, and mechanical tests were conducted. Results showed that moisture causes plasticization of the matrix and attacks the fiber matrix interface. This leads to deterioration of the mechanical properties. The samples were also exposed to UV for up to 600 hr, and post exposure tests were conducted. The

  18. Effect of tool geometry and cutting parameters on delamination and thrust forces in drilling CFRP/Al-Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bouami, Souhail; Habak, Malek; Franz, Gérald; Velasco, Raphaël; Vantomme, Pascal

    2016-10-01

    Composite materials are increasingly used for structural parts in the aeronautic industries. Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) are often used in combination with metallic materials, mostly aluminium alloys. This raises new problems in aircraft assembly. Delamination is one of these problems. In this study, CFRP/Al-Li stacks is used as experimental material for investigation effect of interaction of cutting parameters (cutting speed and feed rate) and tool geometry on delamination and thrust forces in drilling operation. A plan of experiments, based on Taguchi design method, was employed to investigate the influence of tool geometry and in particular the point angle and cutting parameters on delamination and axial effort. The experimental results demonstrate that the feed rate is the major parameter and the importance of tool point angle in delamination and thrust forces in the stacks were shown.

  19. Debris of carbon-fibers originated from a CFRP (pEEK) wrist-plate triggered a destruent synovitis in human.

    PubMed

    Merolli, Antonio; Rocchi, Lorenzo; De Spirito, Marco; Federico, Francesco; Morini, Alessandro; Mingarelli, Luigi; Fanfani, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Application of carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP) artifacts in humans has been promoted in Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery. Literature documents the biocompatibility of materials used, namely carbon fibers (CF) and poly-ether thermoplastics, like poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK). A properly designed and accurately implanted composite artifact should not expose its fibers during or after surgery: however this may happen. A white Caucasian woman came to our attention 11 months after surgery for a wrist fracture. She had a severe impairment, being unable to flex the thumb; index finger and distal phalanx of third finger. We retrieved a correctly positioned plate and documented an aggressive erosive flexor tendons synovitis with eroded stumps of flexor tendons. The plate and soft tissues were analyzed by Visible Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Histopathology showed granulomatous fibrogenic process with CF engulfed inside multinucleated giant cells. Fibers were unmasked and disrupted inside the holes where screws were tightened and corrugation of the polymer coating led to further unmasking. The mechanism of foreign-body reaction to CF has not been studied in depth yet, particularly at the ultrastructural level and in Humans. This case documents a damage occurred in a clinical application and which was theoretically possible. Our opinion is that a proper way to promote the use of CRFP in the Clinic in the short term is to direct Research towards finding a better way to prevent CF debris to be exposed and released. In the longer term, the biological response to CF deserves a deeper understanding.

  20. [Preparation of carbon fiber reinforced fluid type resin denture (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kasuga, H; Sato, H; Nakabayashi, N

    1980-01-01

    Transverse strength of cured fluid resins is weaker than that of the heat cured. We have studied to improve the mechanical strength of self-cured acrylic resin by application of carbon fibers as reinforcement and simple methods which must be acceptable for technicians are proposed. A cloth type carbon fiber was the best reinforcement among studied carbon fibers such as chopped or mat. The chopped fibers were difficult to mix homogeneously with fluid resins and effectiveness of the reinforcement was low. Breaking often occurred at the interface between the reinforcement and resin in the cases of mat which gave defects to the test specimens. To prepare reinforced denture, the cloth was trimmed on the master cast after removal of wax and the prepreg was formed with the alginate impression on the cast by Palapress and the cloth. Other steps were same as the usual fluid resin.

  1. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  2. Selected Bibliography on Fiber-Reinforced Cement and Concrete. Supplement number 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    A listing of 156 additional references with author index is given for fiber-reinforced cement and gypsum matrices, mortars, and concretes. Fiber types include steel, glass, plastic, asbestos, organic, carbon, and others. (Author)

  3. Selected Bibliography on Fiber-Reinforced Cement and Concrete. Supplement Number 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    A listing of 471 additional references with author index is given for fiber-reinforced cement and gypsum matrices, mortars, and concretes. Fiber types include steel, glass, plastic, asbestos, organic, carbon, and others. (Author)

  4. 75 FR 7931 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A380-841, -842, and -861 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... addition, delamination has been observed within the monolithic Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP... observed within the monolithic Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) structure around the pivot support... monolithic Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) structure around the pivot support-ring. This condition, if...

  5. [Clinical evaluation of "All-on-Four" provisional prostheses reinforced with carbon fibers].

    PubMed

    Li, Bei-bei; Lin, Ye; Cui, Hong-yan; Hao, Qiang; Xu, Jia-bin; Di, Ping

    2016-02-18

    To assess the clinical effects of carbon fiber reinforcement on the "All-on-Four" provisional prostheses. Provisional prostheses were divided into control group and carbon fiber reinforcing group according to whether carbon fiber reinforcement was used in the provisional prostheses base resin. In our study, a total of 60 patients (32 males and 28 females) with 71 provisional prostheses(28 maxilla and 43 mandible)were enrolled between April 2008 and December 2012 for control group; a total of 23 patients (13 males and 10 females) with 28 provisional prostheses (9 maxillas and 19 mandibles) were enrolled between January 2013 and March 2014 for carbon fiber reinforcing group. The information of provisional prostheses in the patients was recorded according to preoperative examination. We used the date of definitive prosthesis restoration as the cut-off point, observing whether fracture occurred on the provisional prostheses in the two groups. Additionally we observed whether fiber exposure occurred on the tissue surface of the provisional prostheses and caused mucosal irritation. The interface between the denture base resin and the fibers was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The age [(57.3 ± 10.1) years vs.(55.1 ± 11.4) years], gender (32 males and 28 females vs. 13 males and 10 females), maxilla and mandible distributions (28 maxillas and 43 mandibles vs. 9 maxillas and 19 mandibles), the number of extraction jaws (46 vs. 23), the average using time [(7.8 ± 1.3) months vs. (7.5 ± 1.1) months], and the opposing dentition distributions of provisional prostheses of the patients showed no significant differences between the control and reinforcing groups. There were 21(29.6%) fractures that occurred on the 71 provisional prostheses in the control group; there was no fracture that occurred on the 28 provisional prosthesesin the carbon fiber reinforcing group. The fracture rate of the carbon fiber reinforcing group was significantly lower than that of

  6. Effect of CFRP Schemes on the Flexural Behavior of RC Beams Modeled by Using a Nonlinear Finite-element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rousan, R. Z.

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of the number and schemes of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets on the capacity of bending moment, the ultimate displacement, the ultimate tensile strain of CFRP, the yielding moment, concrete compression strain, and the energy absorption of RC beams and to provide useful relationships that can be effectively utilized to determine the required number of CFRP sheets for a necessary increase in the flexural strength of the beams without a major loss in their ductility. To accomplish this, various RC beams, identical in their geometric and reinforcement details and having different number and configurations of CFRP sheets, are modeled and analyzed using the ANSYS software and a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  7. Structural Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovitigala, Thilan

    The main challenge for civil engineers is to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially feasible structures to the society. Finding new materials such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material that can fulfill the above requirements is a must. FRP material was expensive and it was limited to niche markets such as space shuttles and air industry in the 1960s. Over the time, it became cheaper and spread to other industries such as sporting goods in the 1980-1990, and then towards the infrastructure industry. Design and construction guidelines are available for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), aramid fiber reinforced polymer (AFRP) and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and they are currently used in structural applications. Since FRP is linear elastic brittle material, design guidelines for the steel reinforcement are not valid for FRP materials. Corrosion of steel reinforcement affects the durability of the concrete structures. FRP reinforcement is identified as an alternative to steel reinforcement in corrosive environments. Although basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) has many advantages over other FRP materials, but limited studies have been done. These studies didn't include larger BFRP bar diameters that are mostly used in practice. Therefore, larger beam sizes with larger BFRP reinforcement bar diameters are needed to investigate the flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams. Also, shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams was not yet studied. Experimental testing of mechanical properties and bond strength of BFRP bars and flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams are needed to include BFRP reinforcement bars in the design codes. This study mainly focuses on the use of BFRP bars as internal reinforcement. The test results of the mechanical properties of BFRP reinforcement bars, the bond strength of BFRP reinforcement bars, and the flexural and shear behavior of concrete beams

  8. Thermal Characterization of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, J. D.; Bante-Guerra, J.; Cervantes-Alvarez, F.; Rodrìguez-Gattorno, G.; Arés-Muzio, O.; Romero-Paredes, H.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C. A.; Ramos-Sánchez, V.; Villafán-Vidales, H. I.; Ordonez-Miranda, J.; Li Voti, R.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon (C/C) composites consist in a carbon matrix holding carbon or graphite fibers together, whose physical properties are determined not only by those of their individual components, but also by the layer buildup and the material preparation and processing. The complex structure of C/C composites along with the fiber orientation provide an effective means for tailoring their mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. In this work, we use the Laser Flash Technique to measure the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of C/C composites made up of laminates of weaved bundles of carbon fibers, forming a regular and repeated orthogonal pattern, embedded in a graphite matrix. Our experimental data show that: i) the cross-plane thermal conductivity remains practically constant around (5.3 ± 0.4) W·m-1 K-1, within the temperature range from 370 K to 1700 K. ii) The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity along the cross-plane direction to the fibers axis is about five times smaller than the corresponding ones in the laminates plane. iii) The measured cross-plane thermal conductivity is well described by a theoretical model that considers both the conductive and radiative thermal contributions of the effective thermal conductivity.

  9. Numerical Simulation for Predicting Fatigue Damage Progress in Notched CFRP Laminates by Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Tomonaga; Yashiro, Shigeki

    This study proposes the cohesive zone model (CZM) for predicting fatigue damage growth in notched carbon-fiber-reinforced composite plastic (CFRP) cross-ply laminates. In this model, damage growth in the fracture process of cohesive elements due to cyclic loading is represented by the conventional damage mechanics model. We preliminarily investigated whether this model can appropriately express fatigue damage growth for a circular crack embedded in isotropic solid material. This investigation demonstrated that this model could reproduce the results with the well-established fracture mechanics model plus the Paris' law by tuning adjustable parameters. We then numerically investigated the damage process in notched CFRP cross-ply laminates under tensile cyclic loading and compared the predicted damage patterns with those in experiments reported by Spearing et al. (Compos. Sci. Technol. 1992). The predicted damage patterns agreed with the experiment results, which exhibited the extension of multiple types of damage (e.g., splits, transverse cracks and delaminations) near the notches.

  10. Optimal Electrode Selection for Electrical Resistance Tomography in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Escalona Galvis, Luis Waldo; Diaz-Montiel, Paulina; Venkataraman, Satchi

    2017-02-04

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) offers a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that takes advantage of the inherent electrical properties in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites for internal damage characterization. This paper investigates a method of optimum selection of sensing configurations for delamination detection in thick cross-ply laminates using ERT. Reduction in the number of sensing locations and measurements is necessary to minimize hardware and computational effort. The present work explores the use of an effective independence (EI) measure originally proposed for sensor location optimization in experimental vibration modal analysis. The EI measure is used for selecting the minimum set of resistance measurements among all possible combinations resulting from selecting sensing electrode pairs. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is applied to obtain a spectral representation of the resistance measurements in the laminate for subsequent EI based reduction to take place. The electrical potential field in a CFRP laminate is calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) applied on models for two different laminate layouts considering a set of specified delamination sizes and locations with two different sensing arrangements. The effectiveness of the EI measure in eliminating redundant electrode pairs is demonstrated by performing inverse identification of damage using the full set and the reduced set of resistance measurements. This investigation shows that the EI measure is effective for optimally selecting the electrode pairs needed for resistance measurements in ERT based damage detection.

  11. Measurement of longitudinal strain and estimation of peel stress in adhesive-bonded single-lap joint of CFRP adherend using embedded FBG sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, X.; Murayama, H.; Kageyama, K.; Uzawa, K.; Wada, D.

    2012-04-01

    In this research, longitudinal strain and peel stress in adhesive-bonded single-lap joint of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) were measured and estimated by embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. Two unidirectional CFRP substrates were bonded by epoxy to form a single-lap configuration. The distributed strain measurement system is used. It is based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR), which can provide measurement at an arbitrary position along FBG sensors with the high spatial resolution. The longitudinal strain was measured based on Bragg grating effect and the peel stress was estimated based on birefringence effect. Special manufacturing procedure was developed to ensure the embedded location of FBG sensor. A portion of the FBG sensor was embedded into one of CFRP adherends along fiber direction and another portion was kept free for temperature compensation. Photomicrograph of cross-section of specimen was taken to verify the sensor was embedded into proper location after adherend curing. The residual strain was monitored during specimen curing and adhesive joint bonding process. Tensile tests were carried out and longitudinal strain and peel stress of the bondline are measured and estimated by the embedded FBG sensor. A two-dimensional geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis was performed by ANSYS to evaluate the measurement precision.

  12. Elasto-plastic analysis of interface layers for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doghri, I.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of fiber and matrix in metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic fibers induces high thermal stresses in the matrix. Elasto-plastic analyses - with different degrees of simplification and modelization - show that an interface layer with a sufficiently high CTE can reduce the tensile hoop stress in the matrix substantially.

  13. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  14. [Influence of sterilization treatments on continuous carbon-fiber reinforced polyolefin composite].

    PubMed

    Guan, Shi-bing; Hou, Chun-lin; Chen, Ai-min; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Ji-e

    2007-08-21

    To evaluate the influence of sterilization treatment on continuous carbon-fiber reinforced polyolefin composite (CFRP) so as to provide experimental reference for selection of sterilization method for CFRP. Seventy bars of CFRP were divided into 7 equal groups to undergo sterilization by autoclave, 2% glutaraldehyde soaking, 75% alcohol soaking, ethylene oxide sterilization, and Co-60 gamma ray irradiation of the dosages 11 kGy, 25 kGy, and 18 kGy respectively, and another 10 bars were used as blank controls. Then the bars underwent three-point bending test and longitudinal compression test so as to measure the biomechanical changes after sterilization treatment, including the maximum load, ultimate strength, and elastic modulus. Three-point bending test showed that the levels of maximum load of the all experimental groups were lower than that of the control group, however, only those of the 3 Co-60 irradiation groups were significantly lower than that of the control group and that Co-60 radiation lowered the level of maximum load dose-dependently; and that the levels of ultimate strength of all the all experimental groups were lower than that of the control group, however, only those of the 3 Co-60 groups were significantly lower than that of the control group and that the higher the dosage of Co-60 radiation the lower the level of ultimate strength, however, not dose-dependently. The elastic modulus of the Co-60 25 KGy group was significantly higher than that of the control group, and there was no significant difference in the level of ultimate strength among the other groups. Longitudinal compression test showed that the levels of maximum load and ultimate strength of the 3 Co-60 irradiation groups, autoclave group, and circular ethylene groups were significantly lower than that of the control group, and there was no significant difference in elastic modulus among different groups. During sterilized package of CFRP products produced in quantity autoclave

  15. Self-diagnosis of structures strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. S.; Yang, C. Q.; Harada, T.; Ye, L. P.

    2005-06-01

    The correlation of mechanical and electrical properties of concrete beams strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (HCFRP) sheets is studied in this paper. Two types of concrete beams, with and without reinforcing bars, are strengthened with externally bonded HCFRP sheets, which have a self-structural health monitoring function due to the electrical conduction and piezoresistivity of carbon fibers. Parameters investigated include the volume fractions and types of carbon fibers. According to the investigation, it is found that the hybridization of uniaxial HCFRP sheets with several different types of carbon fibers is a viable method for enhancing the mechanical properties and obtaining a built-in damage detection function for concrete structures. The changes in electrical resistance during low strain ranges before the rupture of carbon fibers are generally smaller than 1%. Nevertheless, after the gradual ruptures of carbon fibers, the electrical resistance increases remarkably with the strain in a step-wise manner. For the specimens without reinforcing bars, the electrical behaviors are not stable, especially during the low strain ranges. However, the electrical behaviors of the specimens with reinforcing bars are relatively stable, and the whole range of self-sensing function of the HCFRP-strengthened RC structures has realized the conceptual design of the HCFRP sensing models and is confirmed by the experimental investigations. The relationships between the strain/load and the change in electrical resistance show the potential self-monitoring capacity of HCFRP reinforcements used for strengthening concrete structures.

  16. Non-destructive inspection using HTS SQUID on aluminum liner covered by CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Y.; Yotsugi, K.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Tanaka, S.

    2007-10-01

    An eddy-current-based SQUID non-destructive inspection (NDI) system to detect deep-lying cracks in multi-layer composite-Al vessels was developed taking advantage of the uncontested sensitivity of HTS-SQUID in low-frequency range. An HTS-SQUID gradiometer was mounted in a pulse tube cryocooler. A pair of differential coils with C-shaped ferrite cores was employed to induce an enhanced eddy current in an Al vessel wrapped in a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) cover. Ellipsoidal dome-shaped Al liners containing through cracks, which were made by pressure cycle tests, in the CFRP covers with total thickness of 6 mm (CFPR 3 mm, and Al 3 mm) were inspected by the system. While inducing eddy currents in the vessels with excitation fields at 100 Hz or 7 kHz, the vessels were rotated under the HTS-SQUID. Above the cracks, anomalous signals due to the cracks were clearly detected at both frequencies. These results suggested the SQUID-NDI technique would be a possible candidate for inspection of high-pressure multi-layer composite-Al vessels.

  17. A Fiber Optic Doppler Sensor and Its Application in Debonding Detection for Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Meng, Guang; Ohsawa, Isamu; Shirai, Takehiro

    2010-01-01

    Debonding is one of the most important damage forms in fiber-reinforced composite structures. This work was devoted to the debonding damage detection of lap splice joints in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) structures, which is based on guided ultrasonic wave signals captured by using fiber optic Doppler (FOD) sensor with spiral shape. Interferometers based on two types of laser sources, namely the He-Ne laser and the infrared semiconductor laser, are proposed and compared in this study for the purpose of measuring Doppler frequency shift of the FOD sensor. Locations of the FOD sensors are optimized based on mechanical characteristics of lap splice joint. The FOD sensors are subsequently used to detect the guided ultrasonic waves propagating in the CFRP structures. By taking advantage of signal processing approaches, features of the guided wave signals can be revealed. The results demonstrate that debonding in the lap splice joint results in arrival time delay of the first package in the guided wave signals, which can be the characteristic for debonding damage inspection and damage extent estimation. PMID:22219698

  18. A fiber optic Doppler sensor and its application in debonding detection for composite structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Meng, Guang; Ohsawa, Isamu; Shirai, Takehiro

    2010-01-01

    Debonding is one of the most important damage forms in fiber-reinforced composite structures. This work was devoted to the debonding damage detection of lap splice joints in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) structures, which is based on guided ultrasonic wave signals captured by using fiber optic Doppler (FOD) sensor with spiral shape. Interferometers based on two types of laser sources, namely the He-Ne laser and the infrared semiconductor laser, are proposed and compared in this study for the purpose of measuring Doppler frequency shift of the FOD sensor. Locations of the FOD sensors are optimized based on mechanical characteristics of lap splice joint. The FOD sensors are subsequently used to detect the guided ultrasonic waves propagating in the CFRP structures. By taking advantage of signal processing approaches, features of the guided wave signals can be revealed. The results demonstrate that debonding in the lap splice joint results in arrival time delay of the first package in the guided wave signals, which can be the characteristic for debonding damage inspection and damage extent estimation.

  19. Mechanical and physical properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers intended for implant suprastructures.

    PubMed

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2007-09-01

    Mechanical properties and quality of fiber/matrix adhesion of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based materials, reinforced with carbon-graphite (CG) fibers that are able to remain in a plastic state until polymerization, were examined. Tubes of cleaned braided CG fibers were treated with a sizing resin. Two resin mixtures, resin A and resin B, stable in the fluid state and containing different cross-linking agents, were reinforced with CG fiber loadings of 24, 36, and 47 wt% (20, 29, and 38 vol.%). In addition, resin B was reinforced with 58 wt% (47 vol.%). After heat-polymerization, flexural strength and modulus were evaluated, both dry and after water storage. Coefficient of thermal expansion, longitudinally and in the transverse direction of the specimens, was determined. Adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties and linear coefficient of thermal expansion were similar for both fiber composites. With increased fiber loading, flexural properties increased. For 47 wt% fibers in polymer A the flexural strength was 547.7 (28.12) MPa and for polymer B 563.3 (89.24) MPa when water saturated. Linear coefficient of thermal expansion was for 47 wt% CG fiber-reinforced polymers; -2.5 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 longitudinally and 62.4 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 in the transverse direction of the specimens. SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix. More porosity was observed with fiber loading of 58 wt%. The fiber treatment and the developed resin matrices resulted in good adhesion between CG fibers and matrix. The properties observed indicate a potential for implant-retained prostheses.

  20. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Marc (Technical Monitor); Shivakumar, Kunigal N.

    2003-01-01

    Fiber reinforced ceramic composites are materials of choice for gas turbine engines because of their high thermal efficiency, thrust/weight ratio, and operating temperatures. However, the successful introduction of ceramic composites to hot structures is limited because of excessive cost of manufacturing, reproducibility, nonuniformity, and reliability. Intense research is going on around the world to address some of these issues. The proposed effort is to develop a comprehensive status report of the technology on processing, testing, failure mechanics, and environmental durability of carbon fiber reinforced ceramic composites through extensive literature study, vendor and end-user survey, visits to facilities doing this type of work, and interviews. Then develop a cooperative research plan between NASA GRC and NCA&T (Center for Composite Materials Research) for processing, testing, environmental protection, and evaluation of fiber reinforced ceramic composites.

  1. Flexural properties of polyethylene, glass and carbon fiber-reinforced resin composites for prosthetic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Irie, Masao; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Minagi, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    High flexural properties are needed for fixed partial denture or implant prosthesis to resist susceptibility to failures caused by occlusal overload. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the effects of four different kinds of fibers on the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites. Polyethylene fiber, glass fiber and two types of carbon fibers were used for reinforcement. Seven groups of specimens, 2 × 2 × 25 mm, were prepared (n = 10 per group). Four groups of resin composite specimens were reinforced with polyethylene, glass or one type of carbon fiber. The remaining three groups served as controls, with each group comprising one brand of resin composite without any fiber. After 24-h water storage in 37°C distilled water, the flexural properties of each specimen were examined with static three-point flexural test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Compared to the control without any fiber, glass and carbon fibers significantly increased the flexural strength (p < 0.05). On the contrary, the polyethylene fiber decreased the flexural strength (p < 0.05). Among the fibers, carbon fiber exhibited higher flexural strength than glass fiber (p < 0.05). Similar trends were observed for flexural modulus and fracture energy. However, there was no significant difference in fracture energy between carbon and glass fibers (p > 0.05). Fibers could, therefore, improve the flexural properties of resin composite and carbon fibers in longitudinal form yielded the better effects for reinforcement.

  2. Experimental Comparison of Different Carbon Fiber Composites in Reinforcement Layouts for Wooden Beams of Historical Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Rescalvo, Francisco J.; Valverde-Palacios, Ignacio; Gallego, Antolino

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers a detailed, quantitative and exhaustive experimental comparison in terms of mechanical properties of three different layouts of carbon composite materials (CFRP) used to strengthen existing old timber beams highly affected by diverse natural defects and biological attacks, testing the use of pultruded laminate attached on the tension side of the element (LR), CFRP fabrics totally U-shape wrapping the timber element (UR), and the combined use of both reinforcement solutions (UR-P). Moreover, unidirectional and bidirectional fabrics were considered and compared. Timber elements used for the experimental program were extracted from a recent rehabilitation of the roof of the current Faculty of Law building, University of Granada (Spain), catalogued as a historical edifice. Experimental results from bending tests show that in all cases reinforcement provides a clear improvement in terms of bending capacity and stiffness as compared with the control specimens (without reinforcement). However, improvements in terms of ductility differ considerably depending on the kind of layout. PMID:28934116

  3. Physical-Mechanical Properties of a Fiber-Reinforced Composite Based on an ELUR-P Carbon Tape and XT-118 Binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Kholmogorov, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    A series of tests to identify the physical-mechanical properties of a unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced composite based on an ELUR-P carbon fibers and an XT-118 epoxy binder were performed. The form of the stress-strain diagrams of specimens loaded in tension in the longitudinal, transverse, and ±45° directions and in compression in the longitudinal and ±45° directions were examined. Tensile diagrams were also determined for the XT-118 binder alone. The relation between the tangential shear modulus and shear strains of the composite was highly nonlinear from the very beginning of loading and depended on the loading type. Such a nonlinear response of the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite in shear cannot be the result of plastic deformation of binder, but can be explained only by structural changes caused by the inner buckling instability of the composite at micro- and mesolevels..

  4. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves.

    PubMed

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m -2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  5. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-01-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m−2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%–73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates. PMID:27877680

  6. [A study on alpha-tricalcium phosphate bone cement carbon fiber-reinforced].

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjin; Yang, Weizhong; Zhou, Dali; Ma, Jiang; Xiao, Bin

    2006-06-01

    In order to improve the mechanical properties of alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP), we prepared surface-modified carbon fibers (CF) reinforced alpha-TCP composite bone cement. Bone cement was soaked in Ringer's body solution to test its capacity of fast formation of hydroxyapatite crystals and self-solidification. Scan electronic microscope (SEM) observation and compressive strength measurement were taken to analyze the mechanical properties and the micro- morphological structure of CF reinforced alpha-TCP bone cement. The results showed that the bone cement was transferred into hydroxyapatite plates after being soaked in Ringer's simulated body fluid for 5 days. Suitable amount of carbon fibers could well spread in and bond with the matrix of the bone cement. The mechanical properties of the bone cement have been improved by CF reinforcing; the compressive strength reaches 46.7 MPa when the amount of carbon fibers is 0.5% in weight percent, which is 22% higher than that of the non-reinforced alpha-TCP bone cement.

  7. Evaluation of long carbon fiber reinforced concrete to mitigate earthquake damage of infrastructure components.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    The proposed study involves investigating long carbon fiber reinforced concrete as a method of mitigating earthquake damage to : bridges and other infrastructure components. Long carbon fiber reinforced concrete has demonstrated significant resistanc...

  8. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF NEW RESIN APPLICATION EQUIPMENT FOR FIBER- REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of a pilot-scale evaluation of new resin application equipment for fiber- reinforced plastics. The study, an evaluation and comparison of styrene emissions, utilized Magnum's FIT(TM) nozzle with conventional spray guns and flow coaters (operated at both ...

  9. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  10. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  11. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  12. Optimal Electrode Selection for Electrical Resistance Tomography in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    PubMed Central

    Escalona Galvis, Luis Waldo; Diaz-Montiel, Paulina; Venkataraman, Satchi

    2017-01-01

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) offers a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that takes advantage of the inherent electrical properties in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites for internal damage characterization. This paper investigates a method of optimum selection of sensing configurations for delamination detection in thick cross-ply laminates using ERT. Reduction in the number of sensing locations and measurements is necessary to minimize hardware and computational effort. The present work explores the use of an effective independence (EI) measure originally proposed for sensor location optimization in experimental vibration modal analysis. The EI measure is used for selecting the minimum set of resistance measurements among all possible combinations resulting from selecting sensing electrode pairs. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is applied to obtain a spectral representation of the resistance measurements in the laminate for subsequent EI based reduction to take place. The electrical potential field in a CFRP laminate is calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) applied on models for two different laminate layouts considering a set of specified delamination sizes and locations with two different sensing arrangements. The effectiveness of the EI measure in eliminating redundant electrode pairs is demonstrated by performing inverse identification of damage using the full set and the reduced set of resistance measurements. This investigation shows that the EI measure is effective for optimally selecting the electrode pairs needed for resistance measurements in ERT based damage detection. PMID:28772485

  13. Aerogel to simulate delamination and porosity defects in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Peter; Leckey, Cara A. C.

    2018-04-01

    Representative defect standards are essential for the validation and calibration of new and existing inspection techniques. However, commonly used methods of simulating delaminations in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites do not accurately represent the behavior of the real-world defects for several widely-used NDE techniques. For instance, it is common practice to create a delamination standard by inserting Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in between ply layers. However, PTFE can transmit more ultrasonic energy than actual delaminations, leading to an unrealistic representation of the defect inspection. PTFE can also deform/wrinkle during the curing process and has a thermal effusivity two orders of magnitude higher than air (almost equal to that of a CFRP). It is therefore not effective in simulating a delamination for thermography. Currently there is also no standard practice for producing or representing a known porosity in composites. This paper presents a novel method of creating delamination and porosity standards using aerogel. Insertion of thin sheets of solid aerogel between ply layers during layup is shown to produce air-gap-like delaminations creating realistic ultrasonic and thermographic inspection responses. Furthermore, it is shown that depositing controlled amounts of aerogel powder can represent porosity. Micrograph data verifies the structural integrity of the aerogel through the composite curing process. This paper presents data from multiple NDE methods, including X-ray computed tomography, immersion ultrasound, and flash thermography to the effectiveness of aerogel as a delamination and porosity simulant.

  14. Behavior of Insulated Carbon-FRP-Strengthened RC Beams Exposed to Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayin, B.

    2014-09-01

    There are two main approaches to improving the fire resistance of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) systems. While the most common method is to protect or insulate the FRP system, an other way is to use fibers and resins with a better fire performance. This paper presents a numerical investigation into the five protection behavior of insulated carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP)-strengthened reinforced concrete (RC) beams. The effects of external loading and thermal expansion of materials at elevated temperatures are taken into consideration in a finite-element model. The validity of the numerical model is demonstrated with results from an existing experimental study on insulated CFRP-strengthened RC beams. Conclusions of this investigation are employed to predict the structural behavior of CFRP-strengthened concrete structures.

  15. Flow speed of the ablation vapors generated during laser drilling of CFRP with a continuous-wave laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faas, S.; Freitag, C.; Boley, S.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2017-03-01

    The hot plume of ablation products generated during the laser drilling process of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with a continuous-wave laser beam was analyzed by means of high-speed imaging. The formation of compression shocks was observed within the flow of the evaporated material, which is an indication of flow speeds well above the local speed of sound. The flow speed of the hot ablation products can be estimated by analyzing the position of these compression shocks. We investigated the temporal evolution of the flow speed during the drilling process and the influence of the average laser power on the flow speed. The flow speed increases with increasing average laser powers. The moment of drilling through the material changes the conditions for the drilling process and was confirmed to influence the flow speed of the ablated material. Compression shocks can also be observed during laser cutting of CFRP with a moving laser beam.

  16. Study on shear strengthening of RC continuous T-beams using different layers of CFRP strips

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Alferjani, M. B. S.; Samad, A. A. Abdul; Mohamad, Noridah

    2015-05-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates are externally bonded to reinforced concrete (RC) members to provide additional strength such as flexural, shear, etc. However, this paper presents the results of an experimental investigation for enhancing the shear capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) continuous T- beams using different layers of CFRP wrapping schemes. A total of three concrete beams were tested and various sheet configurations and layouts were studied to determine their effects on ultimate shear strength and shear capacity of the beams. One beam was kept as control beams, while other beams were strengthened with externally bonded CFRP strips withmore » three side bonding and one or two layers of CFRP strips. From the test results, it was found that all schemes were found to be effective in enhancing the shear strength of RC beams. It was observed that the strength increases with the number of sheet layers provided the most effective strengthening for RC continuous T- beam. Beam strengthened using this scheme showed 23.21% increase in shear capacity as compared to the control beam. Two prediction models available in literature were used for computing the contribution of CFRP strips and compared with the experimental results.« less

  17. Tribological dry sliding behavior of chopped carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumaevskii, A. V.; Ivanov, A. N.; Filippov, A. V.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    Tribological tests on 3D printed pure polyetheretherketone and carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone samples were carried out. The negative effect of carbon fiber sticking out of the matrix on wear and sliding process stability was revealed. These fibers may be too long and oriented to the worn surface in a manner that prevents their removal by wear so that the worn surface becomes irregular and the sliding process instable.

  18. Measurements of Mode I Interlaminar Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers Using Digital Image Correlation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Merzkirch, Matthias; Ahure Powell, Louise; Foecke, Tim

    Numerical models based on cohesive zones are usually used to model and simulate the mechanical behavior of laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in automotive and aerospace applications and require different interlaminar properties. This work focuses on determining the interlaminar fracture toughness (G IC) under Mode I loading of a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen of unidirectional CFRP, serving as prototypical material. The novelty of this investigation is the improvement of the testing methodology by introducing digital image correlation (DIC) as an extensometer and this tool allows for crack growth measurement, phenomenological visualization and quantification of various material responses tomore » Mode I loading. Multiple methodologies from different international standards and other common techniques are compared for the determination of the evolution of G IC as crack resistance curves (R-curves). The primarily metrological sources of uncertainty, in contrast to material specific related uncertainties, are discussed through a simple sensitivity analysis. Additionally, the current work offers a detailed insight into the constraints and assumptions to allow exploration of different methods for the determination of material properties using the DIC measured data. The main aim is an improvement of the measurement technique and an increase in the reliability of measured data during static testing, in advance of future rate dependent testing for crashworthiness simulations.« less

  19. Measurements of Mode I Interlaminar Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers Using Digital Image Correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Merzkirch, Matthias; Ahure Powell, Louise; Foecke, Tim

    2017-07-01

    Numerical models based on cohesive zones are usually used to model and simulate the mechanical behavior of laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in automotive and aerospace applications and require different interlaminar properties. This work focuses on determining the interlaminar fracture toughness (G IC) under Mode I loading of a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen of unidirectional CFRP, serving as prototypical material. The novelty of this investigation is the improvement of the testing methodology by introducing digital image correlation (DIC) as an extensometer and this tool allows for crack growth measurement, phenomenological visualization and quantification of various material responses tomore » Mode I loading. Multiple methodologies from different international standards and other common techniques are compared for the determination of the evolution of G IC as crack resistance curves (R-curves). The primarily metrological sources of uncertainty, in contrast to material specific related uncertainties, are discussed through a simple sensitivity analysis. Additionally, the current work offers a detailed insight into the constraints and assumptions to allow exploration of different methods for the determination of material properties using the DIC measured data. The main aim is an improvement of the measurement technique and an increase in the reliability of measured data during static testing, in advance of future rate dependent testing for crashworthiness simulations.« less

  20. Lightning Strike Induced Damage Mechanisms of Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hirohide

    Composite materials have a wide application in aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries, because of the superior structural and weight performances. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites possess a much lower electrical conductivity as compared to traditional metallic materials utilized for aircraft structures, serious concern about damage resistance/tolerance against lightning has been rising. Main task of this study is to clarify the lightning damage mechanism of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy polymer composites to help further development of lightning strike protection. The research on lightning damage to carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites is quite challenging, and there has been little study available until now. In order to tackle this issue, building block approach was employed. The research was started with the development of supporting technologies such as a current impulse generator to simulate a lightning strike in a laboratory. Then, fundamental electrical properties and fracture behavior of CFRPs exposed to high and low level current impulse were investigated using simple coupon specimens, followed by extensive parametric investigations in terms of different prepreg materials frequently used in aerospace industry, various stacking sequences, different lightning intensity, and lightning current waveforms. It revealed that the thermal resistance capability of polymer matrix was one of the most influential parameters on lightning damage resistance of CFRPs. Based on the experimental findings, the semi-empirical analysis model for predicting the extent of lightning damage was established. The model was fitted through experimental data to determine empirical parameters and, then, showed a good capability to provide reliable predictions for other test conditions and materials. Finally, structural element level lightning tests were performed to explore more practical situations. Specifically, filled-hole CFRP plates and patch

  1. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Argade, Shyam

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a critical review of the processing techniques for fabricating continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs for possible applications at elevated temperatures. Some of the issues affecting durability of the composite materials such as fiber coatings and cracking of the matrix because of shrinkage in PIP-process are also examined. An assessment of the potential inexpensive processes is also provided. Finally three potential routes of manufacturing C/SiC composites using a technology that NC A&T developed for carbon/carbon composites are outlined. Challenges that will be encountered are also listed.

  2. Picometer resolution interferometric characterization of the dimensional stability of zero CTE CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero Machado, Jorge; Heinrich, Thomas; Schuldt, Thilo; Gohlke, Martin; Lucarelli, Stefano; Weise, Dennis; Johann, Ulrich; Peters, Achim; Braxmaier, Claus

    2008-07-01

    Highly stable but lightweight structural materials are essential for the realization of spaceborne optical instruments, for example telescopes. In terms of optical performance, usually tight tolerances on the absolute spacing between telescope mirrors have to be maintained from integration on ground to operation in final orbit. Furthermore, a certain stability of the telescope structure must typically be ensured in the measurement band. Particular challenging requirements have to be met for the LISA Mission (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna), where the spacing between primary and secondary mirror must be stable to a few picometers. Only few materials offer sufficient thermal stability to provide such performance. Candidates are for example Zerodur and Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP), where the latter is preferred in terms of mechanical stiffness and robustness. We are currently investigating the suitability of CFRP with respect to the LISA requirements by characterization of its dimensional stability with heterodyne laser interferometry. The special, highly symmetric interferometer setup offers a noise level of 2 pm/√Hz at 0.1Hz and above, and therefore represents a unique tool for this purpose. Various procedures for the determination of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) have been investigated, both on a test sample with negative CTE, as well as on a CFRP tube specifically tuned to provide a theoretical zero expansion in the axial dimension.

  3. On the performances and wear of WC-diamond like carbon coated tools in drilling of CFRP/Titanium stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccarusso, L.; Durante, M.; Impero, F.; Minutolo, F. Memola Capece; Scherillo, F.; Squillace, A.

    2016-10-01

    The use of hybrid structures made of CFRP and titanium alloys is growing more and more in the last years in the aerospace industry due to the high strength to weight ratio. Because of their very different characteristics, the mechanical fastening represent the most effective joining technique for these materials. As a consequence, drilling process plays a key role in the assembly. The one shot drilling, i.e. the contemporary drilling of the stack of the two materials, seems to be the best option both in terms of time saving and assembly accuracy. Nevertheless, due to the considerable different machinability of fiber reinforced plastics and metallic materials, the one shot drilling is a critical process both for the holes quality and for the tools wear. This research was carried out to study the effectiveness of new generation tools in the drilling of CFRP/Titanium stacks. The tools are made of sintered grains of tungsten carbide (WC) in a binder of cobalt and coated with Diamond like carbon (DLC), and are characterized by a patented geometry; they mainly differ in parent WC grain size and binder percentage. Both the cutting forces and the wear phenomena were accurately investigated and the results were analyzed as a function of number of holes and their quality. The results show a clear increase of the cutting forces with the number of holes for all the used drilling tools. Moreover, abrasive wear phenomena that affect initially the tools coating layer were observed.

  4. Impact resistance of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-strain curves are obtained for a variety of glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced plastics in dynamic tension, over the stress-strain range of 0.00087-2070/sec. The test method is of the one-bar block-to-bar type, using a rotating disk or a pendulum as the loading apparatus and yielding accurate stress-strain curves up to the breaking strain. In the case of glass fiber reinforced plastic, the tensile strength, strain to peak impact stress, total strain and total absorbed energy all increase significantly as the strain rate increases. By contrast, carbon fiber reinforced plastics show lower rates of increase with strain rate. It is recommended that hybrid composites incorporating the high strength and rigidity of carbon fiber reinforced plastic with the high impact absorption of glass fiber reinforced plastics be developed for use in structures subjected to impact loading.

  5. AN EMPIRICAL MODEL TO PREDICT STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM FIBER-REINFORCED PLASTICS FABRICATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Styrene is a designated hazardous air pollutant, per the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. It is also a tropospheric ozone precursor. Fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) fabrication is the primary source of anthropogenic styrene emissions in the United States. This paper describes an em...

  6. A New Fiber Preform with Nanocarbon Binder for Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite by Liquid Molding Process.

    PubMed

    Seong, Dong Gi; Ha, Jong Rok; Lee, Jea Uk; Lee, Wonoh; Kim, Byung Sun

    2015-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite has been a good candidate of lightweight structural component in the automotive industry. As fast production speed is essential to apply the composite materials for the mass production area such as automotive components, the high speed liquid composite molding processes have been developed. Fast resin injection through the fiber preform by high pressure is required to improve the production speed, but it often results in undesirable deformations of the fiber preform which causes defectives in size and properties of the final composite products. In order to prevent the undesirable deformation and improve the stability of preform shape, polymer type binder materials are used. More stable fiber preform can be obtained by increasing the amount of binder material, but it disturbs the resin impregnation through the fiber preform. In this study, carbon nanomaterials such as graphene oxide were embedded on the surface of carbon fiber by electrophoretic deposition method in order to improve the shape stability of fiber preform and interfacial bonding between polymer and the reinforcing fiber. Effects of the modified reinforcing fiber were investigated in two respects. One is to increase the binding energy between fiber tows, and the other is to increase the interfacial bonding between polymer matrix and fiber surface. The effects were analyzed by measuring the binding force of fiber preform and interlaminar shear strength of the composite. This study also investigated the high speed liquid molding process of the composite materials composed of polymer matrix and the carbon fiber preforms embedded by carbon nanomaterials. Process parameter such as permeability of fiber preform was measured to investigate the effect of nanoscale surface modification on the macroscale processing condition for composite manufacturing.

  7. Strength of anisotropic wood and synthetic materials. [plywood, laminated wood plastics, glass fiber reinforced plastics, polymeric film, and natural wood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazi, Y. K.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using general formulas for determining the strength of different anisotropic materials is considered, and theoretical formulas are applied and confirmed by results of tests on various nonmetallic materials. Data are cited on the strength of wood, plywood, laminated wood plastics, fiber glass-reinforced plastics and directed polymer films.

  8. Characterization of a New Fully Recycled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Subjected to High Strain Rate Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, H.; Tamboura, S.; Fitoussi, J.; BenDaly, H.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is the complete physicochemical characterization and strain rate effect multi-scale analysis of a new fully recycled carbon fiber reinforced composites for automotive crash application. Two composites made of 20% wt short recycled carbon fibers (CF) are obtained by injection molding. The morphology and the degree of dispersion of CF in the matrixes were examined using a new ultrasonic method and SEM. High strain tensile behavior up to 100 s-1 is investigated. In order to avoid perturbation due to inertial effect and wave propagation, the specimen geometry was optimized. The elastic properties appear to be insensitive to the strain rate. However, a high strain rate effect on the local visco-plasticity of the matrix and fiber/matrix interface visco-damageable behavior is emphasized. The predominant damage mechanisms evolve from generalized matrix local ductility at low strain rate regime to fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers pull-out at high strain rate regime.

  9. Characterization of a New Fully Recycled Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Subjected to High Strain Rate Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, H.; Tamboura, S.; Fitoussi, J.; BenDaly, H.; Tcharkhtchi, A.

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is the complete physicochemical characterization and strain rate effect multi-scale analysis of a new fully recycled carbon fiber reinforced composites for automotive crash application. Two composites made of 20% wt short recycled carbon fibers (CF) are obtained by injection molding. The morphology and the degree of dispersion of CF in the matrixes were examined using a new ultrasonic method and SEM. High strain tensile behavior up to 100 s-1 is investigated. In order to avoid perturbation due to inertial effect and wave propagation, the specimen geometry was optimized. The elastic properties appear to be insensitive to the strain rate. However, a high strain rate effect on the local visco-plasticity of the matrix and fiber/matrix interface visco-damageable behavior is emphasized. The predominant damage mechanisms evolve from generalized matrix local ductility at low strain rate regime to fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers pull-out at high strain rate regime.

  10. Grafting methyl acrylic onto carbon fiber via Diels-Alder reaction for excellent mechanical and tribological properties of phenolic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jie; Duan, Xiao; Luo, Lan; Zhang, Chao; Qi, Ying; Li, Hejun; Feng, Yongqiang; Huang, Jianfeng

    2018-03-01

    Carbon fibers (CFs) were grafted with methyl acrylic via Diels-Alder reaction at the different oil bath temperature effectively creating a carboxyl functionalized surface. The effect of grafting temperature on the surface morphology and functional groups of carbon fibers were investigated by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and SEM respectively. The results showed that the optimal grafting temperature was 80 °C, and the relative surface coverage by carboxylic acid groups increased from an initial 5.16% up to 19.30% significantly improved the chemical activity without damaging the skin and core region of the carbon fibers. Mechanical property tests indicated that the shear and tensile strength of the sample with the grafting temperature of 80 °C (CFRP-3) increased obviously by 90.3% and 78.7%, respectively, compared with the pristine carbon fibers reinforced composite. Further, the sample CFRP-3 exhibited higher and more stable friction coefficient and improved wear resistance, while the wear rate decreased 52.7%, from 10.8 × 10-6 to 5.1 × 10-6 mm3/N m. The present work shows that grafting methyl acrylic via Diels-Alder reaction could be a highly efficient and facile method to functionalize carbon fibers for advanced composites.

  11. Applications of laser ultrasound NDT methods on composite structures in aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael; Focke, Oliver; v. Kopylow, Christoph

    2008-09-01

    Composite materials are used more and more in aircraft production. Main composite types are Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP), Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics (GFRP) and metal-aluminium laminates (e. g. Glass Fiber Aluminium Reinforced GLARE©). Typical parts made of CFRP material are flaps, vertical and horizontal tail planes, center wing boxes, rear pressure bulkheads, ribs and stringers. These composite parts require adequate nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. Flaws to be detected are delaminations and debondings, porosity and foreign body inclusion. Manual ultrasonic testing with single element transducers is still the most applied method for composite parts with small and medium size. The extension of the conventional ultrasound technique for nondestructive testing with the laser ultrasound method brings new possibilities into the production processes for example the inspection of complex CFRP-components and the possibilities of online observation under remote control. In this paper we describe the principle of laser ultrasound with respect to the demands of nondestructive testing especially of small complex CFRP and C/PPS parts. We report applications of laser-based ultrasound options with generated types of guided and bulk waves on modern aircraft materials.

  12. [The behavior of fiber-reinforced plastics during laser cutting].

    PubMed

    Emmrich, M; Levsen, K; Trasser, F J

    1992-06-01

    The pattern of the organic emissions, which are produced by processing of fibre reinforced plastics (epoxy resins reinforced by aramid and glass fibres and phenol resins reinforced by aramid fibre) with laser beam was studied and the concentrations of the main components determined. Despite the application of plastic materials with different chemical structures, the observed patterns are very similar. Mainly aromatic hydrocarbons are emitted, especially benzene and toluene, as well as some heteroatom-containing aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g. phenol). By use of oxygen as process gas the emissions during cutting of glass fibre reinforced plastics can be reduced, while they will be constantly high with aramid fibre reinforced plastics.

  13. Application of small-diameter FBG sensors for detection of damages in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Yoji; Mizutani, Tadahito; Yashiro, Shigeki; Takeda, Nobuo

    2001-08-01

    Small-diameter fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors have been developed by Hitachi Cable Ltd. and the authors. Since the outside diameter of polyimide coating is 52 micrometers , embedding of the sensors into carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites prepregs of 125 micrometers in thickness does not deteriorate the mechanical properties of the composite laminates. In this research, the small-diameter FBG sensor was applied for the detection of transverse cracks in CFRP composites. The FBG sensor was embedded in 0 degree(s) ply of a CFRP cross-ply laminate.

  14. Development and flight test of metal-lined CFRP cryogenic tank for reusable rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Ken; Takeuchi, Shinsuke; Sato, Eiichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Namiki, Fumiharu; Tanaka, Kohtaro; Watabe, Yoko

    2005-07-01

    A cryogenic tank made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) shell with aluminum thin liner has been designed as a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank for an ISAS reusable launch vehicle, and the function of it has been proven by repeated flights onboard the test vehicle called reusable vehicle testing (RVT) in October 2003. The liquid hydrogen tank has to be a pressure vessel, because the fuel of the engine of the test vehicle is supplied by fuel pressure. The pressure vessel of a combination of the outer shell of CFRP for strength element at a cryogenic temperature and the inner liner of aluminum for gas barrier has shown excellent weight merit for this purpose. Interfaces such as tank outline shape, bulk capacity, maximum expected operating pressure (MEOP), thermal insulation, pipe arrangement, and measurement of data are also designed to be ready onboard. This research has many aims, not only development of reusable cryogenic composite tank but also the demonstration of repeated operation including thermal cycle and stress cycle, familiarization with test techniques of operation of cryogenic composite tanks, and the accumulation of data for future design of tanks, vehicle structures, safety evaluation, and total operation systems.

  15. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  16. The surface properties of carbon fibers and their adhesion to organic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Drzal, L. T.

    1987-01-01

    The state of knowledge of the surface properties of carbon fibers is reviewed, with emphasis on fiber/matrix adhesion in carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Subjects treated include carbon fiber structure and chemistry, techniques for the study of the fiber surface, polymer/fiber bond strength and its measurement, variations in polymer properties in the interphase, and the influence of fiber matrix adhesion on composite mechanical properties. Critical issues are summarized and search recommendations are made.

  17. An experimental study of permeability within an out-of-autoclave vacuum-bag-only CFRP laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Landon F.

    The out-of-autoclave vacuum-bag-only (OOA-VBO) manufacturing process is a process that eliminates an autoclave when manufacturing aerospace quality carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). OOA-VBO pre-impregnated resin tow systems rely on air channel networks that guide unwanted voids out of the laminate. The air path networks can be characterized by measuring the permeability of a pre-cured laminate. Permeability results were successfully obtained for a laminate with a compaction similar to that found in a typical vacuum bagging setup. A study was done to find the relationship between compaction of the laminate and permeability. Permeability was measured as the laminate cured, using a constant temperature ramp rate. An experimental nodal analysis was performed to find the permeability at the midpoint of the in-plane direction.

  18. Argon-oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on carbon fiber reinforced polymer for improved bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartosias, Marios

    Acceptance of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) structures requires a robust surface preparation method with improved process controls capable of ensuring high bond quality. Surface preparation in a production clean room environment prior to applying adhesive for bonding would minimize risk of contamination and reduce cost. Plasma treatment is a robust surface preparation process capable of being applied in a production clean room environment with process parameters that are easily controlled and documented. Repeatable and consistent processing is enabled through the development of a process parameter window utilizing techniques such as Design of Experiments (DOE) tailored to specific adhesive and substrate bonding applications. Insight from respective plasma treatment Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and screening tests determined critical process factors from non-factors and set the associated factor levels prior to execution of the DOE. Results from mode I Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) testing per ASTM D 5528 [1] standard and DOE statistical analysis software are used to produce a regression model and determine appropriate optimum settings for each factor.

  19. Surface Monitoring of CFRP Structures for Adhesive Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledesma, Rodolfo; Palmieri, Frank L.; Yost, William T.; Connell, John W.; Fitz-Gerald, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composite materials requires reliable monitoring and detection of surface contaminants to assure robust and durable bonded structures. Surface treatment and effective monitoring prior to bonding is essential in order to obtain a surface free from contaminants that may degrade structural performance. Two techniques which monitor the effectiveness of the laser surface treatment of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials are being investigated: laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE). The applicability of LIBS to detect silicone contaminants on CFRP composites is studied using 35 ns Nd:YAG laser pulses at 355 nm with a pulse energy of 45 mJ. The LIBS regime in which pulse energies are < 100 mJ is referred to as mLIBS. CFRP surfaces were contaminated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a major component of silicone based mold release agents. The presence of PDMS is found by inspecting the Si I emission line at 288.2 nm. Untreated CFRP samples and CFRP contaminated with PDMS were tested. The PDMS areal density ranged from 0.36 Â+/- 0.04 to 0.51 Â+/- 0.16 mg/cm2. The results demonstrate the successful detection of PDMS on CFRP using mLIBS. In addition, OSEE was used to measure CFRP surface cleanliness pre- and post-treatment by laser ablation on specimens contaminated with PDMS coatings from 8 nm to 1311 nm in thickness. The results showed a significant increase in the OSEE photocurrent after laser surface treatment.

  20. Effect of combined extrusion parameters on mechanical properties of basalt fiber-reinforced plastics based on polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashtannik, P. I.; Ovcharenko, V. G.; Boot, Yu. A.

    1997-11-01

    Basalt fibers are efficient reinforcing fillers for polypropylene because they increase both the mechanical and the tribotechnical properties of composites. Basalt fibers can compete with traditional fillers (glass and asbestos fibers) of polypropylene with respect to technological, economic, and toxic properties. The effect of technological parameters of producing polypropylene-based basalt fiber-reinforced plastics (BFRPs) by combined extrusion on their mechanical properties has been investigated. The extrusion temperature was found to be the main parameter determining the mechanical properties of the BFRPs. With temperature growth from 180 to 240°C, the residual length of the basalt fibers in the composite, as well as the adhesive strength of the polymer-fiber system, increased, while the composite defectiveness decreased. The tensile strength and elastic modulus increased from 35 to 42 MPa and 3.2 to 4.2 GPa, respectively. At the same time, the growth in composite solidity led to its higher brittleness. Thus, a higher temperature of extrusion allows us to produce materials which can be subjected to tensile and bending loads, while the materials produced at a lower temperature of extrusion are impact stable. The effect of the gap size between the extruder body and moving disks on the mechanical properties of the BFRPs is less significant than that of temperature. An increase of the gap size from 2 to 8 mm improves the impregnation quality of the fibers, but the extruder productivity diminishes. The possibility of controling the properties of reinforced polypropylene by varying the technological parameters of combined extrusion is shown. The polypropylene-based BFRPs produced by the proposed method surpass the properties of glass and asbestos fiber-reinforced plastics.

  1. Deformation behavior of FRP-metal composites locally reinforced with carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholze, M.; Kolonko, A.; Lindner, T.; Lampke, T.; Helbig, F.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates variations of hybrid laminates, consisting of one aluminum sheet and a unidirectional glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) basic structure with partial carbon fiber (CF) reinforcement. To create these heterogeneous FRP laminates, it is necessary to design and produce semi-finished textile-based products. Moreover, a warp knitting machine in conjunction with a warp thread offset unit was used to generate bionic inspired compounds. By the variation of stacking prior to the consolidation process of the hybrid laminate, an oriented CF reinforcement at the top and middle layer of the FRP is realized. In both cases the GFRP layer prevents contact between the aluminum and carbon fibers. In so doing, the high strength of carbon fibers can be transferred to the hybrid laminate in load directions with an active prevention of contact corrosion. The interface strength between thermoplastic and metal component was improved by a thermal spray coating on the aluminum sheet. Because of the high surface roughness and porosity, mechanical interlock was used to provide high interface strength without bonding agents between both components. The resulting mechanical properties of the hybrid laminates are evaluated by three point bending tests in different load directions. The effect of local fiber orientation and layer positioning on failure and deformation mechanism is additionally investigated by digital image correlation (DIC).

  2. Study on Damage Evaluation and Machinability of UD-CFRP for the Orthogonal Cutting Operation Using Scanning Acoustic Microscopy and the Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongyao; He, Xiaodong; Xu, Zhonghai; Jiao, Weicheng; Yang, Fan; Jiang, Long; Li, Linlin; Liu, Wenbo; Wang, Rongguo

    2017-02-20

    Owing to high specific strength and designability, unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polymer (UD-CFRP) has been utilized in numerous fields to replace conventional metal materials. Post machining processes are always required for UD-CFRP to achieve dimensional tolerance and assembly specifications. Due to inhomogeneity and anisotropy, UD-CFRP differs greatly from metal materials in machining and failure mechanism. To improve the efficiency and avoid machining-induced damage, this paper undertook to study the correlations between cutting parameters, fiber orientation angle, cutting forces, and cutting-induced damage for UD-CFRP laminate. Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) was employed and one-/two-dimensional damage factors were then created to quantitatively characterize the damage of the laminate workpieces. According to the 3D Hashin's criteria a numerical model was further proposed in terms of the finite element method (FEM). A good agreement between simulation and experimental results was validated for the prediction and structural optimization of the UD-CFRP.

  3. Study on Damage Evaluation and Machinability of UD-CFRP for the Orthogonal Cutting Operation Using Scanning Acoustic Microscopy and the Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongyao; He, Xiaodong; Xu, Zhonghai; Jiao, Weicheng; Yang, Fan; Jiang, Long; Li, Linlin; Liu, Wenbo; Wang, Rongguo

    2017-01-01

    Owing to high specific strength and designability, unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polymer (UD-CFRP) has been utilized in numerous fields to replace conventional metal materials. Post machining processes are always required for UD-CFRP to achieve dimensional tolerance and assembly specifications. Due to inhomogeneity and anisotropy, UD-CFRP differs greatly from metal materials in machining and failure mechanism. To improve the efficiency and avoid machining-induced damage, this paper undertook to study the correlations between cutting parameters, fiber orientation angle, cutting forces, and cutting-induced damage for UD-CFRP laminate. Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) was employed and one-/two-dimensional damage factors were then created to quantitatively characterize the damage of the laminate workpieces. According to the 3D Hashin’s criteria a numerical model was further proposed in terms of the finite element method (FEM). A good agreement between simulation and experimental results was validated for the prediction and structural optimization of the UD-CFRP. PMID:28772565

  4. Photoacoustic microscopic imaging of surface and subsurface damages in CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahata, Kazuyuki; Ogi, Keiji; Namita, Takeshi; Ohira, Katsumi; Maruyama, Masayuki; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2018-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging comprises an optical excitation within a target zone and the detection of the ultrasonic wave so created. A pulsed laser illuminates the target zone, and this illumination causes rapid thermoelastic expansion that generates a broadband high-frequency ultrasonic wave (photoacoustic wave, PA). In this paper, we report proof-of-concept experiments for nondestructive testing of laminar materials using a PA microscope. A specimen containing carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) was used in this experiment and involved an artificial delamination. A 532-nm-wavelength laser irradiates the top surface of the specimen, and the resulting ultrasonic waves are received by a point-focusing immersion transducer on the same side. Our system estimated the depth and dimension of the subsurface delamination accurately. By coating a light-absorbing material on the surface, the amplitude of the PA wave increased. This finding shows that the signal-noise (S/N) ratio of the scattered wave from delaminations can be improved with the surface coatings.

  5. Electrical Resistance Based Damage Modeling of Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Robert James

    In the current thesis, the 4-probe electrical resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites is utilized as a metric for sensing low-velocity impact damage. A robust method has been developed for recovering the directionally dependent electrical resistivities using an experimental line-type 4-probe resistance method. Next, the concept of effective conducting thickness was uniquely applied in the development of a brand new point-type 4-probe method for applications with electrically anisotropic materials. An extensive experimental study was completed to characterize the 4-probe electrical resistance of CFRP specimens using both the traditional line-type and new point-type methods. Leveraging the concept of effective conducting thickness, a novel method was developed for building 4-probe electrical finite element (FE) models in COMSOL. The electrical models were validated against experimental resistance measurements and the FE models demonstrated predictive capabilities when applied to CFRP specimens with varying thickness and layup. These new models demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy compared to previous literature and could provide a framework for future advancements in FE modeling of electrically anisotropic materials. FE models were then developed in ABAQUS for evaluating the influence of prescribed localized damage on the 4-probe resistance. Experimental data was compiled on the impact response of various CFRP laminates, and was used in the development of quasi- static FE models for predicting presence of impact-induced delamination. The simulation-based delamination predictions were then integrated into the electrical FE models for the purpose of studying the influence of realistic damage patterns on electrical resistance. When the size of the delamination damage was moderate compared to the electrode spacing, the electrical resistance increased by less than 1% due to the delamination damage. However, for a specimen with large

  6. Initial development of high-accuracy CFRP panel for DATE5 antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yuan; Lou, Zheng; Hao, Xufeng; Zhu, Jing; Cheng, Jingquan; Wang, Hairen; Zuo, Yingxi; Yang, Ji

    2016-07-01

    DATE5 antenna, which is a 5m telescope for terahertz exploration, will be sited at Dome A, Antarctica. It is necessary to keep high surface accuracy of the primary reflector panels so that high observing efficiency can be achieved. In antenna field, carbon fiber reinforced composite (CFRP) sandwich panels are widely used as these panels are light in weight, high in strength, low in thermal expansion, and cheap in mass fabrication. In DATE5 project, CFRP panels are important panel candidates. In the design study phase, a CFRP prototype panel of 1-meter size is initially developed for the verification purpose. This paper introduces the material arrangement in the sandwich panel, measured performance of this testing sandwich structure samples, and together with the panel forming process. For anti-icing in the South Pole region, a special CFRP heating film is embedded in the front skin of sandwich panel. The properties of some types of basic building materials are tested. Base on the results, the deformation of prototype panel with different sandwich structures and skin layers are simulated and a best structural concept is selected. The panel mold used is a high accuracy one with a surface rms error of 1.4 μm. Prototype panels are replicated from the mold. Room temperature curing resin is used to reduce the thermal deformation in the resin transfer process. In the curing, vacuum negative pressure technology is also used to increase the volume content of carbon fiber. After the measurement of the three coordinate measure machine (CMM), a prototype CFRP panel of 5.1 μm rms surface error is developed initially.

  7. Thermal conductivity measurement below 40 K of the CFRP tubes for the Mid-Infrared Instrument mounting struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaughnessy, B. M.; Eccleston, P.; Fereday, K. J.; Canfer, S. J.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Jessen, N. C.

    2007-05-01

    The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) is one of four instruments on the James Webb Space Telescope observatory, scheduled for launch in 2013. It must be cooled to about 7 K and is supported within the telescope’s 40 K instrument module by a hexapod of carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) tubing. This article describes the measurement of cryogenic thermal conductivity of the candidate CFRP. Measured thermal conductivities were about 0.05 W/m K at a mean temperature of 10 K increasing to about 0.20 W/m K at a mean temperature of 40 K.

  8. NDT evaluation of long-term bond durability of CFRP-structural systems applied to RC highway bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Kenneth C.

    2016-06-01

    The long-term durability of CFRP structural systems applied to reinforced-concrete (RC) highway bridges is a function of the system bond behavior over time. The sustained structural load performance of strengthened bridges depends on the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates remaining 100 % bonded to concrete bridge members. Periodic testing of the CFRP-concrete bond condition is necessary to sustain load performance. The objective of this paper is to present a non-destructive testing (NDT) method designed to evaluate the bond condition and long-term durability of CFRP laminate (plate) systems applied to RC highway bridges. Using the impact-echo principle, a mobile mechanical device using light impact hammers moving along the length of a bonded CFRP plate produces unique acoustic frequencies which are a function of existing CFRP plate-concrete bond conditions. The purpose of this method is to test and locate CFRP plates de-bonded from bridge structural members to identify associated deterioration in bridge load performance. Laboratory tests of this NDT device on a CFRP plate bonded to concrete with staged voids (de-laminations) produced different frequencies for bonded and de-bonded areas of the plate. The spectra (bands) of frequencies obtained in these tests show a correlation to the CFRP-concrete bond condition and identify bonded and de-bonded areas of the plate. The results of these tests indicate that this NDT impact machine, with design improvements, can potentially provide bridge engineers a means to rapidly evaluate long lengths of CFRP laminates applied to multiple highway bridges within a national transportation infrastructure.

  9. Non-destructive evaluation of porosity and its effect on mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, M. R.; Binoy, M. P.; Surya, N. M.; Murthy, C. R. L.; Engelbart, R. W.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, an attempt is made to induce porosity of varied levels in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based polymer composite laminates fabricated using prepregs by varying the fabrication parameters such as applied vacuum, autoclave pressure and curing temperature. Different NDE tools have been utilized to evaluate the porosity content and correlate with measurable parameters of different NDE techniques. Primarily, ultrasonic imaging and real time digital X-ray imaging have been tried to obtain a measurable parameter which can represent or reflect the amount of porosity contained in the composite laminate. Also, effect of varied porosity content on mechanical properties of the CFRP composite materials is investigated through a series of experimental investigations. The outcome of the experimental approach has yielded interesting and encouraging trend as a first step towards developing an NDE tool for quantification of effect of varied porosity in the polymer composite materials.

  10. Evaluation of Shear Tie Connectors for Use in Insulated Concrete Sandwich Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    stainless steel, galvanized carbon steel, carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP), glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP), and basalt fiber reinforced polymer...Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Delta Tie produced by Dayton Superior; • (B) THERMOMASS® composite GFRP pins; • (C) THERMOMASS® non-composite...GFRP pins; • (D) Altus Group CFRP Grid; • (E) Universal Building products GFRP Teplo Tie; and • (F) Universal Building products Basalt FRP

  11. Reducing the Surface Performance Requirements of a Primary Mirror by Adding a Deformable Mirror in its Optical Path

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) mirrors been proposed for use in future imaging satellites. Compared to traditional glass -based mirrors, CFRP...SUBJECT TERMS carbon fiber reinforced polymer mirror, adaptive optics, deformable mirror, surface figure error 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 79 16. PRICE CODE...Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT In recent years, carbon fiber reinforced

  12. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard C

    2011-05-03

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P < 10 -4 , and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P < 10 -8 . Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  13. Modeling of short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A.; Aswini, N.; Dandekar, C. R.; Makhe, S.

    2012-09-01

    A micromechanics based finite element model (FEM) is developed to facilitate the design of a new production quality fiber reinforced plastic injection molded part. The composite part under study is composed of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix reinforced with 30% by volume fraction of short carbon fibers. The constitutive material models are obtained by using micromechanics based homogenization theories. The analysis is carried out by successfully coupling two commercial codes, Moldflow and ANSYS. Moldflow software is used to predict the fiber orientation by considering the flow kinetics and molding parameters. Material models are inputted into the commercial software ANSYS as per the predicted fiber orientation and the structural analysis is carried out. Thus in the present approach a coupling between two commercial codes namely Moldflow and ANSYS has been established to enable the analysis of the short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite parts. The load-deflection curve is obtained based on three constitutive material model namely an isotropy, transversely isotropy and orthotropy. Average values of the predicted quantities are compared to experimental results, obtaining a good correlation. In this manner, the coupled Moldflow-ANSYS model successfully predicts the load deflection curve of a composite injection molded part.

  14. Fabrication of Fe–Co Magnetostrictive Fiber Reinforced Plastic Composites and Their Sensor Performance Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Katabira, Kenichi; Yoshida, Yu; Masuda, Atsuji; Watanabe, Akihito; Narita, Fumio

    2018-01-01

    The inverse magnetostrictive effect is an effective property for energy harvesting; the material needs to have large magnetostriction and ease of mass production. Fe–Co alloys being magnetostrictive materials have favorable characteristics which are high strength, ductility, and excellent workability, allowing easy fabrication of Fe–Co alloy fibers. In this study, we fabricated magnetostrictive polymer composites, in which Fe–Co fibers were woven into polyester fabric, and discussed their sensor performance. Compression and bending tests were carried out to measure the magnetic flux density change, and the effects of magnetization, bias magnetic field, and the location of the fibers on the performance were discussed. It was shown that magnetic flux density change due to compression and bending is related to the magnetization of the Fe–Co fiber and the bias magnetic field. The magnetic flux density change of Fe–Co fiber reinforced plastics was larger than that of the plastics with Terfenol-D particles. PMID:29522455

  15. Fire test method for graphite fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A potential problem in the use of graphite fiber reinforced resin matrix composites is the dispersal of graphite fibers during accidential fires. Airborne, electrically conductive fibers originating from the burning composites could enter and cause shorting in electrical equipment located in surrounding areas. A test method for assessing the burning characteristics of graphite fiber reinforced composites and the effectiveness of the composites in retaining the graphite fibers has been developed. The method utilizes a modified rate of heat release apparatus. The equipment and the testing procedure are described. The application of the test method to the assessment of composite materials is illustrated for two resin matrix/graphite composite systems.

  16. The Effect of Moisture on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites. 1. Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-27

    II i NSWC/WOL/’r 76-7 0 00 WHITE OAK LABORATORY THE EFFECT OF MOISTURE ON CARBON FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES I DIFFUSION 0 BY Joseph M. AugI 27...Effect of Moisture on Carbon Fiber’ Reinorcd EoxyComposites. onZI j , l Joseph M./Augll - lan E./egr ,. E RORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10...Diffusion Carbon fiber composite* 20. A bf AACT (Ceedhlua on rverse side it meosemp &W idmtl’ 5 bl eek mmbeet) Mathematical models are suggested for

  17. Effect of the Microstructure on the Fracture Mode of Short-Fiber Reinforced Plastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Masaaki; Okabe, Tomonaga; Takeda, Nobuo

    A numerical simulation was presented to discuss the microscopic damage and its influence on the strength and energy-absorbing capability of short-fiber reinforced plastic composites. The dominant damage includes matrix crack and/or interfacial debonding, when the fibers are shorter than the critical length for fiber breakage. The simulation addressed the matrix crack with a continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model and the interfacial debonding with an embedded process zone (EPZ) model. Fictitious free-edge effects on the fracture modes were successfully eliminated with the periodic-cell simulation. The advantage of our simulation was pointed out by demonstrating that the simulation with edge effects significantly overestimates the dissipative energy of the composites. We then investigated the effect of the material microstructure on the fracture modes in the composites. The simulated results clarified that the inter-fiber distance affects the breaking strain of the composites and the fiber-orientation angle affects the position of the damage initiation. These factors influence the strength and energy-absorbing capability of short fiber-reinforced composites.

  18. FRP MODEL - VERSION 1.0 FOR ESTIMATING STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM FIBER-REINFORCED PLASTICS FABRICATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This software estimates styrene emissions from the manufacture of fiber-reinforced plastics/composite (FRP/C) products. In using the model, the user first chooses the appropriate process: gel coating, resin sprayup, hand layup, etc. Choosing a process will cause the 'baseline' in...

  19. The Effect of CFRP Surface Treatment on the Splat Morphology and Coating Adhesion Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Amirthan; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Metallization of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites aggrandized their application to aircraft, automobile, and wind power industries. Recently, the metallization of CFRP surface using thermal spray technique, especially the cold spray, a solid state deposition technique, is a topic of research. However, a direct cold spray deposition on the CFRP substrate often imposes severe erosion on the surface owing to the high-impact energy of the sprayed particles. This urges the requirement of an interlayer on the CFRP surface. In the present study, the effect of surface treatment on the interlayer adhesion strength is evaluated. The CFRP samples were initially treated mechanically, chemically, and thermally and then an interlayer was developed by atmospheric plasma spray system. The quality of the coating is highly dependent on the splat taxonomy; therefore the present work also devoted to study the splat formation behavior using the splat-collection experiments, where the molten Cu particles impinged on the treated CFRP substrates. These results were correlated with the coating adhesion strength. The coating adhesion strength was measured by pull-out test. The results showed that the surface treatment, particularly the chemical treatment, was fairly successful in improving the adhesion strength.

  20. Fire test method for graphite fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A potential problem in the use of graphite fiber reinforced resin matrix composites is the dispersal of graphite fibers during accidental fires. Airborne, electrically conductive fibers originating from the burning composites could enter and cause shorting in electrical equipment located in surrounding areas. A test method for assessing the burning characteristics of graphite fiber reinforced composites and the effectiveness of the composites in retaining the graphite fibers has been developed. The method utilizes a modified Ohio State University Rate of Heat Release apparatus. The equipment and the testing procedure are described. The application of the test method to the assessment of composite materials is illustrated for two resin matrix/graphite composite systems.

  1. Structure and properties of polymeric composite materials during 1501 days outer space exposure at Salyut-7 orbital station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Startsev, Oleg V.; Nikishin, Eugene F.

    1995-01-01

    Specimens of polymeric composite materials for aviation and space applications such as glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP), carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP), organic fiber reinforced plastics (OFRP), and hybrid plastics (HP) based on epoxy compounds were exposed to the space environment on the surface of Salyut-7 orbital station. The space exposure lasted 1501 days as a maximum. The data relating to the change in mechanical properties, mass losses, glass transition temperature, linear thermal expansion coefficient, and microstructure after various periods of exposure are given. It has been found that the change in properties is caused by the processes of binder postcuring and microerosion of the exposed surface of plastics. The phenomenon of strengthening of the surface layer of hybrid composites, due to which the nature of destruction changes at bending loads, has been revealed.

  2. Strengthening of Existing Bridge Structures for Shear and Bending with Carbon Textile-Reinforced Mortar.

    PubMed

    Herbrand, Martin; Adam, Viviane; Classen, Martin; Kueres, Dominik; Hegger, Josef

    2017-09-19

    Increasing traffic loads and changes in code provisions lead to deficits in shear and flexural capacity of many existing highway bridges. Therefore, a large number of structures are expected to require refurbishment and strengthening in the future. This projection is based on the current condition of many older road bridges. Different strengthening methods for bridges exist to extend their service life, all having specific advantages and disadvantages. By applying a thin layer of carbon textile-reinforced mortar (CTRM) to bridge deck slabs and the webs of pre-stressed concrete bridges, the fatigue and ultimate strength of these members can be increased significantly. The CTRM layer is a combination of a corrosion resistant carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) fabric and an efficient mortar. In this paper, the strengthening method and the experimental results obtained at RWTH Aachen University are presented.

  3. Strengthening of Existing Bridge Structures for Shear and Bending with Carbon Textile-Reinforced Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Herbrand, Martin; Classen, Martin; Kueres, Dominik; Hegger, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Increasing traffic loads and changes in code provisions lead to deficits in shear and flexural capacity of many existing highway bridges. Therefore, a large number of structures are expected to require refurbishment and strengthening in the future. This projection is based on the current condition of many older road bridges. Different strengthening methods for bridges exist to extend their service life, all having specific advantages and disadvantages. By applying a thin layer of carbon textile-reinforced mortar (CTRM) to bridge deck slabs and the webs of pre-stressed concrete bridges, the fatigue and ultimate strength of these members can be increased significantly. The CTRM layer is a combination of a corrosion resistant carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) fabric and an efficient mortar. In this paper, the strengthening method and the experimental results obtained at RWTH Aachen University are presented. PMID:28925962

  4. Research on mechanical properties of carbon fiber /polyamide reinforced PP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinghui; Yu, Qiang; Liu, Lixia; Ji, Wenhua; Yang, Li; Fan, Dongli

    2017-10-01

    The polyamide composites reinforced by carbon fiber/polypropylene are produced by injection molding processing. The flow abilities and mechanical properties of the CF/PA/PP composite materials are studied by the fusion index instrument and the universal testing machine. The results show that with the content of carbon fiber/polyamide increase, the impact breaking strength and the tensile property of the composite materials increase, which is instructive to the actual injection production of polypropylene products.

  5. Fiber optic strain monitoring of textile GFRP during RTM molding and fatigue tests by using embedded FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Tatsuro; Osaka, Katsuhiko; Nakakita, Satoru; Fukuda, Takehito

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes cure and health monitoring of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) textile composites both during a resin transfer molding (RTM) process and in loading tests. Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) textile composites also were used for a comparative study. Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fiber optic sensors were embedded in FRP to monitor internal strain. From the results of cure monitoring, it was found that the embedded FBG sensors were useful to know when cured resin constrained fibers. It also appeared that specimens were subjected to friction stress resulted from difference of coefficient of thermal expansion between FRP and a stainless steel mold in cooling process of RTM molding. After the molding, tensile and fatigue tests were conducted. The results of tensile tests showed that output of the embedded FBG sensors agreed well that of surface-bonded strain gauges despite deterioration of reflected spectra form the sensors. From the results of fatigue tests, the FBG sensors showed good status until 100,000 cycles when specimens had no damage. From these results, it can be concluded that embedded FBG sensors have good capability of monitoring internal strain in textile FRP both during RTM process and in service.

  6. [Survey of carbon fiber reinforced plastic orthoses and occupational and medical problems based on a questionnaire administered to companies involved in the manufacture of prosthetics and orthotics].

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Yuko; Furuta, Nami; Makino, Kenichiro; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    We surveyed carbon fiber reinforced plastic orthoses (carbon orthoses) and their associated occupational and medical problems based on a questionnaire sent to 310 companies which were members of the Japan Orthotics and Prosthetics Association. Of all the companies, 232 responded: 77 of the 232 companies dealt with ready-made carbon orthoses, 52 dealt with fabricated custom-made orthoses, and 155 did not dealt with carbon orthoses. Although the total number of custom-made carbon ortheses in Japan was 829/ 5 years, there was a difference by region, and one company fabricated only 12 (per 5 years) custom-made carbon orthoses on average. The advantages of the carbon orthosis were the fact that it was "light weight", "well-fitted", had a "good appearance", and "excellent durability", while the disadvantages were that it was "expensive", "high cost of production", of "black color", and required a "longer time for completion", and "higher fabrication techniques". From the standpoint of industrial medicine, "scattering of fine fragments of carbon fibers", "itching on the skin" and "health hazards" were indicated in companies that manufacture the orthosis. In order to make the carbon orthosis more popular, it is necessary to develop a new carbon material that is easier to fabricate at a lower cost, to improve the fabrication technique, and to resolve the occupational and medical problems.

  7. Experimental study on behavior of steel channel strengthened with CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hongyuan; Deng, Xuezhi; Zhou, Xiaojun

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the behaviour of axially loaded long and eccentrically loaded short thin-walled steel channels, strengthened with transversely bonded carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets. Seven long members, each 1400 mm long, and seven short members, each 750mmlong, were tested. The main parameters were the number of CFRP plies (one or two) and the clear spacing between the CFRP strips (50, 100 or 150 mm). The effect of CFRP sheet layer and clear spacing was studied. All the ultimate load capacity of the reinforced members was improved in different extent. A maximum strength gain of 9.13% was achieved for long members with two CFRP layers and 50 mm spacing of CFRP strips. The experimental results show that the global buckling happens to all the long specimens. For short members, the maximum strength gain of 12.1% was achieved with two CFRP layers and 50 mm spacing of CFRP strips. With the exception of the most heavily reinforced (2 plies at 50 and 100 mm), local buckling was observed prior to global buckling for short members, which was completely opposite of the control specimens. Meanwhile, when the clear spacing of CFRP strips is greater than theweb height of steel channel, the transversely bonded CFRP does not have a significant improvement in buckling load capacity of the short- and long-channel components. While the clear spacing is less than the web height, the more number of CFRP layer, the more enhancement of buckling load capacity.

  8. Modeling and Measurement of Sustained Loading and Temperature-Dependent Deformation of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bonded to Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yoseok; Lee, Jaeha; Kim, WooSeok

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting the effects of short-term sustained load and temperature on time-dependent deformation of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bonded to concrete and pull-off strength at room temperature after the sustained loading period. The approach involves experimental and numerical analysis. Single-lap shear specimens were used to evaluate temperature and short-term sustained loading effects on time-dependent behavior under sustained loading and debonding behavior under pull-off loading after a sustained loading period. The numerical model was parameterized with experiments on the concrete, FRP, and epoxy. Good correlation was seen between the numerical results and single-lap shear experiments. Sensitivity studies shed light on the influence of temperature, epoxy modulus, and epoxy thickness on the redistribution of interfacial shear stress during sustained loading. This investigation confirms the hypothesis that interfacial stress redistribution can occur due to sustained load and elevated temperature and its effect can be significant. PMID:28787948

  9. Modeling and Measurement of Sustained Loading and Temperature-Dependent Deformation of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bonded to Concrete.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yoseok; Lee, Jaeha; Kim, WooSeok

    2015-01-29

    This paper aims at presenting the effects of short-term sustained load and temperature on time-dependent deformation of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bonded to concrete and pull-off strength at room temperature after the sustained loading period. The approach involves experimental and numerical analysis. Single-lap shear specimens were used to evaluate temperature and short-term sustained loading effects on time-dependent behavior under sustained loading and debonding behavior under pull-off loading after a sustained loading period. The numerical model was parameterized with experiments on the concrete, FRP, and epoxy. Good correlation was seen between the numerical results and single-lap shear experiments. Sensitivity studies shed light on the influence of temperature, epoxy modulus, and epoxy thickness on the redistribution of interfacial shear stress during sustained loading. This investigation confirms the hypothesis that interfacial stress redistribution can occur due to sustained load and elevated temperature and its effect can be significant.

  10. Cost efficient carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastics with in-situ polymerization of polyamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, T.; Akdere, M.; Röding, T.; Gries, T.; Seide, G.

    2017-10-01

    Lightweight design has gained more and more relevance over the last decades. Especially in automotive industry it is of paramount importance to reduce weight and save fuel. At the same time the demand for safety and performance increases the components’ weight. To reach a trade-off between driving comfort and efficiency new lightweight materials have to be developed. One possible solution is the usage of carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastics (CFRTP) as a lightweight substitute material. In contrast to conventional carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP), CFRTPs are cheaper and have a higher impact resistance. Furthermore they are characterized by hot forming ability, weldability and recyclability. However, the impregnation of the textile requires high pressure, because of the melted polymer’s high viscosity. A new innovative approach for CFRTP is the usage of in-situ polymerization with ɛ-caprolactam as matrix, which has a much lower viscosity and thus requires much lower pressure for impregnation and consolidation.

  11. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P < 10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P < 10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential. PMID:25553057

  12. Creep of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    Details of the laminat - 5ing technique have already been given elsewhere The nominal thickness of material I composite was 2.5mm. All the other...TEST RESULTS 6 5 DISCUSSION 8 5.1 Composites containing 00 fibres 8 5.2 Multi-plied 90 ± 450 material 80I5,3 Angle-plied ±450 material 9 5.4 The...influence of laminate construction on the creep of CFRP 9 5.5 The relationship between creep strain and time under load in carbon fibre composites 10 6

  13. Studying impact damage on carbon-fiber reinforced aircraft composite panels with sonicir

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Han Xiaoyan; Zhang Ding; He Qi

    2011-06-23

    Composites are becoming more important materials in commercial aircraft structures such as the fuselage and wings with the new B787 Dreamliner from Boeing which has the target to utilize 50% by weight of composite materials. Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are the material of choice in aircraft structures. This is due to their light weight and high strength (high strength-to-weight ratio), high specific stiffness, tailorability of properties, design flexibility etc. Especially, by reducing the aircraft's body weight by using such lighter structures, the cost of fuel can be greatly reduced with the high jet fuel price for commercial airlines. However, these compositesmore » are prone to impact damage and the damage may occur without any observable sign on the surface, yet resulting in delaminations and disbonds that may occur well within the layers. We are studying the impact problem with carbon-fiber reinforced composite panels and developing SonicIR for this application as a fast and wide-area NDE technology. In this paper, we present our results in studying composite structures including carbon-fiber reinforced composite materials, and preliminary quantitative studies on delamination type defect depth identification in the panels.« less

  14. 2D simulations of orthogonal cutting of CFRP: Effect of tool angles on parameters of cut and chip morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhassine, Mehdi; Rivière-Lorphèvre, Edouard; Arrazola, Pedro-Jose; Gobin, Pierre; Dumas, David; Madhavan, Vinay; Aizpuru, Ohian; Ducobu, François

    2018-05-01

    Carbon-fiber reinforced composites (CFRP) are attractive materials for lightweight designs in applications needing good mechanical properties. Machining of such materials can be harder than metals due to their anisotropic behavior. In addition, the combination of the fibers and resin mechanical properties must also include the fiber orientation. In the case of orthogonal cutting, the tool inclination, rake angle or cutting angle usually influence the cutting process but such a detailed investigation is currently lacking in a 2D configuration. To address this issue, a model has been developed with Abaqus Explicit including Hashin damage. This model has been validated with experimental results from the literature. The effects of the tool parameters (rake angle, clearance angle) on the tool cutting forces, CFRP chip morphology and surface damage are herewith studied. It is shown that 90° orientation for the CFRP increases the surface damage. The rake angle has a minimal effect on the cutting forces but modifies the chip formation times. The feed forces are increased with increasing rake angle.

  15. Quasi-plane-hypothesis of strain coordination for RC beams seismically strengthened with externally-bonded or near-surface mounted fiber reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhenhua; Zeng, Xiantao; Liu, Hanlong; Zhou, Fengjun

    2013-03-01

    The application of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP), including carbon FRP and glass FRP, for structural repair and strengthening has grown due to their numerous advantages over conventional materials such as externally bonded reinforcement (EBR) and near-surface mounted (NSM) strengthening techniques. This paper summarizes the results from 21 reinforced concrete beams strengthened with different methods, including externally-bonded and near-surface mounted FRP, to study the strain coordination of the FRP and steel rebar of the RC beam. Since there is relative slipping between the RC beam and the FRP, the strain of the FRP and steel rebar of the RC beam satisfy the quasi-plane-hypothesis; that is, the strain of the longitudinal fiber that parallels the neutral axis of the plated beam within the scope of the effective height ( h 0) of the cross section is in direct proportion to the distance from the fiber to the neutral axis. The strain of the FRP and steel rebar satisfies the equation: ɛ FRP= βɛ steel, and the value of β is equal to 1.1-1.3 according to the test results.

  16. Finite Element Analysis of Increasing Column Section and CFRP Reinforcement Method under Different Axial Compression Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinghai, Zhou; Tianbei, Kang; Fengchi, Wang; Xindong, Wang

    2017-11-01

    Eight less stirrups in the core area frame joints are simulated by ABAQUS finite element numerical software. The composite reinforcement method is strengthened with carbon fiber and increasing column section, the axial compression ratio of reinforced specimens is 0.3, 0.45 and 0.6 respectively. The results of the load-displacement curve, ductility and stiffness are analyzed, and it is found that the different axial compression ratio has great influence on the bearing capacity of increasing column section strengthening method, and has little influence on carbon fiber reinforcement method. The different strengthening schemes improve the ultimate bearing capacity and ductility of frame joints in a certain extent, composite reinforcement joints strengthening method to improve the most significant, followed by increasing column section, reinforcement method of carbon fiber reinforced joints to increase the minimum.

  17. Evaluation of fiber reinforced concrete : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1991-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the physical properties of plastic and hardened fiber reinforced concrete using three basic types of fibers: steel, fiberglass and polypropylene. Fibers have been shown to increase flexural and tensile strength, d...

  18. Computation of the Distribution of the Fiber-Matrix Interface Cracks in the Edge Trimming of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-ji; Zhang, Bo-yu; Ma, Jian-wei; Bi, Guang-jian; Hu, Hai-bo

    2018-04-01

    Edge trimming is commonly used to bring the CFRP components to right dimension and shape in aerospace industries. However, various forms of undesirable machining damage occur frequently which will significantly decrease the material performance of CFRP. The damage is difficult to predict and control due to the complicated changing laws, causing unsatisfactory machining quality of CFRP components. Since the most of damage has the same essence: the fiber-matrix interface cracks, this study aims to calculate the distribution of them in edge trimming of CFRP, thereby to obtain the effects of the machining parameters, which could be helpful to guide the optimal selection of the machining parameters in engineering. Through the orthogonal cutting experiments, the quantitative relation between the fiber-matrix interface crack depth and the fiber cutting angle, cutting depth as well as cutting speed is established. According to the analysis on material removal process on any location of the workpiece in edge trimming, the instantaneous cutting parameters are calculated, and the formation process of the fiber-matrix interface crack is revealed. Finally, the computational method for the fiber-matrix interface cracks in edge trimming of CFRP is proposed. Upon the computational results, it is found that the fiber orientations of CFRP workpieces is the most significant factor on the fiber-matrix interface cracks, which can not only change the depth of them from micrometers to millimeters, but control the distribution image of them. Other machining parameters, only influence the fiber-matrix interface cracks depth but have little effect on the distribution image.

  19. CFRP composite optical telescope assembly for the 1 m ULTRA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert N.; Romeo, Robert C.

    2006-06-01

    The focus of the ULTRA Project is to develop and test Ultra-Lightweight Technology for Research applications in Astronomy. The ULTRA project is a collaborative effort involving the private firm Composite Mirror Applications, Inc (CMA) and 3 universities: University of Kansas, San Diego State University, and Dartmouth College. Funding for ULTRA is predominately from a NSF three year MRI program grant to CMA and KU with additional support from CMA, KU and SDSU. The goal of the ULTRA program is to demonstrate that a viable alternative exists to traditional glass mirror and steel telescope technology by designing, fabricating and testing a research telescope constructed from carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials. In particular, a 1m diameter, Cassegrain telescope optics set and optical tube assembly (OTA) are being designed and fabricated by CMA. The completed telescope will be deployed at SDSU's Mt Laguna Observatory in a refurbished structure (new dome and mount provided via KU and SDSU). We expect that a successful completion and testing of this project will lead to future use of CFRP technology in larger telescopes and segmented telescopes. This paper describes the OTA (optical tube assembly) that has been developed for the ULTRA project. The mirror technology is described in another paper in this conference. A poster describes the ULTRA project overview in more detail.

  20. Development of an FBG Sensor Array for Multi-Impact Source Localization on CFRP Structures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mingshun; Sai, Yaozhang; Geng, Xiangyi; Sui, Qingmei; Liu, Xiaohui; Jia, Lei

    2016-10-24

    We proposed and studied an impact detection system based on a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor array and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm to determine the location and the number of low velocity impacts on a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) plate. A FBG linear array, consisting of seven FBG sensors, was used for detecting the ultrasonic signals from impacts. The edge-filter method was employed for signal demodulation. Shannon wavelet transform was used to extract narrow band signals from the impacts. The Gerschgorin disc theorem was used for estimating the number of impacts. We used the MUSIC algorithm to obtain the coordinates of multi-impacts. The impact detection system was tested on a 500 mm × 500 mm × 1.5 mm CFRP plate. The results show that the maximum error and average error of the multi-impacts' localization are 9.2 mm and 7.4 mm, respectively.

  1. Momentum and velocity of the ablated material in laser machining of carbon fiber preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, P.; Speker, N.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2013-11-01

    The automation in fabrication of CFRP (carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics) parts demands efficient and low-cost machining technologies. In conventional cutting technologies, tool-wear and low process speeds are some of the reasons for high costs. Thus, the use of lasers is an attractive option for cutting CF-preforms. A typical effect degrading the quality in laser cutting CF-preform is a bulged cutting edge. This effect is assumed to be caused by interaction of the fibers with the ablated material, which leaves the kerf at high velocity. Hence, a method for measuring the momentum and the velocity of the vapor is presented in this article. To measure the momentum of the ablated material, the CF-preform is mounted on a precision scale while cutting it with a laser. The direction of the momentum was determined by measuring the momentum parallel and orthogonal to the CF-preform surface. A change of the direction of the momentum with different cutting-speeds is assessed at constant laser-power. Averaged velocities of the ablation products of up to 300 m/s were determined by measuring the ablated mass and the momentum.

  2. Mechanical Properties of a Unidirectional Basalt-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Under a Loading Simulating Operation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, D. S.; Slovikov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of unidirectional composites based on basalt fibers and different marks of epoxy resins are presented. Uniaxial tensile tests were carried out using a specimen fixation technique simulating the operation conditions of structures. The mechanical properties of the basalt-fiber-reinforced plastics (BFRPs) were determined. The diagrams of loading and deformation of BFRP specimens were obtain. The formulations of the composites with the highest mechanical properties were revealed.

  3. Manufacturing Energy Intensity and Opportunity Analysis for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites and Other Lightweight Materials

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Liddell, Heather; Brueske, Sabine; Carpenter, Alberta

    With their high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are important materials for lightweighting in structural applications; however, manufacturing challenges such as low process throughput and poor quality control can lead to high costs and variable performance, limiting their use in commercial applications. One of the most significant challenges for advanced composite materials is their high manufacturing energy intensity. This study explored the energy intensities of two lightweight FRP composite materials (glass- and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers), with three lightweight metals (aluminum, magnesium, and titanium) and structural steel (as a reference material) included for comparison. Energy consumption for current typical and state-of-the-artmore » manufacturing processes were estimated for each material, deconstructing manufacturing process energy use by sub-process and manufacturing pathway in order to better understand the most energy intensive steps. Energy saving opportunities were identified and quantified for each production step based on a review of applied R&D technologies currently under development in order to estimate the practical minimum energy intensity. Results demonstrate that while carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have the highest current manufacturing energy intensity of all materials considered, the large differences between current typical and state-of-the-art energy intensity levels (the 'current opportunity') and between state-of-the-art and practical minimum energy intensity levels (the 'R&D opportunity') suggest that large-scale energy savings are within reach.« less

  4. Analyzing the effect of carbon fiber reinforced polymer on the crashworthiness of aluminum square hollow beam for crash box application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, R.; Jayanth, K.; Sarkar, I.; Ravi, K.

    2017-11-01

    Crashworthiness of a material is a measure of its ability to absorb energy during a crash. A well-designed crash box is instrumental in protecting the costly vehicle components. A square, hollow, hybrid beam of aluminum/CFRP was subjected to dynamic axial load to analyze the effect of five different lay-up sequences on its crashworthiness. The beam was placed between two plates. Boundary conditions were imposed on them to simulate a frontal body crash test model. Modeling and dynamic analysis of composite structures was done on ABAQUS. Different orientation of carbon fibers varies the crashworthiness of the hybrid beam. Addition of CFRP layer showed clear improvement in specific energy absorption and crush force efficiency compared to pure aluminum beam. Two layers of CFRP oriented at 90° on Aluminum showed 52% increase in CFE.

  5. Methods for evaluating tensile and compressive properties of plastic laminates reinforced with unwoven glass fibers

    Treesearch

    Karl Romstad

    1964-01-01

    Methods of obtaining strength and elastic properties of plastic laminates reinforced with unwoven glass fibers were evaluated using the criteria of the strength values obtained and the failure characteristics observed. Variables investigated were specimen configuration and the manner of supporting and loading the specimens. Results of this investigation indicate that...

  6. Integration of Carbon Fiber Composite Materials into Air-Cooled Reciprocating Piston Engines for UA V Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-04

    Wrapping Pre-impregnated CFRP unidirectional and +/-45° woven carbon fiber fabric prepreg was used for the loop. Pre-impregnated material was a...viable application for the connecting rod because there are no complex geometries for the CFRP to negotiate. Prepreg aids in maintaining proper fiber

  7. Recycling and characterization of carbon fibers from carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites by a novel super-heated-steam method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwan-Woo; Lee, Hye-Min; An, Jeong-Hun; Chung, Dong-Chul; An, Kay-Hyeok; Kim, Byung-Joo

    2017-12-01

    In order to manufacture high quality recycled carbon fibers (R-CFs), carbon fiber-reinforced composite wastes were pyrolysed with super-heated steam at 550 °C in a fixed bed reactor for varying reaction times. The mechanical and surface properties of the R-CFs were characterized with a single fiber tensile test, interface shear strength (IFSS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface analysis showed that there was no matrix char residue on the fiber surfaces. The tensile strength and IFSS values of the R-CFs were 90% and 115% compared to those of virgin carbon fibers (V-CFs), respectively. The recycling efficiency of the R-CFs from the composites were strongly dependent on the pyrolysis temperature, reaction time, and super-heated steam feeding rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Thermal Cycling on the Tensile Behavior of Polymer Composites Reinforced by Basalt and Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, S. Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Moslem; Eslami-Farsani, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling on the tensile behavior of three types of polymer-matrix composites — a phenolic resin reinforced with woven basalt fibers, woven carbon fibers, and hybrid basalt and carbon fibers — in an ambient environment. For this purpose, tensile tests were performed on specimens previously subjected to a certain number of thermal cycles. The ultimate tensile strength of the specimen reinforced with woven basalt fibers had by 5% after thermal cycling, but the strength of the specimen with woven carbon fibers had reduced to a value by 11% higher than that before thermal cycling.

  9. Anodized titanium and stainless steel in contact with CFRP: an electrochemical approach considering galvanic corrosion.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Yves; Tognini, Roger; Mayer, Joerg; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2007-09-15

    The combination of different materials in an implant gives the opportunity to better fulfill the requirements that are needed to improve the healing process. However, using different materials increases the risk of galvanic coupling corrosion. In this study, coupling effects of gold-anodized titanium, stainless steel for biomedical applications, carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRP), and CFRP containing tantalum fibers are investigated electrochemically and by long-term immersion experiments in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization experiments (i/E curves) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of the separated materials showed a passive behavior of the metallic samples. Anodized titanium showed no corrosion attacks, whereas stainless steel is highly susceptibility for localized corrosion. On the other side, an active dissolution behavior of both of the CFRPs in the given environment could be determined, leading to delaminating of the carbon fibers from the matrix. Long-term immersion experiments were carried out using a set-up especially developed to simulate coupling conditions of a point contact fixator system (PC-Fix) in a biological environment. Electrochemical data were acquired in situ during the whole immersion time. The results of the immersion experiments correlate with the findings of the electrochemical investigation. Localized corrosion attacks were found on stainless steel, whereas anodized titanium showed no corrosion attacks. No significant differences between the two CFRP types could be found. Galvanic coupling corrosion in combination with crevice conditions and possible corrosion mechanisms are discussed. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Voltammetric detection of biological molecules using chopped carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kazuharu; Yugami, Asako; Kojima, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Voltammetric detection of biological molecules was carried out using chopped carbon fibers produced from carbon fiber reinforced plastics that are biocompatible and inexpensive. Because chopped carbon fibers normally are covered with a sizing agent, they are difficult to use as an electrode. However, when the surface of a chopped carbon fiber was treated with ethanol and hydrochloric acid, it became conductive. To evaluate the functioning of chopped carbon fibers, voltammetric measurements of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-) were carried out. Redoxes of FAD, ascorbic acid and NADH as biomolecules were recorded using cyclic voltammetry. The sizing agents used to bundle the fibers were epoxy, polyamide and polyurethane resins. The peak currents were the greatest when using the chopped carbon fibers that were created with epoxy resins. When the electrode response of the chopped carbon fibers was compared with that of a glassy carbon electrode, the peak currents and the reversibility of the electrode reaction were sufficient. Therefore, the chopped carbon fibers will be useful as disposable electrodes for the sensing of biomolecules.

  11. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  12. Online Structural-Health Monitoring of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics Using Different Carbon Allotropes in the Interphase.

    PubMed

    Müller, Michael Thomas; Pötzsch, Hendrik Florian; Gohs, Uwe; Heinrich, Gert

    2018-06-25

    An electromechanical response behavior is realized by nanostructuring the glass fiber interphase with different highly electrically conductive carbon allotropes like carbon nanotubes (CNT), graphene nanoplatelets (GNP), or conductive carbon black (CB). The operational capability of these multifunctional glass fibers for an online structural-health monitoring is demonstrated in endless glass fiber-reinforced polypropylene. The electromechanical response behavior, during a static or dynamic three-point bending test of various carbon modifications, shows qualitative differences in the signal quality and sensitivity due to the different aspect ratios of the nanoparticles and the associated electrically conductive network densities in the interphase. Depending on the embedding position within the glass fiber-reinforced composite compression, shear and tension loadings of the fibers can be distinguished by different characteristics of the corresponding electrical signal. The occurrence of irreversible signal changes during the dynamic loading can be attributed to filler reorientation processes caused by polymer creeping or by destruction of electrically conductive paths by cracks in the glass fiber interphase.

  13. Dimensional stability of wood-plastic composites reinforced with potassium methyl siliconate modified fiber and sawdust made from beetle-killed trees

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Zhiyong Cai; Nicole M. Stark; Charles J. Montezun

    2014-01-01

    Wood fromtwovarieties of beetle-killed trees was used to fabricate wood–plastic composites. Loblolly pine and lodgepole pine beetle-killed trees were defibrated mechanically and thermomechanically, respectively, into fiber. Fiber and sawdust produced from the trees were modified with potassium methyl siliconate (PMS) and injection-molded into fiber/sawdust reinforced...

  14. Inspection and evaluation of a bridge deck reinforced with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) bars.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-03-01

    Cracking in reinforced concrete decks is inevitable. It leads to the corrosion and eventual deterioration of the deck system. The use of non-corrosive reinforcement is one alternative to steel in reinforced concrete construction. : This report deals ...

  15. Application of CFRP with High Hydrogen Gas Barrier Characteristics to Fuel Tanks of Space Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemoto, Koichi; Yamamoto, Yuta; Okuyama, Keiichi; Ebina, Takeo

    In the future, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) with high hydrogen gas barrier performance will find wide applications in all industrial hydrogen tanks that aim at weight reduction; the use of such materials will be preferred to the use of conventional metallic materials such as stainless steel or aluminum. The hydrogen gas barrier performance of CFRP will become an important issue with the introduction of hydrogen-fuel aircraft. It will also play an important role in realizing fully reusable space transportation system that will have high specific tensile CFRP structures. Such materials are also required for the manufacture of high-pressure hydrogen gas vessels for use in the fuel cell systems of automobiles. This paper introduces a new composite concept that can be used to realize CFRPs with high hydrogen gas barrier performance for applications in the cryogenic tanks of fully reusable space transportation system by the incorporation of a nonmetallic crystal layer, which is actually a dense and highly oriented clay crystal laminate. The preliminary test results show that the hydrogen gas barrier characteristics of this material after cryogenic heat shocks and cyclic loads are still better than those of other polymer materials by approximately two orders of magnitude.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Effectiveness of Strengthening Concrete Slab in Tension of the Steel-Concrete Composite Beam Using Pretensioned CFRP Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowiak, Iwona; Madaj, Arkadiusz

    2017-12-01

    One of the methods to increase the load carrying capacity of the reinforced concrete (RC) structure is its strengthening by using carbon fiber (CFRP) strips. There are two methods of strengthening using CFRP strips - passive method and active method. In the passive method a strip is applied to the concrete surface without initial strains, unlike in the active method a strip is initially pretensioned before its application. In the case of a steel-concrete composite beam, strips may be used to strengthen the concrete slab located in the tension zone (in the parts of beams with negative bending moments). The finite element model has been developed and validated by experimental tests to evaluate the strengthening efficiency of the composite girder with pretensioned CFRP strips applied to concrete slab in its tension zone.

  17. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

  18. 2.45 GHz Microwave Processing and Its Influence on Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics.

    PubMed

    Teufl, Daniel; Zaremba, Swen

    2018-05-18

    During the production of fiber-reinforced composite materials, liquid resin is introduced into the fiber material and cured, i.e., hardened. An elevated temperature is needed for this curing. Microwave curing of composites has been investigated for some time, but it has mostly been done using small domestic or laboratory equipment. However, no investigation has been carried out using an industrial-sized chamber-microwave for glass fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP). Here, we show that microwave curing produces laminates of the same quality as oven-cured ones. The study shows that, if the process is done right, GFRP samples can be produced with an industrial scale microwave. Even if not fully cured, microwave samples show a glass transition temperature measured with DMA ( T g-DMA ) that is comparable to the T g-DMA according to the proposed cure cycle on the data sheet. Specific microwave-cured configurations show better inter-laminar shear strength than oven specimens. The results show that microwave-based heat introduction can be a beneficial curing method for GFRP laminates. A microwave-optimized process is faster and leads to better mechanical properties.

  19. 2.45 GHz Microwave Processing and Its Influence on Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Zaremba, Swen

    2018-01-01

    During the production of fiber-reinforced composite materials, liquid resin is introduced into the fiber material and cured, i.e., hardened. An elevated temperature is needed for this curing. Microwave curing of composites has been investigated for some time, but it has mostly been done using small domestic or laboratory equipment. However, no investigation has been carried out using an industrial-sized chamber-microwave for glass fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP). Here, we show that microwave curing produces laminates of the same quality as oven-cured ones. The study shows that, if the process is done right, GFRP samples can be produced with an industrial scale microwave. Even if not fully cured, microwave samples show a glass transition temperature measured with DMA (Tg-DMA) that is comparable to the Tg-DMA according to the proposed cure cycle on the data sheet. Specific microwave-cured configurations show better inter-laminar shear strength than oven specimens. The results show that microwave-based heat introduction can be a beneficial curing method for GFRP laminates. A microwave-optimized process is faster and leads to better mechanical properties. PMID:29783684

  20. An experimental study of mechanical behavior of natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratna, Sanatan; Misra, Sheelam

    2018-05-01

    Fibre-reinforced polymer composites have played a dominant role for a long time in a variety of applications for their high specific strength and modulus. The fibre which serves as a reinforcement in reinforced plastics may be synthetic or natural. Past studies show that only synthetic fibres such as glass, carbon etc., have been used in fibre reinforced plastics. Although glass and other synthetic fibre-reinforced plastics possess high specific strength, their fields of application are very limited because of their inherent higher cost of production. In this connection, an investigation has been carried out to make use of horse hair, an animal fibre abundantly available in India. Animal fibres are not only strong and lightweight but also relatively very cheaper than mineral fibre. The present work describes the development and characterization of a new set of animal fiber based polymer composites consisting of horse hair as reinforcement and epoxy resin. The newly developed composites are characterized with respect to their mechanical characteristics. Experiments are carried out to study the effect of fibre length on mechanical behavior of these epoxy based polymer composites. Composite made form horse hair can be used as a potential reinforcing material for many structural and non-structural applications. This work can be further extended to study other aspects of such composites like effect of fiber content, loading pattern, fibre treatment on mechanical behavior of horse hair based polymer horse hair.

  1. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, Suri A.; Pemsler, J. Paul; Cooke, Richard A.; Litchfield, John K.; Smith, Mark B.

    1996-01-01

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates.

  2. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, S.A.; Pemsler, J.P.; Cooke, R.A.; Litchfield, J.K.; Smith, M.B.

    1996-03-05

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates. 2 figs.

  3. The life times of polymer composites in construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Urs

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses examples that prove the long-term reliability of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) under extreme loading conditions and outdoor weathering. Results of polymer/steel-composite anchorage systems, Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) plates and shells, GFRP box girders, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) post-tensioning tendons and CFRP stays are going to be presented.

  4. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1990-05-22

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed. 2 figs.

  5. Quantitative radiographic analysis of fiber reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Baidya, K P; Ramakrishna, S; Rahman, M; Ritchie, A

    2001-01-01

    X-ray radiographic examination of the bone fracture healing process is a widely used method in the treatment and management of patients. Medical devices made of metallic alloys reportedly produce considerable artifacts that make the interpretation of radiographs difficult. Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials have been proposed to replace metallic alloys in certain medical devices because of their radiolucency, light weight, and tailorable mechanical properties. The primary objective of this paper is to provide a comparable radiographic analysis of different fiber reinforced polymer composites that are considered suitable for biomedical applications. Composite materials investigated consist of glass, aramid (Kevlar-29), and carbon reinforcement fibers, and epoxy and polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) matrices. The total mass attenuation coefficient of each material was measured using clinical X-rays (50 kev). The carbon fiber reinforced composites were found to be more radiolucent than the glass and kevlar fiber reinforced composites.

  6. Prediction of the effect of temperature on impact damage in carbon/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez del Río, T.; Zaera, R.; Navarro, C.

    2003-09-01

    The effect of temperature on impact damage in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) tape laminates produced by low velocity impact was studied by numerical simulations made to model drop weight tower impact tests on carbon/epoxy laminate composites. The damage model was implemented into a user subroutine of the finite element code ABAQUS. The model takes into account the thermal stresses resulting form the different thermal expansion coefficients in each ply of the laminate. The tests and simulations show how temperature affects the propagation of each damage mode. Matrix cracking and delamination are greatly affected by low temperature, white matrix crushing and fibre failure appear only in a small region at all the impact energies and test temperatures.

  7. Strength and deformability of concrete beams reinforced by non-metallic fiber and composite rebar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, K. L.; Plevkov, V. S.; Nevskii, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Production of durable and high-strength concrete structures with unique properties has always been crucial. Therefore special attention has been paid to non-metallic composite and fiber reinforcement. This article describes the experimental research of strength and deformability of concrete beams with dispersed and core fiber-based reinforcement. As composite reinforcement fiberglass reinforced plastic rods with diameters 6 mm and 10 mm are used. Carbon and basalt fibers are used as dispersed reinforcement. The developed experimental program includes designing and production of flexural structures with different parameters of dispersed fiber and composite rebar reinforcement. The preliminary testing of mechanical properties of these materials has shown their effectiveness. Structures underwent bending testing on a special bench by applying flexural static load up to complete destruction. During the tests vertical displacements were recorded, as well as value of actual load, slippage of rebars in concrete, crack formation. As a result of research were obtained structural failure and crack formation graphs, value of fracture load and maximum displacements of the beams at midspan. Analysis of experimental data showed the effectiveness of using dispersed reinforcement of concrete and the need for prestressing of fiberglass composite rebar.

  8. Tensile and tribological properties of a short-carbon-fiber-reinforced peek composite doped with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Zhang, L. Q.

    2009-09-01

    The main objective of this paper is to develop a high-wear-resistant short-carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composite by introducing additional multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into it. The compounds were mixed in a Haake batch mixer and fabricated into sheets by compression molding. Samples with different aspect ratios and concentrations of fillers were tested for wear resistance. The worn surfaces of the samples were examined by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the photomicrographs revealed a higher wear resistance of the samples containing the additional carbon nanotubes. Also, a better interfacial adhesion between the short carbon fibers and vinyl ester in the composite was observed.

  9. Effect of thermal cycling on flexural properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers.

    PubMed

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2009-07-01

    To determine flexural strength and modulus after water storage and thermal cycling of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced (CGFR) polymers based on poly(methyl methacrylate) and a copolymer matrix, and to examine adhesion between fiber and matrix by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solvent cleaned carbon-graphite (CG) braided tubes of fibers were treated with a sizing resin. The resin mixture of the matrix was reinforced with 24, 36, 47 and 58wt% (20, 29, 38 and 47vol.%) CG-fibers. After heat polymerization the specimens were kept for 90 days in water and thereafter hydrothermally cycled (12,000 cycles, 5/55 degrees C). Mechanical properties were evaluated by three-point bend testing. After thermal cycling, the adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated by SEM. Hydrothermal cycling did not decrease flexural strength of the CGFR polymers with 24 and 36wt% fiber loadings; flexural strength values after thermocycling were 244.8 (+/-32.33)MPa for 24wt% and 441.3 (+/-68.96)MPa for 36wt%. Flexural strength values after thermal cycling were not further increased after increasing the fiber load to 47 (459.2 (+/-45.32)MPa) and 58wt% (310.4 (+/-52.79)MPa). SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix for all fiber loadings examined. The combination of the fiber treatment and resin matrix described resulted in good adhesion between CG-fibers and matrix. The flexural values for fiber loadings up to 36wt% appear promising for prosthodontic applications such as implant-retained prostheses.

  10. Model for the Effect of Fiber Bridging on the Fracture Resistance of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Lee, Yi-Der; Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    A micromechanical methodology has been developed for analyzing fiber bridging and resistance-curve behavior in reinforced-carbon-carbon (RCC) panels with a three-dimensional (3D) composite architecture and a silicon carbide (SiC) surface coating. The methodology involves treating fiber bridging traction on the crack surfaces in terms of a weight function approach and a bridging law that relates the bridging stress to the crack opening displacement. A procedure has been developed to deduce material constants in the bridging law from the linear portion of the K-resistance curve. This report contains information on the application of procedures and outcomes.

  11. Remote Strain Sensing of CFRP Using Microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Project is investigating technologies that increase automated remote inspection of aircraft composite structures. Therefore, microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) is being investigated as a method of enabling rapid remote measurement of strain occurring at the first ply of a composite fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) structure using Radio Frequency (RF) Electro-Magnetic (EM) radiation. While microwave reflectometry has been used to detect disbonds in CFRP structures, its use in detecting strain has been limited. This work will present data demonstrating the measurement of the reactance changes due to loading conditions that are indicative of strain in a CFRP structure. In addition, the basic EM signature will be presented along with an analysis of temperature and humidity effects.

  12. Interlaminar and ductile characteristics of carbon fibers-reinforced plastics produced by nanoscaled electroless nickel plating on carbon fiber surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Rhee, Kyong-Yop

    2002-01-15

    In this work, a new method based on nanoscaled Ni-P alloy coating on carbon fiber surfaces is proposed for the improvement of interfacial properties between fibers and epoxy matrix in a composite system. Fiber surfaces and the mechanical interfacial properties of composites were characterized by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), and impact strength. Experimental results showed that the O(1s)/C(1s) ratio or Ni and P amounts had been increased as the electroless nickel plating proceeded; the ILSS had also been slightly improved. The impact properties were significantly improved in the presence of Ni-P alloy on carbon fiber surfaces, increasing the ductility of the composites. This was probably due to the effect of substituted Ni-P alloy, leading to an increase of the resistance to the deformation and the crack initiation of the epoxy system.

  13. Damage Detection of CFRP Plates by Full-Spectral Analysis of a Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor Signal

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Solid and Structures Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, 2-12-1-I1-70, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552; Groves, Roger M.

    2010-05-28

    This paper describes the measurement of average strain, strain distribution and vibration of cantilever beam made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP), using a single Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor mounted on the beam surface. Average strain is determined from the displacement of the peak wavelength of reflected light from the FBG sensor. Unstrained reference FBG sensors were used to compensate for temperature drift and the photoelastic coefficient (P{sub e}), which was used to calculate the gauge factor. Measured strains agree with those measured by a resistance foil strain gauge attached to the sample. Stress distributions are measured by monitoringmore » the variation in the full width half maximum (FWHM) values of the reflected spectrum, using a proposed optical analytical model, described in the paper. FWHM values were measured for both the cantilever test beam and a for a reference beam, loaded using a four-point bending rig. The trend of the stress distribution for the test beam matches with our analytical model, however with a relatively large noise present in the experimentally determined data. The vibration of cantilever beam was measured by temporal analysis of the peak reflection wavelength. This technique is very stable as measurements are not affected by variations in the signal amplitude. Finally an application of FBG sensors for damage detection of CFRP plates is demonstrated, by measuring the average strain and natural frequency. With small defects of different sizes applied to the CFRP plate, average strains were seen to increase with damage size and the natural frequency decreased with damage size.« less

  14. Carbon nanotube-based structural health monitoring for fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Kan; Mardirossian, Aris; Heider, Dirk; Thostenson, Erik

    2017-04-01

    In fiber reinforced composite materials, the modes of damage accumulation, ranging from microlevel to macro-level (matrix cracks development, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix de-bonding, delamination, etc.), are complex and hard to be detected through conventional non-destructive evaluation methods. Therefore, in order to assure the outstanding structural performance and high durability of the composites, there has been an urgent need for the design and fabrication smart composites with self-damage sensing capabilities. In recent years, the macroscopic forms of carbon nanotube materials have been maturely investigated, which provides the opportunity for structural health monitoring based on the carbon nanotubes that are integrated in the inter-laminar areas of advanced fiber composites. Here in this research, advanced fiber composites embedded with laminated carbon nanotube layers are manufactured for damage detection due to the relevant spatial electrical property changes once damage occurs. The mechanical-electrical coupling response is recorded and analyzed during impact test. The design and manufacturing of integrating the carbon nanotubes intensely affect the detecting sensitivity and repeatability of the integrated multifunctional sensors. The ultimate goal of the reported work is to develop a novel structural health monitoring method with the capability of reporting information on the damage state in a real-time way.

  15. Vertically aligned TiO2 nanorods-woven carbon fiber for reinforcement of both mechanical and anti-wear properties in resin composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jie; Zhang, Chao; Luo, Dan; Cui, Yali; Li, Hejun; Lu, Zhaoqing; Huang, Jianfeng

    2018-03-01

    A series of TiO2 nanorods were successfully grown on woven carbon fiber by hydrothermal method to reinforce the resin composite. The TiO2 nanorods improved the mechanical interlocking among woven carbon fibers and resin matrix, resulting in better fibers/resin interfacial bonding. Compared with desized-woven carbon fiber, the uniform TiO2 nanorods array resulted in an improvement of 84.3% and 73.9% in the tensile and flexural strength of the composite. However, the disorderly TiO2 nanorods on woven carbon fiber leaded to an insignificant promotion of the mechanical strength. The enhanced performance of well-proportioned TiO2 nanorods-woven carbon fiber was also reflected in the nearly 56% decrease of wear rate, comparing to traditional woven carbon fiber reinforced composite.

  16. Peeling behavior and spalling resistance of CFRP sheets bonded to bent concrete surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hong; Li, Faping

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, the peeling behavior and the spalling resistance effect of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets externally bonded to bent concrete surfaces are firstly investigated experimentally. Twenty one curved specimens and seven plane specimens are studied in the paper, in which curved specimens with bonded CFRP sheets can simulate the concrete spalling in tunnel, culvert, arch bridge etc., whereas plane specimens with bonded CFRP sheets can simulate the concrete spalling in beam bridge, slab bridge and pedestrian bridge. Three kinds of curved specimens with different radii of curvature are chosen by referring to practical tunnel structures, and plane specimens are used for comparison with curved ones. A peeling load is applied on the FRP sheet by loading a circular steel tube placed into the central notch of beam to debond CFRP sheets from the bent concrete surface, meanwhile full-range load-deflection curves are recorded by a MTS 831.10 Elastomer Test System. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical analysis is also conducted for the specimens. Both theoretical and experimental results show that only two material parameters, the interfacial fracture energy of CFRP-concrete interface and the tensile stiffness of CFRP sheets, are needed for describing the interfacial spalling behavior. It is found that the radius of curvature has remarkable influence on peeling load-deflection curves. The test methods and test results given in the paper are helpful and available for reference to the designer of tunnel strengthening.

  17. Bond–Slip Relationship for CFRP Sheets Externally Bonded to Concrete under Cyclic Loading

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Cao, Shuangyin; Yang, Yue; Zhu, Juntao

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to explore the bond–slip relationship between carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and concrete under cyclic loading through experimental and analytical approaches. Modified beam tests were performed in order to gain insight into the bond–slip relationship under static and cyclic loading. The test variables are the CFRP-to-concrete width ratio, and the bond length of the CFRP sheets. An analysis of the test results in this paper and existing test results indicated that the slope of the ascending segment of the bond–slip curve decreased with an increase in the number of load cycles, but the slip corresponding to the maximum shear stress was almost invariable as the number of load cycles increased. In addition, the rate of reduction in the slope of the ascending range of the bond–slip curve during cyclic loading decreased as the concrete strength increased, and increased as the load level or CFRP-to-concrete width ratio enhanced. However, these were not affected by variations in bond length if the residual bond length was longer than the effective bond length. A bilinear bond–slip model for CFRP sheets that are externally bonded to concrete under cyclic loading, which considered the effects of the cyclic load level, concrete strength, and CFRP-to-concrete ratio, was developed based on the existing static bond–slip model. The accuracy of this proposed model was verified by a comparison between this proposed model and test results. PMID:29495383

  18. Bond-Slip Relationship for CFRP Sheets Externally Bonded to Concrete under Cyclic Loading.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Cao, Shuangyin; Yang, Yue; Zhu, Juntao

    2018-02-26

    The objective of this paper was to explore the bond-slip relationship between carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and concrete under cyclic loading through experimental and analytical approaches. Modified beam tests were performed in order to gain insight into the bond-slip relationship under static and cyclic loading. The test variables are the CFRP-to-concrete width ratio, and the bond length of the CFRP sheets. An analysis of the test results in this paper and existing test results indicated that the slope of the ascending segment of the bond-slip curve decreased with an increase in the number of load cycles, but the slip corresponding to the maximum shear stress was almost invariable as the number of load cycles increased. In addition, the rate of reduction in the slope of the ascending range of the bond-slip curve during cyclic loading decreased as the concrete strength increased, and increased as the load level or CFRP-to-concrete width ratio enhanced. However, these were not affected by variations in bond length if the residual bond length was longer than the effective bond length. A bilinear bond-slip model for CFRP sheets that are externally bonded to concrete under cyclic loading, which considered the effects of the cyclic load level, concrete strength, and CFRP-to-concrete ratio, was developed based on the existing static bond-slip model. The accuracy of this proposed model was verified by a comparison between this proposed model and test results.

  19. Buckling Modes of Structural Elements of Off-Axis Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Polyakova, N. V.; Kholmogorov, S. A.; Shishov, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    The structures of two types of unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites — with an ELUR-P carbon fiber tape, an XT-118 cold-cure binder with an HSE 180 REM prepreg, and a hot-cure binder — were investigated. The diameters of fibers and fiber bundles (threads) of both the types of composites were measured, and their mutual arrangement was examined both in the semifinished products (in the uncured state) and in the finished composites. The defects characteristic of both the types of binder and manufacturing technique were detected in the cured composites. Based on an analysis of the results obtained, linearized problems on the internal multiscale buckling modes of an individual fiber (with and without account of its interaction with the surrounding matrix) or of a fiber bundle are formulated. In the initial atate, these structural elements of the fibrous composites are in a subcritical (unperturbed) state under the action of shear stresses and tension (compression) in the transverse direction. Such an initial stress state is formed in them in tension and compression tests on flat specimens made of off-axis-reinforced composites with straight fibers. To formulate the problems, the equations derived earlier from a consistent variant of geometrically nonlinear equations of elasticity theory by reducing them to the one-dimensional equations of the theory of straight rods on the basis of a refined Timoshenko shear model with account of tensile-compressive strains in the transverse direction are used. It is shown that, in loading test specimens, a continuous rearrangement of composite structure can occur due to the realization and continuous change of internal buckling modes as the wave-formation parameter varies continuously, which apparently explain the decrease revealed in the tangential shear modulus of the fibrous composites with increasing shear strains.

  20. LATERAL HEAT FLOW INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY FOR THICKNESS INDEPENDENT DETERMINATION OF THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY IN CFRP

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tralshawala, Nilesh; Howard, Don; Knight, Bryon

    2008-02-28

    In conventional infrared thermography, determination of thermal diffusivity requires thickness information. Recently GE has been experimenting with the use of lateral heat flow to determine thermal diffusivity without thickness information. This work builds on previous work at NASA Langley and Wayne State University but we incorporate thermal time of flight (tof) analysis rather than curve fitting to obtain quantitative information. We have developed appropriate theoretical models and a tof based data analysis framework to experimentally determine all components of thermal diffusivity from the time-temperature measurements. Initial validation was carried out using finite difference simulations. Experimental validation was done using anisotropicmore » carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. We found that in the CFRP samples used, the in-plane component of diffusivity is about eight times larger than the through-thickness component.« less

  1. Method of Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for forming a carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines is discussed. The process includes the steps of braiding carbon fiber into a rope thereby forming a cylindrically shaped valve stem portion and continuing to braid said fiber while introducing into the braiding carbon fiber rope a carbon matrix plug having an outer surface in a net shape of a valve head thereby forming a valve head portion. The said carbon matrix plug acting as a mandrel over which said carbon fiber rope is braided, said carbon fiber rope and carbon matrix plug forming a valve head portion suitable for mating with a valve seat; cutting said braided carbon valve stem portion at one end to form a valve tip and cutting said braided carbon fiber after said valve head portion to form a valve face and thus provide a composite valve preform; and densifying said preform by embedding the braided carbon in a matrix of carbon to convert said valve stem portion to a valve stem and said valve head portion to a valve head thereby providing said composite valve.

  2. Circular Functions Based Comprehensive Analysis of Plastic Creep Deformations in the Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Vahid

    2016-12-01

    Analytically based model is presented for behavioral analysis of the plastic deformations in the reinforced materials using the circular (trigonometric) functions. The analytical method is proposed to predict creep behavior of the fibrous composites based on basic and constitutive equations under a tensile axial stress. New insight of the work is to predict some important behaviors of the creeping matrix. In the present model, the prediction of the behaviors is simpler than the available methods. Principal creep strain rate behaviors are very noteworthy for designing the fibrous composites in the creeping composites. Analysis of the mentioned parameter behavior in the reinforced materials is necessary to analyze failure, fracture, and fatigue studies in the creep of the short fiber composites. Shuttles, spaceships, turbine blades and discs, and nozzle guide vanes are commonly subjected to the creep effects. Also, predicting the creep behavior is significant to design the optoelectronic and photonic advanced composites with optical fibers. As a result, the uniform behavior with constant gradient is seen in the principal creep strain rate behavior, and also creep rupture may happen at the fiber end. Finally, good agreements are found through comparing the obtained analytical and FEM results.

  3. Viscoelastic behavior and lifetime (durability) predictions. [for laminated fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A method for lifetime or durability predictions for laminated fiber reinforced plastics is given. The procedure is similar to but not the same as the well known time-temperature-superposition principle for polymers. The method is better described as an analytical adaptation of time-stress-super-position methods. The analytical constitutive modeling is based upon a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model developed by Schapery. Time dependent failure models are discussed and are related to the constitutive models. Finally, results of an incremental lamination analysis using the constitutive and failure model are compared to experimental results. Favorable results between theory and predictions are presented using data from creep tests of about two months duration.

  4. REDUCING EMISSIONS IN FIBERGLASS REINFORCED PLASTICS MANUFACTURING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes results of an evaluation of pollution prevention techniques, so that technical assistance providers can provide better information to fiber-reinforced plastics and composites (FRP/C) facilities about pollution prevention options. It gives background about the...

  5. Control of CFRP strengthening applied to civil structures by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, E.; Trentin, R.; Bison, P. G.; Marinetti, S.

    2007-04-01

    NdT methods are highly promoted by an increasing demand of checking the effectiveness of strengthening and repair intervention on structural components, both in buildings and bridges. IR thermography exhibits excellent performances, particularly when innovative materials as CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) are used. Non destructive control by the use of thermographic analysis is used to detect adhesion defects or imperfections, which can lead the component to become brittle and collapsing unexpectedly. This paper shows as the geometrical evaluation of delaminated areas is carried out. Laboratory tests both on reduced or full scale are illustrated in order to set up and validate the proposed procedure. An experimental study on samples bonded with FRP and containing defects appropriately applied at the interface, will be presented. A series of beams (10 m long) have been tested under bending loads and strengthened conditions, by placing a pre-impregnated thin carbon (CFRP) laminate at the intrados. Different reinforcement configurations have been adopted in the beams (ordinary steel reinforcement and with addition of pre-stressed strands), using mechanical devices for the anchorage of the supplementary pre-tension of the strips. At local level, the simulation of possible lack of bonding during loading or intrinsic defects and imperfections has been contextually analysed on specifically dimensioned specimens. Different algorithms have been applied at the evaluation stage in order to estimate the defect size and location. Particularly, the extension of the delamination is estimate with a simple and robust algorithm. In facts, standards set the limit for acceptable defects, both in terms of number and size.

  6. Air- coupled ultrasonic testing of CFRP rods by means of guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kažys, Rymantas; Raišutis, Renaldas; Žukauskas, Egidijus; Mažeika, Liudas; Vladišauskas, Alfonsas

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important parts of the gliders is a lightweight longeron reinforcement made of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) rods. These small diameter (a few millimetres) rods during manufacturing are glued together in epoxy filled matrix in order to build the arbitrary spar profile. However, the defects presenting in the rods such as brake of fibres, lack of bonding, reduction of density affect essentially the strength of the construction and are very complicated in repairing. Therefore, appropriate non-destructive testing techniques of carbon fibber rods should be applied before gluing them together. The objective of the presented work was development of NDT technique of CFRP rods used for aerospace applications, which is based on air- coupled excitation/reception of guided waves. The regularities of ultrasonic guided waves propagating in both circular and rectangular cross-section CFRP rods immersed into water were investigated and it was shown that the guided waves propagating along sample of the rod create leaky waves which are radiated into a surrounding medium. The ultrasonic receiver scanned over the rod enables to pick-up the leaky waves and to determine the non-uniformities of propagation caused by the defects. Theoretical investigations were carried out by means of numerical simulations based on a 2D and 3D finite differences method. By modelling and experimental investigations it was demonstrated that presence of any type of the defect disturbs the leaky wave and enables to detect them. So, the spatial position of defects can be determined also. It was shown that such important defects as a disbond of the plies essentially reduce or even completely suppress the leaky wave, so they can be detected quit easily.

  7. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  8. Thermal characteristics of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-woo; Park, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Yun-hae; Riichi-Murakami

    2018-06-01

    The material with irregular atomic structures such as polymer material exhibits low thermal conductivity because of the complex structural properties. Even materials with same atomic configurations, thermal conductivity may be different based on their structural properties. It is expected that nanoparticles with conductivity will change non-conductive polymer base materials to electrical conductors, and improve the thermal conductivity even with extremely small filling amount. Nano-composite materials contain nanoparticles with a higher surface ratio which makes the higher interface percentage to the total surface of nanoparticles. Therefore, thermal resistance of the interface becomes a dominating factor determines the effective thermal conductivity in nano-composite materials. Carbon fiber has characteristic of resistance or magnetic induction and Also, Carbon nanotube (CNT) has electronic and thermal property. It can be applied for heating system. These characteristic are used as heating composite. In this research, the exothermic characteristics of Carbon fiber reinforced composite added CNT were evaluated depend on CNT length and particle size. It was found that the CNT dispersed in the resin reduces the resistance between the interfaces due to the decrease in the total resistance of the heating element due to the addition of CNTs. It is expected to improve the life and performance of the carbon fiber composite material as a result of the heating element resulting from this paper.

  9. Mechanical recycling of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritzer, Elmar; Heiderich, Gilmar

    2016-03-01

    This contribution examines possible material recycling of offcuts generated during the production of continuous-fiber-reinforced composite sheets. These sheets consist of a polyamide 6 matrix and glass fiber fabric. In the initial step, the offcut is shredded to obtain particles; following that, the particles are processed in a twin-screw process to produce fiber-reinforced plastic pellets with varying fiber contents. These pellets are intended for use in injection molding processes as a substitution for new raw materials. This investigation centers on the mechanical properties which can be achieved with the recycled material after both the twin-screw process and injection molding.

  10. Features and technologies of ERS-1 (ESA) and X-SAR antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuessler, R.; Wagner, R.

    1986-01-01

    Features and technologies of planar waveguide array antennas developed for spaceborne microwave sensors are described. Such antennas are made from carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) employing special manufacturing and metallization techniques to achieve satisfactory electrical properties. Mechanical design enables deployable antenna structures necessary for satellite applications (e.g., ESA ERS-1). The slotted waveguide concept provides high aperture efficiency, good beamshaping capabilities, and low losses. These CFRP waveguide antennas feature low mass, high accuracy and stiffness, and can be operated within wide temperature ranges.

  11. Influence of Fiber Orientation on Single-Point Cutting Fracture Behavior of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy Prepreg Sheets.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yingying; An, Qinglong; Cai, Xiaojiang; Chen, Ming; Ming, Weiwei

    2015-10-02

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the influences of carbon fibers on the fracture mechanism of carbon fibers both in macroscopic view and microscopic view by using single-point flying cutting method. Cutting tools with three different materials were used in this research, namely, PCD (polycrystalline diamond) tool, CVD (chemical vapor deposition) diamond thin film coated carbide tool and uncoated carbide tool. The influence of fiber orientation on the cutting force and fracture topography were analyzed and conclusions were drawn that cutting forces are not affected by cutting speeds but significantly influenced by the fiber orientation. Cutting forces presented smaller values in the fiber orientation of 0/180° and 15/165° but the highest one in 30/150°. The fracture mechanism of carbon fibers was studied in different cutting conditions such as 0° orientation angle, 90° orientation angle, orientation angles along fiber direction, and orientation angles inverse to the fiber direction. In addition, a prediction model on the cutting defects of carbon fiber reinforced plastic was established based on acoustic emission (AE) signals.

  12. Influence of Fiber Orientation on Single-Point Cutting Fracture Behavior of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy Prepreg Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yingying; An, Qinglong; Cai, Xiaojiang; Chen, Ming; Ming, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the influences of carbon fibers on the fracture mechanism of carbon fibers both in macroscopic view and microscopic view by using single-point flying cutting method. Cutting tools with three different materials were used in this research, namely, PCD (polycrystalline diamond) tool, CVD (chemical vapor deposition) diamond thin film coated carbide tool and uncoated carbide tool. The influence of fiber orientation on the cutting force and fracture topography were analyzed and conclusions were drawn that cutting forces are not affected by cutting speeds but significantly influenced by the fiber orientation. Cutting forces presented smaller values in the fiber orientation of 0/180° and 15/165° but the highest one in 30/150°. The fracture mechanism of carbon fibers was studied in different cutting conditions such as 0° orientation angle, 90° orientation angle, orientation angles along fiber direction, and orientation angles inverse to the fiber direction. In addition, a prediction model on the cutting defects of carbon fiber reinforced plastic was established based on acoustic emission (AE) signals. PMID:28793597

  13. Self-healing in single and multiple fiber(s) reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldesenbet, E.

    2010-06-01

    You Polymer composites have been attractive medium to introduce the autonomic healing concept into modern day engineering materials. To date, there has been significant research in self-healing polymeric materials including several studies specifically in fiber reinforced polymers. Even though several methods have been suggested in autonomic healing materials, the concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents has garnered wide attention by the scientific community. A self-healing fiber reinforced polymer composite has been developed. Tensile tests are carried out on specimens that are fabricated by using the following components: hollow and solid glass fibers, healing agent, catalysts, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and a polymer resin matrix. The test results have demonstrated that single fiber polymer composites and multiple fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites with healing agents and catalysts have provided 90.7% and 76.55% restoration of the original tensile strength, respectively. Incorporation of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the healing medium of the single fiber polymer composite has provided additional efficiency. Healing is found to be localized, allowing multiple healing in the presence of several cracks.

  14. Performance and Characterization of Shear Ties for Use in Insulated Precast Concrete Sandwich Wall Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    stainless 14 steel, galvanized carbon steel, carbon- fiber -reinforced polymer (CFRP), glass- fiber -reinforced polymer 15 (GFRP), and basalt - fiber ...CFRP Grid, (E) Universal Building Products GFRP Teplo Tie, and (F) Universal Building Products 6 Basalt FRP RockBar. Traditional steel connections...1.6 E Universal Building Products TeploTie GFRP Tie 10 mm dia. x 150 mm F RockBar Basalt FRP Bar 7 in. x 5/16 in. G TSA Manufacturing C-Clip

  15. Dimensional stability performance of a CFRP sandwich optical bench for microsatellite payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desnoyers, N.; Goyette, P.; Leduc, B.; Boucher, M.-A.

    2017-09-01

    Microsatellite market requires high performance while minimizing mass, volume and cost. Telescopes are specifically targeted by these trade-offs. One of these is to use the optomechanical structure of the telescope to mount electronic devices that may dissipate heat. However, such approach may be problematic in terms of distortions due to the presence of high thermal gradients throughout the telescope structure. To prevent thermal distortions, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) technology can be used for the optomechanical telescope material structure. CFRP is typically about 100 times less sensitive to thermal gradients and its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is about 200 to 600 times lower than standard aluminum alloys according to inhouse measurements. Unfortunately, designing with CFRP material is not as straightforward as with metallic materials. There are many parameters to consider in order to reach the desired dimensional stability under thermal, moisture and vibration exposures. Designing optomechanical structures using CFRP involves many challenges such as interfacing with optics and sometimes dealing with high CTE mounting interface structures like aluminum spacecraft buses. INO has designed a CFRP sandwich telescope structure to demonstrate the achievable performances of such technology. Critical parameters have been optimized to maximize the dimensional stability while meeting the stringent environmental requirements that microsatellite payloads have to comply with. The telescope structure has been tested in vacuum from -40°C to +50°C and has shown a good fit with finite element analysis predictions.

  16. Development of a Highly Stressed Bladed Rotor Made of a CFRP Using the Tailored Fiber Placement Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, K.; Spickenheuer, A.; Bittrich, L.; Heinrich, G.

    2013-05-01

    Increasing the rotational frequency of bladed rotors used in turbomachinery leads to their increased efficiency and performance. Especially for turbomolecular pumps, this would allow either higher compression rates or smaller pump dimensions. The maximal rotational frequency is focused on the structural strength of the construction and the material used. Due to their high density, specific strength, and stiffness in the fiber direction, carbon-fiberreinforced plastics (CFRPs) seem to be ideal for such an application. The highly orthotropic material behavior of CFRPs demands new approaches in terms of their manufacturing and dimensioning. As a new approach, a rotor with 17 blades in a blade-integrated disk construction (BLISK) made of a CFRP, allowing a 35% higher burst speed than a bladed rotor made of a high-strength aluminum alloy, was developed. An appropriate fiber layout has to reflect the rotational symmetry, which demands either a radial or tangential fiber orientation. Therefore, the Tailored Fiber Placement (TFP) technology was used, which allows a high flexibility for the fiber layout. For consolidation, resin infiltration was performed using a modified vacuum-assisted process, and the final geometry was generated employing a milling machine. A radius-dependent layer setup of tangential and radial fibers was chosen to maximize the burst speed by using an adapted finite-element analysis. Additionally, a numerical modal analysis and a numerical failure analysis were performed. Finally, the theoretical results were verified on manufactured rotors by an experimental modal analysis and burst tests, where experimental data showed a good coincidence with numerical results.

  17. Investigation and modeling of the elastic-plastic fracture behavior of continuous woven fabric-reinforced ceramic composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kahl, W.K.

    1997-03-01

    The paper describes a study which attempted to extrapolate meaningful elastic-plastic fracture toughness data from flexure tests of a chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC/Nicalon fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite. Fibers in the fabricated composites were pre-coated with pyrolytic carbon to varying thicknesses. In the tests, crack length was not measured and the study employed an estimate procedure, previously used successfully for ductile metals, to derive J-R curve information. Results are presented in normalized load vs. normalized displacements and comparative J{sub Ic} behavior as a function of fiber precoating thickness.

  18. Reinforcing of thermoplastic polycarbonate and polysulfone with carbon fibers: Production and characteristics of UD-compound objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzer, E.; Jaeger, H.

    1988-01-01

    The production and characteristics of the carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastics polycarbonate and polysulfone are described. The production of prepregs from defined polymer solutions is emphasized along with methods of optimizing the production of compounds. The characteristics of unidirectionally reinforced thermoplastics, such as shear strength, bending strength, and impact resistance are compared with regard to fracture behavior, the influence of intermediate layers, and the behavior under cryogenic conditions and under slightly elevated temperatures. The problem of adhesion between high strength carbon fibers and thermoplastics is examined, taking into account the effect of moisture on the shear strength and the impact resistance.

  19. Color stability of laboratory glass-fiber-reinforced plastics for esthetic orthodontic wires

    PubMed Central

    Inami, Toshihiro; Minami, Naomi; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective In our previous study, glass-fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRPs) made from polycarbonate and glass fibers were prepared for esthetic orthodontic wires using pultrusion. These laboratory GFRP wires are more transparent than the commercially available nickel-titanium wire; however, an investigation of the color stability of GFRP during orthodontic treatment is needed. Accordingly, in the present study, the color stability of GFRP was assessed using colorimetry. Methods Preparation of GFRP esthetic round wires (diameter: 0.45 mm [0.018 inch]) using pultrusion was described previously. Here, to investigate how the diameter of fiber reinforcement affects color stability, GFRPs were prepared by incorporating either 13-µm (GFRP-13) or 7-µm glass (GFRP-7) fibers. The color changes of GFRPs after 24 h, and following 1, 2, and 4 weeks of coffee immersion at 37℃, were measured by colorimetry. We evaluated the color stability of GFRPs by two evaluating units: the color difference (ΔE*) and National Bureau of Standards (NBS). Results After immersion, both GFRPs showed almost no visible color change. According to the colorimetry measurements, the ΔE* values of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 0.73-1.16, and 0.62-1.10, respectively. In accordance with NBS units, both GFRPs showed "slight" color changes. As a result, there were no significant differences in the ΔE* values or NBS units for GFRP-13 or GFRP-7. Moreover, for both GFRPs, no significant differences were observed in any of the immersion periods. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the GFRPs will maintain high color stability during orthodontic treatment, and are an attractive prospect as esthetic orthodontic wires. PMID:26023541

  20. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  1. Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials Used for Tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Christy

    2005-01-01

    The Nonmetallic Materials and Processes Group is presently working on several projects to optimize cost while providing effect materials for the space program. One factor that must be considered is that these materials must meet certain weight requirements. Composites contribute greatly to this effort. Through the use of composites the cost of launching payloads into orbit will be reduced to one-tenth of the current cost. This research project involved composites used for aluminum pressure vessels. These tanks are used to store cryogenic liquids during flight. The tanks need some type of reinforcement. Steel was considered, but added too much weight. As a result, fiber was chosen. Presently, only carbon fibers with epoxy resin are wrapped around the vessels as a primary source of reinforcement. Carbon fibers are lightweight, yet high strength. The carbon fibers are wet wound onto the pressure vessels. This was done using the ENTEC Filament Winding Machine. It was thought that an additional layer of fiber would aid in reinforcement as well as containment and impact reduction. Kevlar was selected because it is light weight, but five times stronger that steel. This is the same fiber that is used to make bullet-proof vests trampolines, and tennis rackets.

  2. Durability of Starch Based Biodegradable Plastics Reinforced with Manila Hemp Fibers.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Shinji

    2011-02-25

    The biodegradability of Manila hemp fiber reinforced biodegradable plastics was studied for 240 days in a natural soil and 30 days in a compost soil. After biodegradability tests, weights were measured and both tensile strength tests and microscopic observation were performed to evaluate the biodegradation behavior of the composites. The results indicate that the tensile strength of the composites displays a sharp decrease for up to five days, followed by a gradual decrease. The weight loss and the reduction in tensile strength of biodegradable composite materials in the compost soil are both significantly greater than those buried in natural soil. The biodegradability of these composites is enhanced along the lower portion because this area is more easily attacked by microorganisms.

  3. Durability of Starch Based Biodegradable Plastics Reinforced with Manila Hemp Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    The biodegradability of Manila hemp fiber reinforced biodegradable plastics was studied for 240 days in a natural soil and 30 days in a compost soil. After biodegradability tests, weights were measured and both tensile strength tests and microscopic observation were performed to evaluate the biodegradation behavior of the composites. The results indicate that the tensile strength of the composites displays a sharp decrease for up to five days, followed by a gradual decrease. The weight loss and the reduction in tensile strength of biodegradable composite materials in the compost soil are both significantly greater than those buried in natural soil. The biodegradability of these composites is enhanced along the lower portion because this area is more easily attacked by microorganisms. PMID:28880000

  4. Experience-based training of students on concretes reinforced by recycled carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosgun, Cumhur; Patlolla, Vamsidhar R.; Alzahrani, Naif; Zeineddine, Hatim F.; Asmatulu, Eylem

    2017-04-01

    Fiber reinforcement increases many properties of the concretes, such as toughness, strength, abrasion, and resistance to corrosion. Use of recycled carbon fibers from industrial waste offers many advantages because it will reduce the waste, contribute the economy, protect natural resources and improve the property of structural units. The City of Wichita, KS is known to be "Air Capital of the World" where many aircraft companies have been producing aircraft, parts and components. Due to the superior properties of composites (e.g., light weight, low density, high impact resistance), they have been highly used by aircraft industry. Prepreg is the most preferred combination of the fiber and resin due to the easy application, but it has a limited shelf life (e.g., three months to one year at most) and scrap has no use after all in the same industry. Every year tons of un-used prepreg or after use scrap are being collected in Wichita, KS. Recycling prepreg from the post-consumer waste offers great advantages of waste reduction and resource conservation in the city. Reusing the carbon fibers obtained from outdated prepreg composites for concrete reinforcement will offer double advantages for our environment and concrete structures. In this study, recycled carbon fibers of the outdated prepreg composites were collected, and then incorporated with concretes at different ratios prior to the molding and mechanical testing. An undergraduate student was involved in the project and observed all the process during the laboratory studies, as well as data collection, analysis and presentation. We believe that experience based learning will enhance the students' skills and interest into the scientific and engineering studies.

  5. Carbon fiber reinforced root canal posts. Mechanical and cytotoxic properties.

    PubMed

    Torbjörner, A; Karlsson, S; Syverud, M; Hensten-Pettersen, A

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical properties of a prefabricated root canal post made of carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFRC) with metal posts and to assess the cytotoxic effects elicited. Flexural modulus and ultimate flexural strength was determined by 3 point loading after CRFC posts had been stored either dry or in water. The bending test was carried out with and without preceding thermocycling of the CFRC posts. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by an agar overlay method after dry and wet storage. The values of flexural modulus and ultimate flexural strength were for dry stored CFRC post 82 +/- 6 GPa and 1154 +/- 65 MPa respectively. The flexural values decreased significantly after water storage and after thermocycling. No cytotoxic effects were observed adjacent to any CFRC post. Although fiber reinforced composites may have the potential to replace metals in many clinical situations, additional research is needed to ensure a satisfying life-span.

  6. Optical Sensing of the Fatigue Damage State of CFRP under Realistic Aeronautical Load Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga-Ramírez, Pablo; Arconada, Álvaro; Frövel, Malte; Belenguer, Tomás; Salazar, Félix

    2015-01-01

    We present an optical sensing methodology to estimate the fatigue damage state of structures made of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), by measuring variations on the surface roughness. Variable amplitude loads (VAL), which represent realistic loads during aeronautical missions of fighter aircraft (FALSTAFF) have been applied to coupons until failure. Stiffness degradation and surface roughness variations have been measured during the life of the coupons obtaining a Pearson correlation of 0.75 between both variables. The data were compared with a previous study for Constant Amplitude Load (CAL) obtaining similar results. Conclusions suggest that the surface roughness measured in strategic zones is a useful technique for structural health monitoring of CFRP structures, and that it is independent of the type of load applied. Surface roughness can be measured in the field by optical techniques such as speckle, confocal perfilometers and interferometry, among others. PMID:25760056

  7. Effect of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polyamide-6/Polypropylene Composites for Lightweight Automotive Parts.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tran, Huu-Duc; Hoang, Van-Tho; Do, Van-Ta; Chun, Doo-Man; Yum, Young-Jin

    2018-03-15

    The development of lightweight automotive parts is an important issue for improving the efficiency of vehicles. Polymer composites have been widely applied to reduce weight and improve mechanical properties by mixing polymers with carbon fibers, glass fibers, and carbon nanotubes. Polypropylene (PP) has been added to carbon fiber-reinforced nylon-6 (CF/PA6) composite to achieve further weight reduction and water resistance. However, the mechanical properties were reduced by the addition of PP. In this research, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to compensate for the reduced mechanical properties experienced when adding PP. Tensile testing and bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. A small amount of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PA6/PP composites. For example, the density of CF/PA6 was reduced from 1.214 to 1.131 g/cm³ (6.8%) by adding 30 wt % PP, and the tensile strength of 30 wt % PP composite was improved from 168 to 173 MPa (3.0%) by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs with small increase of density (1.135 g/cm³). The developed composite will be widely used for lightweight automotive parts with improved mechanical properties.

  8. Behavior of fiber reinforced metal laminates at high strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newaz, Golam; Sasso, Marco; Amodio, Dario; Mancini, Edoardo

    2018-05-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Laminate (CARALL) is a good system for energy absorption through plastic deformation in aluminum and micro-cracking in the composite layers. Moreover, CARALL FMLs also provide excellent impact resistance due to the presence of aluminum layer. The focus of this research is to characterize the CARALL behavior under dynamic conditions. High strain rate tests on sheet laminate samples have been carried out by means of direct Split Hopkinson Tension Bar. The sample geometry and the clamping system were optimized by FEM simulations. The clamping system has been designed and optimized in order reduce impedance disturbance due to the fasteners and to avoid the excessive plastic strain outside the gauge region of the samples.

  9. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  10. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  11. Cutting Modeling of Hybrid CFRP/Ti Composite with Induced Damage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinyang; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In hybrid carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP)/Ti machining, the bi-material interface is the weakest region vulnerable to severe damage formation when the tool cutting from one phase to another phase and vice versa. The interface delamination as well as the composite-phase damage is the most serious failure dominating the bi-material machining. In this paper, an original finite element (FE) model was developed to inspect the key mechanisms governing the induced damage formation when cutting this multi-phase material. The hybrid composite model was constructed by establishing three disparate physical constituents, i.e., the Ti phase, the interface, and the CFRP phase. Different constitutive laws and damage criteria were implemented to build up the entire cutting behavior of the bi-material system. The developed orthogonal cutting (OC) model aims to characterize the dynamic mechanisms of interface delamination formation and the affected interface zone (AIZ). Special focus was made on the quantitative analyses of the parametric effects on the interface delamination and composite-phase damage. The numerical results highlighted the pivotal role of AIZ in affecting the formation of interface delamination, and the significant impacts of feed rate and cutting speed on delamination extent and fiber/matrix failure. PMID:28787824

  12. Structural health monitoring of IACC yachts using fiber optic distributed strain sensors: a technical challenge for America's Cup 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Kimpara, Isao; Akiyoshi, Shimada; Naruse, Hiroshi

    2000-06-01

    In this study, we developed a health monitoring system using a fiber optic distributed strain sensor for International America's Cup Class (IACC) yachts. Most structural components of an IACC yacht consist of an aluminum honeycomb core sandwiched between carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates. In such structures, delamination, skin/core debonding and debonding between adhered members will be result in serious fracture of the structure. We equipped two IACC yachts with fiber optic strain sensors designed to measured the distributed strain using a Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer (BOTDR) and to detect any deterioration or damage to the yacht's structures caused by such failures. And based on laboratory test results, we proposed a structural health monitoring technique for IACC yachts that involves analyzing their strain distribution. Some important information about structural conditions of the IACC yachts could be obtained from this system through the periodical strain measurements in the field.

  13. Strength Evaluation and Failure Prediction of Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced Nylon Spur Gears by Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhong; Hossan, Mohammad Robiul

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, short carbon fiber reinforced nylon spur gear pairs, and steel and unreinforced nylon spur gear pairs have been selected for study and comparison. A 3D finite element model was developed to simulate the multi-axial stress-strain behaviors of the gear tooth. Failure prediction has been conducted based on the different failure criteria, including Tsai-Wu criterion. The tooth roots, where has stress concentration and the potential for failure, have been carefully investigated. The modeling results show that the short carbon fiber reinforced nylon gear fabricated by properly controlled injection molding processes can provide higher strength and better performance.

  14. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2011-11-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  15. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2012-04-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  16. Effect of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polyamide-6/Polypropylene Composites for Lightweight Automotive Parts

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Tran, Huu-Duc; Do, Van-Ta; Yum, Young-Jin

    2018-01-01

    The development of lightweight automotive parts is an important issue for improving the efficiency of vehicles. Polymer composites have been widely applied to reduce weight and improve mechanical properties by mixing polymers with carbon fibers, glass fibers, and carbon nanotubes. Polypropylene (PP) has been added to carbon fiber-reinforced nylon-6 (CF/PA6) composite to achieve further weight reduction and water resistance. However, the mechanical properties were reduced by the addition of PP. In this research, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to compensate for the reduced mechanical properties experienced when adding PP. Tensile testing and bending tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties. A small amount of CNTs improved the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced PA6/PP composites. For example, the density of CF/PA6 was reduced from 1.214 to 1.131 g/cm3 (6.8%) by adding 30 wt % PP, and the tensile strength of 30 wt % PP composite was improved from 168 to 173 MPa (3.0%) by adding 0.5 wt % CNTs with small increase of density (1.135 g/cm3). The developed composite will be widely used for lightweight automotive parts with improved mechanical properties. PMID:29543754

  17. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kiefel, Denis, E-mail: Denis.Kiefel@airbus.com, E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Stoessel, Rainer, E-mail: Denis.Kiefel@airbus.com, E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Grosse, Christian, E-mail: Grosse@tum.de

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT)more » system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.« less

  18. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  19. Experimental Research Into the Effect Of External Actions and Polluting Environments on the Serviceablity of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, D. S.; Vildeman, V. E.; Babin, A. D.; Grinev, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    The results of mechanical tests of fiberglass and CFRP specimens in transverse bending and interlaminar shear (the short-beam method) and of sandwich panels in tension and compression are presented. The effect of external polluting environments on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials and structures is estimated. Stress-strain diagrams are constructed.

  20. The effect of CFRP on retrofitting of damaged HSRC beams using AE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffian Noor, M. S.; Noorsuhada, M. N.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the effect of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) on retrofitted high strength reinforced concrete (HSRC) beams using acoustic emission (AE) technique. Two RC beam parameters were prepared. The first was the control beam which was undamaged HSRC beam. The second was the damaged HSRC beam retrofitted with CFRP on the soffit. The main objective of this study is to assess the crack modes of HSRC beams using AE signal strength. The relationship between signal strength, load and time were analysed and discussed. The crack pattern observed from the visual observation was also investigated. HSRC beam retrofitted with CFRP produced high signal strength compared to control beam. It demonstrates the effect of the AE signal strength for interpretation and prediction of failure modes that might occur in the beam specimens.

  1. Influence of drill helical direction on exit damage development in drilling carbon fiber reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y.; Jia, Z. Y.; Wang, F. J.; Fu, R.; Guo, H. B.; Cheng, D.; Zhang, B. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Drilling is inevitable for CFRP components’ assembling process in the aviation industry. The exit damage frequently occurs and affects the load carrying capacity of components. Consequently, it is of great urgency to enhance drilling exit quality on CFRP components. The article aims to guide the reasonable choice of drill helical direction and effectively reduce exit damage. Exit observation experiments are carried out with left-hand helical, right-hand helical and straight one-shot drill drilling T800S CFRP laminates separately. The development rules of exit damage and delamination factor curves are obtained. Combined with loading conditions and fracture modes of push-out burrs, and thrust force curves, the influence of drill helical direction on exit damage development is derived. It is found that the main fracture modes for left-hand helical, right-hand helical, and straight one-shot drill are mode I, extrusive fracture, mode III respectively. Among them, mode III has the least effect on exit damage development. Meanwhile, the changing rate of thrust force is relative slow for right-hand helical and straight one-shot drill in the thrust force increasing phase of stage II, which is disadvantaged for exit damage development. Therefore, straight one-shot drill’s exit quality is the best.

  2. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon-Al-Cu Composite for Friction Material.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lihui; Luo, Ruiying; Ma, Denghao

    2018-03-31

    A carbon/carbon-Al-Cu composite reinforced with carbon fiber 2.5D-polyacrylonitrile-based preforms was fabricated using the pressureless infiltration technique. The Al-Cu alloy liquids were successfully infiltrated into the C/C composites at high temperature and under vacuum. The mechanical and metallographic properties, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the C/C-Al-Cu composites were analyzed. The results showed that the bending property of the C/C-Al-Cu composites was 189 MPa, whereas that of the pure carbon slide material was only 85 MPa. The compressive strength of C/C-Al-Cu was 213 MPa, whereas that of the pure carbon slide material was only 102 MPa. The resistivity of C/C-Al-Cu was only 1.94 μΩm, which was lower than that of the pure carbon slide material (29.5 μΩm). This finding can be attributed to the "network conduction" structure. Excellent wettability was observed between Al and the carbon matrix at high temperature due to the existence of Al₄C₃. The friction coefficients of the C/C, C/C-Al-Cu, and pure carbon slide composites were 0.152, 0.175, and 0.121, respectively. The wear rate of the C/C-Al-Cu composites reached a minimum value of 2.56 × 10 -7 mm³/Nm. The C/C-Al-Cu composite can be appropriately used as railway current collectors for locomotives.

  3. Physical and mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced smart porous concrete for planting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Bum; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Seo, Dae-Seuk

    2005-05-01

    The reinforcement strength of porous concrete and its applicability as a recycled aggregate was measured. Changes in physical and mechanical properties, subsequent to the mixing of carbon fiber and silica fume, were examined, and the effect of recycled aggregate depending on their mixing rate was evaluated. The applicability of planting to concrete material was also assessed. The results showed that there were not any remarkable change in the porosity and strength characteristics although its proportion of recycled aggregate increased. Also, the mixture of 10% of silica was found to be most effective for strength enforcement. In case of carbon fiber, the highest flexural strength was obtained with its mixing rate being 3%. It was also noticed that PAN-derived carbon fiber was superior to Pitch-derived ones in view of strength. The evaluation of its use for vegetation proved that the growth of plants was directly affected by the existence of covering soil, in case of having the similar size of aggregate and void.

  4. Temperature-compensated strain measurement using FBG sensors embedded in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Nobuhira; Okabe, Yoji; Takeda, Nobuo

    2002-07-01

    For accurate strain measurement by fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, it is necessary to compensate the influence of temperature change. In this study two devices using FBG sensors have been developed for temperature-compensated strain measurement. They are named hybrid sensor and laminate sensor, respectively. The former consists of two different materials connected in series: carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP). Each material contains an FBG sensor with a different Bragg wavelength, and both ends of the device are glue to a structure. Using the difference of their Young's moduli and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs), both strain and temperature can be measured. The latter sensor is a laminate of two 90 degree(s) plies of CFRP and an epoxy plate, and an FBG sensor is embedded in the epoxy plate. When the temperature changes, the cross section of the optical fiber is deformed by the thermal residual stress. The deformation of the fiber causes the birefringence and widens the reflection spectrum. Since the temperature can be calculated from the spectrum width, which changes in proportion to the temperature, the accuracy of the strain measurement is improved. The usefulness of these sensors were experimentally confirmed.

  5. Analysis of surface damage in retrieved carbon fiber-reinforced and plain polyethylene tibial components from posterior stabilized total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Wright, T M; Rimnac, C M; Faris, P M; Bansal, M

    1988-10-01

    The performance of carbon fiber-reinforced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene was compared with that of plain (non-reinforced) polyethylene on the basis of the damage that was observed on the articulating surfaces of retrieved tibial components of total knee prostheses. Established microscopy techniques for subjectively grading the presence and extent of surface damage and the histological structure of the surrounding tissues were used to evaluate twenty-six carbon fiber-reinforced and twenty plain polyethylene components that had been retrieved after an average of twenty-one months of implantation. All of the tibial components were from the same design of total knee replacement. The two groups of patients from whom the components were retrieved did not differ with regard to weight, the length of time that the component had been implanted, the radiographic position and angular alignment of the component, the original diagnosis, or the reason for removal of the component. The amounts and types of damage that were observed did not differ for the two materials. For both materials, the amount of damage was directly related to the length of time that the component had been implanted. The histological appearance of tissues from the area around the component did not differ for the two materials, except for the presence of fragments of carbon fiber in many of the samples from the areas around carbon fiber-reinforced components.

  6. Fatigue crack growth in fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth in fiber composites occurs by such complex modes as to frustrate efforts at developing comprehensive theories and models. Under certain loading conditions and with certain types of reinforcement, simpler modes of fatigue crack growth are observed. These modes are more amenable to modeling efforts, and the fatigue crack growth rate can be predicted in some cases. Thus, a formula for prediction of ligamented mode fatigue crack growth rate is available.

  7. A phenomenological intra-laminar plasticity model for FRP composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yinhua; Hou, Chi; Wang, Wenzhi; Zhao, Meiying; Wan, Xiaopeng

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinearity of fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have significant effects on the analysis of composite structures. This article proposes a phenomenological intralaminar plasticity model to represent the nonlinearity of FRP composite materials. Based on the model presented by Ladeveze et al., the plastic potential and hardening functions are improved to give a more rational description of phenomenological nonlinearity behavior. A four-parameter hardening model is built to capture important features of the hardening curve and consequently gives the good matching of the experiments. Within the frame of plasticity theory, the detailed constitutive model, the numerical algorithm and the derivation of the tangent stiffness matrix are presented in this study to improve model robustness. This phenomenological model achieved excellent agreement between the experimental and simulation results in element scale respectively for glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) and carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP). Moreover, the model is capable of simulating the nonlinear phenomenon of laminates, and good agreement is achieved in nearly all cases.

  8. Design guidelines for high dimensional stability of CFRP optical bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desnoyers, Nichola; Boucher, Marc-André; Goyette, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    In carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) optomechanical structures, particularly when embodying reflective optics, angular stability is critical. Angular stability or warping stability is greatly affected by moisture absorption and thermal gradients. Unfortunately, it is impossible to achieve the perfect laminate and there will always be manufacturing errors in trying to reach a quasi-iso laminate. Some errors, such as those related to the angular position of each ply and the facesheet parallelism (for a bench) can be easily monitored in order to control the stability more adequately. This paper presents warping experiments and finite-element analyses (FEA) obtained from typical optomechanical sandwich structures. Experiments were done using a thermal vacuum chamber to cycle the structures from -40°C to 50°C. Moisture desorption tests were also performed for a number of specific configurations. The selected composite material for the study is the unidirectional prepreg from Tencate M55J/TC410. M55J is a high modulus fiber and TC410 is a new-generation cyanate ester designed for dimensionally stable optical benches. In the studied cases, the main contributors were found to be: the ply angular errors, laminate in-plane parallelism (between 0° ply direction of both facesheets), fiber volume fraction tolerance and joints. Final results show that some tested configurations demonstrated good warping stability. FEA and measurements are in good agreement despite the fact that some defects or fabrication errors remain unpredictable. Design guidelines to maximize the warping stability by taking into account the main dimensional stability contributors, the bench geometry and the optical mount interface are then proposed.

  9. Interface enhancement of glass fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites with flame-synthesized carbon nanotubes and its enhancing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lingmin; Wang, Xiao; Fang, Pengfei; Liew, Kim Meow; Pan, Chunxu

    2011-02-01

    Interface enhancement with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provides a promising approach for improving shock strength and toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composites. The effects of incorporating flame-synthesized CNTs (F-CNTs) into GFRP were studied, including on hand lay-up preparation, microstructural characterization, mechanical properties, fracture morphologies, and theoretical calculation. The experimental results showed that: (1) the impact strength of the GFRP modified by F-CNTs increased by more than 15% over that of the GFRP modified by CNTs from chemical vapor deposition; and (2) with the F-CNT enhancement, no interfacial debonding was observed at the interface between the fiber and resin matrix on the GFRP fracture surface, which indicated strong adhesive strength between them. The theoretical calculation revealed that the intrinsic characteristics of the F-CNTs, including lower crystallinity with a large number of defects and chemical functional groups on the surface, promoted their surface activity and dispersibility at the interface, which improved the interfacial bond strength of GFRP.

  10. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

    PubMed Central

    Invernizzi, Marta; Natale, Gabriele; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Griffini, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    Glass (GFR) and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D) printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C) thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol) as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components. PMID:28773704

  11. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Marta; Natale, Gabriele; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Griffini, Gianmarco

    2016-07-16

    Glass (GFR) and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D) printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C) thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol) as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  12. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical

  13. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  14. Eddy current testing of composite pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casperson, R.; Pohl, R.; Munzke, D.; Becker, B.; Pelkner, M.

    2018-04-01

    The use of composite pressure vessels instead of conventional vessels made of steel or aluminum grew strongly over the last decade. The reason for this trend is the tremendous weight saving in the case of composite vessels. However, the long-time behavior is not fully understood for filling and discharging cycles and creep strength and their influence on the CFRP coating (carbon fiber reinforced plastics) and the internal liner (steel, aluminum, or plastics). The CFRP ensures the pressure resistance while the inner liner is used as a container for liquid or gas. To overcome the missing knowledge of aging, BAM started an internal project to investigate degradation of these material systems. Therefore, applicable testing methods like eddy current testing are needed. Normally, high-frequency eddy current testing (HF-ET, f > 10 MHz) is deployed for CFRP due to its low conductivity of the fiber, which is in the order of 0.01 MS/s, and the capacitive coupling between the fibers. Nevertheless, in some cases conventional ET can be applied. We show a concise summary of studies on the application of conventional ET of composite pressure vessels.

  15. Electrically and Thermally Conductive Carbon Fibre Fabric Reinforced Polymer Composites Based on Nanocarbons and an In-situ Polymerizable Cyclic Oligoester.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji-Un; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Lee, Hun Su; Khil, Myung-Seob; Kim, Seong Yun

    2018-05-16

    There is growing interest in carbon fibre fabric reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites based on a thermoplastic matrix, which is easy to rapidly produce, repair or recycle. To expand the applications of thermoplastic CFRP composites, we propose a process for fabricating conductive CFRP composites with improved electrical and thermal conductivities using an in-situ polymerizable and thermoplastic cyclic butylene terephthalate oligomer matrix, which can induce good impregnation of carbon fibres and a high dispersion of nanocarbon fillers. Under optimal processing conditions, the surface resistivity below the order of 10 +10 Ω/sq, which can enable electrostatic powder painting application for automotive outer panels, can be induced with a low nanofiller content of 1 wt%. Furthermore, CFRP composites containing 20 wt% graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were found to exhibit an excellent thermal conductivity of 13.7 W/m·K. Incorporating multi-walled carbon nanotubes into CFRP composites is more advantageous for improving electrical conductivity, whereas incorporating GNPs is more beneficial for enhancing thermal conductivity. It is possible to fabricate the developed thermoplastic CFRP composites within 2 min. The proposed composites have sufficient potential for use in automotive outer panels, engine blocks and other mechanical components that require conductive characteristics.

  16. Testing of containers made of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with the aid of acoustic emission analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolitz, K.; Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis as a quasi-nondestructive test method makes it possible to differentiate clearly, in judging the total behavior of fiber-reinforced plastic composites, between critical failure modes (in the case of unidirectional composites fiber fractures) and non-critical failure modes (delamination processes or matrix fractures). A particular advantage is that, for varying pressure demands on the composites, the emitted acoustic pulses can be analyzed with regard to their amplitude distribution. In addition, definite indications as to how the damages occurred can be obtained from the time curves of the emitted acoustic pulses as well as from the particular frequency spectrum. Distinct analogies can be drawn between the various analytical methods with respect to whether the failure modes can be classified as critical or non-critical.

  17. NDE and SHM Simulation for CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a common technique for damage detection in composite materials. There is a need for advanced NDE that goes beyond damage detection to damage quantification and characterization in order to enable data driven prognostics. The damage types that exist in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites include microcracking and delaminations, and can be initiated and grown via impact forces (due to ground vehicles, tool drops, bird strikes, etc), fatigue, and extreme environmental changes. X-ray microfocus computed tomography data, among other methods, have shown that these damage types often result in voids/discontinuities of a complex volumetric shape. The specific damage geometry and location within ply layers affect damage growth. Realistic threedimensional NDE and structural health monitoring (SHM) simulations can aid in the development and optimization of damage quantification and characterization techniques. This paper is an overview of ongoing work towards realistic NDE and SHM simulation tools for composites, and also discusses NASA's need for such simulation tools in aeronautics and spaceflight. The paper describes the development and implementation of a custom ultrasound simulation tool that is used to model ultrasonic wave interaction with realistic 3-dimensional damage in CFRP composites. The custom code uses elastodynamic finite integration technique and is parallelized to run efficiently on computing cluster or multicore machines.

  18. TEA CO2 laser machining of CFRP composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, A.; Li, L.; Mativenga, P.; Whitehead, D.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have found wide applications in the aerospace, marine, sports and automotive industries owing to their lightweight and acceptable mechanical properties compared to the commonly used metallic materials. Machining of CFRP composites using lasers can be challenging due to inhomogeneity in the material properties and structures, which can lead to thermal damages during laser processing. In the previous studies, Nd:YAG, diode-pumped solid-state, CO2 (continuous wave), disc and fibre lasers were used in cutting CFRP composites and the control of damages such as the size of heat-affected zones (HAZs) remains a challenge. In this paper, a short-pulsed (8 μs) transversely excited atmospheric pressure CO2 laser was used, for the first time, to machine CFRP composites. The laser has high peak powers (up to 250 kW) and excellent absorption by both the carbon fibre and the epoxy binder. Design of experiment and statistical modelling, based on response surface methodology, was used to understand the interactions between the process parameters such as laser fluence, repetition rate and cutting speed and their effects on the cut quality characteristics including size of HAZ, machining depth and material removal rate (MRR). Based on this study, process parameter optimization was carried out to minimize the HAZ and maximize the MRR. A discussion is given on the potential applications and comparisons to other lasers in machining CFRP.

  19. Experimental research on continuous basalt fiber and basalt-fibers-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2008-11-01

    The interest for continuous basalt fibers and reinforced polymers has recently grown because of its low price and rich natural resource. Basalt fiber was one type of high performance inorganic fibers which were made from natural basalt by the method of melt extraction. This paper discusses basic mechanical properties of basalt fiber. The other work in this paper was to conduct tensile testing of continuous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer rod. Tensile strength and stress-strain curve were obtained in this testing. The strength of rod was fairly equal to rod of E-glass fibers and weaker than rod of carbon fibers. Surface of crack of rod was studied. An investigation of fracture mechanism between matrix and fiber was analyzed by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) method. A poor adhesion between the matrix and fibers was also shown for composites analyzing SEM photos. The promising tensile properties of the presented basalt fibers composites have shown their great potential as alternative classical composites.

  20. Tribo-performance of epoxy hybrid composites reinforced with carbon fibers and potassium titanate whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresha, B.; Harshavardhan, B.; Ravishankar, R.

    2018-04-01

    The present investigation deals with the fabrication and characterization of epoxy reinforced with bidirectional carbon fiber mat (CF/Ep) and filled with 2.5, 5 and 7.5 wt% potassium titanate whiskers (PTw) composites. The effect of PTw loading on hardness, tensile properties and dry sliding wear behaviour of CF/Ep composite were carefully investigated in expectation of providing valuable information for the application of hybrid CF/Ep composites. Results indicated that the incorporation of PTw actually improved the hardness, tensile strength and tensile modulus of CF/Ep composites. Meanwhile, the specific wear rate of CF/Ep filled by 5 wt % PTw reached to 6.3× 10-14 m3/N-m, which is 41% lower than that of CF/Ep composite at the same dry sliding condition. It also seen that the fiber and filler worked synergistically to enhance the wear resistance. Further, for all composites the friction coefficient increases with increase in load and sliding velocity. However, PTw reinforced CF/Ep exhibited considerably higher coefficient of friction compared to unfilled ones, while PTw filler loading of 5 wt% was effective in reducing the specific wear rate of CF/Ep composite. The carbon fiber carried the applied load between the contact surfaces and protected the epoxy from severe abrasion of the counterface. At the same time, the exposed PTw out of the epoxy matrix around the fiber inhibited the direct scraping between the fiber and counterface so that the fibers could be less directly impacted during the subsequent wear process and they were protected from severe damage.

  1. Polypropylene fiber reinforced microsilica concrete bridge deck overlay at Link River Bridge

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-02-01

    In 1997 ODOT overlaid the Link River Bridge with microsilica concrete, reinforced with polypropylene fibers (FMC). The manufacturer claimed the fibers would reduce plastic shrinkage cracks and settlement cracking during the early life of the concrete...

  2. Seawater infiltration effect on thermal degradation of fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Haziq Izzuddin bin; Hassan, Mohamad Zaki bin; Ibrahim, Ikhwan; Rashidi, Ahmad Hadi Mohamed; Nor, Siti Fadzilah M.; Daud, Mohd Yusof Md

    2018-05-01

    Seawater salinity has been associated with the reduction of polymer structure durability. The aim of this study is to investigate the change in thermal degradation of fiber reinforced epoxy composite due to the presence of seawater. Carbon fiber, carbon/kevlar, fiberglass, and jute that reinforced with epoxy resin was laminated through hand-layup technique. Initially, these specimen was sectioned to 5×5 mm dimension, then immersed in seawater and distilled water at room temperature until it has thoroughly saturated. Following, the thermal degradation analysis using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), the thermic changes due to seawater infiltration was defined. The finding shows that moisture absorption reduces the glass transition temperature (Tg) of fiber reinforced epoxy composite. However, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of seawater infiltrated laminate composite is compareable with distilled water infiltrated laminate composite. The carbon fiber reinfored epoxy has the highest glass transition temperature out of all specimen.

  3. Determination of depth and size of defects in carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic with different methods of pulse thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popow, Vitalij; Gurka, Martin

    2018-03-01

    The main advantage of high performance composite material is its exceptional light-weight capability due to individual tailoring of anisotropic fiber lay-up. Its main draw-back is a brittle and complex failure behavior under dynamic loading which requires extensive quality assurance measures and short maintenance intervals. For this reason efficient test methods are required, which not only generate good and reliable results, but are also simple in handling, allow rapid adaptation to different test situations and short measuring times. Especially the knowledge about size and position of a defect is necessary to decide about acceptance or rejection of a structure under investigation. As a promising method for contactless in-line and off-line inspection we used pulsed thermography. For the determination of the depth of the defects we used logarithmic peak second derivative, a widely accepted method. Alternatively an analytical model, describing the adiabatic heating of a solid plate by an instantaneous pulse, was fitted directly to the measurement data. For the determination of defect size four different approaches were investigated and compared with exact values. The measurements were done with continuous carbon-fiber reinforced materials.

  4. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  5. Delamination toughness characterization of out-of-autoclave vacuum-bag-only polymer matrix composites enhanced by z-aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John S.

    Brewer, John S., M. S., University of South Alabama, May 2015. Delamination Toughness Characterization of Out-of-Autoclave Vacuum-Bag-Only Polymer Matrix Composites Enhanced by z-aligned Carbon Nanofibers. Chair of Committee: Kuang-Ting Hsiao, Ph.D. In the last few decades, the use of composite materials has revolutionized materials manufacturing. Now, carbon fiber materials are at the forefront of engineering and manufacturing technology. One of the chief failure modes of composite materials is delamination. For this reason, this study employed the Mode-I Interlaminar Fracture Toughness Test (ASTM D 5528-01) to characterize how the inclusion of z-aligned carbon nanofibers (CNF) in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) affects delamination strength. CFRP with z-aligned CNF in concentrations of 0.3% and 0.6% by weight were compared to control CFRP samples and CFRP samples modified with 0.3 weight percent unaligned CNF. The largest improvement was seen in the 0.3 weight percent aligned composite with a mean interlaminar fracture toughness increase of over 35%, while the uncertainty was decreased. A standard deviation of 3.3% was observed which equates to an uncertainty value 30% better than the control samples. Data and microscopy are included and discussed.

  6. Study on fibre laser machining quality of plain woven CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maojun; Li, Shuo; Yang, Xujing; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Zhichao

    2018-03-01

    Laser cutting is suitable for large-scale and high-efficiency production with relatively high cutting speed, while machining of CFRP composite using lasers is challenging with severe thermal damage due to different material properties and sensitivity to heat. In this paper, surface morphology of cutting plain woven carbon fibre-reinforced plastics (CFRP) by fibre laser and the influence of cutting parameters on machined quality were investigated. A full factorial experimental design was employed involving three variable factors, which included laser pulse frequency at three levels together with laser power and cutting speed at two levels. Heat-affected zone (HAZ), kerf depth and kerf angle were quantified to understand the interactions with cutting parameters. Observations of machined surface were analysed relating to various damages using optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which included HAZ, matrix recession, fibre protruding, striations, fibre-end swelling, collapses, cavities and delamination. Based on ANOVA analysis, it was found that both cutting speed and laser power were significant factors for HAZ and kerf depth, while laser power was the only significant factor for kerf angle. Besides, HAZ and the kerf depth showed similar sensitivity to the pulse energy and energy per unit length, which was opposite for kerf angle. This paper presented the feasibility and experimental results of cutting CFRP laminates using fibre laser, which is possibly the efficient and high-quality process to promote the development of CFRPs.

  7. Structural Foaming at the Nano-, Micro-, and Macro-Scales of Continuous Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-29

    up to 40%. Approach: Our approach was to work with conventional composite systems manufactured through the traditional prepreg and autoclave...structural porosity at MNM scales could be introduced into the matrix, the carbon fiber reinforcement, and during prepreg lamination processing, without...areas, including fibers. Furthermore, investigate prepreg thickness and resin content effects on the thermomechanical performance of laminated

  8. Thermoplastic-carbon fiber hybrid yarn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketterer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts were directed to develop processing methods to make carbon fiber/thermoplastic fiber preforms that are easy to handle and drapeable, and to consolidate them into low void content laminates. The objectives were attained with the development of the hybrid yarn concept; whereby, thermoplastic fiber can be intimately intermixed with carbon fiber into a hybrid yarn. This was demonstrated with the intermixing of Celion 3000 with a Celanese liquid crystal polymer fiber, polybutylene terepthalate fiber, or polyetheretherketone fiber. The intermixing of the thermoplastic matrix fiber and the reinforcing carbon fiber gives a preform that can be easily fabricated into laminates with low void content. Mechanical properties of the laminates were not optimized; however, initial results indicated properties typical of a thermoplastic/carbon fiber composites prepared by more conventional methods.

  9. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Automotive Composite

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Naus, Dan J; Corum, James; Klett, Lynn B

    2006-04-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quais-isotropic carbon-fiber thermoplastic composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite consisted of a PolyPhenylene Sulfide (PPS) thermoplastic matrix (Fortron's PPS - Ticona 0214B1 powder) reinforced with 16 plies of carbon-fiber unidirectional tape, [0?/90?/+45?/-45?]2S. The carbon fiber was Hexcel AS-4C and was present in a fiber volume of 53% (60%, by weight). The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design datamore » and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.« less

  10. Recycling carbon fibre reinforced polymers for structural applications: technology review and market outlook.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Soraia; Pinho, Silvestre T

    2011-02-01

    Both environmental and economic factors have driven the development of recycling routes for the increasing amount of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) waste generated. This paper presents a review of the current status and outlook of CFRP recycling operations, focusing on state-of-the-art fibre reclamation and re-manufacturing processes, and on the commercialisation and potential applications of recycled products. It is shown that several recycling and re-manufacturing processes are reaching a mature stage, with implementations at commercial scales in operation, production of recycled CFRPs having competitive structural performances, and demonstrator components having been manufactured. The major challenges for the sound establishment of a CFRP recycling industry and the development of markets for the recyclates are summarised; the potential for introducing recycled CFRPs in structural components is discussed, and likely promising applications are investigated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Study on the Connecting Length of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiongfei; Li, Yue; Li, Zhanguo

    2018-05-01

    The paper studied the varying mode of shear stress in the connecting zone of CFRP. Using epoxy resin (EP) as bond material, performance of specimens with different connecting length of CFRP was tested to obtain the conclusion. CFRP-confined concrete column was tested subsequently to verify the conclusion. The results show that: (1) The binding properties of modified epoxy resin with CFRP is good; (2) As the connecting length increased, the ultimate tensile strength of CFRP increased as well in the range of the experiment parameters; (3) Tensile strength of CFRP can reach the ultimate strength when the connecting length is 90mm;(4) The connecting length of 90mm of CFRP meet the reinforcement requirements.

  12. 3D Fiber Orientation Simulation for Plastic Injection Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Baojiu; Jin, Xiaoshi; Zheng, Rong; Costa, Franco S.; Fan, Zhiliang

    2004-06-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer is widely used in the products made using injection molding processing. The distribution of fiber orientation inside plastic parts has direct effects on quality of molded parts. Using computer simulation to predict fiber orientation distribution is one of most efficient ways to assist engineers to do warpage analysis and to find a good design solution to produce high quality plastic parts. Fiber orientation simulation software based on 2-1/2D (midplane /Dual domain mesh) techniques has been used in industry for a decade. However, the 2-1/2D technique is based on the planar Hele-Shaw approximation and it is not suitable when the geometry has complex three-dimensional features which cannot be well approximated by 2D shells. Recently, a full 3D simulation software for fiber orientation has been developed and integrated into Moldflow Plastics Insight 3D simulation software. The theory for this new 3D fiber orientation calculation module is described in this paper. Several examples are also presented to show the benefit in using 3D fiber orientation simulation.

  13. Finite element modelling for mode-I fracture behaviour of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetan, H. C.; Kattimani, Subhaschandra; Murigendrappa, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    Debonding is a major failure mechanism in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) due to presence of many adhesion joins, in between many layers. In the current study a finite element simulation is carried out using Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) and Cohesive Zone Modelling (CZM) using Abaqus as analysis tool. A comparative study is performed in to order analyze convergence of results from CZM and VCCT. It was noted that CZM results matched well with published literature. The results from VCCT were also in good comparison with experimental data of published literature, but were seen to be overestimated. Parametric study is performed to evaluate the variation of input parameters like initial stiffness, element size, peak stress and energy release rate `G'. From the numerical evaluation, it was noted that CZM simulation relies largely on element size and peak stress.

  14. Low cost carbon fiber technology development for carbon fiber composite applications : phase 1.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-01-01

    The main goals of this research program at UTSI were: 1) to produce low cost carbon fibers and 2) to develop specific carbonbased : material technologies to meet current and future high performance fiber-reinforced composite needs of FTA and other : ...

  15. Crack growth monitoring at CFRP bond lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahammer, M.; Adebahr, W.; Sachse, R.; Gröninger, S.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-02-01

    With the growing need for lightweight technologies in aerospace and automotive industries, fibre-reinforced plastics, especially carbon-fibre (CFRP), are used with a continuously increasing annual growth rate. A promising joining technique for composites is adhesive bonding. While rivet holes destroy the fibres and cause stress concentration, adhesive bond lines distribute the load evenly. Today bonding is only used in secondary structures due to a lack of knowledge with regard to long-term predictability. In all industries, numerical simulation plays a critical part in the development process of new materials and structures, while it plays a vital role when it comes to CFRP adhesive bondings conducing the predictability of life time and damage tolerance. The critical issue with adhesive bondings is crack growth. In a dynamic tensile stress testing machine we dynamically load bonded CFRP coupon specimen and measure the growth rate of an artificially started crack in order to feed the models with the results. We also investigate the effect of mechanical crack stopping features. For observation of the bond line, we apply two non-contact NDT techniques: Air-coupled ultrasound in slanted transmission mode and active lockin-thermography evaluated at load frequencies. Both methods give promising results for detecting the current crack front location. While the ultrasonic technique provides a slightly higher accuracy, thermography has the advantage of true online monitoring, because the measurements are made while the cyclic load is being applied. The NDT methods are compared to visual inspection of the crack front at the specimen flanks and show high congruence. Furthermore, the effect of crack stopping features within the specimen on the crack growth is investigated. The results show, that not all crack fronts are perfectly horizontal, but all of them eventually come to a halt in the crack stopping feature vicinity.

  16. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Ghose, S.; Kirk, H. G.; Trung, L.-P.; McDonald, K. T.; Kotsina, Z.; Nocera, P.; Assmann, R.; Redaelli, S.; Bertarelli, A.; Quaranta, E.; Rossi, A.; Zwaska, R.; Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Mokhov, N.

    2016-11-01

    A comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have been studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5 ×1020 p /cm2 . The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF) selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (˜5 ×1018 p cm-2 ). In addition, the

  17. Simulated space environmental effects on a polyetherimide and its carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Kristen T.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Harries, Wynford L.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    1993-01-01

    The selection of materials for spacecraft construction requires identification of candidate materials which can perform reliably in the space environment. Understanding the effects of the space environment on the materials is an important step in the selection of candidate materials. This work examines the effects of energetic electrons, thermal cycling, electron radiation in conjunction with thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen on a thermoplastic polyetherimide and its carbon-fiber-reinforced composites. Composite materials made with non-sized fibers as well as materials made with fibers sized with an epoxy were evaluated. The mechanical and thermomechanical properties of the materials were studied and spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the mechanisms for the observed effects. Considerations for future material development are suggested.

  18. Hypervelocity Impact Studies of Carbon Nanotubes and Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwada, Suman

    This dissertation studies the hypervelocity impact characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and investigates the use of CNTs as reinforcements in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber composites for hypervelocity impact shielding applications. The first part of this dissertation is aimed at developing an understanding of the hypervelocity impact response of CNTs--at the nanotube level. Impact experiments are designed with CNTs as projectiles to impact and crater aluminum plates. The results show that carbon nanotubes are resistant to the high-energy shock pressures and the ultra-high strain loading during hypervelocity impacts. Under our experimental conditions, single-walled carbon nanotubes survive impacts up to 4.07 km/s, but transform to graphitic ribbons and nanodiamonds at higher impact velocities. The nanodiamonds are metastable and transform to onion-like nanocarbon over time. Double-walled carbon nanotubes retain their form and structure even at impacts over 7 km/s. Higher hypervelocity impact resistance of DWCNTs could be attributed to the absorption of additional energy due to relative motion between the layers in the transverse direction of these coaxial nanotubes. The second part of this dissertation researches the effect of reinforcement of carbon nanotubes and their buckypapers on the hypervelocity impact shielding properties of UHMWPE-fiber composites arranged in a Whipple Shield configuration (a shield design used for the protection of the international space station from hypervelocity impacts by orbital debris). Composite laminates were prepared via compression molding and nanotube buckypapers via vacuum filtration. Dispersed nanotubes were introduced to the composite laminates via direct spraying onto the fabric prior to composite processing. The experimental results show that nanotubes dispersed in polymer matrix do not affect the hypervelocity impact resistance of the composite system. Nanotube buckypapers, however, improve

  19. The effect of exfoliated graphite on carbon fiber reinforced composites for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Adam Michael

    It is desirable to lighten cryogenic fuel tanks through the use of composites for the development of a reusable single stage launch vehicle. Conventional composites fall victim to microcracking due to the cyclic loading and temperature change experienced during launch and re-entry conditions. Also, the strength of a composite is generally limited by the properties of the matrix. The introduction of the nanoplatelet, exfoliated graphite or graphene, to the matrix shows promise of increasing both the microcracking resistivity and the mechanical characteristics. Several carbon fiber composite plates were manufactured with varying concentrations of graphene and tested under both room and cryogenic conditions to characterize graphene's effect on the composite. Results from tensile and fracture testing indicate that the ideal concentration of graphene in our carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites for cryogenic applications is 0.08% mass graphene.

  20. Carbon fiber reinforcements for sheet molding composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ozcan, Soydan; Paulauskas, Felix L.

    A method of processing a carbon fiber tow includes the steps of providing a carbon fiber tow made of a plurality of carbon filaments, depositing a sizing composition at spaced-apart sizing sites along a length of the tow, leaving unsized interstitial regions of the tow, and cross-cutting the tow into a plurality of segments. Each segment includes at least a portion of one of the sizing sites and at least a portion of at least one of the unsized regions of the tow, the unsized region including and end portion of the segment.

  1. Modeling the Non-Linear Response of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Using a Combined Damage/Plasticity Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuecker, Clara; Davila, Carlos G.; Pettermann, Heinz E.

    2008-01-01

    The present work is concerned with modeling the non-linear response of fiber reinforced polymer laminates. Recent experimental data suggests that the non-linearity is not only caused by matrix cracking but also by matrix plasticity due to shear stresses. To capture the effects of those two mechanisms, a model combining a plasticity formulation with continuum damage has been developed to simulate the non-linear response of laminates under plane stress states. The model is used to compare the predicted behavior of various laminate lay-ups to experimental data from the literature by looking at the degradation of axial modulus and Poisson s ratio of the laminates. The influence of residual curing stresses and in-situ effect on the predicted response is also investigated. It is shown that predictions of the combined damage/plasticity model, in general, correlate well with the experimental data. The test data shows that there are two different mechanisms that can have opposite effects on the degradation of the laminate Poisson s ratio which is captured correctly by the damage/plasticity model. Residual curing stresses are found to have a minor influence on the predicted response for the cases considered here. Some open questions remain regarding the prediction of damage onset.

  2. Characterisation of CFRP surface contamination by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Pawel H.; Sawczak, Miroslaw; Wandowski, Tomasz; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw M.; Cenian, Adam

    2014-03-01

    The application of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in aeronautics has been increasing. The CFRP elements are joint using rivets and adhesive bonding. The reliability of the bonding limits the use of adhesive bonding for primary aircraft structures, therefore it is important to assess the bond quality. The performance of adhesive bonds depends on the physico-chemical properties of the adhered surfaces. This research is focused on characterization of surfaces before bonding. In-situ examination of large surface materials, determine the group of methods that are preferred. The analytical methods should be non-destructive, enabling large surface analysis in relatively short time. In this work a spectroscopic method was tested that can be potentially applied for surface analysis. Four cases of surface condition were investigated that can be encountered either in the manufacturing process or during aircraft service. The first case is related to contamination of CFRP surface with hydraulic fluid. This fluid reacts with water forming a phosphoric acid that can etch the CFRP. Second considered case was related to silicone-based release agent contamination. These agents are used during the moulding process of composite panels. Third case involved moisture content in CFRP. Moisture content lowers the adhesion quality and leads to reduced performance of CFRP resulting in reduced performance of the adhesive bond. The last case concentrated on heat damage of CFRP. It was shown that laser induced fluorescence method can be useful for non-destructive evaluation of CFRP surface and some of the investigated contaminants can be easily detected.

  3. Evaluation of Different Techniques of Active Thermography for Quantification of Artificial Defects in Fiber-Reinforced Composites Using Thermal and Phase Contrast Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Röllig, Mathias; Gower, Michael; Lodeiro, Maria; Baker, Graham; Monte, Christian; Adibekyan, Albert; Gutschwager, Berndt; Knazowicka, Lenka; Blahut, Ales

    2018-05-01

    For assuring the safety and reliability of components and constructions in energy applications made of fiber-reinforced polymers (e.g., blades of wind turbines and tidal power plants, engine chassis, flexible oil and gas pipelines) innovative non-destructive testing methods are required. Within the European project VITCEA complementary methods (shearography, microwave, ultrasonics and thermography) have been further developed and validated. Together with partners from the industry, test specimens have been constructed and selected on-site containing different artificial and natural defect artefacts. As base materials, carbon and glass fibers in different orientations and layering embedded in different matrix materials (epoxy, polyamide) have been considered. In this contribution, the validation of flash and lock-in thermography to these testing problems is presented. Data analysis is based on thermal contrasts and phase evaluation techniques. Experimental data are compared to analytical and numerical models. Among others, the influence of two different types of artificial defects (flat bottom holes and delaminations) with varying diameters and depths and of two different materials (CFRP and GFRP) with unidirectional and quasi-isotropic fiber alignment is discussed.

  4. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Ghose, S.

    Here, a comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have beenmore » studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5×10 20 p/cm 2. The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF) selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (~5×10 18 p cm -2). In

  5. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    DOE PAGES

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Ghose, S.; ...

    2016-11-16

    Here, a comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have beenmore » studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5×10 20 p/cm 2. The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF) selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (~5×10 18 p cm -2). In

  6. The development of the Ariane-4 adaptor 937B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, A.; Pascual, J.; Lechon, J.; Aceituna, J.

    1990-06-01

    The Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) sandwich shell Ariane 4 payload adapter 937B is described. Two interface metallic end rings are incorporated in the design. The overall dimensions of the adapter are described. The main feature of the adapter is the use of cocuring technology in manufacturing the entire adapter sandwich shell in one piece. Manufacturing cost reductions are described. Qualification test results are presented. Mathematical models used in design analysis of the adapter are outlined.

  7. Reinforced carbon fiber laminates with oriented carbon nanotube epoxy nanocomposites: Magnetic field assisted alignment and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    He, Yuxin; Yang, Song; Liu, Hu; Shao, Qian; Chen, Qiuyu; Lu, Chang; Jiang, Yuanli; Liu, Chuntai; Guo, Zhanhu

    2018-05-01

    The epoxy nanocomposites with ordered multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used to influence the micro-cracks resistance of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy (CF/EP) laminate at 77 K, Oxidized MWCNTs functionalized with Fe 3 O 4 (Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs) with good magnetic properties were prepared by co-precipitation method and used to modify epoxy (EP) for cryogenic applications. Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs reinforced carbon fiber epoxy composites were also prepared through vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). The ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs were observed to have effectively improved the mechanical properties of epoxy (EP) matrix at 77 K and reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of EP matrix. The ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs also obviously improved the micro-cracks resistance of CF/EP composites at 77 K. Compared to neat EP, the CTE of ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs modified CF/EP composites was decreased 37.6%. Compared to CF/EP composites, the micro-cracks density of ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs modified CF/EP composites at 77 K was decreased 37.2%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The formation of web-like connection among electrospun chitosan/PVA fiber network by the reinforcement of ellipsoidal calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Sambudi, Nonni Soraya; Kim, Minjeong G; Park, Seung Bin

    2016-03-01

    The electrospun fibers consist of backbone fibers and nano-branch network are synthesized by loading of ellipsoidal calcium carbonate in the mixture of chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) followed by electrospinning. The synthesized ellipsoidal calcium carbonate is in submicron size (730.7±152.4 nm for long axis and 212.6±51.3 nm for short axis). The electrospun backbone fibers experience an increasing in diameter by loading of calcium carbonate from 71.5±23.4 nm to 281.9±51.2 nm. The diameters of branch fibers in the web-network range from 15 nm to 65 nm with most distributions of fibers are in 30-35 nm. Calcium carbonate acts as reinforcing agent to improve the mechanical properties of fibers. The optimum value of Young's modulus is found at the incorporation of 3 wt.% of calcium carbonate in chitosan/PVA fibers, which is enhanced from 15.7±3 MPa to 432.4±94.3 MPa. On the other hand, the ultimate stress of fibers experiences a decrease. This result shows that the fiber network undergoes changes from flexible to more stiff by the inclusion of calcium carbonate. The thermal analysis results show that the crystallinity of polymer is changed by the existence of calcium carbonate in the fiber network. The immersion of fibers in simulated body fluid (SBF) results in the formation of apatite on the surface of fibers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxidation Microstructure Studies of Reinforced Carbon/Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Curry, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory oxidation studies of reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) are discussed with particular emphasis on the resulting microstructures. This study involves laboratory furnace (500-1500 C deg) and arc-jet exposures (1538 C deg) on various forms of RCC. RCC without oxidation protection oxidized at 800 and 1100 C deg exhibits pointed and reduced diameter fibers, due to preferential attack along the fiber edges. RCC with a SiC conversion coating exhibits limited attack of the carbon substrate at 500, 700 and 1500 C deg. However samples oxidized at 900, 1100, and 1300 C deg show small oxidation cavities at the SiC/carbon interface below through-thickness cracks in the SiC coating. These cavities have rough edges with denuded fibers and can be easily distinguished from cavities created in processing. Arc-jet tests at 1538 C deg show limited oxidation attack when the SiC coating and glass sealants are intact. When the SiC/sealant protection system is damaged, attack is extensive and proceeds through matrix cracks, creating denuded fibers on the edges of the cracks. Even at 1538 C deg, where diffusion control dominates, attack is non-uniform with fiber edges oxidizing in preference to the bulk fiber and matrix.

  10. Fiber-coupled three-micron pulsed laser source for CFRP laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyga, Sebastian; Blass, David; Katzy, Veronika; Westphalen, Thomas; Jungbluth, Bernd; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2018-02-01

    We present a laser source providing up to 18 W and 1.5 mJ at a wavelength of 3 μm. The output is generated by frequency conversion of randomly polarized multimode radiation at 1064 nm of an Nd:YAG laser in a two-stage conversion setup. The frequency converter comprises an optical parametric oscillator and a subsequent optical parametric amplifier using PPLN as nonlinear medium in both stages. To implement fiber-based beam delivery for materials processing, we coupled the output at 3 μm to a multimode ZrF4-fiber. This source was then used to remove epoxy resin from the surface of CFRP samples.

  11. CFRP variable curvature mirror used for realizing non-moving-element optical zoom imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Fan, Xuewu; Pang, Zhihai; Ren, Guorui; Wang, Wei; Xie, Yongjie; Ma, Zhen; Du, Yunfei; Su, Yu; Wei, Jingxuan

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, how to eliminate moving elements while realizing optical zoom imaging has been paid much attention. Compared with the conventional optical zooming techniques, removing moving elements would bring in many benefits such as reduction in weight, volume and power cost and so on. The key to implement non-moving-element optical zooming lies in the design of variable curvature mirror (VCM). In order to obtain big enough optical magnification, the VCM should be capable of generating a large variation of saggitus. Hence, the mirror material should not be brittle, in other words the corresponding ultimate strength should be high enough to ensure that mirror surface would not be broken during large curvature variation. Besides that, the material should have a not too big Young's modulus because in this case less force is required to generate a deformation. Among all available materials, for instance SiC, Zerodur and et.al, CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced polymer) satisfies all these requirements and many related research have proven this. In this paper, a CFRP VCM is designed, fabricated and tested. With a diameter of 100mm, a thickness of 2mm and an initial curvature radius of 1740mm, this component could change its curvature radius from 1705mm to 1760mm, which correspond to a saggitus variation of nearly 23μm. The work reported further proves the suitability of CFRP in constructing variable curvature mirror which could generate a large variation of saggitus.

  12. Temperature Dependence on the Strength and Stress Rupture Behavior of a Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Calomino, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Tensile strengths and stress rupture lives of carbon-fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) specimens were measured at 800 C and are compared to previously reported 1200 C data. All tests were conducted in an environmental chamber containing 1000 ppm of oxygen in argon. The average 800 C tensile strength of 610 MPa is 10% greater than at 1200 C. Average stress rupture lives at 800 C were 2.5 times longer than those obtained at 1200 C. The difference in the 800 and 1200 C lives is related to the oxidation rate of the reinforcing carbon fibers, which is the primary damage mode of C/SiC composites in oxygen-containing environments.

  13. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  14. Orthogonal cutting modeling of hybrid CFRP/Ti toward specific cutting energy and induced damage analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinyang; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    This paper studied the machinability of hybrid CFRP/Ti stack via the numerical approach. To this aim, an original FE model consisting of three fundamental physical constituents, i.e., CFRP phase, interface and Ti phase, was established in the Abaqus Explicit/code to construct the machining behavior of the composite-to-metal alliance. The CFRP phase was modeled as an equivalent homogeneous material (EHM) by considering its anisotropic behavior relative to the fiber orientation (θ) while the Ti alloy phase was assumed to exhibit isotropic and elastic-plastic behavior. The "interface" linking the "CFRP-to-Ti" contact boundary was physically modeled as an intermediate transition region through the concept of cohesive zone (CZ). Different constitutive laws and damage criteria were implemented to simulate the chip separation process of the bi-material system. The key cutting responses including specific cutting energy consumption, induced subsurface damage, and interface delamination were precisely addressed via the comprehensive FE analyses, and several key conclusions were drawn from this study.

  15. Fiber Reinforced Composite Cores and Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Stephen W. (Inventor); Campbell, G. Scott (Inventor); Tilton, Danny E. (Inventor); Stoll, Frederick (Inventor); Sheppard, Michael (Inventor); Banerjee, Robin (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A fiber reinforced core panel is formed from strips of plastics foam helically wound with layers of rovings to form webs which may extend in a wave pattern or may intersect transverse webs. Hollow tubes may replace foam strips. Axial rovings cooperate with overlying helically wound rovings to form a beam or a column. Wound roving patterns may vary along strips for structural efficiency. Wound strips may alternate with spaced strips, and spacers between the strips enhance web buckling strength. Continuously wound rovings between spaced strips permit folding to form panels with reinforced edges. Continuously wound strips are helically wrapped to form annular structures, and composite panels may combine both thermoset and thermoplastic resins. Continuously wound strips or strip sections may be continuously fed either longitudinally or laterally into molding apparatus which may receive skin materials to form reinforced composite panels.

  16. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  17. Potassium methyl siliconate-treated pulp fibers and their effects on wood plastic composites: Water sorption and dimensional stability

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Zhiyong Cai; Nicole M. Stark; Charles J. Monlezun

    2013-01-01

    Potassium methyl siliconate (PMS) was investigated as a new nano modifier of wood fiber and wood flour to improve the compatibility between the fiber/flour and the plastic matrix in fiber reinforced plastic composites. Before injection molding, bleached and brown pulp fibers and mixed species wood flour were pretreated in PMS solutions. The morphology of the treated...

  18. Static and cyclic loading of fiber-reinforced dental resin.

    PubMed

    Drummond, James L; Bapna, Mahendra S

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexure strength of unidirectional fiber-reinforced resins under static and cyclic loading with and without thermal cycling. The fiber-reinforced resin materials chosen for this project were commercially available endodontic posts and commercially procured bar samples. For all materials, controls for flexure strength were tested in air and in water using three-point loading. Specimens were thermal cycled between 7 and 63 degrees C for 6000 cycles. A staircase approach was used to determine the flexure fatigue limit and scanning microscopy was used to examine the microstructure. The carbon/graphite fiber-reinforced resin posts and the glass FiberKor posts were significantly stronger than the ceramic (zirconia) and the other glass-reinforced resin materials. Thermal cycling caused a significant lowering (11-24%) of the flexure strength for each resin based post system. The ceramic post system decreased only by 2%. Further, for standard size glass fiber-reinforced resin bars, no significant differences between testing in air and water was observed, but a significant difference between static and cyclic loading was noted. The decreases in the strength property due to thermal cycling and the cyclic loading of these materials indicates that their utilization in the oral environment enhances their degradation, and potentially shortens their clinical life.

  19. Global Carbon Fiber Composites Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Das, Sujit; Warren, Josh; West, Devin

    This analysis identifies key opportunities in the carbon fiber supply chain where resources and investments can help advance the clean energy economy. The report focuses on four application areas — wind energy, aerospace, automotive, and pressure vessels — that top the list of industries using carbon fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers. For each of the four application areas, the report addresses the supply and demand trends within that sector, supply chain, and costs of carbon fiber and components.

  20. Crashworthiness characteristics of a carbon fiber reinforced dual-phase epoxy–polyurea hybrid matrix composite

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Hongyu; Attard, Thomas L.; Dhiradhamvit, Kittinan; ...

    2014-11-07

    In this paper, the crashworthiness characteristics of rectangular tubes made from a Carbon-fiber reinforced Hybrid-Polymeric Matrix (CHMC) composite were investigated using quasi-static and impact crush tests. The hybrid matrix formulation of the CHMC was created by combining an epoxy-based thermosetting polymer with a lightly crosslinked polyurea elastomer at various cure-time intervals and volumetric ratios. The load–displacement responses of both CHMC and carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy (CF/epoxy) specimens were obtained under various crushing speeds; and crashworthiness parameters, such as the average crushing force and specific energy absorption (SEA), were calculated using subsequent load–displacement relationships. The CHMC maintained a high level of structuralmore » integrity and post-crush performance, relative to traditional CF/epoxy. The influence of the curing time and volumetric ratios of the polyurea/epoxy dual-hybridized matrix system on the crashworthiness parameters was also investigated. The results reveal that the load carrying capacity and total energy absorption tend to increase with greater polyurea thickness and lower elapsed reaction curing time of the epoxy although this is typically a function of the loading rate. In conclusion, the mechanism by which the CHMC provides increased damage tolerance was also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).« less

  1. Determination of mechanical properties of some glass fiber reinforced plastics suitable to Wind Turbine Blade construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigmann, R.; Savin, A.; Goanta, V.; Barsanescu, P. D.; Leitoiu, B.; Iftimie, N.; Stanciu, M. D.; Curtu, I.

    2016-08-01

    The control of wind turbine's components is very rigorous, while the tower and gearbox have more possibility for revision and repairing, the rotor blades, once they are deteriorated, the defects can rapidly propagate, producing failure, and the damages can affect large regions around the wind turbine. This paper presents the test results, performed on glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) suitable to construction of wind turbine blades (WTB). The Young modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, ultimate stress have been determined using tensile and shear tests. Using Dynamical Mechanical Analysis (DMA), the activation energy for transitions that appear in polyester matrix as well as the complex elastic modulus can be determined, function of temperature.

  2. An Investigation of Fiber Reinforced Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Composites at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhu; Li, Yu-Yu; Lu, Can; Liu, Jian

    2018-05-21

    In this study, chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) fiber reinforced composites were made at indoor temperatures. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the CBPC composites were studied. The CBPC matrix of aluminum phosphate binder, metakaolin, and magnesia with different Si/P ratios was prepared. The results show that when the Si/P ratio was 1.2, and magnesia content in the CBPC was 15%, CBPC reached its maximum flexural strength. The fiber reinforced CBPC composites were prepared by mixing short polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers or unidirectional continuous carbon fiber sheets. Flexural strength and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined, and the microstructures of specimens were analyzed by scanning electron micrography, X-ray diffraction, and micro X-ray computed tomography. The flexural performance of continuous carbon fiber reinforced CBPC composites was better than that of PVA fiber composites. The elastic modulus, loss modulus, and loss factor of the fiber composites were measured through dynamic mechanical analysis. The results showed that fiber reinforced CBPC composites are an inorganic polymer viscoelastic material with excellent damping properties. The reaction of magnesia and phosphate in the matrix of CBPC formed a different mineral, newberyite, which was beneficial to the development of the CBPC.

  3. Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Xu, Jin-Yu; Li, Weimin

    2015-09-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material (BFRPGCM) was prepared. The stress-strain curve has been worked out. The ideal energy-absorbing efficiency has been analyzed and the application prospect has been explored. The results show the following: fiber reinforced cellular material has successively sized pore structures; the stress-strain curve has two stages: elastic stage and yielding plateau stage; the greatest value of the ideal energy-absorbing efficiency of BFRPGCM is 89.11%, which suggests BFRPGCM has excellent energy-absorbing property. Thus, it can be seen that BFRPGCM is easy and simple to make, has high plasticity, low density and excellent energy-absorbing features. So, BFRPGCM is a promising energy-absorbing material used especially in civil defense engineering.

  4. Effects of machining conditions on the specific cutting energy of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, A. I.; Syahmi, A. Z.; Naquib, M.; Lih, T. C.; Mansor, A. F.; Khalil, A. N. M.

    2017-10-01

    This article presents an approach to evaluate the effects of different machining conditions on the specific cutting energy of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites (CFRP). Although research works in the machinability of CFRP composites have been very substantial, the present literature rarely discussed the topic of energy consumption and the specific cutting energy. A series of turning experiments were carried out on two different CFRP composites in order to determine the power and specific energy constants and eventually evaluate their effects due to the changes in machining conditions. A good agreement between the power and material removal rate using a simple linear relationship. Further analyses revealed that a power law function is best to describe the effect of feed rate on the changes in the specific cutting energy. At lower feed rate, the specific cutting energy increases exponentially due to the nature of finishing operation, whereas at higher feed rate, the changes in specific cutting energy is minimal due to the nature of roughing operation.

  5. Toxicology and occupational hazards of new materials and processes in metal surface treatment, powder metallurgy, technical ceramics, and fiber-reinforced plastics.

    PubMed

    Midtgård, U; Jelnes, J E

    1991-12-01

    Many new materials and processes are about to find their way from the research laboratory into industry. The present paper describes some of these processes and provides an overview of possible occupational hazards and a list of chemicals used or produced in the processes. The technological areas that are considered are metal surface treatment (ion implantation, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying), powder metallurgy, advanced technical ceramics, and fiber-reinforced plastics.

  6. Fabrication of CFRP/Al Active Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi; Haga, Osamu; Ohira, Junichiro; Takemoto, Kyosuke; Imori, Masataka

    This paper describes fabrication and evaluation of the active laminate. It was made by hot-pressing of an aluminum plate as a high CTE material, a unidirectional CFRP prepreg as a low CTE material and an electric resistance heater, a KFRP prepreg as a low CTE material and an insulator between them, and copper foils as electrodes. In this study, fabricating conditions and performances such as curvature change and output force were examined. Under optimized fabricating conditions, it became clear that 1) the curvature of the active laminate linearly changes as a function of temperature, between room temperature and its hot pressing temperature without hysteresis by electric resistance heating of carbon fiber in the CFRP layer and cooling, and 2) the output force against a fixed punch almost linearly increases with increasing temperature during heating from 313K up to around the glass transition temperature of the epoxy matrix.

  7. Leaf spring made of fiber-reinforced resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hori, J.

    1986-01-01

    A leaf spring made of a matrix reinforced by at least two types of reinforcing fibers with different Young's modulus is described in this Japanese patent. At least two layers of reinforcing fibers are formed by partially arranging the reinforcing fibers toward the direction of the thickness of the leaf spring. A mixture of different types of reinforced fibers is used at the area of boundary between the two layers of reinforced fibers. The ratio of blending of each type of reinforced fiber is frequently changed to eliminate the parts where discontinuous stress may be applied to the leaf spring. The objective of this invention is to prevent the rapid change in Young's modulus at the boundary area between each layer of reinforced fibers in the leaf spring.

  8. Findings of the U.S. Department of Defense Technology Assessment Team on Japanese High-Temperature Composites February 1989 Visit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    I-4 1. Polymer Matrix Composites ................................................... r -4 2. Continuous-Fiber-Reinforced MMCs...Manufacturing CASTEM Casting Analysis System (KOBELCO) C-C Carbon-Carbon ( Composite ) CERASEP SiC - SiC CMC Made by SEP CF Carbon Fiber CFRP Carbon-Fiber...curing operations are done in clean rooms). Most operations are highly automated, with minimal manpower required. Some preceramic polymers appear to have

  9. Preliminary guidelines and recommendations for the development of material and process specifications for carbon fiber-reinforced liquid resin molded materials.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-05-01

    This document recommends guidance and criteria for the development of material and process specifications and material acceptance documents for liquid resins and continuous carbon fiber reinforcement materials used in liquid molding processes to manu...

  10. Testing procedures for carbon fiber reinforced plastic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosse, H. J.; Kaitatzidi, M.; Roth, S.

    1977-01-01

    Tests for studying the basic material are considered and quality control investigations involving preimpregnated materials (prepreg) are discussed. Attention is given to the prepreg area weight, the fiber area weight of prepregs, the resin content, volatile components, the effective thickness, resin flow, the resistance to bending strain, tensile strength, and shear strength. A description of tests conducted during the manufacturing process is also presented, taking into account X-ray methods, approaches of neutron radiography, ultrasonic procedures, resonance methods and impedance studies.

  11. Mechanical properties of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer/magnesium alloy hybrid laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pengpeng; Wu, Xuan; Pan, Yingcai; Tao, Ye; Wu, Guoqing; Huang, Zheng

    2018-04-01

    In this study, we prepared fibre metal laminates (FMLs) consisting of high-modulus carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) prepregs and thin AZ31 alloy sheets by using hot-pressing technology. Tensile and low-velocity impact tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of the magnesium alloy-based FMLs (Mg-FMLs) and to investigate the differences in the fracture behaviour between the Mg-FMLs and traditional Mg-FMLs. Results show that the Mg-FMLs exhibit higher specific tensile strength and specific tensile modulus than traditional Mg-FMLs and that the tensile behaviour of the Mg-FMLs is mainly governed by the CFRP because of the combination of high interlaminar shear properties and thin magnesium alloy layers. The Mg-FMLs exhibit excellent bending stiffness. Hence, no significant difference between the residual displacement d r and indentation depth d i , and the permanent deformation is mainly limited to a small zone surrounding the impact location after the impact tests.

  12. Thermal Preload Relaxation of Bolted CFRP Structures for Flexible Life Time Design Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbertz, Hendrik; Friedrich, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Taking into account the assembly, maintenance and repair of component systems, it becomes clear that mechanical fastening is necessary also for CFRP structures besides adhesive bonding. Threaded fasteners usually prestress CFRP materials perpendicular to the fibres. In this direction the high strength-increase by the carbon fibres is subordinated and the material properties are dominated by the relatively low strength plastic matrix. The following chapters explain the basics of preload loss at threaded fasteners and show the results of experiments with different influences on preload relaxation with CFRP materials. As the presented studies were carried out under the influence of temperature, thermal load plastification will be regarded as priority. The structural changes in the material are also documented with microscope images as well as an outlook for further research is given.

  13. Fiber orientation interpolation for the multiscale analysis of short fiber reinforced composite parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köbler, Jonathan; Schneider, Matti; Ospald, Felix; Andrä, Heiko; Müller, Ralf

    2018-06-01

    For short fiber reinforced plastic parts the local fiber orientation has a strong influence on the mechanical properties. To enable multiscale computations using surrogate models we advocate a two-step identification strategy. Firstly, for a number of sample orientations an effective model is derived by numerical methods available in the literature. Secondly, to cover a general orientation state, these effective models are interpolated. In this article we develop a novel and effective strategy to carry out this interpolation. Firstly, taking into account symmetry arguments, we reduce the fiber orientation phase space to a triangle in R^2 . For an associated triangulation of this triangle we furnish each node with an surrogate model. Then, we use linear interpolation on the fiber orientation triangle to equip each fiber orientation state with an effective stress. The proposed approach is quite general, and works for any physically nonlinear constitutive law on the micro-scale, as long as surrogate models for single fiber orientation states can be extracted. To demonstrate the capabilities of our scheme we study the viscoelastic creep behavior of short glass fiber reinforced PA66, and use Schapery's collocation method together with FFT-based computational homogenization to derive single orientation state effective models. We discuss the efficient implementation of our method, and present results of a component scale computation on a benchmark component by using ABAQUS ®.

  14. Fiber orientation interpolation for the multiscale analysis of short fiber reinforced composite parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köbler, Jonathan; Schneider, Matti; Ospald, Felix; Andrä, Heiko; Müller, Ralf

    2018-04-01

    For short fiber reinforced plastic parts the local fiber orientation has a strong influence on the mechanical properties. To enable multiscale computations using surrogate models we advocate a two-step identification strategy. Firstly, for a number of sample orientations an effective model is derived by numerical methods available in the literature. Secondly, to cover a general orientation state, these effective models are interpolated. In this article we develop a novel and effective strategy to carry out this interpolation. Firstly, taking into account symmetry arguments, we reduce the fiber orientation phase space to a triangle in R^2 . For an associated triangulation of this triangle we furnish each node with an surrogate model. Then, we use linear interpolation on the fiber orientation triangle to equip each fiber orientation state with an effective stress. The proposed approach is quite general, and works for any physically nonlinear constitutive law on the micro-scale, as long as surrogate models for single fiber orientation states can be extracted. To demonstrate the capabilities of our scheme we study the viscoelastic creep behavior of short glass fiber reinforced PA66, and use Schapery's collocation method together with FFT-based computational homogenization to derive single orientation state effective models. We discuss the efficient implementation of our method, and present results of a component scale computation on a benchmark component by using ABAQUS ®.

  15. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-03

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while themore » degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.« less

  16. Surface decoration of short-cut polyimide fibers with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their application for reinforcement of lightweight PC/ABS composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le; Han, Enlin; Wu, Yulun; Wang, Xiaodong; Wu, Dezhen

    2018-06-01

    The surface decoration of short-cut polyimide (PI) fibers with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was performed by fabricating a polydopamine (PDA) coating layer on the fiber surface and then immobilizing MWCNTs onto the coating layer via covalent bonding. This successful surface decoration was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared microscopy and static water contact angle. The application of the surface-decorated PI fibers as reinforcing fibers for reinforcement of polycarbonate (PC)/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (ABS) alloy was investigated, which indicated that the MWCNTs-decorated PI fibers not only could effectively reinforce the PC/ABS alloy but also generated a significant lightweighting effect on the resulting composites. The maximum mechanical properties were achieved for the composites at a fiber content of 20 wt.% and a fiber length of 3 mm. This significant reinforcement effect is attributed to the enhancement of interaction bonding strength between the fibers and matrix as a result of the surface decoration of PI fibers with MWCNTs. The morphological investigation suggested that fiber rupture was the major energy dissipation mechanism in the tensile and impact failures, whereas fiber debonding and pullout were partly involved in the fracture energy dissipation. In addition, the presence of surface-decorated PI fibers slightly enhanced the thermal stability and load bearing capability of composites. This work can provide a type of high-performance lightweight composite material for automobile and aviation industries.

  17. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  18. Mid-IR laser ultrasonic testing for fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, Masahiro; Hatano, Hideki; Oguchi, Kanae; Yamawaki, Hisashi; Watanabe, Makoto; Enoki, Manabu

    2018-04-01

    Ultrasonic testing is the most common method to detect defects in materials and evaluate their sizes and locations. Since piezo-electric transducers are manually handled from point to point, it takes more costs for huge products such as airplanes. Laser ultrasonic testing (LUT) is a breakthrough technique. A pulsed laser generates ultrasonic waves on a material surface due to thermoelastic effect or ablation. The ultrasonic waves can be detected by another laser with an interferometer. Thus, LUT can realize instantaneous inspection without contacting a sample. A pulse laser with around 3.2 μm wavelength (in the mid-IR range) is more suitable to generate ultrasonic waves for fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) because the light is well absorbed by the polymeric matrix. On the other hand, such a laser is not available in the market. In order to emit the mid-IR laser pulse, we came up with the application of an optical parametric oscillator and developed an efficient wavelength conversion device by pumping a compact Nd:YAG solid-state laser. Our mid-IR LUT system is most suitable for inspection of FRPs. The signal-to-noise ratio of ultrasonic waves generated by the mid-IR laser is higher than that by the Nd:YAG laser. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the performance of the mid-IR LUT system in reflection mode. We investigated the effects of the material properties and the laser properties on the generated ultrasonic waves. In addition, C-scan images by the system were also presented.

  19. Finite strain anisotropic elasto-plastic model for the simulation of the forming and testing of metal/short fiber reinforced polymer clinch joints at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, A.; Rolfes, R.; Behrens, A.; Bouguecha, A.; Hübner, S.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.

    2017-10-01

    There is a strong trend in the automotive industry to reduce car body-, chassis- and power-train mass in order to lower carbon emissions. More wide spread use of lightweight short fiber reinforced polymer (SFRP) is a promising approach to attain this goal. This poses the challenge of how to integrate new SFRP components by joining them to traditional sheet metal structures. Recently (1), the clinching technique has been successfully applied as a suitable joining method for dissimilar material such as SFRP and Aluminum. The material pairing PA6GF30 and EN AW 5754 is chosen for this purpose due to their common application in industry. The current contribution presents a verification and validation of a finite strain anisotropic material model for SFRP developed in (2) for the FE simulation of the hybrid clinching process. The finite fiber rotation during forming and separation, and thus the change of the preferential material direction, is represented in this model. Plastic deformations in SFRP are considered in this model via an invariant based non-associated plasticity formulation following the multiplicative decomposition approach of the deformation gradient where the stress-free intermediate configuration is introduced. The model allows for six independent characterization curves. The aforementioned material model allows for a detailed simulation of the forming process as well as a simulative prediction of the shear test strength of the produced joint at room temperature.

  20. Machinability Study on Milling Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials using Design of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, H.; Haron, C. H. C.; Ghani, J. A.; Suhaily, M.; Yuzairi, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    The surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of a milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials are depending on the milling parameters (spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut). Therefore, a study was carried out to investigate the relationship between the milling parameters and their effects on a kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The composite panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) method. A full factorial design of experiments was use as an initial step to screen the significance of the parameters on the defects using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). If the curvature of the collected data shows significant, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is then applied for obtaining a quadratic modelling equation that has more reliable in expressing the optimization. Thus, the objective of this research is obtaining an optimum setting of milling parameters and modelling equations to minimize the surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The spindle speed and feed rate contributed the most in affecting the surface roughness and the delamination factor of the kenaf composite materials.

  1. Enhancement of Gas Barrier Properties of CFRP Laminates Fabricated Using Thin-Ply Prepregs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    横関, 智弘; 高木, 智宏; 吉村, 彰記; Ogasawara, Toshio; 荻原, 慎二

    Composite laminates manufactured using thin-ply prepregs are expected to have superior resistance properties against microcracking compared to those using standard prepregs. In this study, comparative investigations are presented on the microcrack accumulation and gas leakage characteristics of CFRP laminates fabricated using standard and thin-ply prepregs, consisting of high-performance carbon fiber and toughened epoxy, as a fundamental research on the cryogenic composite tanks for future space vehicles. It was shown that laminates using thin-ply prepregs exhibited much higher strain at microcrack initiation compared to those using standard prepregs at room and cryogenic temperatures. In addition, helium gas leak tests using CFRP laminated tubular specimens subjected to quasi-static tension loadings were performed. It was demonstrated that CFRP laminates using thin-ply prepregs have higher gas barrier properties than those using standard prepregs.

  2. Multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites using carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Jakubinek, Michael B.; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Rahmat, Meysam; Djokic, Drazen; Laqua, Kurtis; Park, Daesun; Kim, Keun-Su; Simard, Benoit; Yousefpour, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has made several nano-based materials available with the potential to address limitations of conventional fiber reinforced polymer composites, particularly in reference to multifunctional structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the most prevalent case and offer amazing properties at the individual nanotube level. There are already a few high-profile examples of the use of CNTs in space structures to provide added electrical conductivity for static dissipation and electromagnetic shielding. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), which are structurally analogous to CNTs, also present a range of attractive properties. Like the more widely explored CNTs, individual BNNTs display remarkable mechanical properties and high thermal conductivity but with contrasting functional attributes including substantially higher thermal stability, high electrical insulation, polarizability, high neutron absorption and transparency to visible light. This presents the potential of employing either or both BNNTs and CNTs to achieve a range of lightweight, functional composites for space structures. Here we present the case for application of BNNTs, in addition to CNTs, in space structures and describe recent advances in BNNT production at the National Research Council Canada (NRC) that have, for the first time, provided sufficiently large quantities to enable commercialization of high-quality BNNTs and accelerate development of chemistry, composites and applications based on BNNTs. Early demonstrations showing the fabrication and limited structural testing of polymer matrix composites, including glass fiber-reinforced composite panels containing BNNTs will be discussed.

  3. Flash Thermography to Evaluate Porosity in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRPs)

    PubMed Central

    Meola, Carosena; Toscano, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    It is a fact that the presence of porosity in composites has detrimental effects on their mechanical properties. Then, due to the high probability of void formation during manufacturing processes, it is necessary to have the availability of non-destructive evaluation techniques, which may be able to discover the presence and the distribution of porosity in the final parts. In recent years, flash thermography has emerged as the most valuable method, but it is still not adequately enclosed in the industrial enterprise. The main reason of this is the lack of sufficient quantitative data for a full validation of such a technique. The intention of the present work is to supply an overview on the current state-of-the-art regarding the use of flash thermography to evaluate the porosity percentage in fiber reinforced composite materials and to present the latest results, which are gathered by the authors, on porous carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates. To this end, several coupons of two different stacking sequences and including a different amount of porosity are fabricated and inspected with both non-destructive and destructive testing techniques. Data coming from non-destructive testing with either flash thermography or ultrasonics are plotted against the porosity percentage, which was previously estimated with the volumetric method. The new obtained results are a witness to the efficacy of flash thermography. Some key points that need further consideration are also highlighted. PMID:28788527

  4. Interfacial enhancement of carbon fiber/nylon 12 composites by grafting nylon 6 to the surface of carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Chen; Qingyu, Cai; Jing, Wu; Xiaohong, Xia; Hongbo, Liu; Zhanjun, Luo

    2018-05-01

    Nylon 6 (PA6) grafted onto carbon fiber (CF) after chemical oxidation treatment was in an attempt to reinforce the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared analysis (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TG) were selected to characterize carbon fibers with different surface treated. Experimental results showed that PA6 was grafted uniformly on the fiber surface through the anionic polymerization. A large number of functional groups were introduced to the fiber surface and the surface roughness was increased. After grafting PA6 on the oxidized carbon fibers, it played an important role on improving the interfacial adhesion between the fibers and the matrix by improving PA12 wettability, increasing chemical bonding and mechanical interlocking. Compared with the desized CF composites, the tensile strength of PA6-CF/PA12 composites was increased by 30.8% from 53.9 MPa to 70.2 MPa. All results indicated that grafting PA6 onto carbon fiber surface was an effective method to enhance the mechanical strength of carbon fiber/nylon 12 composites.

  5. Strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with various types of non-metallic fiber and rods reinforcement under static loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevskii, A. V.; Baldin, I. V.; Kudyakov, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of modern building materials based on non-metallic fibers and their application in concrete structures represent one of the important issues in construction industry. This paper presents results of investigation of several types of raw materials selected: basalt fiber, carbon fiber and composite fiber rods based on glass and carbon. Preliminary testing has shown the possibility of raw materials to be effectively used in compressed concrete elements. Experimental program to define strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with non-metallic fiber reinforcement and rod composite reinforcement included design, manufacture and testing of several types of concrete samples with different types of fiber and longitudinal rod reinforcement. The samples were tested under compressive static load. The results demonstrated that fiber reinforcement of concrete allows increasing carrying capacity of compressed concrete elements and reducing their deformability. Using composite longitudinal reinforcement instead of steel longitudinal reinforcement in compressed concrete elements insignificantly influences bearing capacity. Combined use of composite rod reinforcement and fiber reinforcement in compressed concrete elements enables to achieve maximum strength and minimum deformability.

  6. Fatigue and post-fatigue performance of Fabry-Perot FOS installed on CFRP-strengthened RC-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Catalin; Labossiere, Pierre; Proulx, Jean

    2004-07-01

    There is a growing need for built-in monitoring systems for civil engineering infrastructures, due to problems such as increasing traffic loads and rising costs of maintenance and repair. Fibre optic sensors (FOS), capable of reading various parameters are promising candidates for life-long health monitoring of these structures. However, since FOS have only been introduced recently into the field of structural monitoring, their acceptance and widespread implementation will be conditioned by their durability under severe climatic and loading conditions. This paper reports on the performance of strain extrinsic FOS attached to carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) plates used to strengthen concrete structures. The specimens tested in this project are reinforced concrete (RC) beams with an additional external CFRP reinforcement. The FOS-instrumented beams were first subjected to fatigue loading for various numbers of cycles and load amplitudes. Then, they were tested monotonically to failure under four-point-bending. The test results provide an insight on the fatigue and post-fatigue behaviour of FOS used for monitoring reinforced concrete structures.

  7. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon–Al–Cu Composite for Friction Material

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ruiying; Ma, Denghao

    2018-01-01

    A carbon/carbon–Al–Cu composite reinforced with carbon fiber 2.5D-polyacrylonitrile-based preforms was fabricated using the pressureless infiltration technique. The Al–Cu alloy liquids were successfully infiltrated into the C/C composites at high temperature and under vacuum. The mechanical and metallographic properties, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the C/C–Al–Cu composites were analyzed. The results showed that the bending property of the C/C–Al–Cu composites was 189 MPa, whereas that of the pure carbon slide material was only 85 MPa. The compressive strength of C/C–Al–Cu was 213 MPa, whereas that of the pure carbon slide material was only 102 MPa. The resistivity of C/C–Al–Cu was only 1.94 μΩm, which was lower than that of the pure carbon slide material (29.5 μΩm). This finding can be attributed to the “network conduction” structure. Excellent wettability was observed between Al and the carbon matrix at high temperature due to the existence of Al4C3. The friction coefficients of the C/C, C/C–Al–Cu, and pure carbon slide composites were 0.152, 0.175, and 0.121, respectively. The wear rate of the C/C–Al–Cu composites reached a minimum value of 2.56 × 10−7 mm3/Nm. The C/C–Al–Cu composite can be appropriately used as railway current collectors for locomotives. PMID:29614723

  8. Microstructural characterization of PAN based carbon fiber reinforced nylon 6 polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munirathnamma, L. M.; Ningaraju, S.; Kumar, K. V. Aneesh; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    Microstructural characterization of nylon 6/polyacrolonitrile based carbon fibers (PAN-CFs) of 10 to 40 wt% has been performed by positron lifetime technique (PLT). The positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime (τ3), o-Ps intensity (I3) and fractional free volume (Fv) of nylon 6/PAN-CF composites are correlated with the mechanical properties viz., Tensile strength and Young's modulus. The Fv show negative deviation with the reinforcement of 10 to 40 wt% of PAN-CF from the linear additivity relation. The negative deviation in nylon 6/PAN-CF composite suggests the induced molecular packing due to the chemical interaction between the polymeric chains of nylon 6 and PAN-CF. This is evident from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) studies. The FTIR results suggests that observed negative deviation in PALS results of nylon 6/PAN-CF reinforced polymer composites is due to the induced chemical interaction at N-H-O sites. The improved tensile strength (TS) and Young's modulus (YM) in nylon 6/PAN-CF reinforced polymer composites is due to AS4C (surface treated and epoxy coated) PAN-CF has shown highest adhesion level due to better stress transfer between nylon 6 and PAN-CF.

  9. Multiscale modeling of PVDF matrix carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greminger, Michael; Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh

    2017-06-01

    Self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced composites have the potential to enable structural health monitoring that is inherent to the composite material rather than requiring external or embedded sensors. It has been demonstrated that a self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite can be created by using the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) as the matrix material and using a Kevlar layer to separate two carbon fiber layers. In this configuration, the electrically conductive carbon fiber layers act as electrodes and the Kevlar layer acts as a dielectric to prevent the electrical shorting of the carbon fiber layers. This composite material has been characterized experimentally for its effective d 33 and d 31 piezoelectric coefficients. However, for design purposes, it is desirable to obtain a predictive model of the effective piezoelectric coefficients for the final smart composite material. Also, the inverse problem can be solved to determine the degree of polarization obtained in the PVDF material during polarization by comparing the effective d 33 and d 31 values obtained in experiment to those predicted by the finite element model. In this study, a multiscale micromechanics and coupled piezoelectric-mechanical finite element modeling approach is introduced to predict the mechanical and piezoelectric performance of a plain weave carbon fiber reinforced PVDF composite. The modeling results show good agreement with the experimental results for the mechanical and electrical properties of the composite. In addition, the degree of polarization of the PVDF component of the composite is predicted using this multiscale modeling approach and shows that there is opportunity to drastically improve the smart composite’s performance by improving the polarization procedure.

  10. Evaluation of FRP repair method for cracked bridge members.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-01-01

    This research program was undertaken to investigate the effects Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) have on the shear strength on under-reinforced, lab-scale prestressed concrete (PC) bridge girders. Many bridges in the states of Missouri and Kan...

  11. Energy Absorption Capacity in Natural Fiber Reinforcement Composites Structures

    PubMed Central

    López-Alba, Elías; Díaz, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters on the material behavior of natural fiber reinforced plastic structures has been investigated, showing the potential for transport application in energy absorbing structures. Two different woven fabrics (twill and hopsack) made of flax fibers as well as a non-woven mat made of a mixture of hemp and kenaf fibers were employed as reinforcing materials. These reinforcing textiles were impregnated with both HD-PE (high-density polyethylen) and PLA (polylactic acid) matrix, using a continuous compression molding press. The impregnated semi-finished laminates (so-called organic sheets) were thermoformed in a second step to half-tubes that were assembled through vibration-welding process to cylindric crash absorbers. The specimens were loaded by compression to determine the specific energy absorption capacity. Quasi-static test results were compared to dynamic test data obtained on a catapult arrangement. The differences on the specific energies absorption (SEA) as a function of different parameters, such as the wall thickness, the weave material type, the reinforced textiles, and the matrix used, depending on the velocity rate application were quantified. In the case of quasi-static analysis it is observed a 20% increment in the SEA value when wove Hopsack fabric reinforcement is employed. No velocity rate influence from the material was observed on the SEA evaluation at higher speeds used to perform the experiments. The influence of the weave configuration (Hopsack) seems to be more stable against buckling effects at low loading rates with 10% higher SEA values. An increase of SEA level of up to 72% for PLA matrix was observed when compared with HD-PE matrix. PMID

  12. Energy Absorption Capacity in Natural Fiber Reinforcement Composites Structures.

    PubMed

    López-Alba, Elías; Schmeer, Sebastian; Díaz, Francisco

    2018-03-13

    The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters on the material behavior of natural fiber reinforced plastic structures has been investigated, showing the potential for transport application in energy absorbing structures. Two different woven fabrics (twill and hopsack) made of flax fibers as well as a non-woven mat made of a mixture of hemp and kenaf fibers were employed as reinforcing materials. These reinforcing textiles were impregnated with both HD-PE (high-density polyethylen) and PLA (polylactic acid) matrix, using a continuous compression molding press. The impregnated semi-finished laminates (so-called organic sheets) were thermoformed in a second step to half-tubes that were assembled through vibration-welding process to cylindric crash absorbers. The specimens were loaded by compression to determine the specific energy absorption capacity. Quasi-static test results were compared to dynamic test data obtained on a catapult arrangement. The differences on the specific energies absorption (SEA) as a function of different parameters, such as the wall thickness, the weave material type, the reinforced textiles, and the matrix used, depending on the velocity rate application were quantified. In the case of quasi-static analysis it is observed a 20% increment in the SEA value when wove Hopsack fabric reinforcement is employed. No velocity rate influence from the material was observed on the SEA evaluation at higher speeds used to perform the experiments. The influence of the weave configuration (Hopsack) seems to be more stable against buckling effects at low loading rates with 10% higher SEA values. An increase of SEA level of up to 72% for PLA matrix was observed when compared with HD-PE matrix.

  13. Analysis of Wood Structure Connections Using Cylindrical Steel and Carbon Fiber Dowel Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodiannikov, Mikhail A.; Kashevarova, Galina G., Dr.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the results of the statistical analysis of corrosion processes and moisture saturation of glued laminated timber structures and their joints in corrosive environment are shown. This paper includes calculation results for dowel connections of wood structures using steel and carbon fiber reinforced plastic cylindrical dowel pins in accordance with applicable regulatory documents by means of finite element analysis in ANSYS software, as well as experimental findings. Dependence diagrams are shown; comparative analysis of the results obtained is conducted.

  14. Reinforcement of Existing Cast-Iron Structural Elements by Means of Fiber Reinforced Composites / Wzmacnianie Istniejących, Żeliwnych Elementów Konstrukcyjnych za Pomocą Włóknokompozytów

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinowski, Jakub; Różycki, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    The paperdeals with tubular, cast-iron columns which should be reinforced due to the planned new structural function of these elements. According to the requirements of the monument conservator the general appearance of columns should not be altered significantly. Reinforcement with an external, thin coating (sleeve or jacket) made of composite (carbon fibre reinforced polymer - CFRP) was proposed. Details of the proposedtechniquewerepresented. The reinforcementeffect was verifiedin destructivetestsperformed on two columns without reinforcement and the two other columns reinforced with the chosentechnique. Due to the expected very high load capacity of the axially loaded column, the test rig was designed in such a manner that the force could be applied on big eccentricity. For this purpose a specialbase was prepared(comp. Fig. 1). Destructivetests have confirmed the high effectiveness of the adopted strengthening technique.

  15. Development of ductile hybrid fiber reinforced polymer (D-H-FRP) reinforcement for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somboonsong, Win

    The corrosion of steel rebars has been the major cause of the reinforced concrete deterioration in transportation structures and port facilities. Currently, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) spends annually $31 billion for maintaining and repairing highways and highway bridges. The study reported herein represents the work done in developing a new type of reinforcement called Ductile Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Polymer or D-H-FRP using non-corrosive fiber materials. Unlike the previous FRP reinforcements that fail in a brittle manner, the D-H-FRP bars exhibit the stress-strain curves that are suitable for concrete reinforcement. The D-H-FRP stress-strain curves are linearly elastic with a definite yield point followed by plastic deformation and strain hardening resembling that of mild steel. In addition, the D-H-FRP reinforcement has integrated ribs required for concrete bond. The desirable mechanical properties of D-H-FRP reinforcement are obtained from the integrated design based on the material hybrid and geometric hybrid concepts. Using these concepts, the properties can be tailored to meet the specific design requirements. An analytical model was developed to predict the D-H-FRP stress-strain curves with different combination of fiber materials and geometric configuration. This model was used to optimize the design of D-H-FRP bars. An in-line braiding-pultrusion manufacturing process was developed at Drexel University to produce high quality D-H-FRP reinforcement in diameters that can be used in concrete structures. A series of experiments were carried out to test D-H-FRP reinforcement as well as their individual components in monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. Using the results from the tensile tests and fracture analysis, the stress-strain behavior of the D-H-FRP reinforcement was fully characterized and explained. Two series of concrete beams reinforced with D-H-FRP bars were studied. The D-H-FRP beam test results were then compared with companion

  16. Hybrid Fiber Layup and Fiber-Reinforced Polymeric Composites Produced Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Garrigan, Sean P. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Dietsch, Benjamin A. (Inventor); Cupp, Gary N. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Embodiments of a hybrid fiber layup used to form a fiber-reinforced polymeric composite, and a fiber-reinforced polymeric composite produced therefrom are disclosed. The hybrid fiber layup comprises one or more dry fiber strips and one or more prepreg fiber strips arranged side by side within each layer, wherein the prepreg fiber strips comprise fiber material impregnated with polymer resin and the dry fiber strips comprise fiber material without impregnated polymer resin.

  17. Mechanical analysis of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composite for self-deployable structure in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Bin; Ahn, Yong San; Jang, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Goo, Nam Seo; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is one of smart polymers which exhibit shape memory effect upon external stimuli. Reinforcements as carbon fiber had been used for making shape memory polymer composite (CF-SMPC). This study investigated a possibility of designing self-deployable structures in harsh space condition using CF-SMPCs and analyzed their shape memory behaviors with constitutive equation model.CF-SMPCs were prepared using woven carbon fabrics and a thermoset epoxy based SMP to obtain their basic mechanical properties including actuation in harsh environment. The mechanical and shape memory properties of SMP and CF-SMPCs were characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and universal tensile machine (UTM) with an environmental chamber. The mechanical properties such as flexural strength and tensile strength of SMP and CF-SMPC were measured with simple tensile/bending test and time dependent shape memory behavior was characterized with designed shape memory bending test. For mechanical analysis of CF-SMPCs, a 3D constitutive equation of SMP, which had been developed using multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient and shape memory strains, was used with material parameters determined from CF-SMPCs. Carbon fibers in composites reinforced tensile and flexural strength of SMP and acted as strong elastic springs in rheology based equation models. The actuation behavior of SMP matrix and CF-SMPCs was then simulated as 3D shape memory bending cases. Fiber bundle property was imbued with shell model for more precise analysis and it would be used for prediction of deploying behavior in self-deployable hinge structure.

  18. Influence of airborne-particle abrasion on mechanical properties and bond strength of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos Jose; Santana, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pereira, Janaina Carla; Araujo, Tatiana Santos; Menezes, Murilo Souza

    2008-06-01

    Controversy exists concerning the use of fiber-reinforced posts to improve bond strength to resin cement because some precementation treatments can compromise the mechanical properties of the posts. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of airborne-particle abrasion on the mechanical properties and microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts. Flexural strength (delta(f)), flexural modulus (E(f)), and stiffness (S) were assessed using a 3-point bending test for glass fiber-reinforced and carbon fiber-reinforced resin posts submitted to airborne-particle abrasion (AB) with 50-microm Al(2)O(3), and for posts without any surface treatment (controls) (n=10). Forty glass fiber (GF) and 40 carbon fiber (CF) posts were submitted to 1 of 4 surface treatments (n=10) prior to MTBS testing: silane (S); silane and adhesive (SA); airborne-particle abrasion with 50-microm Al(2)O(3) and silane (ABS); airborne-particle abrasion, silane, and adhesive (ABSA). Two composite resin restorations (Filtek Z250) with rounded depressions in the lateral face were bilaterally fixed to the post with resin cement (RelyX ARC). Next, the specimen was sectioned with a precision saw running perpendicular to the bonded surface to obtain 10 bonded beam specimens with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2). Each beam specimen was tested in a mechanical testing machine (EMIC 2,000 DL), under stress, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). Failure patterns of tested specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 3-point bending test demonstrated significant differences among groups only for the post type factor for flexural strength, flexural modulus, and stiffness. The carbon fiber posts exhibited significantly higher mean flexural strength (P=.001), flexural modulus (P=.003), and stiffness (P=.001) values when compared with glass

  19. Assessment of the behavior of reinforced concrete beams retrofitted with pre-stressed CFPR subjected to cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojatkashani, Ata; Zanjani, Sara

    2018-03-01

    Rehabilitation of weak and damaged structures has been considered widely during recent years. A relatively modern way of strengthening concrete components is to confine parts under tension and shear by means of carbon fiber reinforce polymer (CFRP). This way of strengthening due to the conditions of composite materials such as light weight, linear elastic behavior until failure point, high tensile strength, high elastic modulus, resistance against corrosion, and high fatigue resistance has become so common. During structural strengthening by means of not pre-stressed FRP materials, usually, it is not possible to benefit from the maximum capacity of FRP materials. In addition, sometimes, the expensive cost of such materials will not make a suitable balance between rates of strengthening and consuming spending. Thus, pre-stressing CFRP materials has an undeniable role in the effective use of materials. In the current research, general procedure of simulation using finite-element method (FEM) by means of the numerical package ABAQUS has been presented. In this article, 12 reinforced concrete (RC) models in two states (strengthened with simple and pre-stressed CFRP) under cycling loading have been considered. A parametric study has been carried out in this research on the effects of parameters such as CFRP surface area, percentage of tensile steel rebar and pre-stressing stress on ultimate load carrying capacity (ULCC), stiffness, and the ability of depreciation energy for the samples. In the current article also, for design parameters, percentages of tensile steel rebars, surface area of CFPR sheets, and the effective pre-stressing stress in RC beams retrofitted with pre-stressed CFPR sheets have investigated. In this paper, it was investigated that using different amount of parameters such as steel rebar percentage, CFRP surface area percentage, and CFRP pre-stressing, the resulted ULCC and energy depreciation of the specimens was observed to be increasing and

  20. Statistical aspects of the failure of organic-fiber-reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, S. L.; Kuperman, A. M.; Puchkov, L. V.; Zelenskii, É. S.; Berlin, Al. Al.; Kharchenko, E. F.; Kul'kov, A. A.

    1985-11-01

    Dispersion of the strength of filaments and of the Weibull coefficient β leads to a drop in strength of a strand compared with the strength of the components when the adhesion by gluing together does not amount to 2-5%. The drop in strength is determined by the dispersion of strength which depends on the length of the tested specimens. Gluing together of the fibers in filaments changes the nature of the load diagrams σ-ɛ of a filament when its length exceeds δ0. A consequence is that the mechanism of rupture of the strand changes, and this leads to an additional drop of its strength. When specimens are 500 mm long, the drop in strength of the strand compared with the mean strength of the filaments amounts to 10%. Because of the dispersion of the Weibull coefficient β, the strength of filaments does not correspond exactly to the strength of the microplastic obtained from these filaments. When there is dispersion of the strength of the filaments, failure of the plastic proceeds by failure of the microplastics as a whole. Gluing together of fibers has a double effect on the strength of the material: increased degree of gluing together of the fibers reduces the "noneffective length" from δ0 to 0.4-0.5 mm, and this leads to an increase of approximately 50% of the strength of the microplastic; increased gluing together leads to a change in the mechanism of failure of the strand and of the organic-fiber-plastic made from it if there is dispersion of the strength of the component filaments, and this reduces the strength of the material in accordance with (3) (by 12-14% in our case). The longitudinal instability of the properties of the filament leads to an additional drop in strength of the material by 4.5%.

  1. Guided ultrasonic waves for determining effective orthotropic material parameters of continuous-fiber reinforced thermoplastic plates.

    PubMed

    Webersen, Manuel; Johannesmann, Sarah; Düchting, Julia; Claes, Leander; Henning, Bernd

    2018-03-01

    Ultrasonic methods are widely established in the NDE/NDT community, where they are mostly used for the detection of flaws and structural damage in various components. A different goal, despite the similar technological approach, is non-destructive material characterization, i.e. the determination of parameters like Young's modulus. Only few works on this topic have considered materials with high damping and strong anisotropy, such as continuous-fiber reinforced plastics, but due to the increasing demand in the industry, appropriate methods are needed. In this contribution, we demonstrate the application of laser-induced ultrasonic Lamb waves for the characterization of fiber-reinforced plastic plates, providing effective parameters for a homogeneous, orthotropic material model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Interfacial adhesion improvement in carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hybrid composites by the application of a reactive hybrid resin initiated by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebényi, G.; Faragó, D.; Lámfalusi, Cs.; Göbl, R.

    2018-04-01

    Interfacial adhesion is a key factor in composite materials. The effective co-working of the reinforcing materials and matrix is essential for the proper load transfer between them, and to achieve the desired reinforcing effect. In case of nanocomposites, especially carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced nanocomposites the adhesion between the CNTs and the polymer matrix is poor. To improve the interfacial adhesion and exploit the reinforcing effect of these nanoparticles a two step curable epoxy (EP)/vinylester (VE) hybrid resin system was developed where the EP is cured using hardener in the first step, during the composite production, and in the second step the curing of the VE is initiated by gamma irradiation, which also activates the reinforcing materials and the cured matrix component. A total of six carbon fiber reinforced composite systems were compared with neat epoxy and EP/VE hybrid matrices with and without chemical initiator and MWCNT nano-reinforcement. The effect of gamma irradiation was investigated at four absorbed dose levels. According to our three point bending and interlaminar shear test results the adhesion has improved between all constituents of the composite system. It was demonstrated that gamma irradiation has beneficial effect on the static mechanical, especially interlaminar properties of both micro- and nanocomposites in terms of modulus, strength and interlaminar shear strength.

  3. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  4. Fracture resistance and primary failure mode of endodontically treated teeth restored with a carbon fiber-reinforced resin post system in vitro.

    PubMed

    Raygot, C G; Chai, J; Jameson, D L

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize the fracture resistance and mode of fracture of endodontically treated incisors restored with cast post-and-core, prefabricated stainless steel post, or carbon fiber-reinforced composite post systems. Ten endodontically treated teeth restored with each technique were subjected to a compressive load delivered at a 130-degree angle to the long axis until the first sign of failure was noted. The fracture load and the mode of fracture were recorded. The failure loads registered in the three groups were not significantly different. Between 70%, and 80% of teeth from any of the three groups displayed fractures that were located above the simulated bone level. The use of carbon fiber-reinforced composite posts did not change the fracture resistance or the failure mode of endodontically treated central incisors compared to the use of metallic posts.

  5. Uncertainty quantification of fiber orientation distribution measurements for long-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sharma, Bhisham N.; Naragani, Diwakar; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    We present a detailed methodology for experimental measurement of fiber orientation distribution (FOD) in injection-molded discontinuous fiber composites using the method of ellipses on 2D cross sections. Best practices to avoid biases occurring during surface preparation and optical imaging of carbon-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics are discussed. A marker-based watershed transform routine for efficient image segmentation and the separation of touching fiber ellipses is developed. The sensitivity of the averaged orientation tensor to the image sample size is studied for the case of long-fiber thermoplastics. A Mori-Tanaka implementation of the Eshelby model is then employed to quantify the sensitivity of elastic stiffness predictionsmore » to biases in the FOD measurements.« less

  6. Highly Conductive Carbon Fiber Reinforced Concrete for Icing Prevention and Curing.

    PubMed

    Galao, Oscar; Bañón, Luis; Baeza, Francisco Javier; Carmona, Jesús; Garcés, Pedro

    2016-04-12

    This paper aims to study the feasibility of highly conductive carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) as a self-heating material for ice formation prevention and curing in pavements. Tests were carried out in lab ambient conditions at different fixed voltages and then introduced in a freezer at -15 °C. The specimens inside the freezer were exposed to different fixed voltages when reaching +5 °C for prevention of icing and when reaching the temperature inside the freezer, i.e. , -15 °C, for curing of icing. Results show that this concrete could act as a heating element in pavements with risk of ice formation, consuming a reasonable amount of energy for both anti-icing (prevention) and deicing (curing), which could turn into an environmentally friendly and cost-effective deicing method.

  7. Investigation of the Reliability of Bridge Elements Reinforced with Basalt Plastic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval', T. I.

    2017-09-01

    The poorly studied problem on the reliability and durability of basalt-fiber-reinforced concrete bridge elements is considered. A method of laboratory research into the work of specimens of the concrete under a manyfold cyclic dynamic load is proposed. The first results of such experiments are presented.

  8. Uncertainty quantification of fiber orientation distribution measurements for long-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sharma, Bhisham N.; Naragani, Diwakar; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    Here, we present a detailed methodology for experimental measurement of fiber orientation distribution in injection-molded discontinuous fiber composites using the method of ellipses on two-dimensional cross sections. Best practices to avoid biases occurring during surface preparation and optical imaging of carbon-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics are discussed. We developed a marker-based watershed transform routine for efficient image segmentation and the separation of touching fiber ellipses. The sensitivity of the averaged orientation tensor to the image sample size is studied for the case of long-fiber thermoplastics. A Mori–Tanaka implementation of the Eshelby model is then employed to quantify the sensitivity of elastic stiffness predictionsmore » to biases in the fiber orientation distribution measurements.« less

  9. Uncertainty quantification of fiber orientation distribution measurements for long-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, Bhisham N.; Naragani, Diwakar; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; ...

    2017-09-28

    Here, we present a detailed methodology for experimental measurement of fiber orientation distribution in injection-molded discontinuous fiber composites using the method of ellipses on two-dimensional cross sections. Best practices to avoid biases occurring during surface preparation and optical imaging of carbon-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics are discussed. We developed a marker-based watershed transform routine for efficient image segmentation and the separation of touching fiber ellipses. The sensitivity of the averaged orientation tensor to the image sample size is studied for the case of long-fiber thermoplastics. A Mori–Tanaka implementation of the Eshelby model is then employed to quantify the sensitivity of elastic stiffness predictionsmore » to biases in the fiber orientation distribution measurements.« less

  10. Study on basalt fiber parameters affecting fiber-reinforced mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Chernykh, T. N.; Sashina, A. V.; Bogusevich, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the effect of different dosages and diameters of basalt fibers on tensile strength increase during bending of fiberboard-reinforced mortar samples. The optimal dosages of fiber, providing maximum strength in bending are revealed. The durability of basalt fiber in an environment of cement, by means of microscopic analysis of samples of fibers and fiberboard-reinforced mortar long-term tests is examined. The article also compares the behavior of basalt fiber in the cement stone environment to a glass one and reveals that the basalt fiber is not subject to destruction.

  11. Recycling of Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

    2014-02-01

    This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

  12. Transverse isotropic modeling of the ballistic response of glass reinforced plastic composites

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Taylor, P.A.

    1997-12-31

    The use of glass reinforced plastic (GRP) composites is gaining significant attention in the DoD community for use in armor applications. These materials typically possess a laminate structure consisting of up to 100 plies, each of which is constructed of a glass woven roving fabric that reinforces a plastic matrix material. Current DoD attention is focused on a high strength, S-2 glass cross-weave (0/90) fabric reinforcing a polyester matrix material that forms each ply of laminate structure consisting anywhere from 20 to 70 plies. The resulting structure displays a material anisotropy that is, to a reasonable approximation, transversely isotropic. Whenmore » subjected to impact and penetration from a metal fragment projectile, the GRP displays damage and failure in an anisotropic manner due to various mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber fracture and pull-out, and fiber-matrix debonding. In this presentation, the author will describe the modeling effort to simulate the ballistic response of the GRP material described above using the transversely isotropic (TI) constitutive model which has been implemented in the shock physics code, CTH. The results of this effort suggest that the model is able to describe the delamination behavior of the material but has some difficulty capturing the in-plane (i.e., transverse) response of the laminate due to its cross-weave fabric reinforcement pattern which causes a departure from transverse isotropy.« less

  13. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2008-01-01

    OXIMAP is a numerical (FEA-based) solution tool capable of calculating the carbon fiber and fiber coating oxidation patterns within any arbitrarily shaped carbon silicon carbide composite structure as a function of time, temperature, and the environmental oxygen partial pressure. The mathematical formulation is derived from the mechanics of the flow of ideal gases through a chemically reacting, porous solid. The result of the formulation is a set of two coupled, non-linear differential equations written in terms of the oxidant and oxide partial pressures. The differential equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the partial vapor pressures of the oxidant and oxides as a function of the spatial location and time. The local rate of carbon oxidation is determined at each time step using the map of the local oxidant partial vapor pressure along with the Arrhenius rate equation. The non-linear differential equations are cast into matrix equations by applying the Bubnov-Galerkin weighted residual finite element method, allowing for the solution of the differential equations numerically.

  14. Fiber reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) composites for reinforced concrete strengthening.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-07-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite systems are widely used for strengthening, repairing, and rehabilitation of reinforced concrete structural : members. A promising newly-developed type of composite, comprised of fibers and an inorganic cement-based matrix, ...

  15. Acoustic emission localization based on FBG sensing network and SVR algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Yaozhang; Zhao, Xiuxia; Hou, Dianli; Jiang, Mingshun

    2017-03-01

    In practical application, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) structures are easy to appear all sorts of invisible damages. So the damages should be timely located and detected for the safety of CFPR structures. In this paper, an acoustic emission (AE) localization system based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing network and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed for damage localization. AE signals, which are caused by damage, are acquired by high speed FBG interrogation. According to the Shannon wavelet transform, time differences between AE signals are extracted for localization algorithm based on SVR. According to the SVR model, the coordinate of AE source can be accurately predicted without wave velocity. The FBG system and localization algorithm are verified on a 500 mm×500 mm×2 mm CFRP plate. The experimental results show that the average error of localization system is 2.8 mm and the training time is 0.07 s.

  16. Load-bearing capacity of human incisor restored with various fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    PubMed

    Le Bell-Rönnlöf, Anna-Maria; Lassila, Lippo V J; Kangasniemi, Ilkka; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the load-bearing capacity and microstrain of incisors restored with posts of various kinds. Both prefabricated titanium posts and different fiber-reinforced composite posts were tested. The crowns of human incisors were cut and post preparation was carried out. The roots were divided into groups: (1) prefabricated serrated titanium posts, (2) prefabricated carbon fiber-reinforced composite posts, (3) individually formed glass fiber-reinforced composite posts with the canal full of fibers, and (4) individually formed "split" glass fiber-reinforced composite posts. The posts were cemented and composite crowns were made. Intact human incisors were used as reference. All roots were embedded in acrylic resin cylinders and stored at room temperature in water. Static load was applied under a loading angle of 45° using a universal testing machine. On half of the specimens microstrain was measured with strain gages and an acoustic emission analysis was carried out. Failure mode assessment was also made. The group with titanium posts showed highest number of unfavorable failures compared to the groups with fiber-reinforced composite posts. With fiber-reinforced composite posts the failures may more often be favorable compared to titanium posts, which clinically means repairable failures. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Commercially obtained PMR-15 polyimide prepregs with S-glass and graphite fiber reinforcements were evaluated along with in-house prepared glass and graphite cloth PMR 2 materials. A novel autoclave approach was conceived and used to demonstrate that both the PMR systems respond to 1.4 MPa (200 psi) autoclave pressures to produce void free composites equivalent to die molded laminates. Isothermal gravimetric analysis and subsequent mechanical property tests indicated that the PMR 2 system was significantly superior in thermo-oxidative stability, and that S-glass reinforcements may contribute to the accelerated degradation of composites at 316 C (600 F) when compared to graphite fiber reinforced composites. Fully reversed bending fatigue experiments were conducted with a type of fixture unused for organic matrix composites. These studies indicated that the graphite fiber composites were clearly superior in fatigue resistance to the glass fiber reinforced material and that PMR matrix composite systems yield performance of the same order as composite materials employing other families of matrices.

  18. Joining strength performances of metal skin and CFRP core laminate structures realized by compression-curing process, with supporting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliato, Luca; Jang, Changsoon; Kim, Naksoo

    2018-05-01

    In the recent years, the trend of lightening vehicles and structures of every kind has become an ever-growing issue, both for university and industrial researchers. As demonstrated in previous authors' works, laminate structures made of metal skin (MS) and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) core show high specific bending strength properties while granting considerable weight reduction but, so far, no investigations have been carried out on the hole sensitivity and joinability of these hybrid structures. In the present research work, the hole size sensitivity of MS-CFRP structure has been studied by means of uniaxial tensile test on 160mm (length), 25mm (width), 2.0mm (average thickness) specimens bored with Ø06mm, Ø9mm, and Ø12mm holes. The specimen thickness is composed of two metal skins of 0.4mm thickness each, 8×0.2mm CFRP stacked layers and two thin epoxy-based adhesive layers. The specimens have been manufactured by means of a compression-curing process in which the different materials are stacked and, thanks to die pressure and temperature, the curing process is completed in a relatively short time (15˜20 minutes). The specimens have been tested by means of simple tension test showing that, for the MS-CFRP material, the smaller the hole the smaller the maximum bearable load. Moreover, specimens with the same hole sizes have been bolted together with class 12 resistance bolts and tested by means of tensile test, allowing to determine the maximum transferable load between the two MS-CFRP plates. Aiming to prove the improvement in the specific transferable load, experiments on only-steel specimens with the same weight of the MS-CFRP ones and joined with the same method and bolts have been carried out, allowing to conclude that, for the 9mm hole bolted plates, the proposed material has a specific maximum transferable 27% higher than that of the steel composing their skins.

  19. Characterization of Reinforced Structural Composites with Carbon Nanotubes Grown Directly on the Fibers/Fabrics Using the PopTube Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, William Edward

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are ideal candidates for the reinforcement of the matrix and interphase zone in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), due to their ability to more effectively bind the reinforcing fibers to the matrix material. This can lead to the enhancement of several critical composite properties - including interfacial shear strength and interlaminar fracture toughness - that are typically associated with a composite material's resistance to delamination. Direct dispersion of CNTs into the matrix of the composites has been shown to be very difficult. A more effective way to reinforce PMCs using CNTs is to grow CNTs directly on the reinforcing fibers. To this end, a novel technique used to grow CNTs directly on carbon fibers has been developed at The University of Alabama and Auburn University. This method, referred to as the PopTube Approach, uses microwave irradiation to grow CNTs at room temperature in air, without the need for inert gas protection or additional feed stock gases. The simple nature of the PopTube Approach lends itself to large-scale, high-yield manufacturing that can be done in a cost effective manner. However, before this technique is developed beyond the laboratory scale, its effectiveness as a route to produce CNT-reinforced composites must be evaluated in a comprehensive manner. The objective of this work is to do just that - characterize the mechanical properties of CNT-reinforced composites produced via the PopTube Approach. A systematic experimental program is carried out to provide a comprehensive assessment of the effects of the PopTube Approach on a wide range of composite mechanical properties. Results show that the PopTube Approach provides for enhanced resistance to delamination with respect to several different loading events. Fractography studies are used to qualitatively understand the mechanisms responsible for these improvements in delamination resistance on the micro-scale. Results also suggest that improvements in

  20. Carbon fiber reinforced hierarchical orthogrid stiffened cylinder: Fabrication and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Lai, Changlian; Sun, Fangfang; Li, Ming; Ji, Bin; Wei, Weiyi; Liu, Debo; Zhang, Xi; Fan, Hualin

    2018-04-01

    To get strong, stiff and light cylindrical shell, carbon fiber reinforced hierarchical orthogrid stiffened cylinders are designed and fabricated. The cylinder is stiffened by two-scale orthogrid. The primary orthogrid has thick and high ribs and contains several sub-orthogrid cells whose rib is much thinner and lower. The primary orthogrid stiffens the bending rigidity of the cylinder to resist the global instability while the sub-orthogrid stiffens the bending rigidity of the skin enclosed by the primary orthogrid to resist local buckling. The cylinder is fabricated by filament winding method based on a silicone rubber mandrel with hierarchical grooves. Axial compression tests are performed to reveal the failure modes. With hierarchical stiffeners, the cylinder fails at skin fracture and has high specific strength. The cylinder will fail at end crushing if the end of the cylinder is not thickened. Global instability and local buckling are well restricted by the hierarchical stiffeners.

  1. Investigation of electrical and impact properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites with carbon nanotube buckypaper layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Christopher Brandon

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite materials have become commonplace in many industries including aerospace, automotive, and sporting goods. Previous research has determined a coupling relationship between the mechanical and electrical properties of these materials where the application of electrical current has been shown to improve their mechanical strengths. The next generations of these composites have started to be produced with the addition of nanocarbon buckypaper layers which provide even greater strength and electrical conductivity potentials. The focus of this current research was to characterize these new composites and compare their electro-mechanical coupling capabilities to those composites which do not contain any nonocarbons.

  2. FIBER ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDED LONG CARBON FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang, Jin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Mathur, Raj N.

    2015-03-23

    A set of edge-gated and center-gated plaques were injection molded with long carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites, and the fiber orientation was measured at different locations of the plaques. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight (ASMI) software was used to simulate the injection molding of these plaques and to predict the fiber orientation, using the anisotropic rotary diffusion and the reduced strain closure models. The phenomenological parameters of the orientation models were carefully identified by fitting to the measured orientation data. The fiber orientation predictions show very good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Residual stresses in shape memory alloy fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsz Loong, Tang; Jamian, Saifulnizan; Ismail, Al Emran; Nur, Nik Hisyammudin Muhd; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    Process-induced residual stress in shape memory alloy (SMA) fiber reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite was simulated by ANSYS APDL. The manufacturing process of the composite named as NiTi/Al is start with loading and unloading process of nickel titanium (NiTi) wire as SMA to generate a residual plastic strain. Then, this plastic deformed NiTi wire would be embedded into Al to become a composite. Lastly, the composite is heated form 289 K to 363 K and then cooled back to 300 K. Residual stress is generated in composite because of shape memory effect of NiTi and mismatch of thermal coefficient between NiTi wire and Al matrix of composite. ANSYS APDL has been used to simulate the distribution of residual stress and strain in this process. A sensitivity test has been done to determine the optimum number of nodes and elements used. Hence, the number of nodes and elements used are 15680 and 13680, respectively. Furthermore, the distribution of residual stress and strain of nickel fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite (Ni/Al) and titanium fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite (Ti/Al) under same simulation process also has been simulated by ANSYS APDL as comparison to NiTi/Al. The simulation results show that compressive residual stress is generated on Al matrix of Ni/Al, Ti/Al and NiTi/Al during heating and cooling process. Besides that, they also have similar trend of residual stress distribution but difference in term of value. For Ni/Al and Ti/Al, they are 0.4% difference on their maximum compressive residual stress at 363K. At same circumstance, NiTi/Al has higher residual stress value which is about 425% higher than Ni/Al and Ti/Al composite. This implies that shape memory effect of NiTi fiber reinforced in composite able to generated higher compressive residual stress in Al matrix, hence able to enhance tensile property of the composite.

  4. Characterization and Oxidation Behavior of Rayon-Derived Carbon Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Hull, David

    2010-01-01

    Rayon-derived fibers are the central constituent of reinforced carbon/ carbon (RCC) composites. Optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the as-fabricated fibers and the fibers after oxidation. Oxidation rates were measured with weight loss techniques in air and oxygen. The as-received fibers are approximately 10 micron in diameter and characterized by grooves or crenulations around the edges. Below 800 C, in the reaction-controlled region, preferential attack began in the crenulations and appeared to occur down fissures in the fibers.

  5. Drawing dependent structures, mechanical properties and cyclization behaviors of polyacrylonitrile and polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers prepared by plasticized spinning.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Qin, Aiwen; Zhao, Xinzhen; Liu, Dapeng; Wang, Haiye; He, Chunju

    2015-09-14

    Drawing to change the structural properties and cyclization behaviors of the polyacrylonitrile (PAN) chains in crystalline and amorphous regions is carried out on PAN and PAN/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fibers. Various characterization methods including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and thermal gravimetric analysis are used to monitor the structural evolution and cyclization behaviors of the fibers. With an increase of the draw ratio during the plasticized spinning process, the structural parameters of the fibers, i.e. crystallinity and planar zigzag conformation, are decreased at first, and then increased, which are associated with the heat exchange rate and the oriented-crystallization rate. A possible mechanism for plasticized spinning is proposed to explain the changing trends of crystallinity and planar zigzag conformation. PAN and PAN/CNT fibers exhibit various cyclization behaviors induced by drawing, e.g., the initiation temperature for the cyclization (Ti) of PAN fibers is increased with increasing draw ratio, while Ti of PAN/CNT fibers is decreased. Drawing also facilitates cyclization and lowers the percentage of β-amino nitrile for PAN/CNT fibers during the stabilization.

  6. Tribological study of non-asbestos fiber reinforced phenolic composites for braking applications

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gopal, P.; Dharani, L.R.; Blum, F.D.

    A cashew modified phenolic resin was used as the binder to prepare several different nonasbestos fiber reinforced composite friction materials. Friction-wear tests were conducted at various loads, speeds and temperatures on a Chase friction testing machine. The fade and wear characteristics of glass and carbon fiber reinforced friction materials were studied. The wear rates of hybrid composites containing Kevlar{reg_sign} (registered trademark of E.I. duPont de Nemours) pulp were compared to those of control composites without Kevlar{reg_sign} pulp.

  7. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  8. Full Scale RC Beam-Column Joints Strengthened with Steel Reinforced Polymer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vita, Alessandro; Napoli, Annalisa; Realfonzo, Roberto

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental campaign performed at the Laboratory of Materials and Structural Testing of the University of Salerno (Italy) in order to investigate the seismic performance of RC beam-column joints strengthened with Steel Reinforced Polymer (SRP) systems. With the aim to represent typical façade frames’ beam-column subassemblies found in existing RC buildings, specimens were provided with two short beam stubs orthogonal to the main beam and were designed with inadequate seismic details. Five members were strengthened by using two different SRP layouts while the remaining ones were used as benchmarks. Once damaged, two specimens were also repaired, retrofitted with SRP and subjected to cyclic test again. The results of cyclic tests performed on SRP strengthened joints are examined through a comparison with the outcomes of the previous experimental program including companion specimens not provided with transverse beam stubs and strengthened by Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) systems. In particular, both qualitative and quantitative considerations about the influence of the confining effect provided by the secondary beams on the joint response, the suitability of all the adopted strengthening solutions (SRP/CFRP systems), the performances and the failure modes experienced in the several cases studied are provided.

  9. Structural health monitoring and impact detection for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosters, Eric; van Els, Thomas J.

    2010-04-01

    The increasing use of thermoplastic carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials in the aerospace industry for primary aircraft structures, such as wing leading-edge surfaces and fuselage sections, has led to rapid growth in the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). Impact, vibration, and load can all cause failure, such as delamination and matrix cracking, in composite materials. Moreover, the internal material damage can occur without being visible to the human eye, making inspection of and clear insight into structural integrity difficult using currently available evaluation methods. Here, we describe the detection of impact and its localization in materials and structures by high-speed interrogation of multiple-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors mounted on a composite aircraft component.

  10. Optimization of Recycled Glass Fibre-Reinforced Plastics Gear via Integration of the Taguchi Method and Grey Relational Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizamzul Mehat, Nik; Syuhada Zakarria, Noor; Kamaruddin, Shahrul

    2018-03-01

    The increase in demand for industrial gears has resulted in the increase in usage of plastic-matrix composites particularly glass fibre-reinforced plastics as the gear materials. The usage of these synthetic fibers is to enhance the mechanical strength and the thermal resistance of the plastic gears. Nevertheless, the production of large quantities of these synthetic fibre-reinforced composites poses a serious threat to the ecosystem. Comprehending to this fact, the present work aimed at investigating the effects of incorporating recycled glass fibre-reinforced plastics in various compositions particularly on dimensional stability and mechanical properties of gear produced with diverse injection moulding processing parameters setting. The integration of Grey relational analysis (GRA) and Taguchi method was adopted to evaluate the influence of recycled glass fibre-reinforced plastics and variation in processing parameters on gear quality. From the experimental results, the blending ratio was found as the most influential parameter of 56.0% contribution in both improving tensile properties as well as in minimizing shrinkage, followed by mould temperature of 24.1% contribution and cooling time of 10.6% contribution. The results obtained from the aforementioned work are expected to contribute to accessing the feasibility of using recycled glass fibre-reinforced plastics especially for gear application.

  11. [Mechanical studies of lumbar interbody fusion implants].

    PubMed

    Bader, R J; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Mittelmeier, W; Bertagnoli, R; Gradinger, R

    2002-05-01

    In addition to autogenous or allogeneic bone grafts, fusion cages composed of metal or plastic are being used increasingly as spacers for interbody fusion of spinal segments. The goal of this study was the mechanical testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) fusion cages used for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. With a special testing device according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, the mechanical properties of the implants were determined under four different loading conditions. The implants (UNION cages, Medtronic Sofamor Danek) provide sufficient axial compression, shear, and torsional strength of the implant body. Ultimate axial compression load of the fins is less than the physiological compression loads at the lumbar spine. Therefore by means of an appropriate surgical technique parallel grooves have to be reamed into the endplates of the vertebral bodies according to the fin geometry. Thereby axial compression forces affect the implants body and the fins are protected from damaging loading. Using a supplementary anterior or posterior instrumentation, in vivo failure of the fins as a result of physiological shear and torsional spinal loads is unlikely. Due to specific complications related to autogenous or allogeneic bone grafts, fusion cages made of metal or carbon fiber reinforced plastic are an important alternative implant in interbody fusion.

  12. Effect of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed Mohsin, S. M.; Baarimah, A. O.; Jokhio, G. A.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of kenaf fibers in reinforced concrete slab with different thickness is discusses and presented in this paper. Kenaf fiber is a type of natural fiber and is added in the reinforced concrete slab to improve the structure strength and ductility. For this study, three types of mixtures were prepared with fiber volume fraction of 0%, 1% and 2%, respectively. The design compressive strength considered was 20 MPa. Six cubes were prepared to be tested at 7th and 28th day. A total of six reinforced concrete slab with two variances of thickness were also prepared and tested under four-point bending test. The differences in the thickness is to study the potential of kenaf fiber to serve as part of shear reinforcement in reinforced concrete slab that was design to fail in shear. It was observed that, addition of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab impr